WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported injection drug

  1. Concordance of risk behavior reporting within HCV serodiscordant injecting partnerships of young injection drug users in San Francisco, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer L; Morris, Meghan D; Yu, Michelle; Page, Kimberly; Hahn, Judith A

    2014-09-01

    Young injection drug users (IDU, under age 30) often inject with other IDU, creating an environment for risk of blood-borne disease transmission through sharing of needles and drug preparation equipment. Epidemiologic studies rely on self reported injection behavior data for measures of transmission risk, therefore we sought to quantify the degree of concordance of reported injecting risk behaviors between injecting dyads. From May, 2006 through 2013 we enrolled 72 injecting dyads in San Francisco, California, who were hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA discordant. Each partnership was followed prospectively for up to six months. Monthly interviews from each partner were date-matched and responses to relationship characteristics and risk behavior questions were compared. Concordance of reporting was estimated with the concordance correlation coefficient for longitudinal data (CCC) and the prevalence adjusted bias adjusted kappa (PABAK). Participants had a median age of 26 (IQR: 23, 28) years and median years injecting of 7.0 (IQR: 3.0, 10.6). Thirty-eight percent of the injecting dyads were also sexual partners. Concordance levels were highest for partnership characteristics, such as length of acquaintance, number of days cohabitating, and sexual intercourse in the past month (CCC=0.95; 0.82, and 0.90, respectively). Shared injection risk behaviors such as injecting with the HCV+ partner's previously used syringe and using contaminated injection preparation equipment had slight to fair agreement (CCC=0.22; 0.23; PABAK=0.43, 0.36, respectively). Concordance levels ranged from low to high. Potential sources of measurement error for low agreement items include recall and social-desirability biases and question interpretation. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Consistency of self-reported drug use events in a mixed methods study of people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyal, Stephanie R; Kral, Alex H; Dominguez Gonzalez, Karina; Wenger, Lynn D; Bluthenthal, Ricky N

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the consistency of information provided by people who inject drugs (PWID) during quantitative and qualitative interviews in mixed methods studies. We illustrate the use of the intraclass correlation coefficient, descriptive statistics, and regression to assess the consistency of information provided during a mixed methods study of PWID living in Los Angeles and San Francisco, California, USA. Age of first use of heroin, methamphetamine, marijuana, powder cocaine, and crack cocaine and first injection of heroin, methamphetamine, and powder cocaine were collected during an interviewer administered computer-assisted personal interview followed by an in-depth qualitative interview (n = 102). Participants were 63% male, racially/ethnically diverse. 80.4% between the ages of 40 and 60 years old, 89% US-born, and 57% homeless. Consistency of self-reported data was adequate for most drug use events. Exact concordance between quantitative and qualitative measures of age of onset ranged from 18.2-50%. Event ordering was consistent across qualitative and quantitative results for 90.2% of participants. Analyses indicated that age of onset for heroin use, heroin injection, and injection of any drug was significantly lower when assessed by qualitative methods as compared to quantitative methods. While inconsistency will emerge during mixed method studies, confidence in the timing and ordering of major types of events such as drug initiation episodes appear to be warranted.

  3. Sex differences in self-report of physical health by injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B K; Koman, J J; Williams, J S; Catan, V M; Souply, K L

    1994-01-01

    Through heterosexual contact, injection drug users (IDUs) put others at risk of contracting Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease. Self-report of health was compared among IDUs in Laredo, Texas, San Diego, California, and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and in a subsample which contained HIV positive subjects from these cities. These data were compared with similar National Opinion Research Center data and indicated that IDUs do not report their health to be different from that of the general public. Previous research has reported sex differences in morbidity and mortality in the non-IDU population. This study found sex differences in perception of health by IDUs in Laredo and San Diego.

  4. [Apply association rules to analysis adverse drug reactions of shuxuening injection based on spontaneous reporting system data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Xie, Yan-Ming; Xiang, Yong-Yang

    2014-09-01

    This research based on the analysis of spontaneous reporting system (SRS) data which the 9 601 case reports of Shuxuening injection adverse drug reactions (ADR) in national adverse drug reaction monitoring center during 2005-2012. Apply to the association rules to analysis of the relationship between Shuxuening injection's ADR and the characteristics of ADR reports were. We found that ADR commonly combination were "nausea + breath + chills + vomiting", "nausea + chills + vomiting + palpitations", and their confidence level were 100%. The ADR and the case reports information commonly combination were "itching, and glucose and sodium chloride Injection, and generally ADR report, and normal dosage", "palpitation, and glucose and sodium chloride injection, and normal dosage, and new report", "chills, and generally ADR report, and normal dosage, and 0.9% sodium chloride injection", and their confidence level were 100% too. The results showed that patients using Shuxuening injection occurred most of ADRs were systemic damage, skin and its accessories damage, digestive system damage, etc. And most of cases were generally and new reports, and patients with normal dosage. The ADR's occurred had little related with solvent. It is showed that the Shuxuening injection occurred of ADR mainly related to drug composition. So Shuxuening injection used in clinical need to closely observation, and focus on the ADR reaction, and to do a good job of drug risk management.

  5. Epidemiology of Injection Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Nelson; Bruneau, Julie; Jutras-Aswad, Didier

    2016-01-01

    After more than 30 years of research, numerous studies have shown that injection drug use is associated with a wide range of adverse health outcomes such as drug overdoses, drug-related suicidal behaviours, comorbid psychiatric disorders, bloodborne pathogens and other infectious diseases, and traumas. This review explores new trends and prominent issues associated with injection drug use. The dynamic nature of injection drug use is underlined by examining its recent trends and changing patterns in Canada and other “high-income countries.” Three research topics that could further contribute to the development of comprehensive prevention and intervention strategies aimed at people who inject drugs are also discussed: risk behaviours associated with the injection of prescription opioids, binge injection drug use, and mental health problems as determinants of injection risk behaviours. PMID:27254088

  6. Access to HIV treatment and care for people who inject drugs in Kenya: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guise, Andy; Rhodes, Tim; Ndimbii, James; Ayon, Sylvia; Nnaji, Obiora

    2016-12-01

    People who inject drugs (PWID) experience a range of barriers to HIV treatment and care access. The Kenyan government and community-based organisations have sought to develop HIV care for PWID. A principal approach to delivery in Kenya is to provide care from clinics serving the general population and for this to be linked to support from community-based organisations providing harm reduction outreach. This study explores accounts of PWID accessing care in Kenya to identify care barriers and facilitators. PWID accounts were collected within a qualitative longitudinal study. In-depth interviews with PWID living with HIV (n = 44) are combined with interviews with other PWID, care providers and community observation. Results show that some PWID are able to access care successfully, whilst other PWID report challenges. The results focus on three principal themes to give insights into these experiences: the hardship of addiction and the costs of care, the silencing of HIV in the community and then discrimination and support in the clinic. Some PWID are able to overcome, often with social and outreach support, barriers to clinic access; for others, the challenges of addiction, hardship, stigma and discrimination are too constraining. We discuss how clinics serving the general population could be further adapted to increase access. Clinic-based care, even with community links, may, however, be fundamentally challenging for some PWID to access. Additional strategies to develop stand-alone care for PWID and also decentralise HIV treatment and care to community settings and involve peers in delivery should be considered.

  7. Reports of evidence planting by police among a community-based sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Calvin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug policy in Thailand has relied heavily on law enforcement-based approaches. Qualitative reports indicate that police in Thailand have resorted to planting drugs on suspected drug users to extort money or provide grounds for arrest. The present study sought to describe the prevalence and factors associated with this form of evidence planting by police among injection drug users (IDU in Bangkok. Methods Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with evidence planting of drugs by police among a community-based sample of IDU in Bangkok. We also examined the prevalence and average amount of money paid by IDU to police in order to avoid arrest. Results 252 IDU were recruited between July and August, 2008, among whom 66 (26.2% were female and the median age was 36.5 years. In total, 122 (48.4% participants reported having drugs planted on them by police. In multivariate analyses, this form of evidence planting was positively associated with midazolam use (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 2.84; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.58 - 5.11, recent non-fatal overdose (AOR = 2.56; 95%CI: 1.40 - 4.66, syringe lending (AOR = 2.08; 95%CI: 1.19 - 3.66, and forced drug treatment (AOR = 1.88; 95%CI: 1.05 - 3.36. Among those who reported having drugs planted on them, 59 (48.3% paid police a bribe in order to avoid arrest. Conclusion A high proportion of community-recruited IDU participating in this study reported having drugs planted on them by police. Drug planting was found to be associated with numerous risk factors including syringe sharing and participation in government-run drug treatment programs. Immediate action should be taken to address this form of abuse of power reportedly used by police.

  8. Global epidemiology of injecting drug use and HIV among people who inject drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Bradley M; Degenhardt, Louisa; Phillips, Benjamin; Wiessing, Lucas; Hickman, Matthew; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Wodak, Alex; Panda, Samiran; Tyndall, Mark; Toufik, Abdalla; Mattick, Richard P

    2008-11-15

    Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of injecting drug use among individuals aged 15-64 years, and of HIV among people who inject drugs. We did a systematic search of peer-reviewed (Medline, EmBase, and PubMed/BioMed Central), internet, and grey literature databases; and data requests were made to UN agencies and international experts. 11 022 documents were reviewed, graded, and catalogued by the Reference Group to the UN on HIV and Injecting Drug Use. Injecting drug use was identified in 148 countries; data for the extent of injecting drug use was absent for many countries in Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. The presence of HIV infection among injectors had been reported in 120 of these countries. Prevalence estimates of injecting drug use could be ascertained for 61 countries, containing 77% of the world's total population aged 15-64 years. Extrapolated estimates suggest that 15.9 million (range 11.0-21.2 million) people might inject drugs worldwide; the largest numbers of injectors were found in China, the USA, and Russia, where mid-estimates of HIV prevalence among injectors were 12%, 16%, and 37%, respectively. HIV prevalence among injecting drug users was 20-40% in five countries and over 40% in nine. We estimate that, worldwide, about 3.0 million (range 0.8-6.6 million) people who inject drugs might be HIV positive. The number of countries in which the injection of drugs has been reported has increased over the last decade. The high prevalence of HIV among many populations of injecting drug users represents a substantial global health challenge. However, existing data are far from adequate, in both quality and quantity, particularly in view of the increasing importance of injecting drug use as a mode of HIV transmission in many regions.

  9. Groin injecting among a community-recruited sample of people who inject drugs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Lianping; Hayashi, Kanna; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-16

    Use of the femoral vein for the injection of illicit drugs (i.e. groin injecting) has been linked to various health-related harms, including deep vein thrombosis. However, little is known about the prevalence of groin injecting and factors that predict this practice among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Thailand. We sought to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with groin injecting in Bangkok, Thailand. Data were derived from the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok between July and October 2011. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with groin injecting in the last six months. Among 437 participants, 34.3% reported groin injecting in the last six months. In multivariate analyses, factors positively associated with groin injecting included: having higher than secondary education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.00 - 2.56), weekly midazolam injection (AOR = 8.26; 95% CI: 5.04 - 14.06), and reports of having had drugs planted on oneself by police (AOR = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.37 - 3.36). Over one-third of our sample of Thai PWID reported recent groin injecting. Frequent midazolam injection and higher education were found to be associated with groin injecting. That high intensity PWID were more likely to inject in the groin is concerning given the known negative consequences associated with the groin as a site of injection. Additionally, PWID who reported drug planting by police were more likely to inject in the groin, suggesting that reliance on law enforcement approaches may undermine safe injection practices in this setting. These findings highlight the need for evidence-based interventions to address the harms associated with groin injecting, including efforts to alert PWID to risks of groin injecting, the distribution of appropriate injecting equipment, and efforts to encourage use of other injecting sites.

  10. Innovative Drug Injection via Laser Induced Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tae-hee; Yoh, Jack J.

    2010-10-01

    A laser based needle-free liquid drug injection device has been developed. A laser beam is focused inside the liquid contained in the rubber chamber of micro scale. The focused laser beam causes explosive bubble growth and the sudden volume increase in a sealed chamber drives a microjet of liquid drug through the micronozzle. The exit diameter of the nozzle is 125 um and the injected microjet reaches an average velocity of 264 m/s. This device adds the time-varying feature of microjet to the current state of liquid injection for drug delivery.

  11. Low-Frequency Heroin Injection among Out-of-Treatment, Street-Recruited Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Jennie L.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Wenger, Lynn; Wilkins, Tania; Iguchi, Martin Y.; Bourgois, Philippe; Kral, Alex H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the understudied phenomenon of “low-frequency” heroin injection in a sample of street-recruited heroin injectors not in drug treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 2,410 active injection drug users (IDUs) recruited in San Francisco, California from 2000 to 2005. We compare the sociodemographic characteristics and injection risk behaviors of low-frequency heroin injectors (low-FHI; one to 10 self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days) to high-freq...

  12. 细辛脑注射液不良反应137例分析%Literature analysis of 137 adverse drug reaction reports of asarone injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许恒峰

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the types and risk factors of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) induced by Asarone injection so as to provide references for clinical rational use of drug.Methods The ADRs of Asarone injection which reported in domestic medical journal from January 1999-June 2013 were collected and analyzed.Results 72 literatures were picked up from the whole 142 results,137 cases of Asarone injection were collected.The ADRs of Asarone injection were mainly occurred in children below 9 years old (60.59%),ADRs can be accumulated and prompted several organ systems to skin damage,such as allergic reactions and gastrointestinal damage,ect.The adverse drug reaction was abrupt and usually occured within 30 minutes (81.76%),the combined medication accounted for 67.88%.Conclusion Asarone injection can cause varies type of ADRs,which happens mainly to the young adults and those use the combination of Asarone injection and other drugs at the same time.%目的 探讨细辛脑注射液不良反应的发生类型、特点及相关风险因素,为临床合理用药提供参考.方法 对1999年1月至2013年6月医药学期刊报道有关细辛脑注射液致不良反应文献进行汇总和分析.结果 共检索文献全文142篇,纳入分析的文献72篇,共137例细辛脑注射液所致不良反应,药物不良反应可累积多个系统,以皮肤损害、过敏反应、胃肠道损害最为常见,严重者可致过敏性休克、急性肾功能衰竭;9岁以下患者占60.59%,不良反应发生在30 min以内的占81.76%,联合用药时占67.88%.结论 细辛脑注射液的不良反应以速发型为主,多发于青少年,并且联合用药时不良反应发生率较高.

  13. Health and safety risks associated with public injecting among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Leslie Tze Fung; Ti, Lianping; Hayashi, Kanna; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    The injection of illicit drugs in public spaces is known to pose significant health risks to people who inject drugs (IDU). However, to our knowledge this practice has not been explored in the Asian context. Therefore, we sought to characterise the prevalence of and factors associated with public injecting among a community-recruited sample of IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Data were derived from the Mitsampan Community Research Project between July and October 2011. Using multivariate logistic regression, this cross-sectional study examined the prevalence and correlates of public injecting within the past six months among 437 IDU participants. In total, 121 (27.7%) participants reported injecting drugs in a public space within the past six months. In multivariate analyses, public drug injection was independently associated with male gender [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.51, 95% confidence interval (CI)) 1.29-5.22], weekly heroin injection (AOR 2.19, 95% CI 1.27-3.77), assisted injection (AOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.06-3.49), rushed injection (AOR 4.36, 95% CI 2.65-7.24), incarceration (AOR 2.27, 95% CI 1.01-5.04) and noticing police presence where drugs are bought or used (AOR 1.83, 95% CI 1.06-3.19). A substantial proportion of Thai IDU in our sample reported recent public drug injection. This behaviour was independently associated with a wide range of individual and contextual factors that pose significant health and safety risks to the IDU. These findings highlight the importance of addressing the broader social and physical risk environment surrounding IDU as a means of preventing negative health outcomes among this population. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. Reports of police beating and associated harms among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a serial cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Csete, Joanne; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-08-07

    Thailand has for years attempted to address illicit drug use through aggressive drug law enforcement. Despite accounts of widespread violence by police against people who inject drugs (IDU), the impact of police violence has not been well investigated. In the wake of an intensified police crackdown in 2011, we sought to identify the prevalence and correlates of experiencing police beating among IDU in Bangkok. Community-recruited samples of IDU in Bangkok were surveyed between June 2009 and October 2011. Multivariate log-binomial regression was used to identify factors associated with reporting police beating. In total, 639 unique IDU participated in this serial cross-sectional study, with 240 (37.6%) participants reporting that they had been beaten by police. In multivariate analyses, reports of police beating were associated with male gender (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio [APR] = 4.43), younger age (APR = 1.69), reporting barriers to accessing healthcare (APR = 1.23), and a history of incarceration (APR = 2.51), compulsory drug detention (APR = 1.22) and syringe sharing (APR = 1.44), and study enrolment in 2011 (APR = 1.27) (all p < 0.05). Participants most commonly reported police beating during the interrogation process. A high proportion of IDU in Bangkok reported having been beaten by the police. Experiencing police beating was independently associated with various indicators of drug-related harm. These findings suggest that the over-reliance on enforcement-based approaches is contributing to police-perpetrated abuses and the perpetuation of the HIV risk behaviour among Thai IDU.

  15. Profile of People Who Inject Drugs in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin-Esmaeili, Masoumeh; Rahimi-Movaghar, Afarin; Gholamrezaei, Maryam; Razaghi, Emran Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    The marked shift in the patterns of drug use in Iran, from opium smoking to injecting drug use, has led to serious health-related outcomes. This study was designed to explore characteristics of people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tehran, Iran. Nine hundred and four PWID were recruited from treatment and harm reduction facilities, as well as drug user hangouts in public areas in Tehran. Participants were interviewed using the Persian version of the World Health Organization Drug Injecting Study Phase II questionnaire. The median age at the time of the first illegal drug use, at the time of the first injection and current age was 20, 24 and 32, respectively. In more than 80% of the cases, the first drug used was opium. The transition from the first drug use to the first drug injection occurred after an average of 6.6 and 2.7 years for those who had started drug use with opium and heroin, respectively. Two-thirds of the participants shared injecting equipment within the last 6 months. Difficulty in obtaining sterile needles and thehigh cost of syringes were reported as the major reasons for needle/syringe sharing. Approximately 80% of community-recruited PWID reported difficulties in using treatment or harm reduction services. Self-detoxification and forced detoxification were the most common types of drug abuse treatment in alifetime. Despite a dramatic shift in drug policy in Iran during the past few years, wider coverage of harm reduction services, improvement of the quality of services, and education about such services are still necessary.

  16. Individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices among young adult injection drug users in San Diego

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Fátima; Burgos, José Luis; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Teshale, Eyasu; Garfein, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe injection practices significantly increase the risk of hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among injection drug users (IDUs). We examined individual and socio-environmental factors associated with unsafe injection practices in young adult IDUs in San Diego, California. Of 494 IDUs, 46.9% reported receptive syringe sharing and 68.8% sharing drug preparation paraphernalia in the last 3 months. Unsafe injection practices were associated with increased odds of having friends who injected drugs with used syringes, injecting with friends, sexual partners, and injecting heroin. Perceived high susceptibility to HIV and perceived barriers to obtaining sterile syringes were associated with increased odds of receptive syringe sharing, but not with sharing injection paraphernalia. Over half IDUs reported unsafe injection practices, and our results suggest that personal relationships might influence IDUs’ perceptions that dictate behavior. Integrated interventions addressing individual and socio-environmental factors are needed to promote safe injection practices in this population. PMID:24920342

  17. Low-frequency heroin injection among out-of-treatment, street-recruited injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennie L; Lorvick, Jennifer; Wenger, Lynn; Wilkins, Tania; Iguchi, Martin Y; Bourgois, Philippe; Kral, Alex H

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we explore the understudied phenomenon of "low-frequency" heroin injection in a sample of street-recruited heroin injectors not in drug treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 2,410 active injection drug users (IDUs) recruited in San Francisco, California from 2000 to 2005. We compare the sociodemographic characteristics and injection risk behaviors of low-frequency heroin injectors (low-FHI; one to 10 self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days) to high-frequency heroin injectors (high-FHI; 30 or more self-reported heroin injections in the past 30 days). Fifteen percent of the sample met criteria for low-FHI. African American race, men who have sex with men (MSM) behavior, and injection and noninjection methamphetamine use were independently associated with low-FHI. Compared to high-FHI, low-FHI were less likely to report syringe sharing and nonfatal heroin overdose. A small but significant proportion of heroin injectors inject heroin 10 or less times per month. Additional research is needed to qualitatively examine low-frequency heroin injection and its relationship to drug use trajectories.

  18. Longitudinal Trajectories of Ketamine Use among Young Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Shin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that became increasing popular in the club and rave scene in the 1980s and 1990s. Reports surfaced in the late 1990s indicating that ketamine was being injected in several U.S. cities by young injection drug users (IDUs). Since all studies on ketamine injection were cross-sectional, a longitudinal study was undertaken in 2005 to determine: characteristics of young IDUs who continue to inject ketamine; frequency of ketamine injection over an extended time period; risks associated with ongoing ketamine injection; and environmental factors that impact patterns of ketamine use. Methods Young IDUs aged 16 to 29 with a history of injecting ketamine (n=101) were recruited from public locations in Los Angeles and followed during a two-year longitudinal study. A semi-structured instrument captured quantitative and qualitative data on patterns of ketamine injection and other drug use. A statistical model sorted IDUs who completed three or more interviews (n=66) into three groups based upon patterns of ketamine injection at baseline and follow-up. Qualitative analysis focused on detailed case studies within each group. Results IDUs recruited at baseline were typically in their early 20s, male, heterosexual, white, and homeless. Longitudinal injection trajectories included: “Moderates,” who injected ketamine several times per year (n=5); “Occasionals,” who injected ketamine approximately once per year (n=21); and “Abstainers,” who did not inject any ketamine during follow-up (n=40). Findings suggest that ketamine is infrequently injected compared to other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Most IDUs who begin injecting ketamine will stop or curb use due to: negative or ambivalent experiences associated with ketamine; an inability to find the drug due to declining supply; or maturing out of injecting drugs more generally. Conclusion Reducing ketamine injection among young IDUs may best be accomplished

  19. Injectable Drug Eluting Elastomeric Polymer: A Novel Submucosal Injection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Richard T.; Palmer, Michael; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Abell, Thomas L.; Yang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background Biodegradable hydrogels can deliver therapeutic payloads with great potentials in endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) to yield improvements in efficacy and foster mucosal regeneration. Objective To assess the efficacy of an injectable drug eluting elastomeric polymer (iDEEP) as a submucosal injection material. Design Comparative study among 3 different solutions using material characterization tests, ex vivo and in vivo porcine models. Setting Academic hospital. Interventions 30 gastric submucosal cushions were achieved with saline (0.9%), sodium hyaluronate (0.4%), and iDEEP (n = 10) in ex vivo porcine stomachs. Four porcine gastric submucosal cushions were then performed in vivo using iDEEP. Main outcome measurements Maximum injection pressure, Rebamipide release rate, submucosal elevation duration, and assessment of in vivo efficacy by en bloc resection. Results No significant difference in injection pressures between iDEEP (28.9 ± 0.3 PSI) and sodium hyaluronate (29.5 ± 0.4 PSI, P > .05) was observed. iDEEP gels displayed a controlled release of Rebamipide up to 2 weeks in vitro. The elevation height of iDEEP (5.7 ± 0.5 mm) was higher than saline (2.8 ± 0.2 mm, P < .01) and SH (4.2 ± 0.2 mm, P < .05). All EMR procedures were successfully performed after injection of iDEEP, and a large gel cushion was noted after the resection procedure. Limitations Benchtop, ex vivo, and non-survival pig study. Conclusions A novel injection solution was evaluated for endoscopic resection. These results suggest that iDEEP may provide a significant step towards the realization of an ideal EMR and ESD injection material. PMID:22301346

  20. Injection Drug Users' Involvement In Drug Economy: Dynamics of Sociometric and Egocentric Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cui; Latkin, Carl; Muth, Stephen Q; Rudolph, Abby

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the effect of social network cohesiveness on drug economy involvement, and to test whether this relationship is mediated by drug support network size in a sample of active injection drug users. Involvement in the drug economy was defined by self-report of participation in at least one of the following activities: selling drugs, holding drugs or money for drugs, providing street security for drug sellers, cutting/packaging/cooking drugs, selling or renting drug paraphernalia (e.g., pipes, tools, rigs), and injecting drugs in others' veins. The sample consists of 273 active injection drug users in Baltimore, Maryland who reported having injected drugs in the last 6 months and were recruited through either street outreach or by their network members. Egocentric drug support networks were assessed through a social network inventory at baseline. Sociometric networks were built upon the linkages by selected matching characteristics, and k-plex rank was used to characterize the level of cohesiveness of the individual to others in the social network. Although no direct effect was observed, structural equation modeling indicated k-plex rank was indirectly associated with drug economy involvement through drug support network size. These findings suggest the effects of large-scale sociometric networks on injectors' drug economy involvement may occur through their immediate egocentric networks. Future harm reduction programs for injection drug users (IDUs) should consider providing programs coupled with economic opportunities to those drug users within a cohesive network subgroup. Moreover, individuals with a high connectivity to others in their network may be optimal individuals to train for diffusing HIV prevention messages.

  1. Deportation experiences of women who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela M; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2012-04-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico.

  2. Deportation Experiences of Women Who Inject Drugs in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela M.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Palinkas, Lawrence A.; Burgos, José Luis; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Rangel, Gudelia; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2013-01-01

    Deportation from the United States for drug offenses is common, yet the consequences of deportation for women drug users are poorly documented. In 2008, in Tijuana, Mexico, we conducted an exploratory qualitative study of migration, deportation, and drug abuse by interviewing 12 Mexican injection-drug-using women reporting U.S. deportation. Women reported heavy drug use before and after deportation, but greater financial instability and physical danger following deportation than when in the United States. We identified an unmet need for health and social services among deported drug-using women, including HIV prevention, drug treatment, physical and mental health services, and vocational training. Binational coordination is needed to help deported women resettle in Mexico. PMID:21917563

  3. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  4. Injection drug use and HIV/AIDS transmission in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian; Xin; CHU; Judith; A; LEVY

    2005-01-01

    After nearly three decades of being virtually drug free, use of heroin and other illicit drugs has re-emerged in China as a major public health problem. One result is that drug abuse, particularly heroin injection, has come to play a predominant role in fueling China's AIDS epidemic. The first outbreak of HIV among China's IDUs was reported in the border area of Yunnan province between China and Myanmar where drug trafficking is heavy. Since then drug-related HIV has spread to all 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. This paper provides an overview to HIV/AIDS transmission through injection drug use in China. It begins with a brief history of the illicit drug trade in China, followed by a discussion of the emergence of drug related AIDS, and a profile of drug users and their sexual partners who have contracted the virus or who are vulnerable to infection. It ends by summarizing three national strategies being used by China to address both drug use and AIDS as major health threats.

  5. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Age at Initiation of Injection Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C.; Ikeda, Robin M.; Shah, Nina; Fuller, Crystal M.; Bailey, Susan; Morse, Edward; Kerndt, Peter; Maslow, Carey; Wu, Yingfeng; Vlahov, David; Garfein, Richard; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2005-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the relation between childhood sexual abuse and injection drug use initiation among young adult injection drug users. Methods. We used mixed effect linear models to compare age at first injection among 2143 young injection drug users by first sexual abuse age categories. Results. The participants were predominantly male (63.3%) and White (52.8%). Mean age and age at first injection were 23.7 and 19.6 years, respectively; 307 participants (14.3%) reported childhood sexual abuse. After adjustment for gender, race/ethnicity, noninjection drug use before first injection drug use, and recruitment site, childhood sexual abuse was independently associated with younger age at first injection. Conclusions. Childhood sexual abuse was associated with earlier initiation of injection drug use. These data emphasize the need to integrate substance abuse prevention with postvictimization services for children and adolescents. PMID:15798133

  6. Transient severe hypotension with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of teriparatide in osteoporotic patient: a case report and insight for the drug interaction between hypotensive agents and teriparatide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enishi, Tetsuya; Uemura, Hirokazu; Katoh, Shinsuke; Inatsugi, Masanori; Minato, Sho; Inatsugi, Kei; Inatsugi, Mikiko; Sato, Nori; Siryo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Teriparatide, a recombinant form of parathyroid hormone, were well recognized as a useful option for the treatment of the osteoporosis. Although some side effects of teriparatide include headache, nausea, dizziness, and limb pain were reported. Here we present a 80-year-old woman of transient asymptomatic hypotension with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of teriparatide for the treatment of osteoporosis with hypertension disease as acute-phase reactions. Systolic blood pressure decreased in both 30 min and 60 min after injection compared with before injection. Heart rate increased with passage of time. Statistically significant were observed among before, 30 min, 60 min after injection of teriparatide. Slight nausea was seen as subjective symptoms with the first and second injection after 30 min. This case indicates careful attention, at least 1 hr, was recommended with weekly subcutaneous injections of teriparatide in the treatment for osoteoproteic patient with hypertension decreases. This is a first report, to the best of our knowledge, to demonstrate the transient asymptomatic hypotension after once-weekly injection of teriparatide with hypertension disease. Transient hypotension occurred after injection of teriparatide during the treatment period and was asymptomatic except for the first 2 injections.

  7. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2012-06-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug use, and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior, and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.25-0.97) and had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR = 1.90, 95% CI = 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR = 2.38, 95% CI = 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in noninjecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs.

  8. Survey of abuses against injecting drug users in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwahyuono Agus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Indonesia, an ongoing government "war on drugs" has resulted in numerous arrests and anecdotal reports of abuse in detention, but to date there has been little documentation or analysis of this issue. JANGKAR (also known in English as the Indonesian Harm Reduction Network, a nongovernmental organization (NGO based in Jakarta, surveyed 1106 injecting drug users in 13 cities about their experiences of police abuse. Of those interviewed, 667 or 60% reported physical abuse by police. These findings indicate the importance of continuing efforts to promote police reform and harm reduction in Indonesia.

  9. HIV and Injection Drug Use PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-29

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the December 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sharing needles, syringes, and other injection equipment puts you at risk for getting HIV and other infections, including hepatitis. Learn how to reduce your HIV risk.  Created: 11/29/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/29/2016.

  10. 'Trafficking' or 'personal use': do people who regularly inject drugs understand Australian drug trafficking laws?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin E; Ritter, Alison; Cowdery, Nicholas; Sindicich, Natasha

    2014-11-01

    Legal thresholds for drug trafficking, over which possession of an illicit drug is deemed 'trafficking' as opposed to 'personal use', are employed in all Australian states and territories excepting Queensland. In this paper, we explore the extent to which people who regularly inject drugs understand such laws. Participants from the seven affected states/territories in the 2012 Illicit Drug Reporting System (n = 823) were asked about their legal knowledge of trafficking thresholds: whether, if arrested, quantity possessed would affect legal action taken; and the quantities of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and cannabis that would constitute an offence of supply. Data were compared against the actual laws to identify the accuracy of knowledge by drug type and state, and sociodemographics, use and purchasing patterns related to knowledge. Most Illicit Drug Reporting System participants (77%) correctly said that quantity possessed would affect charge received. However, only 55.8% nominated any specific quantity that would constitute an offence of supply, and of those 22.6% nominated a wrong quantity, namely a quantity that was larger than the actual quantity for supply (this varied by state and drug). People who regularly inject drugs have significant gaps in knowledge about Australian legal thresholds for drug trafficking, particularly regarding the actual threshold quantities. This suggests that there may be a need to improve education for this population. Necessity for accurate knowledge would also be lessened by better design of Australian drug trafficking laws. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  11. Effective method for drug injection into subcutaneous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejeong; Park, Hanwook; Lee, Sang Joon

    2017-08-29

    Subcutaneous injection of drug solution is widely used for continuous and low dose drug treatment. Although the drug injections have been administered for a long time, challenges in the design of injection devices are still needed to minimize the variability, pain, or skin disorder by repeated drug injections. To avoid these adverse effects, systematic study on the effects of injection conditions should be conducted to improve the predictability of drug effect. Here, the effects of injection conditions on the drug permeation in tissues were investigated using X-ray imaging technique which provides real-time images of drug permeation with high spatial resolution. The shape and concentration distribution of the injected drug solution in the porcine subcutaneous and muscle tissues are visualized. Dynamic movements of the wetting front (WF) and temporal variations of water contents in the two tissues are quantitatively analyzed. Based on the quantitative analysis of the experimental data, the permeability of drug solution through the tissues are estimated according to permeation direction, injection speed, and tissue. The present results would be helpful for improving the performance of drug injection devices and for predicting the drug efficacy in tissues using biomedical simulation.

  12. Heroin overdose among young injection drug users in San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Kristen C; Davidson, Peter J; Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Moss, Andrew R

    2005-12-12

    We sought to identify prevalence and predictors of heroin-related overdose among young injection drug users (IDU). A total of 795 IDU under age of 30 years were interviewed in four neighbourhoods in San Francisco, California, USA. Participants were recruited as part of a broader study of HIV, hepatitis B and C among injecting drug users in San Francisco using street outreach and snowball techniques. Independent predictors of recent heroin overdose requiring intervention were determined using regression analysis. Of 795 injecting drug users under age of 30 years, 22% (174/795) of participants reported a heroin overdose in the last year. In stepwise multiple logistic regression, independent predictors of recent heroin overdose were lifetime incarceration exceeding 20 months (odds ratio (OR) = 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.52-5.88); heroin injection in the last 3 months (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 2.03-11.74); cocaine injection in the last 3 months (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.14-2.45); injection of heroin mixed with methamphetamine in the last 3 months (OR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.15-2.65); ever tested for hepatitis B or C (OR = 1.66 per year, CI = 1.09-2.54) and ever having witnessed another person overdose (OR = 2.89, 95% CI = 1.76-4.73). Individuals with high levels of incarceration are at great risk of overdose, and prison or jail should be considered a primary intervention site. Further research on the role of cocaine and amphetamine in heroin-related overdose is indicated.

  13. Experiences with urine drug testing by police among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Buxton, Jane A; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Thailand has relied on drug law enforcement in an effort to curb illicit drug use. While anecdotal reports suggest that Thai police frequently use urine toxicology to identify drug users, little is known about the prevalence or impacts of this practice among people who inject drugs (IDU). Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with urine drug testing by police among IDU in Bangkok. Data were derived from a community-recruited sample of IDU in Bangkok participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between July and October 2011. We assessed the prevalence and correlates of being subjected to urine toxicology testing by police using multivariate Poisson regression. In total, 438 IDU participated in this study, with 293 (66.9%) participants reporting having been tested for illicit drugs by police. In multivariate analyses, reports of drug testing by police were independently and positively associated with younger age (adjusted prevalence ratio [APR]: 1.28), a history of methamphetamine injection (APR: 1.22), a history of incarceration (APR: 1.21), having been in compulsory drug detention (APR: 1.43), avoiding healthcare (APR: 1.15), and HIV seropositivity (APR: 1.19), and negatively associated with access to voluntary drug treatment (APR: 0.82) (all p<0.05). A high proportion of IDU in Bangkok were subjected to drug testing by police. Young people and methamphetamine injectors were more likely to have been tested. The findings indicate that drug testing by police is associated with the compulsory drug detention system and may be interfering with IDU's access to healthcare and voluntary drug treatment. These findings raise concern about the widespread practice of drug testing by police and its associated impacts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and validation of a novel scale for measuring interpersonal factors underlying injection drug using behaviours among injecting partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meghan D; Neilands, Torsten B; Andrew, Erin; Maher, Lisa; Page, Kimberly A; Hahn, Judith A

    2017-10-01

    People who inject drugs with sexual partners or close friends have high rates of syringe/ancillary equipment sharing and HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Although evidence suggests that interpersonal factors underlie these higher risk profiles, there is no quantitative measure of how interpersonal factors operate within injecting relationships. We aimed to develop and validate a quantitative scale to assess levels of injecting drug-related interpersonal factors associated with risky injecting behaviours within injecting partnerships. We conducted qualitative interviews with 45 people who inject drugs (PWID) who reported having injecting partners to inform item development, and tested these items in a quantitative study of 140 PWID from San Francisco, USA, to assess internal reliability (Cronbach's alpha) and validity (convergent, and discriminant validity). With results from the qualitative interview data, we developed the Interpersonal Dynamics in Injecting Partnerships (IDIP) scale with 54 final items for 5 subscales of injecting-related interpersonal factors. Exploratory factor analysis revealed 5 factors ("trust", "power", "risk perception", "intimacy", and "cooperation") with eigenvalues of 14.32, 6.18, 3.55, 2.46, and 2.14, explaining 57% of the variance, and indicating good internal reliability (alpha: 0.92-0.68). Strong convergent validity was observed in bivariate logistic regression models where higher levels of trust, intimacy, and cooperation within partnerships were positively associated with partners sharing needles and injecting equipment, whereas higher levels of power and risk perception were negatively associated with partners sharing needles and injecting equipment. These findings offer strong evidence that the IDIP scale provides a psychometrically sound measure of injecting drug-related interpersonal dynamics. This measurement tool has the potential to facilitate additional investigations into the individual and collective impact of

  15. Gender differences in sexual and injection risk behavior among active young injection drug users in San Francisco (the UFO Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Page-Shafer, Kimberly; Lum, Paula J; Stein, Ellen S; Davidson, Peter J; Moss, Andrew R

    2003-03-01

    Female injection drug users (IDUs) represent a large proportion of persons infected with HIV in the United States, and women who inject drugs have a high incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of gender in injection risk behavior and the transmission of blood-borne virus. In 2000-2002, 844 young (<30 years old) IDUs were surveyed in San Francisco. We compared self-reported risk behavior between 584 males and 260 female participants from cross-sectional baseline data. We used logistic regression to determine whether demographic, structural, and relationship variables explained increased needle borrowing, drug preparation equipment sharing, and being injected by another IDU among females compared to males. Females were significantly younger than males and were more likely to engage in needle borrowing, ancillary equipment sharing, and being injected by someone else. Females were more likely than males to report recent sexual intercourse and to have IDU sex partners. Females and males were not different with respect to education, race/ethnicity, or housing status. In logistic regression models for borrowing a used needle and sharing drug preparation equipment, increased risk in females was explained by having an injection partner who was also a sexual partner. Injecting risk was greater in the young female compared to male IDUs despite equivalent frequency of injecting. Overlapping sexual and injection partnerships were a key factor in explaining increased injection risk in females. Females were more likely to be injected by another IDU even after adjusting for years injecting, being in a relationship with another IDU, and other potential confounders. Interventions to reduce sexual and injection practices that put women at risk of contracting hepatitis and HIV are needed.

  16. Drug and sexual HIV risk behaviours related to knowledge of HIV serostatus among injection drug users in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2014-02-01

    This study examines the association between drug and sexual HIV risk behaviours and knowledge of HIV serostatus among a sample of injection drug users, recruited into the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project. We calculated prevalence ratios and associated 95% confidence intervals of reporting a given risk behaviour comparing injection drug users unaware of their serostatus and HIV-negative to HIV-positive injection drug users. Of 523 participants, 21% were unaware of their HIV serostatus. The three groups were not different from each other in terms of drug-use behaviours; however, injection drug users unaware of their HIV serostatus were 33% more likely to report having more than three sexual partners in the past 12 months and 45% more likely to report having unprotected sex compared to HIV-positive injection drug users. We observed markedly higher prevalence of sexual risk behaviours among injection drug users unaware of their serostatus, but drug-use risk behaviours were similar across the groups.

  17. Methodology for evaluating Insite: Canada's first medically supervised safer injection facility for injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Evan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many Canadian cities are experiencing ongoing infectious disease and overdose epidemics among injection drug users (IDUs. In particular, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and hepatitis C Virus (HCV have become endemic in many settings and bacterial and viral infections, such as endocarditis and cellulitis, have become extremely common among this population. In an effort to reduce these public health concerns and the public order problems associated with public injection drug use, in September 2003, Vancouver, Canada opened a pilot medically supervised safer injecting facility (SIF, where IDUs can inject pre-obtained illicit drugs under the supervision of medical staff. The SIF was granted a legal exemption to operate on the condition that its impacts be rigorously evaluated. In order to ensure that the evaluation is appropriately open to scrutiny among the public health community, the present article was prepared to outline the methodology for evaluating the SIF and report on some preliminary observations. The evaluation is primarily structured around a prospective cohort of SIF users, that will examine risk behavior, blood-borne infection transmission, overdose, and health service use. These analyses will be augmented with process data from within the SIF, as well as survey's of local residents and qualitative interviews with users, staff, and key stakeholders, and standardised evaluations of public order changes. Preliminary observations suggest that the site has been successful in attracting IDUs into its programs and in turn helped to reduce public drug use. However, each of the indicators described above is the subject of a rigorous scientific evaluation that is attempting to quantify the overall impacts of the site and identify both benefits and potentially harmful consequences and it will take several years before the SIF's impacts can be appropriately examined.

  18. Overdose experiences among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wood Evan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although previous studies have identified high levels of drug-related harm in Thailand, little is known about illicit drug overdose experiences among Thai drug users. We sought to investigate non-fatal overdose experiences and responses to overdose among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users (IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods Data for these analyses came from IDU participating in the Mit Sampan Community Research Project. The primary outcome of interest was a self-reported history of non-fatal overdose. We calculated the prevalence of past overdose and estimated its relationship with individual, drug-using, social, and structural factors using multivariate logistic regression. We also assessed the prevalence of ever witnessing an overdose and patterns of response to overdose. Results These analyses included 252 individuals; their median age was 36.5 years (IQR: 29.0 - 44.0 and 66 (26.2% were female. A history of non-fatal overdose was reported by 75 (29.8% participants. In a multivariate model, reporting a history of overdose was independently associated with a history of incarceration (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.83, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.52 - 9.65, p = 0.004 and reporting use of drugs in combination (AOR = 2.48, 95% CI: 1.16 - 5.33, p = 0.019. A majority (67.9% reported a history of witnessing an overdose; most reported responding to the most recent overdose using first aid (79.5%. Conclusions Experiencing and witnessing an overdose were common in this sample of Thai IDU. These findings support the need for increased provision of evidence-based responses to overdose including peer-based overdose interventions.

  19. Young people at risk of transitioning to injecting drug use in Sydney, Australia: social disadvantage and other correlates of higher levels of exposure to injecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Toby; Bryant, Joanne; Ellard, Jeanne; Howard, John; Treloar, Carla

    2015-03-01

    While numerous studies have examined characteristics of young people who have recently initiated injecting, little attention has focused on young people who may be at high risk of transitioning to injecting. This study sought to examine the extent that socially disadvantaged young people were exposed to injecting, determine their level of hepatitis C (HCV) knowledge and identify correlates of higher injecting exposure. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 210 young people in 2010-2011 who were exposed to injecting drug use, but had not transitioned to injecting. Respondents were primarily recruited from youth services in metropolitan Sydney. Exposure to injecting in the previous 12 months was assessed with four items that examined whether close friends, romantic/sexual partners or family members/acquaintances injected drugs, and whether they were offered an injection. Most respondents had at least a few close friends who injected drugs (65%) and almost half had been offered drugs to inject in the previous 12 months (48%). It was less common for respondents to report having a partner who injects (11%). Correlates of higher injecting exposure were examined with multivariate ordinal regression. In the multivariate model, higher exposure to injecting was independently associated with the experience of abuse or violent crime [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.80] and reporting more favourable attitudes towards injecting (AOR = 0.86). Higher exposure to injecting was not independently associated with patterns or history of drug use. HCV knowledge was low to moderate and was not associated with higher exposure to injecting. That drug use was not independently associated with higher injecting exposure may suggest that exposure is shaped more by social disadvantage than by drug use patterns. Additional research is required to investigate this, using an improved measure of exposure to injecting. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. 77 FR 71006 - Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-1134 Sodium Nitrite Injection and Sodium Thiosulfate Injection Drug Products Labeled for the Treatment of Cyanide Poisoning; Enforcement... products containing sodium nitrite labeled for the treatment of cyanide poisoning and unapproved...

  1. Botulism in injecting drug users, Dublin, Ireland, November-December 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ward, M

    2009-01-08

    In November and December 2008, six cases of suspect wound botulism were reported in heroin injecting drug users, all residents in Dublin, Ireland. Patients were aged between 23-42 years of age; four cases were male; one patient died shortly after admission. The patients presented to four different hospitals across the city. Botulism in injecting drug users in Ireland was last reported in 2002.

  2. Subdural injection: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cadavid-Puentes, Adriana

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Two cases are reported of accidental subdural injection during epidural procedures for pain control. The first one was a man with chronic lumbar pain who suffered such complication during an epidural injection of steroids using the interlaminar approach. The second one was a woman with intracranial hypotension syndrome who required the application of an epidural blood patch in order to control multiple CSF fistulae. The procedure had to be aborted twice due to the subdural pattern observed after injection of the contrast medium. Accidental subdural block is a rare complication of epidural injection for analgesic or anesthetic procedures.

  3. Drug trafficking routes and hepatitis B in injection drug users, Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Banerjee, Arup; Chandra, Partha K; Mahapatra, Pradip K; Chakrabarti, Shekhar; Chakravarty, Runu

    2006-12-01

    Prevalence of hepatitis B genotype C in injection drug users in the northeastern Indian state of Manipur, neighboring the "Golden Triangle," correlates well with overland drug-trafficking routes, the injection drug use epidemic, and the spread of HIV. Further spread to other regions of India through mobile populations is possible.

  4. Injected Drug May Help Fight Osteoporosis in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_160452.html Injected Drug May Help Fight Osteoporosis in Women Abaloparatide appears to reduce fractures better ... risk of bone fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis better than a placebo and the currently available ...

  5. Echocardiographic Findings Suggestive of Infective Endocarditis in Asymptomatic Danish Injection Drug Users Attending Urban Injection Facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsson, Anna; Søholm, Helle; Dalsgaard, Morten

    2014-01-01

    attending a supervised injection facility. We performed transthoracic echocardiographic examinations on-site in the injection facilities. A total of 206 IDUs (mean age 43 ± 9 years, 23% women) with a median injection drug abuse of 18 years (interquartile range 10 to 26) were included. Fourteen IDUs (14......Injection drug users (IDUs) account for a considerable number of the hospitalizations for infective endocarditis (IE), but the prevalence of diagnosed and unrecognized IE in IDUs is unknown. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of valvular abnormalities suggestive of IE in IDUs...... of 206, 7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4% to 11%) had a previous history of IE. IDUs with a history of IE were significantly older than IDUs without a history of IE (48 ± 8 vs 42 ± 9 years, respectively, p = 0.03) and had a longer duration of injection drug use (27 [18 to 36] vs 17 years [10 to 25], p...

  6. Correlates of injection drug use among individuals admitted to public and private drug treatment facilities in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Elif; Alaei, Arash; Tracy, Melissa; Waye, Katherine; Cetin, Mustafa Kemal; Alaei, Kamiar

    2016-07-01

    The number of individuals seeking treatment for drug use has been increasing in recent years in Turkey. However, existing research on patterns and risk factors for drug use and how they vary by age and location in Turkey is limited. We examined the socio-demographic characteristics, drug use behaviors, and treatment history of citizens admitted to inpatient substance use treatment at public and private facilities in Turkey during 2012 and 2013 and identified correlates of lifetime and current injection drug use. Of the 11,247 patients at the 22 public treatment centers in 2012-2013, a majority were male, lived with family, were unemployed, and had an average age of 27 years. Within private clinics (n=663), a higher proportion was female (9.7% private vs. 5.7% public), aged 11-17 years old (13% vs. 7.4%), used cannabis as their primary drug (18.4% vs. 13.2%), and had previously received drug treatment (57% vs. 47.2%). Within public centers, 40.4% reported ever injecting drugs and 33.7% reported injecting in the past 30 days; the corresponding percentages at private clinics were 22.5% and 18.1%. Significant predictors of injection drug use included being homeless, being a temporal employee or unemployed, having higher education, heroin as a preferred drug, having a longer duration of drug use, and prior drug treatment. Prevention and intervention efforts are needed to reduce the transition to heroin and injection drug use among youth as well as improve access to a variety of drug treatment options for people who use substances in Turkey. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Drug Injection to Sites other than Arm: A Study of Iranian heroin injectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad eKarimi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available For almost all injecting drug users (IDUs, the first injection is done to the arm. Years after in their injection career, they shift to using other sites for intravenous access. Although injection to sites other than arm is considered as a risky behavior, literature is poor regarding this behavior. We aimed to determine the prevalence and associated factors of using intravenous (IV access points other than arm among a national sample of IDUs in Iran. In a secondary analysis of the national drug dependence survey in 2007, we enrolled all 863 IDUs with at least once daily heroin injections. Data on socio-demographics, drug use data and injection related behavior entered to a backward logistic regression to determine the predictors of our main outcome which was injection to any IV access points other than arm. From all participants, 54.8% reported current injection in sites other than arm. Injection sites were femoral venous sinus (17.0%, groin (14.5%, neck (11.5%, other sites (3.0%, or missing (8.8%. Logistic regression revealed that living alone (OR=1.789, 95% CI=1.218 to 2.629, being Sonni (OR=3.475, 95% CI=1.775 to 6.801, Having higher family income (OR=1.002, 95% CI=1.001 to 1.003, higher age at first drug use (OR=1.039, 95% CI=1.009 to 1.069, more injection duration (OR=1.071, 95% CI=1.041 to 1.102, and more injection frequency (OR=1.255, 95% CI=1.072 to 1.471 were associated with higher likelihood of use of IV access points other than arm. Use of the other sites than arm for IV injection shows an attachment to some socio-demographics, drug use data, and injection related characteristics which can be used by policy makers in harm reduction planning.

  8. "The first shot": the context of first injection of illicit drugs, ongoing injecting practices, and hepatitis C infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Maria de Lourdes Aguiar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The context of first drug injection and its association with ongoing injecting practices and HCV (hepatitis C virus infection were investigated. Injection drug users (IDUs (N = 606 were recruited in "drug scenes" (public places, bars in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, interviewed, and tested for HCV. Sharing of needles/syringes was more prevalent at the first injection (51.3% than at the baseline interview (36.8%. Those who shared syringes/needles at first injection were more likely to be currently engaged in direct/indirect sharing practices. Among young injectors (< 30 years, those reporting sharing of needles/ syringes at the first injection were about four times more likely to have been infected by HCV. Hepatitis C virus prevalence among active IDUs (n = 272 was 11%. Prison history and longer duration of drug injection were identified as independent predictors of HCV infection. To effectively curb HCV transmission among IDUs and minimize harms associated with risk behaviors, preventive strategies should target individuals initiating drug injection beginning with their very first injection and discourage the transition from non-injecting use to the self-injection of illicit drugs.

  9. "The first shot": the context of first injection of illicit drugs, ongoing injecting practices, and hepatitis C infection in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Aguiar Oliveira

    Full Text Available The context of first drug injection and its association with ongoing injecting practices and HCV (hepatitis C virus infection were investigated. Injection drug users (IDUs (N = 606 were recruited in "drug scenes" (public places, bars in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, interviewed, and tested for HCV. Sharing of needles/syringes was more prevalent at the first injection (51.3% than at the baseline interview (36.8%. Those who shared syringes/needles at first injection were more likely to be currently engaged in direct/indirect sharing practices. Among young injectors (< 30 years, those reporting sharing of needles/ syringes at the first injection were about four times more likely to have been infected by HCV. Hepatitis C virus prevalence among active IDUs (n = 272 was 11%. Prison history and longer duration of drug injection were identified as independent predictors of HCV infection. To effectively curb HCV transmission among IDUs and minimize harms associated with risk behaviors, preventive strategies should target individuals initiating drug injection beginning with their very first injection and discourage the transition from non-injecting use to the self-injection of illicit drugs.

  10. Crystal methamphetamine and initiation of injection drug use among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werb, Dan; Kerr, Thomas; Buxton, Jane; Shoveller, Jeannie; Richardson, Chris; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2013-12-10

    Although injection drug use is known to result in a range of health-related harms, including transmission of HIV and fatal overdose, little is known about the possible role of synthetic drugs in injection initiation. We sought to determine the effect of crystal methamphetamine use on risk of injection initiation among street-involved youth in a Canadian setting. We used Cox regression analyses to identify predictors of injection initiation among injection-naive street-involved youth enrolled in the At-Risk Youth Study, a prospective cohort study of street-involved youth in Vancouver, British Columbia. Data on circumstances of first injection were also obtained. Between October 2005 and November 2010, a total of 395 drug injection-naive, street-involved youth provided 1434 observations, with 64 (16.2%) participants initiating injection drug use during the follow-up period, for a cumulative incidence of 21.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-41.7) per 100 person-years. In multivariable analysis, recent noninjection use of crystal methamphetamine was positively associated with subsequent injection initiation (adjusted hazard ratio 1.93, 95% CI 1.31-2.85). The drug of first injection was most commonly reported as crystal methamphetamine (14/31 [45%]). Noninjection use of crystal methamphetamine predicted subsequent injection initiation, and crystal methamphetamine was the most commonly used drug at the time of first injection. Evidence-based strategies to prevent transition to injection drug use among crystal methamphetamine users are urgently needed.

  11. Testing a fall risk model for injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Goldberg, Allon

    2012-01-01

    Fall risk is a critical component of clinical assessment and has not been examined for persons who have injected illicit drugs and are aging. The aim of this study was to test and develop the Fall Risk Model for Injection Drug Users by examining the relationships among injection drug use, chronic venous insufficiency, lower extremity impairments (i.e., decreased ankle range of motion, reduced calf muscle endurance, and leg pain), age and other covariates, and the Tinetti balance and gait total score as a measure of fall risk. A cross-sectional comparative design was used with four crossed factors. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables. Moderated multiple regression with linear and quadratic trends in age was used to examine the nature of the relationship between the Tinetti balance and gait total and age and the potential moderating role of injection drug use. A prespecified series of models was tested. Participants (n = 713) were men (46.9%) and women with a mean age of 46.26 years and primarily African American (61.7%) in methadone treatment centers. The fall risk of a 48-year-old leg injector was comparable with the fall risk of a 69-year-old who had not injected drugs. Variables were added to the model sequentially, resulting in some lost significance of some when they were explained by subsequent variables. Final significant variables in the model were employment status, number of comorbidities, ankle range of motion, leg pain, and calf muscle endurance. Fall risk was associated with route of drug use. Lower extremity impairments accounted for the effects of injection drug use and chronic venous insufficiency on risk for falls. Further understanding of fall risk in injection users is necessary as they age, attempt to work, and participate in activities.

  12. Prevalence and correlates of abscesses among a cohort of injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogg Robert S

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies have indicated that injection-related infections such as abscesses and cellulitis account for the majority of emergency room visits and acute hospitalizations accrued by local injection drug users. The objective of this analysis was to examine the prevalence and correlates of developing an abscess among a cohort of injection drug users in Vancouver and to identify socio-demographic and drug use variables associated with abscesses at baseline. We examined abscesses among participants enrolled in a prospective cohort of injection drug users. Categorical variables were analyzed using the Pearson's chi-square test and continuous variables were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Among 1 585 baseline participants, 341 (21.5% reported having an abscess in the last six months. In a logistic regression model that adjusted for all variables that were associated with having an abscess at p

  13. Having multiple sexual partners among Iranian Injection Drug Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin eAssari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transmission of HIV from intra-venous drug users (IDUs to the community occurs predominantly through high-risk sexual behaviors. Limited information exists regarding the high-risk sexual behaviors of IDUs in Iran. Aim. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and factors associated with having multiple sexual partners among Iranian IDUs. Methods. This is a national survey on drug-dependent adults. Participants were sampled from medical centers, prisons, and streets of capitals of 29 provinces in Iran, between May 2007 and February 2008. We analyzed data of 1,416 current IDUs. Socio-demographics and drug use characteristics were entered into a binary logistic regression model to determine predictors of having multiple sexual partners. Results. Having multiple sexual partners in the past or at the time of survey was reported by 56.4% of Iranian IDUs. Multivariate analysis showed that the likelihood of having multiple sexual partners in IDUs decreased by being married (odds ratio [OR], 0.38; P < .001 and increased by female gender (OR, 13.44; P = .02, having illegal income (OR, 1.72; P = .003, higher monthly family income (OR, 1.01; P = .003, pleasure, curiosity, and recreation as cause of first drug use (OR, 1.37; P = .04, ruins as usual place for injection (OR, 1.89; P = .001, and history of syringe sharing (OR, 1.50; P = .02. Conclusions. Having multiple sexual partners was reported by majority of Iranian IDUs, and this was linked to socio-demographics, initiation data, and other risk behaviors. This information should be considered in prevention efforts to reduce sexual transmission of HIV infection in Iran.

  14. High risk behavior for HIV transmission among former injecting drug users:a survey from Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskandar Shelly

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide, especially in eastern Europe, South America, and east and southeast Asia. Among people actively injecting drugs, provision of clean needles and opioid substitution reduce HIV-transmission. However, former injecting drug users (fIDUs are often overlooked as a high risk group for HIV transmission. We compared HIV risk behavior among current and former injecting drug users (IDUs in Indonesia, which has a rapidly growing HIV-epidemic largely driven by injecting drug use. Methods Current and former IDUs were recruited by respondent driven sampling in an urban setting in Java, and interviewed regarding drug use and HIV risk behavior using the European Addiction Severity Index and the Blood Borne Virus Transmission Questionnaire. Drug use and HIV transmission risk behavior were compared between current IDUs and former IDUs, using the Mann-Whitney and Pearson Chi-square test. Results Ninety-two out of 210 participants (44% were self reported former IDUs. Risk behavior related to sex, tattooing or piercing was common among current as well as former IDUs, 13% of former IDUs were still exposed to contaminated injecting equipment. HIV-infection was high among former (66% and current (60% IDUs. Conclusion Former IDUs may contribute significantly to the HIV-epidemic in Indonesia, and HIV-prevention should therefore also target this group, addressing sexual and other risk behavior.

  15. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide.

  16. Variation in drug injection frequency among out-of-treatment drug users in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M; Himmelgreen, D; Dushay, R; Weeks, M R

    1998-05-01

    This article analyzes data on drug injection frequency in a sample of more than 13,000 out-of-treatment drug injectors interviewed across 21 U.S. cities and Puerto Rico through the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Cooperative Agreement for AIDS Community-Based Outreach/Intervention Research Program. The goals of the article are to present findings on injection frequency and to predict variation in terms of a set of variables suggested by previous research, including location, ethnicity, gender, age, educational attainment, years since first use of alcohol and marijuana, income, living arrangement, homelessness, drugs injected, and duration of injection across drugs. Three models were tested. Significant intersite differences were identified in injection frequency, although most of the other predictor variables we tested accounted for little of the variance. Ethnicity and drugs injected, however, were found to be significant. Taken together, location, ethnicity, and type of drug injected provide a configuration that differentiated and (for the variables available for the analysis) best predicted injection frequency. The public health implications of these findings are presented.

  17. Changes in patterns of injecting drug use in Hungary: a shift to synthetic cathinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péterfi, Anna; Tarján, Anna; Horváth, Gergely Csaba; Csesztregi, Tamás; Nyírády, Adrienn

    2014-01-01

    The spread of synthetic cathinone injecting is a new phenomenon observed in recent years in Hungary. Until 2010, when the first anecdotal reports on cathinone injecting appeared, injecting was associated with the use of heroin and amphetamine. In this paper we review available evidence of the changes in the drug market and a concurrent shift in patterns of injecting drug use that have been taking place in Hungary since 2010. Remarkable changes have been observed in police seizures data since 2010. While new psychoactive substances have appeared, the availability of heroin has dropped significantly. A qualitative study in 2011 revealed that these market changes correlate with changes in patterns of injecting drug use: decreasing heroin use and the appearance of mephedrone injecting were reported by treatment and needle and syringe programme (NSP) personnel. These changes are detectable in other routine epidemiological data collection systems in the following years as well (i.e. treatment, drug-related deaths, NSP clientele). Heroin-related treatment demand dropped, as did heroin-related mortality. Parallel to this, a growing number of clients appeared in treatment and in NSPs who were primarily injecting cathinones. The shift to cathinones can be observed in amphetamine and heroin injectors as well. Monitoring changes in patterns of injecting drug use are especially important because of the vulnerability of this drug-user population and the consequences of this high-risk route of drug administration. The realignment observed in Hungary is to be further investigated with regard to its determinants, changes in risk behaviour, and in treatment needs.

  18. Perceived discrimination and injecting risk among people who inject drugs attending Needle and Syringe Programmes in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hannah; Brener, Loren; Mao, Limin; Treloar, Carla

    2014-11-01

    Previous research indicates that stigma and discrimination have negative consequences for both healthcare delivery and for health outcomes of people who inject drugs (PWID). Also important but not as well researched is the association between perceived discrimination and increased engagement in risky behaviours. This research aimed to explore whether perceived discrimination from workers in Needle and Syringe programmes (NSPs) is associated with increased engagement in injecting risk practices such as the sharing of injecting equipment. Convenience sampling was used across eight NSP sites within Western Sydney, Australia. All clients who attended one of the NSPs were eligible to participate. A total of 236 clients completed the survey. Perceived discrimination from NSP staff was found to be significantly associated with some injecting risk practices. Respondents who reported greater perceived discrimination from NSP staff were significantly more likely to report being injected by someone else after they had injected themselves (OR 1.2, 95%CI 1.1-1.3) and reusing a needle or syringe (OR 1.1, 95%CI 1.0-1.3) in the last month. Although clients reported perceiving more discrimination from general health workers than from NSP workers (12.8 vs. 10.2, t=7.739, df=226, pjudgemental, their clients may still have a heightened sensitivity to discrimination which can then have consequences for on-going engagement in risk practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug use practices among people who inject drugs in a context of drug market changes: Challenges for optimal coverage of harm reduction programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Élise; Arruda, Nelson; Leclerc, Pascale; Morissette, Carole; Blanchette, Caty; Blouin, Karine; Alary, Michel

    2017-07-01

    Until the early 2000s, people who inject drugs (PWID) in Québec had mainly been injecting powder cocaine and heroin. Since then, ethnographic studies have shown that the drug market has diversified, with crack and prescription opioids (PO) becoming increasingly available. This could have led to changes in drug use practices among PWID. The objectives of our study were to examine annual trends in injection of different drugs, crack smoking and frequent injection (FI), as well as relationships between injected drugs and FI. PWID are participants in the ongoing Québec SurvUDI surveillance system. PWID (past 6 months) were recruited in 2 urban and 6 semi-urban/rural sites. Each visit included a structured interview addressing drug use behaviours. Analyses were carried out using GEE methods. For trend analyses (2003-2014) on drugs and FI (number of injections≥upper quartile, previous month), the first annual interview was selected for PWID with multiple participations per year. Analyses on associations between FI and types of injected drugs were based on all interviews (2004-2014). Crack/cocaine and heroin injection declined significantly, with prevalence ratios (PR) per year of 0.983 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.980-0.986] and 0.979 (95% CI: 0.969-0.990), while PO injection [PR=1.052 (1.045-1.059)], crack smoking [PR=1.006 (1.001-1.012)], and FI (≥120 injections, previous month) significantly increased [PR=1.015 (1.004-1.026)]. Compared to PWID who injected crack/cocaine±other drugs, the proportion of PWID reporting FI was higher among those who injected PO+heroin/speedball, crack/cocaine or other drugs (adjusted PR 2.29; 95% CI: 2.07-2.53) or PO only (aPR 1.72; 95%CI: 1.47-2.01). Changes that have occurred in the drug market are reflected in PWID's practices. The high frequency of injection observed among PO injectors is of particular concern. Drug market variations are a challenge for health authorities responsible for harm reduction programs. Copyright

  20. Injection drug use, unsafe medical injections, and HIV in Africa: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Savanna R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reuse of injecting equipment in clinical settings is well documented in Africa and appears to play a substantial role in generalized HIV epidemics. The U.S. and the WHO have begun to support large scale injection safety interventions, increased professional education and training programs, and the development and wider dissemination of infection control guidelines. Several African governments have also taken steps to control injecting equipment, including banning syringes that can be reused. However injection drug use (IDU, of heroin and stimulants, is a growing risk factor for acquiring HIV in the region. IDU is increasingly common among young adults in sub-Saharan Africa and is associated with high risk sex, thus linking IDU to the already well established and concentrated generalized HIV epidemics in the region. Demand reduction programs based on effective substance use education and drug treatment services are very limited, and imprisonment is more common than access to drug treatment services. Drug policies are still very punitive and there is widespread misunderstanding of and hostility to harm reduction programs e.g. needle exchange programs are almost non-existent in the region. Among injection drug users and among drug treatment patients in Africa, knowledge that needle sharing and syringe reuse transmit HIV is still very limited, in contrast with the more successfully instilled knowledge that HIV is transmitted sexually. These new injection risks will take on increased epidemiological significance over the coming decade and will require much more attention by African nations to the range of effective harm reduction tools now available in Europe, Asia, and North America.

  1. Crystal methamphetamine injection predicts slower HIV RNA suppression among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, M-J; Zhang, Ruth; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2011-07-01

    We examined the impact of crystal methamphetamine injection on HIV RNA suppression among a prospective cohort of HIV-positive injection drug users initiating antiretroviral therapy. A multivariate Cox regression analysis found crystal methamphetamine injection to be negatively associated with viral load suppression (RH=0.63 [95% CI: 0.40-0.98]; p=0.039). This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate an association between crystal methamphetamine use and HIV RNA suppression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Unexpectedly high injection drug use, HIV and hepatitis C prevalence among female sex workers in the Republic of Mauritius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lisa Grazina; Corceal, Sewraz

    2013-02-01

    Female sex workers (FSW) often have a disproportionately high prevalence of HIV infection and they, along with their clients, are considered a core group contributing to the transmission of HIV in many countries. In 2010, females who reported having vaginal/anal/oral sex in the last 6 months with a male in exchange for money or gifts, aged ≥15 years, and living in Mauritius were recruited into a survey using respondent driven sampling. Consenting females (n = 299) completed a behavioral questionnaire and provided venous blood for HIV, HCV and HBV testing. HIV seroprevalence among FSW was 28.9 % and 43.8 % were infected with HCV; among HIV seropositive FSW, 88.2 % were also infected with HCV. Almost 40 % of FSW reported injecting drugs sometime in their lives and 30.5 % of all FSW reported doing so in the previous 3 months. Among those who ever injected drugs, 82.5 % did so in the past 3 months and among those 60 % reported injecting drugs at least once a day. Among FSW who ever injected drugs, 17.5 % reported sharing a needle at last injection. Regression analyses found injection drug use behaviors to be positively associated with HIV seroprevalence. These findings indicate that FSW, especially those who inject drugs, are at high risk for HIV and HCV infection and transmission and illustrates the need for gender responsive HIV and injection drug use prevention and treatment models that respond to the unique situations that affect this population.

  3. Unrecognized hand ischemia after intraarterial drug injection: successful management of a "near miss" event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vogt Peter M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complications arising from accidental intraarterial drug injections have been described in the past. However, given the multitude of injected substances and complex pathophysiology, guidelines regarding diagnosis and management of patients with intraarterial injections remain vague. As such it remains unclear, when to expect limb ischemia and whether and for how long to monitor patients after intraarterial injections. Case report We present the case of a "near miss event" in an i.v. drug abuser presenting to the emergency department 3 hours after injection of water dissolved zolpidem (Ambien™ tablets into the right ulnar artery. Chief complaint was forearm pain. Clinical examination at the time revealed no concern for limb ischemia and patient was discharged. The patient returned unplanned 18 hours after injection with an ischemic right hand. Angiography revealed no flow in the distal ulnar artery and minimal flow in the palmar arch. Emergent intraarterial thrombolysis with Urokinase was performed and restored hand perfusion. Clinical follow-up 3 months after injury showed full recovery with regular recapillarisation and normal Allen test. Conclusion This case report highlights the need to rigorously monitor patients with suspected intraarterial injections for potential delayed onset of limb ischemia. This is to our knowledge the first described case report of a successful revascularization after prolonged ischemia with delayed onset after zolpidem injection. We recommend close monitoring of these patients for at least 24 hours in addition to starting prophylactic anticoagulation.

  4. Age-related trends in injection site reaction incidence induced by the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors etanercept and adalimumab: the Food and Drug Administration adverse event reporting system, 2004-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshinobu; Umetsu, Ryogo; Kato, Yamato; Hane, Yuuki; Sasaoka, Sayaka; Motooka, Yumi; Hatahira, Haruna; Abe, Junko; Fukuda, Akiho; Naganuma, Misa; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors are increasingly being used as treatment for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the administration of these drugs carries the risk of inducing injection site reaction (ISR). ISR gives rise to patient stress, nervousness, and a decrease in quality of life (QoL). In order to alleviate pain and other symptoms, early countermeasures must be taken against this adverse event. In order to improve understanding of the risk factors contributing to the induction of ISR, we evaluated the association between TNF-α inhibitors and ISR by applying a logistic regression model to age-stratified data obtained from the Food and Drug Administration Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. The FAERS database contains 7,561,254 reports from January 2004 to December 2015. Adjusted reporting odds ratios (RORs) (95% Confidence Intervals) were obtained for interaction terms for age-stratified groups treated with etanercept (ETN) and adalimumab (ADA). The adjusted RORs for ETN* ≥ 70 and ADA* ≥ 70 groups were the lowest among the age-stratified groups undergoing the respective monotherapies. Furthermore, we found that crude RORs for ETN + methotrexate (MTX) combination therapy and ADA + MTX combination therapy were lower than those for the respective monotherapies. This study was the first to evaluate the relationship between aging and ISR using the FAERS database. PMID:28260984

  5. Modeling Initiation into Drug Injection among Street Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Elise; Godin, Gaston; Boudreau, Jean-Francois; Cote, Philippe-Benoit; Denis, Veronique; Haley, Nancy; Leclerc, Pascale; Boivin, Jean-Francois

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed at examining the predictors of initiation into drug injection among street youth using social cognitive theory framework. A prospective cohort study based on semi-annual interviews was carried out. Psychosocial determinants referred to avoidance of initiation. Other potential predictors were: sociodemographic characteristics,…

  6. Pregnancy and Sexual Health among Homeless Young Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathazi, Dodi; Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson

    2009-01-01

    Research on pregnancy and sexual health among homeless youth is limited. In this study, qualitative interviews were conducted with 41 homeless young injection drug users (IDUs) in Los Angeles with a history of pregnancy. The relationship between recent pregnancy outcomes, contraception practices, housing status, substance use, utilization of…

  7. Managing la malilla: Exploring drug treatment experiences among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico, and their implications for drug law reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Jennifer; Pollini, Robin A; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-11-01

    In August 2009, Mexico reformed its drug laws and decriminalized small quantities of drugs for personal use; offenders caught three times will be mandated to enter drug treatment. However, little is known about the quality or effectiveness of drug treatment programs in Mexico. We examined injection drug users' (IDUs) experiences in drug treatment in Tijuana, Mexico, with the goal of informing program planning and policy. We examined qualitative and quantitative data from Proyecto El Cuete, a multi-phased research study on HIV risk among IDUs in Tijuana. Phase I consisted of 20 in-depth interviews and Phase II employed respondent-driven sampling to recruit 222 IDUs for a quantitative survey. We also reviewed national drug policy documents, surveillance data, and media reports to situate drug users' experiences within the broader sociopolitical context. Participants in the qualitative study were 50% male with a mean age of 32; most injected heroin (85.0%) and methamphetamine (60.0%). The quantitative sample was 91.4% male with a mean age of 35; 98.2% injected heroin and 83.7% injected heroin and methamphetamine together. The majority of participants reported receiving treatment: residential treatment was most common, followed by methadone; other types of services were infrequently reported. Participants' perceptions of program acceptability and effectiveness were mixed. Mistreatment emerged as a theme in the qualitative interviews and was reported by 21.6% of Phase II participants, primarily physical (72.0%) and verbal (52.0%) abuse. Our results point to the need for political, economic, and social investment in the drug treatment system before offenders are sentenced to treatment under the revised national drug law. Resources are needed to strengthen program quality and ensure accountability. The public health impact of the new legislation that attempts to bring drug treatment to the forefront of national drug policy should be systematically evaluated. Copyright

  8. Time trend of injection drug errors before and after implementation of bar-code verification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakushima, Ken; Umeki, Reona; Endoh, Akira; Ito, Yoichi M; Nasuhara, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Bar-code technology, used for verification of patients and their medication, could prevent medication errors in clinical practice. Retrospective analysis of electronically stored medical error reports was conducted in a university hospital. The number of reported medication errors of injected drugs, including wrong drug administration and administration to the wrong patient, was compared before and after implementation of the bar-code verification system for inpatient care. A total of 2867 error reports associated with injection drugs were extracted. Wrong patient errors decreased significantly after implementation of the bar-code verification system (17.4/year vs. 4.5/year, pcode medication administration is effective for prevention of wrong patient errors. However, ordinary bar-code verification systems are limited in their ability to prevent incorrect drug preparation in hospital wards.

  9. Interventions to reduce HIV transmission related to injecting drug use in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Ralf; Ball, Andrew; Verster, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The high prevalence of HIV infection and drug dependence among prisoners, combined with the sharing of injecting drug equipment, make prisons a high-risk environment for the transmission of HIV. Ultimately, this contributes to HIV epidemics in the communities to which prisoners return on their release. We reviewed the effectiveness of interventions to reduce injecting drug use risk behaviours and, consequently, HIV transmission in prisons. Many studies reported high levels of injecting drug use in prisons, and HIV transmission has been documented. There is increasing evidence of what prison systems can do to prevent HIV transmission related to injecting drug use. In particular, needle and syringe programmes and opioid substitution therapies have proven effective at reducing HIV risk behaviours in a wide range of prison environments, without resulting in negative consequences for the health of prison staff or prisoners. The introduction of these programmes in countries with an existing or emergent epidemic of HIV infection among injecting drug users is therefore warranted, as part of comprehensive programmes to address HIV in prisons.

  10. Use of liposomes as injectable-drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostro, M J; Cullis, P R

    1989-08-01

    The formation of liposomes and their application as delivery systems for injectable drugs are described. Liposomes are microscopic vesicles composed of one or more lipid membranes surrounding discrete aqueous compartments. These vesicles can encapsulate water-soluble drugs in their aqueous spaces and lipid-soluble drugs within the membrane itself. Liposomes release their contents by interacting with cells in one of four ways: adsorption, endocytosis, lipid exchange, or fusion. Liposome-entrapped drugs are distributed within the body much differently than free drugs; when administered intravenously to healthy animals and humans, most of the injected vesicles accumulate in the liver, spleen, lungs, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. Liposomes also accumulate preferentially at the sites of inflammation and infection and in some solid tumors; however, the reason for this accumulation is not clear. Four major factors influence liposomes' in vivo behavior and biodistribution: (1) liposomes tend to leak if cholesterol is not included in the vesicle membrane, (2) small liposomes are cleared more slowly than large liposomes, (3) the half-life of a liposome increases as the lipid dose increases, and (4) charged liposomal systems are cleared more rapidly than uncharged systems. The most advanced application of liposome-based therapy is in the treatment of systemic fungal infections, especially with amphotericin B. Liposomes are also under investigation for treatment of neoplastic disorders. Liposomes' uses in cancer therapy include encapsulation of known antineoplastic agents such as doxorubicin and methotrexate, delivery of immune modulators such as N-acetylmuramyl-L-alanine-D-isoglutamine, and encapsulation of new chemical entities that are synthesized with lipophilic segments tailored for insertion into lipid bilayers. Liposomal formulations of injectable antimicrobial agents and antineoplastic agents already are undergoing clinical testing, and most probably will receive

  11. Biotech injectable drugs: clinical applications and financial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogenberg, F Randy; Young, Coleen

    2004-07-01

    Biotechnology-derived injectable medications raise complex issues with respect to access and administration for both manufacturers and payers. In addition, biotech injectables rarely fit within traditional prescription drug benefit design structures, thereby creating inequities in reimbursement and access that can undermine a health benefit plan's goals.Benefit-design changes focusing on short-term solutions can exacerbate such situations. Employers, insurers, and managed care organizations need to consider innovative benefit-plan designs to effectively address issues that are associated with biotech medications.Actuarial models, such as the Reimbursement model described in this article, can help to provide the options analyses and decision-making support that are required.

  12. High-Risk Geographic Mobility Patterns among Young Urban and Suburban Persons who Inject Drugs and their Injection Network Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boodram, Basmattee; Hotton, Anna L; Shekhtman, Louis; Gutfraind, Alexander; Dahari, Harel

    2017-09-05

    Young people in the USA who inject drugs, particularly those at a risk of residence instability, experience the highest incidence of hepatitis C (HCV) infections. This study examined associations between geographic mobility patterns and sociodemographic, behavioral, and social network characteristics of 164 young (ages 18-30) persons who inject drugs (PWID). We identified a potential bridge sub-population who reported residence in both urban and suburban areas in the past year (crossover transients) and higher-risk behaviors (receptive syringe sharing, multiple sex partners) compared to their residentially localized counterparts. Because they link suburban and urban networks, crossover transients may facilitate transmission of HIV and HCV between higher and lower prevalence areas. Interventions should address risk associated with residential instability, particularly among PWID who travel between urban and suburban areas.

  13. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, M Florencia; Lum, Paula J; Evans, Jennifer L; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2011-02-24

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%).

  14. Not in the vein: 'missed hits', subcutaneous and intramuscular injections and associated harms among people who inject psychoactive drugs in Bristol, United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, V D; Parry, J V; Ncube, F; Hickman, M

    2016-02-01

    The extent of intentional or accidental subcutaneous and intramuscular injections and the factors associated with these have rarely been studied among people who inject drugs, yet these may play an important role in the acquisition bacterial infections. This study describes the extent of these, and in particular the factors and harms associated with accidental subcutaneous and intramuscular injections (i.e. 'missed hits'). People who inject drugs were recruited using respondent driven sampling. Weighted data was examined using bivariate analyses and logistic regression. The participants mean age was 33 years (31% aged under 30-years), 28% were women, and the mean time since first injection was 12 years (N=329). During the preceding three months, 97% had injected heroin, 71% crack-cocaine, and 16% amphetamines; 36% injected daily. Overall, 99% (325) reported that they aimed to inject intravenously; only three aimed to inject subcutaneously and one intramuscularly. Of those that aimed to inject intravenously, 56% (181) reported ever missing a vein (for 51 this occurred more than four times month on average). Factors associated with 'missed hits' suggested that these were the consequence of poor vascular access, injection technique and/or hygiene. 'Missed hits' were twice as common among those reporting sores/open wounds, abscesses, or redness, swelling and tenderness at injection sites. Intentional subcutaneous and intramuscular injections are rare in this sample. 'Missed hits' are common and appear to be associated with poor injection practice. Interventions are required to reduce risk through improving injecting practice and hygiene. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk of hepatitis C virus infection among young adult injection drug users who share injection equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Lorna E; Ouellet, Lawrence J; Hershow, Ronald; Bailey, Susan L; Williams, Ian T; Williamson, John; Monterroso, Edgar R; Garfein, Richard S

    2002-04-01

    Designing studies to examine hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission via the shared use of drug injection paraphernalia other than syringes is difficult because of saturation levels of HCV infection in most samples of injection drug users (IDUs). The authors measured the incidence of HCV infection in a large cohort of young IDUs from Chicago, Illinois, and determined the risk of HCV seroconversion associated with specific forms of sharing injection paraphernalia. From 1997 to 1999, serum samples obtained from 702 IDUs aged 18-30 years were screened for HCV antibodies; prevalence was 27%. Seronegative participants were tested for HCV antibodies at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. During 290 person-years of follow-up, 29 participants seroconverted (incidence: 10.0/100 person-years). The adjusted relative hazard of seroconversion, controlling for demographic and drug-use covariates, was highest for sharing "cookers" (relative hazard = 4.1, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 11.8), followed by sharing cotton filters (relative hazard = 2.4, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 5.0). Risks associated with syringe-sharing and sharing of rinse water were elevated but not significant. After adjustment for syringe-sharing, sharing cookers remained the strongest predictor of seroconversion (relative hazard = 3.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.3, 9.9). The authors conclude that sharing of injection equipment other than syringes may be an important cause of HCV transmission between IDUs.

  16. Injecting risk behavior among traveling young injection drug users: travel partner and city characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Martha E; Fatch, Robin S; Evans, Jennifer L; Yu, Michelle; Davidson, Peter J; Page, Kimberly; Hahn, Judith A

    2013-06-01

    Young injection drug users (IDUs), a highly mobile population, engage in high levels of injecting risk behavior, yet little is understood about how such risk behavior may vary by the characteristics of the cities to which they travel, including the existence of a syringe exchange program (SEP), as well as travel partner characteristics. In 2004-2005, we conducted a 6-month prospective study to investigate the risk behavior of 89 young IDUs as they traveled, with detailed information gathered about 350 city visits. In multivariable analyses, travel to larger urban cities with a population of 500,000-1,000,000 was significantly associated with injecting drugs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.71; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.56-8.82), ancillary equipment sharing (AES; AOR = 7.05; 95 % CI, 2.25-22.06) and receptive needle sharing (RNS; AOR = 5.73; 95 % CI, 1.11-27.95), as compared with visits to smaller cities with populations below 50,000. Region of the country, and the existence of a SEP within the city visited, were not independently associated with injecting drugs, AES, or RNS during city visits. Traveling with more than one injecting partner was associated with injecting drugs during city visits (AOR = 2.77; 95 % CI, 1.46-5.27), when compared with traveling alone. Additionally, both non-daily and daily/almost daily alcohol use during city visits were associated with AES (AOR = 3.37; 95 % CI, 1.42-7.68; AOR = 3.03; 95 % CI, 1.32-6.97, respectively) as compared with no alcohol consumption. Traveling young IDUs are more likely to inject when traveling with other IDUs and to engage in higher risk injection behavior when they are in large cities. Risk behavior occurring in city visits, including equipment sharing and alcohol consumption, suggests further need for focused interventions to reduce risk for viral infection among this population.

  17. Epidural injections of indomethacin for postlaminectomy syndrome: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete, J Antonio

    2003-02-01

    Since there have been side effects reported with the administration of corticosteroids epidurally, their application has been limited. Because some nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs have central and spinal antinociceptive actions, we have compared the effects of indomethacin (INM) given by the epidural route to methylprednisolone (MTP). This was a prospective, comparative study in an ambulatory pain care center. Two hundred six patients with recurrent low back pain (Visual Analog Scale >7) and radiculopathy after they had had 2 or more lumbar laminectomies with the diagnosis of "postlaminectomy syndrome" were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group I (64 patients) was given 2 epidural injections of lyophilized INM 1 mg. Group II (60 patients) received 2 injections of 2 mg of INM at the same intervals. Group III (82 patients) was treated by 2 epidural injections of MTP 80 mg. In every case, the medication was diluted in 3 mL of 0.5% bupivacaine. Reductions of pain were assessed by changes in the Visual Analog Scale; physical activities, attitude, and medication intake were graded by the Pain Progress Score recorded before each treatment and 2 wk after the last. After each injection, all patients had pain relief to Visual Analog Scale <3. Increased analgesia (P < 0.05) was noted when a double dose of INM was used (Group II) or when 80 mg of MTP was given. The total average scores of the Pain Progress Score showed significant differences at the second injection in Groups II and III only. Physical activity, emotional attitudes, and medication intake were also improved but the changes were not statistically significant. In conclusion, in this group of patients, INM produced adequate analgesia in Groups I and II, with evidence suggesting that 2 mg of INM may produce a similar degree of pain relief as 80 mg of MTP after the second injection. Other nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be explored in the future for the same purpose.

  18. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  19. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  20. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.; Reed, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  1. Injectable nanomaterials for drug delivery: carriers, targeting moieties, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, David M; Sundaram, Padma; Byrne, Mark E

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutics such as nucleic acids, proteins/peptides, vaccines, anti-cancer, and other drugs have disadvantages of low bio-availability, rapid clearance, and high toxicity. Thus, there is a significant need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. Injectable nanocarriers have received much attention due to their vast range of structures and ability to contain multiple functional groups, both within the bulk material and on the surface of the particles. Nanocarriers may be tailored to control drug release and/or increase selective cell targeting, cellular uptake, drug solubility, and circulation time, all of which lead to a more efficacious delivery and action of therapeutics. The focus of this review is injectable, targeted nanoparticle drug delivery carriers highlighting the diversity of nanoparticle materials and structures as well as highlighting current therapeutics and targeting moieties. Structures and materials discussed include liposomes, polymersomes, dendrimers, cyclodextrin-containing polymers (CDPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and gold nanoparticles. Additionally, current clinical trial information and details such as trial phase, treatment, active drug, carrier sponsor, and clinical trial identifier for different materials and structures are presented and discussed.

  2. Injectable biopolymer based hydrogels for drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atta, Sadia; Khaliq, Shaista; Islam, Atif; Javeria, Irtaza; Jamil, Tahir; Athar, Muhammad Makshoof; Shafiq, Muhammad Imtiaz; Ghaffar, Abdul

    2015-09-01

    Biopolymer based pH-sensitive hydrogels were prepared using chitosan (CS) with polyethylene glycol (PEG) of different molecular weights in the presence of silane crosslinker. The incorporated components remain undissolved in different swelling media as they are connected by siloxane linkage which was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The swelling in water was enhanced by the addition of higher molecular weight PEG. The swelling behaviour of the hydrogels against pH showed high swelling in acidic and basic pH, whereas, low swelling was examined at pH 6 and 7. This characteristic pH responsive behaviour at neutral pH made them suitable for injectable controlled drug delivery. The controlled release analysis of Cefixime (CFX) (model drug) loaded CS/PEG hydrogel exhibited that the entire drug was released in 30 min in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) while in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), 85% of drug was released in controlled manner within 80 min. This inferred that the developed hydrogels can be an attractive biomaterial for injectable drug delivery with physiological pH and other biomedical applications.

  3. Drug-related harm among people who inject drugs in Thailand: summary findings from the Mitsampan Community Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Fairbairn, Nadia; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-10-07

    For decades, Thailand has experienced high rates of illicit drug use and related harms. In response, the Thai government has relied on drug law enforcement to address this problem. Despite these efforts, high rates of drug use persist, and Thailand has been contending with an enduring epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among people who inject drugs (IDU). In response to concerns regarding drug-related harm in Thailand and a lack of research focused on the experiences and needs of Thai IDU, the Mitsampan Community Research Project was launched in 2008. The project involved administering surveys capturing a range of behavioral and other data to community-recruited IDU in Bangkok in 2008 and 2009. In total, 468 IDU in Bangkok were enrolled in the project. Results revealed high rates of midazolam injection, non-fatal overdose and incarceration. Syringe sharing remained widespread among this population, driven primarily by problems with access to syringes and methamphetamine injection. As well, reports of police abuse were common and found to be associated with high-risk behavior. Problems with access to evidence-based drug treatment and HIV prevention programs were also documented. Although compulsory drug detention centers are widely used in Thailand, data suggested that these centers have little impact on drug use behaviors among IDU in Bangkok. The findings from this project highlight many ongoing health and social problems related to illicit drug use and drug policies in Bangkok. They also suggest that the emphasis on criminal justice approaches has resulted in human rights violations at the hands of police, and harms associated with compulsory drug detention and incarceration. Collectively, the findings indicate the urgent need for the implementation of evidence-based policies and programs in this setting.

  4. The micro-social risk environment for injection drug use: An event specific analysis of dyadic, situational, and network predictors of injection risk behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulis, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the risk environment for drug use by examining injection risk behavior during specific injection episodes. By leveraging multiple observations of injection episodes of participants, the study attempts to move beyond global assessment of environmental variables to simultaneously model within (i.e., event level) as well as between (i.e., individual level) predictors of injection risk. Furthermore, gender is also explored as a potential moderator of the relationship between the association of specific partner characteristics (e.g., having an injection partner who is also a sexual partner) and injection risk behavior. Data is used from the Sexual Acquisition of Transmission of HIV Cooperative Agreement Study (SATHCAP). Multilevel structural equation modeling is utilized to predict within and between variations in underlying injection risk behavior as measured using four indicators of injection risk. Results indicated that a number of partner level characteristics (i.e., being emotionally close with the partner, sexual partnership, being a first time partner) and one social situational (i.e., the number of non-injectors present at the injection episode) characteristic predicted event level injection risk behavior. However, the impact of partner characteristics also appears to be moderated by gender of the participants. More specifically, sharing a sexual partnership with an injection partner was more strongly associated with injection risk among females as compared to males and females indicated higher levels of risk when injecting with other females while the partner's gender showed no significant association with risk for male injectors. These results suggest that people who inject drug do report varying levels of risk during different injection episodes and this variation can be explained by partner and situational characteristics. Improved understanding of the social processes surrounding injection episodes is required to further refine harm

  5. Distributive sharing among HIV-HCV co-infected injecting drug users: the preventive role of trust in one's physician

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This study, based on data from the MANIF 2000 cohort study, investigates the relationship between the lending of injecting equipment, drug use and experience with HIV care. The sample comprised 224 HIV-HCV-coinfected patients who reported having injected drugs in the previous 6 months and their 538 visits to clinical services. Longitudinal data were collected for medical status, and self-reported risk behaviors. A logistic regression GEE model was used to identify correl...

  6. Predictors of injection drug use cessation and relapse in a prospective cohort of young injection drug users in San Francisco, CA (UFO Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer L; Hahn, Judith A; Lum, Paula J; Stein, Ellen S; Page, Kimberly

    2009-05-01

    Studies of injection drug use cessation have largely sampled adults in drug treatment settings. Little is known about injection cessation and relapse among young injection drug users (IDU) in the community. A total of 365 HCV-negative IDU under age 30 years were recruited by street outreach and interviewed quarterly for a prospective cohort between January 2000 and February 2008. Participants were followed for a total of 638 person-years and 1996 visits. We used survival analysis techniques to identify correlates of injection cessation (> or =3 months) and relapse to injection. 67% of subjects were male, median age was 22 years (interquartile range (IQR) 20-26) and median years injecting was 3.6 (IQR 1.3-6.5). 28.8% ceased injecting during the follow-up period. Among those that ceased injecting, nearly one-half resumed drug injection on subsequent visits, one-quarter maintained injecting cessation, and one-quarter were lost to follow-up. Participating in a drug treatment program in the last 3 months and injecting less than 30 times per month were associated with injection cessation. Injecting heroin or heroin mixed with other drugs, injecting the residue from previously used drug preparation equipment, drinking alcohol, and using benzodiazepines were negatively associated with cessation. Younger age was associated with relapse to injection. These results suggest that factors associated with stopping injecting involve multiple areas of intervention, including access to drug treatment and behavioral approaches to reduce injection and sustain cessation. The higher incidence of relapse in the younger subjects in this cohort underscores the need for earlier detection and treatment programs targeted to adolescents and transition-age youth.

  7. Cross-border injection drug use and HIV and hepatitis C virus seropositivity among people who inject drugs in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horyniak, Danielle; Wagner, Karla D; Armenta, Richard F; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Hendrickson, Erik; Garfein, Richard S

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) are significantly lower among people who inject drugs (PWID) in San Diego, CA, USA compared with PWID in Tijuana, Mexico, located directly across the border. We investigated associations between cross-border injection drug use (IDU), HIV and HCV seroprevalence and engagement in injecting risk behaviours while on each side of the border. Using baseline interviews and serologic testing data from STAHR II, a longitudinal cohort study of PWID in San Diego, bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses examined associations between recent (past six months) cross-border IDU and HIV and HCV antibody seropositivity, socio-demographics, drug use characteristics, and participants' connections to, and perceptions about Mexico. Chi-squared tests and McNemar tests examined associations between cross-border IDU and injecting risk behaviours. Of the 567 participants (93% U.S.-born, 73% male, median age 45 years), 86 (15%) reported recent cross-border IDU. Cross-border IDU was not associated with HIV (OR: 0.85, 95% CI: 0.37-1.95) or HCV seropositivity (OR: 1.01, 95% CI: 0.62-1.65). Age, identifying as Hispanic or Latino/a, and being concerned about risk of violence when travelling to Mexico were independently associated with decreased odds of recent cross-border IDU. Injecting cocaine at least weekly, having ever lived in Mexico and knowing PWID who reside in Mexico were associated with increased odds of recent cross-border IDU. PWID who reported cross-border IDU were significantly less likely to engage in receptive needle sharing, equipment sharing, and public injection while in Mexico compared with in San Diego (all p<0.001). Prevalence of HIV and HCV infection was similar among PWID who had and had not injected in Mexico, possibly due to practising safer injecting while in Mexico. Research is needed to elucidate contextual factors enabling U.S. PWID to inject safely while in Mexico. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  8. Clustered drug and sexual HIV risk among a sample of middle-aged injection drug users, Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a clustered pattern of high-risk drug using and sexual behaviors among younger injection drug users (IDUs), however, no studies have looked at this clustering pattern in relatively older IDUs. This analysis examines the interplay and overlap of drug and sexual HIV risk among a sample of middle-aged, long-term IDUs in Houston, Texas. Our study includes 452 eligible IDUs, recruited into the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance project. Four separate multiple logistic regression models were built to examine the odds of reporting a given risk behavior. We constructed the most parsimonious multiple logistic regression model using a manual backward stepwise process. Participants were mostly male, older (mean age: 49.5±6.63), and nonHispanic Black. Prevalence of receptive needle sharing as well as having multiple sex partners and having unprotected sex with a partner in exchange for money, drugs, or other things at last sex were high. Unsafe injecting practices were associated with high-risk sexual behaviors. IDUs, who used a needle after someone else had injected with it had higher odds of having more than three sex partners (odds ratio (OR) = 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-3.12) in last year and who shared drug preparation equipment had higher odds of having unprotected sex with an exchange partner (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.66-9.09) at last sex. Additionally, homelessness was associated with unsafe injecting practices but not with high-risk sexual behaviors. Our results show that a majority of the sample IDUs are practicing sexual as well as drug-using HIV risk behaviors. The observed clustering pattern of drug and sexual risk behavior among this middle-aged population is alarming and deserve attention of HIV policy-makers and planners.

  9. Outlier populations: individual and social network correlates of solvent-using injection drug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souradet Y Shaw

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We previously identified a high prevalence of Hepatitis C (HCV amongst solvent-using injection drug users (S-IDU relative to other injection drug users within the same locality. Here we incorporated social network variables to better characterize some of the behavioural characteristics that may be putting this specific subgroup of IDU at elevated disease risk. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of at-risk populations was carried out in Winnipeg, Canada in 2009. Individuals reporting any history of injection drug and/or solvent use were included in the study. Associations between subgroup membership, infection with HCV and HIV and individual and social network variables were examined. RESULTS: In relation to other IDU, S-IDU were more likely to be infected with HCV, to report ever having shared a syringe, and to associate with other IDU. They were further differentiated in terms of their self-reported sexual orientation, ethnicity and in the injection drugs typically used. CONCLUSION: Solvent use stands as a proxy measure of numerous other characteristics that put this group of IDU at higher risk of infection. Provision of adequate services to ostracized subpopulations may result in wider population-level benefits.

  10. Drug use and risk behaviours among injecting drug users: a comparison between sex workers and non-sex workers in Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breen Courtney

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper examines the differences in demographics, drug use patterns and self reported risk behaviours between regular injecting drug users (IDU who report engaging in sex work for money or drugs and regular injecting drug users who do not. Methods Cross sectional data collected from regular IDU interviewed as part of the New South Wales (NSW Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS in 2003 were analysed. Results IDU who reported engaging in sex work were more likely to be female, and identify as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander descent. They initiated injecting drug use at a significantly younger age and were more likely to report injection related problems than IDU who had not engaged in sex work. There were no differences in the drug classes used, but findings suggested that the sex workers tended to be more frequent users of crystalline methamphetamine (ice and benzodiazepines. Conclusion The similarities between these groups were more striking than the differences. Further research, examining a larger sample is needed to clarify whether injecting drug users who are sex workers have heavier use patterns.

  11. High risk behavior for HIV transmission among former injecting drug users: A survey from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iskandar, S.; Basar, D.; Hidayat, T.; Siregar, I.M.P.; Pinxten, W.J.L.; Crevel, R. van; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2010-01-01

    Background: Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide, especially in eastern Europe, South America, and east and southeast Asia. Among people actively injecting drugs, provision of clean needles and opioid substitution reduce

  12. High risk behavior for HIV transmission among former injecting drug users: A survey from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iskandar, S.; Basar, D.; Hidayat, T.; Siregar, I.M.; Pinxten, L.; Crevel, R. van; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injecting drug use is an increasingly important cause of HIV transmission in most countries worldwide, especially in eastern Europe, South America, and east and southeast Asia. Among people actively injecting drugs, provision of clean needles and opioid substitution reduce

  13. HIV and risk environment for injecting drug users: the past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Steffanie A; Hallett, Timothy B; Bobrova, Natalia; Rhodes, Tim; Booth, Robert; Abdool, Reychad; Hankins, Catherine A

    2010-07-24

    We systematically reviewed reports about determinants of HIV infection in injecting drug users from 2000 to 2009, classifying findings by type of environmental influence. We then modelled changes in risk environments in regions with severe HIV epidemics associated with injecting drug use. Of 94 studies identified, 25 intentionally examined risk environments. Modelling of HIV epidemics showed substantial heterogeneity in the number of HIV infections that are attributed to injecting drug use and unprotected sex. We estimate that, during 2010-15, HIV prevalence could be reduced by 41% in Odessa (Ukraine), 43% in Karachi (Pakistan), and 30% in Nairobi (Kenya) through a 60% reduction of the unmet need of programmes for opioid substitution, needle exchange, and antiretroviral therapy. Mitigation of patient transition to injecting drugs from non-injecting forms could avert a 98% increase in HIV infections in Karachi; whereas elimination of laws prohibiting opioid substitution with concomitant scale-up could prevent 14% of HIV infections in Nairobi. Optimisation of effectiveness and coverage of interventions is crucial for regions with rapidly growing epidemics. Delineation of environmental risk factors provides a crucial insight into HIV prevention. Evidence-informed, rights-based, combination interventions protecting IDUs' access to HIV prevention and treatment could substantially curtail HIV epidemics.

  14. Predictors of non-fatal overdose among a cohort of polysubstance-using injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Thomas; Fairbairn, Nadia; Tyndall, Mark; Marsh, David; Li, Kathy; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2007-02-23

    Non-fatal overdose is a major determinant of morbidity among injection drug users (IDU). We sought to evaluate factors associated with non-fatal overdose among IDU in Vancouver. We examined non-fatal overdose among participants in the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study. Correlates of non-fatal overdose occurring between 1996 and 2004 were identified using generalized estimating equations (GEE). There were 1587 participants included in this analysis, including 576 (36%) women. At baseline, 750 (47%) reported a history of non-fatal overdose. In total, 985 reports of non-fatal overdose were made during follow-up by 519 (32.7%) participants. In multivariate GEE analyses, factors independently associated with non-fatal overdose included: heroin injection (AOR=2.67), cocaine injection (AOR=2.01), benzodiazepine use (AOR=2.00), requiring help injecting (AOR=1.58), binge drug use (AOR=1.52), homelessness (AOR=1.38), alcohol use (AOR=1.32), street injecting (AOR=1.22), non-injectable opiate use (AOR=1.16), speedball use (AOR=1.15), and recent incarceration (AOR=1.14). Younger age (AOR=0.99) and methadone use (AOR=0.51) were protective. We found that non-fatal overdose was common among local IDU. Non-fatal overdose was associated with several factors that may be amenable to intervention, including opiate and stimulant use, and the characteristic of requiring help with injecting. These findings indicate the need for the ongoing development of structural interventions to address this common cause of morbidity among IDU.

  15. Designing an experimental HIV/HCV intervention to promote the safe re-use of drug preparation materials by injection drug users in Puerto Rico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robles Rafaela R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Injection drug users (IDUs in San Juan, Puerto Rico are characterized by high rates of daily injecting, injection of shared drugs, re-use of injection syringes, and use of shooting galleries. They lack adequate access to new injection syringes and drug preparation equipment, and experience elevated rates of HIV and HCV infection. Between April and August, 2006, researchers and active IDUs collaborated in the development of an experimental HIV/HCV intervention aimed at identifying drug preparation items and practices that will enable IDUs to make drug solutions without potentially contaminated injection syringes contacting materials used to prepare drugs. The collaboration involved discussing and testing a variety of drug preparation items and practices in office and community settings. The process was repeated until concerns that had been raised were resolved, and a tentative set of intervention items and practices to be evaluated in a community field trial was identified. Throughout, a strong emphasis was placed on the capacity of an item or practice to address common problems confronted by IDUs (blunted needles, clogged syringes, injected particles in addition to the core aim of reducing contamination of preparation materials by blood in injection syringes. This report describes the final selection of items and practices: 1 A small water bottle that permits IDUs to add approximately .05 cc water drops directly to drug powder in cookers; 2 A preparation syringe (a type of ancillary equipment not used for injecting that permits IDUs to pull up a measurable amount of water to add to drug powder, an alternative to producing water drops; 3 A filtering device, the Sterifilt filter, attached to a preparation syringe, which eliminates the need for cotton or cigarette filters; 4 Use of a preparation syringe to distribute drug solution by backloading to injection syringe(s; 5 A small water bottle enabling IDUs to clean injection syringes by

  16. A qualitative study on opioid overdose in injection drug users in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Rahimi Movaghar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Injection drug use (IDU in Iran is not rare and is one of the main factors in opioid overdose. The objective of this study was the qualitative assessment of overdose, related factors, and available interventions. Methods: A qualitative method was employed. Six districts of Tehran with a population of 400,000 inhabitants were selected. The districts were different in socioeconomic characteristics, urban structures and prevalence of IDU and crime. A total of 81 key informants from different sectors and 154 injection drug users (IDUs were selected by purposeful, opportunistic and snowball sampling, and interviewed individually or in groups. Ethnographic observations were done for studying the life situation of IDUs. Results: In one district no cases of IDU were found. In other districts, overdose in IDUs was reported to be common. Heroin injection alone or in combination with other drugs was the main reported cause of overdose. Reportedly, wrong estimation of drug purity was the most important reason. Even in the districts with highest rate of IDU and overdose, most clinics and hospitals did not have enough facilities necessary for management of acute opioid overdose. Conclusion: According to the high prevalence of overdose, provision of preventive education of drug users and their relatives and availability and accessibility of emergency services is highly recommended.

  17. Identifying injection drug users at risk of nonfatal overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffin, Phillip O; Tracy, Melissa; Bucciarelli, Angela; Ompad, Danielle; Vlahov, David; Galea, Sandro

    2007-07-01

    Drug overdose is the second leading cause of accidental deaths among U.S. adults aged 15-64 years. Emergency physicians have a unique opportunity to provide overdose prevention interventions, because habitual drug users are in frequent need of medical care. The authors evaluated associations between individual-level risk factors and experiencing an overdose in the past six months to determine which characteristics and behaviors may be most predictive of overdose. The authors used data from a sample of street-recruited habitual drug users who participated in face-to-face interviews about overdose from November 2001 to February 2004. This analysis was restricted to 772 respondents who had been injecting for at least one year and who had injected heroin within the past two months. A total of 16.6% of participants had overdosed in the past six months. Characteristics and behaviors that were independently associated with an increased risk of a recent overdose were having had a prior overdose (odds ratio [OR], 28.58; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.10 to 57.96), using cocaine/crack in the past six months (OR, 2.07; 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.45), using alcohol in the past six months (OR, 1.90; 95% CI = 1.01 to 3.57), experiencing serious withdrawal symptoms in the past two months (OR, 2.70; 95% CI = 1.58 to 4.61), and younger age. Drug users who have previously experienced a nonfatal overdose are at very high risk of experiencing future overdoses. Further longitudinal studies are needed to identify robust predictors of overdose risk over time in habitual drug users, but these data suggest that drug users who have overdosed warrant aggressive prevention efforts such as agonist maintenance treatment or provision of take-home naloxone.

  18. Epidemiology of Drug Use and HIV-Related Risk Behaviors among People Who Inject Drugs in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Xulin Tan

    Full Text Available Heroin trafficking and consumption has increased steadily over the past decade in Tanzania, but limited information regarding HIV and drug use exists for the city of Mwanza. Our study investigates the epidemiology of drug use, and HIV risk behaviors among drug users in the northwestern city of Mwanza. Using a combination of targeted sampling and participant referral, we recruited 480 participants in Mwanza between June and August 2014. The sample was 92% male. Seventy-nine (16.4% participants reported injecting heroin, while 434 (90.4% reported smoking heroin. Unstable housing and cohabitation status were the only socioeconomic characteristics significantly associated with heroin injection. More than half of heroin injectors left syringes in common locations, and half reported sharing needles and syringes. Other risk behaviors such as lack of condom use during sex, and the use of illicit drugs during sex was widely reported as well. Among the study sample, there was poor awareness of health risks posed by needle/syringe sharing and drug use. Our results show that heroin use and HIV risk related behaviors are pressing problems that should not be ignored in Mwanza. Harm reduction programs are urgently needed in this population.

  19. Profile of male Brazilian injecting drug users who have sex with men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Aline Dayrell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to characterize the profile of male injecting drug users who have sex with other men (MSM IDUs recruited through a cross-sectional multi-city survey (AjUDE-Brasil II Project in six Brazilian cities, in 2000-2001. MSM IDUs were compared to other male IDUs using bivariate and multivariate procedures (logistic regression and answer tree analysis with the CHAID algorithm. Among the 709 male IDUs, 187 (26.4% reported ever having had sex with other men, while only 37 reported sex with other men in the previous six months. MSM IDUs were more likely to be unemployed (OR = 2.3, to have injected tranquilizers (OR = 3.6, and to be HIV-seropositive (OR = 2.1, compared to other male IDUs. Male same-sex relations in this subgroup appear to be associated with strategies to finance drug consuming habits, including sex for drugs with occasional female partners or obtaining injection paraphernalia from occasional sex partners. Further studies should focus on this especially vulnerable subgroup of IDUs, due to the bidirectional and complex interrelationships between their drug injecting habits and sexual risk behaviors.

  20. Temporal differences in gamma-hydroxybutyrate overdoses involving injecting drug users versus recreational drug users in Helsinki: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd James J

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB and gamma-butyrolactone (GBL have been profiled as 'party drugs' used mainly at dance parties and in nightclubs on weekend nights. The purpose of this study was to examine the frequency of injecting drug use among GHB/GBL overdose patients and whether there are temporal differences in the occurrence of GHB/GBL overdoses of injecting drug and recreational drug users. Methods In this retrospective study, the ambulance and hospital records of suspected GHB- and GBL overdose patients treated by the Helsinki Emergency Medical Service from January 1st 2006 to December 31st 2007 were reviewed. According to the temporal occurrence of the overdose, patients were divided in two groups. In group A, the overdose occurred on a Friday-Saturday or Saturday-Sunday night between 11 pm-6 am. Group B consisted of overdoses occurring on outside this time frame. Results Group A consisted of 39 patient contacts and the remaining 61 patient contacts were in group B. There were statistically significant differences between the two groups in (group A vs. B, respectively: history of injecting drug abuse (33% vs. 59%, p = 0.012, reported polydrug and ethanol use (80% vs. 62%, p = 0.028, the location where the patients were encountered (private or public indoors or outdoors, 10%, 41%, 41% vs. 25%, 18%, 53%, p = 0.019 and how the knowledge of GHB/GBL use was obtained (reported by patient/bystanders or clinical suspicion, 72%, 28% vs. 85%, 10%, p = 0.023. Practically all (99% patients were transported to emergency department after prehospital care. Conclusion There appears to be at least two distinct groups of GHB/GBL users. Injecting drug users represent the majority of GHB/GBL overdose patients outside weekend nights.

  1. Austrian's syndrome: The first described case of pneumococcal meningitis pneumonia and endocarditis in an injecting drug user.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beadsworth, Mike B J; Wooton, Dan; Chenzbraun, Adrian; Beeching, Nick J

    2007-12-01

    We describe the first reported case of Austrian's syndrome in an injecting drug user (IDU). The triad of endocarditis, meningitis and pneumonia caused by invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is most commonly associated with excess alcohol. Injecting drug use is a recognised risk factor for IPD, whose prevalence and resistance continue to rise. We propose that injecting drug use is associated with Austrian's syndrome and that it should at least be considered in 'at risk' groups presenting with IPD. Furthermore, IDU presenting with IPD, meningitis and pneumonia should be considered for echocardiography.

  2. Injection Molding and its application to drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zema, Lucia; Loreti, Giulia; Melocchi, Alice; Maroni, Alessandra; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2012-05-10

    Injection Molding (IM) consists in the injection, under high pressure conditions, of heat-induced softened materials into a mold cavity where they are shaped. The advantages the technique may offer in the development of drug products concern both production costs (no need for water or other solvents, continuous manufacturing, scalability, patentability) and technological/biopharmaceutical characteristics of the molded items (versatility of the design and composition, possibility of obtaining solid molecular dispersions/solutions of the active ingredient). In this article, process steps and formulation aspects relevant to IM are discussed, with emphasis on the issues and advantages connected with the transfer of this technique from the plastics industry to the production of conventional and controlled-release dosage forms. Moreover, its pharmaceutical applications thus far proposed in the primary literature, intended as either alternative manufacturing strategies for existing products or innovative systems with improved design and performance characteristics, are critically reviewed.

  3. Incarceration experiences among a community-recruited sample of injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Calvin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since 2003 Thailand has waged an aggressive "war on drugs" campaign focused on arresting and incarcerating suspected drug users and dealers. However, little is known about incarceration experiences among IDU in the wake of the recent war on drugs. Therefore, we sought to examine incarceration experiences among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Methods We examined the prevalence of incarceration among community-recruited IDU participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with a self-reported history of incarceration. We also examined the prevalence of injection drug use and syringe sharing within prisons. Results 252 IDU were recruited in August 2008; 66 (26.2% were female and the median age was 36.5 years. In total, 197 (78.2% participants reported a history of incarceration. In multivariate analyses, reporting a history of incarceration was associated with a history of compulsory drug treatment (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 4.93; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.95 - 12.48, non-fatal overdose (AOR = 3.69; 95%CI: 1.45 - 9.39, syringe sharing (AOR = 2.20; 95%CI: 1.12 - 4.32, and female gender (AOR = 0.41; 95%CI: 0.20 - 0.82. Among those who reported a history of incarceration, 59 (29.9% reported injection drug use in prison, and 48 (81.4% of these individuals reported sharing syringes in prison. Incarceration was not associated with the number of injections performed in the previous week (p = 0.202. Conclusion Over three-quarters of the IDU participating in this study reported a history of incarceration, and 30% of these individuals reported injection drug use within prison. Further, an alarmingly high level of syringe sharing within prison was reported, and incarceration was not associated with reductions in drug use. These findings provide further evidence of the need for community diversion strategies, as well as harm reduction programs, in Thai

  4. STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS NASAL CARRIAGE AMONG INJECTING AND NON-INJECTING DRUG USERS AND ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Varshochi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus Aureus (SA is one of the most prevalent bacterial pathogens in human beings. Approximately 20% of healthy persons are persistent carriers and 60% are intermittent carriers of SA. Nasal cavity is one of the most important sites of its colonization. Intravenous (IV drug abuse has been proposed as a risk factor for colonization of SA in the nasal mucosa. The goal of this study was to determine the frequency of SA carriers in nasal cavity among IV and non-IV drug abusers (addicts, as well as to assess the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the positive cases. In a cross-sectional analysis of 300 drug addicts (Group I: 100 non-injecting addicts, Group II: 100 IV injecting drug addicts in rehab, Group III: 100 IV injecting drug addicts not in rehab in the infectious diseases clinics of Tabriz’s Imam Reza and Sina teaching hospitals and the rehabilitation center of Razi hospital, were investigated. Hospitalized addicts, insulin-dependent diabetic cases, HIV positive patients and those on chronic hemodialysis were excluded. The nasal mucosal sample was prepared from each case for SA isolation and its antimicrobial susceptibility was investigated by antibiogram. Eighty-four cases (28% were culture positive for SA, including 26 cases in group one, 32 cases in group two and 26 cases in group three (p = 0.55. There was only one MRSA isolate present in all the cases studied (1.2%. No resistance to linozolid, rifampin and vancomycin was observed. The resistance to erythromycin, cefoxitin, ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, co-trimoxazol and gentamicin were 3.6, 4.8, 2.4, 3.6, 1.2 and 2.4% respectively. No statistically significant differences existed between the three groups in antibacterial susceptibility pattern. Sensitivity to oxacillin using the E-test results and disc diffusion were completely consistent. The percentage of carries of SA in the anterior nasal mucosa among IV and non-IV drug addicts is not considerably higher than the

  5. Development of biopsy gun for aspiration and drug injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Guy; Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Chang Nho; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2015-04-01

    Tumor samples are required for pathological examinations, and different instruments are generally used to obtain samples of different types of tumors. Among the many methods available for obtaining tumor tissues, gun biopsy is widely used because it is much simpler than incisional biopsy and can collect many more samples than aspiration biopsy. However, conventional biopsy guns cannot simultaneously perform biopsy aspiration, bleeding prevention, and marker injection. In this study, we developed a biopsy gun that can simultaneously perform biopsy aspiration and sample collection, in addition to injecting a styptic agent and marker to prevent bleeding and contamination in the biopsy track. We then used a prototype to evaluate the feasibility of the developed device. The collectable sample size was also assessed. Performance of the biopsy aspiration feature was also evaluated, including the maximum aspiration viscosity. Finally, we tested the maximum amount of drug that can be injected. We found that the biopsy gun developed here is an alternative tool for biopsy collection with improved procedure safety and diagnostic accuracy.

  6. Non-structured treatment interruptions (NTIs) among injection drug users in Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavasery, Ravi; Galai, Noya; Astemborski, Jacquie; Lucas, Gregory M; Celentano, David D; Kirk, Gregory D; Mehta, Shruti H.

    2009-01-01

    Background We characterized patterns of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) use and predictors of non-structured treatment interruptions (NTIs) among injection drug users (IDUs) in Baltimore, MD. Methods 335 IDUs who initiated HAART from 1996-2006 were studied. NTIs were defined as any subsequent six-month interval where HAART was not reported. Predictors of the first NTI and subsequent restart of HAART were examined using Cox regression. Results 260 (78%) reported ≥1 NTI. Of 215 with ≥1 follow-up visit after the NTI, 44 (20%) never restarted HAART, 62 (29%) restarted and remained on HAART and 109 (51%) reported multiple NTIs. NTIs were less likely among those who initiated HAART in later calendar years and hada recent outpatient visit and more likely among women, persons with detectable HIV RNA at the prior visit and those who reported injecting daily. Among those with NTIs, interuptions occurred earlier in persons who were younger, did not have a prior AIDS diagnosis and were actively injecting; NTIs lasted longer in persons who had higher HIV RNA levels, were incarcerated and drinking alcohol. A recent outpatient visit and not actively injecting were associated with restarting HAART. Conclusions NTIs were common in this population and occurred most frequently in the setting of active drug use and disruption of health care. Effective linkages between primary care for HIV and substance abuse treatment may improve HAART outcomes in this population. PMID:19214124

  7. Biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles as drug delivering injectable cell scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yanhong; Gallego, Monica Ramos; Nielsen, Lene Feldskov; Jorgensen, Lene; Everland, Hanne; Møller, Eva Horn; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2011-11-30

    Injectable cell scaffolds play a dual role in tissue engineering by supporting cellular functions and delivering bioactive molecules. The present study aimed at developing biodegradable nanocomposite microparticles with sustained drug delivery properties thus potentially being suitable for autologous stem cell therapy. Semi-crystalline poly(l-lactide/dl-lactide) (PLDL70) and poly(l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA85) were used to prepare nanoparticles by the double emulsion method. Uniform and spherical nanoparticles were obtained at an average size of 270-300 nm. The thrombin receptor activator peptide-6 (TRAP-6) was successfully loaded in PLDL70 and PLGA85 nanoparticles. During the 30 days' release, PLDL70 nanoparticles showed sustainable release with only 30% TRAP-6 released within the first 15 days, while almost 80% TRAP-6 was released from PLGA85 nanoparticles during the same time interval. The release mechanism was found to depend on the crystallinity and composition of the nanoparticles. Subsequently, mPEG-PLGA nanocomposite microparticles containing PLDL70 nanoparticles were produced by the ultrasonic atomization method and evaluated to successfully preserve the intrinsic particulate properties and the sustainable release profile, which was identical to that of the nanoparticles. Good cell adhesion of the human fibroblasts onto the nanocomposite microparticles was observed, indicating the desired cell biocompatibility. The presented results thus demonstrate the development of nanocomposite microparticles tailored for sustainable drug release for application as injectable cell scaffolds.

  8. Rates of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription among injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonner Simon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the survival benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV infection are well established, the clinical management of HIV disease continues to present major challenges. There are particular concerns regarding access to appropriate HIV treatment among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDU. Methods In a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected IDU in Vancouver, Canada, we examined initial ART regimens vis-à-vis the provincial government's therapeutic guidelines at the time ART was initiated. Briefly, there have been four sets of guidelines: Era 1 (1992 to November 1995; double-drug (dual NRTIs ART for patients with a CD4 cell count of 350 or less; Era 2 (December 1995 to May 1996; double-drug therapy for patients with a CD4+ cell count of 500 or less; Era 3 (June 1996 to June 1997; triple-drug therapy (dual NRTIs with a PI or NNRTI for patients who had a plasma viral load of > 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; dual therapy with two NRTIs for those with a plasma viral load of 5,000 to 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL; Era 4 (since July 1997; universal use of triple drug therapy as first-line treatment. Results Between May 1996 and May 2003, 431 HIV-infected individuals were enrolled into the cohort. By May 31, 2003, 291 (67.5% individuals had initiated ART. We noted instances of inappropriate antiretroviral prescription in each guideline era, with 9 (53% in Era 1, 3 (12% in Era 2, 22 (28% in Era 3, and 23 (15% in Era 4. Of the 57 subjects who received an inappropriate ART regimen initially, 14 never received the appropriate therapy; among the remaining 43, the median time to the initiation of a guideline-appropriate ART regimen was 12 months (inter-quartile range 5 – 20. Conclusion The present study identified measurable rates of guideline-inappropriate ART prescription for patients who were injection drug users. Rates were highest in the era of dual therapy, although high rates persisted into the triple

  9. Risk factors associated with injection initiation among drug users in Northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriyanon Vinai

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circumstances surrounding injection initiation have not been well addressed in many developing country contexts. This study aimed to identify demographic factors, sexual behaviors and drug use characteristics related to injection initiation among drug users in northern Thailand. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 2,231 drug users admitted to the Northern Drug Treatment Center in Mae Rim, Chiang Mai, Thailand, between February 1, 1999 and December 31, 2000. A multiple logistic regression was employed to identify the independent effects from potential risk factors of transition into injection. Results After controlling for other covariates, being 20 years of age or older, single, ever receiving education, urban residence, and having a history of smoking or incarceration were significantly associated with higher likelihood of injection initiation. Multiple sex partners and an experience of sex abuse were associated with an increased risk of injection initiation. Comparing to those whose first drug was opium, individuals using heroin as their initiation drug had greater risk of injection initiation; conversely, those taking amphetamine as their first drug had less risk of injection initiation. Age of drug initiation was negatively associated with the risk of injection initiation: the older the age of drug initiation, the less the risk of injection initiation. Conclusion Injection initiation was related to several demographic factors, sexual behaviors and drug use characteristics. Understanding these factors will benefit the design of approaches to successfully prevent or delay transition into injection.

  10. A pH-Sensitive Injectable Nanoparticle Composite Hydrogel for Anticancer Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available According to previous reports, low pH-triggered nanoparticles were considered to be excellent carriers for anticancer drug delivery, for the reason that they could trigger encapsulated drug release at mild acid environment of tumor. Herein, an acid-sensitive β-cyclodextrin derivative, namely, acetalated-β-cyclodextrin (Ac-β-CD, was synthesized by acetonation and fabricated to nanoparticles through single oil-in-water (o/w emulsion technique. At the same time, camptothecin (CPT, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, was encapsulated into Ac-β-CD nanoparticles in the process of nanoparticle fabrication. Formed nanoparticles exhibited nearly spherical structure with diameter of 209±40 nm. The drug release behavior of nanoparticles displayed pH dependent changes due to hydrolysis of Ac-β-CD. In order to overcome the disadvantages of nanoparticle and broaden its application, injectable hydrogels with Ac-β-CD nanoparticles were designed and prepared by simple mixture of nanoparticles solution and graphene oxide (GO solution in this work. The injectable property was confirmed by short gelation time and good mobility of two precursors. Hydrogels were characterized by dynamic mechanical test and SEM, which also reflected some structural features. Moreover, all hydrogels underwent a reversible sol-gel transition in alkaline environment. Finally, the results of in vitro drug release profile indicated that hydrogel could control drug release or bind drug inside depending on the pH value of released medium.

  11. Mortality and HIV transmission among male Vietnamese injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Vu Minh; Minh, Nguyen Le; Ha, Tran Viet; Ngoc, Nguyen Phuong; Vu, Pham The; Celentano, David D; Mo, Tran Thi; Go, Vivian F

    2011-03-01

    To estimate all-cause mortality rate and to assess predictors of all-cause mortality among injection drug users (IDUs) in Thai Nguyen province, Vietnam between 2005 and 2007. Prospective cohort study. Community-dwelling IDUs were enrolled and followed at 3-month intervals for up to 2 years. A total of 894 male IDUs (median age of 32 years, 22.8% HIV-positive, all having injected opioids). Deaths were confirmed by family members and by reviewing government records. Marginal Cox proportional hazards models for clustered data were constructed to determine the independent predictors of all-cause mortality, using both fixed baseline measurements and time-dependent repeated measurements. During 710.1 person-years of follow-up, 45 (5.0%) drug injectors died. The causes of deaths were AIDS-related (14 cases, 31%), drug overdose (12, 27%), suicide (three, 7%), traffic accident (three, 7%), violence (two, 4%), pneumonia (two, 4%), non-traffic accident (one, 2%) and unknown causes (eight, 18%). The all-cause mortality rate was 6.3% (95% CI = 4.6-8.5) per 100 person-years. The standardized mortality ratio was 13.4. The HIV incidence rate was 5.2 (95% CI = 3.5-7.6) per 100 person-years. In multi-factorial analysis, HIV infection [hazard ratio (HR) = 3.5, 95% CI = 1.9-6.3] and previous diagnosis of tuberculosis (HR = 10.0, 95% CI = 4.1-24.3) were associated significantly with increased hazard of death. The all-cause, age- and sex-standardized mortality among Vietnamese IDUs is 13-fold higher than the general population and substantially higher than IDUs studied in developed countries. Effective prevention and control of HIV infection and tuberculosis are needed urgently. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Predictors of accidental fatal drug overdose among a cohort of injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, P T; McGough, J; Hagan, H; Thiede, H; Critchlow, C; Alexander, E R

    2001-06-01

    This study evaluated factors associated with accidental fatal drug overdose among a cohort of injection drug users (IDUs). In a prospective cohort study of 2849 IDUs in King County, Washington, deaths were identified by electronically merging subject identifiers with death certificate records. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed to identify predictors of overdose mortality. Thirty-two overdoses were observed. Independent predictors of overdose mortality were bisexual sexual orientation (relative risk [RR] = 4.86; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.30, 13.2), homelessness (RR = 2.30; 95% CI = 1.06, 5.01), infrequent injection of speedballs (RR = 5.36; 95% CI = 1.58, 18.1), daily use of powdered cocaine (RR = 4.84; 95% CI = 1.13, 20.8), and daily use of poppers (RR = 22.0; 95% CI = 1.74, 278). Sexual orientation, homelessness, and drug use identify IDUs who may benefit from targeted interventions.

  13. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users

    OpenAIRE

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Linda MN Hoang; Romney, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A...

  14. Continued high prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV among injecting and noninjecting drug users in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Camoni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV infections among injecting and non-injecting drug users treated within public drug-treatment centres in Italy to determine the correlates of infection. In the sample of 1330 drug users, the prevalence of HIV was 14.4% among drug injectors and 1.6% among non-injectors; the prevalence of HBV was 70.4% among injecting drug users and 22.8% among non-injectors and of HCV was 83.2% among injecting drug users and 22.0% among non-injectors. Old age, unemployment, and intravenous drug use were significantly correlated with each of the infections, as well as a longer history of injecting drug use. The results indicate that these infections continue to circulate among drug users, highlighting the need for monitoring of this group in Italy.

  15. Trends in methamphetamine use in young injection drug users in San Francisco from 1998 to 2004: the UFO Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglez-Dias, Aline; Hahn, Judith A; Lum, Paula J; Evans, Jennifer; Davidson, Peter; Page-Shafer, Kimberly

    2008-05-01

    To describe temporal trends in methamphetamine use among young injection drug users (IDU) in San Francisco. Secondary analysis of cross-sectional baseline data collected for a longitudinal study of young IDU from 1998 to 2004. Participants were 1445 young IDU (<30 years old) who reported injection in the previous month, English-speaking, and recruited by street outreach methods. We examined trends for: lifetime (ever) and recent (30-day) methamphetamine use, including injected and non-injected, and by age group and sexual risk behaviour [men who have sex with men injecting drug users (MSM-IDU), male IDU (non-MSM) and female IDU]. In 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003 and 2004 we interviewed 237, 276, 431, 310, 147 and 44 participants, respectively. Overall, median age was 22 years [interquartile range (IQR) 20-25], 30.3% were women and median duration of injecting was 4.4 years (IQR 2-7). Prevalence of methamphetamine use was high, with 50.1% reporting recent injection, but overall there were no temporal increases in reported 'ever' injected use. Recent methamphetamine injection (past 30 days) increased significantly, and peaked at 60% in 2003. MSM-IDU had higher methamphetamine injection ever (92.3%) and recently (59.5%) compared to heterosexual male (non-MSM) IDU (81.6% and 47.3%, respectively) and to female IDU (78.4% and 46.1%, respectively). Despite reports of ubiquitous increases in methamphetamine use, there were no significant increases in 6 years in ever injecting methamphetamine overall among young IDU. MSM-IDU who reported the highest methamphetamine use overall reported some increases in recent injected use. The methamphetamine 'epidemic' was probably under way among young IDU earlier than other populations.

  16. Examining the spatial distribution of law enforcement encounters among people who inject drugs after implementation of Mexico's drug policy reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, Tommi L; Beletsky, Leo; Arredondo, Jaime; Werb, Daniel; Rangel, Gudelia; Vera, Alicia; Brouwer, Kimberly

    2015-04-01

    In 2009, Mexico decriminalized the possession of small amounts of illicit drugs for personal use in order to refocus law enforcement resources on drug dealers and traffickers. This study examines the spatial distribution of law enforcement encounters reported by people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tijuana, Mexico to identify concentrated areas of policing activity after implementation of the new drug policy. Mapping the physical location of law enforcement encounters provided by PWID (n = 461) recruited through targeted sampling, we identified hotspots of extra-judicial encounters (e.g., physical/sexual abuse, syringe confiscation, and money extortion by law enforcement) and routine authorized encounters (e.g., being arrested or stopped but not arrested) using point density maps and the Getis-Ord Gi* statistic calculated at the neighborhood-level. Approximately half of the participants encountered law enforcement more than once in a calendar year and nearly one third of these encounters did not result in arrest but involved harassment or abuse by law enforcement. Statistically significant hotspots of law enforcement encounters were identified in a limited number of neighborhoods located in areas with known drug markets. At the local-level, law enforcement activities continue to target drug users despite a national drug policy that emphasizes drug treatment diversion rather than punitive enforcement. There is a need for law enforcement training and improved monitoring of policing tactics to better align policing with public health goals.

  17. Relationship between heterosexual anal sex, injection drug use and HIV infection among black men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risser, J M H; Padgett, P; Wolverton, M; Risser, W L

    2009-05-01

    US blacks carry a disproportionate risk of heterosexually transmitted HIV. This study aimed to evaluate the association between self-reported heterosexual anal intercourse and HIV. Using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), we recruited and interviewed 909 blacks from areas of high poverty and HIV prevalence in Houston, Texas, and who reported heterosexual sex in the last year. All individuals were tested for HIV. Weighted prevalence values were calculated to account for non-random recruitment associated with RDS. The weighted population prevalence of HIV infection was 2.4% and 2.5% among men and women, respectively. Education, employment status, income and crack cocaine use were not associated with HIV infection. Lifetime injection drug use (odds ratio [OR] 3.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-8.33%) and heterosexual anal intercourse (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.02-5.73%) were associated with HIV infection. Individuals who reported both injection drug use and heterosexual anal intercourse had 6.21 increased odds of HIV (95% CI 2.47-15.61%). Our results suggest that heterosexual anal sex may be a vector for HIV transmission, especially in the context of injection drug use. Prevention strategies directed at curbing the HIV epidemic among black heterosexuals require that we correctly identify the risks so that appropriate interventions can be developed.

  18. Hepatitis C virus phylogenetic clustering is associated with the social-injecting network in a cohort of people who inject drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sacks-Davis

    Full Text Available It is hypothesized that social networks facilitate transmission of the hepatitis C virus (HCV. We tested for association between HCV phylogeny and reported injecting relationships using longitudinal data from a social network design study. People who inject drugs were recruited from street drug markets in Melbourne, Australia. Interviews and blood tests took place three monthly (during 2005-2008, with participants asked to nominate up to five injecting partners at each interview. The HCV core region of individual isolates was then sequenced and phylogenetic trees were constructed. Genetic clusters were identified using bootstrapping (cut-off: 70%. An adjusted Jaccard similarity coefficient was used to measure the association between the reported injecting relationships and relationships defined by clustering in the phylogenetic analysis (statistical significance assessed using the quadratic assignment procedure. 402 participants consented to participate; 244 HCV infections were observed in 238 individuals. 26 genetic clusters were identified, with 2-7 infections per cluster. Newly acquired infection (AOR = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.04-3.96, p = 0.037, and HCV genotype 3 (vs. genotype 1, AOR = 2.72, 95% CI: 1.48-4.99 were independent predictors of being in a cluster. 54% of participants whose infections were part of a cluster in the phylogenetic analysis reported injecting with at least one other participant in that cluster during the study. Overall, 16% of participants who were infected at study entry and 40% of participants with newly acquired infections had molecular evidence of related infections with at least one injecting partner. Likely transmission clusters identified in phylogenetic analysis correlated with reported injecting relationships (adjusted Jaccard coefficient: 0.300; p<0.001. This is the first study to show that HCV phylogeny is associated with the injecting network, highlighting the importance of the injecting network in HCV

  19. Internalized HIV and Drug Stigmas: Interacting Forces Threatening Health Status and Health Service Utilization Among People with HIV Who Inject Drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Sarah K; Burke, Sara E; Dovidio, John F; Levina, Olga S; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M; Heimer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Marked overlap between the HIV and injection drug use epidemics in St. Petersburg, Russia, puts many people in need of health services at risk for stigmatization based on both characteristics simultaneously. The current study examined the independent and interactive effects of internalized HIV and drug stigmas on health status and health service utilization among 383 people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg. Participants self-reported internalized HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, health status (subjective rating and symptom count), health service utilization (HIV care and drug treatment), sociodemographic characteristics, and health/behavioral history. For both forms of internalized stigma, greater stigma was correlated with poorer health and lower likelihood of service utilization. HIV and drug stigmas interacted to predict symptom count, HIV care, and drug treatment such that individuals internalizing high levels of both stigmas were at elevated risk for experiencing poor health and less likely to access health services.

  20. The oral health of street-recruited injecting drug users: prevalence and correlates of problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslett, Anne-Marie; Dietze, Paul; Dwyer, Robyn

    2008-11-01

    To examine the effects of a series of injecting drug users' (IDU) characteristics and drug use behaviours upon the self-reported oral health of a sample of IDU. Cross-sectional survey. Melbourne, Australia. A total of 285 IDU recruited through needle and syringe programmes, snowballing and outreach across six sites. Structured survey that collected information on current drug use patterns, self-reported blood-borne virus status and general health factors, including open-ended questions on past-year dental health problems. Sixty-eight per cent of the sample reported dental problems that were commonly severe and caused dental pain. Despite these reported problems, almost half the sample had not visited the dentist in the 12 months prior to the survey. Participants who were older, and reported homelessness, not eating every day and more common injection of amphetamines rather than heroin in the previous month, were more likely to report having a past-year dental problem. Dental problems in IDUs are common but few receive treatment. Further, those using amphetamines, with poor housing, hygiene and poor nutrition, are most at risk. Programmes designed to improve the oral health of IDU need to be developed and implemented in a manner amenable to the varying social circumstances of this marginalized group in the community.

  1. Management of femoral artery pseudoaneurysm due to addictive drug injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建文; 王三明; 陈小东

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study surgical management for patients with femoral pseudoaneurysm resulting from addictive druginjection.Methods: Clinical data of 34 patients with femoral pseudoaneurysm resulting from addictive drug injection were retrospectively reviewed.Results: Thirteen patients underwent bypass graft ( end to side) of external iliac artery and superficial femoral artery using expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE).Three patients who had an autogenous saphenous vein graft in situs, one of whom was then performed an ePTFE graft when rupture and bleeding occurred at the anastomotic site. Color Doppler image showed patent grafted blood vessels in all the patients after operation. Eighteen patients had their femoral arteries ligated. Limbs of all the 34 patients were saved.Conclusions: Ligating femoral artery is an effective way to treat femoral artery pseudoaneurysm if autogenous saphenous vein graft or artificial vessel graft is notapplicable.

  2. Social support and recovery among Mexican female sex workers who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Sarah P; Syvertsen, Jennifer L; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2013-07-01

    This qualitative study describes social support that female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) receive and recovery efforts in the context of relationships with family and intimate partners. We conducted thematic analysis of in-depth interviews with 47 FSW-IDUs enrolled in an intervention study to reduce injection/sexual risk behaviors in Tijuana, Mexico. FSW-IDUs received instrumental and emotional social support, which positively and negatively influenced recovery efforts. Participants reported how some intimate partners provided conflicting positive and negative support during recovery attempts. Problematic support (i.e., well-intended support with unintended consequences) occurred in strained family relationships, limiting the positive effects of support. Mexican drug treatment programs should consider addressing social support in recovery curricula through evidence-based interventions that engage intimate partners, children and family to better reflect socio-cultural and contextual determinants of substance abuse.

  3. Hematological particularities and co-infections in injected drug users with AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Menezes Brunetta

    Full Text Available HIV patients infected through injected drug use have poorer prognosis than other groups. We evaluated the hematological alterations and rates of co-infections in injected drug use patients with AIDS. Injected drug use patients were younger, predominantly of male gender, and presented lower CD4, total lymphocyte, and platelet counts, but not neutrophil count, than control group. Injected drug use patients had a higher rate of hepatitis C and mycobacteria infection. Furthermore, all injected drug use patients with hemoglobin <10.0 g dL-1 and lymphocyte <1000 µL-1 had CD4 count lower than 100 µL-1. In conclusion, HIV-infected injected drug use patients constitute a special group of patients, and hemoglobin concentration and lymphocyte count can be used as surrogate markers for disease severity.

  4. Effectiveness of the behavior change intervention to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among people who inject drugs in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawa D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Duangta Pawa,1 Chitlada Areesantichai1,2 1College of Public Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, 2Drug Dependence Research Center WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Drug Dependence, Bangkok, Thailand Background: People who inject drugs (PWID in Thailand reported unsafe injection practices resulting in injection-related health consequences. Harm reduction self-efficacy plays an important role and could be improved to reduce harm associated with injecting drugs. Evidence-based interventions targeting PWID are needed. This study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the behavior change intervention within the PWID population. Methods: The behavior change intervention, Triple-S, was designed to improve harm reduction self-efficacy among PWID. This quasi-experimental study was a pre- and post-comparison with a control group design. Participants were PWID, aged 18–45 years, and located in Bangkok. Changes in harm reduction self-efficacy of the intervention group were compared with the control group using paired and independent t-test. Results: Most of PWID were male (84%, had a secondary school and lower education (71%, were single, and had a mean age of 41 years. They had been injecting drugs for an average of 20 years, and the median of drug injections per week was ten times in the past month. Pre- and post-intervention effects were measured and results showed that the intervention group reported improvement in harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions (P=0.048. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that Triple-S intervention can significantly improve harm reduction self-efficacy in negative emotional conditions. The results may suggest the importance of behavior change intervention, especially when integrated with services provided by drop-in centers. The intervention can be further developed to cover other harm reduction behaviors and improve harm reduction self-efficacy. Keywords: drug injection, harm

  5. Can HIV and Hepatitis C Virus Infection be Eliminated Among Persons Who Inject Drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, David C; Des Jarlais, Don C; Feelemyer, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are readily transmitted among persons who inject drugs. The HIV and HCV epidemics have expanded rapidly, becoming global health issues. Combined prevention has been implemented to reduce injection and sexual transmission of HIV and HCV among persons who inject drugs. Reductions in risky injection and sexual behavior have led to dramatic reductions in HIV in many countries. Whether comparable reductions in HCV transmission can be achieved has yet to be determined. Eliminating HIV and HCV among persons who inject drugs will require considerable resources and commitment, particularly in low and middle income countries.

  6. Accidental intraoral formalin injection: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakant Dandriyal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Formalin is a hazardous chemical that needs cautious handling and special storage. Owing to its disinfectant and fixative (i.e. for preserving pathologic tissue specimens in histopathology properties, it is widely used in dentistry. Although, the terms formaldehyde and formalin are often confused as being identical, these are different as to the concentrations of the primary component i.e. formaldehyde. In fact, the common fixative available as 10% neutral buffered formalin is actually a 4% solution of formaldehyde (i.e., a 10% solution made from a 37-40% commercially pure formaldehyde solution. This case report describes an unfortunate case of accidental injection instead of local anesthetic, of formalin into the pterygomandibular space in a 35-year old woman during inferior alveolar nerve block for surgical removal of impacted lower right third molar and its successful management by cautious debridement (under both local and general anesthesia and empirical drug therapy (utilizing analgesics and antibiotics.

  7. Accidental intraoral formalin injection: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandriyal, Ramakant; Giri, Kolly Yada; Alam, Sarwar; Singh, Aishwarya Pratap

    2014-10-30

    Formalin is a hazardous chemical that needs cautious handling and special storage. Owing to its disinfectant and fixative (i.e. for preserving pathologic tissue specimens in histopathology) properties, it is widely used in dentistry. Although, the terms formaldehyde and formalin are often confused as being identical, these are different as to the concentrations of the primary component i.e. formaldehyde. In fact, the common fixative available as 10% neutral buffered formalin is actually a 4% solution of formaldehyde (i.e., a 10% solution made from a 37-40% commercially pure formaldehyde solution). This case report describes an unfortunate case of accidental injection instead of local anesthetic, of formalin into the pterygomandibular space in a 35-year old woman during inferior alveolar nerve block for surgical removal of impacted lower right third molar and its successful management by cautious debridement (under both local and general anesthesia) and empirical drug therapy (utilizing analgesics and antibiotics).

  8. Supported-sorbent injection. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S. Jr.

    1997-07-01

    A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

  9. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Sheard, Laura; Tompkins, Charlotte N E

    2007-10-30

    International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs) can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support); better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs); and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes). Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members); personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent); and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive). A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified.

  10. Factors that help injecting drug users to access and benefit from services: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sheard Laura

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background International research shows that injecting drug users (IDUs can encounter many barriers when they try to access drug treatment and other services. However, the existing literature is mostly quantitative and does not consider the kinds of factors that injectors themselves identify as enabling them to access and benefit from services. Responding to this gap in knowledge, our paper explores IDUs' own suggestions for improving service engagement and their reports of other factors enabling them to seek help. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 75 current illicit drug injectors in three geographically diverse areas of West Yorkshire, England. Recruitment was through needle exchange programmes, with additional snowball sampling to ensure inclusivity of gender, ethnicity and primary drug injected. Transcribed data were analysed thematically using Framework. Results Although participants were often satisfied with current access to services, they made three broad suggestions for improving engagement. These were: providing more services (more providers and more forms of support; better operation of existing services (including better communication systems and more flexibility around individual needs; and staffing-related improvements (particularly, less judgemental and more understanding staff attitudes. Other factors identified as important enablers of help seeking were: having supporting relationships (particularly with family members; personal circumstances/life events (especially becoming a parent; and an injector's state of mind (such as feeling motivated and positive. Conclusion A range of practical suggestions for improving IDUs' access to drug treatment and other services are identified.

  11. Individual, Social, and Environmental Influences Associated With HIV Infection Among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Lozada, Remedios; Pollini, Robin A.; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Mantsios, Andrea; Abramovitz, Daniela A.; Rhodes, Tim; Latkin, Carl A.; Loza, Oralia; Alvelais, Jorge; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective We examined correlates of HIV infection among injection drug users (IDUs) in Tijuana, Mexico, a city bordering the United States, which is situated on major migration and drug trafficking routes. Methods IDUs aged ≥18 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Participants underwent antibody testing for HIV and syphilis and structured interviews. Weighted logistic regression identified correlates of HIV infection. Results Of 1056 IDUs, the median age was 37 years, 86% were male, and 76% were migrants. HIV prevalence was higher in female participants than in male participants (8% vs. 3%; P = 0.01). Most IDUs testing HIV-positive were previously unaware of their serostatus (93%). IDUs reported injecting with a median of 2 people in the prior 6 months and had been arrested for having injection stigmata (ie, “track-marks”) a median of 3 times. Factors independently associated with HIV infection were being female, syphilis titers consistent with active infection, larger numbers of recent injection partners, living in Tijuana for a shorter duration, and being arrested for having track-marks. Conclusions Individual, social, and environmental factors were independently associated with HIV infection among IDUs in Tijuana. These findings suggest the need to intervene not solely on individual risk behaviors but on social processes that drive these behaviors, including problematic policing practices. PMID:18176320

  12. Factors associated with methadone treatment among injection drug users in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, Nadia; Hayashi, Kanna; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Qi, Jiezhi; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Little is known about the characteristics of injection drug users (IDU) who take methadone treatment in Thailand. We examined prevalence and correlates of methadone treatment among a community-recruited sample of IDU in Bangkok, Thailand. Among 273 participants, 143 (52.4%) reported accessing methadone treatment within the previous 6 months. Older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-3.30) and more than weekly midazolam injection (AOR = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.04-3.29) were positively associated, whereas alcohol use (AOR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.18-0.63) and noninjection methamphetamine use (AOR = 0.49, 95% CI = 0.29-0.85) were negatively associated with methadone treatment. In subanalyses, 98.6% of IDU on methadone continued to inject drugs, and the most common reason for stopping methadone was becoming incarcerated (49%). Evidence-based addiction treatment in the form of methadone maintenance therapy, with attention paid to concomitant midazolam injection in this setting, should be implemented.

  13. Differential experiences of Mexican policing by people who inject drugs residing in Tijuana and San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Emily F; Werb, Dan; Beletsky, Leo; Rangel, Gudelia; Cuevas Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Wagner, Karla D

    2017-03-01

    Research among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the USA and Mexico has identified a range of adverse health impacts associated with policing of PWIDs. We employed a mixed methods design to investigate how PWIDs from San Diego and Mexico experienced policing in Tijuana, and how these interactions affect PWIDs behavior, stratifying by country of origin. In 2012-2014, 575 PWIDs in San Diego, 102 of whom had used drugs in Mexico in the past six months, were enrolled in the STAHR-II study, with qualitative interviews conducted with a subsample of 20 who had recently injected drugs in Mexico. During this period, 735 PWIDs in Tijuana were also enrolled in the El Cuete-IV study, with qualitative interviews conducted with a subsample of 20 recently stopped by police. We calculated descriptive statistics for quantitative variables and conducted thematic analysis of qualitative transcripts. Integration of these data involved comparing frequencies across cohorts and using qualitative themes to explain and explore findings. Sixty-one percent of San Diego-based participants had been recently stopped by law enforcement officers (LEOs) in Mexico; 53% reported it was somewhat or very likely that they would be arrested while in Mexico because they look like a drug user. Ninety percent of Tijuana-based participants had been recently stopped by LEOs; 84% reported it was somewhat or very likely they could get arrested because they look like a drug user. Participants in both cohorts described bribery and targeting by LEOs in Mexico. However, most San Diego-based participants described compliance with bribery as a safeguard against arrest and detention, with mistreatment being rare. Tijuana-based participants described being routinely targeted by LEOs, were frequently detained, and reported instances of sexual and physical violence. Tijuana-based participants described modifying how, where, and with whom they injected drugs in response; and experienced feelings of stress, anxiety, and

  14. Risk factors for hepatitis C seropositivity among young people who inject drugs in New York City: Implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Benjamin; Winkelstein, Emily R; Shu, Marla A; Carden, Michael R; McKnight, Courtney; Des Jarlais, Don C; Glesby, Marshall J; Marks, Kristen; Edlin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection remains a significant problem in the United States, with people who inject drugs (PWID) disproportionately afflicted. Over the last decade rates of heroin use have more than doubled, with young persons (18-25 years) demonstrating the largest increase. We conducted a cross-sectional study in New York City from 2005 to 2012 among young people who injected illicit drugs, and were age 18 to 35 or had injected drugs for ≤5 years, to examine potentially modifiable factors associated with HCV among young adults who began injecting during the era of syringe services. Among 714 participants, the median age was 24 years; the median duration of drug injection was 5 years; 31% were women; 75% identified as white; 69% reported being homeless; and 48% [95% CI 44-52] had HCV antibodies. Factors associated with HCV included older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.99 [1.52-2.63]; pyoung PWID in New York City remained high and constant during 2005-2012. Age and several injection behaviors conferred independent risk. Individuals were somewhat aware of their own risk. Public and outdoor injection and arrest for possession of a syringe are risk factors for HCV that can be modified through structural interventions.

  15. Use of North America's first medically supervised safer injecting facility among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddon, Hudson; Wood, Evan; Tyndall, Mark; Lai, Calvin; Hogg, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine supervised injecting facility (SIF) use among a cohort of 395 HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, Canada. The correlates of SIF use were identified using generalized estimating equation analyses. In multivariate analyses, frequent SIF use was associated with homelessness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.90), daily heroin injection (AOR = 1.56), and daily cocaine injection (AOR = 1.59). The reasons given for not using the SIF included a preference for injecting at home and already having a safe place to inject. The SIF services most commonly used were needle exchange and nursing services. The SIF appears to have attracted a high-risk subpopulation of HIV-positive IDUs; this coverage perhaps could be extended with the addition of HIV-specific services such as disease monitoring and the provision of antiretroviral therapy.

  16. Hyperthermia-Induced Drug Delivery from Thermosensitive Liposomes Encapsulated in an Injectable Hydrogel for Local Chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    López-Noriega, Adolfo; Hastings, Conn L.; Ozbakir, Burcin; O'Donnell, Kathleen E.; O'Brien, Fergal J.; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Duffy, Garry P.; Ruiz-Hernåndez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    A novel drug delivery system, enabling an in situ, thermally triggered drug release is described, consisting of an injectable thermoresponsive chitosan hydrogel containing doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes. The design, fabrication, characterization, and an assessment of in vitro bioactivi

  17. [Influencing factor and mechanism analysis of adverse drug reaction in traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xu; Xie, Yan-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is the key contents in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) injection safety research. However, influencing factors of ADR is not clearly, mechanism research is relatively rare, which are to be found in the literature to date. Qualified drugs and normal usage and dosage are the premise condition of ADR judgment. Age, sex, basic diseases, allergic constitution or drug allergy history are common factors. Kinds of solvent, drug concentration, storage time after liquid drug preparation, dripping speed, incompatibility of TCM injection and clinical commonly used medicine are the major ADR research factors. Adverse events mechanism should be synthetically judged by pre-clinical research, clinical manifestation, drug epidemiological trials results. In order to judge and study ADR correctly, It should be acquainted with TCM injection adverse events or ADR influencing factors,improve injection specification, and pay attention to the ADR mechanism, promote post-marketed reevaluation of safety in TCM injection.

  18. Drug injection of Lanwei acupoint to prevent pull response duringappendectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Sheng Liang; Yu Chuah Liu; Yun Chun Zhang

    2000-01-01

    AIM To observe the effects of Lanwei acupiont blockade with drug to prevent pull re,ponse duringappendectomy.METHODS Sixty patients with appendix (37 male and 23 female, ASA Ⅰ - Ⅱ) aged from 16 to 58 yearsold, were divided into two groups at random, and they underwent persistent epidural nerve ,lock and McBurney opening. Group A for experiment (nA = 30) received persistent epidural nerve blck plus druginjection of Lanwei acupoint. And the control group, group B (nB=30), received simple epidural nerveblock. No remarkable difference was found in the general data of both groups (P>0.05).RESULTS None of the experimental group had marked nausea and vomiting. Twenty-six cases belonged tograde 0 (account for 86.67%). Three cases were of grade Ⅰ. One case was of grade Ⅱ. None belonged tograde Ⅲ. There were fewer changes in HR, BP and SPO2 during the operation. Compared with the experimental group. The results in the control group showed obvious changes in HR,BP and SPO2, especially at the time of 5 minute post-pull appendix (P<0.01). Eleven cases belonged tograde Ⅲ (36.67%), seven cases to grade Ⅱ and Four cases to grade Ⅰ, only 2 cases to grade 0.CONCLUSION Adjusting the function of Zang and Fu, maintaining the coordination and the balanceamong Zang and Fu, drug injection of Lanwei acupoint may prevent vagus-vagus reflex. The method issimple, easy, inexpensive and effective. It is advantageous to anesthetic care during the operation.

  19. Correlates of Injection Drug Use among Female Sex Workers in Two Mexico-U.S. Border Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Semple, Shirley J.; Pu, Minya; Orozovich, Prisci; Martinez, Gustavo; Lozada, Remedios; Fraga, Miguel; de la Torre, Adela; Staines, Hugo; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the overlap between injection drug use and sex work by women in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez, situated on the Mexico-U.S. border. Methods: FSWs aged ≥18 years who were not knowingly HIV-positive and reported having unprotected sex with ≥1 client in the prior two months underwent interviews and testing for HIV, syphilis gonorrhea and Chlamydia. Logistic regression identified factors associated with injecting drugs within the last month. Results: Of 924 FSWs, 18.0% had ever injected drugs. Among FSW-IDUs (N=114), prevalence of HIV, syphilis titers >1:8, gonorrhea and Chlamydia was significantly higher at 12.3%, 22.7%, 15.2% and 21.2% compared to 4.8%, 13.1%, 5.2% and 11.9% among other FSWs (N=810). FSW-IDUs also had more clients in the past six months (median: 300 vs. 240, p=0.02). Factors independently associated with injecting drugs in the past month included living in Tijuana, being younger, being married/common-law, longer duration in the sex trade, speaking English, earning less for sex without condoms, often using drugs before sex, and knowing other FSWs who injected drugs. Conclusions: FSW-IDUs had higher STI levels, engaged in riskier behaviors and were more vulnerable to having unsafe sex with clients compared to other FSWs, indicating that this subgroup is an important bridge population requiring focused prevention. PMID:17714888

  20. Increasing availability of illicit drugs among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Nosyk, Bohdan; Ti, Lianping; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, the Thai government has strengthened drug law enforcement as a strategy to address a continuing epidemic of illicit drug use. We sought to assess temporal trends in street-level availability of illicit drugs among injection drug users (IDUs) in Bangkok, Thailand. Using univariate statistics and multivariate logistic regression, we assessed changes in the availability of five substances (heroin, methamphetamine, crystal methamphetamine, midazolam, and illicit methadone) between 2009 and 2011 and examined social, structural and individual factors influencing availability among community-recruited samples of IDUs in Bangkok. Availability was measured in three levels: immediate (available in ≤10 min); moderate (available in 10-90 min); and delayed (available in >90 min; our reference category). The analyses included 718 IDUs, including 165 (23.0%) women. Controlling for changes in participant characteristics between assessments, and in a period of constant nominal illicit drug prices, moderate availability of all substances increased significantly between 2009 and 2011, with adjusted odds ratios ranging between 2.36 (illicit methadone) and 4.61 (crystal methamphetamine) (all plaw enforcement-based approaches and point to the need for greater investment in evidence-based drug policies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intravenous injection of elemental mercury: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases of intravenous injection of elemental mercury are described in this report. One patient succumbed and the other remains asymptomatic two years after the surgical removal of all the injected mercury. Management of intravenous injection of elemental mercury (intended to be an aphrodisiac in these two cases is discussed here and the need for surgical removal of all accessible mercury has been emphasized.

  2. Reconstructing the AIDS epidemic among injection drug users in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana A. Hacker

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic among injection drug users (IDUs in Brazil has been unique in terms of temporal and geographical contrasts. This analysis explores these contrasts through the use of multilevel modeling. Standardized AIDS incidence rates among IDUs for Brazilian municipalities (1986-2000 were used as the dependent variable, with a set of social indicators as independent variables (covariates. In some States of the North/Northeast, the epidemic among IDUs has been incipient. The São Paulo epidemic extended to reach a network of municipalities, most of which located far from the capital. More recently, on a smaller scale, a similar extension has been observed in the southernmost States of the country. Both "number of physicians per inhabitant" and "standard distance to the State capital" were found to be associated with AIDS incidence. AIDS cases among IDUs appeared to cluster in wealthier, more developed municipalities. The relative weight of such extensive dissemination in key, heavily populated States prevails in the Brazilian IDU epidemic, defining a central-western-southeastern strip of wealthier middle-sized municipalities and more recently a southern strip of municipalities deeply affected by the epidemic in this population.

  3. No significant HTLV seroprevalence in German people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, Oliver; Norley, Stephen; Kücherer, Claudia; Bazarbachi, Ali; El Hajj, Hiba; Marcus, Ulrich; Zimmermann, Ruth; Bannert, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Although human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) is transmitted via the same routes as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), its worldwide seroprevalence differs drastically because HTLV is transmitted mainly via infected cells rather than free virus. The sharing of needles and other equipment places people who inject drugs (PWID) at particularly high-risk for such blood-borne diseases. To validate the methodology used to process and analyze the dried blood spots (DBS) utilized in the study, dried serum spots (DSS) with dilutions of sera from known HTLV infected individuals were analyzed by ELISA and Western blot. DBS collected between 2011 and 2015 from 2,077 PWID in eight German cities recruited by respondent-driven sampling were tested for HTLV-specific antibodies. The validation demonstrated that the use of DSS allowed identification of samples with even low titers of HTLV-specific antibodies, although a confirmatory Western blot with an additional venous blood sample would often be required. Despite numerous HIV and HCV positive individuals being identified within the study population, none tested positive for HTLV. While the HIV and HCV prevalences in German PWID are comparable to those in other European countries, the very low prevalence of HTLV reflects the situation in the general population.

  4. Increased risk for hepatitis C associated with solvent use among Canadian Aboriginal injection drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Ann M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solvent abuse is a particularly serious issue affecting Aboriginal people. Here we examine the association between solvent use and socio-demographic variables, drug-related risk factors, and pathogen prevalence in Aboriginal injection drug users (IDU in Manitoba, Canada. Methods Data originated from a cross-sectional survey of IDU from December 2003 to September 2004. Associations between solvent use and variables of interest were assessed by multiple logistic regression. Results A total of 266 Aboriginal IDU were included in the analysis of which 44 self-reported recent solvent use. Hepatitis C infection was 81% in solvent-users, compared to 55% in those reporting no solvent use. In multivariable models, solvent-users were younger and more likely to be infected with hepatitis C (AOR: 3.5; 95%CI: 1.3,14.7, to have shared needles in the last six months (AOR: 2.6; 95%CI:1.0,6.8, and to have injected talwin & Ritalin (AOR: 10.0; 95%CI: 3.8,26.3. Interpretation High hepatitis C prevalence, even after controlling for risky injection practices, suggests that solvent users may form closed networks of higher risk even amongst an already high-risk IDU population. Understanding the social-epidemiological context of initiation and maintenance of solvent use is necessary to address the inherent inequalities encountered by this subpopulation of substance users, and may inform prevention strategies for other marginalized populations.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among persons who inject drugs in San Diego, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenta, R F; Collins, K M; Strathdee, S A; Bulterys, M A; Munoz, F; Cuevas-Mota, J; Chiles, P; Garfein, R S

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs (PWID) might be at increased risk for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and reactivation of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) due to their injection drug use. To determine prevalence and correlates of M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in San Diego, California, USA. PWID aged 18 years underwent standardized interviews and serologic testing using an interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA) for LTBI and rapid point-of-care assays for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections. Independent correlates of M. tuberculosis infection were identified using multivariable log-binomial regression. A total of 500 participants met the eligibility criteria. The mean age was 43.2 years (standard deviation 11.6); most subjects were White (52%) or Hispanic (30.8%), and male (75%). Overall, 86.7% reported having ever traveled to Mexico. Prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 23.6%; 0.8% were co-infected with HIV and 81.7% were co-infected with HCV. Almost all participants (95%) had been previously tested for M. tuberculosis; 7.6% had been previously told they were infected. M. tuberculosis infection was independently associated with being Hispanic, having longer injection histories, testing HCV-positive, and correctly reporting that people with 'sleeping' TB cannot infect others. Strategies are needed to increase awareness about and treatment for M. tuberculosis infection among PWID in the US/Mexico border region.

  6. 75 FR 9333 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Tilmicosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-02

    ... supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Elanco Animal Health, A Division of Eli Lilly & Co. The supplemental NADA provides a dose range for use of an injectable solution of tilmicosin phosphate... to NADA 140-929 for MICOTIL 300 (tilmicosin injection, USP) Injection, available by veterinary...

  7. Immediate Impact of Hurricane Sandy on People Who Inject Drugs in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouget, Enrique R; Sandoval, Milagros; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Friedman, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    Over the eight months following Hurricane Sandy, of October 2012, we interviewed 300 people who inject drugs in New York City. During the week after the storm, 28% rescued others or volunteered with aid groups; 60% experienced withdrawal; 27% shared drug injection or preparation equipment, or injected with people they normally would not inject with; 70% of those on opioid maintenance therapy could not obtain sufficient doses; and 43% of HIV-positive participants missed HIV medication doses. Although relatively brief, a hurricane can be viewed as a Big Event that can alter drug environments and behaviors, and may have lasting impact. The study's limitations are noted and future needed research is suggested.

  8. Incident syphilis infection among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Heather A; Rusch, Melanie L; Vera, Alicia; Rangel, Gudelia; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2015-12-01

    Given that syphilis is associated with HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID), we examined syphilis incidence among PWID in Tijuana, Mexico. From 2006 to 2007, 940 PWID (142 women and 798 men) were recruited via respondent-driven sampling and followed for 18 months. At semi-annual visits, participants were tested for syphilis and completed surveys, which collected information on socio-demographics, sexual behaviours, substance use and injection behaviours. Poisson regression was used to estimate syphilis incidence rates (IRs), incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Twenty-one participants acquired syphilis during follow-up (IR = 1.57 per 100 person-years, 95% CI: 1.02-2.41). In a multivariate analysis, syphilis incidence was higher among women (IRR = 3.90, 95% CI: 1.37-11.09), HIV-positive participants (IRR = 4.60, 95% CI: 1.58-13.39) and those who reported ever exchanging sex for drugs, money, or other goods (IRR = 2.74, 95% CI: 0.97-7.76), while syphilis incidence was lower among those living in Tijuana for a longer duration (IRR = 0.95 per year, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) and those reporting at least daily injection drug use (past 6 months) (IRR = 0.22, 95% CI: 0.09-0.54). Our findings suggest interventions that address the destabilising conditions associated with migration and integrate sexual and drug-related risk reduction strategies may help reduce syphilis incidence among PWID along the Mexico-US border.

  9. Association of higher-risk alcohol consumption with injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours in intravenous drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Shen, Jiucheng; Deng, Yuan; Liu, Xianling; Li, Jianhua; Wolff, Kim; Finch, Emily

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol use is common among injecting drug users. The coexistence of alcohol consumption and injecting risk behaviour has the potential to increase harms among intravenous drug users (IDUs). This study aimed to determine whether the level of alcohol use is a risk factor for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. A total of 637 treatment-seeking IDUs were assessed for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours and drinking risk level as defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE). Multivariate analyses were performed to identify alcohol risk factors associated with injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. After adjusting for the effects of ethnicity, employment and drug used, the odds ratio of higher risk drinking for injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours was 1.92 (95% CI 1.31-2.83). Higher-risk drinking in IDUs is associated with higher rates of injecting paraphernalia sharing behaviours. It is important to take alcohol use into account when evaluating these patients for treatment and designing intervention strategies.

  10. The context of HIV risk behaviours among HIV-positive injection drug users in Viet Nam: Moving toward effective harm reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Duong

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injection drug users represent the largest proportion of all HIV reported cases in Viet Nam. This study aimed to explore the perceptions of risk and risk behaviours among HIV-positive injection drug users, and their experiences related to safe injection and safe sex practices. Methods This study used multiple qualitative methods in data collection including in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and participant observation with HIV-positive injection drug users. Results The informants described a change in the sharing practices among injection drug users towards more precautions and what was considered 'low risk sharing', like sharing among seroconcordant partners and borrowing rather than lending. However risky practices like re-use of injection equipment and 'syringe pulling' i.e. the use of left-over drugs in particular, were frequently described and observed. Needle and syringe distribution programmes were in place but carrying needles and syringes and particularly drugs could result in being arrested and fined. Fear of rejection and of loss of intimacy made disclosure difficult and was perceived as a major obstacle for condom use among recently diagnosed HIV infected individuals. Conclusion HIV-positive injection drug users continue to practice HIV risk behaviours. The anti-drug law and the police crack-down policy appeared as critical factors hampering ongoing prevention efforts with needle and syringe distribution programmes in Viet Nam. Drastic policy measures are needed to reduce the very high HIV prevalence among injection drug users.

  11. A situational picture of HIV/AIDS and injection drug use in Vinnitsya, Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumchev Kostyantyn

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New and explosive HIV epidemics are being witnessed in certain countries of Eastern Europe, including Ukraine, as well as a rapid and dramatic increase in the supply, use, and negative public health consequences of illicit drugs. A majority of registered HIV cases in Ukraine occur among injection drug users (IDUs, large numbers of whom report HIV risk behaviors such as needle sharing. The purpose of this study was to apply the World Health Organization's Rapid Assessment and Response on Injection Drug Use (IDU-RAR guide to create a situational picture in the Vinnitsya Oblast, Ukraine, a region with very scarce information about the HIV/AIDS and injection drug use (IDU epidemics. Methods The IDU-RAR uses a combination of qualitative data collection techniques commonly employed in social science and evaluation research to quickly depict the extent and nature of the given health problem and propose locally relevant recommendations for improvement. The investigators focused their assessment on the contextual factors, drug use, and intervention and policy components of the IDU-RAR. A combination of network and block sampling techniques was used. Data collection methods included direct observation, review of existing data, structured and unstructured interviews, and focus group discussions. Key informants and locations were visited until no new information was being generated. Results The number of registered HIV cases in Vinnitsya has increased from 3 (1987–1995 to 860 (1999–10/2004, 57 of whom have already died. Ten percent of annual admissions to the area's Regional Narcological Dispensary were for opiate disorders, and the number of registered IDUs rose by 20% from 1999 to 2000. The level of HIV/AIDS awareness is generally poor among the general population but high among high-risk populations. Both HIV/AIDS and injection drug use carry a strong stigma in the community, even among medical professionals. There was very little

  12. Warsaw Declaration on HIV/AIDS and injection drug use adopted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürgens, Ralf

    2003-12-01

    Explosive epidemics of HIV among injection drug users are occurring in both developing and developed countries. Globally, it is estimated that 10 percent of HIV infections are attributable to injection drug use, but this proportion is increasing, and is much higher in many countries. Effective interventions exist to prevent the spread of HIV among injection drug users, but in most countries they are being adopted too slowly, or not at all. On 14 November 2003, the Warsaw Declaration: A Framework for Effective Action on HIV/ADS and Injection Drug Use, was adopted at the 2nd International Policy Dialogue on HIV/AIDS. Its purpose is to provide a framework for--finally--"mounting an effective response that will slow and eventually stop the HIV/AIDS epidemic among injecting drug users worldwide."

  13. Undiagnosed HIV among people who inject drugs in Manipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Medhi, Gajendra K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Paranjape, R S; Kermode, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Manipur is a geographically isolated state of India characterised by a high HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID). A low-to-moderate lifetime rate of HIV testing has been documented amongst PWID in Manipur. Little is known about the extent of undiagnosed HIV in this setting and whether uptake of HIV testing (and knowledge of a positive diagnosis) leads HIV-positive PWID to change their risk behaviours. The cross-sectional data (n = 821) analysed for this paper were collected in 2009 for the Integrated Behavioural and Biological Assessment (IBBA) using interviewer-administered questionnaires and the collection of de-linked blood and urine samples. Almost one-third (30.7%) of the participants tested HIV positive. The majority knew where to obtain a confidential HIV test (80.7%), however, half of the HIV-positive participants had either never had an HIV test (37.7%), or had undertaken a test without collecting the result (12.7%). Almost one-quarter (23.4%) of the HIV-positive participants and 17.4% of the HIV-negative participants had shared a needle/syringe with at least one other injector during the preceding month. Encouragingly, HIV-positive participants were significantly more likely than HIV-negative participants to use condoms with their regular sexual partners, however, there was still a high proportion of HIV-positive participants who did not use a condom at last sex with their regular (47.2%) or casual (48.0%) partners. Having taken an HIV test and collected the result was associated with a reduction in HIV-risk behaviours among HIV-positive participants, but not among HIV-negative participants. In conclusion, we found that a substantial proportion of the HIV-positive PWID in Manipur were not aware of their positive status, and risky injecting and sexual practices were commonplace. However, HIV-positive PWID appear to reduce their high-risk behaviours when they become aware of their HIV status highlighting the importance of taking HIV testing

  14. Hunger and associated harms among injection drug users in an urban Canadian setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anema Aranka

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food insufficiency is often associated with health risks and adverse outcomes among marginalized populations. However, little is known about correlates of food insufficiency among injection drug users (IDU. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study to examine the prevalence and correlates of self-reported hunger in a large cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. Food insufficiency was defined as reporting "I am hungry, but don't eat because I can't afford enough food". Logistic regression was used to determine independent socio-demographic and drug-use characteristics associated with food insufficiency. Results Among 1,053 participants, 681 (64.7% reported being hungry and unable to afford enough food. Self-reported hunger was independently associated with: unstable housing (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.68, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20 - 2.36, spending ≥ $50/day on drugs (AOR: 1.43, 95% CI: 1.06 - 1.91, and symptoms of depression (AOR: 3.32, 95% CI: 2.45 - 4.48. Conclusion These findings suggest that IDU in this setting would likely benefit from interventions that work to improve access to food and social support services, including addiction treatment programs which may reduce the adverse effect of ongoing drug use on hunger.

  15. Hepatitis C and HIV in injecting drug users in Armenia, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berbesi-Fernández, Dedsy; Segura-Cardona, Ángela; Montoya-Vélez, Liliana; Castaño-Perez, Guillermo A

    2015-12-15

    A constant and progressive increase in the availability of heroin in Colombia in recent decades and the intravenous use  of this drug have established the need to prevent a possible epidemic of HIV and hepatitis C. This research determined the sero-prevalence of hepatitis C and HIV according to sociodemographic characteristics and risk behaviors in people who inject drugs in Armenia, Colombia. This is a cross-sectional study on 265 users captured through respondent-driven sampling after informed consent. Sero-prevalence of hepatitis C was 22.3 % [95% CI 12.3 % -23.5 %]; for HIV infection, it was 2.6 % [95% CI 0.4 to 6.0]; 67.5% reported injecting for more than two years, 35 % shared needles and syringes, and 12.4 % had used a condom during their last sexual intercourse. Users who did not purchase syringes in drugstores in the last six months are 2.7 times [95% CI 1.32 to 5.48] more likely to contract hepatitis C; daily injection frequency was higher in HIV- positive cases [OR 2.87; 95% CI 0.55 to 15.9] but nonsignificant. One fourth of respondents are infected with HIV or hepatitis C, either as a single infection or co-infection. This study identified risk practices such as sharing needles and low condom use in the last six months, worldwide documented and discussed risk factors. This research is a first step in the search for strategies to prevent the spread of HIV infection and hepatitis C in networks of injecting drug users.

  16. Evidence for a "Founder Effect" among HIV-infected injection drug users (IDUs in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanagihara Richard

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported a HIV-1 subtype A infection in a community of injection drug users (IDUs in Karachi, Pakistan. We now show that this infection among the IDUs may have originated from a single source. Methods Phylogenetic analysis was performed of partial gag sequences, generated using PCR, from 26 HIV-positive IDU samples. Results Our results showed formation of a tight monophyletic group with an intra-sequence identity of Conclusion Specific measures need to implemented to control transmission of HIV infection in Pakistan through infected migrant workers.

  17. A Cluster of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia Cases among Injection Drug Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Benusic

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided.

  18. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided.

  19. High HCV seroprevalence and HIV drug use risk behaviors among injection drug users in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Tariq

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction HIV and HCV risk behaviors among injection drug users (IDUs in two urban areas in Pakistan were identified. Methods From May to June 2003, 351 IDUs recruited in harm-reduction drop-in centers operated by a national non-governmental organization in Lahore (Punjab province and Quetta (Balochistan province completed an interviewer-administered survey and were tested for HIV and HCV. Multivariable logistic regression identified correlates of seropositivity, stratifying by site. All study participants provided written, informed consent. Results All but two were male; median age was 35 and Discussion Despite no HIV cases, overall HCV prevalence was very high, signaling the potential for a future HIV epidemic among IDUs across Pakistan. Programs to increase needle exchange, drug treatment and HIV and HCV awareness should be implemented immediately.

  20. HIV-1 binding and neutralizing antibodies of injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouverney E.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated a stronger seroreactivity against some synthetic peptides responsible for inducing neutralizing antibodies in injecting drug users (IDU compared to that of individuals sexually infected with HIV-1 (S, but the effectiveness in terms of the neutralizing ability of these antibodies has not been evaluated. Our objective was to study the humoral immune response of IDU by determining the specificity of their antibodies and the presence of neutralizing antibodies. The neutralization capacity against the HIV-1 isolate MN (genotype B, the primary HIV-1 isolate 95BRRJ021 (genotype F, and the seroreactivity with peptides known to induce neutralizing antibodies, from the V2 and V3 loops of different HIV-1 subtypes, were analyzed. Seroreactivity indicates that IDU plasma are more likely to recognize a broader range of peptides than S plasma, with significantly higher titers, especially of V3 peptides. Similar neutralization frequencies of the MN isolate were observed in plasma of the IDU (16/47 and S (20/60 groups in the 1:10 dilution. The neutralization of the 95BRRJ021 isolate was more frequently observed for plasma from the S group (15/23 than from the IDU group (15/47, P = 0.0108. No correlation between neutralization and seroreactivity with the peptides tested was observed. These results suggest that an important factor responsible for the extensive and broad humoral immune response observed in IDU is their infection route. There was very little difference in neutralizing antibody response between the IDU and S groups despite their differences in seroreactivity and health status.

  1. [Abdomen pendulum and subcutaneous injections: the complications. Two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhaim, T; Sinna, R; Garson, S; Boloorchi, A; Crozet, C; Robbe, M

    2007-06-01

    The authors present the complications due to subcutaneous injections on two patients suffering from morbid obesity with an abdomen pendulum. In the first case, injections of heparin of low molecular weight at curative dose, for treatment of a pulmonary embolism, have been complicated with a giant abdominal wall haematoma, the biggest ever reported. The initial treatment was insufficient so we had to practice a dermolipectomy to take off the haematoma of four litters. In the second case, insulin injections were complicated with cellulitis of the abdominal wall and a surgical treatment has been practiced in emergency. The first case reminds us the importance to change the sites of injections and to accommodate the dose, surgical treatment staying as simple as possible. The second case allows us to report a rare complication, not often published but known with obese patients. These two cases illustrate the importance of therapeutic education of the patient and the fact that a simple injection can be life threatening.

  2. The Cedar Project: impacts of policing among young Aboriginal people who use injection and non-injection drugs in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Stephen W; Christian, Chief Wayne M; Pearce, Margo E; Blair, Alden H; Jongbloed, Kate; Zhang, Hongbin; Teegee, Mary; Thomas, Vicky; Schechter, Martin T; Spittal, Patricia M

    2013-09-01

    Policing has profound health implications for people who use illicit drugs. Among Aboriginal communities, distrust of police is common, due partly to legacies of colonial policing. In response to the paucity of research among Aboriginal people who use drugs, this paper aims to: (1) Describe the policing experiences of young Aboriginal people who use drugs; (2) Identify policing activities associated with unsafe injection practices; and (3) Elucidate barriers to positive police relations. The Cedar Project is a cohort study involving young Aboriginal people in Vancouver and Prince George, British Columbia, who use illicit drugs. This mixed-methods study (N=372) used period prevalence from 2007 to 2010 to describe policing experiences, mixed effects regression models to identify correlates of policing activities, and thematic qualitative analysis to assess attitudes to police relations. Many participants were stopped by police (73%), experienced physical force by police (28%), had drug equipment confiscated (31%), and changed location of drug use because of police (43%). Participants who reported dealing drugs (40%) were significantly more likely to experience police engagement. Among participants in Prince George, 4% reported to have had non-consensual sex with members of the criminal justice system. Policing activity was significantly associated with syringe sharing, rushed injection, and reused syringe. Due to personal experience, practical concerns, and intergenerational legacies of unfair policing practices, most participants did not want a positive relationship with police (57%). Desire for a positive relationship with police was directly associated with being helped by police, and inversely associated with being stopped by police and experiencing physical force by police. Policing activities may be impacting the well-being of Aboriginal people who use drugs. Due to focused prosecution of street-level drug dealing, some police may favor enforcement over harm

  3. Correlates of property crime in a cohort of recently released prisoners with a history of injecting drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Amy; Quinn, Brendan; Winter, Rebecca; Kinner, Stuart A; Dietze, Paul; Stoové, Mark

    2015-08-04

    Injecting drug use (IDU) is a strong predictor of recidivism and re-incarceration in ex-prisoners. Although the links between drug use and crime are well documented, studies examining post-release criminal activity and re-incarceration risk among ex-prisoners with a history of IDU are limited. We aimed to explore factors associated with property crime among people with a history of IDU recently released from prison. Individuals with a history of IDU released from prison within the past month were recruited via targeted and snowball sampling methods from street drug markets and services for people who inject drugs (PWID) into a 6-month cohort study. A multivariate logistic regression analysis of baseline data identified adjusted associations with self-reported property crime soon after release. Interviews were conducted a median of 23 days post-release with 141 participants. Twenty-eight percent reported property crime in this period and 85% had injected drugs since release. Twenty-three percent reported injecting at least daily. Reporting daily injecting (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 4.36; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.45-13.07), illicit benzodiazepine use (aOR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.02-5.67), being arrested (aOR = 6.12; 95% CI = 1.83-20.45) and contact with mental health services (aOR = 4.27; 95% CI = 1.45-12.60) since release were associated with property crime. Criminal activity soon after release was common in this sample of PWID, underscoring the need for improved pre-release, transitional and post-release drug use dependence and prevention programmes. Addressing co-occurring mental disorder and poly-pharmaceutical misuse among those with a history of IDU in prison, and during the transition to the community, may reduce property crime in this group.

  4. Longitudinal changes in personal wellbeing in a cohort of people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Nick; Carrotte, Elise R; Higgs, Peter; Stoové, Mark A; Aitken, Campbell K; Dietze, Paul M

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the self-reported personal wellbeing of a cohort of people who inject drugs (PWID) changes over time, and to identify longitudinal correlates of change. We used Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI) scores reported between April 2008 and February 2015 by 757 PWID (66% male) enrolled in the Melbourne Injecting Drug Use Cohort Study (2,862 interviews; up to seven follow-up waves). A mixed-effects model was used to identify correlations between changes in temporal variables and changes in individual PWI scores while controlling for demographic variables. The cohort's mean PWI score did not significantly differ over time (between 54.4/100 and 56.7/100 across the first four interview waves), and was 25-28% lower than general Australian population scores (76.0/100). However, there were large variations in individuals' PWI scores between interviews. Increased psychological distress, moving into unstable accommodation, reporting intentional overdose in the past 12 months and being the victim of assault in the past six months were associated with declines in PWI scores. Participants experienced substantially lower levels of personal wellbeing than the general Australian population, influenced by experiences of psychological distress, assault, overdose and harms related to low socioeconomic status. The results of this study suggest a need to ensure referral to appropriate housing and health support services for PWID.

  5. Circular Migration by Mexican Female Sex Workers Who are Injection Drug Users: Implications for HIV in Mexican Sending Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Victoria D.; Burgos, José Luis; Hiller, Sarah P.; Lozada, Remedios; Rangel, Gudelia; Vera, Alicia; Artamonova, Irina; Rodriguez, Carlos Magis

    2013-01-01

    Background Circular migration and injection drug use increase the risk of HIV transmission in sending communities. We describe female sex workers who are injection drug users’ (FSW-IDUs) circular migration and drug use behaviors. Methods Between 2008-2010, 258 migrant FSW-IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico responded to questionnaires. Results 24% of FSW-IDUs were circular migrants. HIV prevalence was 3.3% in circular migrants and 6.1% in non-circular migrants; 50% of circular and 82% of non-circular migrants were unaware of their HIV infection. Among circular migrants, 44% (n=27) consumed illicit drugs in their birthplace; 70% of these (n=20) injected drugs and one-half of injectors shared injection equipment in their birthplace. Women reporting active social relationships were significantly more likely to return home. Discussion Circular migrant FSW-IDUs exhibit multiple HIV risks and opportunities for bridging populations. Regular HIV testing and treatment and access to substance use services is critical for FSW-IDUs and their sexual/drug-using contacts. PMID:21833727

  6. Street policing, injecting drug use and harm reduction in a Russian city: a qualitative study of police perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Tim; Platt, Lucy; Sarang, Anya; Vlasov, Alexander; Mikhailova, Larissa; Monaghan, Geoff

    2006-09-01

    We undertook a qualitative exploration of police perspectives on injecting drug use and needle and syringe access among injecting drug users (IDUs) in a Russian city which has witnessed explosive spread of HIV associated with drug injecting. Twenty-seven in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted in May 2002 with police officers of varying rank who reported having regular contact with IDUs. All interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed, translated and coded thematically. Accounts upheld an approach to policing which emphasised high street-based visibility and close surveillance of IDUs. IDUs were depicted as 'potential criminals' warranting a 'pre-emptive' approach to the prevention of drug-related crime. Street policing was described as a means of maintaining close surveillance leading to the official registration of persons suspected or proven to be users of illicit drugs. Such registration enabled further ongoing surveillance, including through stop and search procedures. While aware of drug users' reluctance to carry injecting equipment linked to their fears of detention or arrest, accounts suggested that the confiscation of previously used injecting equipment can constitute evidence in relation to drugs possession charges and that discovery of clean injecting equipment may be sufficient to raise suspicion and/or further investigation, including through stop and search or questioning. Our findings suggest an uneasy relationship between street policing and needle and syringe access, whereby policing strategies can undermine an HIV prevention ethos promoting needle and syringe accessibility among IDUs. We conclude that facilitating partnerships between policing agencies and HIV prevention initiatives are a critical feature of creating environments conducive for risk reduction.

  7. Differences in illegal drug consumption between native and immigrants in a large sample of injected drug users in Catalonia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigí, Núria; Espelt, Albert; Folch, Cinta; Sarasa-Renedo, Ana; Castellano, Yolanda; Majó, Xavier; Meroño, Mercè; Brugal, M Teresa; Casabona, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe illegal drug abuse patterns in relation to the migration process and use of drug treatment centers among immigrant injected drug users (IDUs) involved in harm reduction programs, and to compare the characteristics of immigrant and native IDUs. Cross-sectional study of 748 IDUs aged ≥18 years attending harm reduction centers between 2008 and 2009. We explored differences in socio-economic status, illegal drug consumption, health status and use of treatment centers in native versus immigrant IDUs. We also described whether immigrant IDUs started using injected drugs before or after entering the host country. Immigrant IDUs tend to live alone more frequently, start injection at later ages, use heroin and inject it more frequently and use drug treatment centers less frequently than native IDUs. Seventy-six percent of immigrants began using illegal drugs before arriving at the host country. Those who started in other countries were residing in the host country for 5 years or less (63.9%). Overall, immigrant IDUs attended drug treatment centers (36.9%) less frequently than native IDUs (71.8%). In conclusion, migration could be a risk factor for illegal drug abuse initiation or increase in consumption, often with the adoption of local consumption patterns and aggravated due to a lower access to drug treatment centers.

  8. Rethinking risk: gender and injection drug-related HIV risk among female sex workers and their non-commercial partners along the Mexico-U.S. border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvertsen, Jennifer L; Robertson, Angela M; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Martinez, Gustavo; Rangel, M Gudelia; Wagner, Karla D

    2014-09-01

    Studies of injection drug-using couples suggest a gendered performance of risk in which men exert greater control over drug use and render their female partners vulnerable to HIV infection and other negative health outcomes. This study assesses gender roles in injection drug use as practiced among female sex workers and their intimate male partners within a risk environment marked by rapid socioeconomic changes. We draw on quantitative surveys, semi-structured interviews, and ethnographic fieldwork conducted as part of cohort study of HIV/STI risk among female sex workers and their intimate, non-commercial partners along the Mexico-U.S. border. This study employed descriptive statistics and inductive analyses of transcripts and field notes to examine practices related to drug procurement, syringe sharing, and injection assistance among couples in which both partners reported injecting drugs in the past 6 months. Among 156 couples in which both partners injected drugs (n=312), our analyses revealed that women's roles in drug use were active and multidimensional, and both partners' injection risk practices represented embodied forms of cooperation and compassion. Women often earned money to purchase drugs and procured drugs to protect their partners from the police. Sharing drugs and syringes and seeking injection assistance were common among couples due to drug market characteristics (e.g., the use of "black tar" heroin that clogs syringes and damages veins). Both women and men provided and received injection assistance, which was typically framed as caring for the partner in need of help. Our mixed methods study suggests that in certain risk environments, women are more active participants in injection-related practices than has often been revealed. This participation is shaped by dynamic relationship and structural factors. Our suggestion to consider gendered injection risk as a nuanced and relational process has direct implications for future research and

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Theories Used to Explain Injection Risk Behavior among Injection Drug Users: A Review and Suggestions for the Integration of Cognitive and Environmental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Karla Dawn; Unger, Jennifer B.; Bluthenthal, Ricky N.; Andreeva, Valentina A.; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2010-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are at risk for HIV and viral hepatitis, and risky injection behavior persists despite decades of intervention. Cognitive behavioral theories (CBTs) are commonly used to help understand risky injection behavior. The authors review findings from CBT-based studies of injection risk behavior among IDUs. An extensive…

  10. Injection drug use and HIV/AIDS in China: Review of current situation, prevention and policy implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huey T

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Illicit drug abuse and HIV/AIDS have increased rapidly in the past 10 to 20 years in China. This paper reviews drug abuse in China, the HIV/AIDS epidemic and its association with injection drug use (IDU, and Chinese policies on illicit drug abuse and prevention of HIV/AIDS based on published literature and unpublished official data. As a major drug trans-shipment country with source drugs from the "Golden Triangle" and "Gold Crescent" areas in Asia, China has also become an increasingly important drug consuming market. About half of China's 1.14 million documented drug users inject, and many share needles. IDU has contributed to 42% of cumulatively reported HIV/AIDS cases thus far. Drug trafficking is illegal in China and can lead to the death penalty. The public security departments adopt "zero tolerance" approach to drug use, which conflict with harm reduction policies of the public health departments. Past experience in China suggests that cracking down on drug smuggling and prohibiting drug use alone can not prevent or solve all illicit drug related problems in the era of globalization. In recent years, the central government has outlined a series of pragmatic policies to encourage harm reduction programs; meanwhile, some local governments have not fully mobilized to deal with drug abuse and HIV/AIDS problems seriously. Strengthening government leadership at both central and local levels; scaling up methadone substitution and needle exchange programs; making HIV voluntary counseling and testing available and affordable to both urban and rural drug users; and increasing utilization of outreach and nongovernmental organizations are offered as additional strategies to help cope with China's HIV and drug abuse problem.

  11. Declining trends in exposures to harmful policing among people who inject drugs in Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberg, Adina; Kerr, Thomas; Milloy, Michael-John; Dong, Huiru; Nguyen, Paul; Wood, Evan; Hayashi, Kanna

    2016-01-01

    In 2006, the Vancouver Police Department (VPD) developed an organization-wide drug policy approach, which included endorsing harm reduction strategies for people who inject drugs (PWID). We sought to examine rates of potentially harmful policing exposures and associated HIV risk behaviour among PWID in Vancouver, Canada before and after the VPD policy change. Data were derived from two prospective cohort studies of PWID. Multivariable generalized estimating equation models were used to examine changes in the risk of confiscation of drug use paraphernalia and physical violence by the police, as well as changes in the relationship between exposures to the two policing practices and sharing of drug use paraphernalia, before and after the policy change. Among 2193 participants, including 757 (34.5%) women, the rates of experiencing police confiscation of drug use paraphernalia declined from 22.3% in 2002 to 2.8% in 2014, and the rates of reporting experiencing physical violence by the police also declined from 14.1% in 2004 to 2.9% in 2014. In multivariable analyses, the post-policy change period remained independently and negatively associated with reports of confiscation of drug use paraphernalia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 0.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.21 to 0.31) and reported physical violence by the police (AOR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.63 to 0.91). However, experiencing both confiscation of drug use paraphernalia and physical violence by the police (AOR: 1.92; 95% CI: 1.10 to 3.33) and experiencing only confiscation of drug use paraphernalia (AOR: 1.71; 95% CI: 1.34 to 2.19) remained independently and positively associated with sharing of drug use paraphernalia during the post-policy change period. In our study, two policing practices known to increase HIV risk among PWID have declined significantly since the local police launched an evidence-based drug policy approach. However, these practices remained independently associated with elevated HIV risk after the

  12. Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Infection Among Injecting Drug Users in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asli, Maryam; Kandelouei, Tahmineh; Rahimyan, Koroush; Davoodbeglou, Foad; Vaezjalali, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) and its associated risk factors, together with the molecular characterization of the virus in injecting drug users of Tehran. Patients and Methods The study consisted of 229 injecting drug users. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). HBV B virus DNA was extracted from the serum samples, and a fragment of the S gene was amplified using the nested polymerase chain reaction. The genotype, subgenotypes, subtype, and S gene mutation of HBV were determined by direct sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbor-joining method. Results Sixty-four (28%) participants were HBcAb positive, 59 cases were HBcAb positive and HBsAg negative, and 5 cases were HBsAg positive. Hepatitis B DNA was found in three HBsAg-positive cases. Thirteen of 59 (22%) individuals were hepatitis B DNA positive. The phylogenetic tree of hepatitis B DNA showed the existence of genotype D. The only significant correlation was between sharing a syringe and OBI. Conclusions In comparison with the rate of HBcAb positivity reported in other Iranian studies, the rate was higher in the present study. There were a few variations, genotypes, and subtypes among the infected injecting drug users. Further investigations are needed to unravel the molecular characterization of OBI. PMID:27226802

  13. Natural killer cells in highly exposed hepatitis C-seronegative injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, M M; Cameron, B; Luciani, F; Vollmer-Conna, U; Lloyd, A R

    2016-06-01

    Injecting drug use remains the major risk factor for hepatitis C (HCV) transmission. A minority of long-term injecting drug users remain seronegative and aviraemic, despite prolonged exposure to HCV - termed highly exposed seronegative subjects. Natural killer (NK) cells have been implicated in this apparent protection. A longitudinal nested, three group case-control series of subjects was selected from a prospective cohort of seronegative injecting drug users who became incident cases (n = 11), remained seronegative (n = 11) or reported transient high-risk behaviour and remained uninfected (n = 11). The groups were matched by age, sex and initial risk behaviour characteristics. Stored peripheral blood mononuclear cells were assayed in multicolour flow cytometry to enumerate natural killer cell subpopulations and to assess functional activity using Toll-like receptor ligands before measurement of activation, cytokine production and natural cytotoxicity receptor expression. Principal components were derived to describe the detailed phenotypic characteristics of the major NK subpopulations (based on CD56 and CD16 co-expression), before logistic regression analysis to identify associations with exposed, seronegative individuals. The CD56(dim) CD16(+) (P = 0.05, OR 6.92) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) (P = 0.05, OR 6.07) principal components differed between exposed, seronegative individuals and pre-infection samples of the other two groups. These included CD56(dim) CD16(+) and CD56(dim) CD16(-) subsets with CD56(dim) CD16(+) IFN-γ and TNF-α on unstimulated cells, and CD56(dim) CD16(-) CD69(+) , CD107a(+) , IFN-γ and TNF-α following TLR stimulation. The cytotoxic CD56(dim) NK subset thus distinguished highly exposed, seronegative subjects, suggesting NK cytotoxicity may contribute to protection from HCV acquisition. Further investigation of the determinants of this association and prospective assessment of protection against HCV infection are warranted.

  14. Characterization of Occult Hepatitis B Infection Among Injecting Drug Users in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a major health problem worldwide. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of occult hepatitis B infection (OBI and its associated risk factors, together with the molecular characterization of the virus in injecting drug users of Tehran. Patients and Methods The study consisted of 229 injecting drug users. Serum samples were collected and tested for the presence of hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. HBV B virus DNA was extracted from the serum samples, and a fragment of the S gene was amplified using the nested polymerase chain reaction. The genotype, subgenotypes, subtype, and S gene mutation of HBV were determined by direct sequencing. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using the neighbor-joining method. Results Sixty-four (28% participants were HBcAb positive, 59 cases were HBcAb positive and HBsAg negative, and 5 cases were HBsAg positive. Hepatitis B DNA was found in three HBsAg-positive cases. Thirteen of 59 (22% individuals were hepatitis B DNA positive. The phylogenetic tree of hepatitis B DNA showed the existence of genotype D. The only significant correlation was between sharing a syringe and OBI. Conclusions In comparison with the rate of HBcAb positivity reported in other Iranian studies, the rate was higher in the present study. There were a few variations, genotypes, and subtypes among the infected injecting drug users. Further investigations are needed to unravel the molecular characterization of OBI.

  15. INJECTING DRUG USERS’ EXPERIENCES OF POLICING PRACTICES IN TWO MEXICAN-U.S. BORDER CITIES: PUBLIC HEALTH PERSPECTIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Cari L.; Firestone, Michelle; Ramos, Rebeca; Burris, Scott; Ramos, Maria Elena; Case, Patricia; Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Fraga, Miguel Angel; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research has identified the impact of law enforcement practices on the behaviors and health of injection drug users (IDUs). We undertook a qualitative study of IDUs’ experiences of policing practices in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border. Methods In 2004, two teams of Mexican interviewers conducted in-depth interviews with IDUs residing in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez (Cd. Juarez), Mexico who had injected drugs at least once in the prior month. Topics included types of drug used, injection settings, access to sterile needles and experiences with police. Field notes and transcribed interviews were analyzed to identify emergent themes. Results Among the 43 participants, most reported that it is common for IDUs to be arrested and detained for 36 hours for carrying sterile or used syringes. Most reported that they or someone they knew had been beaten by police. Interviews suggested 5 key themes relating to police influence on the risk environment: 1) impact of policing practices on accessibility of sterile syringes, 2) influence of police on choice of places to inject drugs (e.g., shooting galleries), 3) police violence, 4) police corruption, and 5) perceived changes in policing practices. Conclusion Findings suggest that some behavior of police officers in Tijuana and Cd. Juarez is inconsistent with legal norms and may be negatively influencing the risk of acquiring blood-borne infections among IDUs. Implementing a comprehensive and successful HIV prevention program among IDUs requires interventions to influence the knowledge, attitudes and practices of law enforcement officers. PMID:17997089

  16. Experiences with Policing among People Who Inject Drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Small, Will; Csete, Joanne; Hattirat, Sattara; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as “patients” not “criminals,” Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Methods and Findings Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample. Conclusions This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings

  17. Experiences with policing among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Small, Will; Csete, Joanne; Hattirat, Sattara; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as "patients" not "criminals," Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample. This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings pertaining to the use of urine drug testing by police

  18. Experiences with policing among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanna Hayashi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite Thailand's commitment to treating people who use drugs as "patients" not "criminals," Thai authorities continue to emphasize criminal law enforcement for drug control. In 2003, Thailand's drug war received international criticism due to extensive human rights violations. However, few studies have since investigated the impact of policing on drug-using populations. Therefore, we sought to examine experiences with policing among people who inject drugs (PWID in Bangkok, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012.Between July 2011 and June 2012, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 community-recruited PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok. Interviews explored PWID's encounters with police during the past three years. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim, and a thematic analysis was conducted to document the character of PWID's experiences with police. Respondents indicated that policing activities had noticeably intensified since rapid urine toxicology screening became available to police. Respondents reported various forms of police misconduct, including false accusations, coercion of confessions, excessive use of force, and extortion of money. However, respondents were reluctant to report misconduct to the authorities in the face of social and structural barriers to seeking justice. Respondents' strategies to avoid police impeded access to health care and facilitated transitions towards the misuse of prescribed pharmaceuticals. The study's limitations relate to the transferability of the findings, including the potential biases associated with the small convenience sample.This study suggests that policing in Bangkok has involved injustices, human rights abuses, and corruption, and policing practices in this setting appeared to have increased PWID's vulnerability to poor health through various pathways. Novel to this study are findings pertaining to the use of urine drug

  19. Profiles of risk: a qualitative study of injecting drug users in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Traci

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Iran, there are an estimated 200,000 injecting drug users (IDUs. Injecting drug use is a relatively new phenomenon for this country, where opium smoking was the predominant form of drug use for hundreds of years. As in many countries experiencing a rise in injecting drug use, HIV/AIDS in Iran is associated with the injection of drugs, accounting for transmission of more than two-thirds of HIV infections. This study aimed to: describe the range of characteristics of IDUs in Tehran, Iran's capital city; 2 examine the injecting-related HIV risk behaviors of IDUs, and 3 suggest necessary interventions to prevent HIV transmission among IDUs and their families and sex partners. Methods Using rapid assessment and response methods with a qualitative focus, six districts of Tehran were selected for study. A total of 81 key informants from different sectors and 154 IDUs were selected by purposeful, opportunistic and snowball sampling, then interviewed. Ethnographic observations were done for mapping and studying injecting-related HIV risk settings and behaviors. Modified content analysis methods were used to analyze the data and extract typologies of injecting drug users in Tehran. Results Evidence of injecting drug use and drug-related harm was found in 5 of 6 study districts. Several profiles of IDUs were identified: depending on their socioeconomic status and degree of stability, IDUs employed different injecting behaviors and syringe hygiene practices. The prevalence of sharing injection instruments ranged from 30–100%. Varied magnitudes of risk were evident among the identified IDU typologies in terms of syringe disinfection methods, level of HIV awareness, and personal hygiene exhibited. At the time of research, there were no active HIV prevention programs in existence in Tehran. Conclusion The recent rise of heroin injection in Iran is strongly associated with HIV risk. Sharing injection instruments is a common and complex

  20. Resistance to fluoroquinolones and second-line injectable drugs: impact on multidrug-resistant TB outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Falzon, Dennis; Gandhi, Neel; Migliori, Giovanni B; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Cox, Helen S; Holtz, Timothy H; Hollm-Delgado, Maria-Graciela; Keshavjee, Salmaan; DeRiemer, Kathryn; Centis, Rosella; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Lange, Christoph G; Bauer, Melissa; Menzies, Dick

    2013-01-01

    ...) (resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin) patients from 26 centres. The analysis assessed the impact of additional resistance to fluoroquinolones and/or second-line injectable drugs on treatment outcome...

  1. 75 FR 20268 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Propofol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ... change of sponsor for a new animal drug application (NADA) from Intervet, Inc., to Teva Animal Health... and interest in, approved NADA 141-070 for RAPINOVET (propofol), an ] injectable anesthetic, to...

  2. Housing instability among people who inject drugs: results from the Australian needle and syringe program survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Libby; Iversen, Jenny; Baldry, Eileen; Maher, Lisa

    2013-08-01

    High rates of substance dependence are consistently documented among homeless people, and are associated with a broad range of negative outcomes among this population. Investigations of homelessness among drug users are less readily available. This study examined the prevalence and correlates of housing instability among clients of needle syringe programs (NSPs) via the Australian NSP Survey, annual cross-sectional seroprevalence studies among NSP attendees. Following self-completion of a brief, anonymous survey and provision of a capillary blood sample by 2,396 NSP clients, multivariate logistic regressions identified the variables independently associated with housing instability. Nineteen percent of ANSPS participants reported current unstable housing, with primary ('sleeping rough'; 5 %), secondary (staying with friends/relatives or in specialist homelessness services; 8 %), and tertiary (residential arrangements involving neither secure lease nor private facilities; 6 %) homelessness all evident. Extensive histories of housing instability were apparent among the sample: 66 % reported at least one period of sleeping rough, while 77 % had shifted between friends/relatives (73 %) and/or resided in crisis accommodation (52 %). Participants with a history of homelessness had cycled in and out of homelessness over an average of 10 years; and one third reported first being homeless before age 15. Compared to their stably housed counterparts, unstably housed participants were younger, more likely to be male, of Indigenous Australian descent, and to report previous incarceration; they also reported higher rates of key risk behaviors including public injecting and receptive sharing of injecting equipment. The high prevalence of both historical and current housing instability among this group, particularly when considered in the light of other research documenting the many adverse outcomes associated with this particular form of disadvantage, highlights the need

  3. Policy responses to viral hepatitis B and C among people who inject drugs in Member States of the WHO European region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spina, Alexander; Eramova, Irina; Lazarus, Jeffrey V

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Unsafe injections, through infectious bodily fluids, are a major route of transmission for hepatitis B and C. Viral hepatitis burden among people who inject drugs is particularly high in many Member States of central and Eastern Europe while national capacity and willingness to address......, with less than one-third reportedly conducting regular serosurveys among people who inject drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Findings highlight key gaps requiring attention in order to improve national policies and programmes in the region and ensure an adequate response to injection drug use-associated viral hepatitis...... of a national policy for hepatitis prevention and control; however less than one-third (27%) reported having written national strategies. Under half of the responding Member States reported holding events for World Hepatitis Day 2012. One-fifth reported offering hepatitis B and C testing free of charge...

  4. Injecting drug users' utilization of public space in Belgrade: Places, risk-management, and habitual life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žikić Bojan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Results from the case-study in Belgrade injecting drug users are presented here featuring the discussion on injecting occurring within the versatility of places belong to the public space. The attention is paid mostly to the certain type of physical risk environment which is specific to Belgrade injecting scene, called "shtek", but risk production and risk management are reviewed also taking into consideration other types of physical environments.

  5. Using Mindfulness to Develop Health Education Strategies for Blood Borne Virus Prevention in Injecting Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Carla; Laybutt, Becky; Carruthers, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Prevention education has had limited success in reducing transmission of blood borne virus among people who inject drugs. Innovative approaches to prevention education are required. Method: This study used video recordings of injecting episodes and interviews with participants reviewing their video recordings to explore the concept of…

  6. Drug injection practices among high-risk youths: The first shot of ketamine

    OpenAIRE

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Clatts, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Ketamine, a “club drug” commonly administered intranasally among youths for its disassociative properties, has emerged as a drug increasingly common among a new hidden population of injection drug users. Because of a scarcity of epidemiological data, little is known about ketamine injection practices, associated risk behaviors, or the demographic characteristics of ketamine injectors. Using an ethno-epidemiological methodology, we interviewed 40 young (

  7. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among men who inject drugs in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Gregory; Nuken, Amenla; Samson, Luke; Singh, Shalini; Jorm, Anthony F; Kermode, Michelle

    2013-05-27

    Mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicide represent an important public health problem in India. Elsewhere in the world a high prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders have been found among people who inject drugs (PWID). Research in India has largely overlooked symptoms of common mental disorders among this high risk group. This paper reports on the results of a survey examining quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among adult males who inject drugs living in Delhi. Participants (n = 420) were recruited from needle and syringe programs using time location sampling and were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Self-report symptom scales were used to measure the severity of symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-2) within the preceding 2 weeks. We assessed the presence of suicidal thoughts and attempts within the past 12 months. The mean length of injecting career was 20.9 years indicating a sample of chronic injecting drug users, of whom only one-third (38%) were born in Delhi. The level of illiteracy was very high (62%), and just 2% had completed class 12. Scavenging / rag picking was the main form of income for 48%, and many were homeless (69%). One-third (33%) had been beaten up at least twice during the preceding 6 months, and many either never (45%) or rarely (27%) attended family events. We found a high prevalence of depressive (84%, cut-off ≥10) and anxiety (71%, cut-off score of ≥3) symptoms. Fifty-three percent thought about killing themselves in the past 12 months, and 36% had attempted to kill themselves. Our findings revealed a socially excluded population of PWID in Delhi who have minimal education and are often homeless, leaving them vulnerable to physical violence, poverty, poor health, imprisonment and disconnection from family. The high prevalence of psychological distress found in this study has implications for programmes seeking to engage, treat and

  8. Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Robertson, Angela M.; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Deported injection drug users (IDUs) in Mexico may be vulnerable to HIV infection following expulsion from the U.S. We examined factors associated with HIV risk perception among a sample of deportees in Tijuana. From January to April 2010, 313 male IDUs who reported ever being deported from the U.S. completed a questionnaire. Overall, 35% (N=110) of deportees perceived HIV risk. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, factors independently associated with HIV risk perception included: ever having a steady female partner in Tijuana post-deportation (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 2.26; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.01-5.07) and years spent in a U.S. prison (AOR: 1.29 per year; 95% CI: 1.13-1.48). Conversely, years of drug injection use (AOR: 0.95 per year; 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), ever witnessing family members use drugs prior to first migration trip (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.65), years of residence in the United States (AOR: 0.91 per year; 95% CI: 0.84-0.98) and being a Tijuana-native (AOR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16-0.99) were negatively associated HIV risk perception. U.S.-Mexico border cities that receive deported migrants should target HIV prevention interventions to specific subgroups, including drug-using male deportees. Interventions should consider migrant's time in the U.S., the role of their social networks, and reducing missed opportunities for HIV testing/education. PMID:24650124

  9. Reductions in HIV/STI incidence and sharing of injection equipment among female sex workers who inject drugs: results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffanie A Strathdee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We evaluated brief combination interventions to simultaneously reduce sexual and injection risks among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico during 2008-2010, when harm reduction coverage was expanding rapidly in Tijuana, but less so in Juarez. METHODS: FSW-IDUs ≥18 years reporting sharing injection equipment and unprotected sex with clients within the last month participated in a randomized factorial trial comparing four brief, single-session conditions combining either an interactive or didactic version of a sexual risk intervention to promote safer sex in the context of drug use, and an injection risk intervention to reduce sharing of needles/injection paraphernalia. Women underwent quarterly interviews and testing for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, Chlamydia and Trichomonas, blinding interviewers and assessors to assignment. Poisson regression with robust variance estimation and repeated measures ordinal logistic regression examined effects on combined HIV/STI incidence and receptive needle sharing frequency. FINDINGS: Of 584 initially HIV-negative FSW-IDUs, retention was ≥90%. After 12 months, HIV/STI incidence decreased >50% in the interactive vs. didactic sex intervention (Tijuana:AdjRR:0.38,95% CI:0.16-0.89; Juarez: AdjRR:0.44,95% CI:0.19-0.99. In Juarez, women receiving interactive vs. didactic injection risk interventions decreased receptive needle-sharing by 85% vs. 71%, respectively (p = 0.04; in Tijuana, receptive needle sharing declined by 95%, but was similar in active versus didactic groups. Tijuana women reported significant increases in access to syringes and condoms, but Juarez women did not. INTERPRETATION: After 12 months in both cities, the interactive sexual risk intervention significantly reduced HIV/STI incidence. Expanding free access to sterile syringes coupled with brief, didactic education on safer injection was necessary and sufficient for achieving robust

  10. Smart approach to evaluate drug diffusivity in injectable agar-carbomer hydrogels for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, M; Marchetti, P; Rossi, F; Perale, G; Castiglione, F; Mele, A; Masi, M

    2011-03-24

    Hydrogels are commonly studied for tissue engineering applications and controlled drug delivery. In order to evaluate their reliability as scaffolds and delivery devices, literature describes many release studies performed involving different analytical techniques. However, these experiments can be expensive, time-consuming, and often not reproducible. In this study, two injectable agar-carbomer-based hydrogels were studied, both being loaded with sodium fluorescein, a harmless fluorophore with a steric hindrance similar to many small drugs, such as for example steroids and other neuroprotecting agents. Starting from simple, traditional, and inexpensive release experiments, it was possible to indirectly estimate the self-diffusion coefficient (D) of loaded sodium fluorescein. Such a parameter was also directly measured in the gel matrix by means of high resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) diffusion-ordered spectroscopy NMR. Because of the agreement between the calculated values and those measured by HRMAS-NMR spectroscopy, the latter approach can be considered as a simple and fast alternative to long analytic procedures.

  11. [The clinical diagnosis 'wound botulism' in an injecting drug addict

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rundervoort, R.S.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Vermeulen, C.M.; Oostenbrugge, R.J. van

    2003-01-01

    A 38-year-old subcutaneous injecting heroin addict had subacute blurred vision, dysarthria and dysphagia. The next day she could not swallow or speak and developed weakness of all limbs and respiratory failure. Electromyography showed abnormalities compatible with a presynaptic neuromuscular transmi

  12. Using cohort studies to estimate mortality among injecting drug users that is not attributable to AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenhardt, L; Hall, W; Warner‐Smith, M

    2006-01-01

    Background Injecting drug use (IDU) and associated mortality appear to be increasing in many parts of the world. IDU is an important factor in HIV transmission. In estimating AIDS mortality attributable to IDU, it is important to take account of premature mortality rates from other causes to ensure that AIDS related mortality among injecting drug users (IDUs) is not overestimated. The current review provides estimates of the excess non‐AIDS mortality among IDUs. Method Searches were conducted with Medline, PsycINFO, and the Web of Science. The authors also searched reference lists of identified papers and an earlier literature review by English et al (1995). Crude mortality rates (CMRs) were derived from data on the number of deaths, period of follow up, and number of participants. In estimating the all‐cause mortality, two rates were calculated: one that included all cohort studies identified in the search, and one that only included studies that reported on AIDS deaths in their cohort. This provided lower and upper mortality rates, respectively. Results The current paper derived weighted mortality rates based upon cohort studies that included 179 885 participants, 1 219 422 person‐years of observation, and 16 593 deaths. The weighted crude AIDS mortality rate from studies that reported AIDS deaths was approximately 0.78% per annum. The median estimated non‐AIDS mortality rate was 1.08% per annum. Conclusions Illicit drug users have a greatly increased risk of premature death and mortality due to AIDS forms a significant part of that increased risk; it is, however, only part of that risk. Future work needs to examine mortality rates among IDUs in developing countries, and collect data on the relation between HIV and increased mortality due to all causes among this group. PMID:16735295

  13. HIV among injecting drug users: current epidemiology, biologic markers, respondent-driven sampling, and supervised-injection facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Arasteh, Kamyar; Semaan, Salaam; Wood, Evan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent research done primarily during the past 12 months (i.e., primarily in 2008) on the epidemiology of HIV infection among injecting drug users (IDUs). Recent findings Major research developments include a global assessment of HIV infection among IDUs and evidence of a transition from epidemics concentrated among IDUs to generalized, heterosexual epidemics in eastern Europe and Asia. Intervention research also includes several studies of supervised-injecting facilities. Methodological research includes respondent-driven sampling and the use of hepatitis C virus and herpes simplex virus-2 as biomarkers for injecting and sexual risk. Summary There have been important advances in research during the past year, but HIV infection continues to spread rapidly across many areas of the world among IDUs and their nondrug-using sex partners. PMID:19532069

  14. Changing drug use and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users in Ukraine: evidence from biobehavioral surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumchev, Kostyantyn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrated biobehavioral surveys (IBBS have been used to evaluate the impact of HIV prevention efforts among most-at-risk groups in Ukraine since 2007. Harm reduction program coverage among injecting-drug users (IDUs increased substantially from 96,000 in 2008 to 170,000 in 2010 with support from the Global Fund, and IBBS have shown declining HIV prevalence. Aim of the study was to examine the changes in HIV prevalence, drug use patterns and risky behaviors in IDUs on national and city level.METHODS: For this analysis, three IDU-IBBS datasets were combined – 2008 (N=3711, 2009 (N=3962, and 2011 (N=9069. The analysis included 25 cities that participated in either 2008 or 2009, and 2011. Changes in HIV prevalence, drug use, and risk behaviors were compared between 2008/9 and 2011.RESULTS: The surveyed IDU population in 2011 was older than in 2008/9 (31.0 vs. 32.8 years; p<.0001, and included more females (23.5% vs. 25.5%; p=.0038, with substantial variation across cities.Overall HIV prevalence in the sample declined slightly (22.9% to 21.6%; p=.05. In eight cities, HIV prevalence decreased significantly (-5% to -18%, while significant increases were seen in five cities (8% to 15%. Prevalence among IDUs younger than 25 years declined (9.9% to 7.2%; p=.0078.The combined dataset showed no difference in opioid or stimulant past-30-day use, with variation at city level. Clean needle/syringe use during last injection increased significantly (88.8% to 97.0%; p<.0001, with no opposing trend in any city. Three cities had an increase in past-30-day needle/syringe sharing; nine – in container sharing; twelve – in use of preloaded syringes. Changes in condom use were not significant (54.1% to 54.9%, p=.32.CONCLUSIONS: IDUs in Ukraine are ageing and HIV seroprevalence among IDUs continues to decline, especially among young IDUs. However, prevention programming needs to respond to significant regional variations in risk behaviors and HIV

  15. Novel in vivo imaging analysis of an inner ear drug delivery system: Drug availability in inner ear following different dose of systemic drug injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzaki, Sho; Watanabe, Kotaro; Fujioka, Masato; Shibata, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Masaya; Okano, Hirotaka James; Okano, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-12-01

    Systemic application of drugs is commonly used in clinical situations. Some of these drugs are ototoxic. Since there are few studies on in vivo monitoring of drug delivery dynamics, the time course or bioavailability of drugs in the inner ear of live animals following systemic drug application remains unknown. For instance, it is unknown whether the volume of a drug delivered systemically correlates with its inner ear pharmacokinetics. We previously established a new in vivo imaging system to monitor drug delivery in live mice. In the present study, we used this system to compare drug concentration in the inner ear over time after systemic drug injections. We used transgenic GFAP-Luc mice that harbor a firefly luciferase gene expression cassette regulated by 12 kb of murine GFAP promoter and human beta-globin intron 2. Luciferin delivered into the inner ear of these mice reacts with luciferase, and the resulting signals are detected in GFAP-expressing cells in the cochlear nerve. Thus, we assessed in the inner ear the intensity and duration of luciferin/luciferase signals after systemic injections of different volumes of luciferin. An IVIS(®) imaging system was used to observe signals, and these signals were compared to the drug dynamics of luciferin delivered through subcutaneous (sc) injections. The volume of sc-injected drug correlated significantly with photon counts measured in the inner ear. Photons were detected almost immediately after injection, peaking 20 min after injection. Drug concentration did not affect inner ear signals. Luciferin injected systemically appeared in the inner ear between highest and lowest concentration. Drug volume is an important parameter to know if the inner ear requires a higher level of the drug. We observed that it is the volume of a drug-not its concentration-that is the important factor. Indeed, the more volume of a drug injected systemically increased the concentration of that drug in the inner ear. This study provides a

  16. Drug choice, spatial distribution, HIV risk, and HIV prevalence among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaboltas Alla V

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV epidemic in Russia has been driven by the unsafe injection of drugs, predominantly heroin and the ephedrine derived psychostimulants. Understanding differences in HIV risk behaviors among injectors associated with different substances has important implications for prevention programs. Methods We examined behaviors associated with HIV risk among 900 IDUs who inject heroin, psychostimulants, or multiple substances in 2002. Study participants completed screening questionnaires that provided data on sociodemographics, drug use, place of residence and injection- and sex-related HIV risk behaviors. HIV testing was performed and prevalence was modeled using general estimating equation (GEE analysis. Individuals were clustered by neighborhood and disaggregated into three drug use categories: Heroin Only Users, Stimulant Only Users, and Mixed Drug Users. Results Among Heroin Only Users, younger age, front/backloading of syringes, sharing cotton and cookers were all significant predictors of HIV infection. In contrast, sharing needles and rinse water were significant among the Stimulant Only Users. The Mixed Drug Use group was similar to the Heroin Only Users with age, front/back loading, and sharing cotton significantly associated with HIV infection. These differences became apparent only when neighborhood of residence was included in models run using GEE. Conclusion The type of drug injected was associated with distinct behavioral risks. Risks specific to Stimulant Only Users appeared related to direct syringe sharing. The risks specific to the other two groups are common to the process of sharing drugs in preparation to injecting. Across the board, IDUs could profit from prevention education that emphasizes both access to clean syringes and preparing and apportioning drug with these clean syringes. However, attention to neighborhood differences might improve the intervention impact for injectors who favor different drugs.

  17. Pilot trial of an intervention aimed at modifying drug preparation practices among injection drug users in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Hector M; Finlinson, Henriette A; Negron, Juan; Sosa, Irmaly; Rios-Olivares, Eddy; Robles, Rafaela R

    2009-06-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) contaminate preparation materials with blood-borne pathogens by using syringes as measuring and dispensing devices. In collaboration with IDUs, we developed a preventive intervention consisting of four new preparation practices aimed at avoiding the use of syringes in the preparation, and reducing the contamination of the materials. This report describes the results of a pilot trial introducing the new practices to ascertain their adoption potential and their potential efficacy in reducing contamination. Participants comprised 37 active IDUs among whom the new practices were promoted during 16 weeks. In addition to self-reported behaviors, the study collected cookers and plastic caps from shooting galleries and tested them for the presence of blood residues. Adoption rates were: (1) cleaning of skin area with hand sanitizer--65.6%; (2) directly pouring water with a dropper into the cooker--56.3%; (3) drawing drug solution with a preparation syringe and syringe filter--34.4%; and, (4) backload rinsing syringes--53.1%. Rates of blood residues detected in cookers and plastic caps were 41.7% prior to the trial, 28.6% at week 8, 24.6% at week 14, and 12.0% at week 18. We believe the results of the pilot trial are compelling and suggest that this intervention merits further formal testing.

  18. Suicidal ideation and HIV risk behaviors among a cohort of injecting drug users in New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarin Enisha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on mental health among injecting drug users in South Asia is scarce yet poor mental health among users has significant implications for the success of HIV prevention and treatment programmes. A cohort of 449 injecting drug users in Delhi was examined on the following issues (1 examine trends in suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicidal attempts over a 12-month period, (2 examine association between injecting practices (receive and give used syringes and suicidal ideation over a 12 month study period. Methods An observational study was conducted providing phased interventions with follow up interviews every 3 months to 449 injecting drug users (IDUs, from August 2004 to November 2005. The study was conducted in Yamuna Bazaar, a known hub of drug peddling in Delhi. Interventions included nutrition, basic medical services, needle exchange, health education, HIV voluntary counseling and testing, STI diagnosis and treatment, oral buprenorphine substitution, and detoxification, each introduced sequentially. Results Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, did not significantly change over 12 months of observation, while suicide plans actually increased over the time period. Keeping other factors constant, IDUs with suicidal ideation reported more giving and receiving of used syringes in the recent past. Conclusions: Mental health services are warranted within harm reduction programmes. Special attention must be paid to suicidal IDUs given their higher risk behaviours for acquiring HIV and other blood borne infections. IDU intervention programmes should assess and address suicide risk through brief screening and enhanced counseling.

  19. Chronic venous disorders and injection drug use: impact on balance, gait, and walk speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Birk, Thomas J; Kirsner, Robert S

    2008-01-01

    Injection drug users are at high risk for chronic venous disorders (CVD), a condition resulting in a progressive deterioration of venous function of the legs. However, the effects of CVD on walking mobility in this population have not been studied. We examined a causal model of the relationship between injection drug use, CVD, and Walking Mobility. The validity of the Tinetti Balance and Gait scales and walk speed as a composite measure of Walking Mobility was also explored. The participants were 104 men and women from a methadone maintenance treatment center. Drug use included 18 persons who injected drugs only in the hands, arms, and above the waist; 70 who injected all over the body including the lower extremities; and 16 who never injected drugs but used illegal substances by other routes. Forty-nine percent of participants had moderate to severe CVD. Participants were classified into 2 groups according to their history of injection drug use: (a) those who injected in the lower extremities (n = 70) and (b) those who injected in the arms plus those who did not inject (n = 34). All measurements were obtained at baseline and again approximately 6.5 weeks later. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the causal effect of CVD on Walking Mobility. The validity of the Balance and Gait scales and the walk time variable as measures of a Walking Mobility factor was examined using a second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Questionnaires included the Demographic and Health History and Drug History. The lower extremities were evaluated with the clinical portion of the Clinical-Etiology-Anatomy-Pathophysiology classification. Participants completed the Tinetti Balance and Gait test. A timed 6-m walk at the person's normal pace was used to calculate walk speed. Test-retest reliability of the Tinetti Balance and Gait test and walk speed ranged from 0.79 to 0.86. Balance and gait scores were skewed toward the high end of the scale. Walking speed was slow. The leg-injecting

  20. The filter of choice: filtration method preference among injecting drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keijzer Lenneke

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injection drug use syringe filters (IDUSF are designed to prevent several complications related to the injection of drugs. Due to their small pore size, their use can reduce the solution's insoluble particle content and thus diminish the prevalence of phlebitis, talcosis.... Their low drug retention discourages from filter reuse and sharing and can thus prevent viral and microbial infections. In France, drug users have access to sterile cotton filters for 15 years and to an IDUSF (the Sterifilt® for 5 years. This study was set up to explore the factors influencing filter preference amongst injecting drug users. Methods Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered through 241 questionnaires and the participation of 23 people in focus groups. Results Factors found to significantly influence filter preference were duration and frequency of injecting drug use, the type of drugs injected and subculture. Furthermore, IDU's rationale for the preference of one type of filter over others was explored. It was found that filter preference depends on perceived health benefits (reduced harms, prevention of vein damage, protection of injection sites, drug retention (low retention: better high, protective mechanism against the reuse of filters; high retention: filter reuse as a protective mechanism against withdrawal, technical and practical issues (filter clogging, ease of use, time needed to prepare an injection and believes (the conviction that a clear solution contains less active compound. Conclusion It was concluded that the factors influencing filter preference are in favour of change; a shift towards the use of more efficient filters can be made through increased availability, information and demonstrations.

  1. Prevalence and correlates of opiate overdose among young injection drug users in a large U.S. city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Susan G; Cheng, Yingkai; Kral, Alexander H

    2007-05-11

    The current study examines the prevalence and correlates of witnessing and experiencing opiate overdoses among a sample of young, injection drug users (IDUs) and non-injection drug users (NIDUs) in Baltimore, MD. Data were derived from a longitudinal study of 15-30 year old IDUs and NIDUs (N=309) who had initiated heroin, cocaine, and/or crack use within 5 years prior to study enrollment. Chi-square and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were used in bivariate analyses of demographic and drug use variables with each of the two dependent variables. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify correlates of experiencing and witnessing overdose. Twenty-nine percent of participants reported having ever experienced an opiate overdose and 57% reported having ever witnessed an overdose. Having ever experienced an opiate overdose was independently associated with being White (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]=3.2; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.6, 6.4) recent homelessness (AOR=2.9; 95%CI: 1.5, 5.7); and length of injection, 5.6-6.9 years versus 8 versus overdose was independently associated with being White (AOR=2.4; 95%CI: 1.4, 4.1) and injecting >8 years versus overdoses among young, newly initiated IDUs and NIDUs. The results could inform the growing number of overdose prevention efforts throughout the U.S.

  2. 75 FR 76260 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Flunixin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Animal Drugs; Flunixin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food... ANADA provides for use of flunixin meglumine solution by intravenous injection in lactating dairy cows..., filed a supplement to ANADA 200-061 that provides for veterinary prescription use of FLU-NIX...

  3. 75 FR 13225 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Flunixin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    ... Animal Drugs; Flunixin AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food... provides for the use of flunixin meglumine injectable solution in swine. DATES: This rule is effective..., Dublin 24, Ireland, filed ANADA 200-489 that provides for use of FLUNAZINE-S (flunixin...

  4. Surviving in two worlds: social and structural violence of Thai female injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haritavorn, Niphattra

    2014-01-01

    Thai females injecting drugs are ensnared in a web of problems arising from forms of prejudice that magnify their vulnerability. They are vulnerable, at risk, and exposed to a high degree of social suffering. This paper aims to elucidate how social production and structural violence combine to shape the lives of these women. Using a qualitative methodology, two focus groups with 5 key informants and in-depth interviews involving a total of 35 women injecting drugs were conducted in Bangkok. The findings reveal that the structural environment that directly impacts upon these women's lives becomes the reason for their suffering. The structural environment puts these women at risk of violence in numerous social settings in which these women engage as well as generating tension at a subjective level (i.e. the habitus) of these women. Thai female injecting drug users are trapped in a difficult tension between the demands for being Thai women seeking to exist in the masculine world of drug use but at the same time meeting Thai society's expectations of womanhood. Unequal gender relations are manifest in the everyday violence that women face in the drug community, culminating in the essential nature of women being questioned, undermined and threatened. Living in the drug community, women are subjected to violence and harassment, and gendered brutality by intimate partners. In conclusion, the social suffering that Thai female injecting drug users find themselves confronting is confined to dilemmas cause by tensions between drug use and the overriding gender habitus.

  5. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-27

    ... drug regulations to reflect approval of a supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Pfizer, Inc. The supplemental NADA extends the slaughter interval for intact male swine injected with..., filed a supplement to NADA 141-322 for IMPROVEST (gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  6. What happened to the HIV epidemic among non-injecting drug users in New York City?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Arasteh, Kamyar; McKnight, Courtney; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Campbell, Aimee N C; Tross, Susan; Cooper, Hannah L F; Hagan, Holly; Perlman, David C

    2017-02-01

    HIV has reached high prevalence in many non-injecting drug user (NIDU) populations. The aims of this study were to (1) examine the trend in HIV prevalence among non-injecting cocaine and heroin NIDUs in New York City, (2) identify factors potentially associated with the trend and (3) estimate HIV incidence among NIDUs. Serial-cross sectional surveys of people entering drug treatment programs. People were permitted to participate only once per year, but could participate in multiple years. Mount Sinai Beth Israel drug treatment programs in New York City, USA. We recruited 3298 non-injecting cocaine and heroin users from 2005 to 2014. Participants were 78.7% male, 6.1% white, 25.7% Hispanic and 65.8% African American. Smoking crack cocaine was the most common non-injecting drug practice. Trend tests were used to examine HIV prevalence, demographics, drug use, sexual behavior and use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) by calendar year; χ(2) and multivariable logistic regression were used to compare 2005-10 versus 2011-14. HIV prevalence declined approximately 1% per year (P New York City. These results can be considered a proof of concept that it is possible to control non-injecting drug use related sexual transmission HIV epidemics. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  7. Enduring Consequences From the War on Drugs: How Policing Practices Impact HIV Risk Among People Who Inject Drugs in Baltimore City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flath, Natalie; Tobin, Karin; King, Kelly; Lee, Alexandra; Latkin, Carl

    2017-07-03

    Neighborhood-level characteristics, including police activity, are associated with HIV and Hepatitis C injection risk-behaviors among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, the pathways through which these neighborhood perceptions shape individual-level HIV risk behaviors are unclear. This study helps to explain perceived behaviors between perceived neighborhood police activity and HIV injection risk behavior (i.e., injection syringe/tool sharing in the previous 6 months). A sample of (n = 366) PWIDs who self-reported recent use were recruited using community-based outreach methods in Baltimore, Maryland. Neighborhood police perceptions were assessed by asking participants whether they would (1) be more likely to ask others to share injection tools in the context of heightened police activity and (2) be less likely to carry syringes with them due to fear of arrest. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify statistical relationships. Recent police encounters, frequency of heroin injection, and sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for in the model. Neighborhood police perceptions shaped injection-risk behavior. Half of the sample (49%) reported an aversion of carrying personal syringes, due to fear of arrest. Those who agreed they would be more likely to ask others to share injection equipment in the context of heightened police activity were more likely to share syringes (21% vs. 3%, p police activity (aPR: 2.22, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.7, 3.0). This study sheds light on how police perceptions may influence injection risk behavior. While these relationships require further elucidation, this study suggests that public health interventions aiming to reduce HIV risk would benefit from improving community-police relationships.

  8. AIDS incidence and mortality in injecting drug users: the AjUDE-Brasil II Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Mauro Nogueira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents AIDS incidence and mortality among injecting drug users (IDUs reached by the AjUDE-Brasil II Project. From a cross-sectional survey, 478 IDUs were interviewed in three Brazilian cities: Porto Alegre, São José do Rio Preto, and Itajaí. The cohort was followed up in the Brazilian surveillance database for AIDS and mortality during 2000 and 2001. AIDS incidence was 1.1 cases per 100 person-years, and the mortality rate was 2.8 deaths per 100 person-years. AIDS cases only occurred in IDUs who reported ever having shared injecting equipment. Female gender (RR = 5.30, homelessness (RR = 6.16, and report of previous sexual relations with same-sex partners (RR = 6.21 were associated with AIDS. Deaths occurred only among males. Homelessness (RR = 3.00, lack of income (RR = 2.65, HIV seropositive status (RR = 4.52, and no history of incarceration (RR = 3.71 were also associated with death. These findings support evidence that gender and socioeconomic conditions are both determinants of morbidity and mortality in Brazilian IDUs.

  9. Suboptimal Addiction Interventions for Patients Hospitalized with Injection Drug Use-Associated Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Elana S; Karchmer, Adolf W; Theisen-Toupal, Jesse; Castillo, Roger Araujo; Rowley, Chris F

    2016-05-01

    Infective endocarditis is a serious infection, often resulting from injection drug use. Inpatient treatment regularly focuses on management of infection without attention to the underlying addiction. We aimed to determine the addiction interventions done in patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis. This is a retrospective review of patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis from January, 2004 through August, 2014 at a large academic tertiary care center in Boston, Massachusetts. For the initial and subsequent admissions, data were collected regarding addiction interventions, including consultation by social work, addiction clinical nurse and psychiatry, documentation of addiction in the discharge summary plan, plan for medication-assisted treatment and naloxone provision. There were 102 patients admitted with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis, 50 patients (49.0%) were readmitted and 28 (27.5%) patients had ongoing injection drug use at readmission. At initial admission, 86.4% of patients had social work consultation, 23.7% had addiction consultation, and 24.0% had psychiatry consultation. Addiction was mentioned in 55.9% of discharge summary plans, 7.8% of patients had a plan for medication-assisted treatment, and naloxone was never prescribed. Of 102 patients, 26 (25.5%) are deceased. The median age at death was 40.9 years (interquartile range 28.7-48.7). We found that patients hospitalized with injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis had high rates of readmission, recurrent infective endocarditis and death. Despite this, addiction interventions were suboptimal. Improved addiction interventions are imperative in the treatment of injection drug use-associated infective endocarditis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Getting the message: HIV information sources of women who have sex with injecting drug users -- a two-site study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, B J; Wolitski, R J; Tross, S; Corby, N H; Fishbein, M

    1999-04-01

    A field interview was conducted among 325 female sex partners (FSPs) of male injecting drug users (IDUs) in New York City and Long Beach, California, to assess FSPs¿ source of HIV information; attitudes and beliefs regarding the disease and condom use; and risk behaviors. Findings revealed that the subjects, whose only current risk was sexual contact with a drug-injecting partner, were mostly Latino women (62%) or African American women (29%) in their early to mid 30s. One-third had a history with injecting drug use and one in six had previously traded sex for money or drugs. Most of them were presently at-risk for HIV infection; and reported little or no condom use during sexual contact with a male IDU partner. In comparison with FSPs in Long Beach, FSPs in New York: were more knowledgeable about HIV transmission; perceived themselves as being at-risk for exposure to HIV from having unprotected vaginal intercourse with their main partners; have positive attitudes toward condom use; perceived social pressure in using condoms with their main partners; and were more exposed to HIV information from mass media, small media and interpersonal resources. The study generally indicated that FSPs in Long Beach and New York are reachable and reported attitudes and knowledge that support the use of condoms with their main partners.

  11. Injection site abscess due to mycobacterium fortuitum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi DR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Injection abscess is an iatrogenic infection occurring as an isolated case or as cluster outbreak. These infections occur due to contaminated injectables or lapse in sterilisation protocol. While pathogens such as Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, E. coli, and S. aureus are the usual causative agents, unusual organisms such as mycobacteria, particularly the rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM may cause the abscess. The chances of overlooking these organisms is high unless an acid fast bacilli (AFB smear and culture is done on all aspirated pus specimens. We report a case of a three year old child who presented with a gluteal abscess following an intramuscular infection with an unknown preparation.

  12. Perspectives on biomedical HIV prevention options among women who inject drugs in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Angela Robertson; Yotebieng, Kelly A; Agot, Kawango; Rota, Grace; Syvertsen, Jennifer L

    2017-08-05

    Due to heightened vulnerability to HIV from frequent engagement in sex work and overlapping drug-using and sexual networks, women who inject drugs should be a high priority population for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other biomedical HIV prevention tools. Kenya is one of the first African countries to approve oral PrEP for HIV prevention among "key populations," including people who inject drugs and sex workers. The objective of this study was to explore preferences and perceived challenges to PrEP adoption among women who inject drugs in Kisumu, Kenya. We conducted qualitative interviews with nine HIV-uninfected women who inject drugs to assess their perceptions of biomedical HIV interventions, including oral PrEP, microbicide gels, and intravaginal rings. Despite their high risk and multiple biomedical studies in the region, only two women had ever heard of any of these methods. All women were interested in trying at least one biomedical prevention method, primarily to protect themselves from partners who were believed to have multiple other sexual partners. Although women shared concerns about side effects and product efficacy, they did not perceive drug use as a significant deterrent to adopting or adhering to biomedical prevention methods. Beginning immediately and continuing throughout Kenya's planned PrEP rollout, efforts are urgently needed to include the perspectives of high risk women who use drugs in biomedical HIV prevention research and programing.

  13. Sexual and injection-related risks in Puerto Rican-born injection drug users living in New York City: A mixed-methods analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelpí-Acosta Camila

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background These data were collected as part of the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS study. NHBS is a cross-sectional study to investigate HIV behavioral risks among core risk groups in 21 U.S. cities with the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence. This analysis examines data from the NHBS data collection cycle with IDU conducted in New York City in 2009. We explored how the recency of migration from Puerto Rico (PR to New York City (NYC impacts both syringe sharing and unprotected sex among injection drug users (IDU currently living in NYC. Methods We used a mixed-methods approach to examine differences in risk between US-born IDU, PR IDU who migrated to NYC more than three years ago (non-recent migrants, and PR IDU who migrated in the last three years (recent migrants. Respondent-driven sampling (RDS was used to recruit the sample (n = 514. In addition, qualitative individual and group interviews with recent PR migrants (n = 12 and community experts (n = 2 allowed for an in-depth exploration of the IDU migration process and the material and cultural factors behind continued risk behaviors in NYC. Results In multiple logistic regression controlling for confounding factors, recent migrants were significantly more likely to report unprotected sexual intercourse with casual or exchange partners (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.81; 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 1.37-5.76 and receptive syringe sharing (AOR = 2.44; 95% CI: 1.20-4.97 in the past year, compared to US-born IDU. HIV and HCV seroprevalence were highest among non-recent migrants. Qualitative results showed that risky injection practices are partly based on cultural norms acquired while injecting drugs in Puerto Rico. These same results also illustrate how homelessness influences risky sexual practices. Conclusions Poor material conditions (especially homelessness may be key in triggering risky sexual practices. Cultural norms (ingrained while using drugs in PR around injection drug

  14. Correlates of sex trading among male non-injecting drug users in Myanmar: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Yu Mon; Saw, Thu Nandar; Wai, Kyi Mar; Poudel, Krishna C; Win, Hla Hla

    2016-12-05

    Sex trading is a recognized risk factor for human immune deficiency virus infection and other sexually transmitted infections among non-injecting drug users (NIDUs). However, very little research has addressed the factors associated with sex trading among male NIDUs in Myanmar. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to February 2010 using the respondent-driven sampling method. In total, 210 NIDUs aged between 18 and 49 years, with no history of injecting drug use, and who used non-injected illicit drugs in the last 6 months were recruited. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire to collect information on participants' sexual and drug use behaviors. Binary and multivariate logistic regressions were applied to analyze the resulting data. Of 210 NIDUs, 84 (40%) reported involvement in the sex trade during the last 3 months. In the adjusted model, factors associated with sex trade involvement included homosexual preference (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.90; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.61-14.95), having more than two partners (AOR = 3.88; 95% CI 1.55-9.72), had a regular job (AOR = 5.10; 95% CI 1.65-15.72), use of stimulant drugs rather than opiate (AOR = 2.38; 95% CI 1.10-5.15), and who used drugs more than twice per day. More than one third of NIDUs were involved in sex trading. This study suggested that further comprehensive intervention programs that aim to reduce risk factors of trading sex among NIDUs may consider including NIDUs who used stimulant drugs, had regular/full-time jobs, used drugs more than twice per day, and had homosexual preferences.

  15. The association between neighborhood residential rehabilitation and injection drug use in Baltimore, Maryland, 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Kirk, Gregory D; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-07-01

    This study utilized multilevel cross-classified models to longitudinally assess the association between neighborhood residential rehabilitation and injection drug use. We also assessed whether relocating between neighborhoods of varying levels of residential rehabilitation was associated with injection drug use. Residential rehabilitation was categorized into three groups (e.g. low, moderate, high), and lagged one visit to ensure temporality. After adjusting for neighborhood and individual-level factors, residence in a neighborhood with moderate residential rehabilitation was associated with a 23% reduction in injection drug use [AOR=0.77; 95% CI (0.67,0.87)]; residence in a neighborhood with high residential rehabilitation was associated with a 26% reduction in injection drug use [AOR=0.74; 95% CI (0.61,0.91)]. Continuous residence within neighborhoods with moderate/high rehabilitation, and relocating to neighborhoods with moderate/high rehabilitation, were associated with a lower likelihood of injection drug use. Additional studies are needed to understand the mechanisms behind these relationships.

  16. Punitive policing and associated substance use risks among HIV-positive people in Russia who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily K; Bridden, Carly; Blokhina, Elena; Walley, Alexander Y; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Drug law enforcement is part of the HIV risk environment among people who inject drugs (PWID). Punitive policing practices such as extrajudicial arrests for needle possession and police planting of drugs have been described anecdotally in Russia, but these experiences and their associations with risky drug behaviours have not been quantified. This study aims to quantify the burden of extrajudicial police arrests among a cohort of HIV-positive PWID in Russia and to explore its links to drug-related health outcomes. In a cross-sectional study of 582 HIV-positive people with lifetime injection drug use (IDU) in St. Petersburg, Russia, we estimated the prevalence of self-reported extrajudicial police arrests. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate associations between arrests and the following outcomes: overdose, recent IDU and receptive needle sharing. This cohort's mean age was 29.8 years, 60.8% were male; 75.3% reported non-fatal drug overdose, 50.3% recent IDU and 47.3% receptive needle sharing. Extrajudicial arrests were reported by more than half (60.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.5-64.5) and were associated with higher odds of non-fatal drug overdose (AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02-2.25) but not with recent IDU (AOR 1.17, arrests were associated with receptive needle sharing (AOR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.09-3.09). Extrajudicial police arrests were common among this cohort of Russian HIV-positive PWID and associated with non-fatal overdose and, among those with recent IDU, receptive needle sharing. As a part of the HIV risk environment of PWIDs, these practices might contribute to HIV transmission and overdose mortality. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the operational environment of law enforcement and to better understand how police interventions among PWIDs can improve the HIV risk environment.

  17. Injecting drug users and their health seeking behavior: a cross-sectional study in dhaka, bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariful Islam, Sheikh Mohammed; Biswas, Tuhin; Bhuiyan, Faiz Ahmed; Islam, Md Serajul; Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Nessa, Hurun

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs) are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR) age of the participants were 32.5 ± 21.3 and 33 (27-38) years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior.

  18. Injecting Drug Users and Their Health Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR age of the participants were 32.5±21.3 and 33 (27–38 years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior.

  19. Trends in the AIDS epidemic among New York City's injection drug users: localized or citywide?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Russell; Deren, Sherry; Goldstein, Marjorie F; Friedman, Samuel R; Des Jarlais, Don C

    2002-03-01

    The New York City injection drug user acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (IDU AIDS) epidemic accounts for almost one quarter of AIDS cases in IDUs in the United States. Recent studies have reported declines in seroprevalence and risk behaviors among IDUs in New York City during the 1990s. These trends, however, are based on studies primarily conducted in the city's central borough of Manhattan. This article analyzes data from all five boroughs of New York City to examine trends over phases of the epidemic and to determine the level of prevention services available; an exploratory qualitative study was also conducted to assess access to prevention services and injection practices in areas in the "outer boroughs." Findings indicated that (1) borough differences in services and behaviors existed from early in the epidemic; (2) services have been concentrated in Manhattan; and (3) declines in seroprevalence were greatest among Manhattan-recruited IDUs. Enhancing access to services for IDUs in the boroughs outside Manhattan may be needed to continue the positive trends in all areas of New York City.

  20. Drug-related deaths with evidence of intracorporeal drug concealment at autopsy: five case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcher, Glenn

    2011-12-01

    Intracorporeal concealment of illicit drugs is a rare observation at coronial autopsy examinations. The article reports 5 cases of accidental drug overdoses at the Westmead Coronial Morgue, Sydney New South Wales, over a 6-year period with evidence of intracorporeal drug concealment known as body packing or body stuffing. Three different forms of anatomic concealment of drugs are illustrated, Case 2 involving therapeutic medication in the form of glass ampoules for parenteral injection not previously reported. Three deaths were the result of acute toxicity due to polydrug abuse rather than as a consequence of the body packing behavior and rupture of the drug packaging, with the intracorporeal drug concealments an adjunct finding at the autopsy examinations. The cause of death in Case 3 was the direct result of acute cocaine intoxication due to rupture of drug packages in the rectum and mucosal absorption. The article details forensic sociological aspects of drug concealment and subcultural group human behavior that can assist in providing information for the initiation of investigations.

  1. The Edinburgh Addiction Cohort: recruitment and follow-up of a primary care based sample of injection drug users and non drug-injecting controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimber Jo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injection drug use is an important public health problem. Epidemiological understanding of this problem is incomplete as longitudinal studies in the general population are difficult to undertake. In particular little is known about early life risk factors for later drug injection or about the life course of injection once established including the influence of medical and social interventions. Methods Individuals thought to be drug injectors were identified through a single primary medical care facility in Edinburgh between 1980 and 2006 and flagged with the General Registry Office. From October 2005 - October 2007, these cases were traced and invited to undergo interview assessment covering early life experience, substance use, health and social histories. Age and sex matched controls for confirmed cases (alive and dead were later recruited through the same health facility. Controls for living cases completed the same structured interview schedule. Data were also collected on cases and controls through linkage to routine primary care records, death registrations, hospital contact statistics and police and prison records. All interviews were conducted with the knowledge and permission of the current GP. Results The initial cohort size was 814. At start of follow up 227 had died. Of the remaining 587: 20 had no contact details and 5 had embarked from the UK; 40 declined participation; 38 did not respond to invitations; 14 were excluded by their GP on health or social grounds and 22 had their contact details withheld by administrative authorities. 448 were interviewed of whom 16 denied injection and were excluded. Of 191 dead cases with medical records 4 were excluded as their records contained no evidence of injection. 5 interviewed cases died before follow up was concluded though these individuals were counted as "live" cases. 1 control per case (dead and alive was recruited. Linkage to Scottish Morbidity Records data

  2. Public health the leading force of the Indonesian response to the HIV/AIDS crisis among people who inject drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmah Amala

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Issue Indonesia has an explosive HIV/AIDS epidemic starting from the beginning of this century, and it is in process to build its response. Reported AIDS cases doubled from 2003 – 2004, and approximately 54% of these cases are in people who inject drugs. Setting Indonesia is the 4th largest country in population in the world, a predominantly Muslim country with strong views on drug users and people living with HIV/AIDS. Globally speaking, Indonesia has one of the most explosive epidemics in recent years. The project IHPCP (Indonesia HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care Project is a joint support project (primarily AusAID-based that works in partnership with the Government of Indonesia. IHPCP has been a key player of in the country's response, particularly pioneering NSP; stimulating and supporting methadone programs, and being key in promoting ARV for people who currently inject drugs. The project works via both the public health system and NGOs. Outcomes It is still early to measure the impact of current interventions; however, this paper describes the current status of Indonesia's response to the HIV/AIDS crisis among people who inject drugs, and analyses future challenges of the epidemic in Indonesia.

  3. Risk Factors Associated with Unsafe Injection Practices at the First Injection Episode among Intravenous Drug Users in France: Results from PrimInject, an Internet Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Guichard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. New drug use patterns may increase the risk of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis infections. In France, new injection patterns among youths with diverse social backgrounds have emerged, which may explain the persistently high rates of hepatitis C virus infection. This study explores factors associated with injection risk behaviours at first injection among users who began injecting in the post-2000 era. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted on the Internet from October 2010 to March 2011, through an online questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression identified the independent correlates of needle sharing and equipment (cooker/cotton filter sharing. Results. Among the 262 respondents (mean age 25 years, 65% were male. Both risk behaviours were positively associated with initiation before 18 years of age (aOR 3.7 CI 95% 1.3–10.6 and aOR 3.0 CI 95% 1.3–7.0 and being injected by another person (aOR 3.1 CI 95% 1.0–9.9 and aOR 3.0 CI 95% 1.3–7.1. Initiation at a party was an independent correlate of equipment sharing (aOR 2.6 95% CI 1.0–6.8. Conclusions. Results suggest a need for innovative harm reduction programmes targeting a variety of settings and populations, including youths and diverse party scenes. Education of current injectors to protect both themselves and those they might initiate into injection is critically important.

  4. Correlates of susceptibility to hepatitis B among people who inject drugs in Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Rachel M; Topp, Libby; Wand, Handan; Day, Carolyn A; Rodgers, Craig; Haber, Paul S; van Beek, Ingrid; Maher, Lisa

    2012-10-01

    Despite a safe, effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination coverage remains low among people who inject drugs (PWID). Characteristics of participants screened for a trial investigating the efficacy of financial incentives in increasing vaccination completion among PWID were examined to inform targeting of vaccination programs. Recruitment occurred at two health services in inner-city Sydney that target PWID. HBV status was confirmed via serological testing, and questionnaires elicited demographic, drug use, and HBV risk data. Multinomial logistic regression was utilized to determine variables independently associated with HBV status. Of 172 participants, 64% were susceptible, 17% exposed (HBV core antibody-positive), and 19% demonstrated evidence of prior vaccination (HBV surface antibody ≥ 10 mIU/ml). Compared with exposed participants, susceptible participants were significantly more likely to be aged less than 35 years and significantly less likely to be receiving current opioid substitution therapy (OST) and to test hepatitis C antibody-positive. In comparison to vaccinated participants, susceptible participants were significantly more likely to be male and significantly less likely to report daily or more frequent injecting, current OST, and prior awareness of HBV vaccine. HBV vaccination uptake could potentially be increased by targeting younger, less frequent injectors, particularly young men. In addition to expanding vaccination through OST, targeting "at risk" youth who are likely to have missed adolescent catch-up programs may be an important strategy to increase coverage. The lack of an association between incarceration and vaccination also suggests increasing vaccination uptake and completion in adult and juvenile correctional facilities may also be important.

  5. Evaluation of a needle social marketing strategy to control HIV among injecting drug users in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zunyou; Luo, Wei; Sullivan, Sheena G; Rou, Keming; Lin, Peng; Liu, Wei; Ming, Zhongqiang

    2007-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a needle social marketing strategy to reduce needle sharing and hepatitis C Virus (HCV)/HIV transmission among injecting drug users (IDU) in China. Two-armed, prospective, community-randomized prevention trial. Four counties/townships in Guangxi and Guangdong provinces; one randomized to intervention the other to control in each province. Injecting drug users: 823 (443 intervention, 382 control) at baseline and 852 (415 intervention, 407 control) at the second cross-sectional survey 12 months later. A needle social marketing programme, including promotion of safe injection norms and increased access to clean needles over a 12 month period. Cross sectional surveys at baseline and follow-up compared changes in drug using behaviours and HIV and HCV rates in the intervention and control communities. Needle sharing behaviours were similar in the two groups at baseline (68.4 vs. 67.8%), and dropped significantly to 35.3% in the intervention community and remained relatively stable in the control community (62.3%; P < 0.001). In a subset of cohort of new injectors, the incidence of HCV was significant lower in intervention than in control in both provinces (P < 0.001, P = 0.014) and overall (P < 0.001) but HIV was only significantly lower in intervention in Guangdong (P = 0.011). Needle social marketing can reduce risky injecting behaviour and HIV/HCV transmission among injecting drug users in China and should be expanded.

  6. Massage-induced release of subcutaneously injected liposome-encapsulated drugs to the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskoy, V S; Whiteman, K R; Torchilin, V P; Wolf, G L

    1998-01-01

    Liposome-based, externally regulated drug delivery system is described in which liposome-encapsulated bioactive molecules can be delivered into the blood in response to simple mechanical action. Without any mechanical stimulation, subcutaneously injected 200 mm liposomes are usually trapped in the interstitial for prolonged time. However, upon lymphotropic stimulation (such as manual massage of the injection site), the liposomes can be mobilized into the blood via lymphatic pathway. Up to 40% of the injection dose can be delivered to the blood via lymphatic pathway from the injection site at the rabbit's front paw dorsum during 5 min manual massage cycle. Using vasoconstricting hormone angiotensin II as liposome-encapsulated pharmacological marker, we demonstrated that physiological response to encapsulated drug (average blood pressure increase) can also induced and modulated by massage. Massage itself was found to have no effect on the blood pressure. Modification of liposome surface with polyethylene glycol was found to increase blood localization of the liposome-encapsulated drug presumably due to decreasing the uptake of the drug carrier by lymph node macrophages. Pressure-dependent gaps between lymphatic capillary endothelial cells are thought to play the role of the size discrimination device allowing larger particulates into the lymphatics and, eventually into the blood after increase of interstitial pressure caused by injection site massage.

  7. Youth Reporters Discuss "Problem" Drugs. Youth Reports Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Elizabeth; And Others

    This report on drugs is based on mail responses received from urban and suburban high school students enrolled in college preparatory courses. The questions asked of these students included: (1) how do teenagers feel about the use of the various kinds of drugs by people their age? (2) what makes some teenagers use such drugs? (3) what keeps some…

  8. The impact of childhood emotional abuse on violence among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Stephanie; Wood, Evan; Dong, Huiru; Dobrer, Sabina; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Childhood emotional abuse is a known risk factor for various poor social and health outcomes. While people who inject drugs (IDU) report high levels of violence, in addition to high rates of childhood maltreatment, the relationship between childhood emotional abuse and later life violence within this population has not been examined. Cross-sectional data were derived from an open prospective cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada. Childhood emotional abuse was measured using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. We used multivariate logistic regression to examine potential associations between childhood emotional abuse and being a recent victim or perpetrator of violence. Between December 2005 and May 2013, 1437 IDU were eligible for inclusion in this analysis, including 465 (32.4%) women. In total, 689 (48.0%) reported moderate to severe history of childhood emotional abuse, whereas 333 (23.2%) reported being a recent victim of violence and 173 (12.0%) reported being a recent perpetrator of violence. In multivariate analysis, being a victim of violence (adjusted odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.94) and being a perpetrator of violence (adjusted odds ratio = 1.58, 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.24) remained independently associated with childhood emotional abuse. We found high rates of childhood emotional abuse and subsequent adult violence among this sample of IDU. Emotional abuse was associated with both victimisation and perpetration of violence. These findings highlight the need for policies and programmes that address both child abuse and historical emotional abuse among adult IDU. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  9. HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among hanka injection drug users in central Ukraine: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slobodyanyuk Pavel

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ukraine has experienced an increase in injection drug use since the 1990s. An increase in HIV and hepatitis C virus infections has followed, but not measures of prevalence and risk factors. The purposes of this study are to estimate the prevalence of HIV, HCV, and co-infection among injection drug users (IDUs in central Ukraine and to describe risk factors for HIV and HCV. Methods A sample of 315 IDUs was recruited using snowball sampling for a structured risk interview and HIV/HCV testing (81.9% male, 42% single, average age 28.9 years [range = 18 to 55]. Results HIV and HCV antibodies were detected in 14.0% and 73.0%, respectively, and 12.1% were seropositive for both infections. The most commonly used drug was hanka, home-made from poppy straw and often mixed with other substances including dimedrol, diazepines, and hypnotics. The average period of injecting was 8.5 years; 62.5% reported past-year sharing needles or injection equipment, and 8.0% shared with a known HIV-positive person. More than half (51.1% reported multiple sexual partners, 12.9% buying or selling sex, and 10.5% exchanging sex and drugs in the past year. Those who shared with HIV positive partners were 3.4 times more likely to be HIV positive than those who did not. Those who front- or back-loaded were 4 times more likely to be HCV positive than those who did not. Conclusion Harm reduction, addiction treatment and HIV prevention programs should address risk factors to stop further spread of both HIV and HCV among IDUs and to the general population in central Ukraine.

  10. High HIV Prevalence and Associated Risk Factors Among Female Sexual Partners of Male Injection Drug Users (MWID) in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadol, Patrick; Tran, Hoang; Hammett, Theodore; Phan, Son; Nguyen, Duong; Kaldor, John; Law, Matthew

    2016-02-01

    Injection drug use is a major factor in acquiring and transmitting HIV in Vietnam. This analysis aims to present estimates of HIV infection and factors associated with HIV infection among female sex partners (FSP) of MWID in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted in 2011 and 2013 among males who inject drugs (MWID) who then referred their FSP for a behavioral and biologic survey. In total, 445 MWID and FSPs were enrolled. HIV prevalence among MWID was 50 and 35 % among FSPs. Among FSPs, 60.3 % reported ever using illegal drugs and among those, 72.7 % reported ever injecting illicit drugs. Among FSP, injection drug for >1 year [adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR), 95 % CI 2.94, 1.19-7.26), p value = <0.001] and having a male partner infected with HIV [(aOR 3.35: 1.97-5.69), p value = <0.001] were associated with HIV infection. The prevalence of HIV infection is high among FSP of MWID in HCMC and is highly associated with the injection drug use behavior of the FSP. Harm-reduction intervention programs that focus on the MWID-FSP couple or directly on the FSPs are required.

  11. Modelling the force of infection for hepatitis B and hepatitis C in injecting drug users in England and Wales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hope VD

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injecting drug use is a key risk factor, for several infections of public health importance, especially hepatitis B (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV. In England and Wales, where less than 1% of the population are likely to be injecting drug users (IDUs, approximately 38% of laboratory reports of HBV, and 95% of HCV reports are attributed to injecting drug use. Methods Voluntary unlinked anonymous surveys have been performed on IDUs in contact with specialist agencies throughout England and Wales. Since 1990 more than 20,000 saliva samples from current IDUs have been tested for markers of infection for HBV, HCV testing has been included since 1998. The analysis here considers those IDUs tested for HBV and HCV (n = 5,682 from 1998–2003. This study derives maximum likelihood estimates of the force of infection (the rate at which susceptible IDUs acquire infection for HBV and HCV in the IDU population and their trends over time and injecting career length. The presence of individual heterogeneity of risk behaviour and background HBV prevalence due to routes of transmission other than injecting are also considered. Results For both HBV and HCV, IDUs are at greatest risk from infection in their first year of injecting (Forces of infection in new initiates 1999–2003: HBV = 0.1076 95% C.I: 0.0840–0.1327 HCV = 0.1608 95% C.I: 0.1314–0.1942 compared to experienced IDUs (Force of infection in experienced IDUs 1999–2003: HBV = 0.0353 95% C.I: 0.0198–0.0596, HCV = 0.0526 95% C.I: 0.0310–0.0863 although independently of this there is evidence of heterogeneity of risk behaviour with a small number of IDUs at increased risk of infection. No trends in the FOI over time were detected. There was only limited evidence of background HBV infection due to factors other than injecting. Conclusion The models highlight the need to increase interventions that target new initiates to injecting to reduce the transmission of blood-borne viruses

  12. Gas gangrene following intra-arterial injection of oral medication in a drug abuser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiart, D C; Andrade, B; Murie, J A

    1992-09-01

    We report a patient in whom intra-arterial injection of oral medication led to the development of fulminating gas gangrene and death, despite the initial clinical symptoms being minor. We believe that prophylactic antibiotics should be administered to patients following intra-arterial injection of oral medication especially if immunocompetence, such as from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, is likely.

  13. Hepatitis A and B among young persons who inject drugs--vaccination, past, and present infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Melissa G; Drobeniuc, Jan; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Garfein, Richard S; Kamili, Saleem; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2015-06-04

    Our study aims were to assess hepatitis A virus (HAV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) susceptibility and infection among young persons who inject drugs (PWID) who may have been vaccinated as children and to evaluate self-report of HAV and HBV vaccination. We recruited PWID aged 18-40 years-old in San Diego during 2009 and 2010 and collected demographic, socioeconomic, health, and behavioral factors. Participants were asked if they had been vaccinated against HAV and HBV, and serum samples were collected for HAV and HBV serologic testing. Of 519 participants, 365 (72%) were male, 252 (49%) were white non-Hispanic, 38 (7%) were Black non-Hispanic, 138 (27%) were White Hispanic, and 22 (4%) were born outside the U. S. Of the total participants, 245 (47%) had surface hepatitis B antibody (anti-HBs) titers Hepatitis B surface antigen was detected in 7 (1%) of total participants; and 135 (26%) were anti-HCV-antibody positive. Compared to serologic findings, self-report of HBV and HAV vaccination was 71% and 41% sensitive, and 58% and 73% specific, respectively. HAV and HBV antibodies in half or more of this young PWID population did not have levels indicative of protection, and about a quarter had HCV infection, putting them at risk for complications resulting from co-infection with HAV or HBV. Programs serving this population should vaccinate PWIDs against HAV and HBV and not rely on self-report of vaccination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A Case Report of Unusual Vasculitic Reaction After Methocarbamol Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Sahebari

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Descriptive case report of a 42-year old woman with coetaneous vasculitis, and severe abdominal pain, which was led to diagnostic laparotomy. These presentations are probably as a side effect of Methocarbamol injection. This is the first report according to our literature search (PubMed, google scholar, ISI web of knowledge, ProQuest, MD consult, Science Direct, SCOPUS about Methocarbamol related vasculitis from 1966 since now. Vasculitis is not a known side effect of Methocarbamol. This case indicates, likely the potential for development of vasculitis with this medication.

  15. Mujer Mas Segura (Safer Women: a combination prevention intervention to reduce sexual and injection risks among female sex workers who inject drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Alicia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs are at risk of acquiring HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STI and blood-borne infections through unprotected sex and sharing injection equipment. We conducted a 2×2 factorial randomized controlled trial to evaluate combination interventions to simultaneously reduce sexual and injection risks among FSW-IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Methods/design FSW-IDUs ≥18 years reporting sharing injection equipment and unprotected sex with clients within the last month were randomized to one of four conditions based on an a priori randomization schedule, blinding interviewer/counselors to assignment. Due to the extreme vulnerability of this population, we did not include a control group that would deny some women access to preventive information. All women received similar information regardless of group allocation; the difference was in the way the information was delivered and the extent to which women had an interactive role. Each condition was a single 60-minute session, including either an interactive or didactic version of an injection risk intervention and sexual risk intervention. Women underwent interviewer-administered surveys and testing for HIV, syphilis, gonorrhea, Chlamydia, and Trichomonas at baseline and quarterly for 12 months. Combined HIV/STI incidence will be the primary outcome. Secondary outcomes are proportionate reductions in sharing of injection equipment and unprotected sex with clients. Discussion Of 1,132 women, 548 (48.4% were excluded (88.9% were ineligible; 11.1% refused to participate or did not return; 584 eligible women enrolled (284 in Tijuana; 300 in Ciudad Juarez. All 584 participants completed the baseline interview, provided biological samples and were randomized to one of the four groups. During follow-up, 17 participants (2.9% were lost to follow-up, of whom 10 (58.8% had died, leaving 567 participants for analysis. This study

  16. Annual Report 2000: Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Office of Justice Programs.

    This annual report reflects changes to the National Institute of Justice's Drug Use Forecasting program. After several years of development and testing, the restructured program was fully implemented in 2000 as Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM). Probability-based sampling was adopted, the interview instrument (questionnaire) was enhanced to…

  17. Employment-based abstinence reinforcement promotes opiate and cocaine abstinence in out-of-treatment injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtyn, August F; Koffarnus, Mikhail N; DeFulio, Anthony; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O; Strain, Eric C; Schwartz, Robert P; Silverman, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    We examined the use of employment-based abstinence reinforcement in out-of-treatment injection drug users, in this secondary analysis of a previously reported trial. Participants (N = 33) could work in the therapeutic workplace, a model employment-based program for drug addiction, for 30 weeks and could earn approximately $10 per hr. During a 4-week induction, participants only had to work to earn pay. After induction, access to the workplace was contingent on enrollment in methadone treatment. After participants met the methadone contingency for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. After participants met those contingencies for 3 weeks, they had to provide opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples to maintain maximum pay. The percentage of drug-negative urine samples remained stable until the abstinence reinforcement contingency for each drug was applied. The percentage of opiate- and cocaine-negative urine samples increased abruptly and significantly after the opiate- and cocaine-abstinence contingencies, respectively, were applied. These results demonstrate that the sequential administration of employment-based abstinence reinforcement can increase opiate and cocaine abstinence among out-of-treatment injection drug users.

  18. Seroprevalence of HTLV1,2 Virus Among Injection Drug Addicts in Isfahan, 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Farzaneh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV, is a member of the retroviridae family. Infection with this virus leads to adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP. HTLV is endemic in Japan, parts of central Africa, Caribbean basin and Iran (Mashhad. Transmission routes of HTLV are believed to be from mother to child, especially during breastfeeding, sexual contact, and through blood transfusion or needle sharing. Considering the risk of HTLV infection among injection drug addicts, the authors evaluated the seroprevalence of HTLV1,2 infection among injection drug addicts in Isfahan Methods: This cross sectional study included a total of 150 injection drug users who were recruited at the drug abuse treatment clinic and the infectious diseases department of Alzahra university Hospital. Participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Epidemiologic data were recorded and their blood samples were tested for HBs Ag and antibodies against HTLV1,2, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C (HCV by Elisa method . Results were analyzed by SPSS software version 13. Results: Seroprevalence of HTLV1,2, HBV(HBs Ag, HCV and HIV was 2.7%, 1.3% 23.3% and 2.7%, respectively. Some of the subjects were co infected with two viruses. One patient was infected with both HCV Ab and HBs Ag , while another was positive for HIV Ab plus HBs Ag . Three were co infected with HCV and HIV. Among those with HTLV1,2, only one was HCV Ab positive. Only in one person with HTLV1,2 Ab had a positive history of blood transfusion. Conclusion: This study shows that this virus is present in injection drug users community of Isfahan and can be a potential source for transmission. But proposal of screening of HTLV1,2 among injection drug users in Isfahan requires further investigations.

  19. Injection Drug Use and Hepatitis C as Risk Factors for Mortality in HIV-Infected Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    May, Margaret T; Justice, Amy C; Birnie, Kate

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HIV-infected individuals with a history of transmission through injection drug use (IDU) have poorer survival than other risk groups. The extent to which higher rates of hepatitis C (HCV) infection in IDU explain survival differences is unclear. METHODS: Adults who started antiretrovi...

  20. HIV Infection among People Who Inject Drugs: The Challenge of Racial/Ethnic Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; McCarty, Dennis; Vega, William A.; Bramson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection, with minority groups typically having higher rates of infection, are a formidable public health challenge. In the United States, among both men and women who inject drugs, HIV infection rates are elevated among Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks. A meta-analysis of international research concluded that…

  1. 75 FR 1274 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Hyaluronate Sodium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... a supplemental new animal drug application (NADA) filed by Anika Therapeutics, Inc. The supplemental NADA provides for a revised human food safety warning for use of hyaluronate sodium injectable solution... Therapeutics, Inc., 236 W. Cummings Park, Woburn, MA 01801, filed a supplement to NADA 122-578 that provides...

  2. HIV Infection among People Who Inject Drugs: The Challenge of Racial/Ethnic Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; McCarty, Dennis; Vega, William A.; Bramson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection, with minority groups typically having higher rates of infection, are a formidable public health challenge. In the United States, among both men and women who inject drugs, HIV infection rates are elevated among Hispanics and non-Hispanic Blacks. A meta-analysis of international research concluded that…

  3. Active and latent tuberculosis among HIV-positive injecting drug users in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijerink, H.; Wisaksana, R.; Lestari, M.; Meilana, I.; Chaidir, L.; Ven, A.J. van der; Alisjahbana, B.; Crevel, R. van

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with tuberculosis but few data are available from low-income settings. We examined IDU in relation to active and latent tuberculosis (LTBI) among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia, which has a high burden of tuberculosis and a rapidly growing

  4. 78 FR 44432 - New Animal Drugs; Change of Sponsor; Fentanyl; Iron Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... sponsor for two approved new animal drug applications (NADAs) from Alstoe, Ltd., Animal Health, to Sogeval S.A., and a change of sponsor for an NADA from Nexcyon Pharmaceuticals, Inc. to Elanco Animal Health..., NADA 099-667 for IMPOSIL (iron dextran complex) Injection and NADA 110-399 for GLEPTOSIL...

  5. Comparative Effectiveness of Etanercept and Adalimumab in Patient Reported Outcomes and Injection-Related Tolerability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Navarro-Millán

    Full Text Available To describe patient preferences in selecting specific biologics and compare clinical response using patient reported outcomes (PROs among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA started on different anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF therapies.Participants were enrollees in Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Patients with RA who had at least two provider visits and started a new anti-TNF therapy from 10/2010-8/2011, were eligible for participation in this longitudinal study. Using a telephone survey, patient preferences in biologic selection and RAPID3, MDHAQ, and SF-12 scores were collected at baseline and at 6 months. Patient scores rating injection/infusion-site burning and stinging (ISBS were collected at 6 months.In all, 267 patients with RA responded to the baseline survey, of whom 57% preferred an injectable biologic, 22% preferred an infused biologic, and 21% had no preference. Motivation for injectable biologics was convenience (92% and for infusion therapy was dislike or lack of self-efficacy for self-injection (16%. After 6 months of treatment with anti-TNF, 70% of the 177 patients who answered the ISBS question reported ISBS with the last dose; on a scale of 1 (none to 10 (worst, 41% of these reported a score of 2-5; and 29% reported a score of 6-10. Adalimumab users experienced 3.2 times (95% confidence interval 1.2-8.6 the level of ISBS that etanercept users experienced. There were no significant differences in RAPID3, MDHAQ, or SF-12 scores between etanercept or adalimumab initiators.Convenience and fear of self-injection were important considerations to patients selecting a biologic drug. Although more convenient, adalimumab associated with more ISBS than did etanercept, and this rate was higher than reported in clinical trials. At 6 months, PROs did not differ between etanercept and adalimumab users.

  6. Spatial Epidemiology of HIV among Injection Drug Users in Tijuana, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Kimberly C.; Rusch, Melanie L.; Weeks, John R.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Magis-Rodríguez, Carlos; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2012-01-01

    The northwest border city of Tijuana is Mexico’s fifth largest and is experiencing burgeoning drug use and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemics. Since local geography influences disease risk, we explored the spatial distribution of HIV among injection drug users (IDUs). From 2006–2007, 1056 IDUs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling, and then followed for eighteen months. Participants underwent semi-annual surveys, mapping, and testing for HIV, tuberculosis, and syphilis. Using Average Nearest Neighbor and Getis-Ord Gi* statistics, locations where participants lived, worked, bought and injected drugs were compared with HIV status and environmental and behavioral factors. Median age was thirty-seven years; 85 percent were male. Females had higher HIV prevalence than males (10.2 percent vs. 3.4 percent; p=0.001). HIV cases at baseline (n=47) most strongly clustered by drug injection sites (Z-Score −6.173; p < 0.001), with a 16 km2 hotspot near the Mexico/U.S. border, encompassing the red-light district. Spatial correlates of HIV included syphilis infection, female gender, younger age, increased hours on the street per day, and higher number of injection partners. Almost all HIV seroconverters injected within a 2.5 block radius of each other immediately prior to seroconversion. Only history of syphilis infection and female gender were strongly associated with HIV in the area where incident cases injected. Directional trends suggested a largely static epidemic until July–December 2008, when HIV spread to the southeast, possibly related to intensified violence and policing that spiked in the latter half of 2008. While clustering allows for targeting interventions, the dynamic nature of epidemics suggests the importance of mobile treatment and harm reduction programs. PMID:23606753

  7. Never injected, but hepatitis C virus-infected: a study among self-declared never-injecting drug users from the Amsterdam Cohort Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.S.B. van den Berg; T.J.W. van de Laar; A. Kok; F.R. Zuure; R.A. Coutinho; M. Prins

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to gain insight in transmission routes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among never-injecting drug users (DU) by studying, incidence, prevalence, determinants and molecular epidemiology of HCV infection. From the Amsterdam Cohort Studies among DU, 352 never-injecting DU

  8. Injection of new psychoactive substance snow blow associated with recently acquired HIV infections among homeless people who inject drugs in Dublin, Ireland, 2015.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Giese, Coralie

    2015-10-08

    In February 2015, an outbreak of recently acquired HIV infections among people who inject drugs (PWID) was identified in Dublin, following similar outbreaks in Greece and Romania in 2011. We compared drug and risk behaviours among 15 HIV cases and 39 controls. Injecting a synthetic cathinone, snow blow, was associated with recent HIV infection (AOR: 49; p = 0.003). Prevention and control efforts are underway among PWID in Dublin, but may also be needed elsewhere in Europe.

  9. High risk behaviors of injection drug users registered with harm reduction programme in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memon Ashraf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surveillance data of Sindh AIDS Control Programme, Pakistan suggest that HIV infection is rapidly increasing among IDUs in Karachi and has reached 9% in 2004–5 indicating that the country has progressed from nascent to concentrated level of HIV epidemic. Findings of 2nd generation surveillance in 2004–5 also indicate 104/395 (26.3% IDUs HIV positive in the city. Methods We conducted a cross sectional study among registered IDUs of a needle exchange and harm reduction programme in Karachi, Pakistan. A total of 161 IDUs were included in the study between October–November 2003. A detailed questionnaire was implemented and blood samples were collected for HIV, hepatitis B & C and syphilis. HIV, hepatitis B and C antibody tests were performed using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA method. Syphilis tests (RPR & TPHA were performed on Randox kit. Besides calculating frequencies univariate analysis was performed using t tests for continuous variables as age, age at first intercourse and average age of initiation of addiction and chi square for categorical variables like paid for sex or not to identify risk factors for hepatitis B and C and syphilis. Results Average age of IDU was 35.9 years and average age of initiation of drugs was 15.9 years. Number of drug injections per day was 2.3. Shooting drugs in group sharing syringes was reported by 128 (79.5% IDUs. Over half 94 (58.3% reported paying for sex and 64% reported never using a condom. Commercial selling of blood was reported by 44 (28%. 1 of 161 was HIV positive (0.6%. The prevalence of hepatitis B was 12 (7.5%, hepatitis C 151 (94.3% and syphilis 21 (13.1%. IDUs who were hepatitis C positive were more likely to start sexual activity at an earlier age and had never used condoms. Similarly IDUs who were hepatitis B positive were more likely to belong to a younger age group. Syphilis positive IDUs were more likely to have paid for sex and had never used a condom

  10. When the dragon's awake: a needs assessment of people injecting drugs in a small urban centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Diana L; Goodyear, Lesley; Keough, Fran

    2008-06-01

    St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador is one of the smallest Canadian provincial capitals. Like other Canadian coastal communities, St. John's has been affected by dramatic economic and institutional restructuring that negatively impacted community health. Marginalized populations including people who inject drugs are more negatively affected by the gap between health needs and available services. A mixed methods needs assessment began with a survey and key informant and focus group interviews to determine attitudes, knowledge, and practices of people with current or previous experience injecting drugs. An environmental scan of programmes and services was conducted followed by a community consultation with key stakeholders, community agencies, study participants, the media, and members of the public to share and validate findings, solicit feedback, and gather data about future knowledge transfer activities. This paper examines two of the five barriers to health and health services for people injecting drugs: First, there was a discrepancy amongst people injecting drugs between awareness and use of safer practices, and second, there was a limited formalized network of health and social programmes and services. Accurate and timely information about safer practices, whilst an essential component of a harm reduction approach, is insufficient to reduce the risk of negative health outcomes for people injecting drugs. Funding new programmes and services, although desirable, is not always feasible in small urban centres with limited human and material resources. Recommendations for promoting health, reducing harm, and building local capacity must consider these limitations. Registered nurses are well positioned to provide leadership through collaborative community-based research, education and advocacy.

  11. Prevalence and genotypes of hepatitis C virus among injecting drug users from Salvador-BA, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Betânia S Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is the major infectious disease agent among injecting drug users (IDUs, with seroprevalence ranging from 50-90%. In this paper, serological and virological parameters were investigated among 194 IDUs, 94 ex-IDUs and 95 non-IDUs that were sampled by the "snowball" technique in three localities renowned for both intense drug use and trafficking activities in Salvador, Brazil. The majority of the participants were male, but sex and mean age differed significantly between IDUs/ex-IDUs and non-IDUs (p < 0.05. Anti-HCV screening revealed that 35.6%, 29.8% and 5.3% of samples from IDUs, ex-IDUs and non-IDUs, respectively, were seropositive. HCV-RNA detection confirmed that the prevalence of infection was 29.4%, 21.3% and 5.3% for IDUs, ex-IDUs and non-IDUs, respectively. Genotyping analysis among IDUs/ex-IDUs determined that 76.9% were infected with genotype 1, 18.5% with genotype 3 and 4.6% with a mixed genotype; this result differed significantly from non-IDUs, where genotype 3 was the most frequent (60%, followed by genotype 1 (20% and a mixed genotype (20%. We report a significantly higher prevalence of HCV infection in IDUs/ex-IDUs compared to the control group (p < 0.001. Although the sample size of our study was small, the differences in HCV genotype distribution reported herein for IDUs/ex-IDUs and non-IDUs warrant further investigation.

  12. People who inject drugs in intimate relationships: it takes two to combat HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bassel, Nabila; Shaw, Stacey A; Dasgupta, Anindita; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2014-03-01

    We reviewed papers published during the past 18 months (2012-2013) focusing on micro-social contexts of gender and power inequalities as drivers of HIV risks among people who inject drugs (PWID) in intimate heterosexual relationships. Although there has been a proliferation of social and behavioral research on the micro-social contexts of drug injection in heterosexual intimate relationships, there is still a gap in knowledge of these issues, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Research has identified couple-based approaches for PWID in intimate relationships as an effective HIV prevention strategy to address micro-social contexts driving HIV risks. While HIV incidence has declined in many countries, prevalence remains at troubling levels among PWID and transmission from PWID to their sex partners is increasing in many parts of the world. HIV prevention among drug-using couples must address the importance of the relationship dyad and micro-social contexts.

  13. Novel in vivo imaging analysis of an inner ear drug delivery system in mice: comparison of inner ear drug concentrations over time after transtympanic and systemic injections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Kanzaki

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Systemic steroid injections are used to treat idiopathic sudden-onset sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL and some inner ear disorders. Recent studies show that transtympanic (TT steroid injections are effective for treating ISSHL. As in vivo monitoring of drug delivery dynamics for inner ear is lacking, its time course and dispersion of drugs is unknown. Here, we used a new in vivo imaging system to monitor drug delivery in live mice and to compare drug concentrations over time after TT and systemic injections. METHODS: Luciferin delivered into the inner ears of GFAP-Luc transgenic mice reacted with luciferase in GFAP-expressing cells in the cochlear spiral ganglion, resulting in photon bioluminescence. We used the Xenogen IVIS® imaging system to measure how long photons continued to be emitted in the inner ear after TT or systemic injections of luciferin, and then compared the associated drug dynamics. RESULTS: The response to TT and IP injections differed significantly. Photons were detected five minutes after TT injection, peaking at ~20 minutes. By contrast, photons were first detected 30 minutes after i.p. injection. TT and i.p. drug delivery time differed considerably. With TT injections, photons were detected earlier than with IP injections. Photon bioluminescence also disappeared sooner. Delivery time varied with TT injections. CONCLUSIONS: We speculate that the drug might enter the Eustachian tube from the middle ear. We conclude that inner-ear drug concentration can be maintained longer if the two injection routes are combined. As the size of luciferin differs from that of therapeutics like dexamethasone, combining drugs with luciferin may advance our understanding of in vivo drug delivery dynamics in the inner ear.

  14. The effect of exposures to policing on syringe sharing among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Buxton, Jane A; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    While intensive drug law enforcement is recognized as a social-structural driver of HIV epidemics among people who inject drugs (IDU), few studies have investigated the effects of direct encounters with police, particularly in Asian settings. Using multivariate log-binomial regression, we examined the relationship between syringe sharing and exposures to two types of policing practices among IDU in Bangkok, Thailand: having been beaten by police and having been tested for illicit drugs by police. Between July and October 2011, 435 IDU participated in the study, with 75 (17.2 %) participants reporting syringe sharing in the past 6 months. In multivariate analyses, exposures to the two types of policing practices had an independent effect on syringe sharing, with experiencing both practices showing the greatest effect. These findings highlight the importance of addressing the policy and social environment surrounding IDU as a means of HIV prevention.

  15. Sexual violence from police and HIV risk behaviours among HIV-positive women who inject drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia – a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Lunze

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Police violence against people who inject drugs (PWID is common in Russia and associated with HIV risk behaviours. Sexual violence from police against women who use drugs has been reported anecdotally in Russia. This mixed-methods study aimed to evaluate sexual violence from police against women who inject drugs via quantitative assessment of its prevalence and HIV risk correlates, and through qualitative interviews with police, substance users and their providers in St. Petersburg, Russia. Methods: Cross-sectional analyses with HIV-positive women who inject drugs (N=228 assessed the associations between sexual violence from police (i.e. having been forced to have sex with a police officer and the following behaviours: current drug use, needle sharing and injection frequency using multiple regression models. We also conducted in-depth interviews with 23 key informants, including PWID, police, civil society organization workers, and other stakeholders, to explore qualitatively the phenomenon of sexual violence from police in Russia and strategies to address it. We analyzed qualitative data using content analysis. Results: Approximately one in four women in our quantitative study (24.1%; 95% CI, 18.6%, 29.7% reported sexual violence perpetrated by police. Affected women reported more transactional sex for drugs or money than those who were not; however, the majority of those reporting sexual violence from police were not involved in these forms of transactional sex. Sexual violence from police was not significantly associated with current drug use or needle sharing but with more frequent drug injections (adjusted incidence rate ratio 1.43, 95% CI 1.04, 1.95. Qualitative data suggested that sexual violence and coercion by police appear to be entrenched as a norm and are perceived insurmountable because of the seemingly absolute power of police. They systematically add to the risk environment of women who use drugs in Russia

  16. Differences in sociodemographic, drug use and health characteristics between never, former and current injecting, problematic hard-drug users in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havinga, Petra; van der Velden, Claudia; de Gee, Anouk; van der Poel, Agnes; Yin, Huifang

    2014-01-01

    Background: Injecting drug users are at increased risk for harmful effects compared to non-injecting drug users. Some studies have focused on differences in characteristics between these two groups (e. g., housing, overall health). However, no study has investigated the specific Dutch situation whic

  17. The intersection between sex and drugs: a cross-sectional study among the spouses of injection drug users in Chennai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Santhanam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is estimated that there are up to 1.1 million injection drug users (IDUs in India; the majority are likely married. We characterize HIV, hepatitis B (HBV and hepatitis C (HCV prevalence and the risk environment of a sample of spouses of IDUs. Methods A cohort of 1158 IDUs (99% male was recruited in Chennai, India from 2005-06. A convenience sample of 400 spouses of the male IDUs in this cohort was recruited in 2009. A risk assessment questionnaire was administered and a blood sample collected. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with prevalent HIV. Results Median age was 31 years; thirteen percent were widowed and 7% were not currently living with their spouse. Only 4 (1% reported ever injecting drugs; Twenty-two percent and 25% reported ever using non-injection drugs and alcohol, respectively. The majority had one lifetime sexual partner and 37 (9% reporting exchanging sex. Only 7% always used condoms with their regular partner. HIV, HBV and HCV prevalence were 2.5%, 3.8% and 0.5%, respectively; among spouses of HIV+ IDUs (n = 78, HIV prevalence was 10.3%. The strongest predictor of HIV was spousal HIV status (OR: 17.9; p Conclusions Our finding of a 10-fold higher HIV prevalence among spouses of IDUs compared with general population women indicates their vulnerability; prevalence is likely to increase given the context of low condom use and frequent sexual violence. Prevention efforts directed at IDUs should also include programs for spouses.

  18. Addiction treatment and stable housing among a cohort of injection drug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Palepu

    Full Text Available Unstable housing and homelessness is prevalent among injection drug users (IDU. We sought to examine whether accessing addiction treatment was associated with attaining stable housing in a prospective cohort of IDU in Vancouver, Canada.We used data collected via the Vancouver Injection Drug User Study (VIDUS between December 2005 and April 2010. Attaining stable housing was defined as two consecutive "stable housing" designations (i.e., living in an apartment or house during the follow-up period. We assessed exposure to addiction treatment in the interview prior to the attainment of stable housing among participants who were homeless or living in single room occupancy (SRO hotels at baseline. Bivariate and multivariate associations between the baseline and time-updated characteristics and attaining stable housing were examined using Cox proportional hazard regression models.Of the 992 IDU eligible for this analysis, 495 (49.9% reported being homeless, 497 (50.1% resided in SRO hotels, and 380 (38.3% were enrolled in addiction treatment at the baseline interview. Only 211 (21.3% attained stable housing during the follow-up period and of this group, 69 (32.7% had addiction treatment exposure prior to achieving stable housing. Addiction treatment was inversely associated with attaining stable housing in a multivariate model (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR]=0.71; 95% CI: 0.52-0.96. Being in a partnered relationship was positively associated with the primary outcome (AHR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.02-1.88. Receipt of income assistance (AHR=0.65; 95% CI: 0.44-0.96, daily crack use (AHR=0.69; 95% CI: 0.51-0.93 and daily heroin use (AHR=0.63; 95% CI: 0.43-0.92 were negatively associated with attaining stable housing.Exposure to addiction treatment in our study was negatively associated with attaining stable housing and may have represented a marker of instability among this sample of IDU. Efforts to stably house this vulnerable group may be occurring in contexts

  19. HIV Testing in Non-Injection Drug Users: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves Guimarães, Rafael; Lucchese, Roselma; Lara Fernandes, Inaina; Vera, Ivânia; Goulart Rodovalho, Aurélio; Alves Guimarães, Vanessa; Cristina Silva, Graciele; Lopes de Felipe, Rodrigo; Alexandre de Castro, Paulo; Martins Ferreira, Priscilla

    2017-05-24

    The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of and identify factors associated with lifetime testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in non-injection drug users (NIDU). A cross-sectional study was conducted with 323 individuals in clinics for chemical dependency in the state of Goiás in the Central-West region of Brazil. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with lifetime HIV testing. Testing for HIV was associated with age, female gender, crack use, history of sexually transmitted infections, acquaintance with people living with HIV/AIDS and/or who had died from AIDS, and history of having received some instruction on HIV/AIDS prevention methods. It was found that only 26.6% reported having access to the HIV rapid test. We concluded determinants for HIV testing must be taken into account when planning prevention and programming strategies. These include the widening of testing coverage among NIDU, educational health actions, establishment of links between sexually transmitted infection prevention services and addiction treatment services, and the use of rapid tests to help people who are in contact with the virus learn about their HIV status, enter treatment, and improve their quality of life.

  20. 300 Area Uranium Stabilization Through Polyphosphate Injection: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mackley, Rob D.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Williams, Mark D.

    2009-06-30

    The objective of the treatability test was to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to treat uranium-contaminated groundwater in situ. A test site consisting of an injection well and 15 monitoring wells was installed in the 300 Area near the process trenches that had previously received uranium-bearing effluents. This report summarizes the work on the polyphosphate injection project, including bench-scale laboratory studies, a field injection test, and the subsequent analysis and interpretation of the results. Previous laboratory tests have demonstrated that when a soluble form of polyphosphate is injected into uranium-bearing saturated porous media, immobilization of uranium occurs due to formation of an insoluble uranyl phosphate, autunite [Ca(UO2)2(PO4)2•nH2O]. These tests were conducted at conditions expected for the aquifer and used Hanford soils and groundwater containing very low concentrations of uranium (10-6 M). Because autunite sequesters uranium in the oxidized form U(VI) rather than forcing reduction to U(IV), the possibility of re-oxidation and subsequent re-mobilization is negated. Extensive testing demonstrated the very low solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of autunite. In addition to autunite, excess phosphorous may result in apatite mineral formation, which provides a long-term source of treatment capacity. Phosphate arrival response data indicate that, under site conditions, the polyphosphate amendment could be effectively distributed over a relatively large lateral extent, with wells located at a radial distance of 23 m (75 ft) reaching from between 40% and 60% of the injection concentration. Given these phosphate transport characteristics, direct treatment of uranium through the formation of uranyl-phosphate mineral phases (i.e., autunite) could likely be effectively implemented at full field scale. However, formation of calcium-phosphate mineral phases using the selected three-phase approach was problematic. Although

  1. HCV infection prevalence lower than expected among 18-40-year-old injection drug users in San Diego, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfein, Richard S; Rondinelli, Amanda; Barnes, Richard F W; Cuevas, Jazmine; Metzner, Mitcheal; Velasquez, Michele; Rodriguez, David; Reilly, Meredith; Xing, Jian; Teshale, Eyasu H

    2013-06-01

    San Diego, California shares the world's busiest land border crossing with Tijuana, Mexico-a city where 95 % of injection drug users (IDUs) test hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody-positive. Yet, little is known about the prevalence and risk behaviors for HCV among IDUs in San Diego. In 2009-2010, 18-40-year-old IDUs in San Diego County completed a risk assessment interview and serologic testing for HCV and HIV infection. Recruitment involved respondent-driven sampling, venue-based sampling at a syringe exchange program, and convenience sampling. Correlates of HCV infection were identified by multivariable logistic regression. Among 510 current IDUs, 26.9 % (95 % CI 23.0-30.7 %) and 4.2 % (95 % CI 2.4-5.9 %) had been infected with HCV and HIV, respectively. Overall, median age was 28 years; 74 % were male; 60 % white and 29 % Hispanic; and 96 % were born in the U.S. Median years of injecting was 6; 41 % injected daily; 60 % injected heroin most often; 49 % receptively shared syringes and 68 % shared other injection paraphernalia; and only 22 % reported always using new syringes in the past 3 months. Two thirds had ever traveled to Mexico and 19 % injected in Mexico. HCV infection was independently associated with sharing injection paraphernalia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.69) and SEP use (AOR = 2.17) in the previous 3 months, lifetime history of drug overdose (AOR = 2.66), and increased years of injecting (AOR = 2.82, all P values Diego was modest compared to other US cities and much lower than Tijuana. Given that known individual-level HCV risk factors were common in San Diego, the city's lower HCV prevalence might be due to differences in social and structural factors between the cities.

  2. Trends in the AIDS epidemic among New York City’s injection drug users: Localized or citywide?

    OpenAIRE

    Rockwell, Russell; Deren, Sherry; Goldstein, Marjorie F.; Friedman, Samuel R.; Don C Des Jarlais

    2002-01-01

    The New York City injection drug user acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (IDU AIDS)epidemic accounts for almost one quarter of AIDS cases in IDUs in the United States. Recent studies have reported declines in seroprevalence and risk behaviors among IDUs in New York City during the 1990s. These trends, however, are based on studies primarily conducted in the city’s central borough of Manhattan. This article analyzes data from all five boroughs of New York City to examine trends over phases of ...

  3. Prevalence and predictors of injection drug use and risky sexual behaviors among adolescents in substance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurstone, Christian; Salomonsen-Sautel, Stacy; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K; Hartman, Christie A; Sakai, Joseph T; Hoffenberg, Analice S; McQueen, Matt B; Min, Sung-Joon; Crowley, Thomas J; Corley, Robin P; Hewitt, John K; Hopfer, Christian J

    2013-01-01

    The longitudinal risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection following adolescent substance treatment is not known. Therefore, it is not known if adolescent substance treatment should include HIV prevention interventions. To address this important research gap, this study evaluates the longitudinal prevalence and predictors of injection drug use (IDU) and sex risk behaviors among adolescents in substance treatment. Participants were 260 adolescents (13-18 years) in substance treatment and 201 community control adolescents (11-19 years). Participants were assessed at baseline and follow-up (mean time between assessments = 6.9 years for the clinical sample and 5.6 years for the community control sample). Outcomes included self-report lifetime history of IDU, number of lifetime sex partners and frequency of unprotected sexual intercourse. At baseline, 7.5% of the clinical sample, compared to 1.0% of the community control sample had a lifetime history of IDU (χ12=10.53, p = .001). At follow-up, 17.4% of the clinical sample compared to 0% of the community control sample had a lifetime history of IDU (χ12=26.61, p = .0005). The number of baseline substance use disorders and onset age of marijuana use significantly predicted the presence of lifetime IDU at follow-up, after adjusting for baseline age, race, and sex. The clinical sample reported more lifetime sex partners and more frequent unprotected sex than the community control sample at baseline and follow-up. Many adolescents in substance treatment develop IDU and report persistent risky sex. Effective risk reduction interventions for adolescents in substance treatment are needed that address both IDU and risky sex. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  4. Latent classes of polydrug and polyroute use and associations with human immunodeficiency virus risk behaviours and overdose among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Meredith C; Roesch, Scott C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Lindsay, Suzanne; Gonzalez-Zuniga, Patricia; Gaines, Tommi L

    2017-03-24

    Patterns of polydrug use among people who inject drugs (PWID) may be differentially associated with overdose and unique human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk factors. Subgroups of PWID in Tijuana, Mexico, were identified based on substances used, route of administration, frequency of use and co-injection indicators. Participants were PWID residing in Tijuana age ≥18 years sampled from 2011 to 2012 who reported injecting an illicit substance in the past month (n = 735). Latent class analysis identified discrete classes of polydrug use characterised by 11 indicators of past 6 months substance use. Multinomial logistic regression examined class membership association with HIV risk behaviours, overdose and other covariates using an automated three-step procedure in mplus to account for classification error. Participants were classified into five subgroups. Two polydrug and polyroute classes were defined by use of multiple substances through several routes of administration and were primarily distinguished from each other by cocaine use (class 1: 5%) or no cocaine use (class 2: 29%). The other classes consisted primarily of injectors: cocaine, methamphetamine and heroin injection (class 3: 4%); methamphetamine and heroin injection (class 4: 10%); and heroin injection (class 5: 52%). Compared with the heroin-only injection class, memberships in the two polydrug and polyroute use classes were independently associated with both HIV injection and sexual risk behaviours. Substance use patterns among PWID in Tijuana are highly heterogeneous, and polydrug and polyroute users are a high-risk subgroup who may require more tailored prevention and treatment interventions. [Meacham MC, Roesch SC, Strathdee SA, Lindsay S, Gonzalez-Zuniga P, Gaines TL. Latent classes of polydrug and polyroute use and associations with human immunodeficiency virus risk behaviours and overdose among people who inject drugs in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017

  5. Mortality among young injection drug users in San Francisco: a 10-year follow-up of the UFO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jennifer L; Tsui, Judith I; Hahn, Judith A; Davidson, Peter J; Lum, Paula J; Page, Kimberly

    2012-02-15

    This study examined associations between mortality and demographic and risk characteristics among young injection drug users in San Francisco, California, and compared the mortality rate with that of the population. A total of 644 young (UFO ("U Find Out") Study, from November 1997 to December 2007. Using the National Death Index, the authors identified 38 deaths over 4,167 person-years of follow-up, yielding a mortality rate of 9.1 (95% confidence interval: 6.6, 12.5) per 1,000 person-years. This mortality rate was 10 times that of the general population. The leading causes of death were overdose (57.9%), self-inflicted injury (13.2%), trauma/accidents (10.5%), and injection drug user-related medical conditions (13.1%). Mortality incidence was significantly higher among those who reported injecting heroin most days in the past month (adjusted hazard ratio = 5.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 24.3). The leading cause of death in this group was overdose, and primary use of heroin was the only significant risk factor for death observed in the study. These findings highlight the continued need for public health interventions that address the risk of overdose in this population in order to reduce premature deaths.

  6. Injecting drugs of abuse and immunity: implications for HIV vaccine testing and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugen, Kenneth E; Nyland, Susan B

    2006-11-01

    The recreational use of legal and illegal drugs has significant effects on immune responses and can potentially modulate susceptibility to infection by a number of pathogens. A number of agents including cannabinoids (marijuana), cocaine opiates, amphetamines, nicotine and alcohol were demonstrated to have potentially adverse effects on the susceptibility to infections, mediated most likely, by adverse effects on immunity. As such, these drugs of abuse could have significant and potentially adverse effects on the vaccination efficacy of a number of vaccines currently on the market and on potential experimental vaccines currently in the pipeline. This review will present an overview on how drugs of abuse potentially impacts immune responses and vaccination efficacy. The emphasis of this review will be the effects of opiate abuse, as exemplified by injecting/intravenous drug users (IDU), on HIV/AIDS and its potential impact on vaccine efficacy trials against this devastating infection/syndrome.

  7. Injection Drug Use Quality of Life scale (IDUQOL: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing measures of injection drug users' quality of life have focused primarily on health and health-related factors. Clearly, however, quality of life among injection drug users is impacted by a range of unique cultural, socioeconomic, medical, and geographic factors that must also be considered in any measure. The Injection Drug User Quality of Life (IDUQOL scale was designed to capture the unique and individual circumstances that determine quality of life among injection drug users. The overall purpose of the present study was to examine the validity of inferences made from the IDUQOL by examining the (a dimensionality, (b reliability of scores, (c criterion-related validity evidence, and (d both convergent and discriminant validity evidence. Methods An exploratory factor analysis using principal axis factoring in SPSS 12.0 was conducted to determine whether the use of a total score on the IDUQOL was advisable. Reliability of scores from the IDUQOL was obtained using internal consistency and one-week test-retest reliability estimates. Criterion-related validity evidence was gathered using variables such as stability of housing, sex trade involvement, high-risk injection behaviours, involvement in treatment programs, emergency treatment or overdose over the previous six months, hospitalization and emergency treatment over the subsequent six month period post data collection. Convergent and discriminant validity evidence was gathered using measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social desirability. Results The sample consisted of 241 injection drug users ranging in age from 19 to 61 years. Factor analysis supports the use of a total score. Both internal consistency (alpha = .88 and one-week test-retest reliability (r = .78 for IDUQOL total scores were good. Criterion-related, convergent, and discriminant validity evidence supports the interpretation of IDUQOL total scores as measuring a construct consistent with

  8. Comparison of HIV infection risk behaviors among injection drug users from East and West Coast US cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfein, Richard S; Monterroso, Edgar R; Tong, Tony C; Vlahov, David; Des Jarlais, Don C; Selwyn, Peter; Kerndt, Peter R; Word, Carl; Fernando, M Daniel; Ouellet, Lawrence J; Holmberg, Scott D

    2004-06-01

    This study assessed whether behavioral differences explained higher human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence among injection drug users (IDUs) in three East Coast versus two West Coast cities in the United States. Sociodemographic, sexual, and injecting information were collected during semiannual face-to-face interviews. Baseline data from New York City; Baltimore, Maryland; and New Haven, Connecticut, were compared with data from Los Angeles, California, and San Jose, California. Among 1,528 East Coast and 1,149 West Coast participants, HIV sero-prevalence was 21.5% and 2.3%, respectively (odds ratio [OR] 11.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] 7.9-17.8). HIV risk behaviors were common among IDUs on both coasts, and several were more common among West Coast participants. Adjusting for potential risk factors, East (vs. West) Coast of residence remained highly associated with HIV status (adjusted OR 12.14; 95% CI 7.36-20.00). Differences in HIV sero-prevalence between East and West Coast cities did not reflect self-reported injection or sexual risk behavior differences. This suggests that other factors must be considered, such as the probability of having HIV-infected injection or sexual partners. Prevention efforts are needed on the West Coast to decrease HIV-associated risk behaviors among IDUs, and further efforts are also needed to reduce HIV incidence on the East Coast.

  9. The provision of non-needle/syringe drug injecting paraphernalia in the primary prevention of HCV among IDU: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Syed

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sharing drug injecting paraphernalia other than needles and syringes (N/S has been implicated in the transmission of Hepatitis C virus (HCV among injecting drug users (IDU. We aimed to determine whether the provision of sterile non-N/S injecting paraphernalia reduces injecting risk behaviours or HCV transmission among IDU. Methods A systematic search of seven databases and the grey literature for articles published January 1989-February 2010 was undertaken. Thirteen studies (twelve observational and one non-randomized uncontrolled pilot intervention were identified and appraised for study design and quality by two investigators. Results No studies examined the association between the provision of non-N/S injecting paraphernalia and incident HCV infection. One cross-sectional study found that individuals who frequently, compared to those who infrequently, used sterile cookers and water, were less likely to report prevalent HCV infection. Another found no association between the uptake of sterile non-N/S injecting paraphernalia and self-reported sharing of this paraphernalia. The remaining observational studies used attendance at needle and syringe exchange programmes (NSP or safer injection facilities (SIF that provided non-N/S injecting paraphernalia as a proxy measure. Eight studies presented adjusted odds ratios, ranging from 0.3 to 0.9, suggesting a reduced likelihood of self-reported sharing of non-N/S injecting paraphernalia associated with use of NSP or SIF. There was substantial uncertainty associated with these estimates however. Three unadjusted studies reported a reduction in the prevalence of sharing of non-N/S injecting paraphernalia over time among NSP users. Only one study reported an adjusted temporal trend in the prevalence of sharing non-N/S injecting paraphernalia, finding higher rates among non-NSP users than NSP users at each time point, and a greater reduction in sharing among non-NSP than NSP users over

  10. Hepatitis-C virus infection among injecting drug users in Lahore, Pakistan: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Abdul Majeed; Majeed, Sadia; Jamil, Muhammad; Rehman, Abdul; Majeed, Sufia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus among injecting drugs users, furthermore different genotypes of HCV infection and their effect on viral load were also found and subsequently most prevalent subtype was predicted. Methods: All samples were processed for Anti-HCV antibody detection through ELISA by using third generation ELISA Kit. The Anti-HCV positive serum samples were stored for RT-PCR to estimate the viral load and genotypes of HCV for study. Injecting drug users selected from in and around Lahore Metropolitan from July 2012 to August 2013 was included. The data analysis was completed by using SPSS version 16. A p-value of < 0.05 was considered to be significant. Results: A total of 241 Injecting drug users were enrolled and screened for Anti HCV in the study. Prevalence of HCV infection in IDUs from Lahore was found to be 36.09%. Education (p=0.000), low socioeconomic status (p=0.011), Blood transfusion (0.003), any tattoo on the body (p=0.002), use of injectable drugs with reused syringes (p=0.000) and sharing of syringes (p=0.001) in groups was significantly associated with HCV infection. Some utensils were also significantly associated with HCV status. The most common subtype of HCV genotype was 3a (n=65) followed by 2a (n=15) and 1a (n=6). Conclusion: The study reveals that IDUs with reused syringes status and sharing of syringes in group had more chances to get HCV infection. The viral load in IDUs infected with different subtypes of genotype was significantly associated. PMID:27182243

  11. Employment-Based Reinforcement of Adherence to Oral Naltrexone Treatment in Unemployed Injection Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J.; Donlin, Wendy D.; Aklin, Will M.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S.; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E.; Silverman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence; however suffers from notoriously poor adherence when prescribed for oral self-administration. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could be used to reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a Contingency (n=35) or Prescription (n=32) group fo...

  12. New evidence on the HIV epidemic in Libya: why countries must implement prevention programs among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzoyan, Lusine; Berendes, Sima; Jeffery, Caroline; Thomson, Joanna; Ben Othman, Hussain; Danon, Leon; Turki, Abdullah A; Saffialden, Rabea; Valadez, Joseph J

    2013-04-15

    Libya had one of the world's largest nosocomial HIV outbreaks in the late 1990 s leading to the detention of 6 foreign medical workers. They were released in 2007 after the Libyan Government and the European Union agreed to humanitarian cooperation that included the development of Libya's first National HIV Strategy and the research reported in this article. Despite the absence of sound evidence on the status and dynamics of Libya's HIV epidemic, some officials posited that injecting drug use was the main mode of transmission. We therefore sought to assess HIV prevalence and related risk factors among people who inject drugs (PWID) in Tripoli. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 328 PWID in Tripoli using respondent-driven sampling. We collected behavioral data and blood samples for HIV, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus testing. We estimate an HIV prevalence of 87%, hepatitis C virus prevalence of 94%, and hepatitis B virus prevalence of 5%. We detected injecting drug use-related and sexual risk factors in the context of poor access to comprehensive services for HIV prevention and mitigation. For example, most respondents (85%) reported having shared needles. In this first biobehavioral survey among PWID in Libya, we detected one of the highest (or even the highest) levels of HIV infection worldwide in the absence of a comprehensive harm-reduction program. There is an urgent need to implement an effective National HIV Strategy informed by the results of this research, especially because recent military events and related sociopolitical disruption and migration might lead to a further expansion of the epidemic.

  13. Comparison of injecting drug users who obtain syringes from pharmacies and syringe exchange programs in Tallinn, Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talu Ave

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both syringe exchange programs (SEPs and pharmacy sales of syringes are available in Estonia, though the current high incidence and high prevalence of HIV among injection drug users (IDUs in Tallinn, Estonia requires large-scale implementation of additional harm reduction programs as a matter of great urgency. The aims of this report were to compare risk behavior and HIV infection and to assess the prevention needs among IDUs who primarily use pharmacies as their source of sterile syringes with IDUs who primarily use SEPs in Tallinn. Methods A cross-sectional study using respondent-driven sampling was used to recruit 350 IDUs for an interviewer-administered survey and HIV testing. IDUs were categorized into two groups based on their self-reported main source for syringes within the last six months. Odds ratios with 95% CI were used to compare characteristics and risk factors between the groups. Results The main sources of sterile needles for injection drug users were SEP/SEP outreach (59% and pharmacies (41%. There were no differences in age, age at injection drug use initiation, the main drug used or experiencing overdoses. Those IDUs using pharmacies as a main source of sterile needles had lower odds for being infected with either HIV (AOR 0.54 95% CI 0.33–0.87 or HCV (AOR 0.10 95% CI 0.02–0.50, had close to twice the odds of reporting more than one sexual partner within the previous 12 months (AOR 1.88 95% CI 1.17–3.04 and engaging in casual sexual relationships (AOR 2.09 95% CI 1.24–3.53 in the last six months. Conclusion The data suggest that the pharmacy users were at a less "advanced" stage of their injection career and had lower HIV prevalence than SEP users. This suggests that pharmacies could be utilized as a site for providing additional HIV prevention messages, services for IDUs and in linking IDUs with existing harm reduction services.

  14. Short-term declines in CD4 levels associated with cocaine use in HIV-1 seropositive, minority injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, N. S.; Brown, L. S.; Makuch, R. W.

    1993-01-01

    This study evaluates the association of cocaine use with short-term change in CD4 counts among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) seropositive, minority injecting drug users prior to the introduction of zidovudine (AZT). Ninety-eight HIV-1 seropositive subjects were recruited from six inner-city, methadone maintenance clinics. A baseline assessment included a short questionnaire regarding drug behavior and quantitation of CD4 cell counts. These measures were repeated on all subjects 3 to 4 months later. Thirty-eight subjects reported using cocaine between baseline and 4-month follow-up evaluations. Males and African Americans were more likely to be cocaine users (P < .01). Cocaine users were more likely to engage in heroin and needle use (P < .001). Cocaine users experienced a significant decline in CD4 cells compared with nonusers (P = .013); no marked difference in CD4 decline was noted between heroin users and nonusers (P = .19). Multivariate analysis showed that a decline in CD4 counts was 2.82 times more likely to occur in cocaine users than in cocaine nonusers (90% two-sided confidence interval of 1.08, 7.37). These findings support the hypothesis of a possible link between cocaine use and short-term CD4 decline in HIV-1 seropositive injecting drug users. PMID:8478971

  15. Consumer reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Lise; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Hansen, Ebba Holme

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reporting adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has traditionally been the sole province of healthcare professionals. Since 2003 in Denmark, consumers have been able to report ADRs directly to the authorities. The objective of this study was to compare ADRs reported by consumers with ADRs...... reported from other sources, in terms of their type, seriousness and the suspected medicines involved. METHODS: The number of ADRs reported to the Danish ADR database from 2004 to 2006 was analysed in terms of category of reporter, seriousness, category of ADRs by system organ class (SOC) and the suspected...... medicines on level 1 of the anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classification system. ADR reports from consumers were compared with reports from other sources (physicians, pharmacists, lawyers, pharmaceutical companies and other healthcare professionals). Chi-square and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated...

  16. Hepatitis-B Infections among the Injection Drug Abusers: An Emerging Risk in Public Health, Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, K J; Nandi, A K

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the incidence of Hepatitis-B (HBV) infection among the injection drugs abusers (IDUs). The research work was a cross-sectional study. A total of 400 IDUs were selected from July 2012 to June 2013 at the Outpatient Department of the Central Drug Addiction Treatment Center, Tejgaon, Dhaka, Bangladesh. They were selected consecutively following the purposive sampling method on the basis of defined selection criteria. Research instruments were a pre-tested interviewer questionnaire and blood specimen. Results showed that 79.70%(315) of the IDUs were found literate and 20.3%(85) illiterate. In present occupation, majority of them 60.5%(242) had no work and 39.5%(158) specific occupation. The mean age of them was 27.9±6.4 years. In marital status, 46.5%(186) were unmarried, 20.7%(83) married after addiction and 30.3%(121) married before addiction. Majority of the IDUs 75.2%(289) started their addiction with cannabis. In addition to injection drugs use, all of them were multiple drug abusers. In response to the sharing of needle, 35.7%(143) of the IDUs shared needle uncommonly and 64.3%(257) did not shared it at all. Ninety-three percent (372) of them were heterosexual and polygamous having extramarital sex with multiple partners. The quality of sex-partners was wife, friends, brothel & hotel based sex sellers and street sex sellers. Majority of IDUs {82.0%(328)} did not use condom at all and 15.5(62) sold blood several times in their lifetime. Seven percent {7.0%(28)} injection drug abusers had been suffering from hepatitis-B virus (HBV) infection. HBV infection was found to be significantly (p≥0.05) associated with the quality of sex partners and number of sex partners, and age and marital status. There is no significant association with sharing of needle particularly occasional sharing of needle. Altering the behaviors of IDUs, especially their sexual lifestyles, drug habit, using of disposable syringe without sharing of

  17. Attitudes toward Methadone among Out-of-Treatment Minority Injection Drug Users: Implications for Health Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolas D. Zaller

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Injection drug use (IDU continues to be a significant public health issue in the U.S. and internationally, and there is evidence to suggest that the burden of injection drug use and associatedmorbidity and mortality falls disproportionately on minority communities. IDU is responsible for a significant portion of new and existing HIV/AIDS cases in many parts of the world. In the U.S., the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C virus is higher among populations of African-American and Latino injection drug users (IDUs than among white IDUs. Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT has been demonstrated to effectively reduce opiate use, HIV risk behaviors and transmission, general mortality and criminal behavior, but opiate-dependent minorities are less likely to access MMT than whites. A better understanding of the obstacles minority IDUs face accessing treatment is needed to engage racial and ethnic disparities in IDU as well as drug-related morbidity and mortality. In this study, we explore knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about methadone among 53 out-of-treatment Latino and African-American IDUs in Providence, RI. Our findings suggest that negative perceptions of methadone persist among racial and ethnic minority IDUs in Providence, including beliefs that methadone is detrimental to health and that people should attempt to discontinue methadone treatment. Additional potential obstacles to entering methadone therapy include cost and the difficulty of regularly attending a methadone clinic as well as the belief that an individual on MMT is not abstinent from drugs. Substance use researchers and treatment professionals should engage minority communities, particularly Latino communities, in order to better understand the treatment needs of a diverse population, develop culturally appropriate MMT programs, and raise awareness of the benefits of MMT.

  18. Behavioral Risk Reduction in a Declining HIV Epidemic: Injection Drug Users in New York City, 1990-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Perlis, Theresa; Friedman, Samuel R.; Chapman, Timothy; Kwok, John; Rockwell, Russell; Paone, Denise; Milliken, Judith; Monterroso, Edgar

    2000-01-01

    Assessed trends in HIV risk behaviors among New York City injection drug users from 1990-97. Interviews at a drug detoxification program and a research storefront in a high drug-use area showed continuing risk reduction among users that indicated a declining phase in the large HIV epidemic in New York City. HIV prevention programs appeared to be…

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of ‘Agua Celeste’ Use among Female Sex Workers who Inject Drugs in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meghan D.; Case, Patricia; Robertson, Angela M.; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Clapp, John D.; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Agua celeste, or “heavenly water,” is the street name for a sky-blue colored solvent reportedly inhaled or ingested to produce an intoxicating effect. Study aims were to (1) describe prevalence of Agua Celestse (AC) use, and (2) identify correlates of lifetime and recent use of AC use among female sex workers who also inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) in northern Mexico. Methods Between 2008 and 2010, baseline data from FSW-IDUs ≥ 18 years old living in Tijuana or Ciudad Juarez participating in a longitudinal behavioral intervention were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Among 623 FSW-IDUs (307 from Tijuana and 316 from Ciudad Juarez (CJ)), 166 (26%) reported ever using AC, all of whom lived in CJ. Among the CJ sample, lifetime prevalence of AC use was 53%, median age of first use was 16 years (IQR: 14–23), and 10% reported it as their first abused substance. Ever using AC was independently associated with ever being physically abused and younger age, and was marginally associated with initiating injection drug use and regular sex work at age eighteen or younger. Among those ever using AC, 70/166 (42.2%) reported using it within the last 6 months, which was independently associated with using drugs with clients before or during sex, being on the street more than 8 hours per day, and younger age. Discussion We observed considerable geographic variation in the use of AC in northern Mexico. Future studies exploring factors influencing use, its precise formulation(s), and its potential health effects are needed to guide prevention and treatment. PMID:21441001

  20. Prevalence and correlates of 'agua celeste' use among female sex workers who inject drugs in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Meghan D; Case, Patricia; Robertson, Angela M; Lozada, Remedios; Vera, Alicia; Clapp, John D; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2011-09-01

    Agua celeste, or "heavenly water", is the street name for a sky-blue colored solvent reportedly inhaled or ingested to produce an intoxicating effect. Study aims were to (1) describe prevalence of agua celestse (AC) use, and (2) identify correlates of lifetime and recent use of AC use among female sex workers who also inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) in northern Mexico. Between 2008 and 2010, baseline data from FSW-IDUs≥18 years old living in Tijuana or Ciudad Juarez participating in a longitudinal behavioral intervention were analyzed using logistic regression. Among 623 FSW-IDUs (307 from Tijuana and 316 from Ciudad Juarez (CJ)), 166 (26%) reported ever using AC, all of whom lived in CJ. Among the CJ sample, lifetime prevalence of AC use was 53%, median age of first use was 16 years (IQR: 14-23), and 10% reported it as their first abused substance. Ever using AC was independently associated with ever being physically abused and younger age, and was marginally associated with initiating injection drug use and regular sex work at age eighteen or younger. Among those ever using AC, 70/166 (42.2%) reported using it within the last 6 months, which was independently associated with using drugs with clients before or during sex, being on the street more than 8h per day, and younger age. We observed considerable geographic variation in the use of AC in northern Mexico. Future studies exploring factors influencing use, its precise formulation(s), and its potential health effects are needed to guide prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV transmission as a result of drug market violence: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Thomas

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While unprotected sexual intercourse and the use of contaminated injection equipment account for the majority of HIV infections worldwide, other routes of HIV transmission have received less attention. We report on a case of HIV transmission attributable to illicit drug market violence involving a participant in a prospective cohort study of injection drug users. Data from a qualitative interview was used in addition to questionnaire data and nursing records to document an episode of violence which likely resulted in this individual acquiring HIV infection. The case report demonstrates that the dangers of drug market violence go beyond the immediate physical trauma associated with violent altercations to include the possibility for infectious disease transmission. The case highlights the need to consider antiretroviral post-exposure prophylaxis in cases of drug market violence presenting to the emergency room, as well strategies to reduce violence associated with street-based drug markets.

  2. Thermo-Responsive Injectable MPEG-Polyester Diblock Copolymers for Sustained Drug Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon Hyun

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-responsive diblock copolymers composed of hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol (MPEG and hydrophobic biodegradable polyesters were prepared for application as injectable drug delivery systems, because they show a thermo-responsive sol-to-gel transition, especially around body temperature, when dispersed in aqueous solutions. The thermogelling hydrogels formed by hydrophobic aggregation could be varied by changing the components of the hydrophobic polyester part. For the polyester block in the present study, 95 mol% of ε-caprolactone (CL was used for the main polyester chain and 5 mol% of p-dioxanone (DO was copolymerized randomly by the MPEG initiator in the presence of HCl as the catalyst. By adding a small portion of DO into the poly ε-caprolactone (PCL chains, the temperature range of gelation, the intensity of viscosity and the drug release behavior were changed. The MPEG-b-poly(ε-caprolactone-ran-p-dioxanone (MPEG-b-PCDO hydrogel showed the enhanced drug release in vitro and in vivo compared to MPEG-b-PCL hydrogel. Therefore, MPEG-polyester hydrogels may serve as minimally invasive and therapeutic, injectable hydrogel systems with adjustable temperature-responsive and biodegradable windows, as well as sustained release of drugs over a certain time period.

  3. Fluorescent blue lights, injecting drug use and related health risk in public conveniences: findings from a qualitative study of micro-injecting environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, Stephen; Coomber, Ross

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents findings relating to injecting drug users' experiences and opinions of public toilets illuminated with fluorescent blue lights and presents an empirical assessment of the intended deterrent effect of such installations. Data analysis identified that blue lights deterred less than half the sample interviewed. Furthermore over half (18/31) of the sample were prepared to inject in conditions specifically designed to deter injecting practice. Of these, 11 respondents were completely undeterred and 7 individuals were only partially deterred by blue light environments. These findings are discussed within the interpretative frameworks of Pierre Bourdieu's theory of habitus and symbolic violence. The authors conclude that fluorescent blue lights contribute towards the development of situated resistance by injecting drug users within a public injecting habitus; a resistance that produces and reproduces drug-related harm and is a behaviour that opposes the symbolic violence of harm reduction intervention. The paper concludes with suggestions for theory-driven practical intervention that may seek to disrupt the harmful elements of the public injecting habitus. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Trends in reports of driving following illicit drug consumption among regular drug users in Australia, 2007-2013: Has random roadside drug testing had a deterrent effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horyniak, Danielle; Dietze, Paul; Lenton, Simon; Alati, Rosa; Bruno, Raimondo; Matthews, Allison; Breen, Courtney; Burns, Lucy

    2017-07-01

    Driving following illicit drug consumption ('drug-driving') is a potential road safety risk. Roadside drug testing (RDT) is conducted across Australia with the dual aims of prosecuting drivers with drugs in their system and deterring drug-driving. We examined trends over time in self-reported past six-month drug-driving among sentinel samples of regular drug users and assessed the impact of experiences of RDT on drug-driving among these participants. Data from 1913 people who inject drugs (PWID) and 3140 regular psychostimulant users (RPU) who were first-time participants in a series of repeat cross-sectional sentinel studies conducted in Australian capital cities from 2007 to 2013 and reported driving in the past six months were analysed. Trends over time were assessed using the χ(2) test for trend. Multivariable logistic regressions assessed the relationship between experiences of RDT and recent drug-driving, adjusting for survey year, jurisdiction of residence and socio-demographic and drug use characteristics. The percentage of participants reporting recent (past six months) drug-driving decreased significantly over time among both samples (PWID: 83% [2007] vs. 74% [2013], pdrug-driving remained prevalent. Lifetime experience of RDT increased significantly over time (PWID: 6% [2007] vs. 32% [2013], pdrug-driving among either PWID or RPU. Although there is some evidence that drug-driving among key risk groups of regular drug users is declining in Australia, possibly reflecting a general deterrent effect of RDT, experiencing RDT appears to have no specific deterrent effect on drug-driving. Further intervention, with a particular focus on changing attitudes towards drug-driving, may be needed to further reduce this practice among these groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. People who inject drugs in prison: HIV prevalence, transmission and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Kate; Moazen, Babak; Noori, Atefeh; Rahimzadeh, Shadi; Farzadfar, Farshad; Hariga, Fabienne

    2015-02-01

    In 2011, over 10.1 million people were held in prisons around the world. HIV prevalence is elevated in prison and this is due to the over representation of people who inject drugs (PWID). Yet HIV prevention programs for PWID are scarce in the prison setting. With a high proportion of drug users and few prevention programs, HIV transmission occurs and sometimes at an alarming rate. This commentary focuses primarily on drug users in prison; their risk behaviours and levels of infection. It also comments on the transmission of HIV including outbreaks and the efforts to prevent transmission within the prison setting. The spread of HIV in prison has substantial public health implications as virtually all prisoners return to the community. HIV prevention and treatment strategies known to be effective in community settings, such as methadone maintenance treatment, needle and syringe programs, condoms and antiretroviral therapy should be provided to prisoners as a matter of urgency.

  6. Compulsory drug detention exposure is associated with not receiving antiretroviral treatment among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Kaplan, Karyn; Suwannawong, Paisan; Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S G; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-05-06

    Thailand has experienced a longstanding epidemic of HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID). However, antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage among HIV-positive PWID has historically remained low. While ongoing drug law enforcement involving periodic police crackdowns is known to increase the risk of HIV transmission among Thai PWID, the impact of such drug policy approaches on the ART uptake has been understudied. Therefore, we sought to identify factors associated with not receiving ART among HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok, Thailand, with a focus on factors pertaining to drug law enforcement. Data were collected from a community-recruited sample of HIV-positive PWID in Bangkok who participated in the Mitsampan Community Research Project between June 2009 and October 2011. We identified factors associated with not receiving ART at the time of interview using multivariate logistic regression. In total, 128 HIV-positive PWID participated in this study, with 58 (45.3%) reporting not receiving ART at the time of interview. In multivariate analyses, completing less than secondary education (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 3.32 ; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.48 - 7.45), daily midazolam injection (AOR: 3.22, 95% CI: 1.45 - 7.15) and exposure to compulsory drug detention (AOR: 3.36, 95% CI: 1.01 - 11.21) were independently and positively associated with not receiving ART. Accessing peer-based healthcare information or support services was independently and positively associated with receiving ART (AOR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.84). Approximately half of our study group of HIV-positive PWID reported not receiving ART at the time of interview. Daily midazolam injectors, those with lower education attainment, and individuals who had been in compulsory drug detention were more likely to be non-recipients of ART whereas those who accessed peer-based healthcare-related services were more likely to receive ART. These findings suggest a potentially adverse impact of compulsory drug

  7. Development of a novel injectable drug delivery system for subconjunctival glaucoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Karsten; Falke, Karen; Bernsdorf, Arne; Grabow, Niels; Kastner, Christian; Sternberg, Katrin; Minrath, Ingo; Eickner, Thomas; Wree, Andreas; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Guthoff, Rudolf; Witt, Martin; Hovakimyan, Marina

    2015-09-28

    In this study we present the development of an injectable polymeric drug delivery system for subconjunctival treatment of primary open angle glaucoma. The system consists of hyaluronic acid sodium salt (HA), which is commonly used in ophthalmology in anterior segment surgery, and an isocyanate-functionalized 1,2-ethylene glycol bis(dilactic acid) (ELA-NCO). The polymer mixtures with different ratios of HA to ELA-NCO (1/1, 1/4, and 1/10 (v/v)) were investigated for biocompatibility, degradation behavior and applicability as a sustained release system. For the latter, the lipophilic latanoprost ester pro-drug (LA) was incorporated into the HA/ELA-NCO system. In vitro, a sustained LA release over a period of about 60days was achieved. In cell culture experiments, the HA/ELA-NCO (1/1, (v/v)) system was proven to be biocompatible for human and rabbit Tenon's fibroblasts. Examination of in vitro degradation behavior revealed a total mass loss of more than 60% during the observation period of 26weeks. In vivo, LA was continuously released for 152days into rabbit aqueous humor and serum. Histological investigations revealed a marked leuko-lymphocytic infiltration soon after subconjunctival injection. Thereafter, the initial tissue reaction declined concomitantly with a continuous degradation of the polymer, which was completed after 10months. Our study demonstrates the suitability of the polymer resulting from the reaction of HA with ELA-NCO as an injectable local drug delivery system for glaucoma therapy, combining biocompatibility and biodegradability with prolonged drug release.

  8. Unprotected Sex with Injecting Drug Users among Iranian Female Sex Workers: Unhide HIV Risk Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodabakhsh Ahmadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the prevalence and associated factors of unprotected sex with injecting drug users (IDUs among a sample of female sex workers (FSWs in Iran. Methods. This cross-sectional study included 144 FSWs who were interviewed as a part of Unhide HIV Risk Study, a national behavioral survey focusing on various high-risk populations, including IDUs, FSWs, and Men who have Sex with Men (MSMs in 2009. The survey was conducted in eight provinces in Iran using respondent-driven sampling. Participants’ sociodemographic status, HIV knowledge, and HIV attitude were analyzed via logistic regression to determine the predictors of unprotected sex with IDU(s during the past month. Results. Nineteen percent of FSWs reported at least one occasion of unprotected sex with IDU(s in the month preceding the study. Higher educational level (OR=−0.653, 95%CI=-1.192 to −0.115, perceived HIV risk (OR=−1.047, 95%CI=-2.076 to −0.019, and perceived family intimacy during childhood (OR=−1.104, 95%CI=-1.957 to −0.251 were all independently associated with lower odds of having unprotected sex with IDU(s in the month preceding the study. Age, marital status, living condition, HIV knowledge, and perceived behavioral control did not affect the odds of FSWs having sex with IDUs. Conclusion. Perceived HIV risk, which is a modifiable factor, seems to be a promising target for harm reduction interventions amongst Iranian female sex workers. Data presented here may aid in reducing or eliminating the role of sex workers as a bridge for HIV transmission from IDUs to the general population in Iran.

  9. WHO guidance on the prevention of viral hepatitis B and C among people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Nick; Verster, Annette; Rodolph, Michelle; Akl, Elie A

    2014-05-01

    Viral hepatitis B and C (HBV, HCV) disproportionately affect people who inject drugs (PWID) across the world. To date there has been little global action focusing on prevention, care and treatment of HBV and HCV among PWID. Here we report on the development process and discuss the implications of evidence informed WHO Guidelines for the Prevention of HBV and HCV in PWID. The World Health Organization (WHO) convened a Guideline Development Panel to develop recommendations on the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. The process followed the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. It included the development of PICO (Population, Interventions, Comparator, Outcomes) questions and conducting systematic reviews. Quality of evidence was classified into 4 levels: high, moderate, low, and very low. In the process of moving from evidence to recommendations, the following were considered: quality of evidence, balance of benefits and harms, community values and preferences and resource use. The WHO recommendations include the following for working with PWID: offer the rapid HBV vaccination regimen; offer incentives to increase uptake and completion of the HBV vaccine schedule; needle and syringe programs should also provide low dead-space syringes for distribution; and offer peer interventions to reduce the incidence of viral hepatitis. This guideline complements other WHO documents regarding PWID, including HIV prevention initiatives such as needle and syringe programs and opioid substitution therapy. This guidance offers a first step in the prevention of HBV and HCV among PWID. However, the lack of high quality evidence in this area necessitates further research and resources for implementation.

  10. An overview of anthrax infection including the recently identified form of disease in injection drug users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W.; Sweeney, Daniel A.; Cui, Xizhong; Li, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Bacillus anthracis infection (anthrax) can be highly lethal. Two recent outbreaks related to contaminated mail in the USA and heroin in the UK and Europe and its potential as a bioterrorist weapon have greatly increased concerns over anthrax in the developed world. Methods This review summarizes the microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of anthrax. Results and conclusions Anthrax, a gram-positive bacterium, has typically been associated with three forms of infection: cutaneous, gastrointestinal, and inhalational. However, the anthrax outbreak among injection drug users has emphasized the importance of what is now considered a fourth disease form (i.e., injectional anthrax) that is characterized by severe soft tissue infection. While cutaneous anthrax is most common, its early stages are distinct and prompt appropriate treatment commonly produces a good outcome. However, early symptoms with the other three disease forms can be nonspecific and mistaken for less lethal conditions. As a result, patients with gastrointestinal, inhalational, or injectional anthrax may have advanced infection at presentation that can be highly lethal. Once anthrax is suspected, the diagnosis can usually be made with gram stain and culture from blood or tissue followed by confirmatory testing (e.g., PCR). While antibiotics are the mainstay of anthrax treatment, use of adjunctive therapies such as anthrax toxin antagonists are a consideration. Prompt surgical therapy appears to be important for successful management of injectional anthrax. PMID:22527064

  11. Heterogeneity in risk-behaviour matters; Modelling the spread of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus among injecting drug users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, A.S. de

    2014-01-01

    By sharing injecting equipment, blood borne infections are spread among Injecting Drug Users (IDU). One infection that affects many IDU is the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), which can cause liver cirrhosis and liver carcinoma. The virus that causes AIDS, HIV, is also spread by this route. In this thesis,

  12. Descriptive Aspects of Injection Drug Users in Iran’s National Harm Reduction Program by Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Eskandarieh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Ministry of Health, Treatment and Medical Education of Iran has recently announced an estimated figure of 200,000 injecting drug users (IDUs. The aim of this study was to pilot a national program using demographics, types of drug abuse and prevalence of blood-borne infections among IDUs.Methods: In order to elicit data on demographics, types of drug abuse and prevalence of blood-borne infections among IDUs, a questionnaire was designed in the Bureau of Mental-Social Health and Addiction in collaboration with Iran’s Drug Control Headquarters of the Police Department. Therapeutical alliance of addiction in Shafagh Center was based on Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT.Results: Among 402 reported IDUs most of them were male, single and in age range of 20 to 39 years old with 72.7% history of imprisonment. Most of them had elementary and high school education and a history of addiction treatment. The majority were current users of opioid, heroin and crack. The prevalence of blood-borne infections was 65.9% and 18.8% for HCV and HIV/AIDS infections, respectively.Conclusion: Prevention programs about harm reduction, treatment and counseling should include young IDUs as a core focus of their intervention structure

  13. Risk factors for HIV infection in injection drug users and evidence for onward transmission of HIV to their sexual partners in Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Samiran; Kumar, M Suresh; Lokabiraman, S; Jayashree, K; Satagopan, M C; Solomon, Suniti; Rao, Usha Anand; Rangaiyan, Gurumurthy; Flessenkaemper, Sabine; Grosskurth, Heiner; Gupte, Mohan D

    2005-05-01

    Determining HIV prevalence in injection drug users (IDUs) and their regular sex partners in Chennai, India. A total of 226 IDUs and their regular sex partners were enrolled during April-July 2003. After informed consent was obtained, a semistructured questionnaire was administered and serum was tested for HIV antibody. The HIV seroprevalence was 30% (68/226) in IDUs and 5% in their regular sex partners (11/226). While in 25% of couples only the male partner was HIV positive, 5% of the couples were concordant for HIV infection and 70% were HIV negative. Fifty-seven percent of the HIV-positive IDUs and 45% of the HIV-infected women thought that they had "no chance" or "very little chance" of getting HIV, reflecting low HIV risk perception. More than 20% IDUs reported borrowing or lending of injection equipment. In univariate analyses "sex" and "condom use" with sex workers had no bearing but "more than twice a day injecting frequency," "history of incarceration," "tattoos," "recruitment from northern part of the city," and ever-injecting drugs in drug-selling places had significant association with HIV infection in IDUs. In an adjusted model, the odds of HIV infection were 2 times higher among IDUs who had ever injected drugs in drug-selling places and 6 times higher in those who were recruited from the northern part of central Chennai. Reducing sharing of injection equipment and unsafe tattooing through targeted and environmental interventions, increasing HIV risk perception, and promoting safer sex practices among IDUs and their sex partners are urgent program needs.

  14. Barriers to pharmacy-based syringe purchase among injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollini, Robin A; Lozada, Remedios; Gallardo, Manuel; Rosen, Perth; Vera, Alicia; Macias, Armando; Palinkas, Lawrence A; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-06-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) may be denied purchase of sterile syringes even where purchase without a prescription is legal. This study examined barriers to over-the-counter (OTC) syringe purchase among IDUs in Tijuana, Mexico. A quantitative survey and subsequent focus groups were used to quantify barriers to purchase, identify their correlates and provide in-depth exploration of syringe purchase experiences. Of 627 IDUs, 81% purchased a syringe in the past 6 months and 16% were refused or overcharged. Factors independently associated with refusal/overcharging were homelessness, receptive syringe sharing, >5 uses per syringe, and number of lifetime abscesses. Few pharmacies sold syringes to IDUs, who adapted by limiting purchase attempts to pharmacies known to sell syringes consistently. Failed purchases occurred when drug withdrawal required purchase at unusual times or locations, often following release from jail. IDUs reported syringe sharing, syringe reuse, and searching through unsecured medical waste for syringes in response to failed purchase attempts. Interventions to expand OTC syringe sales to IDUs, particularly near detention facilities, will facilitate safer injection practices.

  15. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL: Findings from a content validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs, however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring. Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM, were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements.

  16. Effects of Electroacupuncture plus Intra-carotid Drug Injection on Rheoencephalogram in Patients with Cerebral Infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江明; 胡永均; 童利民; 王大军; 张道敬

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the mechanism of electroacupuncture (EA) plus intra-carotid drug injection for treating cerebral infarction. Methods: Rheoencephalogram was recorded with a RG-2B type of bridge rheoencephalograph and findings were compared before and after the treatment. Results: After the treatment, the prolonged rising time was shortened, and the decreased amplitude obviously elevated. Conclusion: The therapy can dilate cerebral blood vessels, increase the cerebral blood flow, and improve the elasticity of cerebral blood vessels, leading to sufficient blood and oxygen supply in the ischemic brain tissues and to restoration of their functions.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection epidemiology among people who inject drugs in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiessing, Lucas; Ferri, Marica; Grady, Bart

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: People who inject drugs (PWID) are a key population affected by hepatitis C virus (HCV). Treatment options are improving and may enhance prevention; however access for PWID may be poor. The availability in the literature of information on seven main topic areas (incidence, chronicity...... January 2000 and 31 December 2012, with a search strategy of general keywords regarding viral hepatitis, substance abuse and geographic scope, as well as topic-specific keywords. Additional articles were found through structured email consultations with a large European expert network. Data availability...

  18. Paraplegia complicating selective steroid injections of the lumbar spine. Report of five cases and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wybier, Marc [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Hopital Lariboisiere, Service de Radiologie Osteo-articulaire, Paris (France); Gaudart, Sandrine [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Radiology Department, Hopital Beaujon, Clichy (France); Petrover, David; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Musculoskeletal Radiology Department, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Houdart, Emmanuel [Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Neuroradiology Department, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2010-01-15

    Selective steroid injections of the lumbar spine carry a risk of paraplegia of sudden onset. Seven cases have been reported in the English literature since 2002. Five new cases have been analyzed, all coming from Paris area centers. Injections were performed between 2003 and 2008. The following items were searched for: location of a previous lumbar spine surgery if any, symptoms indicating the procedure, route of injection, imaging technique used for needle guidance, injection of a contrast medium, type of steroid, other drugs injected if any, paraplegia level, post-procedure MR findings. The current and reported cases were compared. MR findings were consistent with spinal cord ischemia of arterial origin. The high rate of patients who had been operated on in these cases does not correspond to that of patients undergoing injections. The presence of epidural scar might increase the risk. The foraminal route was the only one involved in nonoperated patients. Foraminal, interlaminar, or juxta-zygoapophyseal routes were used in operated-on patients. The high rate of French cases when compared to the literature might arise from the almost exclusive use of prednisolone acetate, a molecule with a high tendency to coalesce in macro-aggregates, putting the spinal cord at risk of arterial supply embolization. (orig.)

  19. High prevalence of non-fatal overdose among people who inject drugs in Malaysia: Correlates of overdose and implications for overdose prevention from a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazazi, Alexander R; Zelenev, Alexei; Fu, Jeannia J; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-07-01

    Overdose is the leading cause of death among opioid users, but no data are available on overdose among people who inject drugs in Malaysia. We present the first estimates of the prevalence and correlates of recent non-fatal overdose among people who inject drugs in Malaysia. In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS) in Klang Valley to assess health outcomes associated with injection drug use. Self-reported history of non-fatal overdose in the previous 6 months was the primary outcome. Sociodemographic, behavioral and structural correlates of non-fatal overdose were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Most injected daily (91.3%) and were male (96.3%) and ethnically Malay (90.4%). Overall, 20% of participants had overdosed in the prior 6 months, and 43.3% had ever overdosed. The RDS-adjusted estimate of the 6-month period prevalence of overdose was 12.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7.9-16.6%). Having injected for more years was associated with lower odds of overdose (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.6 per 5 years of injection, CI: 0.5-0.7). Rushing an injection from fear of the police nearly doubled the odds of overdose (AOR 1.9, CI: 1.9-3.6). Alcohol use was associated with recent non-fatal overdose (AOR 2.1, CI: 1.1-4.2), as was methamphetamine use (AOR 2.3, CI: 1.3-4.6). When adjusting for past-month drug use, intermittent but not daily methadone use was associated with overdose (AOR 2.8, CI: 1.5-5.9). This study reveals a large, previously undocumented burden of non-fatal overdose among people who inject drugs in Malaysia and highlights the need for interventions that might reduce the risk of overdose, such as continuous opioid substitution therapy, provision of naloxone to prevent fatal overdose, treatment of polysubstance use, and working with police to improve the risk environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B

  20. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for injecting drug users in the WHO European Region 2002-2004

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donoghoe, Martin C; Bollerup, Annemarie R; Lazarus, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Providing equitable access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) to injecting drug users (IDUs) is both feasible and desirable. Given the evidence that IDUs can adhere to HAART as well as non-IDUs and the imperative to provide universal and equitable access to HIV/AIDS treatment for all...... the injecting status of those initiating HAART and the use of opioid substitution therapy among HAART patients, and discuss how HAART might be better delivered to injecting drug users. Our data adds to the evidence that IDUs in Europe have poor and inequitable access to HAART, with only a relatively small...

  1. Analysis of drug abuse data reported by medical institutions in Taiwan from 2002 to 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui Hsu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse has become a global issue of concern. It affects not only individual users, but also their families and communities. Data were retrieved from the database of the Taiwan Surveillance System of Drug Abuse and Addiction Treatment (SSDAAT from 2002 to 2011, and 147,660 cases reported by medical institutions in Taiwan were reviewed. This study showed that the top five reported abused drugs by medical institutions during the last decade were heroin, methamphetamine, benzodiazepines, ketamine, and zolpidem. Heroin and methamphetamine continued to be the first two abused drugs reported by medical institutions. Heroin abuse was significant, but has shown a downward trend. However, emerging abused drugs, such as ketamine and zolpidem, presented upward trends. 3,4-Methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA abuse seems to have re-emerged and has increased gradually since 2010. Injection without needle sharing has become the most common route of administration of abused drugs since 2002. The majority of causes for these reported drug abuses were drug dependence, followed by peer influence and stress relief. Hepatitis C was the most commonly reported infectious disease, followed by hepatitis B and AIDS in the drug abusers reported by medical institutions. It should be noted that access to drugs via the Internet increased year by year, and this is clearly an area needing constant monitoring.

  2. Effectiveness, Adverse Effects and Drug Compliance of Long-Acting Injectable Risperidone in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Mehmet Fatih; Erdogan, Betül; Tural Hesapcioglu, Selma; Cop, Esra

    2017-07-19

    Although the use of oral risperidone in children and adolescents has been well studied, there is little information on the intramuscular use of long-acting injectable risperidone (LAIR). The aims of this study were to investigate the effectiveness and adverse effects of LAIR in children and adolescents with conduct disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. In total, 42 patients (age range 12-17 years) who were non-adherent to oral antipsychotic drugs, received 25 mg/day of LAIR intramuscularly every 2 weeks. The drug was administered at least four times and up to 66 times (median drug use: 9.50 times). The effectiveness and adverse effects of the treatment were examined. There was an improvement in 13 (92.8%) of the 14 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder, in 25 (78.1%) of 32 patients diagnosed with conduct disorder and in one (50%) of two patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Six patients had comorbid conduct disorder and bipolar disorder. Totally, 81% of the patients improved with LAIR. Weight-gain, daytime somnolence, muscle stiffness and spasms, impaired concentration, and fatigue were the most common side effects through the whole sample. Menstrual problems were common in girls. In the study, 57.1% of the patients continued to receive their injections regularly until the end of the treatment, under physician control. A total of 16.7% discontinued the treatment due to non-adherence. The LAIR treatment was terminated in 26.2% of the patients, due to weight-gain, dystonia, and galactorrhea. In children and adolescents with conduct disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia who show noncompliance with oral drugs, LAIR may improve treatment compliance. LAIR is a reliable treatment in terms of its effectiveness. Weight-gain, dystonia, and galactorrhea were the adverse effects that were responsible for LAIR treatment cessation.

  3. Covalent and injectable chitosan-chondroitin sulfate hydrogels embedded with chitosan microspheres for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ming; Ma, Ye; Tan, Huaping; Jia, Yang; Zou, Siyue; Guo, Shuxuan; Zhao, Meng; Huang, Hao; Ling, Zhonghua; Chen, Yong; Hu, Xiaohong

    2017-02-01

    Injectable hydrogels and microspheres derived from natural polysaccharides have been extensively investigated as drug delivery systems and cell scaffolds. In this study, we report a preparation of covalent hydrogels basing polysaccharides via the Schiff' base reaction. Water soluble carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC) and oxidized chondroitin sulfate (OCS) were prepared for cross-linking of hydrogels. The mechanism of cross-linking is attributed to the Schiff' base reaction between amino and aldehyde groups of polysaccharides. Furthermore, bovine serum albumin (BSA) loaded chitosan-based microspheres (CMs) with a diameter of 3.8-61.6μm were fabricated by an emulsion cross-linking method, followed by embedding into CMC-OCS hydrogels to produce a composite CMs/gel scaffold. In the current work, gelation rate, morphology, mechanical properties, swelling ratio, in vitro degradation and BSA release of the CMs/gel scaffolds were examined. The results show that mechanical and bioactive properties of gel scaffolds can be significantly improved by embedding CMs. The solid CMs can serve as a filler to toughen the soft CMC-OCS hydrogels. Compressive modulus of composite gel scaffolds containing 20mg/ml of microspheres was 13KPa, which was higher than the control hydrogel without CMs. Cumulative release of BSA during 2weeks from CMs embedded hydrogel was 30%, which was significantly lower than those of CMs and hydrogels. Moreover, the composite CMs/gel scaffolds exhibited lower swelling ratio and slower degradation rate than the control hydrogel without CMs. The potential of the composite hydrogel as an injectable scaffold was demonstrated by encapsulation of bovine articular chondrocytes in vitro. These results demonstrate the potential of CMs embedded CMC-OCS hydrogels as an injectable drug and cell delivery system in cartilage tissue engineering.

  4. The Washington Needle Depot: fitting healthcare to injection drug users rather than injection drug users to healthcare: moving from a syringe exchange to syringe distribution model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glickman Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Needle exchange programs chase political as well as epidemiological dragons, carrying within them both implicit moral and political goals. In the exchange model of syringe distribution, injection drug users (IDUs must provide used needles in order to receive new needles. Distribution and retrieval are co-existent in the exchange model. Likewise, limitations on how many needles can be received at a time compel addicts to have multiple points of contact with professionals where the virtues of treatment and detox are impressed upon them. The centre of gravity for syringe distribution programs needs to shift from needle exchange to needle distribution, which provides unlimited access to syringes. This paper provides a case study of the Washington Needle Depot, a program operating under the syringe distribution model, showing that the distribution and retrieval of syringes can be separated with effective results. Further, the experience of IDUs is utilized, through paid employment, to provide a vulnerable population of people with clean syringes to prevent HIV and HCV.

  5. Endovascular Thrombin Injection for a Pulmonary Artery Pseudoaneurysm: Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Ho; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Massive hemoptysis caused by pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms is uncommon, and endovascular treatment such as coil embolization is the first choice for treating pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms. Various embolic agents could be used according to the angiographic findings, yet embolization with thrombin injection is very rare. Herein, we describe a case of a pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm that was successfully treated by endovascular thrombin injection using a microcatheter because of the difficulty in performing a coil embolization due to a short feeding artery.

  6. Could Education Contribute to Reduce Prevalence of HIV among Injecting Drug Users? A Case Study of IDUs from the Rehabilitation Center for Drugs Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2008-01-01

    This study primarily focuses on Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) from the Narconon Nepal for drugs rehabilitation and prevention center. The study attempt to explore the changing behavior of IDUs from the education received from the rehabilitation center which contributes to reduce the prevalence of HIV among IDUs. The data were collected through semi…

  7. [Nursing role in reporting adverse drug reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Garaicoechea, Ana; Reis-Carvalho, Joana; Ripa-Aisa, Irantzu; Jiménez-Mendoza, Ana; Díaz-Balén, Almudena; Oroviogoicoechea, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous report system, in which suspected adverse drug reaction (ADR) are reported by healthcare workers, is currently one of the primary methods to prevent and discover new and serious ADR to marketed medicinal products. The collaboration of nursing professionals with this task makes it possible to improve patient safety and to reduce ADR costs. Although a total of 781 cases of ADR cases were reported in Navarra in 2011, only 7.33% were reported by nurses. The objectives werw to determine the factors that influence nurses in reporting of ADR, and second, to devise strategies which help to increase reporting. A bibliographic search for articles that included the words: reacciones adversas medicamentosas (adverse drug reactions), notificación (reporting) and enfermería (nursing) was conducted using the PubMed and Cinhal databases. A total of 107 articles were retrieved, of which 27 were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The conclusion learned by reading and analyzing the selected articles was that the factors that affect the notification depend on the attitude of the notifier, as well as personal and professional factors. The main strategies to encourage notification are education and training, motivation, and the availability of facilitating tools. The main factors that have an influence on under-notification are the lack of knowledge and motivation among professionals. To solve the problem of under-notification, the main actions and strategies to undertake are education, motivation and persistence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Factorial design studies of antiretroviral drug-loaded stealth liposomal injectable: PEGylation, lyophilization and pharmacokinetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, Beeravelli; Krishna, Mylangam Chaitanya; Murthy, Kolapalli Venkata Ramana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to formulate and evaluate the ritonavir-loaded stealth liposomes by using 32 factorial design and intended to delivered by parenteral delivery. Liposomes were prepared by ethanol injection method using 32 factorial designs and characterized for various physicochemical parameters such as drug content, size, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The optimization process was carried out using desirability and overlay plots. The selected formulation was subjected to PEGylation using 10 % PEG-10000 solution. Stealth liposomes were characterized for the above-mentioned parameters along with surface morphology, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer, differential scanning calorimeter, stability and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in rats. Stealth liposomes showed better result compared to conventional liposomes due to effect of PEG-10000. The in vivo studies revealed that stealth liposomes showed better residence time compared to conventional liposomes and pure drug solution. The conventional liposomes and pure drug showed dose-dependent pharmacokinetics, whereas stealth liposomes showed long circulation half-life compared to conventional liposomes and pure ritonavir solution. The results of statistical analysis showed significance difference as the p value is (<0.05) by one-way ANOVA. The result of the present study revealed that stealth liposomes are promising tool in antiretroviral therapy.

  9. Cross sectional analysis of respiratory symptoms in an injection drug user cohort: the impact of obstructive lung disease and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Shruti H

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Injection drug use is associated with an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and with obstructive lung diseases (OLD. Understanding how HIV and OLD may impact respiratory symptoms among injection drug users (IDUs is important to adequately care for this high-risk population. We characterized the independent and joint effects of HIV and OLD on respiratory symptoms of a cohort of inner-city IDUs. Methods Demographics, risk behavior and spirometric measurements were collected from a cross-sectional analysis of the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome Link to the IntraVenous Experience study, an observational cohort of IDUs followed in Baltimore, MD since 1988. Participants completed a modified American Thoracic Society respiratory questionnaire and the Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea score to assess respiratory symptoms of cough, phlegm, wheezing and dyspnea. Results Of 974 participants, 835 (86% were current smokers and 288 (29.6% were HIV-infected. The prevalence of OLD (FEV1/FVC ≤ 0.70 was 15.5%, and did not differ by HIV status. OLD, but not HIV, was associated with increased frequency of reported respiratory symptoms. There was a combined effect of OLD and HIV on worsening of MRC scores. OLD and HIV were independently associated with an increased odds of reporting an MRC ≥ 2 (OR 1.83 [95%CI 1.23-2.73] and 1.50 [95%CI 1.08-2.09], respectively. COPD, but not HIV, was independently associated with reporting an MRC ≥ 3 (OR 2.25 [95%CI 1.43-3.54] and 1.29 [95%CI 0.87-1.91], respectively. Conclusions While HIV does not worsen cough, phlegm or wheezing, HIV significantly increases moderate but not severe dyspnea in individuals of similar OLD status. Incorporating the MRC score into routine evaluation of IDUs at risk for OLD and HIV provides better assessment than cough, phlegm and wheezing alone.

  10. A systematic review of Hepatitis C virus treatment uptake among people who inject drugs in the European Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V; Sperle, Ida; Maticic, Mojca;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fifteen million adults in the World Health Organization European Region are estimated to have active hepatitis C infection. Intravenous drug use is a major hepatitis C transmission route in this region, and people who inject drugs (PWID) constitute a high-risk and high-prevalence popu...

  11. Worsening of myasthenia gravis after administration of injectable long-acting risperidone for treatment of schizophrenia; first case report and a call for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ismail, Ismail Ibrahim; John, John K; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to autoantibodies affecting the neuromuscular junction. Co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and schizophrenia is very rare and raises a challenge in management of both diseases. Antipsychotic drugs exhibit anticholinergic side effects and have the potentials of worsening myasthenia. Long-acting risperidone is an injectable atypical antipsychotic drug that has not been previously reported to worsen myasthenia gravis in literature. We report the first case report of worsening of myasthenia after receiving long-acting risperidone injection for schizophrenia in a 29-year-old female with both diseases. She started to have worsening 2 weeks following the first injection and her symptoms persisted despite receiving plasma exchange. This could be explained by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. We recommend that long-acting risperidone should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, and clinicians must be aware of the potential risks of this therapy.

  12. HIV prevalence and gender differences among new injection-drug-users in Tallinn, Estonia: A persisting problem in a stable high prevalence epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusküla, Anneli; Raag, Mait; Marsh, Kristina; Talu, Ave; Vorobjov, Sigrid; Des Jarlais, Don

    2017-01-01

    Introduction New injectors / younger drug users are an important population to target for intervention because they are often at especially high risk of HIV and HCV infection. We examined HIV prevalence and gender differences in HIV prevalence and risk behavior among new injection-drug-users in Tallinn, Estonia. Methods Respondent driven sampling (RDS) interview surveys and HIV testing were conducted in Tallinn in 2009, 2011 and 2013. We classified “new injectors” as persons who reported their first injection as occurring within three years of the study interview. Recruiting trees of the three individual RDS studies were joined to form one RDS dataset and RDS estimates for prevalence and means were derived. Bootstrap tests were used to compare data from men and women, HIV infected and uninfected. Results Among 110 new injectors (34 women and 76 men) the mean age was 24.5 (SD 7.5) years; 63% reported injecting mainly fentanyl, 34% injecting mainly amphetamine, 36% sharing syringes, 89% were sexually active, and, of these, 88% did not always use condoms in the last 6 months. HIV prevalence was 18% (95%CI 8–28%) (41% (95%CI 19–63%) among female and 7% (95%CI 2–12%) among male new injectors). Based on self-reports, 8.1% of all new injectors (and 22% of female new injectors) were HIV positive before starting to inject drugs. 40% of HIV infected reported receiving antiretroviral therapy. In multivariable analysis, gender (male: OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.03–0.45), main drug injected (fentanyl: OR 6.7, 95% CI 1.3–35.7) and syringe sharing (distributive: OR 0.11, 95% CI 0.02–0.55; and receptive: OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.0–13.5) were associated with the HIV seropositivity. Conclusions New injectors exhibit high-risk behavior and correspondingly high HIV prevalence. Sexual transmission of HIV infection, including before injection initiation, is likely to be a significant contributor to HIV risk among female new injectors. This highlights the need to identify and target new

  13. A Thixotropic Polyglycerol Sebacate-Based Supramolecular Hydrogel as an Injectable Drug Delivery Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongye Ye

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a “self-healing” polyglycerol sebacate—polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (PGS-PEGMEMA/α-Cyclodextrin (αCD hydrogel which could be sheared into a liquid during injection and has the potential to quickly “heal” itself back into gel post-injection. This hydrogel was shown to be biocompatible and biodegradable and therefore appropriate for use in vivo. Furthermore, the storage and loss moduli of the hydrogels could be tuned (by varying the concentration of αCD between a fraction of a kPa to a few 100 kPa, a range that coincides with the moduli of cells and human soft tissues. This property would allow for this hydrogel to be used in vivo with maximal mechanical compatibility with human soft tissues. In vitro experiments showed that the hydrogel demonstrated a linear mass erosion profile and a biphasic drug (doxorubicin release profile: Phase I was primarily driven by diffusion and Phase II was driven by hydrogel erosion. The diffusion mechanism was modeled with the First Order equation and the erosion mechanism with the Hopfenberg equation. This established fitting model could be used to predict releases with other drugs and estimate the composition of the hydrogel required to achieve a desired release rate.

  14. [HIV infection and injecting drug users: The urgency of reinvigorating harm-reduction programmes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujols, Joan; Iraurgi, Ioseba; Solà, Ivan; Ballesteros, Javier; Siñol, Núria; Batlle, Fanny; Pérez de Los Cobos, José

    2010-01-01

    The HIV epidemic among injecting drug users (IDUs) has led to greater support for the development of the harm-reduction perspective. This has proven to be a driving force for initially reluctant policy makers, managers and health care providers and has facilitated the implementation of harm-reduction programmes. This article presents recent data, both global and at the European and Spanish levels, about a) the epidemiological situation of HIV infection among IDUs, and b) the state of development of harm-reduction programmes. The incidence of HIV infection among IDUs not only continues to grow in different areas of, for example, Southeast Asia or Eastern Europe, but has even shown an upturn in cities or specific IDU groups in parts of Western Europe with apparently comprehensive harm-reduction strategies. On the other hand, of the 158 countries that acknowledge illegal drug use via injection in their territory, only 82 support harm reduction, explicitly in national policy documents and/or through the implementation or tolerance of interventions such as needle exchange programmes or opioid agonist programmes. These data, in conjunction with the high-quality and consistent evidence on the efficacy and effectiveness of harm- and risk-reduction programmes for HIV prevention and management among IDUs, should serve as a call to avoid complacency with regard to the diversification, accessibility and coverage of harm- and risk-reduction programmes for IDUs.

  15. Injectable thermosensitive chitosan/glycerophosphate-based hydrogels for tissue engineering and drug delivery applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrir, Farzaneh G; Ganji, Fariba; Ahooyi, Taha M

    2015-01-01

    Recently, great attention has been paid to in situ gel-forming chitosan/glycerophosphate (CS/Gp) formulation due to its high biocompatibility with incorporated cells and medical agents, biodegradability and sharp thermosensitive gelation. CS/Gp is in liquid state at room temperature and after minimally invasive administration into the desired tissue, it forms a solid-like gel as a response to temperature increase. The overview of various recently patented strategies on injectable delivery systems indicates the significance of this formulation in biomedical applications. This thermosensitive hydrogel has a great potential as scaffold material in tissue engineering, due to its good biocompatibility, minimal immune reaction, high antibacterial nature, good adhesion to cells and the ability to be molded in various geometries. Moreover, CS/Gp hydrogel has been utilized as a smart drug delivery system to increase patient compliance by maintaining the drug level in the therapeutic window for a long time while avoiding the need for frequent injections of the therapeutic agent. This review paper highlights the recent patents and investigations on different formulations of CS/Gp hydrogels as tissue engineering scaffolds and carriers for therapeutic agents. Additionally, the dominant mechanism of sol-gel transition in those systems as well as their physicochemical properties and biocompatibility are discussed in detail.

  16. Access to highly active antiretroviral therapy for injection drug users: adherence, resistance, and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Vlahov

    Full Text Available Injection drug users (IDUs continue to comprise a major risk group for HIV infection throughout the world and represent the focal population for HIV epidemics in Asia and Eastern Europe/Russia. HIV prevention programs have ranged from HIV testing and counseling, education, behavioral and network interventions, drug abuse treatment, bleach disinfection of needles, needle exchange and expanded syringe access, as well as reducing transition to injection and primary substance abuse prevention. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART in 1996, dramatic clinical improvements have been seen. In addition, the treatment's impact on reducing HIV viral load (and therefore transmission by all routes provides a stronger rationale for an expansion of the focus on prevention to emphasize early identification and treatment of HIV infected individuals. However, treatment of IDUs has many challenges including adherence, resistance and relapse to high risk behaviors, all of which impact issues of access and ultimately effectiveness of potent antiretroviral treatment. A major current challenge in addressing the HIV epidemic revolves around an appropriate approach to HIV treatment for IDUs.

  17. Low mortality but increasing incidence of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in people who inject drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgeirsson, Hilmir; Thalme, Anders; Weiland, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of infective endocarditis in people who inject drugs (PWID). The management of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID can be problematic. The objective of this retrospective observational study was to assess the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and mortality of S aureus endocarditis (SAE) in PWID in Stockholm, Sweden. The Department of Infectious Diseases at the Karolinska University Hospital serves as a regional referral center for drug users with severe infections. Patients with active intravenous drug use treated for SAE at the department between January 2004 and December 2013 were retrospectively identified. Clinical and microbiological data were obtained from medical records and the diagnosis verified according to the modified Duke criteria. In total, 120 SAE episodes related to intravenous drug use were identified. Its incidence in Stockholm was 0.76/100,000 adult person-years for the entire period, increasing from 0.52/100,000 person-years in 2004 to 2008 to 0.99 in 2009 to 2013 (P = 0.02). The SAE incidence among PWID specifically was 249 (range 153–649) /100,000 person-years. Forty-two (35%) episodes were left-sided, and multiple valves were involved in 26 (22%). Cardiac valve surgery was performed in 10 (8%) episodes, all left-sided. The in-hospital and 1-year mortality rates were 2.5% (3 deaths) and 8.0% (9 deaths), respectively. We noted a high and increasing incidence over time of SAE related to intravenous drug use in Stockholm. The increased incidence partly reflects a rising number of PWID during the study period. The low mortality noted, despite a substantial proportion with left-sided endocarditis, probably in part reflects the quality of care obtained at a large and specialized referral center for drug users with severe infections. PMID:27930590

  18. Utilization, cost trends, and member cost-share for self-injectable multiple sclerosis drugs--pharmacy and medical benefit spending from 2004 through 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunze, April M; Gunderson, Brent W; Gleason, Patrick P; Heaton, Alan H H; Johnson, Steven V

    2007-01-01

    ...) drugs to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Initially covered as a medical expense, self-injectable MS drugs are increasingly considered specialty pharmaceuticals and are often covered under the pharmacy benefit...

  19. CDC Vital Signs–HIV and Injection Drug Use

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-11-29

    This podcast is based on the December 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Sharing needles, syringes, and other injection equipment puts you at risk for getting HIV and other infections, including hepatitis. Learn how to reduce your HIV risk.  Created: 11/29/2016 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexual Transmitted Diseases and Tuberculosis Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/29/2016.

  20. A qualitative exploration of travel-related risk behaviours of injection drug users from two Slovene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Švab Igor

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This qualitative study of travel-related risk behaviours of Slovene injection drug users was based on interviews with individuals enrolled in drug addiction treatment programmes run by three regional centres for prevention and treatment of drug addiction. The primary objective of the study was to analyse behaviour patterns and practices of injection drug users during travel. Methods Travel-related problems of Slovene injection drug users were identified on the basis of data obtained by 25 in-depth interviews. A semi-structured questionnaire with 13 open-ended questions was developed after a preliminary study and review of the literature, and on the basis of experience with the treatment of drug addiction in Slovenia. Results The sample comprised 25 individuals, 18 men and seven women, aged 25 to 53 years. The interviews were 10 to 30 minutes long. The results obtained were presented as identified risk behaviours. Five categories were generated, providing information on the following topics: procurement of illicit drugs, criminal acts/environment, HIV and hepatitis B and C infections, storage and transport of substitution medication and pre-travel health protection. The first three categories comprise the injection drug users' risk behaviours that are most frequently explored in the literature. The other two categories - storage and transport of medication across the border and pre-travel health protection - reflect national specificities and the effectiveness of substitution treatment programmes. The majority of participants denied having shared needles and other injecting equipment when travelling. Participants who had no doctor's certificate had recourse to various forms of risk behaviour, finding a number of ways to hide the medication at the border. Conclusion This qualitative study provides insight into potential travel-related risk behaviour of injection drug users from two Slovene regions - central and coastal. The potential

  1. Social and structural factors associated with HIV infection among female sex workers who inject drugs in the Mexico-US border region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffanie A Strathdee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: FSWs who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs can acquire HIV through high risk sexual and injection behaviors. We studied correlates of HIV infection among FSW-IDUs in northern Mexico, where sex work is quasi-legal and syringes can be legally obtained without a prescription. METHODS: FSW-IDUs>18 years old who reported injecting drugs and recent unprotected sex with clients in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez underwent surveys and HIV/STI testing. Logistic regression identified correlates of HIV infection. RESULTS: Of 620 FSW-IDUs, prevalence of HIV, gonorrhea, Chlamydia, trichomonas, syphilis titers ≥1:8, or any of these infections was 5.3%, 4%, 13%, 35%, 10% and 72%, respectively. Compared to other FSW-IDUs, HIV-positive women were more likely to: have syphilis titers ≥1:8 (36% vs. 9%, p<0.001, often/always inject drugs with clients (55% vs. 32%, p = 0.01, and experience confiscation of syringes by police (49% vs. 28%, p = 0.02. Factors independently associated with HIV infection were syphilis titers ≥1:8, often/always injecting with clients and police confiscation of syringes. Women who obtained syringes from NEPs (needle exchange programs within the last month had lower odds of HIV infection associated with active syphilis, but among non-NEP attenders, the odds of HIV infection associated with active syphilis was significantly elevated. CONCLUSIONS: Factors operating in both the micro-social environment (i.e., injecting drugs with clients and policy environment (i.e., having syringes confiscated by police, attending NEPs predominated as factors associated with risk of HIV infection, rather than individual-level risk behaviors. Interventions should target unjustified policing practices, clients' risk behaviors and HIV/STI prevention through NEPs.

  2. A tale of two cities: stigma and health outcomes among people with HIV who inject drugs in St. Petersburg, Russia and Kohtla-Järve, Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sara E; Calabrese, Sarah K; Dovidio, John F; Levina, Olga S; Uusküla, Anneli; Niccolai, Linda M; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Heimer, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Experiences of stigma are often associated with negative mental and physical health outcomes. The present work tested the associations between stigma and health-related outcomes among people with HIV who inject drugs in Kohtla-Järve, Estonia and St. Petersburg, Russia. These two cities share some of the highest rates of HIV outside of sub-Saharan Africa, largely driven by injection drug use, but Estonia has implemented harm reduction services more comprehensively. People who inject drugs were recruited using respondent-driven sampling; those who indicated being HIV-positive were included in the present sample (n = 381 in St. Petersburg; n = 288 in Kohtla-Järve). Participants reported their health information and completed measures of internalized HIV stigma, anticipated HIV stigma, internalized drug stigma, and anticipated drug stigma. Participants in both locations indicated similarly high levels of all four forms of stigma. However, stigma variables were more strongly associated with health outcomes in Russia than in Estonia. The St. Petersburg results were consistent with prior work linking stigma and health. Lower barriers to care in Kohtla-Järve may help explain why social stigma was not closely tied to negative health outcomes there. Implications for interventions and health policy are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The anatomy of risk: a quantitative investigation into injection drug users' taxonomy of risk attitudes and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Lisa A; Bickel, Warren K; Badger, Gary J; Quesnel, Kimberly J

    2007-04-01

    The authors report on the first study to use the systematic quantitative methods of the psychometric paradigm of risk analysis to examine risk perceptions among substance abusers. Fifty opioid-dependent injection drug users (IDUs) and 50 matched, control individuals completed a series of measures to provide quantitative representations of risk perceptions about 53 risk-laden items (including activities, substances, technologies, and diseases). Results indicated that risk perceptions of IDUs and controls were highly correlated on many items; however, IDUs perceived several items, such as hepatitis, HIV, handguns, and unprotected sex, as markedly more risky. IDUs also perceived both themselves and others as having greater risk of contracting hepatitis and HIV. IDUs wanted significantly reduced regulation of drugs, including prescription drugs, heroin, valium, and barbiturates. Factor analyses conducted to understand how risk ratings related to various characteristics that have been shown to influence risk perception revealed 3 factors that account for approximately 80% of the variability in risk perception across groups: Factor 1, related to the severity of the risk; Factor 2, related to the certainty of the risk; and Factor 3, related to the immediacy of the risk. However, IDUs more strongly associated the extent to which they were personally affected by a risk item and the extent to which the risk affected fewer or more people to Factor 1, whereas control participants more strongly associated these characteristics with Factor 2. Identifying improved methodologies for evaluating the risk perceptions of IDUs may be of considerable utility in understanding their high-risk behavior.

  4. Factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity to an OMV meningococcal B vaccine in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petousis-Harris, Helen; Jackson, Catherine; Stewart, Joanna; Coster, Gregor; Turner, Nikki; Goodyear-Smith, Felicity; Lennon, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Pain on vaccine injection and subsequent site reactions of pain and swelling may influence confidence in vaccines and their uptake. This study aimed to identify factors associated with reported pain on injection and reactogenicity following administration of a strain specific meningococcal B outer membrane vesicle vaccine. A retrospective analysis of data was conducted from a phase II single center randomized observer-blind study that evaluated the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity of this vaccine in 2 cohorts of healthy 8 to 12 y old children. Vaccine administration technique was observed by an unblinded team member and the vaccine administrator instructed on standardized administration. Participants kept a daily diary to record local reactions (erythema, induration and swelling) and pain for 7 d following receipt of the vaccine. Explanatory variables were cohort, vaccine, age, gender, ethnicity, body mass index, atopic history, history of frequent infections, history of drug reactions, pain on injection, vaccinator, school population socioeconomic status, serum bactericidal antibody titer against the vaccine strain NZ98/254, and total IgG. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted using ordinal logistic regression for factors relating to pain on injection and reactogenicity. Perceived pain on injection was related to vaccine formulation, vaccine administrator and ethnicity. Reactogenicity outcomes varied with ethnicity and vaccine administrator. Maintaining community and parental confidence in vaccine safety without drawing attention to differences between individuals and groups is likely to become increasingly difficult. Vaccine administration technique alone has the potential to significantly reduce pain experienced on injection and local vaccine reactions.

  5. The Molecular Epidemiological Study of HCV Subtypes among Intravenous Drug Users and Non-Injection Drug Users in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Tao

    Full Text Available More than half of intravenous drug users (IDUs in China suffer from the Hepatitis C virus (HCV. The virus is also more prevalent in non-injection drug users (NIDUs than in the general population. However, not much is known about HCV subtype distribution in these populations.Our research team conducted a cross-sectional study in four provinces in China. We sampled 825 IDUs and 244 NIDUs (1162 total, genotyped each DU's virus, and performed a phylogenetic analysis to differentiate HCV subtypes.Nucleic acid testing (NAT determined that 82% percent (952/1162 of samples were HCV positive; we subtyped 90% (859/952 of these. We found multiple HCV subtypes: 3b (249, 29.0%, 3a (225, 26.2%, 6a (156, 18.2%, 1b (137, 15.9%, 6n (50, 5.9%, 1a (27, 3.1%, and 2a (15, 1.7%. An analysis of subtype distributions adjusted for province found statistically significant differences between HCV subtypes in IDUs and NIDUs.HCV subtypes 3b, 3a, 6a, and 1b were the most common in our study, together accounting for 89% of infections. The subtype distribution differences we found between IDUs and NIDUs suggested that sharing syringes was not the most likely pathway for HCV transmission in NIDUs. However, further studies are needed to elucidate how NIDUs were infected.

  6. Occult hepatitis B virus infection among injecting drug users in the Central-West Region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Alves Dias de Matos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV infection was investigated in 149 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg negative injecting drug users (IDUs in the Central-West Region of Brazil. Of these individuals, 19 were positive for HBV DNA, resulting in an occult HBV infection prevalence of 12.7% (19/149; six of these 19 individuals had anti-HBV core and/or anti-HBV surface antibodies and 13 were negative for HBV markers. All IDUs with occult hepatitis B reported sexual and/or parenteral risk behaviours. All HBV DNA-positive samples were successfully genotyped. Genotype D was the most common (17/19, followed by genotype A (2/19. These findings reveal a high prevalence of occult HBV infection and the predominance of genotype D among IDUs in Brazil's Central-West Region.

  7. Suicide by intravenous injection of rocuronium-bromide: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Slobodan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Suicides by intravenous injection of an overdose of medicaments are uncommon. In this paper, we present the case of a suicide by rocuronium-bromide injection in combination with an oral overdose of metoprolol. Unfortunately, in Belgrade, there is no toxicological laboratory capable of detecting rocuronium. The interpretation of autopsy and toxicological data in this case was made difficult due to the extreme putrefaction of the body of the deceased. So, by forensic investigation, the case was solved indirectly, through circumstantial evidence: an empty ampoule of rocuronium found near the body, as well as a plastic syringe and cloth-bandage found in the left hand of the deceased.

  8. Randomized, community-based pharmacy intervention to expand services beyond sale of sterile syringes to injection drug users in pharmacies in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M

    2013-09-01

    Structural interventions may help reduce racial/ethnic disparities in HIV. In 2009 to 2011, we randomized pharmacies participating in a nonprescription syringe access program in minority communities to intervention (pharmacy enrolled and delivered HIV risk reduction information to injection drug users [IDUs]), primary control (pharmacy only enrolled IDUs), and secondary control (pharmacy did not engage IDUs). Intervention pharmacy staff reported more support for syringe sales than did control staff. An expanded pharmacy role in HIV risk reduction may be helpful.

  9. Fixed drug eruptions to ciprofloxacin - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama R. Bhosale

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruptions (FDE are common adverse drug reactions and they recur at the same site with each exposure to a particular drug. Drugs inducing FDE are usually those taken intermittently. Most common drugs causing fixed drug eruptions are antibiotics and analgesics. Here, we report a case of FDE to ciprofloxacin which was used in treatment of upper respiratory tract infection. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(3.000: 221-222

  10. Multimodal assessment of spatial distribution of drug-tracer uptake by brain tissue after intra-arterial injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh-Moon, Rajinder; Chaudhuri, Durba; Wang, Mei; Straubinger, Robert; Bigio, Irving J.; Joshi, Shailendra

    2014-02-01

    It is challenging to track the rapid changes in drug concentrations after intra-arterial (IA) administration to elucidate the pharmacokinetics of this method of drug delivery. Traditional pharmacokinetic parameters (such as protein binding) that are highly relevant to intravenous (IV) administration do not seem to apply to IA injections. Regional drug delivery is affected by the biomechanics of drug injection, resting blood flow, and local tissue extraction. In-vivo and ex-vivo, optical methods for spatial mapping of drug deposition can assist in visualizing drug distributions and aid in the screening of potential drugs and carrier candidates. We present a multimodal approach for the assessment of drug distribution in postmortem tissue specimens using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, multispectral imaging, and confocal microscopy and demonstrate feasibility of distinguishing route of administration advantages of liposome-dye conjugate delivery. The results of this study suggest that insight on drug dynamics gained by this aggregated approach can be used to help screen and/or optimize potential drug candidates and drug delivery protocols.

  11. Injectable in situ forming drug delivery system for cancer chemotherapy using a novel tissue adhesive: characterization and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinoki, Sachiro; Taguchi, Tetsushi; Saito, Hirofumi; Tanaka, Junzo; Tateishi, Tetsuya

    2007-06-01

    Injectable polymers that are biocompatible and biodegradable are important biomaterials for drug delivery system (DDS) and tissue engineering. We have already developed novel tissue adhesives consisting of biomacromolecules and organic acid derivatives with active ester groups. The resulting tissue adhesive forms in situ as a gel and has high bonding strength for living tissue as well as it has good biocompatibility and biodegradability. Here, we report on the physicochemical properties and in vitro evaluation of this novel tissue adhesive consisting of human serum albumin (HSA) and tartaric acid derivative (TAD) containing doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). The results of the measurement of physicochemical characteristics indicate that the gelation time and gel strength of HSA-TAD gels can be controlled according to the material composition. The bonding strength of HSA-TAD adhesives was found to be sufficient to adhere at focus and to correspond with the cross-linking density of HSA-TAD gels. Furthermore, the release of DOX from HSA-TAD gels was sustained for approximately 100 h in an in vitro evaluation. The novel tissue adhesive, therefore, is expected to be applicable for use as an injectable in situ forming DDS.

  12. HIV Treatment for Alcohol and Non-Injection Drug Users in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson-Gomez, Julia; Bodnar, Gloria; Petroll, Andy; Johnson, Kali; Glasman, Laura

    2015-12-01

    Since the mid-1990 s, many developing countries have introduced and expanded the availability of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to persons living with HIV (PLH). However, AIDS-related mortality continues to be high particularly among drug users. In this article, we present results from in-depth interviews with 13 HIV medical providers and 29 crack cocaine and alcohol using PLH in El Salvador. Providers endorsed negative attitudes toward substance using PLH and warned PLH that combining cART with drugs and alcohol would damage their livers and kidneys resulting in death. Upon diagnosis, PLH received little information about HIV treatment and many suffered depression and escalated their drug use. PLH reported suspending cART when they drank or used drugs because of providers' warnings. Substance using PLH were given few strategies and resources to quit using drugs. Messages from medical providers discourage drug users from initiating or adhering to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and may contribute to treatment abandonment.

  13. Injectable bulking agents for urinary incontinence after radical prostaectomy, mimicking local recurrence: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Je Hong; Ahn, Sung Eun; Moon, Sung Kyoung; Park, Seong Jin; Lim, Joo Won; Lee, Sun Ju [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Periurethral bulking agent injection (or transurethral submucosal injection) is a comparatively less invasive procedure for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in patients who develop incontinence after radical prostatectomy, and who are more frequently being treated with transurethral submucosal injection. However, as the radiologic findings of bulking agents are not very well known, they can be mistaken for local recurrence in prostate cancer patients who have undergone prostatectomy. Unlike some of the literatures, in which the radiologic features of collagen injections have been reported, the radiologic findings of silicone injections are yet to be determined. Thus, it is our intention to report this case along with the literature review as the authors have experienced an actual case of a silicone injection mistaken as local recurrence.

  14. Injectable, thermo-reversible and complex coacervate combination gels for protein drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kwang-Mi; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2008-05-01

    Injectable and thermo-reversible physical combination gels were formed in aqueous solution by preparing complex coacervate with two oppositely charged biomacromolecules that composed of negatively charged chondroitin 6-sulfate and positively charged high molecular weight gelatin type A and co-formulating with a negative, thermo-sensitive polysaccharide, methylcellulose containing a salting-out salt, ammonium sulfate. The combination of complex coacervation and a thermo-reversible gel demonstrated synergistic effects on the complex coacervate formation the release rates of model proteins and in situ gel depot formation. Gels indicated sustained release patterns of the protein over 25 days with minimal initial bursts. Optimized novel in situ gel depot systems containing dual advantages of complex coacervation and temperature responsiveness demonstrated a potential for efficient protein drug delivery in terms of high protein loading, sustained protein release, ease of administration, an aqueous environment without toxic organic solvents, and a simple fabrication method.

  15. Sexual risk behavior among injection drug-using human immunodeficiency virus positive clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B K; Koman, J J; Catan, V M; Souply, K L; Birkel, R C; Golaszewski, T J

    1993-06-01

    This study examined sexual risk behavior of 154 seropositive Hispanic injection drug-using clients who were a subsample of a larger study. The results revealed that while nearly 71% followed safe sex practices at a 6-month follow-up, the other 29% were following risky sexual behaviors. Among males who were 25 years of age or younger, slightly over 58% were practicing unsafe sex. Among females, those in the 31-35 age group were all following risky sexual behaviors. Generally, those who lived with their sexual partners, females, and younger clients tended to follow risky sexual behaviors. These findings are very significant in the light of the heterosexual transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Educational and case management programs are needed to provide such clients with an understanding of the possibility of HIV transmission to their sexual partners and to their children in case of pregnancies.

  16. Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic among injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fábio; Doneda, Denise; Gandolfi, Denise; Nemes, Maria Inês Battistella; Andrade, Tarcísio; Bueno, Regina; Piconez e Trigueiros, Daniela

    2003-12-15

    The Brazilian response to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic is being observed all over the world because of its success. Understanding the role of injection drug users (IDUs) in the epidemic and the political response thereto is a key factor in the control of the epidemic in Brazil. This paper summarizes some of the most important analyses of the Brazilian response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic among and from IDUs. Key elements of the response include the support of the Brazilian Universal Public Health System, the provision of universal access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, and the creation of harm reduction projects that are politically and financially supported by the federal government. The response among and from IDUs is a key element in overall control of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The response to the epidemic among and from IDUs has been headed in the correct direction since its beginning and is now being intensively expanded.

  17. HIV among People Who Inject Drugs in the Middle East and North Africa: Systematic Review and Data Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Ghina R.; Weiss, Helen A.; Thomas, Sara L.; Riome, Suzanne; Setayesh, Hamidreza; Riedner, Gabriele; Semini, Iris; Tawil, Oussama; Akala, Francisca Ayodeji; Wilson, David; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is perceived that little is known about the epidemiology of HIV infection among people who inject drugs (PWID) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). The primary objective of this study was to assess the status of the HIV epidemic among PWID in MENA by describing HIV prevalence and incidence. Secondary objectives were to describe the risk behavior environment and the HIV epidemic potential among PWID, and to estimate the prevalence of injecting drug use in MENA. Methods and Findings This was a systematic review following the PRISMA guidelines and covering 23 MENA countries. PubMed, Embase, regional and international databases, as well as country-level reports were searched up to December 16, 2013. Primary studies reporting (1) the prevalence/incidence of HIV, other sexually transmitted infections, or hepatitis C virus (HCV) among PWIDs; or (2) the prevalence of injecting or sexual risk behaviors, or HIV knowledge among PWID; or (3) the number/proportion of PWID in MENA countries, were eligible for inclusion. The quality, quantity, and geographic coverage of the data were assessed at country level. Risk of bias in predefined quality domains was described to assess the quality of available HIV prevalence measures. After multiple level screening, 192 eligible reports were included in the review. There were 197 HIV prevalence measures on a total of 58,241 PWID extracted from reports, and an additional 226 HIV prevalence measures extracted from the databases. We estimated that there are 626,000 PWID in MENA (range: 335,000–1,635,000, prevalence of 0.24 per 100 adults). We found evidence of HIV epidemics among PWID in at least one-third of MENA countries, most of which are emerging concentrated epidemics and with HIV prevalence overall in the range of 10%–15%. Some of the epidemics have however already reached considerable levels including some of the highest HIV prevalence among PWID globally (87.1% in Tripoli, Libya). The relatively high

  18. Respiratory Disease following Illicit Injection of Silicone: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Charles Essenmacher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unregulated, pseudomedical procedures risk serious sequelae even when otherwise safe compounds are used. Silicone is commonly used legally in cosmetic procedures owing to its durability, resistance to heat and aging, and low immunogenicity. However, inappropriate or illegal silicone injection can pose severe local and systemic complications including serious pulmonary compromise. We describe the case of a 30-year-old female who presented with hemoptysis and progressive shortness of breath following illicit silicone injections to the gluteal fat and was found to have new, diffuse, bilateral, ground-glass opacities on contrast-enhanced pulmonary computed tomography. Transbronchial biopsy elucidated that this was a lipoid pneumonia-type injury secondary to silicone infiltration.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes of parenteral somatostatin analogue injections in 195 patients with acromegaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Christian J; Karavitaki, Niki; Störmann, Sylvère; Trainer, Peter J; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, Ilonka; Droste, Michael; Korbonits, Márta; Feldmann, Berit; Zopf, Kathrin; Sanderson, Violet Fazal; Schwicker, David; Gelbaum, Dana; Haviv, Asi; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-acting somatostatin analogues delivered parenterally are the most widely used medical treatment in acromegaly. This patient-reported outcomes survey was designed to assess the impact of chronic injections on subjects with acromegaly. Methods The survey was conducted in nine pituitary centres in Germany, UK and The Netherlands. The questionnaire was developed by endocrinologists and covered aspects of acromegaly symptoms, injection-related manifestations, emotional and daily life impact, treatment satisfaction and unmet medical needs. Results In total, 195 patients participated, of which 112 (57%) were on octreotide (Sandostatin LAR) and 83 (43%) on lanreotide (Somatuline Depot). The majority (>70%) of patients reported acromegaly symptoms despite treatment. A total of 52% of patients reported that their symptoms worsen towards the end of the dosing interval. Administration site pain lasting up to a week following injection was the most frequently reported injection-related symptom (70% of patients). Other injection site reactions included nodules (38%), swelling (28%), bruising (16%), scar tissue (8%) and inflammation (7%). Injection burden was similar between octreotide and lanreotide. Only a minority of patients received injections at home (17%) and 5% were self-injecting. Over a third of patients indicated a feeling of loss of independence due to the injections, and 16% reported repeated work loss days. Despite the physical, emotional and daily life impact of injections, patients were satisfied with their treatment, yet reported that modifications that would offer major improvement over current care would be ‘avoiding injections’ and ‘better symptom control’. Conclusion Lifelong injections of long-acting somatostatin analogues have significant burden on the functioning, well-being and daily lives of patients with acromegaly. PMID:26744896

  20. Investigation of Plasma Treatment on Micro-Injection Moulded Microneedle for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Karthik; Whiteside, Benjamin; Grant, Colin; Patel, Rajnikant; Tuinea-Bobe, Cristina; Norris, Keith; Paradkar, Anant

    2015-10-30

    Plasma technology has been widely used to increase the surface energy of the polymer surfaces for many industrial applications; in particular to increase in wettability. The present work was carried out to investigate how surface modification using plasma treatment modifies the surface energy of micro-injection moulded microneedles and its influence on drug delivery. Microneedles of polyether ether ketone and polycarbonate and have been manufactured using micro-injection moulding and samples from each production batch have been subsequently subjected to a range of plasma treatment. These samples were coated with bovine serum albumin to study the protein adsorption on these treated polymer surfaces. Sample surfaces structures, before and after treatment, were studied using atomic force microscope and surface energies have been obtained using contact angle measurement and calculated using the Owens-Wendt theory. Adsorption performance of bovine serum albumin and release kinetics for each sample set was assessed using a Franz diffusion cell. Results indicate that plasma treatment significantly increases the surface energy and roughness of the microneedles resulting in better adsorption and release of BSA.

  1. Injection drug use is a risk factor for HCV infection in urban Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Paez Jimenez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify current risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV transmission in Greater Cairo. DESIGN AND SETTING: A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted comparing incident acute symptomatic hepatitis C patients in two "fever" hospitals of Greater Cairo with two control groups: household members of the cases and acute hepatitis A patients diagnosed at the same hospitals. Controls were matched on the same age and sex to cases and were all anti-HCV antibody negative. Iatrogenic, community and household exposures to HCV in the one to six months before symptoms onset for cases, and date of interview for controls, were exhaustively assessed. RESULTS: From 2002 to 2007, 94 definite acute symptomatic HCV cases and 188 controls were enrolled in the study. In multivariate analysis, intravenous injections (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.2-20.2, medical stitches (OR = 4.2; 95% CI = 1.6-11.3, injection drug use (IDU (OR = 7.9; 95% CI = 1.4-43.5, recent marriage (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.1-9.9 and illiteracy (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.8-8.5 were independently associated with an increased HCV risk. CONCLUSION: In urban Cairo, invasive health care procedures remain a source of HCV transmission and IDU is an emerging risk factor. Strict application of standard precautions during health care is a priority. Implementation of comprehensive infection prevention programs for IDU should be considered.

  2. Investigation of Plasma Treatment on Micro-Injection Moulded Microneedle for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Karthik; Whiteside, Benjamin; Grant, Colin; Patel, Rajnikant; Tuinea-Bobe, Cristina; Norris, Keith; Paradkar, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Plasma technology has been widely used to increase the surface energy of the polymer surfaces for many industrial applications; in particular to increase in wettability. The present work was carried out to investigate how surface modification using plasma treatment modifies the surface energy of micro-injection moulded microneedles and its influence on drug delivery. Microneedles of polyether ether ketone and polycarbonate and have been manufactured using micro-injection moulding and samples from each production batch have been subsequently subjected to a range of plasma treatment. These samples were coated with bovine serum albumin to study the protein adsorption on these treated polymer surfaces. Sample surfaces structures, before and after treatment, were studied using atomic force microscope and surface energies have been obtained using contact angle measurement and calculated using the Owens-Wendt theory. Adsorption performance of bovine serum albumin and release kinetics for each sample set was assessed using a Franz diffusion cell. Results indicate that plasma treatment significantly increases the surface energy and roughness of the microneedles resulting in better adsorption and release of BSA. PMID:26529005

  3. 30 Years on Selected Issues in the Prevention of HIV among Persons Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. C. Des Jarlais

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After 30 years of extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV among persons who inject drugs (PWID, we now have a good understanding of the critical issues involved. Following the discovery of HIV in 1981, epidemics among PWID were noted in many countries, and consensus recommendations for interventions for reducing injection related HIV transmission have been developed. While high-income countries have continued to develop and implement new Harm Reduction programs, most low-/middle-income countries have implemented Harm Reduction at very low levels. Modeling of combined prevention programming including needle exchange (NSP and antiretroviral therapy (ARV suggests that NSP be given the highest priority. Future HIV prevention programming should continue to provide Harm Reduction programs for PWID coupled with interventions aimed at reducing sexual transmission. As HIV continues to spread in low- and middle-income countries, it is important to achieve and maintain high coverage of Harm Reduction programs in these locations. As PWID almost always experience multiple health problems, it will be important to address these multiple problems within a comprehensive approach grounded in a human rights perspective.

  4. Determination of Melatonin in Rat Pineal Gland and Drug with Flow-Injection Chemiluminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI,Shou-Lian; ZHAO,LI-Xia; CHENG,Xiang-Lei; LIN,Jin-Ming

    2007-01-01

    A flow-injection chemiluminescence(CL)method for the determination of melatonin based on the CL reaction of melatonin with hydrogen peroxide and sodium hypochlorite(NaOCl)in a basic alkaline solution was developed.The possible CL mechanism has been discussed,and a proposal for the reaction pathway was given that singlet oxygen was clarified to be produced in this reaction system and was responsible for the CL emission.Under the optimized conditions.the linear concentration range of application was 1.0 X 10-7-2.5×10-4 mol·L-1 with a detection Iimit of 5.0X 10-8 mol·L-1(S/N=3).The relative standard deviation for eight repeated measurements of 1.0×10-6 mol·L-1 melatonin was 2.8%.The interferences of several important biological substances.some indole compound,cations and anions were studied.No interference was found for the anions,glucose,starch,most of cations and low concentration(less than 3.0×10-6 mol·L-1)of some biological substances and indole compound.The method was applied to the determination of melatonin in rat pineal gland and drug with satisfactory results.The sample throughput was 90 injections per hour.

  5. Investigation of Plasma Treatment on Micro-Injection Moulded Microneedle for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Nair

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma technology has been widely used to increase the surface energy of the polymer surfaces for many industrial applications; in particular to increase in wettability. The present work was carried out to investigate how surface modification using plasma treatment modifies the surface energy of micro-injection moulded microneedles and its influence on drug delivery. Microneedles of polyether ether ketone and polycarbonate and have been manufactured using micro-injection moulding and samples from each production batch have been subsequently subjected to a range of plasma treatment. These samples were coated with bovine serum albumin to study the protein adsorption on these treated polymer surfaces. Sample surfaces structures, before and after treatment, were studied using atomic force microscope and surface energies have been obtained using contact angle measurement and calculated using the Owens-Wendt theory. Adsorption performance of bovine serum albumin and release kinetics for each sample set was assessed using a Franz diffusion cell. Results indicate that plasma treatment significantly increases the surface energy and roughness of the microneedles resulting in better adsorption and release of BSA.

  6. Multiquadrant Subtenon Triamcinolone Injection for Acute Corneal Graft Rejection: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunali Goyal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case of reversal of an acute corneal graft rejection following multiquadrant subtenon triamcinolone injection. Case Presentation: A 19-year-old woman who had acute corneal graft rejection failed to show resolution of the graft rejection after standard treatment with systemic, intravenous, and topical steroids. The graft rejection, however, responded to injection of triamcinolone in multiple subtenon quadrants. Conclusions: For corneal graft rejection, multiquadrant subtenon triamcinolone injections may be a safe adjunct to systemic treatment.

  7. Efficacy of a Multi-level Intervention to Reduce Injecting and Sexual Risk Behaviors among HIV-Infected People Who Inject Drugs in Vietnam: A Four-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian F Go

    Full Text Available Injecting drug use is a primary driver of HIV epidemics in many countries. People who inject drugs (PWID and are HIV infected are often doubly stigmatized and many encounter difficulties reducing risk behaviors. Prevention interventions for HIV-infected PWID that provide enhanced support at the individual, family, and community level to facilitate risk-reduction are needed.455 HIV-infected PWID and 355 of their HIV negative injecting network members living in 32 sub-districts in Thai Nguyen Province were enrolled. We conducted a two-stage randomization: First, sub-districts were randomized to either a community video screening and house-to-house visits or standard of care educational pamphlets. Second, within each sub-district, participants were randomized to receive either enhanced individual level post-test counseling and group support sessions or standard of care HIV testing and counseling. This resulted in four arms: 1 standard of care; 2 community level intervention; 3 individual level intervention; and 4 community plus individual intervention. Follow-up was conducted at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Primary outcomes were self-reported HIV injecting and sexual risk behaviors. Secondary outcomes included HIV incidence among HIV negative network members.Fewer participants reported sharing injecting equipment and unprotected sex from baseline to 24 months in all arms (77% to 4% and 24% to 5% respectively. There were no significant differences at the 24-month visit among the 4 arms (Wald = 3.40 (3 df; p = 0.33; Wald = 6.73 (3 df; p = 0.08. There were a total of 4 HIV seroconversions over 24 months with no significant difference between intervention and control arms.Understanding the mechanisms through which all arms, particularly the control arm, demonstrated both low risk behaviors and low HIV incidence has important implications for policy and prevention programming.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01689545.

  8. Sampling Males Who Inject Drugs in Haiphong, Vietnam: Comparison of Time-Location and Respondent-Driven Sampling Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hoang Vu; Le, Linh-Vi N; Johnston, Lisa Grazina; Nadol, Patrick; Van Do, Anh; Tran, Ha Thi Thanh; Nguyen, Tuan Anh

    2015-08-01

    Accurate measurements of HIV prevalence and associated risk factors among hidden and high-risk groups are vital for program planning and implementation. However, only two sampling methods are purported to provide representative estimates for populations without sampling frames: time-location sampling (TLS) and respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Each method is subject to potential biases and questionable reliability. In this paper, we evaluate surveys designed to estimate HIV prevalence and associated risk factors among people who inject drugs (PWID) sampled through TLS versus RDS. In 2012, males aged ≥16 years who reported injecting drugs in the previous month and living in Haiphong, Vietnam, were sampled using TLS or RDS. Data from each survey were analyzed to compare HIV prevalence, related risk factors, socio-demographic characteristics, refusal estimates, and time and expenditures for field implementation. TLS (n = 432) and RDS (n = 415) produced similarly high estimates for HIV prevalence. Significantly lower proportions of PWID sampled through RDS received methadone treatment or met an outreach worker. Refusal estimates were lower for TLS than for RDS. Total expenditures per sample collected and number of person-days of staff effort were higher for TLS than for RDS. Both survey methods were successful in recruiting a diverse sample of PWID in Haiphong. In Vietnam, surveys of PWID are conducted throughout the country; although the refusal estimate was calculated to be much higher for RDS than TLS, RDS in Haiphong appeared to sample PWID with less exposure to services and required fewer financial and staff resources compared with TLS.

  9. An Injectable, Click-Cross-Linked Small Intestinal Submucosa Drug Depot for the Treatment of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungsook; Park, Ji Hoon; Park, Seung Hun; Lee, Hye Yun; Kim, Jae Ho; Kim, Moon Suk

    2016-12-01

    Here, a click-cross-linked small intestine submucosa (SIS) drug depot is described for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To the best of the knowledge, there have been no studies related to the intra-articular injection of methotrexate (Met)-loaded click-cross-linkable SIS (Met-loaded Cx-SIS) for RA treatment. As the key objective of this work, injectable formulations of tetrazine-modified SIS (TE-SIS) and transcyclooctene-modified SIS (TC-SIS) are employed as drug depots. Within a few seconds, the simple mixing of equal amounts of TE-SIS and TC-SIS suspensions forms a gelatinous click-cross-linked SIS (Cx-SIS) drug depot in vitro and in vivo. The formed Cx-SIS depot is maintained in the articular joint over an extended period, while SIS alone rapidly disappears. Injectable formulations of Met-loaded Cx-SIS and Met-loaded SIS are prepared and then injected into articular joints to form drug depots. Compared to animals treated with Met-loaded SIS, RA animals treated with Met-loaded Cx-SIS show effective RA repair, as well as extensive regeneration of chondrocytes and glycosaminoglycan deposits. Collectively, these results indicate that the Met-loaded Cx-SIS depot is successfully formed after intra-articular injection of click-cross-linkable SIS, and that this formulation induces long-lasting Met release and allows Met to act effectively in the articular joint, resulting in RA repair.

  10. Can differences in the type, nature or amount of polysubstance use explain the increased risk of non-fatal overdose among psychologically distressed people who inject drugs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Kim S; McIlwraith, Fairlie; Dietze, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Burns, Lucy; Cogger, Shelley; Alati, Rosa

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates whether the type, nature or amount of polysubstance use can explain the increased risk of non-fatal overdose among people who inject drugs with severe psychological distress. Data came from three years (2011-2013) of the Illicit Drug Reporting System (IDRS), an annual sentinel sample of injecting drug users across Australia (n=2673). Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used on 14 drug types to construct five latent factors, each representing a type of polysubstance use. Tests of measurement invariance were carried out to determine if polysubstance use profiles differed between those with and without severe psychological distress. Next, we regressed non-fatal overdose on the polysubstance use factors with differences in the relationships tested between groups. Among those with severe psychological distress a polysubstance use profile characterised by heroin, oxycodone, crystal methamphetamine and cocaine use was associated with greater risk of non-fatal overdose. Among those without severe psychological distress, two polysubstance use profiles, largely characterised by opioid substitution therapies and prescription drugs, were protective against non-fatal overdose. The types of polysubstance use profiles did not differ between people who inject drugs with and without severe psychological distress. However, the nature of use of one particular polysubstance profile placed the former group at a strongly increased risk of non-fatal overdose, while the nature of polysubstance use involving opioid substitution therapies was protective only among the latter group. The findings identify polysubstance use profiles of importance to drug-related harms among individuals with psychological problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Determinants of HIV infection among female sex workers in two cities in the Republic of Moldova: the role of injection drug use and sexual risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohrabyan, Lev; Johnston, Lisa Grazina; Scutelniciuc, Otilia; Iovita, Alexandrina; Todirascu, Lilia; Costin, Tatiana; Plesca, Valeriu; Cotelnic-Harea, Tatiana; Ionascu, Gabriela

    2013-10-01

    In 2009-2010, females who reported having vaginal, anal or oral sex in exchange for money in the previous year, ≥16 years, and living in either Chisinau (n = 299) or Balti (n = 359), Moldova, were recruited into a respondent driven sampling survey. One fifth reported ever injecting drugs and over 30 % ever had sexual intercourse with men who inject drugs. In both cities, condom use with permanent and casual partners was much lower than condom use with commercial partners. In Chisinau, 6.9 % and in Balti, 24.7 % tested positive for HIV; 18 and 23.7 % had antibodies to hepatitis C; 9.1 and 8.9 % had antibodies to HBV; and, 8.4 and 6.1 % tested positive for syphilis. HIV seropositive FSW in either city were more likely to have ever injected drugs and to be infected with HCV. Limited government initiative and drastic reductions in international funding will likely impact urgently needed HIV prevention and harm reduction services targeting FSW in Moldova.

  12. Drug Control: Observations on Elements of the Federal Drug Control Strategy. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    Although the United States government invests vast sums of money in the war on drugs, the availability of drugs and the number of persons using illegal drugs are still serious problems. Information that Congress can use in improving drug control strategies is provided here. Some of the report's highlights include current research on promising…

  13. Responsibility attribution of HIV infection and coping among injection drug users in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chih-Chin; Chronister, Julie; Chou, Chih-Hung; Tan, Sooyin; Macewicz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This study explored responsibility attribution (RA) of HIV/AIDS infection (i.e., how an individual perceives the cause of their HIV/AIDS infection) and its relationship to coping styles among injection drug users (IDUs) with HIV/AIDS. In addition, this study investigated whether self-esteem, social support, and religiosity mediate the relationship between RA and coping styles of IDUs with HIV/AIDS. Participants were 201 adult IDUs with HIV/AIDS participating in the National Drug Rehabilitation Center in Malaysia. Five measures were used to assess the above constructs. Cluster analysis, analysis of variance, and mediation analyses were conducted. Results of this study indicated that IDUs with HIV/AIDS in Malaysia can be classified into four homogenous attribution groups: external, fatalistic, internal, and indeterminate. Mediator analyses revealed that combination of self-esteem, social support, and religiosity mediate the relationship between RA and coping behaviors. Clinicians working with IDUs with HIV/AIDS need to address the role of RA, self-esteem, religiosity, and social support as these psychosocial constructs are linked to coping with HIV/AIDS. Future researchers should investigate whether enhancing self-esteem, social support, and religiosity can promote active problem-solving coping and reduce the use of avoidance coping behaviors.

  14. Patient–Provider Rapport in the Health Care of People Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginetta Salvalaggio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Little research has described determinants and consequences of patient–provider rapport among people who inject drugs (PWIDs. This mixed-method study (a qualitatively described facilitators, barriers, and consequences to rapport development between PWIDs and their health care providers and (b quantitatively tested the hypothesis that quality of rapport is associated with positive patterns of service use. Two exploratory focus groups with PWIDs and care providers were conducted. Subsequently, 89 PWIDs completed a survey interview; of those, eight completed a follow-up qualitative interview. Qualitative results indicated that rapport is influenced by drug-related behaviors, addiction severity, provider expertise, patient-centered care, and perceived discrimination and that rapport then influences patient compliance, timing of care, and criminal activity. Quantitative results indicated that rapport predicted PWID satisfaction with care as well as frequency and timing of emergency department presentations. Results suggest that PWID–provider rapport has several unique determinants and is associated with positive health care outcomes.

  15. Acute bilateral ureteral obstruction following Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid polymer injection: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Lavi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral obstruction following bulking agent injection for treatment of vesicoureteral reflux is rare. Herein we report a case of acute bilateral ureteral obstruction following bilateral Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid polymer injection. The obstruction which manifested hours following the injection, was treated with prompt insertion of bilateral ureteral stents. The stents were removed 4 weeks later with complete resolution of the obstruction. We believe that ureteral stenting is an excellent solution for acute ureteral obstruction following Dextranomer/hyaluronic acid polymer injection

  16. Economic impact of prescribing error prevention with computerized physician order entry of injectable antineoplastic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerich, V; Borg, C; Villanueva, C; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Helias, P; Rohrlich, P-S; Demarchi, M; Pivot, X; Limat, S

    2013-03-01

    A cost-benefit analysis was carried out to determine the potential economic costs and benefits of pharmaceutical analysis in preventing prescribing errors for full standardized injectable antineoplastic drugs computerized physician order entry, in a pharmaceutical unit (University teaching hospital), compared with theoretical setting with no pharmaceutical analysis. The viewpoint is that of the payer or the French national Public Health Insurance system, and is limited to hospital cost (only direct medical costs related to net cost and net benefit. A decision analysis model was performed to compare two strategies: with pharmaceutical analysis (± pharmacy intervention) and without pharmaceutical analysis. are expressed in terms of benefit-to-cost ratio and total benefit. The robustness of the results was assessed through a series of one-way sensitivity analyses. Over 1 year, prescribing error incidence was estimated at 1.5% [1.3-1.7], i.e. 218 avoided prescribing errors. Potential avoidance of hospital stay was estimated at 419 days or 1.9 ± 0.3 days per prescribing error. Cost-benefit analysis could estimate a net benefit-to-cost ratio of 33.3 (€17.34/€0.52) and a total benefit at €16.82 per pharmaceutical analysis or €249,844 per year. The sensitivity analysis showed robustness of results. Our study shows a substantial economic benefit of pharmaceutical analysis and intervention in the prevention of prescribing errors. The clinical pharmacist adds both value and economic benefit, making it possible to avoid additional use of expensive antineoplastic drugs and hospitalization. Computerized physician order entry of antineoplastic drugs improves the relevance of clinical pharmacist interventions, expanding pharmaceutical analysis and also the role of the pharmacist.

  17. Evaluation of an injectable thermosensitive hydrogel as drug delivery implant for ocular glaucoma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lei; Wang, Tao; Zhao, Feng; Zheng, Qiongjuan; Li, Xiaoning; Luo, Jing; Liu, Ji; Quan, Daping; Ge, Jian

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a biodegradable thermo-sensitive hydrogel from poly(trimethylene carbonate)15-F127-poly(trimethylene carbonate)15 (PTMC15-F127-PTMC15) was designed and evaluated as an injectable implant during ocular glaucoma filtration surgery in vivo and in vitro. Mitomycin C (MMC) was loaded into this hydrogel for controlled released to prolong the efficacy and to reduce the long-term toxicity. The properties of the hydrogel were confirmed using 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Compared to the Pluronic F127 hydrogel, the PTMC15-F127-PTMC15 hydrogel showed a good solution-gel transition temperature at 37°C, a lower work concentration of 5% w/v and a longer mass loss time of more than 2 weeks. The in vitro study showed that the drug could be released from PTMC15-F127-PTMC15 (5% w/v) hydrogel for up to 16 days with only 57% of drug released in the first day. Moreover, the cell toxicity, which was tested via LDH and ANNEXIN V/PI, decreased within 72 h in human tenon's fibroblast cells (HTFs). The in vivo behavior in a rabbit glaucoma filtration surgery model indicated that this hydrogel loaded with 0.1 mg/ml MMC led to a better functional bleb with a prolonged mean bleb survival time (25.5±2.9 days). The scar tissue formation, new collagen deposition and myofibroblast generation appeared to be reduced upon histological and immunohistochemistry examinations, with no obvious side effects and inflammatory reactions. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that this novel hydrogel is a safe and effective drug delivery candidate in ocular glaucoma surgery.

  18. Eligibility of persons who inject drugs for treatment of hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Amber; Robaeys, Geert

    2014-09-28

    In this decade, an increase is expected in end-stage liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, most commonly caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Although people who inject drugs (PWID) are the major source for HCV infection, they were excluded from antiviral treatments until recently. Nowadays there is incontrovertible evidence in favor of treating these patients, and substitution therapy and active substance use are no longer contraindications for antiviral treatment. The viral clearance in PWID after HCV antiviral treatment with interferon or pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is comparable to the viral clearance in non-substance users. Furthermore, multidisciplinary approaches to delivering treatment to PWID are advised, and their treatment should be considered on an individualized basis. To prevent the spread of HCV in the PWID community, recent active PWID are eligible for treatment in combination with needle exchange programs and substitution therapy. As the rate of HCV reinfection is low after HCV antiviral treatment, there is no need to withhold HCV treatment due to concerns about reinfection alone. Despite the advances in treatment efficacies and data supporting their success, HCV assessment of PWID and initiation of antiviral treatment remains low. However, the proportion of PWID assessed and treated for HCV is increasing, which can be further enhanced by understanding the barriers to and facilitators of HCV care. Removing stigmatization and implementing peer support and group treatment strategies, in conjunction with greater involvement by nurse educators/practitioners, will promote greater treatment seeking and adherence by PWID. Moreover, screening can be facilitated by noninvasive methods for detecting HCV antibodies and assessing liver fibrosis stages. Recently, HCV clearance has become a major endpoint in the war against drugs for the Global Commission on Drug Policy. This review highlights the most recent evidence concerning

  19. Evaluation of an injectable thermosensitive hydrogel as drug delivery implant for ocular glaucoma surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xi

    Full Text Available In this study, a biodegradable thermo-sensitive hydrogel from poly(trimethylene carbonate15-F127-poly(trimethylene carbonate15 (PTMC15-F127-PTMC15 was designed and evaluated as an injectable implant during ocular glaucoma filtration surgery in vivo and in vitro. Mitomycin C (MMC was loaded into this hydrogel for controlled released to prolong the efficacy and to reduce the long-term toxicity. The properties of the hydrogel were confirmed using 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography (GPC. Compared to the Pluronic F127 hydrogel, the PTMC15-F127-PTMC15 hydrogel showed a good solution-gel transition temperature at 37°C, a lower work concentration of 5% w/v and a longer mass loss time of more than 2 weeks. The in vitro study showed that the drug could be released from PTMC15-F127-PTMC15 (5% w/v hydrogel for up to 16 days with only 57% of drug released in the first day. Moreover, the cell toxicity, which was tested via LDH and ANNEXIN V/PI, decreased within 72 h in human tenon's fibroblast cells (HTFs. The in vivo behavior in a rabbit glaucoma filtration surgery model indicated that this hydrogel loaded with 0.1 mg/ml MMC led to a better functional bleb with a prolonged mean bleb survival time (25.5±2.9 days. The scar tissue formation, new collagen deposition and myofibroblast generation appeared to be reduced upon histological and immunohistochemistry examinations, with no obvious side effects and inflammatory reactions. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that this novel hydrogel is a safe and effective drug delivery candidate in ocular glaucoma surgery.

  20. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users: 12-month outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly; DeFulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2015-06-01

    Oral naltrexone could be a promising relapse-prevention pharmacotherapy for recently detoxified opioid-dependent patients; however, interventions are often needed to promote adherence with this treatment approach. We recently conducted a study to evaluate a 26-week employment-based reinforcement intervention of oral naltrexone in unemployed injection drug users (Dunn et al., 2013). Participants were randomly assigned into a contingency (n = 35) group required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain entry into a therapeutic workplace or a prescription (n = 32) group given a take-home supply of oral naltrexone and access to the workplace without observed ingestion. Monthly urine samples were collected and analyzed for evidence for naltrexone adherence, opioid use, and cocaine use. As previously reported, contingency participants provided significantly more naltrexone-positive urine samples than prescription participants during the 26-week intervention period. The goal of this current study is to report the 12-month outcomes, which occurred 6 months after the intervention ended. Results at the 12-month visit showed no between-groups differences in naltrexone-positive, opioid-negative, or cocaine-negative urine samples and no participant self-reported using naltrexone at the follow-up visit. These results show that even after a period of successfully reinforced oral naltrexone adherence, longer-term naltrexone use is unlikely to be maintained after reinforcement contingencies are discontinued. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Prescription drugs associated with reports of violence towards others.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Moore

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Violence towards others is a seldom-studied adverse drug event and an atypical one because the risk of injury extends to others. OBJECTIVE: To identify the primary suspects in adverse drug event reports describing thoughts or acts of violence towards others, and assess the strength of the association. METHODOLOGY: From the Food and Drug Administration (FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (AERS data, we extracted all serious adverse event reports for drugs with 200 or more cases received from 2004 through September 2009. We identified any case report indicating homicide, homicidal ideation, physical assault, physical abuse or violence related symptoms. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Disproportionality in reporting was defined as a 5 or more violence case reports, b at least twice the number of reports expected given the volume of overall reports for that drug, c a χ2 statistic indicating the violence cases were unlikely to have occurred by chance (p<0.01. RESULTS: We identified 1527 cases of violence disproportionally reported for 31 drugs. Primary suspect drugs included varenicline (an aid to smoking cessation, 11 antidepressants, 6 sedative/hypnotics and 3 drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The evidence of an association was weaker and mixed for antipsychotic drugs and absent for all but 1 anticonvulsant/mood stabilizer. Two or fewer violence cases were reported for 435/484 (84.7% of all evaluable drugs suggesting that an association with this adverse event is unlikely for these drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Acts of violence towards others are a genuine and serious adverse drug event associated with a relatively small group of drugs. Varenicline, which increases the availability of dopamine, and antidepressants with serotonergic effects were the most strongly and consistently implicated drugs. Prospective studies to evaluate systematically this side effect are needed to establish the incidence, confirm differences among drugs and

  2. Doxycycline-induced drug fever: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hai-Ling; Lu, Ning-Wei; Xie, Hua; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Qiu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Drug fever is a febrile reaction induced by a drug without additional clinical symptoms. This adverse reaction is not rare but under diagnosed and under reported. Doxycycline is a tetracycline compound with broad-spectrum antibiotic activity. Drug fever induced by doxycycline is rarely reported. In this study, we describe a patient in whom doxycycline induced drug fever after 17 days of therapy for brucellosis.

  3. "Back then" and "nowadays": social transition narratives in accounts of injecting drug use in an East European setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Tim; Bivol, Stela

    2012-02-01

    Whereas most research investigating drug use transitions narrows its analyses around the individual and their decision-making, we explore how personal narratives of drug transition interplay with broader narratives of social and economic change in a 'transition society' of post-Soviet Europe. Informed by narrative theory, we draw upon analyses of 42 audio-recorded qualitative interviews conducted in the city of Balti, Moldova, in late 2009, with people with current and recent experience of injecting drug use. Accounts of drug transition connect with stories of shifting socio-economic conditions, drug markets, drug law enforcement practices, and social relationships across generations. Participants cast themselves as the 'transition generation', juxtaposing 'their' time of drug initiation "back then" with "nowadays". We find that personal stories of drug initiation, transition and career are told in relation to a meta-narrative of social transition. Whereas 'back then', drug use was depicted as 'natural', 'home-produced', embedded in social relations, and symbolically valuable, in the post-transition narrative of 'now', this culture of drug use has become disrupted, through the internationalisation of drug markets, the individualisation of social relations, the weakening of social ties and trust relations, flux in moral boundaries, and shifting social values of drug use. The meta-narrative of social transition serves to bridge biographical adaptation as collective experience. This helps to moderate the social harms linked to the 'becoming other' constituted by drug injecting, and bridge the effects of rationed expectation that can characterise post-Soviet transitions. We suggest that the narrative of transition offers a cultural script that says "transition is to blame".

  4. High coverage needle/syringe programs for people who inject drugs in low and middle income countries: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Des Jarlais Don C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Persons who inject drugs (PWID are at an elevated risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. In many high-income countries, needle and syringe exchange programs (NSP have been associated with reductions in blood-borne infections. However, we do not have a good understanding of the effectiveness of NSP in low/middle-income and transitional-economy countries. Methods A systematic literature review based on PRISMA guidelines was utilized to collect primary study data on coverage of NSP programs and changes in HIV and HCV infection over time among PWID in low-and middle-income and transitional countries (LMICs. Included studies reported laboratory measures of either HIV or HCV and at least 50% coverage of the local injecting population (through direct use or through secondary exchange. We also included national reports on newly reported HIV cases for countries that had national level data for PWID in conjunction with NSP scale-up and implementation. Results Studies of 11 NSPs with high-coverage from Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Estonia, Iran, Lithuania, Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam were included in the review. In five studies HIV prevalence decreased (range −3% to −15% and in three studies HCV prevalence decreased (range −4.2% to −10.2%. In two studies HIV prevalence increased (range +5.6% to +14.8%. HCV incidence remained stable in one study. Of the four national reports of newly reported HIV cases, three reported decreases during NSP expansion, ranging from −30% to −93.3%, while one national report documented an increase in cases (+37.6%. Estimated incidence among new injectors decreased in three studies, with reductions ranging from −11/100 person years at risk to −16/100 person years at risk. Conclusions While not fully consistent, the data generally support the effectiveness of NSP in reducing HIV and HCV infection in low/middle-income and transitional-economy countries. If

  5. Differences in HIV risk behavior of injection drug users in New York City by health care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A K; Harripersaud, K; Crawford, N D; Rivera, A V; Fuller, C M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the HIV risk behaviors and demographic characteristics of injection drug users (IDUs) by type of health care setting, which can inform development of tailored structural interventions to increase access to HIV prevention and medical treatment services. IDU syringe customers were recruited from pharmacies as part of the "Pharmacist As Resources Making Links to Community Services" (PHARM-Link) study, a randomized community-based intervention in New York City (NYC) aimed at connecting IDUs to HIV prevention, medical, and social services. An ACASI survey ascertained demographics, risk behavior, health-care utilization, and location where health care services were received in the past year. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Of 602 participants, 34% reported receiving health care at a community clinic, 46% a private medical office, 15% a mobile medical unit, and 59% an emergency room (ER). After adjustment, participants who attended a community clinic were significantly more likely to have health insurance, report syringe sharing, and be HIV positive. Whites, nondaily injectors, insured, and higher income IDUs were more likely to attend a private medical office. Participants who recently used a case manager and had multiple sexual partners were more likely to use a mobile medical unit. ER attendees were more likely to be homeless and report recent drug treatment use. These findings show that IDU demographics and risk behaviors differ by health care setting, suggesting that risk reduction interventions should be tailored to health care settings. Specifically, these data suggest that community clinics and mobile medical units serve high-risk IDUs, highlighting the need for more research to develop and test innovative prevention and care programs within these settings.

  6. Changes in patterns of drug injection concurrent with a sustained reduction in the availability of heroin in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Libby; Day, Carolyn; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2003-06-05

    Between 1996 and 2000, heroin was the drug most frequently injected in Australia, and viable heroin markets existed in six of Australia's eight jurisdictions. In 2001, there was a dramatic and sustained reduction in the availability of heroin that was accompanied by a substantial increase in its price, and a 14% decline in the average purity of seizures analysed by forensic laboratories. The shortage of heroin constitutes a unique natural experiment within which to examine the impact of supply reduction. This paper reviews one important correlate of the shortage, namely changes in patterns of illicit drug injection. A number of studies have consistently suggested that between 2000 and 2001, there was a sizeable decrease in both prevalence and frequency of heroin injection among injecting drug users. These changes were accompanied by increased prevalence and frequency of stimulant injection. Cocaine was favoured in NSW, the sole jurisdiction in which a cocaine market was established prior to the heroin shortage; whereas methamphetamine predominated in other jurisdictions. Some data suggest that, at least in the short-term, some drug injectors left the market altogether subsequent to the reduced heroin availability. However, the findings that (1) some former heroin users switched their drug preference to a stimulant; and (2) subsequently attributed this change to the reduced availability of heroin, suggests that reducing the supply of one drug may serve to increase the use of others. Given the differential harms associated with the use of stimulants and opiates, this possibility has grave implications for Australia, where the intervention and treatment system is designed primarily to accommodate opiate use and dependence.

  7. An injectable, dual pH and oxidation-responsive supramolecular hydrogel for controlled dual drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xinfeng; Jin, Yong; Sun, Tongbing; Qi, Rui; Li, Hanping; Fan, Wuhou

    2016-05-01

    A novel pH and oxidation dual-responsive and injectable supramolecular hydrogel was developed, which was formed from multi-block copolymer poly(ether urethane) (PEU) and α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) inclusion complexes (ICs). The PEU copolymer was synthesized through a simple one-pot condensation polymerization of poly(ethylene glycol), di(1-hydroxyethylene) diselenide, dimethylolpropionic acid and 3-isocyanatomethyl-3,5,5-trimethylcyclohexyl isocyanate. In aqueous solution, the amphiphilic PEU copolymers could self-assemble into nanoparticles with dual pH and oxidation sensitivities, which can efficiently load and controllably release a hydrophobic drug indomethacin (IND). Then a dual-drug loaded supramolecular hydrogel was obtained by addition of α-CD and hydrophilic model drug (rhodamine B, RB) into the resulting IND-loaded PEU nanoparticle solution. The rheology studies showed that the supramolecular hydrogels with good injectability underwent a pH-induced reversible sol-gel transition and an oxidation-triggered degradation behavior. The in vitro drug release results demonstrated that the hydrogels showed dual drug release behavior and the release rates could be significantly accelerated by addition of an oxidizing agent (H2O2) or increasing the environmental pH. Therefore, this injectable and dual stimuli-responsive supramolecular hydrogel based codelivery systems could potentially be a promising candidate for controlled drug delivery systems.

  8. Youth, violence and non-injection drug use: nexus of vulnerabilities among lesbian and bisexual sex workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Tara; Kerr, Thomas; Duff, Putu; Feng, Cindy; Shannon, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence of enhanced HIV risk among sexual minority populations, and sex workers (SWs) in particular, there remains a paucity of epidemiological data on the risk environments of SWs who identify as lesbian or bisexual. Therefore, this short report describes a study that examined the individual, interpersonal and structural associations with lesbian or bisexual identity among SWs in Vancouver, Canada. Analysis drew on data from an open prospective cohort of street and hidden off-street SWs in Vancouver. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were used to examine the independent relationships between individual, interpersonal, work environment and structural factors and lesbian or bisexual identity. Of the 510 individuals in our sample, 95 (18.6%) identified as lesbian or bisexual. In multivariable analysis, reporting non-injection drug use in the last six months (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89; 95% confidence intervals [CI] = 1.42, 5.75), youth ≤24 years of age (AOR = 2.43; 95% CI = 1.24, 4.73) and experiencing client-perpetrated verbal, physical and/or sexual violence in the last six months (AOR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.15, 2.98) remained independently associated with lesbian/bisexual identity, after adjusting for potential confounders. The findings demonstrate an urgent need for evidence-based social and structural HIV prevention interventions. In particular, policies and programmes tailored to lesbian and bisexual youth and women working in sex work, including those that prevent violence and address issues of non-injection stimulant use are required.

  9. Simultaneous bilateral septic arthritis of the knee after intraarticular steroid injection: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munigangaiah, Sudarshan; O'Sullivan, Theresa A; Lenehan, Brian

    2014-07-01

    Osteoarthritis of knee is one of the common problems in elderly population. Intraarticular corticosteroid injection is a conservative management modality in osteoarthritis of knee. Septic arthritis is an infective complication of intraarticular corticosteroid injection. Septic arthritis in rheumatoid arthritis patients have worse prognosis because of delay in diagnosis. A higher rate of infectious complications following intraarticular injection is expected in immunocompromised and rheumatoid patients. We would like to report an extremely rare case of simultaneous bilateral knee septic arthritis after bilateral knee intraarticular steroid injection in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. Patient was treated successfully with multiple bilateral knee arthroscopic washouts and long-term intravenous antibiotics. This case report emphasizes the increased risk of infection in rheumatoid arthritis patients and a risk benefit assessment on individual basis before carrying out intraarticular steroid injection. Patient should be aware of this increased risk of infection.

  10. Injection Drug Use Is a Risk Factor for HCV Infection in Urban Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez Jimenez, Adela; Mohamed, Mostafa K.; Sharaf Eldin, Noha; Abou Seif, Hasnaa; El Aidi, Said; Sultan, Yehia; Elsaid, Nasr; Rekacewicz, Claire; El-Hoseiny, Mostafa; El-Daly, May; Abdel-Hamid, Mohamed; Fontanet, Arnaud

    2009-01-01

    Objective To identify current risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) transmission in Greater Cairo. Design and Setting A 1∶1 matched case-control study was conducted comparing incident acute symptomatic hepatitis C patients in two “fever” hospitals of Greater Cairo with two control groups: household members of the cases and acute hepatitis A patients diagnosed at the same hospitals. Controls were matched on the same age and sex to cases and were all anti-HCV antibody negative. Iatrogenic, community and household exposures to HCV in the one to six months before symptoms onset for cases, and date of interview for controls, were exhaustively assessed. Results From 2002 to 2007, 94 definite acute symptomatic HCV cases and 188 controls were enrolled in the study. In multivariate analysis, intravenous injections (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.2–20.2), medical stitches (OR = 4.2; 95% CI = 1.6–11.3), injection drug use (IDU) (OR = 7.9; 95% CI = 1.4–43.5), recent marriage (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.1–9.9) and illiteracy (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.8–8.5) were independently associated with an increased HCV risk. Conclusion In urban Cairo, invasive health care procedures remain a source of HCV transmission and IDU is an emerging risk factor. Strict application of standard precautions during health care is a priority. Implementation of comprehensive infection prevention programs for IDU should be considered. PMID:19784363

  11. Efficacy of sofosbuvir-based therapies in HIV/HCV infected patients and persons who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puoti, Massimo; Panzeri, Claudia; Rossotti, Roberto; Baiguera, Chiara

    2014-12-15

    In the era of Directly Acting anti HCV Antivirals treatment of hepatitis C is successful in the majority of persons treated. However, treatment of persons with HIV or who inject drugs remains challenging because of special issues: drug-drug interactions with antiretroviral, psychiatric and drug substitution therapies, treatment adherence, impact of treatment on HIV disease course or on risk of bacterial infections. Sofosbuvir induced sustained virologic response in 91% of 23 HIV/HCV coinfected persons treated in combination with ribavirin and pegylated interferon, in 83% of 497 treated in combination with ribavirin and in all 50 patients infected with HCV GT1 treated in combination with ledipasvir and ribavirin. The rates of efficacy in HCV-HIV coinfected were almost the same as those observed in HCV monoinfected suggesting that the efficacy of sofosbuvir is not reduced by HIV coinfection. There are no data on the efficacy of sofosbuvir in injection drugs users. The pangenotypic activity, the high barrier to resistance, the modest potential for drug-drug interactions makes sofosbuvir a reference drug for the treatment of these two special populations.

  12. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural, pharmacy-based…

  13. Gender Difference in the Clinical and Behavioral Characteristics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected Injection Drug Users in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hsing Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that drug injection risks and sexual behavior related risks are equally important in determining the risk of HIV infection among IDUs. Gender-specific approaches to prevention which reflect differences in gender-related patterns of risk are also needed.

  14. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural,…

  15. Risk factors of HIV infection and needle sharing among injecting drug users in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hien, N.T.; Giang, L.T.; Binh, P.N.; Devillé, W.; Ameijden, E.J.C. van; Wolffers, I.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify risk factors for needle sharing and HIV infection among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC), Vietnam. METHODS: Three cross-sectional surveys among IDUs, both on the street (in 11 urban districts) and in the rehabilitation center for IDUs in HCMC, w

  16. Community Impact of Pharmacy-Randomized Intervention to Improve Access to Syringes and Services for Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Natalie D.; Amesty, Silvia; Rivera, Alexis V.; Harripersaud, Katherine; Turner, Alezandria; Fuller, Crystal M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In an effort to reduce HIV transmission among injection drug users (IDUs), New York State deregulated pharmacy syringe sales in 2001 through the Expanded Syringe Access Program by removing the requirement of a prescription. With evidence suggesting pharmacists' ability to expand their public health role, a structural, pharmacy-based…

  17. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  18. A bio-ballistic micro-jet for drug injection into animal skin using a Nd:YAG laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoh, J. J.; Jang, H.; Park, M.; Han, T.; Hah, J.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging of the abdominal skin of a guinea pig after injecting a fluorescent probe and biotin via the laser-induced ballistic technique revealed the epidermal and dermal layers which were stained well below 60 \\upmu m underneath the outer layer of the skin. An extensive network of cells was evident in the deeper layer of the stained dermis as the distributed fluorescein isothiocyanate dose was administered by repeated injection using a laser-based micro-jet. We performed optically controlled release of the drug by breaching the guinea pig's skin tissue targeting the region 10-400 \\upmu m beneath the outermost layer. Tissue damage was minimized by reducing the injection volume to approximately 100 nl per pulse. This was done using a micro-jet diameter equal to half of that of a conventional 200 \\upmu m syringe needle. Thus, the optimally controlled delivery of liquid drugs using an irradiated laser pulse was shown to be possible.

  19. Treatment of chronic hepatitis C among injecting drug users: A 5-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzić Maja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Hepatitic C infection (HCV is a systemic, generalised disease with the prevalence of inflammation in the liver. The aim of this study was to determine the success of treatment for chronic hepatitis C with pegilated interferon alfa 2a and ribavirin in injecting drug users. Methods. This a 5-year follow-up study included 30 patients [63.3% men and 36.7% women, average age 30.2 years (SD 7.1 years] injecting drug users in one-year abstinence, with chronic hepatitis C, treated with the pegilated interferon α 2a and ribavirin. Complete history with possible route of infection, the standard biochemical tests, liver biopsy, quantification of the viral genome in sera and HCV genotyping and subtyping were done prior to the therapy initiation. Depending on the HCV genotype, the therapy was conducted over a period of 48 weeks for genotype 1 and 24 weeks for genotype non 1. Five years later all 30 patients were invited on control examination; 22 of them appeared at the check-up and quantification of the viral genome in their sera were analized. Results. The established degree of liver fibrosis was: F0 in 40%, F1 in 23.33%, F2 in 26.67%, F3 in 3.33% and F4 in 6.67% of the patients. Genotype 3a was dominant (50.0%, 1b was registered in 40.0%, 1a in 6.66% and 2b in 3.33% of the patients. Sustained virologic response (SVR was achieved in 86.7% of the patients, 10.0% of the patients were non-responders, while 3.33% of them revealed recurrence of HCV. Opiate abuse recurrence during antiviral therapy happened in 6.7% of the patients. Five years after the antiviral therapy 73.3% of the patients appeared at the check-up and all of them were in stable abstinence from opiate abuse. All of those, with a sustained viral response of five-year duration, had the negative PCR HCV RNA test (< 50 IU ml-1. In the patients showing unsatisfactory therapy response 5 years before, antiviral therapy was repeated by the same therapeutic regimen, but without adequate

  20. Acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2014-01-01

    Chlorpheniramine is a widely used drug for management of allergic reaction.The serious adverse reaction to this drug is extremely rare.In this report, the authors present a case of acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection.

  1. Acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beuy Joob

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorpheniramine is a widely used drug for management of allergic reaction. The serious adverse reaction to this drug is extremely rare. In this report, the authors present a case of acute anaphylactic reaction to expired chlorpheniramine injection.

  2. Multiscale Modeling of Drug-induced Effects of ReDuNing Injection on Human Disease: From Drug Molecules to Clinical Symptoms of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Fang; Gu, Jiangyong; Zhang, Xinzhuang; Chen, Lirong; Cao, Liang; Li, Na; Wang, Zhenzhong; Xiao, Wei; Xu, Xiaojie

    2015-05-01

    ReDuNing injection (RDN) is a patented traditional Chinese medicine, and the components of it were proven to have antiviral and important anti-inflammatory activities. Several reports showed that RDN had potential effects in the treatment of influenza and pneumonia. Though there were several experimental reports about RDN, the experimental results were not enough and complete due to that it was difficult to predict and verify the effect of RDN for a large number of human diseases. Here we employed multiscale model by integrating molecular docking, network pharmacology and the clinical symptoms information of diseases and explored the interaction mechanism of RDN on human diseases. Meanwhile, we analyzed the relation among the drug molecules, target proteins, biological pathways, human diseases and the clinical symptoms about it. Then we predicted potential active ingredients of RDN, the potential target proteins, the key pathways and related diseases. These attempts may offer several new insights to understand the pharmacological properties of RDN and provide benefit for its new clinical applications and research.

  3. Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection System Demonstration Project public design report. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The public design report describes the Blast Furnace Granulated Coal Injection (BFGCI) project under construction at Bethlehem Steel Corporation`s (BSC) Burns Harbor, Indiana, plant. The project is receiving cost-sharing from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and is being administrated by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center in accordance with the DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-91MC27362. The project is the first installation in the United States for the British Steel technology using granular coal in blast furnaces. The objective is to demonstrate that granular coal is an economic and reliable fuel which can successfully be applied to large North American blast furnaces. These include: coal grind size, coal injection rate, coal source (type) and blast furnace conversion method. To achieve the program objectives, the demonstration project is divided into the following three Phases: Phase I-Design; Phase II-Procurement & Construction; and Phase III-Operation. Preliminary design (Phase I) began in 1991 with detailed design commencing in April 1993. Construction at Burns Harbor (Phase II) began August 1993. Construction is expected to be complete in the first quarter of 1995 which will be followed by a demonstration test program (Phase III).

  4. Frailty, HIV infection, and mortality in an aging cohort of injection drug users.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damani A Piggott

    Full Text Available Frailty is associated with morbidity and premature mortality among elderly HIV-uninfected adults, but the determinants and consequences of frailty in HIV-infected populations remain unclear. We evaluated the correlates of frailty, and the impact of frailty on mortality in a cohort of aging injection drug users (IDUs.Frailty was assessed using standard criteria among HIV-infected and uninfected IDUs in 6-month intervals from 2005 to 2008. Generalized linear mixed-model analyses assessed correlates of frailty. Cox proportional hazards models estimated risk for all-cause mortality.Of 1230 participants at baseline, the median age was 48 years and 29% were HIV-infected; the frailty prevalence was 12.3%. In multivariable analysis of 3,365 frailty measures, HIV-infected IDUs had an increased likelihood of frailty (OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.24-2.21 compared to HIV-uninfected IDUs; the association was strongest (OR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.62-3.48 among HIV-infected IDUs with advanced HIV disease (CD4<350 cells/mm3 and detectable HIV RNA. No significant association was seen with less advanced disease. Sociodemographic factors, comorbidity, depressive symptoms, and prescription drug abuse were also independently associated with frailty. Mortality risk was increased with frailty alone (HR 2.63, 95% CI, 1.23-5.66, HIV infection alone (HR 3.29, 95% CI, 1.85-5.88, and being both HIV-infected and frail (HR, 7.06; 95%CI 3.49-14.3.Frailty was strongly associated with advanced HIV disease, but IDUs with well-controlled HIV had a similar prevalence to HIV-uninfected IDUs. Frailty was independently associated with mortality, with a marked increase in mortality risk for IDUs with both frailty and HIV infection.

  5. Multipoint Grout Injection System. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-09-01

    At the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), radioactive waste contained in the 16 cylindrical Gunite and Associated Tanks (GAATs) must retrieved so the tanks can be closed. In many cases, removing the small amounts of sludge that remain in the tank after the bulk of the waste is retrieved is extremely costly and provides little benefit from site health and environmental standpoints. The Tanks Focus Area is working with ORR's M and I contractor (Bechtel-Jacobs), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Ground Environmental Services to demonstrate the application of multi-point-injection (MPI) grout emplacement technology for horizontal cylindrical tanks during a cold demonstration in FY99. GAAT TH-4 has been identified as the tank to be used for the hot demonstration in FY00. Evaluation efforts continue on the effect of slag on strength performance of the grout to be used in TH-4 tank closure. The site must find out what level of slag can be accommodated in the grout while maintaining strength performance requirements. Other efforts in support of the utilization of MPI TM technology in large-scale waste tanks will continue. Also, ORR is collaborating with SRS to evaluate the use this technology to support grouting of the Old Burial Ground tanks at SRS.

  6. Promoting adverse drug reaction reporting: comparison of different approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Ribeiro-Vaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe different approaches to promote adverse drug reaction reporting among health care professionals, determining their cost-effectiveness. METHODS We analyzed and compared several approaches taken by the Northern Pharmacovigilance Centre (Portugal to promote adverse drug reaction reporting. Approaches were compared regarding the number and relevance of adverse drug reaction reports obtained and costs involved. Costs by report were estimated by adding the initial costs and the running costs of each intervention. These costs were divided by the number of reports obtained with each intervention, to assess its cost-effectiveness. RESULTS All the approaches seem to have increased the number of adverse drug reaction reports. We noted the biggest increase with protocols (321 reports, costing 1.96 € each, followed by first educational approach (265 reports, 20.31 €/report and by the hyperlink approach (136 reports, 15.59 €/report. Regarding the severity of adverse drug reactions, protocols were the most efficient approach, costing 2.29 €/report, followed by hyperlinks (30.28 €/report, having no running costs. Concerning unexpected adverse drug reactions, the best result was obtained with protocols (5.12 €/report, followed by first educational approach (38.79 €/report. CONCLUSIONS We recommend implementing protocols in other pharmacovigilance centers. They seem to be the most efficient intervention, allowing receiving adverse drug reactions reports at lower costs. The increase applied not only to the total number of reports, but also to the severity, unexpectedness and high degree of causality attributed to the adverse drug reactions. Still, hyperlinks have the advantage of not involving running costs, showing the second best performance in cost per adverse drug reactions report.

  7. The Effect of Methylprednisolone Acetate Injection at Cervical Trigger Points in both Chronic and Drug Resistant Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Hadianfard

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Most adults have surely once experienced a headache. A high percentage of these headaches are the referred pain from cervical structures, such as neck muscles, known as cervicogenic headaches. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of injection of methylprednisolone acetate at the Gallbladder-20 acupuncture points in muscle originated chronic and drug resistant headaches. Materials & Methods: In this randomized clinical trial study conducted at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2009-2010, 25 patients with both chronic and drug resistant cervicogenic headaches, who had cervical muscle tender points, underwent methylprednisolone acetate injection. To evaluate the severity of these patients' headache, VAS (Visual Analogue Scale was used. The collected data was analyzed using the SPSS software and Wilcoxon test. Results: The Mean headache intensity on the visual scale of these people before the injection was 3 .2 ± 76.7. This value was 2.60±2.9, 3 days after injection. The values at 1 and 3 months post procedure were 3.52±3.3, and 3.48±3.5, respectively. In other words, a statistically significant loss of pain score (P<0.001 was observed. The frequency of headache attacks 1 and 3 months after injection decreased 72% and 76% among patients, respectively. Average duration of headache attacks, one month and three months after injection, was decreased in 72 percent of patients. Conclusion: Injection of methylprednisolone acetate at the GB-20acu points in muscle originated cervicogenic headache could be used as an appropriate therapy that has significant therapeutic efficacies only when injected once.

  8. An injectable hybrid nanoparticle-in-oil-in-water submicron emulsion for improved delivery of poorly soluble drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Wang, Hua; Liang, Wenquan; Huang, Yongzhuo

    2012-04-01

    Poor drugability problems are commonly seen in a class of chemical entities with poor solubility in water and oil, and moreover, physicochemical instability of these compounds poses extra challenges in design of dosage forms. Such problems contribute a significant high failure rate in new drug development. A hybrid nanoparicle-in-oil-in-water (N/O/W) submicron emulsion was proposed for improved delivery of poorly soluble and unstable drugs (e.g., dihydroartemisinin (DHA)). DHA is known for its potent antimalarial effect and antitumor activity. However, its insolubility and instability impose big challenges for formulations, and so far, no injectable dosage forms are clinically available yet. Therefore, an injectable DHA N/O/W system was developed. Unlike other widely-explored systems (e.g., liposomes, micelles, and emulsions), in which low drug load and only short-term storage are often found, the hybrid submicron emulsion possesses three-fold higher drug-loading capacity than the conventional O/W emulsion. Of note, it can be manufactured into a freeze-drying form and can render its storage up to 6 months even in room temperature. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PK profiles were significantly improved, and this injectable system was effective in suppressing tumor growth. The strategy provides a useful solution to effective delivery of such a class of drugs.

  9. 'Workers', 'clients' and the struggle over needs: understanding encounters between service providers and injecting drug users in an Australian city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David

    2009-03-01

    A feature of contemporary Western, neo-liberal democracies is the frequent interaction between representatives of health and social services and the members of stigmatised and 'unruly' populations, such as injecting drug users. Previous research on drugs has tended to ignore the power relations and cultural dynamics at work in these encounters, and the ways in which they are framed by the wider neo-liberal context. Drawing on an ethnography of street-based heroin use in Melbourne, Australia's second largest city, I show how the discourses of both service providers and injecting drug users draw on wider neo-liberal values of independence, autonomy, rationality and responsibility. Service providers negotiate a framework of needs interpretation that creates and reproduces professional identities, and maintains boundaries between 'workers' and 'clients'. It also includes tensions around the definition of injecting drug users as 'chaotic' (i.e., failed neo-liberal) subjects, and slippage between service philosophies that emphasise a social model of health and forms of service delivery that emphasise the production of responsibilised subjects. For their part, street-based injectors construct an alternative framework of needs interpretation that emphasises their self-reliance, autonomy and independence, attributes and capacities largely denied them in service-provider discourse. In encounters with service providers, street-based injectors respond in various ways that include elements of resistance, strategic accommodation and the incorporation of therapeutic discourse. I conclude by considering the implications of my analysis for the future development of drug policy and practice.

  10. Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection & risk factors for HCV positivity in injecting & non-injecting drug users attending a de-addiction centre in northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasish Basu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Injecting drug use is a major route of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in India, but there may be other risk factors also. This study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in injecting drug users (IDUs vs. non-IDUs (NIDUs, and to study the risk estimates for HCV seropositivity in the total sample of substance users with regard to various demographic, clinical, behavioural and personality factors. Methods: The IDUs (n = 201 and NIDUs (n = 219 were assessed for demographic, clinical and behavioural information, and were rated on instruments for severity of dependence, risk behaviour and personality profiles. Anti-HCV antibody was tested by ELISA and confirmed by recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA test. Results: Almost one-third of the IDUs (64 of 201; 31.8% were positive for anti-HCV antibody, as opposed to only seven (3.2% of the NIDUs. The four risk factors strongly associated with HCV positivity in multivariate analysis were sharing syringe [Exp(B 75.04; 95%CI 18.28-307.96; P<0.001], reuse of injection accessories (16.39; 3.51-76.92; P<0.001, blood transfusion (5.88; 1.63-21.23; P=0.007 and IDU status (3.60; 1.26-10.31; P=0.017. Other variables less strongly but significantly associated with HCV positivity were multiple sex partners, opioid dependence, risk behaviour scores, impulsivity, and lower age of onset of drug use. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed a high seroprevalence of anti-HCV antibody in IDUs. In the substance users, HCV positivity was significantly and independently associated with several clinical, behavioural, and personality risk factors.

  11. Aspirin induced fixed drug eruptions: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama R. Bhosale

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Fixed drug eruptions are common cutaneous adverse drug reactions, commonly caused by anticonvulsants, antibiotics and analgesics. Here, we report a case of a 27-year-old male of fixed drug eruptions due to Aspirin which was used in treatment of headache. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(2.000: 220-221

  12. A Stochastic Differential Equation Model for the Spread of HIV amongst People Who Inject Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfeng Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce stochasticity into the deterministic differential equation model for the spread of HIV amongst people who inject drugs (PWIDs studied by Greenhalgh and Hay (1997. This was based on the original model constructed by Kaplan (1989 which analyses the behaviour of HIV/AIDS amongst a population of PWIDs. We derive a stochastic differential equation (SDE for the fraction of PWIDs who are infected with HIV at time. The stochasticity is introduced using the well-known standard technique of parameter perturbation. We first prove that the resulting SDE for the fraction of infected PWIDs has a unique solution in (0, 1 provided that some infected PWIDs are initially present and next construct the conditions required for extinction and persistence. Furthermore, we show that there exists a stationary distribution for the persistence case. Simulations using realistic parameter values are then constructed to illustrate and support our theoretical results. Our results provide new insight into the spread of HIV amongst PWIDs. The results show that the introduction of stochastic noise into a model for the spread of HIV amongst PWIDs can cause the disease to die out in scenarios where deterministic models predict disease persistence.

  13. A Stochastic Differential Equation Model for the Spread of HIV amongst People Who Inject Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yanfeng; Greenhalgh, David; Mao, Xuerong

    2016-01-01

    We introduce stochasticity into the deterministic differential equation model for the spread of HIV amongst people who inject drugs (PWIDs) studied by Greenhalgh and Hay (1997). This was based on the original model constructed by Kaplan (1989) which analyses the behaviour of HIV/AIDS amongst a population of PWIDs. We derive a stochastic differential equation (SDE) for the fraction of PWIDs who are infected with HIV at time. The stochasticity is introduced using the well-known standard technique of parameter perturbation. We first prove that the resulting SDE for the fraction of infected PWIDs has a unique solution in (0, 1) provided that some infected PWIDs are initially present and next construct the conditions required for extinction and persistence. Furthermore, we show that there exists a stationary distribution for the persistence case. Simulations using realistic parameter values are then constructed to illustrate and support our theoretical results. Our results provide new insight into the spread of HIV amongst PWIDs. The results show that the introduction of stochastic noise into a model for the spread of HIV amongst PWIDs can cause the disease to die out in scenarios where deterministic models predict disease persistence.

  14. Arterial Ligation for Infected Femoral Psuedo-Aneurysm in Drug Injecting Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadzade Mohammad Ali

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-aneurysm of the femoral artery is the most common arterial complication in drug injecting abusers. Scholars in vascular surgery have published debating statements regarding techniques of successful surgical management during last two decades. We present the results of simple arterial ligation in a series of 32 patients presenting with infected femoral pseudo-aneurysm. Most of the patients were males (89%. Young persons in the age group of 15-44 years were mostly affected. Site of lesion included common femoral artery in 65% , superficial femoral artery 28% and at bifurcation 6.2%. celulitis in 14 (53%, abscess & "ncelulitis in 6 (19%, necrosing fasciitis in 2 (6.2% and vascular abscess in 7 (22% cases were the forms of associated local infection. There was no hemorrhage, vascular thrombosis, amputation, or mortality. Claudicating were the only complications identified in 2 patients with Tripe ligation. Ligation is the optimal management for infected pseudo-aneurysms because it is easy, cost-effective, and safe. Early reconstruction is not recommended, since there is an extended infection in the location of the pseudo-aneurysm.

  15. View from the front lines: an emergency medicine perspective on clostridial infections in injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales y Tucker, Richard Diego; Frazee, Bradley

    2014-12-01

    Injection drug use (IDU), specifically non-intravenous "skin-popping" of heroin, seems to provide optimal conditions for Clostridial infection and toxin production. IDU is therefore a major risk factor for wound botulism and Clostridial necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI) and continues to be linked to cases of tetanus. Case clusters of all 3 diseases have occurred among IDUs in Western U.S. and Europe. Medical personnel who care for the IDU population must be thoroughly familiar with the clinical presentation and management of these diseases. Wound botulism presents with bulbar symptoms and signs that are easily overlooked; rapid acquisition and administration of antitoxin can prevent neuromuscular respiratory failure. In addition to Clostridium perfringens, IDU-related NSTIs can be caused by Clostridium sordellii and Clostridium novyi, which may share a distinct clinical presentation. Early definitive NSTI management, which decreases mortality, requires a low index of suspicion on the part of emergency physicians and low threshold for surgical exploration and debridement on the part of the surgeon. Tetanus should be preventable in the IDU population through careful attention to vaccination status. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. HIV/AIDS prevention among female sexual partners of injection drug users in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Pinto, J B; Ramos, R

    1995-01-01

    A participatory community project in the US-Mexico border town of Ciudad Juarez, aimed at helping women who are sex partners of male injection drug users to reduce behaviours which increase their risk for HIV infection, is described and evaluated. The design and implementation of the project were influenced by Paulo Freire's pedagogy in the Latin American tradition of 'popular' education, by Bandura's self-efficacy concepts, and by David Warner's 'barefoot doctor' community health care methodology. Using these approaches the participants were directly involved in the development of teaching materials, and curriculum content and implementation of the project. The programme was evaluated quantitatively using NIDA's AIDS Intake and Follow-up Assessment (AIA/AFA) questionnaires, and qualitatively using open ended interviews. While the AIA/AFA questionnaires detected small changes in the frequency of condom use among the participants, ethnographic interviews detected significant changes in the nature of the behaviours which were placing the women at risk. The changes seem to stem from an increase in the degree of self-esteem, self-efficacy and awareness of the social, economic, and political constraints of their lives. These results demonstrate the need for qualitative measures to be incorporated in the evaluation of community based health education programmes. A series of recommendations is presented to facilitate further development and replication of the programme in similar populations.

  17. Cortisol Response Mediates HIV-1-Related Cognitive Deficits Among Injecting Drug Abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond L. Ownby

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The cortisol response is an important measure of the endocrine activity to environmental challenges and has been related to cognitive function and mood. Previous studies have shown that the cortisol response to stress is dysregulated in persons with HIV-1 infection. Since cortisol is neurotoxic and its levels have been related to cognitive dysfunction in various disorders, it is possible that neuroendocrine dysregulation may also be related to cognitive dysfunction in individuals with HIV-1 infection. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the cortisol response to an alpha adrenergic challenge, cold pressor, is related to cognitive function in HIV-infected injecting drug abusers. We used growth curve modeling to study the relationship of cold pressor challenge stimulated cortisol response to scores on the modified HIV Dementia Scale (mHDS. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effects of HIV-1 infection on the HDS score directly and indirectly via pattern of cortisol response. The analysis showed that HIV-1 infection was directly related to mHDS performance and that it also influenced scores on the mHDS by way of individuals’ pattern of cortisol response. Cortisol response to α-adrenergic challenge thus may mediate cognitive deficits in individuals with HIV-1 infection. These findings further emphasize the importance of understanding the role of stress in the cognitive problems associated with HIV-1 infection.

  18. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis N. Martinez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914. HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995 and late period (1996–2005. We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time.

  19. An Overview of HIV Prevention Interventions for People Who Inject Drugs in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A. Ratliff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, Tanzania has seen a rapid rise in the number of people who inject drugs (PWID, specifically heroin. While the overall HIV prevalence in Tanzania has declined recently to 5.6%, in 2009, the HIV prevalence among PWID remains alarmingly high at 35%. In this paper, we describe how the Tanzania AIDS Prevention Program (TAPP, Médecins du Monde France (MdM-F, and other organisations have been at the forefront of addressing this public health issue in Africa, implementing a wide array of harm reduction interventions including medication-assisted treatment (MAT, needle and syringe programs (NSP, and “sober houses” for residential treatment in the capital, Dar es Salaam, and in Zanzibar. Looking toward the future, we discuss the need to (1 extend existing services and programs to reach more PWID and others at risk for HIV, (2 develop additional programs to strengthen existing programs, and (3 expand activities to include structural interventions to address vulnerabilities that increase HIV risk for all Tanzanians.

  20. Effectiveness of harm reduction programmes for injecting drug users in Dhaka city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Tasnim; Hussein, Najmul; Kelly, Robert

    2005-10-25

    This paper provides a brief overview of the harm reduction programme for injecting drug users (IDU) of CARE, Bangladesh in Dhaka city and uses data from surveillance and a focussed research study on a cohort of IDU, to evaluate the programme. The harm reduction programme in Dhaka is run by CARE, Bangladesh and includes needle/syringe exchange, awareness raising on HIV/STI, abscess management, condom distribution and advocacy with different groups of people. The needle/syringe exchange programme (NEP) has been in place since 1998, the 2nd Generation Surveillance in Bangladesh is being conducted since 1998, and an in-depth cohort study, started in 2002, is being conducted in two areas of Dhaka city with approximately 500 IDU under CARE's NEP who are being followed bi-annually to assess risk behaviour, incidence of HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis. As the surveillance and the cohort study are both closely associated with the NEP of CARE, Bangladesh, these data can be used to monitor the NEP.

  1. Effectiveness of harm reduction programmes for injecting drug users in Dhaka city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Robert

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper provides a brief overview of the harm reduction programme for injecting drug users (IDU of CARE, Bangladesh in Dhaka city and uses data from surveillance and a focussed research study on a cohort of IDU, to evaluate the programme. The harm reduction programme in Dhaka is run by CARE, Bangladesh and includes needle/syringe exchange, awareness raising on HIV/STI, abscess management, condom distribution and advocacy with different groups of people. The needle/syringe exchange programme (NEP has been in place since 1998, the 2nd Generation Surveillance in Bangladesh is being conducted since 1998, and an in-depth cohort study, started in 2002, is being conducted in two areas of Dhaka city with approximately 500 IDU under CARE's NEP who are being followed bi-annually to assess risk behaviour, incidence of HIV, hepatitis C and syphilis. As the surveillance and the cohort study are both closely associated with the NEP of CARE, Bangladesh, these data can be used to monitor the NEP.

  2. Employment-based reinforcement of adherence to oral naltrexone treatment in unemployed injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Defulio, Anthony; Everly, Jeffrey J; Donlin, Wendy D; Aklin, Will M; Nuzzo, Paul A; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie S; Umbricht, Annie; Fingerhood, Michael; Bigelow, George E; Silverman, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Oral naltrexone has high potential for use as a relapse prevention pharmacotherapy for opiate dependence yet suffers from notoriously poor adherence. This study evaluated whether entry to a therapeutic workplace could reinforce adherence with oral naltrexone. Opiate-dependent and cocaine-using injection drug users were detoxified, inducted onto oral naltrexone, and randomly assigned to a contingency (n = 35) or prescription (n = 32) group for a 26-week period. Contingency participants were required to ingest naltrexone under staff observation to gain access to the therapeutic workplace. Prescription participants received a take-home supply of naltrexone and could access the workplace independent of naltrexone ingestion. Primary outcome measures were percent of urine samples positive for naltrexone at 30-day assessments and negative for opiates and cocaine at 30-day assessments. Contingency participants provided significantly more urine samples that were positive for naltrexone compared with prescription participants (72% vs. 21%, p negative (71% vs. 60%, p = .19.) or cocaine-negative (56% vs. 53%, p = .82) samples in the contingency and prescription groups, respectively. Opiate-positive samples were significantly more likely to occur in conjunction with cocaine (p workplace significantly promoted adherence to oral naltrexone, and that the majority of opiate use occurred in conjunction with cocaine use, suggesting that untreated cocaine use may limit the effectiveness of oral naltrexone in promoting opiate abstinence.

  3. Treatment of 104 Cases of Chemotherapy-Induced Leukopenia by Injection of Drugs into Zusanli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹先哲; 尹德印; 刘新群; 丁旭萌

    2001-01-01

    @@From April 1992 to April 1998, 104 cases of chemotherapy-induced leukopenia were treated by injection into Zusanli (ST 36) with a mixture consisting of dexamethasone, 654-2, ATP and inosine. The therapeutic results were satisfactory as reported in the following. Clinical Data In this series, all the 127 cases were definitely diagnosed by pathological examination. Of them, 93 were male and 34 female, ranging in age from 12 to 75 years. 38 cases were carcinoma of esophagus, 22 carcinoma of cardia of stomach, 21 cancer of lung, 11 hepatic carcinoma, 8 lymphoma, 8 mammary cancer, 7 carcinoma of colon, and 12 other kinds of the tumors. Leukocyte count was below 4.0×109/L in all the patients after being treated by chemotherapy.

  4. Measurement report on the LHC injection kicker ripple denition and maximum pulse length (MD 1268)

    CERN Document Server

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Kotzian, Gerd; Stoel, Linda; Velotti, Francesco Maria; Vlachodimitropoulos, Vasileios; Wiesner, Christoph; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The present LHC lling scheme uses a batch spacing which corresponds to the design report specication of the injection kicker rise time. A reduction of the batch spacing can be directly used to increase luminosity without detrimental eect on beam stability. Therefore, measurements were performed to understand if a tighter batch spacing would lead to increased injection oscillations of a the rst and last bunches of a bunch train and eventually also a growth of the transverse emittance. The results of theses measurement were used to dene the minimum possible batch spacing for an acceptable emittance growth. Another measurement was performed to test if a batch consisting of 320 bunches can be injected instead of the nominal 288 bunch trains. This bunch train is dierently produced in the LHC injectors and features an optimum between beam stability and luminosity gain. The pulse length of the injection kicker was measured to ensure the full batch can be injected at once.

  5. Bringing the DERP to consumers: 'Consumer Reports Best Buy Drugs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Steven D

    2006-01-01

    Consumers Union, publisher of Consumer Reports magazine, has used the drug class reviews of the Drug Effectiveness Review Project (DERP) as one critical component of a free public information project on the comparative effectiveness, safety, and cost of prescription drugs. The project translates the DERP findings for consumers. Drawing on other sources and adding information on drug costs, the project chooses Best Buy drugs in each category it evaluates. This guidance can help consumers save up to thousands of dollars per year, and it has the potential to reduce overall drug spending.

  6. Impact of injecting drug use on mortality in Danish HIV-infected patients: a nation-wide population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette V; Omland, Lars Haukali Hvass; Gerstoft, Jan

    2010-01-01

    To estimate the impact of injecting drug use (IDU) on mortality in HIV-infected patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era.......To estimate the impact of injecting drug use (IDU) on mortality in HIV-infected patients in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era....

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of Combined Sexual and Injection Risk Reduction Interventions among Female Sex Workers Who Inject Drugs in Two Very Distinct Mexican Border Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jose L; Patterson, Thomas L; Graff-Zivin, Joshua S; Kahn, James G; Rangel, M Gudelia; Lozada, M Remedios; Staines, Hugo; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of combined single session brief behavioral intervention, either didactic or interactive (Mujer Mas Segura, MMS) to promote safer-sex and safer-injection practices among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) in Tijuana (TJ) and Ciudad-Juarez (CJ) Mexico. Data for this analysis was obtained from a factorial RCT in 2008-2010 coinciding with expansion of needle exchange programs (NEP) in TJ, but not in CJ. A Markov model was developed to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained (QALY) over a lifetime time frame among a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 FSW-IDUs comparing a less intensive didactic vs. a more intensive interactive format of the MMS, separately for safer sex and safer injection combined behavioral interventions. The costs for antiretroviral therapy was not included in the model. We applied a societal perspective, a discount rate of 3% per year and currency adjusted to US$2014. A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. The combined and individual components of the MMS interactive behavioral intervention were compared with the didactic formats by calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER), defined as incremental unit of cost per additional health benefit (e.g., HIV/STI cases averted, QALYs) compared to the next least costly strategy. Following guidelines from the World Health Organization, a combined strategy was considered highly cost-effective if the incremental cost per QALY gained fell below the gross domestic product per capita (GDP) in Mexico (equivalent to US$10,300). For CJ, the mixed intervention approach of interactive safer sex/didactic safer injection had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$4,360 ($310-$7,200) per QALY gained compared with a dually didactic strategy. Using the dually interactive strategy had an ICER of US$5,874 ($310-$7,200) compared with the mixed approach. For TJ, the combination of interactive safer sex

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of Combined Sexual and Injection Risk Reduction Interventions among Female Sex Workers Who Inject Drugs in Two Very Distinct Mexican Border Cities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Burgos

    Full Text Available We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of combined single session brief behavioral intervention, either didactic or interactive (Mujer Mas Segura, MMS to promote safer-sex and safer-injection practices among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs in Tijuana (TJ and Ciudad-Juarez (CJ Mexico. Data for this analysis was obtained from a factorial RCT in 2008-2010 coinciding with expansion of needle exchange programs (NEP in TJ, but not in CJ.A Markov model was developed to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained (QALY over a lifetime time frame among a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 FSW-IDUs comparing a less intensive didactic vs. a more intensive interactive format of the MMS, separately for safer sex and safer injection combined behavioral interventions. The costs for antiretroviral therapy was not included in the model. We applied a societal perspective, a discount rate of 3% per year and currency adjusted to US$2014. A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. The combined and individual components of the MMS interactive behavioral intervention were compared with the didactic formats by calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER, defined as incremental unit of cost per additional health benefit (e.g., HIV/STI cases averted, QALYs compared to the next least costly strategy. Following guidelines from the World Health Organization, a combined strategy was considered highly cost-effective if the incremental cost per QALY gained fell below the gross domestic product per capita (GDP in Mexico (equivalent to US$10,300.For CJ, the mixed intervention approach of interactive safer sex/didactic safer injection had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of US$4,360 ($310-$7,200 per QALY gained compared with a dually didactic strategy. Using the dually interactive strategy had an ICER of US$5,874 ($310-$7,200 compared with the mixed approach. For TJ, the combination of interactive safer sex

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of Combined Sexual and Injection Risk Reduction Interventions among Female Sex Workers Who Inject Drugs in Two Very Distinct Mexican Border Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Jose L.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Graff-Zivin, Joshua S.; Kahn, James G.; Rangel, M. Gudelia; Lozada, M. Remedios; Staines, Hugo; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2016-01-01

    Background We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of combined single session brief behavioral intervention, either didactic or interactive (Mujer Mas Segura, MMS) to promote safer-sex and safer-injection practices among female sex workers who inject drugs (FSW-IDUs) in Tijuana (TJ) and Ciudad-Juarez (CJ) Mexico. Data for this analysis was obtained from a factorial RCT in 2008–2010 coinciding with expansion of needle exchange programs (NEP) in TJ, but not in CJ. Methods A Markov model was developed to estimate the incremental cost per quality adjusted life year gained (QALY) over a lifetime time frame among a hypothetical cohort of 1,000 FSW-IDUs comparing a less intensive didactic vs. a more intensive interactive format of the MMS, separately for safer sex and safer injection combined behavioral interventions. The costs for antiretroviral therapy was not included in the model. We applied a societal perspective, a discount rate of 3% per year and currency adjusted to US$2014. A multivariate sensitivity analysis was performed. The combined and individual components of the MMS interactive behavioral intervention were compared with the didactic formats by calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER), defined as incremental unit of cost per additional health benefit (e.g., HIV/STI cases averted, QALYs) compared to the next least costly strategy. Following guidelines from the World Health Organization, a combined strategy was considered highly cost-effective if the incremental cost per QALY gained fell below the gross domestic product per capita (GDP) in Mexico (equivalent to US$10,300). Findings For CJ, the mixed intervention approach of interactive safer sex/didactic safer injection had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$4,360 ($310–$7,200) per QALY gained compared with a dually didactic strategy. Using the dually interactive strategy had an ICER of US$5,874 ($310–$7,200) compared with the mixed approach. For TJ, the combination of

  10. Research Reports: Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... critical review of reportsof endogenous psychedelic N, N-dimethyltryptamines in humans: 1955-2010. Drug Test Anal . 2012; ... 76. Strassman RJ. Human psychopharmacology of N,N- dimethyltryptamine. Behav Brain Res. 1996;73(1-2):121- ...

  11. The effects of injection of bovine vaccine into a human digit: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricketts David M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of needlestick injuries in farmers and veterinary surgeons is significant and the consequences of such an injection can be serious. Case presentation We report accidental injection of bovine vaccine into the base of the little finger. This resulted in increased pressure in the flexor sheath causing signs and symptoms of ischemia. Amputation of the digit was required despite repeated surgical debridement and decompression. Conclusion There have been previous reports of injection of oil-based vaccines into the human hand resulting in granulomatous inflammation or sterile abscess and causing morbidity and tissue loss. Self-injection with veterinary vaccines is an occupational hazard for farmers and veterinary surgeons. Injection of vaccine into a closed compartment such as the human finger can have serious sequelae including loss of the injected digit. These injuries are not to be underestimated. Early debridement and irrigation of the injected area with decompression is likely to give the best outcome. Frequent review is necessary after the first procedure because repeat operations may be required.

  12. Safe havens and rough waters: networks, place, and the navigation of risk among injection drug-using Malaysian fishermen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brooke S; Choo, Martin; El-Bassel, Nabila; Gilbert, Louisa; Wu, Elwin; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2014-05-01

    HIV prevalence among Malaysian fishermen is ten times that of the general population. Fishing boats are a key place where drug use occurs, but we know little about how these environments shape HIV risk behaviour. Utilizing Rhodes' 'risk environment' framework, we assessed drug use contexts and how characteristics of place associated with fishing and fishermen's social networks served as key axes along which drug use and HIV risk behaviour occurred. Data were collected during 2009-2011 in Kuantan, a fishing port on the eastern coast of Malaysia, and include 28 in-depth interviews and 398 surveys collected using RDS. Logistic regression was used to determine the effect of occupational, network and risk environment characteristics on unsafe injection behaviour and access to clean needles/syringes; qualitative data were coded and analyzed thematically. Drug injecting was common and occurred on boats, often with other crewmembers. Captains and crewmembers were aware of drug use. Unsafe injection practices were significantly associated with having a larger proportion of drug injectors in network (OR=3.510, 95% CI=1.053-11.700) and having a captain provide drugs for work (OR=2.777, 95% CI=1.018-7.576). Size of fishermen network (OR=0.987, 95% CI=0.977-0.996), crewmembers' knowledge of drug use (OR=7.234, 95% CI=1.430-36.604), and having a captain provide drugs for work (OR=0.134, 95% CI=0.025-0.720) predicted access to clean needles/syringes. Qualitative analyses revealed that occupational culture and social relationships on boats drove drug use and HIV risk. While marginalized in broader society, the acceptance of drug use within the fishing community created occupational networks of risk. Fishing boats were spaces of both risk and safety; where drug users participated in the formal economy, but also where HIV risk behaviour occurred. Understanding the interplay between social networks and place is essential for developing HIV prevention and harm reduction policies

  13. HIV incidence among injection drug users in New York City, 1992-1997: evidence for a declining epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, D C; Marmor, M; Friedmann, P; Titus, S; Aviles, E; Deren, S; Torian, L; Glebatis, D; Murrill, C; Monterroso, E; Friedman, S R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We assessed recent (1992-1997) HIV incidence in the large HIV epidemic among injection drug users in New York City. METHODS: Data were compiled from 10 separate studies (N = 4979), including 6 cohort studies, 2 "repeat service user" studies, and 2 analyses of voluntary HIV testing and counseling services within drug treatment programs. RESULTS: In the 10 studies, 52 seroconversions were found in 6344 person-years at risk. The observed incidence rates among the 10 studies were all within a narrow range, from 0 per 100 person-years at risk to 2.96 per 100 person-years at risk. In 9 of the 10 studies, the observed incidence rate was less than 2 per 100 person-years at risk. The weighted average incidence rate was 0.7 per 100 person-years at risk. CONCLUSIONS: The recent incidence rate in New York City is quite low for a high-seroprevalence population of injection drug users. The very large HIV epidemic among injection drug users in New York City appears to have entered a "declining phase," characterized by low incidence and declining prevalence. The data suggest that very large high-seroprevalence HIV epidemics may be "reversed." PMID:10705851

  14. Injection-locked composite lasers for mm-wave modulation : LDRD 117819 final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Joel Robert; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Raring, James; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Alford, Charles Fred (Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Skogen, Erik J.; Chow, Weng Wah; Cajas, Florante G. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Overberg, Mark E.; Torres, David L. (LMATA Government Services, LLC, Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin

    2010-09-01

    This report summarizes a 3-year LDRD program at Sandia National Laboratories exploring mutual injection locking of composite-cavity lasers for enhanced modulation responses. The program focused on developing a fundamental understanding of the frequency enhancement previously demonstrated for optically injection locked lasers. This was then applied to the development of a theoretical description of strongly coupled laser microsystems. This understanding was validated experimentally with a novel 'photonic lab bench on a chip'.

  15. Relationship between food insecurity and mortality among HIV-positive injection drug users receiving antiretroviral therapy in British Columbia, Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranka Anema

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the potential impact of food insecurity on mortality among people living with HIV/AIDS. We examined the potential relationship between food insecurity and all-cause mortality among HIV-positive injection drug users (IDU initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART across British Columbia (BC. METHODS: Cross-sectional measurement of food security status was taken at participant ART initiation. Participants were prospectively followed from June 1998 to September 2011 within the fully subsidized ART program. Cox proportional hazard models were used to ascertain the association between food insecurity and mortality, controlling for potential confounders. RESULTS: Among 254 IDU, 181 (71.3% were food insecure and 108 (42.5% were hungry. After 13.3 years of median follow-up, 105 (41.3% participants died. In multivariate analyses, food insecurity remained significantly associated with mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] = 1.95, 95% CI: 1.07-3.53, after adjusting for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-positive IDU reporting food insecurity were almost twice as likely to die, compared to food secure IDU. Further research is required to understand how and why food insecurity is associated with excess mortality in this population. Public health organizations should evaluate the possible role of food supplementation and socio-structural supports for IDU within harm reduction and HIV treatment programs.

  16. Appearance concerns and psychological distress among HIV-infected individuals with injection drug use histories: prospective analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blashill, Aaron J; Gordon, Janna R; Safren, Steven A

    2012-09-01

    Morphologic alterations in body composition are common among HIV-infected individuals, and these changes are associated with increased appearance concerns. Previous cross-sectional data indicate that appearance concerns among HIV-infected individuals are related to increased levels of psychological distress. However, to date, no known prospective data have been published on these relationships. The purpose of the current study was to address the temporal prediction of appearance concerns on depression and anxiety severity. Data were culled from a prospective, randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and medication adherence in individuals with a history of injection drug use (IDU). Participants were 89 HIV-infected individuals who were randomized to either a cognitive behavioral therapy or treatment as usual condition. Linear mixed-level modeling revealed elevated levels of appearance concerns were prospectively related to increased depression and anxiety, as rated by both clinician-administered and self-report measures. Appearance concerns among depressed, IDU, HIV-infected individuals are associated with changes in psychological distress. Psychosocial interventions should consider the role of appearance as it relates to psychological functioning.

  17. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Superinfection Was Not Detected following 215 Years of Injection Drug User Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Rose; Herring, Belinda L.; Barbour, Jason D.; Grant, Robert M.; Bacchetti, Peter; Kral, Alex; Edlin, Brian R.; Delwart, Eric L.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) superinfection was sought among 37 HIV-1-positive street-recruited active injection drug users (IDUs) from the San Francisco Bay area. HIV-1 sequences from pairs of samples collected 1 to 12 years apart, spanning a total of 215 years of exposure, were generated at p17 gag, the V3-V5 region of env, and/or the first exon of tat and phylogenetically analyzed. No evidence of HIV-1 superinfection was detected in which a highly divergent HIV-1 variant emerged at a frequency >20% of the serum viral quasispecies. Based on the reported risk behavior of the IDUs and the HIV-1 incidence in uninfected subjects in the same cohort, a total of 3.4 new infections would have been expected if existing infection conferred no protection from superinfection. Adjusted for risk behaviors, the estimated relative risk of superinfection compared with initial infection was therefore 0.0 (95% confidence interval, 0.00, 0.79; P = 0.02), indicating that existing infection conferred a statistically significant level of protection against superinfection with an HIV-1 strain of the same subtype, which was between 21 and 100%. PMID:14671091

  18. MBL2 and Hepatitis C Virus Infection among Injection Drug Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edlin Brian R

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variations in MBL2 that reduce circulating levels and alter functional properties of the mannose binding lectin (MBL have been associated with many autoimmune and infectious diseases. We examined whether MBL2 variants influence the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Methods Participants were enrolled in the Urban Health Study of San Francisco Bay area injection drug users (IDU during 1998 through 2000. Study subjects who had a positive test for HCV antibody were eligible for the current study. Participants who were positive for HCV RNA were frequency matched to those who were negative for HCV RNA on the basis of ethnicity and duration of IDU. Genotyping was performed for 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms in MBL2. Statistical analyses of European American and African American participants were conducted separately. Results The analysis included 198 study subjects who were positive for HCV antibody, but negative for HCV RNA, and 654 IDUs who were positive for both antibody and virus. There was no significant association between any of the genetic variants that cause MBL deficiency and the presence of HCV RNA. Unexpectedly, the MBL2 -289X promoter genotype, which causes MBL deficiency, was over-represented among European Americans who were HCV RNA negative (OR = 1.65, 95% CI 1.05–2.58, although not among the African Americans. Conclusion This study found no association between genetic variants that cause MBL deficiency and the presence of HCV RNA. The observation that MBL2 -289X was associated with the absence of HCV RNA in European Americans requires validation.

  19. Brain viral burden, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in HAART-treated HIV positive injecting drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald B; Simmonds, Peter; Bell, Jeanne E

    2014-02-01

    The long-term impact of chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection on brain status in injecting drug users (IDU) treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is unknown. Viral persistence in the brain with ongoing neuroinflammation may predispose to Alzheimer-like neurodegeneration. In this study, we investigated the brains of ten HAART-treated individuals (six IDU and four non-DU), compared with ten HIV negative controls (six IDU and four non-DU). HIV DNA levels in brain tissue were correlated with plasma and lymphoid tissue viral loads, cognitive status, microglial activation and Tau protein and amyloid deposition. Brain HIV proviral DNA levels were low in most cases but higher in HIV encephalitis (n = 2) and correlated significantly with levels in lymphoid tissue (p = 0.0075), but not with those in plasma. HIV positive subjects expressed more Tau protein and amyloid than HIV negative controls (highest in a 58 year old), as did IDU, but brain viral loads showed no relation to Tau and amyloid. Microglial activation linked significantly to HIV positivity (p = 0.001) and opiate abuse accentuated these microglial changes (p = 0.05). This study confirms that HIV DNA persists in brains despite HAART and that opiate abuse adds to the risk of brain damage in HIV positive subjects. Novel findings in this study show that (1) plasma levels are not a good surrogate indicator of brain status, (2) viral burden in brain and lymphoid tissues is related, and (3) while Tau and amyloid deposition is increased in HIV positive IDU, this is not specifically related to increased HIV burden within the brain.

  20. High HIV prevalence, suboptimal HIV testing, and low knowledge of HIV-positive serostatus among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niccolai, Linda M; Toussova, Olga V; Verevochkin, Sergei V; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to estimate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence and testing patterns among injection drug users (IDUs) in St. Petersburg, Russia. HIV prevalence among 387 IDUs in the sample was 50%. Correlates of HIV-positive serostatus included unemployment, recent unsafe injections, and history/current sexually transmitted infection. Seventy-six percent had been HIV tested, but only 22% of those who did not report HIV-positive serostatus had been tested in the past 12 months and received their test result. Correlates of this measure included recent doctor visit and having been in prison or jail among men. Among the 193 HIV-infected participants, 36% were aware of their HIV-positive serostatus. HIV prevalence is high and continuing to increase in this population. Adequate coverage of HIV testing has not been achieved, resulting in poor knowledge of positive serostatus. Efforts are needed to better understand motivating and deterring factors for HIV testing in this setting.

  1. 77 FR 39390 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Maropitant; Tildipirosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval actions for new animal drug applications (NADAs) and abbreviated new animal drug applications (ANADAs) during May 2012. FDA is also informing the public of the availability of summaries of the basis of approval and of environmental review documents, where...

  2. Retinal tears and rhegmatogenous retinal detachment after intravitreal injections: its prevalence and case reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabag, Revan Yildirim; Parlak, Melih; Cetin, Gölgem; Yaman, Aylin; Osman Saatci, A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report the prevalence of postoperative retinal tear or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment secondary to intravitreal injections. Methods Surgical and medical records of patients who received intravitreal injections at the practice of a single retina specialist from January 2004 to May 2013 and who were followed for at least 6 months were investigated retrospectively. Results During the study period, a total of 3,907 intravitreal injections were performed in 1,049 eyes of 784 patients (416 males [47%]). The mean number of injections per eye was 3.72 ± 3.43 (range, 1–22). The mean age of the participants was 67.03 ± 13.56 (range, 5–94 years). The mean follow-up time was 31.98 ± 22.86 months (range, 6–144 months). Retinal break or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment occurred in 3 injections of 3 eyes, yielding an overall prevalence of 0.077% per injection and 0.29% per eye. Conclusions Retinal tear and rhegmatogenous detachment are rare complications of intravitreal injection. Precautions should be taken especially in patients having predisposing conditions, such as high myopia, or any other vitreoretinal disorders. PMID:27330458

  3. Paradoxes in antiretroviral treatment for injecting drug users: access, adherence and structural barriers in Asia and the former Soviet Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Offered proper support, injection drug users (IDUs) can achieve the same levels of adherence to and clinical benefit from antiretroviral treatment (ARV) as other patients with HIV. Nonetheless, in countries of Asia and the former Soviet Union where IDUs represent the largest share of HIV cases, IDUs have been disproportionately less likely to receive ARV. While analysis of adherence amongst IDUs has focused on individual patient ability to adhere to medical regimens, HIV treatment systems themselves are in need of examination. Structural impediments to provision of ARV for IDUs include competing, vertical systems of care; compulsory drug treatment and rehabilitation services that often offer neither ARV nor effective treatment for chemical dependence; lack of opiate substitution treatments demonstrated to increase adherence to ARV; and policies that explicitly or implicitly discourage ARV delivery to active IDUs. Labeling active drug users as socially untrustworthy or unproductive, health systems can create a series of paradoxes that ensure confirmation of these stereotypes. Needed reforms include professional education and public campaigns that emphasize IDU capacity for health protection and responsible choice; recognition that the chronic nature of injecting drug use and its links to HIV infection require development of ARV treatment delivery that includes active drug users; and integrated treatment that strengthens links between health providers and builds on, rather than seeks to bypass, IDU social networks and organizations.

  4. Microfluidics-based single-step preparation of injection-ready polymeric nanosystems for medical imaging and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kegang; Zhu, Zhen; Wang, Xueya; Gonçalves, Daniel; Zhang, Bei; Hierlemann, Andreas; Hunziker, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Translation of therapeutic polymeric nanosystems to patients and industry requires simplified, reproducible and scalable methods for assembly and loading. A single-step in-line process based on nanocoprecipitation of oxazoline-siloxane block copolymers in flow-focusing poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidics was designed to manufacture injection-ready nanosystems. Nanosystem characteristics could be controlled by copolymer concentration, block length and chemistry, microchannel geometry, flow rate, aqueous/organic flow rate ratio and payload concentration. The well-tolerated nanosystems exhibited differential cell binding and payload delivery and could confer sensitivity to photodynamic therapy to HeLa cancer cells. Such injection-ready nanosystems carrying drugs, diagnostic or functional materials may facilitate translation to clinical application.Translation of therapeutic polymeric nanosystems to patients and industry requires simplified, reproducible and scalable methods for assembly and loading. A single-step in-line process based on nanocoprecipitation of oxazoline-siloxane block copolymers in flow-focusing poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidics was designed to manufacture injection-ready nanosystems. Nanosystem characteristics could be controlled by copolymer concentration, block length and chemistry, microchannel geometry, flow rate, aqueous/organic flow rate ratio and payload concentration. The well-tolerated nanosystems exhibited differential cell binding and payload delivery and could confer sensitivity to photodynamic therapy to HeLa cancer cells. Such injection-ready nanosystems carrying drugs, diagnostic or functional materials may facilitate translation to clinical application. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03543k

  5. Bilateral post-injection fibrosis of the gluteal region mimicking lumbar disc herniation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Kamil Cagri; Altinel, Levent; Isikb, Cengiz; Komurcuc, Erkam; Mutlud, Serhat; Ozdemire, Mustafa

    2009-10-10

    Tissue fibrosis is a known complication of intramuscular injections, which is especially seen in children due to vaccinations and injections. Herein we report a case of post injection gluteal fibrosis that had undergone two unsuccessful lumbar discectomies to treat the symptoms of this disease.A 45 years old male patient was consulted to our clinic from the department of neurochirurgy with complaints of bilateral hip pain. The patient was operated on for lumbar disc herniation in L4-5 level twice but his complaints had not resolved. A third operation including L4-5 instrumentation and fusion was planned. His examination revealed nodules in his both hips. His x-rays, MRI and blood tests were normal. He underwent bilateral gluteal fascia excision and his complaints resolved totally.The clinical diagnosis of post-injection fibrosis is problematic, due to the difficulty of determining the etiology. In many patients the diagnosis comes from a history of injection. Pain in the gluteal region is not a frequently described clinical feature of this condition. Many reports in the literature emphasize a contracture rather than pain.Post-injection fibrosis in the gluteal region may mimic lumbar disc herniation and a detailed physical examination is the key for correct differential diagnosis. In refractory cases not responding to conservative treatment, surgical excision of the nodules may lead to a complete clinical recovery of the patient.

  6. Bilateral post-injection fibrosis of the gluteal region mimicking lumbar disc herniation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Cagri Kose

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Tissue fibrosis is a known complication of intramuscular injections, which is especially seen in children due to vaccinations and injections. Herein we report a case of post injection gluteal fibrosis that had undergone two unsuccessful lumbar discectomies to treat the symptoms of this disease. A 45 years old male patient was consulted to our clinic from the department of neurochirurgy with complaints of bilateral hip pain. The patient was operated on for lumbar disc herniation in L4-5 level twice but his complaints had not resolved. A third operation including L4-5 instrumentation and fusion was planned. His examination revealed nodules in his both hips. His x-rays, MRI and blood tests were normal. He underwent bilateral gluteal fascia excision and his complaints resolved totally. The clinical diagnosis of post-injection fibrosis is problematic, due to the difficulty of determining the etiology. In many patients the diagnosis comes from a history of injection. Pain in the gluteal region is not a frequently described clinical feature of this condition. Many reports in the literature emphasize a contracture rather than pain. Post-injection fibrosis in the gluteal region may mimic lumbar disc herniation and a detailed physical examination is the key for correct differential diagnosis. In refractory cases not responding to conservative treatment, surgical excision of the nodules may lead to a complete clinical recovery of the patient.

  7. Contribution of pharmacists to the reporting of adverse drug reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, AC; van Puijenbroek, EP; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2002-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study is to get a better view about the possible contribution of pharmacists' reports to the quantity and the quality of reports and in this way to the quality of a voluntary reporting system of adverse drug reactions. Methods A total of 15 293 reports, sent to the Netherlands

  8. Optimal Control of Hepatitis C Antiviral Treatment Programme Delivery for Prevention amongst a Population of Injecting Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Natasha K.; Pitcher, Ashley B.; Vickerman, Peter; Vassall, Anna; Hickman, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    In most developed countries, HCV is primarily transmitted by injecting drug users (IDUs). HCV antiviral treatment is effective, and deemed cost-effective for those with no re-infection risk. However, few active IDUs are currently treated. Previous modelling studies have shown antiviral treatment for active IDUs could reduce HCV prevalence, and there is emerging interest in developing targeted IDU treatment programmes. However, the optimal timing and scale-up of treatment is unknown, given the...

  9. Optimal Control of Hepatitis C Antiviral Treatment Programme Delivery for Prevention amongst a Population of Injecting Drug Users

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, NK; Pitcher, AB; Vickerman, P.; Vassall, A; Hickman, M

    2011-01-01

    : In most developed countries, HCV is primarily transmitted by injecting drug users (IDUs). HCV antiviral treatment is effective, and deemed cost-effective for those with no re-infection risk. However, few active IDUs are currently treated. Previous modelling studies have shown antiviral treatment for active IDUs could reduce HCV prevalence, and there is emerging interest in developing targeted IDU treatment programmes. However, the optimal timing and scale-up of treatment is unknown, given t...

  10. Vancouver's supervised injection facility granted constitutional exemption from federal drug law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In a landmark decision on 27 May 2008, the B.C. Supreme Court held that because Insite--North America's only supervised injection facility (SIF)--provided health care, denial of access to Insite and safe injection would threaten individuals' rights to life, liberty and security of the person.

  11. Associations of Body Mass Index with Sexual Risk-Taking and Injection Drug Use among US High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Lowry

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if body mass index (BMI is associated with behaviors that may increase risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs among US high school students. We analyzed nationally representative data from the 2005–2011 national Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS to examine associations of BMI categories with sexual risk behaviors and injection drug use among sexually active high school students, using sex-stratified logistic regression models. Controlling for race/ethnicity and grade, among female and male students, both underweight (BMI < 5th percentile and obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile were associated with decreased odds of being currently sexually active (i.e., having had sexual intercourse during the past 3 months. However, among sexually active female students, obese females were more likely than normal weight females to have had 4 or more sex partners (odds ratio, OR = 1.59, not used a condom at last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.30, and injected illegal drugs (OR = 1.98. Among sexually active male students, overweight (85th percentile ≤ BMI < 95th percentile was associated with not using a condom at last sexual intercourse (OR = 1.19 and obesity was associated with injection drug use (OR = 1.42. Among sexually active students, overweight and obesity may be indicators of increased risk for HIV and other STDs.

  12. Declining seroprevalence in a very large HIV epidemic: injecting drug users in New York City, 1991 to 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, D C; Perlis, T; Friedman, S R; Deren, S; Chapman, T; Sotheran, J L; Tortu, S; Beardsley, M; Paone, D; Torian, L V; Beatrice, S T; DeBernardo, E; Monterroso, E; Marmor, M

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed recent trends in HIV seroprevalence among injecting drug users in New York City. METHODS: We analyzed temporal trends in HIV seroprevalence from 1991 through 1996 in 5 studies of injecting drug users recruited from a detoxification program, a methadone maintenance program, research storefronts in the Lower East Side and Harlem areas, and a citywide network of sexually transmitted disease clinics. A total of 11,334 serum samples were tested. RESULTS: From 1991 through 1996, HIV seroprevalence declined substantially among subjects in all 5 studies: from 53% to 36% in the detoxification program, from 45% to 29% in the methadone program, from 44% to 22% at the Lower East Side storefront, from 48% to 21% at the Harlem storefront, and from 30% to 21% in the sexually transmitted disease clinics (all P < .002 by chi 2 tests for trend). CONCLUSIONS: The reductions in HIV seroprevalence seen among injecting drug users in New York City from 1991 through 1996 indicate a new phase in this large HIV epidemic. Potential explanatory factors include the loss of HIV-seropositive individuals through disability and death and lower rates of risk behavior leading to low HIV incidence. PMID:9842377

  13. Smart gelation of chitosan solution in the presence of NaHCO3 for injectable drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Tang, Ximin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Guo, Shengrong

    2011-07-29

    In situ gelling systems are attractive as injectable vehicles for drug delivery. The present work described a novel gelation process of acidic chitosan solution in the presence of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)). The NaHCO(3) concentration played an important role in this gelling system. When it came within the appropriate range, the chitosan/NaHCO(3) system would stay at sol state in certain condition and showed sol-gel transition from the top to the bottom after heating. The rheological properties of the gelling system, as well as the morphology and erosion behavior of the formed chitosan hydrogels were evaluated as a function of the NaHCO(3) concentration in sols. The hydrogels showed porous morphologies with some diversification depending on the NaHCO(3) concentration, which also affected their erosion behaviors and drug release rates. Moreover, the gelation mechanism of such chitosan/NaHCO(3) system was studied and proposed as the formation of three-dimensional chitosan network with physical junctions thanks to the deprotonation of -NH(3)(+) in chitosan accompanying with the gradual neutralization between HCO(3)(-) and acid. In vivo gelation test was also performed by the dorsal subcutaneous injection of chitosan/NaHCO(3) solution in rat. The formation of in situ gels suggested such system promising applications in injectable drug delivery system.

  14. Barriers to retention in methadone maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Bangkok, Thailand: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kanna; Ti, Lianping; Ayutthaya, Prempreeda Pramoj Na; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Small, Will; Kerr, Thomas

    2017-09-07

    Methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) is a mainstay for treating opioid use disorder and preventing and managing HIV among people who inject drugs (PWID). While previous research suggested low dosing of methadone and high rates of discontinuation of MMT among PWID in Thailand, little is known about patients' lived experiences with MMT in this setting. Therefore, we conducted a mixed-methods study to examine barriers to retention in MMT among PWID in Bangkok, Thailand, with particular attention to methadone dosing. Bivariate statistics were used to analyze quantitative survey data collected from methadone-treated PWID between July and October 2011. Qualitative data collected through semi-structured interviews with 16 methadone-treated PWID between July 2011 and June 2012 were analyzed thematically, with a focus on individual-level, social-structural, and environmental barriers to accessing MMT. Among 158 survey participants, a median dosage of methadone was 30 mg/day (interquartile range 20-50). Of these, 15.8% reported having acquired street methadone due to low prescribed dosages of methadone and 19.0% reported recent syringe sharing. Qualitative interview data indicated some methadone provider-related barriers, including discouraging patients from using methadone due to it being a Western medicine, difficulty negotiating higher doses of methadone, and abrupt dose reductions without patient consultation (involving the provision of non-medicated "syrup" in some cases). Social-structural and environmental barriers to optimal MMT access included intense police surveillance of methadone clinics; and frequent incarceration of PWID and a lack of access to methadone in prisons. Among our sample of methadone-treated PWID, methadone dosages were suboptimal according to the international guidelines. Poor adherence to international guidelines for opioid agonist therapies, aggressive law enforcement, and a lack of methadone in prisons need to be addressed to optimize MMT and

  15. Under-Reported Aspects of Platinum Drug Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Theile

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum drugs remain the backbone of many antineoplastic regimens. Among the numerous chemical or pharmacological effects of platinum drugs, some aspects tend to be under-reported. Thus, this perspective paper intends to stress some neglected properties of platinum drugs: first, the physico-chemical characteristics (aquation reaction kinetics that determine site-specific toxicity; second, the impact on RNA molecules. Knowledge of the ‘RNA world’ has dramatically changed our understanding of cellular and molecular biology. The inherent RNA-crosslinking properties should make platinum-based drugs interact with coding and non-coding RNAs. Third, we will discuss the impact on the immune system, which is now recognized to substantially contribute to chemotherapy efficacy. Together, platinum drugs are in fact old drugs, but are worth re-focusing on. Many aspects are still mysterious but can pave the way to new drugs or an improved application of the already existing compounds.

  16. Lichenoid drug eruption induced by colchicine: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Isa; Demir, Vasfiye; Akdeniz, Sedat

    2016-07-15

    Lichenoid drug eruption (LDE) is a common cutaneous side effect of drugs including antimalarials, antihypertensives, nonsteroids, anti-inflammatory drugs and diuretics. The physiopathologic relationship between colchicine treatment and LDE is unclear. There is very little documentation of LDE induced by colchicine in the literature. In this report, we present a case that developed LDE on the abdomen and the legs during the colchicine treatment.

  17. Uptake and Acceptability of Information and Communication Technology in a Community-Based Cohort of People Who Inject Drugs: Implications for Mobile Health Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genz, Andrew; Kirk, Gregory; Piggott, Damani; Mehta, Shruti H; Linas, Beth S; Westergaard, Ryan P

    2015-06-25

    Mobile phone and Internet-based technologies are increasingly used to disseminate health information and facilitate delivery of medical care. While these strategies hold promise for reducing barriers to care for medically-underserved populations, their acceptability among marginalized populations such as people who inject drugs is not well-understood. To understand patterns of mobile phone ownership, Internet use and willingness to receive health information via mobile devices among people who inject drugs. We surveyed current and former drug injectors participating in a longitudinal cohort study in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Respondents completed a 12-item, interviewer-administered questionnaire during a regular semi-annual study visit that assessed their use of mobile technology and preferred modalities of receiving health information. Using data from the parent study, we used logistic regression to evaluate associations among participants' demographic and clinical characteristics and their mobile phone and Internet use. The survey was completed by 845 individuals, who had a median age of 51 years. The sample was 89% African-American, 65% male, and 33% HIV-positive. Participants were generally of low education and income levels. Fewer than half of respondents (40%) indicated they had ever used the Internet. Mobile phones were used by 86% of respondents. Among mobile phone owners, 46% had used their phone for text messaging and 25% had accessed the Internet on their phone. A minority of respondents (42%) indicated they would be interested in receiving health information via phone or Internet. Of those receptive to receiving health information, a mobile phone call was the most favored modality (66%) followed by text messaging (58%) and Internet (51%). Utilization of information and communication technology among this cohort of people who inject drugs was reported at a lower level than what has been estimated for the general U.S. Our findings identify a potential

  18. The moral universe of injecting drug users in the era of AIDS: sharing injecting equipment and the protection of moral standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumridge, E; Chetwynd, J

    1998-12-01

    Recent work on HIV counselling suggests that the protection of the moral status of the recipient is a key factor in the successful uptake of advice. This study suggests it may be equally important in the uptake of health promotion messages. A discourse analysis of the talk of 20 young injecting drug users (IDUs) identified a contradiction between their asserted self-identity as careful and socially responsible injectors, and their admission of risky lending and borrowing of injecting equipment. This contradiction was resolved by the production of discourses of exoneration, differentially tailored to the moral implications of lending and of borrowing. Lenders argued a form of 'market morality' wherein it was the duty of each to accept the consequences of his/her decisions. Lenders were therefore morally exonerated since moral failure was the 'borrowers'. Borrowing was usually depicted as 'desperate measures' for which moral culpability was disavowed because of 'powerlessness'. The exception of routine borrowing, acknowledged as risky and against community norms, was accounted for in a nihilistic discourse of indifference to infection and death. The need for a 'counter discourse' around notions of community is discussed.

  19. Self-Reported Drug and Alcohol Use and Attitudes toward Drug Testing in High Schools with Random Student Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Robert L.; Campbell, Michael D.; Campbell, Teresa G.; Shea, Corinne L.; DuPont, Helen S.

    2013-01-01

    Many schools implement random student drug testing (RSDT) programs as a drug prevention strategy. This study analyzes self-report surveys of students in eight secondary schools with well-established RSDT programs, comparing students who understood they were subject to testing and students who understood they were not subject to testing. Students…

  20. Self-Reported Drug and Alcohol Use and Attitudes toward Drug Testing in High Schools with Random Student Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, Robert L.; Campbell, Michael D.; Campbell, Teresa G.; Shea, Corinne L.; DuPont, Helen S.

    2013-01-01

    Many schools implement random student drug testing (RSDT) programs as a drug prevention strategy. This study analyzes self-report surveys of students in eight secondary schools with well-established RSDT programs, comparing students who understood they were subject to testing and students who understood they were not subject to testing. Students…

  1. Do pharmacists' reports of adverse drug reactions reflect patients' concerns?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, A.C.; van Puijenbroek, E.P.; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje Theodora Wilhelmina

    2004-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the concerns patients express to a Drug Information Line about possible adverse drug reactions (ADRs) they have experienced, are sufficiently reflected by the ADR reports submitted by pharmacists to the Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre

  2. Distribution of hepatitis C virus genotypes among injecting drug users in contact with treatment centers in Belgium, 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micalessi, M I; Gérard, C; Ameye, L; Plasschaert, S; Brochier, B; Vranckx, R

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current prevalence of HCV genotypes in injecting drug users recruited at treatment centers all over Belgium, and to analyze if the distribution of genotypes was correlated with demographic characteristics, at-risk behaviors, and co-infection with other viruses. Therefore 147 anti-HCV-positive serum samples were selected for subsequent HCV RNA detection and genotyping. HCV RNA could be detected in 98 (67%) of the 147 serum samples. Genotype 1 (38%) and 3 (49%) were the most common genotypes followed by genotype 4 (9%) and genotype 2 (2%). One mixed infection (1%) was detected. The subtype could be determined in 80 cases: genotype 3a was the most prevalent (49%), followed by genotype 1a (16%) and genotype 1b (15%). No significant difference was found between the distribution of genotypes and the location of treatment centers, at-risk behaviors and co-infection with other viruses. Nevertheless, a slight variation over time could be identified (P = 0.06): one in two genotype 3 drug users started with their injecting drug use in the last 10 years (33% in the period 1995-1999 and 21% in the period > or =2000) compared to only one in four genotype 1 drug users (20% in the period 1995-1999 and 9% in the period > or =2000).

  3. Complications of polyalkylimide 4% injections (Bio-Alcamid): a report of 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, R B; Hage, J J; van Rozelaar, L; Lange, C A H; Raaijmakers, J

    2006-01-01

    Injectable filler materials can be valuable to aesthetic surgeons. To date, hardly any short-term and no long-term complications of polyalkylimide injections (Bio-Alcamid) have been reported. We present and discuss the history of 18 patients who had such complications. The patients were between 31 and 55 years of age. The time between injection and the onset of complications of polyalkylimide ranged from 1 month to 3 years. Additional invasive therapy at, or near, the site of injections triggered the onset of infection in 10 patients. By use of T2-weighted MRI with fat suppressing spectro-presaturation inversion recovery (SPIR) the filler material can be visualised. Once infection or migration of the permanent filler occurs, the therapeutic options are limited to surgical removal by a direct approach. Polyalkylimide should be handled under strict antiseptic circumstances. This does not only apply at the time of initial injections, but even more during any subsequent invasive treatment such as evacuation of surplus deposits or additional surgical procedures at, or near, the site of injection.

  4. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region......%). The drugs most frequently reported were lisdexamphetamine (n = 40), rivaroxaban (n = 16) and warfarin (n = 15) (vaccines excluded). In 13 out of 484 reports, the ADR was associated with a fatal outcome. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study indicate that an ADEM promotes and facilitates spontaneous ADR...

  5. Prevalence and characteristics of abuse experiences and depression symptoms among injection drug-using female sex workers in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulibarri, Monica D; Hiller, Sarah P; Lozada, Remedios; Rangel, M Gudelia; Stockman, Jamila K; Silverman, Jay G; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the prevalence and characteristics of physical and sexual abuse and depression symptoms among 624 injection drug-using female sex workers (FSW-IDUs) in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; a subset of 47 from Tijuana also underwent qualitative interviews. Linear regressions identified correlates of current depression symptoms. In the interviews, FSW-IDUs identified drug use as a method of coping with the trauma they experienced from abuse that occurred before and after age 18 and during the course of sex work. In a multivariate linear regression model, two factors-ever experiencing forced sex and forced sex in the context of sex work-were significantly associated with higher levels of depression symptoms. Our findings suggest the need for integrated mental health and drug abuse services for FSW-IDUs addressing history of trauma as well as for further research on violence revictimization in the context of sex work in Mexico.

  6. Prevalence and Characteristics of Abuse Experiences and Depression Symptoms among Injection Drug-Using Female Sex Workers in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D. Ulibarri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This mixed methods study examined the prevalence and characteristics of physical and sexual abuse and depression symptoms among 624 injection drug-using female sex workers (FSW-IDUs in Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico; a subset of 47 from Tijuana also underwent qualitative interviews. Linear regressions identified correlates of current depression symptoms. In the interviews, FSW-IDUs identified drug use as a method of coping with the trauma they experienced from abuse that occurred before and after age 18 and during the course of sex work. In a multivariate linear regression model, two factors—ever experiencing forced sex and forced sex in the context of sex work—were significantly associated with higher levels of depression symptoms. Our findings suggest the need for integrated mental health and drug abuse services for FSW-IDUs addressing history of trauma as well as for further research on violence revictimization in the context of sex work in Mexico.

  7. Use of latent class analysis approach to describe drug and sexual HIV risk patterns among injection drug users in Houston, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Syed W B; Ross, Michael W; Lai, Dejian; Risser, Jan M

    2014-04-01

    Following latent class analysis (LCA) approach we examined patterns of HIV risk using two related domains of behavior: drug use, and sexual activity among 523 injection drug users (IDUs) recruited into the 2009 National HIV behavioral surveillance system. Using posterior probability of endorsing six drug and sexual items, we identified three distinct classes representing underlying HIV risk. Forty percent of our participants were at highest risk, 25 % at medium risk, and 35 % at lowest risk for HIV infection. Compared to the Lowest-risk class members, the Highest-risk class members had riskier drug and sexual behaviors and had higher prevalence of HIV cases (6 vs. 4 %). This analysis underscores the merit of LCA to empirically identify risk patterns using multiple indicators and our results show HIV risk varies among IDUs as their drug and sexual behaviors. Tailored and targeted prevention and treatment interventions for the dual risk pattern are required rather than for drug or sexual risk in silos.

  8. Consumer adverse drug reaction reporting - A new step in pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, K; de Graaf, L; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2003-01-01

    The direct reporting of adverse drug reactions by patients is becoming an increasingly important topic for discussion in the world of pharmacovigilance. At this time, few countries accept consumer reports. We present an overview of experiences with consumer reporting in various countries of the

  9. Consumer adverse drug reaction reporting - A new step in pharmacovigilance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Grootheest, K; de Graaf, L; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    2003-01-01

    The direct reporting of adverse drug reactions by patients is becoming an increasingly important topic for discussion in the world of pharmacovigilance. At this time, few countries accept consumer reports. We present an overview of experiences with consumer reporting in various countries of the worl

  10. Potential bias due to outcome-related loss to follow-up in cohort studies on incidence of drug injection: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sordo, Luis; Bravo, Maria J; Barrio, Gregorio; Indave, B Iciar; Degenhardt, Louisa; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto

    2015-08-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize results from cohort studies on initiation into drug injection among vulnerable populations, to quantify heterogeneity in the estimated incidence rates of drug injection and to identify potential sources of heterogeneity and bias. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and LILACS were searched for relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. Investigators independently reviewed studies for inclusion, retrieved information on baseline population characteristics and follow-up features and assessed study quality. Study-specific incidence rates of drug injection were calculated as the number of new injectors divided by the person-years at risk. The I(2) statistic was used to quantify heterogeneity in incidence rates across studies, and random-effects meta-regression models were used to identify determinants of heterogeneity and bias. Nine cohorts totalling 1843 participants met the inclusion criteria, with individual sample sizes of 70-415 participants and follow-up lengths of 6 months-3.4 years. The incidence of drug injection varied widely, from 2.1 to 24.2 cases per 100 person-years. The strong between-study heterogeneity (I(2)  = 90%, Pcohort studies on drug injection initiation. Low retention rates and potential for downward selection bias in cohort studies on drug injection initiation are caused primarily by greater loss to follow-up among individuals at higher risk of starting injection, compared with other participants. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. A micro-environmental intervention to reduce the harms associated with drug-related overdose: evidence from the evaluation of Vancouver's safer injection facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Thomas; Small, Will; Moore, David; Wood, Evan

    2007-01-01

    Conventional drug overdose prevention strategies have been criticised for failing to address the macro- and micro-environmental factors that shape drug injecting practices and compromise individual ability to reduce the risks associated with drug-related overdose. This in turn has led to calls for interventions that address overdose risks by modifying the drug-using environment, including the social dynamics within them. Safer injection facilities (SIFs) constitute one such intervention, although little is known about the impact of such facilities on factors that mediate risk for overdose. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with fifty individuals recruited from a cohort of SIF users in Vancouver, the Scientific Evaluation Of Supervised Injecting (SEOSI). Audio recorded interviews elicited injection drug users' (IDU) accounts of overdoses as well as perspectives regarding the impact of SIF use on overdose risk and experiences of overdose. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. Fifty IDU, including 21 women, participated in this study. The perspectives of participants suggest that the Vancouver SIF plays an important role in mediating various risks associated with overdose. In particular, the SIF addresses many of the unique contextual risks associated with injection in public spaces, including the need to rush injections due to fear of arrest. Further, SIF use appears to enable overdose prevention by simultaneously offsetting potential social risks associated with injecting alone and injecting in the presence of strangers. The immediate emergency response offered by nurses at the SIF was also valued highly, especially when injecting adulterated drugs and drugs of unknown purity and composition. The perspectives of IDU participating in this study suggest that SIFs can address many of the micro-environmental factors that drive overdose risk and limit individual ability to employ overdose prevention practices

  12. An adverse drug event manager facilitates spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Siri; Klarskov, Pia; Borgeskov, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is used for continuous risk-benefit evaluation of marketed pharmaceutical products and for signal detection. The Adverse Drug Event Manager (ADEM) is a service offered to clinicians employed at hospitals in the Capital Region...

  13. 'Drug users stick together': HIV testing in peer-based drop-in centres among people who inject drugs in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ti, Lianping; Hayashi, Kanna; Hattirat, Sattara; Suwannawong, Paisan; Kaplan, Karyn; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Introduction Although there is a well recognised need for novel approaches to HIV testing, particularly for marginalised populations at high risk for HIV infection, there remains a dearth of information on the acceptability of peer-based HIV testing among people who inject drugs (PWID). Between July 2011 and June 2012, 22 in-depth interviews were conducted with PWID participating in the Mitsampan Community Research Project in Bangkok, Thailand. Semi-structured interviews explored willingness to access rapid HIV testing delivered by a healthcare professional or a trained peer within peer-based drop-in centres. Audio-recorded interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic analysis was conducted. All participants indicated interest in accessing rapid HIV testing by a healthcare professional at peer-based drop-in centres due to the advantage of receiving immediate results. Experiencing stigma and discrimination by healthcare workers and wanting to avoid administrative barriers in hospitals were also reported as reasons for why PWID preferred HIV testing in peer-based settings. Peer support and shared lived experiences were repeatedly mentioned as benefits of peer-based testing. However, some concerns regarding peer-delivered testing were expressed and included a fear of peers' violating confidentiality and concerns regarding peers' qualifications for conducting an HIV test. Many PWID in this study sample noted the value of a peer-based approach to receiving testing and indicated their willingness to access rapid HIV testing in peer-based drop-in centres. The findings from this study highlight the potential for novel peer-based methods to complement existing HIV services in an effort to improve access to testing among this population.

  14. Clostridium septicum infection of hepatic metastases following alcohol injection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Neam; Sohail, Muhammad R; Hashmey, Rayhan H; Al Kaabi, Mohammed

    2009-12-31

    Clostridium septicum infections are generally associated with gastrointestinal or hematologic malignancies. We report the first case of hepatic metastases infection with Clostridium septicum that followed alcohol injection of liver lesion. Clinicians should consider this possibility in patients with underlying malignancy who present with hepatic abscess, as prompt surgical drainage and empiric antibiotics may be life saving.

  15. Characterization of HBV Among HBV/HIV-1 Co-Infected Injecting Drug Users from Mombasa, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibaya, Rukia M; Lihana, Raphael W; Kiptoo, Michael; Songok, Elijah M; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Osman, Saida; Ishizaki, Azumi; Bi, Xiuqiong; Okoth, Fredrick A; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Lwembe, Raphael M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are both bloodborne viruses. Markers of either active or past HBV infection are present in many HIV infected patients. Worldwide, HBV prevalence varies geographically and endemicity is classified as low (8%). Genotypically, prevalence varies among different populations, with genotype A having a wide distribution. In Kenya, the prevalence of HIV-1/HBV co-infection ranges from 6-53% depending on the sub-population, with genotype A as the most common. To determine the prevalence and characterize HBV in HBV/HIV co-infected injecting drug users (IDUs) from Mombasa, Kenya. Blood samples were collected from HIV-infected IDUs in Mombasa, Kenya. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) was tested by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). HBV DNA was extracted by SMITEST R&D kit. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was done; followed by population sequencing of HBV preS, core and full genome using specific primers. Analysi