WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported hollow carbon

  1. Adsorption characteristics of activated carbon hollow fibers

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Carbon hollow fibers were prepared with regenerated cellulose or polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using sodium phosphate dibasic followed by the carbonization process. The activation process increases the adsorption properties of fibers which is more prominent for active carbone fibers obtained from the cellulose precursor. Chemical activation with sodium phosphate dibasic produces an active carbon material with both mesopores and micropores.

  2. Preparation of hollow spherical carbon nanocages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, C.-K.; Kang, H. Y.; Hong, C.-I; Huang, C.-H.; Chang, F.-C.; Wang, H. Paul, E-mail: wanghp@mail.ncku.edu.tw [National Cheng Kung University, Department of Environmental Engineering, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    This study presents a new and simple method for the synthesis of hollow carbon spheres possessing nanocage sizes of 7.1, 14, and 20 nm in diameter. The core-shell (i.e., Cu-C) nanoparticles prepared by carbonization of the Cu{sup 2+}-cyclodextrin (CD) complexes at 573 K for 2 h was etched with HCl (6N) to yield the hollow carbon spheres. The carbon-shell of the hollow carbon nanospheres, which consisted of mainly diamond-like and graphite carbons, is not perturbed during etching. In addition to the nanocages, the hollow carbon nanospheres also possess micropores with an opening of 0.45 nm, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out through the carbon-shell. Many elements (such as Zn{sup 2+} or Cu{sup 2+}) can therefore be filled into the nanocages of the hollow carbon nanospheres. With these unique properties, for instance, designable active species such as Cu and ZnO encapsulated in the carbon-shell can act as Cu-ZnO-C yolk-shell nanoreactors which are found very effective in the catalytic decomposition of methanol.

  3. Fabrication of functional hollow carbon spheres with large hollow interior as active colloidal catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Sun; Guanghui Wang; Wencui Li; Xiangqian Zhang; Anhui Lu

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we have established a facile method to synthesize functional hollow carbon spheres with large hollow interior,which can act as active colloidal catalysts.The method includes the following steps:first,hollow polymer spheres with large hollow interior were prepared using sodium oleate as the hollow core generator,and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and hexamethylene tetramine (HMT) as the polymer precursors under hydrothermal conditions; Fe3+ or Ag+ cations were then introduced into the as-prepared hollow polymer spheres through the carboxyl groups; finally,the hollow polymer spheres can be pseudomorphically converted to hollow carbon spheres during pyrolysis process,meanwhile iron or silver nanoparticles can also be formed in the carbon shell simultaneously.The structures of the obtained functional hollow carbon spheres were characterized by TEM,XRD,and TG.As an example,Ag-doped hollow carbon spheres were used as colloid catalysts which showed high catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  4. Preparation and Electrochemical Properties of Silver Doped Hollow Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Fu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Silver doped PAN-based hollow carbon nanofibers were prepared combining co-electrospinning with in situ reduction technique subsequently heat treatment to improve the electrochemical performances of carbon based supercapacitor electrodes. The morphology, structure and electrochemical performances of the resulted nanofiber were studied. The results show that the silver nanoparticles can be doped on the surface of hollow carbon nanofibers and the addition of silver favors the improvement of the electrochemical performances, exhibiting the enhanced reversibility of electrode reaction and the capacitance and the reduced charge transfer impedance.

  5. Rational synthesis of carbon-coated hollow Ge nanocrystals with enhanced lithium-storage properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Chaoji; Xiang, Jingwei; Liu, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yunhui; Hu, Xianluo

    2016-06-01

    High-capacity anode materials based on alloy-type group IV elements always have large volume expansion during lithiation when they are used in lithium-ion batteries. Designing hollow structures is a well-established strategy to accommodate the volume change because of sufficient internal void space. Here we report a facile template-free route to prepare hollow Ge nanospheres without using any templates through a quasi-microemulsion method. Ge nanocrystals are preferably self-assembled along the interface of liquid vesicles between water and tetrahydrofuran, and well-defined hollow architectures of ~50 nm in diameter are formed. Both the wall thickness and hollow interiors can be easily tuned. After subsequent carbon coating via pyrolysis of acetylene, the as-formed Ge@C nanocomposite with hollow interiors exhibits a highly reversible capacity of about 920 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1 over 50 cycles, and excellent rate capability. The small size and the high structural integrity of hollow Ge@C structures contribute to the superior lithium-storage performances.High-capacity anode materials based on alloy-type group IV elements always have large volume expansion during lithiation when they are used in lithium-ion batteries. Designing hollow structures is a well-established strategy to accommodate the volume change because of sufficient internal void space. Here we report a facile template-free route to prepare hollow Ge nanospheres without using any templates through a quasi-microemulsion method. Ge nanocrystals are preferably self-assembled along the interface of liquid vesicles between water and tetrahydrofuran, and well-defined hollow architectures of ~50 nm in diameter are formed. Both the wall thickness and hollow interiors can be easily tuned. After subsequent carbon coating via pyrolysis of acetylene, the as-formed Ge@C nanocomposite with hollow interiors exhibits a highly reversible capacity of about 920 mA h g-1 at 200 mA g-1 over 50 cycles, and excellent rate

  6. Hollow Carbon Nanofiber-Encapsulated Sulfur Cathodes for High Specific Capacity Rechargeable Lithium Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Guangyuan

    2011-10-12

    Sulfur has a high specific capacity of 1673 mAh/g as lithium battery cathodes, but its rapid capacity fading due to polysulfides dissolution presents a significant challenge for practical applications. Here we report a hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur cathode for effective trapping of polysulfides and demonstrate experimentally high specific capacity and excellent electrochemical cycling of the cells. The hollow carbon nanofiber arrays were fabricated using anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates, through thermal carbonization of polystyrene. The AAO template also facilitates sulfur infusion into the hollow fibers and prevents sulfur from coating onto the exterior carbon wall. The high aspect ratio of the carbon nanofibers provides an ideal structure for trapping polysulfides, and the thin carbon wall allows rapid transport of lithium ions. The small dimension of these nanofibers provides a large surface area per unit mass for Li2S deposition during cycling and reduces pulverization of electrode materials due to volumetric expansion. A high specific capacity of about 730 mAh/g was observed at C/5 rate after 150 cycles of charge/discharge. The introduction of LiNO3 additive to the electrolyte was shown to improve the Coulombic efficiency to over 99% at C/5. The results show that the hollow carbon nanofiber-encapsulated sulfur structure could be a promising cathode design for rechargeable Li/S batteries with high specific energy. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Development and characterization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN based carbon hollow fiber membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mohd Saufi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the development and characterization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN based carbon hollow fiber membrane. Nitrogen was used as an inert gas during pyrolysis of the PAN hollow fiber membrane into carbon membrane. PAN membranes were pyrolyzed at temperature ranging from 500oC to 800oC for 30 minutes of thermal soak time. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and gas sorption analysis were applied to characterize the PAN based carbon membrane. Pyrolysis temperature was found to significantly change the structure and properties of carbon membrane. FTIR results concluded that the carbon yield still could be increased by pyrolyzing PAN membranes at temperature higher than 800oC since the existence of other functional group instead of CH group. Gas adsorption analysis showed that the average pore diameter increased up to 800oC.

  8. Soft-templated synthesis of mesoporous carbon nanospheres and hollow carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Youliang; Li, Tiehu; Fang, Changqing; Zhang, Maorong; Liu, Xiaolong; Yu, Ruien; Hu, Jingbo

    2013-10-01

    Using coal tar pitch based amphiphilic carbonaceous materials (ACMs) as the precursor and amphiphilic triblock copolymer Plutonic P123 as the only soft template, carbon nanospheres with partially ordered mesopores and hollow carbon nanofibers were synthesized. The concentration of P123, cp, and the mass ratio of P123 to ACM, r, are the key parameters of controlling the shape of the as-prepared products. Mesoporous carbon nanospheres with diameter of 30-150 nm were prepared under the condition of cp = 13.3 g/L and r = 1.2. When cp = 26.7 g/L and r = 2, hollow carbon nanofibers with diameters of 50-200 nm and mesopores/macropores were obtained. Carbon nanospheres and hollow carbon fibers were amorphous materials. The mesoporous carbon nanospheres show good stability in the cyclic voltammograms and their specific capacitance at 10 mV s-1 is 172.1 F/g.

  9. Electrochemically Active Polymeric Hollow Fibers based on Poly(ether- b -amide)/Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Cuevas, Carolina

    2017-09-18

    A simple and effective method to incorporate catalytic activity to a hollow fiber membrane is reported. Polyetherimide hollow fiber membranes were coated with a solution containing carboxyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes and poly(ether-b-amide). Electron microscopy images confirmed the presence of a layer of percolating carbon nanotubes on the surface of the membranes. Cyclic voltammetry and linear swept voltammetry experiments showed that these membranes are able to drive the reactions of hydrogen evolution, and oxygen reduction, making them a cheaper, and greener substitute for platinum based cathodes in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. Water flux and molecular weight cut off experiments indicated that the electrochemically active coating layer does not affect the ultrafiltration performance of the membrane.

  10. Hollow clay tile wall program summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.C.; Jones, W.D. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Beavers, J.E. [MS Technology, Inc. (United States)

    1995-07-30

    Many of the Y-12 Plant buildings, constructed during the 1940s and 1950s, consist of steel ed concrete framing infilled with hollow clay tile (HCT). The infill was intended to provide for building enclosure and was not designed to have vertical or lateral load-carrying capacity. During the late 1970s and early 1980s, seismic and wind evaluations were performed on many of these buildings in conjunction with the preparation of a site-wide safety analysis report. This analytical work, based on the best available methodology, considered lateral load-carrying capacity of the HCT infill on the basis of building code allowable shear values. In parallel with the analysis effort, DOE initiated a program to develop natural phenomena capacity and performance criteria for existing buildings, but these criteria did not specify guidelines for determining the lateral force capacity of frames infilled with HCT. The evaluation of infills was, therefore, based on the provisions for the design of unreinforced masonry as outlined in standard masonry codes. When the results of the seismic and wind evaluations were compared with the new criteria, the projected building capacities fell short of the requirements. Apparently, if the buildings were to meet the new criteria, many millions of dollars would be required for building upgrades. Because the upgrade costs were significant, the assumptions and approaches used in the analyses were reevaluated. Four issues were identified: (1) Once the infilled walls cracked, what capacity (nonlinear response), if any, would the walls have to resist earthquake or wind loads applied in the plane of the infill (in-plane)? (2) Would the infilled walls remain within the steel or reinforced concrete framing when subjected to earthquake or high wind loads applied perpendicular to the infill (out-of-plane)? (3) What was the actual shear capacity of the HCT infill? (4) Was modeling the HCT infill as a shear wall the best approach?

  11. Electromagnetic and microwave absorbing properties of hollow carbon nanospheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tianchun Zou; Haipeng Li; Naiqin Zhao; Chunsheng Shi

    2013-04-01

    A mass of hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) was fabricated by chemical vapour deposition of methane over Ni/Al2O3 catalyst at 600 °C. The products were characterized with high-resolution transmission electron microscope images, and the results showed that the external diameter of the HCNSs was 5–90nm and the thickness of wall was about 10 nm. Microwave absorption of HCNSs/paraffin composites was mainly attributed to dielectric loss. The microwave-absorbing peaks of composites containing HCNSs shifts to low frequencies, and the bandwidth below −10 dB and minimum RL decrease with increasing thickness of HCNSs/paraffin composites.

  12. Preparation of SnO 2 /Carbon Composite Hollow Spheres and Their Lithium Storage Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen

    2008-10-28

    In this work, we present a novel concept of structural design for preparing functional composite hollow spheres and derived double-shelled hollow spheres. The approach involves two main steps: preparation of porous hollow spheres of one component and deposition of the other component onto both the interior and exterior surfaces of the shell as well as in the pores. We demonstrate the concept by preparing SnO2/carbon composite hollow spheres and evaluate them as potential anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. These SnO2/carbon hollow spheres are able to deliver a reversible Li storage capacity of 473 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles. Unusual double-shelled carbon hollow spheres are obtained by selective removal of the sandwiched porous SnO2 shells. © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  13. Filtration of sodium chloride from seawater using carbon hollow tube composed of carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhary Ravi Prakash Patel

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present article deals with filtration of seawater to remove sodium chloride (NaCl using filter made from organized structures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The filter consists of hollow carbon cylinder (length ~10 cm, diameter ~1 cm, which is composed of radially aligned CNTs. This carbon hollow cylinder has been synthesized by continuous spray pyrolysis of ferrocene–benzene solution in argon atmosphere. The hollow cylinder has been turned into a water filter by closing one end and keeping a small funnel at the other. Filtration of seawater (Marina Beach, Chennai, India has been obtained both under the self pressure of seawater column in the hollow cylinder and under the difference of pressure created by enclosing the filter in a vacuum tight container. It has been found that the efficiency of filtration is about two times higher under partial vacuum (~10–2 torr created on the filtrate (water side. After filtration of seawater, a deposit in the inner surface of hollow cylinder has been found. This deposit has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and it has been found that the deposit was NaCl. The filtration leads to almost complete removal of NaCl from the seawater.

  14. Hollow carbon nanobubbles: monocrystalline MOF nanobubbles and their pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Jiang, Xiangfen; Zhao, Yanyi; Carné-Sánchez, Arnau; Malgras, Victor; Kim, Jeonghun; Kim, Jung Ho; Wang, Shaobin; Liu, Jian; Jiang, Ji-Sen; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Hu, Ming

    2017-05-01

    While bulk-sized metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) face limits to their utilization in various research fields such as energy storage applications, nanoarchitectonics is believed to be a possible solution. It is highly challenging to realize MOF nanobubbles with monocrystalline frameworks. By a spatially controlled etching approach, here, we can achieve the synthesis of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-8) nanobubbles with a uniform size of less than 100 nm. Interestingly, the ZIF-8 nanobubbles possess a monocrystalline nanoshell with a thickness of around 10 nm. Under optimal pyrolytic conditions, the ZIF-8 nanobubbles can be converted into hollow carbon nanobubbles while keeping their original shapes. The structure of the nanobubble enhances the fast Na(+)/K(+) ion intercalation performance. Such remarkable improvement cannot be realized by conventional MOFs or their derived carbons.

  15. Three-dimensional porous hollow fibre copper electrodes for efficient and high-rate electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, Recep; Hummadi, Khalid Khazzal; Kortlever, Ruud; Wit, de Patrick; Milbrat, Alexander; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W.J.; Benes, Nieck E.; Koper, Marc T.M.; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous-phase electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide requires an active, earth-abundant electrocatalyst, as well as highly efficient mass transport. Here we report the design of a porous hollow fibre copper electrode with a compact three-dimensional geometry, which provides a large area, three-

  16. Synthesis, characterization and X-ray spectral investigation of hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilkiv, Bogdan [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Str., Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Petrovska, Svitlana, E-mail: sw.piotrowska@gmail.com [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Str., Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Sergiienko, Ruslan [Physico-Technological Institute of Metals and Alloys NAS of Ukraine, 34/1 Vernadsky Ave., Kyiv 142 03680 (Ukraine); Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Foya, Oleksandr [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Str., Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); Ilkiv, Oleksandra [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Engineering-Physical Faculty, 35 Polytekchnichna Str., Kyiv 03056 (Ukraine); Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Zaulychnyy, Yaroslav [Frantsevich Institute for Problems of Materials Science, 3 Krzhyzhanivsky Str., Kyiv 03680 (Ukraine); National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Engineering-Physical Faculty, 35 Polytekchnichna Str., Kyiv 03056 (Ukraine)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • We synthesized hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres. • We investigated the electronic structure of hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres. • Additional mixed π + σ overlapping occurred in the hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres. • Some residual iron atoms form sp hybrid bonds with carbon. - Abstract: Hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres (HGCNSs) obtained by treatment of iron carbide-filled carbon nanocapsules were investigated using the ultra-soft X-ray emission spectroscopy method. Carbon nanocapsules were synthesized by the plasma discharge method in an ultrasonic cavitation field of liquid hexane. It was revealed that additional mixed π + σ-overlapping occurred in the hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres as a result of the bending of the graphene sheets. Some iron atoms remained after washing in acid. It was found that in the hollow graphitic carbon nanospheres, sp-hybrid bonds formed between the carbon and residual iron atoms when high-energy 3d + 4s-states overlapped with sp{sup n}-hybrid orbitals (2 < n < 3). Scanning and transmission electron microscopy methods were used to study the spatial morphology and structure of the fabricated HGCNSs. The electronic structures of the HGCNSs were compared with those of reference synthetic graphite powder, carbon onions, and graphene nanosheets.

  17. Tunable construction of multi-shelled hollow carbonate nanospheres and their potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoming; Zhang, Xiaoting; Yang, Lin; Wang, Ge; Jiang, Kai; Wu, Geoffrey; Cui, Weigang; Wei, Zipeng

    2016-04-01

    The development of multi-shelled hollow carbonate nanospheres (MHCN) for biomedical applications is challenging, and has not been reported. In this study, a facile approach is firstly reported to synthesize hierarchically porous MHCN with controllable shell numbers using a novel strategy called layer-by-layer thermal decomposition of organic acid salts and templates. The choice of organic acid salts as the reactants is innovative and crucial. The shell numbers of porous MHCN can be easily controlled and tuned through adjusting the adsorption temperature of organic acid salts and/or the adsorption ability of the template. The synthetic method can not only open a window to prepare the multi-shelled carbonates but also provide a new strategy to synthesise other multi-shelled inorganic salts. Notably, the hierarchically porous multi-shelled hollow structures empower the carbonates with not only a large specific surface area but also good porosity and permeability, showing great potential for future applications. Herein, our in vitro/vivo evaluations show that CaCO3 MHCN possess a high drug loading capacity and a sustained-release drug profile. It is highly expected that this novel synthetic strategy for MHCN and novel MHCN platform have the potential for biomedical applications in the near future.The development of multi-shelled hollow carbonate nanospheres (MHCN) for biomedical applications is challenging, and has not been reported. In this study, a facile approach is firstly reported to synthesize hierarchically porous MHCN with controllable shell numbers using a novel strategy called layer-by-layer thermal decomposition of organic acid salts and templates. The choice of organic acid salts as the reactants is innovative and crucial. The shell numbers of porous MHCN can be easily controlled and tuned through adjusting the adsorption temperature of organic acid salts and/or the adsorption ability of the template. The synthetic method can not only open a window to

  18. Capillary electrophoretic study of green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhen; Feng, Feng; Hu, Qin; Paau, Man Chin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zezhong; Bai, Yunfeng; Guo, Fangfang; Choi, Martin M F

    2015-09-01

    CE coupled with laser-induced fluorescence and UV absorption detections has been applied to study the complexity of as-synthesized green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles (HC-NP) samples. The effects of pH, type, and concentration of the run buffer and SDS on the separation of HC-NP are studied in detail. It is observed that phosphate run buffer is more effective in separating the HC-NP and the optimal run buffer is found to be 30 mM phosphate and 10 mM SDS at pH 9.0. The CE separation of this HC-NP is based on the difference in size and electrophoretic mobility of HC-NP. Some selected HC-NP fractions are collected and further characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, MS, and transmission electron microscopy. The fractionated HC-NP show profound differences in absorption, emission characteristics, and PL quantum yield that would have been otherwise misled by studying the complex mixture alone. It is anticipated that our CE methodology will open a new initiative on extensive studies of individual HC-NP species in the biomedical, catalysis, electronic, and optical device, energy storage, material, and sensing field.

  19. Formation of Triple-Shelled Molybdenum-Polydopamine Hollow Spheres and Their Conversion into MoO2 /Carbon Composite Hollow Spheres for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yawen; Yu, Le; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2016-11-14

    Unique triple-shelled Mo-polydopamine (Mo-PDA) hollow spheres are synthesized through a facile solvothermal process. A sequential self-templating mechanism for the multi-shell formation is proposed, and the number of shells can be adjusted by tuning the size of the Mo-glycerate templates. These triple-shelled Mo-PDA hollow spheres can be converted to triple-shelled MoO2 /carbon composite hollow spheres by thermal treatment. Owing to the unique multi-shells and hollow interior, the as-prepared MoO2 /carbon composite hollow spheres exhibit appealing performance as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries, delivering a high capacity of ca. 580 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) with good rate capability and long cycle life. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Solution-based carbohydrate synthesis of individual solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres using spray pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengwei; Wang, Yuan; Graser, Jake; Zhao, Ran; Gao, Fei; O'Connell, Michael J

    2013-12-23

    A facile and scalable solution-based, spray pyrolysis synthesis technique was used to synthesize individual carbon nanospheres with specific surface area (SSA) up to 1106 m(2)/g using a novel metal-salt catalyzed reaction. The carbon nanosphere diameters were tunable from 10 nm to several micrometers by varying the precursor concentrations. Solid, hollow, and porous carbon nanospheres were achieved by simply varying the ratio of catalyst and carbon source without using any templates. These hollow carbon nanospheres showed adsorption of to 300 mg of dye per gram of carbon, which is more than 15 times higher than that observed for conventional carbon black particles. When evaluated as supercapacitor electrode materials, specific capacitances of up to 112 F/g at a current density of 0.1 A/g were observed, with no capacitance loss after 20,000 cycles.

  1. A novel method for preparation of hollow and solid carbon spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boyang Liu; Dechang Jia; Jiancun Rao; Qiangchang Meng; Yingfeng Shao

    2008-10-01

    Hollow and solid carbon spheres were prepared by the reaction of ferrocene and ammonium carbonate in a sealed quartz tube at 500°C. The morphology and microstructure of the product were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The carbon spheres are amorphous and their diameters range from 0.8–2.8 m. The shell thickness of the hollow carbon spheres is not uniform and ranges from 100–180 nm. It is suggested that ammonium carbonate is crucial for the formation of carbon spheres and its amount also influences the morphology of the product. The method may be suitable for large scale preparation of carbon spheres.

  2. Hollow Carbon Microspheres/MnO2 Nanosheets Composites:Hydrothermal Synthesis and Electrochemical Behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-li Fan; Fen Ran; Xuan-xuan Zhang; Hai-ming Song; Xiao-qin Niu; Ling-bin Kong; Long Kang

    2015-01-01

    This article reported the electrochemical behaviors of a novel hollow carbon microspheres/manganese dioxide nanosheets (micro-HC/nano-MnO2) composite prepared by an in situ self-limiting deposition method under hydrothermal condition. The results of scanning electron microscopy reveal that MnO2 nanosheets homogeneously grow onto the surface of micro-HC to form a loose-packed microstructure. The quantity of MnO2 required in the electrode layer has thereby been reduced significantly, and higher specific capacitances have been achieved. The micro-HC/nano-MnO2 electrode presents a high capacitance of 239.0 F g-1 at a current density of 5 mA cm-2, which is a strong promise for high-rate electro-chemical capacitive energy storage applications.

  3. Hollow Nanotubes of N-Doped Carbon on CoS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuming; Li, Xiaoyan; Park, Kyusung; Zhou, Limin; Huang, Haitao; Mai, Yiu-Wing; Goodenough, John B

    2016-12-19

    Low-cost, single-step synthesis of hollow nanotubes of N-doped carbon deposited on CoS is enabled by the simultaneous use of three functionalities of polyacrylonitrite (PAN) nanofibers: 1) a substrate for loading active materials, 2) a sacrificial template for creating hollow tubular structures, and 3) a precursor for in situ nitrogen doping. The N-doped carbon in hollow tubes of CoS provides a high-capacity anode of long cycle life for a rechargeable Li-ion or Na-ion battery cell that undergoes the conversion reaction 2 A(+) +2 e(-) +CoS →Co+A2 S with A=Li or Na.

  4. Silicon-Encapsulated Hollow Carbon Nanofiber Networks as Binder-Free Anodes for Lithium Ion Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Nan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-encapsulated hollow carbon nanofiber networks with ample space around the Si nanoparticles (hollow Si/C composites were successfully synthesized by dip-coating phenolic resin onto the surface of electrospun Si/PVA nanofibers along with the subsequent solidification and carbonization. More importantly, the structure and Si content of hollow Si/C composite nanofibers can be effectively tuned by merely varying the concentration of dip solution. As-synthesized hollow Si/C composites show excellent electrochemical performance when they are used as binder-free anodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs. In particular, when the concentration of resol/ethanol solution is 3.0%, the product exhibits a large capacity of 841 mAh g−1 in the first cycle, prominent cycling stability, and good rate capability. The discharge capacity retention of it was ~90%, with 745 mAh g−1 after 50 cycles. The results demonstrate that the hollow Si/C composites are very promising as alternative anode candidates for high-performance LIBs.

  5. Influence of chemical agents on the surface area and porosity of active carbon hollow fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJILJANA M. KLJAJEVIĆ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Active carbon hollow fibers were prepared from regenerated polysulfone hollow fibers by chemical activation using: disodium hydrogen phosphate 2-hydrate, disodium tetraborate 10-hydrate, hydrogen peroxide, and diammonium hydrogen phosphate. After chemical activation fibers were carbonized in an inert atmosphere. The specific surface area and porosity of obtained carbons were studied by nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms at 77 K, while the structures were examined with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The activation process increases these adsorption properties of fibers being more pronounced for active carbon fibers obtained with disodium tetraborate 10-hydrate and hydrogen peroxide as activator. The obtained active hollow carbons are microporous with different pore size distribution. Chemical activation with phosphates produces active carbon material with small surface area but with both mesopores and micropores. X-ray diffraction shows that besides turbostratic structure typical for carbon materials, there are some peaks which indicate some intermediate reaction products when sodium salts were used as activating agent. Based on data from the electrochemical measurements the activity and porosity of the active fibers depend strongly on the oxidizing agent applied.

  6. Fabrication of carbon nanotube-polyimide composite hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Bradley J; Aria, Adrianus I; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a novel method for fabricating hollow microneedles for transdermal drug delivery using a composite of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes and polyimide. Patterned bundles of carbon nanotubes are used as a porous scaffold for defining the microneedle geometry. Polyimide resin is wicked through the carbon nanotube scaffold to reinforce the structure and provide the prerequisite strength for achieving skin penetration. The high aspect ratio and bottom-up assembly of carbon nanotubes allow the structure of the microneedles to be created in a single step of nanotube fabrication, providing a simple, scalable method for producing hollow microneedles. To demonstrate the utility of these microneedles, liquid delivery experiments are performed. Successful delivery of aqueous methylene blue dye into both hydrogel and swine skin in vitro is demonstrated. Electron microscopy images of the microneedles taken after delivery confirm that the microneedles do not sustain any structural damage during the delivery process.

  7. Hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite microspheres with mesoporous structure: hydrothermal fabrication and drug delivery property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Jun; Wang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Ting; Wei, Yi-Ting; Chu, Lian-Feng; Guo, Ya-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Hollow carbonated hydroxyapatite microspheres with mesoporous structure (HCHAs) have been fabricated by using calcium carbonated microspheres as sacrificial templates according to the following routes: (i) the in situ deposit of carbonated hydroxyapatite on the surfaces of CaCO3 microspheres by hydrothermal method and (ii) the removal of CaCO3 by chemical etching. The HCHAs consist of a hollow core and a mesoporous shell. Interestingly, the shell of the microspheres is constructed by carbonated hydroxyapatite nanoplates as building blocks. Moreover, these nanoplates are composed of many smaller nanoparticles with different crystal orientations, and the mesopores exist among these nanoparticles. The HCHAs exhibit the high drug-loading capacity and sustained drug release property, suggesting that the hierarchically porous microspheres have great potentials for bone-implantable drug-delivery applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthesis of mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres as highly efficient Pd electrocatalyst support for ethanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Meng, Hui; Li, Zihui; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Shi, Lei [Changling Catalyst Division, Sinopec Group, Yueyang 414012 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The synthesis procedure of the highly mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres (HCHs) using glucose as carbon source and solid core mesoporous shell silica (SCMSS) as template and the formation mechanism of the HCHs have been presented. The HCHs show an ultrahigh surface area of 1095.59 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and an average mesopore size of 9.38 nm. The hemispherical structure with large mesopores also results in the improvement in the mass transfer and therefore more concentrated ethanol solution can be used to increase the energy density. The additional advantage of the HCHs compared to the hollow carbon spheres is that they can provide the similar surface area at reduced volume. The current densities of ethanol oxidation on Pd nanoparticles supported on HCH (Pd/HCH) electrocatalyst are three times as many as on Pd/C at the same Pd loadings. (author)

  9. Superior supercapacitive performance of hollow activated carbon nanomesh with hierarchical structure derived from poplar catkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Li; Cheng, Ming-Yu; Fu, Lin; Yang, Jing-He; Zheng, Xiu-Cheng; Guan, Xin-Xin

    2017-09-01

    The hollow activated carbon nanomesh (PCACM) with a hierarchical porous structure is derived from biowaste-poplar catkins by in-situ calcination etching with Ni(NO3)2·6H2O and KOH in N2 flow combined with an acid dissolution technique. This procedure not only inherits the natural tube morphology of poplar catkins, but also generates a fascinating nanomesh structure on the walls. PCACM possesses a large specific surface area (SBET = 1893.0 m2 g-1) and high total pore volume (Vp = 1.495 cm3 g-1), and displays an exciting meso-macoporous structure with a concentrated pore size distribution of 4.53 nm. The specific capacitance of PCACM is as high as 314.6 F g-1 at 1.0 A g-1 when used as the electrode materials for supercapacitor. Furthermore, the symmetric supercapacitor of PCACM with 1.0 M Na2SO4 solution as the electrolyte displays a high energy density of 20.86 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 180.13 W kg-1 within a wide voltage rage of 0-1.8 V, which is comparable or even obviously higher than those of other biomass derived carbon reported. It is noteworthy that PCACM also exhibits superior cycling stability and coulombic efficiency. The excellent electrochemical behaviors enable PCACM to be a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  10. Hollow silica-copper-carbon anodes using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zixu; Xin, Fengxia; Cao, Can; Zhao, Chongchong; Shen, Cai; Han, Wei-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    Hollow silica-copper-carbon (H-SCC) nanocomposites are first synthesized using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons to form Cu-MOF@SiO2 and then subjected to heat treatment. In the composites, the hollow structure and the void space from the collapse of the MOF skeleton can accommodate the huge volume change, buffer the mechanical stress caused by lithium ion insertion/extraction and maintain the structural integrity of the electrode and a long cycling stability. The ultrafine copper with a uniform size of around 5 nm and carbon with homogeneous distribution from the decomposition of the MOF skeleton can not only enhance the electrical conductivity of the composite and preserve the structural and interfacial stabilization, but also suppress the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and cushion the volume change. In consequence, the resulting material as an anode for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) delivers a reversible capacity of 495 mA h g-1 after 400 cycles at a current density of 500 mA g-1. The synthetic method presented in this paper provides a facile and low-cost strategy for the large-scale production of hollow silica/copper/carbon nanocomposites as an anode in LIBs.Hollow silica-copper-carbon (H-SCC) nanocomposites are first synthesized using copper metal-organic frameworks as skeletons to form Cu-MOF@SiO2 and then subjected to heat treatment. In the composites, the hollow structure and the void space from the collapse of the MOF skeleton can accommodate the huge volume change, buffer the mechanical stress caused by lithium ion insertion/extraction and maintain the structural integrity of the electrode and a long cycling stability. The ultrafine copper with a uniform size of around 5 nm and carbon with homogeneous distribution from the decomposition of the MOF skeleton can not only enhance the electrical conductivity of the composite and preserve the structural and interfacial stabilization, but also suppress the aggregation of silica nanoparticles and

  11. Energy efficient engine shroudless, hollow fan blade technology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, C. J.

    1981-01-01

    The Shroudless, Hollow Fan Blade Technology program was structured to support the design, fabrication, and subsequent evaluation of advanced hollow and shroudless blades for the Energy Efficient Engine fan component. Rockwell International was initially selected to produce hollow airfoil specimens employing the superplastic forming/diffusion bonding (SPF/DB) fabrication technique. Rockwell demonstrated that a titanium hollow structure could be fabricated utilizing SPF/DB manufacturing methods. However, some problems such as sharp internal cavity radii and unsatisfactory secondary bonding of the edge and root details prevented production of the required quantity of fatigue test specimens. Subsequently, TRW was selected to (1) produce hollow airfoil test specimens utilizing a laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bond approach, and (2) manufacture full-size hollow prototype fan blades utilizing the technology that evolved from the specimen fabrication effort. TRW established elements of blade design and defined laminate-core/hot isostatic press/diffusion bonding fabrication techniques to produce test specimens. This fabrication technology was utilized to produce full size hollow fan blades in which the HIP'ed parts were cambered/twisted/isothermally forged, finish machined, and delivered to Pratt & Whitney Aircraft and NASA for further evaluation.

  12. Hollow spherical carbonized polypyrrole/sulfur composite cathode materials for lithium/sulfur cells with long cycle life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongbao; Zhang, Shichao; Zhang, Lan; Lin, Ruoxu; Wu, Xiaomeng; Fang, Hua; Ren, Yanbiao

    2014-02-01

    Hollow carbonized polypyrrole (PPy) spheres are synthesized using poly(methyl methacrylate-ethyl acrylate-acrylic acid) latex spheres as sacrificial templates. The hollow spherical carbonized PPy/sulfur composite cathode materials are prepared by heating the mixture of hollow carbonized PPy spheres and element sulfur at 155 °C for 24 h. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations show the hollow structures of the carbonized PPy spheres and the homogeneous distribution of sulfur on the carbonized PPy shells. The hollow spherical carbonized PPy/sulfur composite with 60.9 wt.% S shows high specific capacity and excellent cycling stability when used as the cathode materials in lithium/sulfur cells, whose initial specific discharge capacity reaches as high as 1320 mA h g-1 and the reversible discharge capacity retains 758 mA h g-1 after 400 cycles at 0.2C. The excellent electrochemical properties benefit from the hollow structures and the flexible shells of the carbonized PPy spheres.

  13. Facile synthesis of magnetic mesoporous hollow carbon microspheres for rapid capture of low-concentration peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Zhou, Ming-Da; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-08-13

    Mesoporous and hollow carbon microspheres embedded with magnetic nanoparticles (denoted as MHM) were prepared via a facile self-sacrificial method for rapid capture of low-abundant peptides from complex biological samples. The morphology, structure, surface property, and magnetism were well-characterized. The hollow magnetic carbon microspheres have a saturation magnetization value of 130.2 emu g(-1) at room temperature and a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of 48.8 m(2) g(-1) with an average pore size of 9.2 nm for the mesoporous carbon shell. The effectiveness of these MHM affinity microspheres for capture of low-concentration peptides was evaluated by standard peptides, complex protein digests, and real biological samples. These multifunctional hollow carbon microspheres can realize rapid capture and convenient separation of low-concentration peptides. They were validated to have better performance than magnetic mesoporous silica and commercial peptide-enrichment products. In addition, they can be easily recycled and present excellent reusability. Therefore, it is expected that this work may provide a promising tool for high-throughput discovery of peptide biomarkers from biological samples for disease diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  14. Preparation of non-spherical hollow carbon nanocapsules from nickel nanoprecursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ray-Tung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng

    2012-08-01

    Hollow carbon nanocapsules (NCs) are prepared from nickel nanoplate precursors through carburizing, decomposition, and leaching steps. The carburizing step was carried out by heating the nickel nanoplates in oleylamine at 250 °C for 4 h. Decomposition was then performed in a nitrogen atmosphere at 530 °C for 3 min. Characterization of the resulting product of the first two steps shows the intermediates to be Ni3C/Ni-C alloy and Ni/C core-shell nanostructures. Hollow carbon NCs are recovered from the products by leaching the Ni/C core-shell nanostructures in concentrated nitric acid. The NCs are found to have a high specific surface area (1081 m2 g-1) and a mesoporous structure (i.e., a pore volume of 2.81 cm3/g and a narrow pore size distribution of 2.9-3.4 nm). In addition, it is found that the hollow carbon NCs retained the same morphology as the original nickel precursors; demonstrating the robustness of the nickel templates and the ability of the carbon shells to maintain a non-spherical shape.

  15. Copper induced hollow carbon nanospheres by arc discharge method: controlled synthesis and formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Alexandru Ciolan, Mihai; Wang, Xiangke; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    Hollow carbon nanospheres with controlled morphologies were synthesized via the copper-carbon direct current arc discharge method by alternating the concentrations of methane in the reactant gas mixture. A self-healing process to keep the structural integrity of encapsulated graphitic shells was evolved gradually by adding methane gas from 0% to 20%. The outer part of the coated layers expanded and hollow nanospheres grew to be large fluffy ones with high methane concentrations from 30% to 50%. A self-repairing function by the reattachment of broken graphitic layers initiated from near-electrode space to distance was also distinctly exhibited. By comparing several comparable metals (e.g. copper, silver, gold, zinc, iron and nickel)-carbon arc discharge products, a catalytic carbon-encapsulation mechanism combined with a core-escaping process has been proposed. Specifically, on the basis of the experimental results, copper could be applied as a unique model for both the catalysis of graphitic encapsulation and as an adequate template for the formation of hollow nanostructures.

  16. Hollow Electron Beam Collimator: R&D Status Report

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, G; Kuznetsov, G; Shiltsev, V; Valishev, A; Kabantsev, A; Vorobiev, L

    2012-01-01

    Magnetically confined hollow electron beams for controlled halo removal in high-energy colliders such as the Tevatron or the LHC may extend traditional collimation systems beyond the intensity limits imposed by tolerable material damage. They may also improve collimation performance by suppressing loss spikes due to beam jitter and by increasing capture efficiency. A hollow electron gun was designed and built. Its performance and stability were measured at the Fermilab test stand. The gun will be installed in one of the existing Tevatron electron lenses for preliminary tests of the hollow-beam collimator concept, addressing critical issues such as alignment and instabilities of the overlapping proton and electron beams.

  17. Solvothermal synthesis of superhydrophobic hollow carbon nanoparticles from a fluorinated alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyth, S. M.; Ma, W.; Liu, J.; Daio, T.; Sasaki, K.; Takahara, A.; Ameduri, B.

    2015-09-01

    A new and simple method of synthesizing fluorinated carbon at the gram scale is presented by reacting a fluorinated alcohol with sodium at elevated temperatures in a sealed Teflon reactor. The resulting carbon nanoparticles are around 100 nm in diameter, and display a hollow shell morphology, with a significant amount of fluorine doped into the carbon. The nanoparticles disperse easily in ethanol, and are thermally stable up to 400 °C and 450 °C under air and nitrogen, respectively. The nanoparticle dispersion was printed onto various substrates (paper, cloth, silicon), inducing superhydrophobicity.

  18. Three-dimensional porous hollow fibre copper electrodes for efficient and high-rate electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Recep; Hummadi, Khalid Khazzal; Kortlever, Ruud; de Wit, Patrick; Milbrat, Alexander; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W J; Benes, Nieck E; Koper, Marc T M; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous-phase electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide requires an active, earth-abundant electrocatalyst, as well as highly efficient mass transport. Here we report the design of a porous hollow fibre copper electrode with a compact three-dimensional geometry, which provides a large area, three-phase boundary for gas-liquid reactions. The performance of the copper electrode is significantly enhanced; at overpotentials between 200 and 400 mV, faradaic efficiencies for carbon dioxide reduction up to 85% are obtained. Moreover, the carbon monoxide formation rate is at least one order of magnitude larger when compared with state-of-the-art nanocrystalline copper electrodes. Copper hollow fibre electrodes can be prepared via a facile method that is compatible with existing large-scale production processes. The results of this study may inspire the development of new types of microtubular electrodes for electrochemical processes in which at least one gas-phase reactant is involved, such as in fuel cell technology.

  19. Three-dimensional porous hollow fibre copper electrodes for efficient and high-rate electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, Recep; Hummadi, Khalid Khazzal; Kortlever, Ruud; de Wit, Patrick; Milbrat, Alexander; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W. J.; Benes, Nieck E.; Koper, Marc T. M.; Mul, Guido

    2016-02-01

    Aqueous-phase electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide requires an active, earth-abundant electrocatalyst, as well as highly efficient mass transport. Here we report the design of a porous hollow fibre copper electrode with a compact three-dimensional geometry, which provides a large area, three-phase boundary for gas-liquid reactions. The performance of the copper electrode is significantly enhanced; at overpotentials between 200 and 400 mV, faradaic efficiencies for carbon dioxide reduction up to 85% are obtained. Moreover, the carbon monoxide formation rate is at least one order of magnitude larger when compared with state-of-the-art nanocrystalline copper electrodes. Copper hollow fibre electrodes can be prepared via a facile method that is compatible with existing large-scale production processes. The results of this study may inspire the development of new types of microtubular electrodes for electrochemical processes in which at least one gas-phase reactant is involved, such as in fuel cell technology.

  20. Fabrication of hollow carbon nanospheres encapsulating platinum nanoparticles using a photocatalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.H.; Ikeda, S.; Harada, T.; Matsumura, M. [Research Center for Solar Energy Chemistry, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka 560-8531 (Japan); Higashida, S. [Department of Industrial Chemistry, Osaka Prefectural College of Technology, 26-12 Saiwai, Neyagawa, Osaka 572-8572 (Japan); Sakata, T.; Mori, H. [Research Center for Ultra-High Voltage Electron Microscopy, Osaka University, 7-1, Mihogaoka, Ibaraki 567-0047 (Japan)

    2007-02-19

    The fabrication of Pt nanoparticles encapsulated in hollow carbon nanospheres using TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as both the photocatalyst and the inorganic mold is demonstrated. These spheres are found to have high surface area and ultrathin shells with well-developed microporosity, and thus can be used as catalysts. This new imprinting method can be used to synthesize any desired nanostructures using predesigned TiO{sub 2} photocatalysts. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  1. High capacitive performance of hollow activated carbon fibers derived from willow catkins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Song, Yan; Yan, Rui; Zhao, Ning; Tian, Xiaodong; Li, Xiao; Guo, Quangui; Liu, Zhanjun

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we prepared three different kinds of hollow activated carbon fibers (HACFs) from willow catkins (WCs), phenolic- and pitch-based hollow fibers, respectively. The morphology, pore structure, surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of these hollow fibers were studied in parallel. Due to its high-hollow, cost-effective as well as eco-friendly nature, HACFs derived from WCs can be served as excellent electrode materials for electrochemical energy storage devices. Electrochemical measurements illustrate that the WCs derived HACFs exhibit not only high specific capacitance of 333 F g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 but also considerable rate capability with a retention of 62.7% (209 F g-1 at 10 A g-1). Symmetric supercapacitor devices that using WCs derived HACFs as electrodes deliver a maximum energy density of ∼8.8 Wh kg-1 at power density of 50 W kg-1 and good cycling performance with 95.5% retention over 3000 cycles at 5 A g-1 in 6 M KOH aqueous electrolytes.

  2. Narrow-linewidth carbon nanotube emission in silicon hollow-core photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thi Hong Cam; Durán-Valdeiglesias, Elena; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos; Serna, Samuel; Zhang, Weiwei; Balestrieri, Matteo; Keita, Al-Saleh; Caselli, Niccolò; Biccari, Francesco; Le Roux, Xavier; Filoramo, Arianna; Gurioli, Massimo; Vivien, Laurent; Cassan, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Polymer-sorted semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) provide room-temperature emission at near-infrared wavelengths, with potential for large volume production of high-quality solutions and wafer-scale deposition. These features make SWNTs a very attractive material for the realization of on-chip light sources. Coupling SWNT into optical microcavities could enhance and guide their emission, while enabling spectral selection by cavity resonance engineering. This could allow the realization of bright, narrowband sources. Here, we report the first demonstration of coupling SWNTs into the resonant modes of Si hollow-core photonic crystal cavities. We exploit the strong evanescent field in these resonators to interact with SWNT emission, coupling it into an integrated access waveguide. Based on this concept, we demonstrate narrowband SWNT emission resonantly coupled into a Si bus waveguide with a full width at half-maximum of 0.34 nm and an off-resonance rejection exceeding 5 dB.

  3. Facile Synthesis and Photocatalytic Property of Titania/Carbon Composite Hollow Microspheres with Bimodal Mesoporous Shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Titania/carbon composite hollow microspheres with bimodal mesoporous shells are one-pot fabricated by hydrothermal treatment of the acidic (NH42TiF6 aqueous solution in the presence of glucose at 180∘C for 24 h and then calcined at 450∘C. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM, UV-visible spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples was evaluated by daylight-induced photocatalytic decolorization of methyl orange aqueous solution at ambient temperature. The effects of calcination time on the morphology, phase structure, crystallite size, specific surface area, pore structures, and photocatalytic activity of the microspheres were investigated. The results indicated that the as-obtained TiO2/C composite hollow spheres generally exhibit bimodal mesopore size distribution with their peak intra-aggregated mesopore size in the range of 2.3–4.5 nm and peak interaggregated mesopore size in the range of 5.7–12.7 nm, depending on specific calcination time. The daylight-induced photoactivity of as-obtained hollow TiO2/C microspheres generally exceeds that of Degussa P25. The influences of calcination time on the photoactivity are discussed in terms of carbon content, phase structures, and pore structures.

  4. Preparation and electrochemical properties of carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bin-bin; Wu, Yan-bo; Yu, Fang-yuan; Zhou, Ya-nan

    2016-04-01

    Carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries were obtained by coaxial electrospinning. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area analysis, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to investigate the crystalline structure, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the as-prepared hollow nanofibers. The results indicate that the carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers have good long-term cycling performance and good rate capability: at a current density of 0.2C (1.0C = 170 mA·g-1) in the voltage range of 2.5-4.2 V, the cathode materials achieve an initial discharge specific capacity of 153.16 mAh·g-1 with a first charge-discharge coulombic efficiency of more than 97%, as well as a high capacity retention of 99% after 10 cycles; moreover, the materials can retain a specific capacity of 135.68 mAh·g-1, even at 2C.

  5. Preparation and electrochemical properties of carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin-bin Wei; Yan-bo Wu; Fang-yuan Yu; Ya-nan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers as cathode materials for Li-ion batteries were obtained by coaxial electrospinning. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface area analysis, galvanostatic charge–discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were employed to investigate the crystalline structure, morphology, and electrochemical performance of the as-prepared hollow nanofibers. The results indicate that the carbon-coated LiFePO4 hollow nanofibers have good long-term cycling performance and good rate capability:at a current density of 0.2C (1.0C=170 mA·g−1) in the voltage range of 2.5–4.2 V, the cathode materials achieve an initial discharge specific capacity of 153.16 mAh·g−1 with a first charge–discharge coulombic efficiency of more than 97%, as well as a high capacity retention of 99%after 10 cycles;moreover, the materi-als can retain a specific capacity of 135.68 mAh·g−1, even at 2C.

  6. Carbon supported trimetallic nickel-palladium-gold hollow nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Changshuai; Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, Ni nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared in an aqueous solution by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. With Ni NPs as the sacrificial template, hollow NiPdAu NPs are successfully prepared via partly galvanic displacement reaction between suitable metal precursors and Ni NPs. The as-synthesized hollow NiPdAu NPs can well dispersed on the carbon substrate. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are taken to analyze the morphology, structure and composition of the as-synthesized catalysts. The prepared catalysts show superior catalytic activity and stability for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline media compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C. Catalysts prepared in this work show great potential to be anode catalysts in direct methanol fuel cells.

  7. Uniform Li2S precipitation on N,O-codoped porous hollow carbon fibers for high-energy-density lithium-sulfur batteries with superior stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qie, Long; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2016-09-21

    A lithium-polysulfide cell with superior stability is reported with N,O-codoped carbon hollow fiber (NCHF) sheets as a current collector. Due to the highly effective chemisorption and physical adsorption of lithium polysulfides on doped NCHF and a uniform Li2S precipitation during cycling, the Li2S6-impregnated NCHF electrodes exhibit high sulfur utilization and superior cycling stability even with a high areal sulfur loading of 6.2 mg cm(-2).

  8. Separation of hydrogen from carbon monoxide using a hollow fiber polyimide membrane: experimental and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, M.; Mehdi Kamali, S.; Mahdeyarfar, M.; Mohammadi, T. [Research Laboratory for Separation Processes, Chemical Engineering Department, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-10-15

    The separation of hydrogen from carbon monoxide (syngas ratio adjustment) with polymeric membranes was investigated in this work. A polyimide hollow fiber membrane module was used for hydrogen separation. This polymer has shown large permeability and selectivity for hydrogen separation (selectivity of ca. 30). Permeation tests were carried out at different feed conditions. Feed flow rates were varied between 150-300 mL/min, temperature was varied in the range of 20-80 C and feed pressure was varied between 5-9 bar. Mixtures containing 0-50 % carbon monoxide were used when carrying out experiments. Measured membrane permeances for hydrogen and carbon monoxide were about 70-100 GPU (gas permeation units) and 3-5.5 GPU, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model for simulation of gas separation in hollow fiber membrane modules with all flow patterns (crossflow, countercurrent and cocurrent) was presented. This model can be used for calculation of membrane performance or its required surface area for a specific separation. Experimental results have shown good correlation with simulation results. Plasticization, competitive sorption and concentration polarization effect of carbon monoxide on membrane performance is shown with experimental results. This effect reduced hydrogen permeances in mixed gas experiments. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for High-Performance Li-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yufen; Jin, Song; Zhang, Zhen; Du, Zhenzhen; Liu, Huarong; Yang, Jia; Xu, Hangxun; Ji, Hengxing

    2017-04-26

    N-doped carbon materials is of particular attraction for anodes of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of their high surface areas, superior electrical conductivity, and excellent mechanical strength, which can store energy by adsorption/desorption of Li(+) at the interfaces between the electrolyte and electrode. By directly carbonization of zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 nanospheres synthesized by an emulsion-based interfacial reaction, we obtained N-doped hollow carbon nanospheres with tunable shell thickness (20 nm to solid sphere) and different N dopant concentrations (3.9 to 21.7 at %). The optimized anode material possessed a shell thickness of 20 nm and contained 16.6 at % N dopants that were predominately pyridinic and pyrrolic. The anode delivered a specific capacity of 2053 mA h g(-1) at 100 mA g(-1) and 879 mA h g(-1) at 5 A g(-1) for 1000 cycles, implying a superior cycling stability. The improved electrochemical performance can be ascribed to (1) the Li(+) adsorption dominated energy storage mechanism prevents the volume change of the electrode materials, (2) the hollow nanostructure assembled by the nanometer-sized primary particles prevents the agglomeration of the nanoparticles and favors for Li(+) diffusion, (3) the optimized N dopant concentration and configuration facilitate the adsorption of Li(+); and (4) the graphitic carbon nanostructure ensures a good electrical conductivity.

  10. Carbon Hollow Microspheres with a Designable Mesoporous Shell for High-Performance Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hailong; Yin, Xiaowei; Zhu, Meng; Han, Meikang; Hou, Zexin; Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2017-02-22

    In this work, mesoporous carbon hollow microspheres (PCHMs) with designable mesoporous shell and interior void are constructed by a facile in situ stöber templating approach and a pyrolysis-etching process. The PCHMs are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra, Raman spectroscopy, and nitrogen adsorption and desorption system. A uniform mesoporous shell (pore size 4.7 nm) with a thickness of 55 nm and a cavity size of 345 nm is realized. The composite of paraffin mixed with 20 wt % PCHMs exhibits a minimum reflection coefficient (RCmin) of -84 dB at 8.2 GHz with a sample thickness of 3.9 mm and an effective absorption bandwidth (EAB) of 4.8 GHz below -10 dB (>90% electromagnetic wave is attenuated). Moreover, the composite of phenolic resin mixed with 20 wt % PCHMs exhibits an ultrawide EAB of 8 GHz below -10 dB with a thinner thickness of 2.15 mm. Such excellent electromagnetic wave absorption properties are ascribed to the large carbon-air interface in the mesoporous shell and interior void, which is favorable for the matching of characteristic impedance as compared with carbon hollow microspheres and carbon solid microspheres. Considering the excellent performance of PCHMs, we believe the as-fabricated PCHMs can be promising candidates as highly effective microwave absorbers, and the design philosophy can be extended to other spherical absorbers.

  11. Tailoring Pore Size of Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for Confi ning Sulfur in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Weidong [General Motors Global Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States); Wang, Chong M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Quiglin [General Motors Global Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States); Abruna, Hector D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); He, Yang [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wang, Jiangwei [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Mao, Scott X. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Xiao, Xingcheng [General Motors Global Research and Development Center, Warren, MI (United States)

    2015-08-19

    Three types of nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres with different pore sized porous shells are prepared to investigate the performance of sulfur confinement. The reason that why no sulfur is observed in previous research is determined and it is successfully demonstrated that the sulfur/polysulfide will overflow the porous carbon during the lithiation process.

  12. Nitrogen-enriched, double-shelled carbon/layered double hydroxide hollow microspheres for excellent electrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; He, Fei; Gai, Shili; Zhang, Shenghuan; Li, Lei; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-08-01

    A unique, double-shelled, hollow, carbon-based composite with enriched nitrogen has been prepared through a facile and versatile synthetic strategy. The hierarchical composite employs the nitrogen-enriched carbon hollow sphere as an interior shell and intercrossed Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets as an exterior shell. The obtained N-C@LDH hollow microspheres (HMS) have high nitrogen enrichment, large specific surface area (337 m2 g-1), and uniform and open mesoporous structure. Taking advantage of these characteristics, the composite exhibits obviously superior capacitive behavior, including high specific capacitance, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability, compared with nitrogen-free carbon@LDH composite and hollow LDH without carbon shell. The composite displays high specific capacitance of 1711.51 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1. In particular, the high specific capacitance can be kept to 997.3 F g-1 at a high current density of 10 A g-1, which still retains 94.97% of the initial specific capacitance after 500 cycles at this high current density. This N-enriched, hollow carbon/LDH composite can be expected to be a promising electrode material for electrochemical capacitors due to its high electrochemical performance.A unique, double-shelled, hollow, carbon-based composite with enriched nitrogen has been prepared through a facile and versatile synthetic strategy. The hierarchical composite employs the nitrogen-enriched carbon hollow sphere as an interior shell and intercrossed Ni/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets as an exterior shell. The obtained N-C@LDH hollow microspheres (HMS) have high nitrogen enrichment, large specific surface area (337 m2 g-1), and uniform and open mesoporous structure. Taking advantage of these characteristics, the composite exhibits obviously superior capacitive behavior, including high specific capacitance, excellent rate capability and good cycling stability, compared with nitrogen

  13. Matrimid® derived carbon molecular sieve hollow fiber membranes for ethylene/ethane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren

    2011-09-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes have shown promising separation performance compared to conventional polymeric membranes. Translating the very attractive separation properties from dense films to hollow fibers is important for applying CMS materials in realistic gas separations. The very challenging ethylene/ethane separation is the primary target of this work. Matrimid® derived CMS hollow fiber membranes have been investigated in this work. Resultant CMS fiber showed interesting separation performance for several gas pairs, especially high selectivity for C2H4/C2H6. Our comparative study between dense film and hollow fiber revealed very similar selectivity for both configurations; however, a significant difference exists in the effective separation layer thickness between precursor fibers and their resultant CMS fibers. SEM results showed that the deviation was essentially due to the collapse of the porous substructure of the precursor fiber. Polymer chain flexibility (relatively low glass transition temperature (Tg) for Matrimid® relative to actual CMS formation) appears to be the fundamental cause of substructure collapse. This collapse phenomenon must be addressed in all cases involving intense heat-treatment near or above Tg. We also found that the defect-free property of the precursor fiber was not a simple predictor of CMS fiber performance. Even some precursor fibers with Knudsen diffusion selectivity could be transformed into highly selective CMS fibers for the Matrimid® precursor. To overcome the permeance loss problem caused by substructure collapse, several engineering approaches were considered. Mixed gas permeation results under realistic conditions demonstrate the excellent performance of CMS hollow fiber membrane for the challenging ethylene/ethane separation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Hollow Carbon Nanobubbles: Synthesis, Chemical Functionalization, and Container-Type Behavior in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Corinne J; Grass, Robert N; Zeltner, Martin; Mora, Carlos A; Krumeich, Frank; Stark, Wendelin J

    2016-07-18

    Thin-walled, hollow carbon nanospheres with a hydrophobic interior and good water dispersability can be synthesized in two steps: First, metal nanoparticles, coated with a few layers of graphene-like carbon, are selectively modified on the outside with a covalently attached hydrophilic polymer. Second, the metal core is removed at elevated temperature treatment with acid, leaving a well-defined carbon-based hydrophobic cavity. Loading experiments with the dye rhodamine B and doxorubicin confirmed the filling and release of a cargo and adjustment of a dynamic equilibrium (cargo-loaded versus release). Rhodamine B preferably accumulates in the interior of the bubbles. Filled nanobubbles allowed constant dye release into pure water. Studies of the concentration-dependent loading and release show an unusual hysteresis.

  15. Field emission from entangled carbon nanotubes coated on/in a hollow metallic tube

    CERN Document Server

    Tokura, Y; Ohigashi, N; Akita, S; Nakayama, Y; Imasaki, K; Mima, K; Nakai, S

    2001-01-01

    Field emission properties of entangled carbon nanotubes were studied for an electron beam source of Cherenkov or Smith-Purcell free electron laser. The cathode was made of carbon nanotubes which were mixed with a very small amount of resin and coated on/in a hollow metallic tube with outer diameter of 0.5 mm. The emission current was as high as 2.2 mA with a fluctuation of <4%. It seems that some entangled nanotubes were frayed under the high electric field and then electrons were emitted mainly from their tips. Reduction of the work function of the carbon nanotubes was observed with the degradation of vacuum pressure in the experimental apparatus.

  16. Carbon nanotube/raspberry hollow Pd nanosphere hybrids for methanol, ethanol, and formic acid electro-oxidation in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhelin; Zhao, Bo; Guo, Cunlan; Sun, Yujing; Shi, Yan; Yang, Haibin; Li, Zhuang

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, raspberry hollow Pd nanospheres (HPNs)-decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) was developed for electro-oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and formic acid in alkaline media. The electrocatalyst was fabricated simply by attaching HPNs onto the surface of CNT which had been functionalized by polymer wrapping. The as-prepared HPN-CNTs (CHPNs) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The increasing interest and intensive research on fuel cell inspire us to investigate the electrocatalytic properties of the prepared nanostructures. Besides that, previous reports about alkaline other than acidic media could supply a more active environment guide us to examine the electrocatalytic properties in alkaline electrolyte. It is found that this novel hybrid electrocatalyst exhibits excellent electrocatalytic properties and can be further applied in fuel cells, catalysts, and sensors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A sulfur host based on titanium monoxide@carbon hollow spheres for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jintao; Guan, Buyuan; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show advantages for next-generation electrical energy storage due to their high energy density and cost effectiveness. Enhancing the conductivity of the sulfur cathode and moderating the dissolution of lithium polysulfides are two key factors for the success of lithium-sulfur batteries. Here we report a sulfur host that overcomes both obstacles at once. With inherent metallic conductivity and strong adsorption capability for lithium-polysulfides, titanium monoxide@carbon hollow nanospheres can not only generate sufficient electrical contact to the insulating sulfur for high capacity, but also effectively confine lithium-polysulfides for prolonged cycle life. Additionally, the designed composite cathode further maximizes the lithium-polysulfide restriction capability by using the polar shells to prevent their outward diffusion, which avoids the need for chemically bonding all lithium-polysulfides on the surfaces of polar particles.

  18. Bench Scale Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Bhandari, Dhaval [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Narang, Kristi [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); McCloskey, Pat [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Singh, Surinder [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Ananthasayanam, Balajee [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Howson, Paul [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Lee, Julia [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Wroczynski, Ron [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States); Stewart, Frederick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Orme, Christopher [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Klaehn, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McNally, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rownaghi, Ali [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lu, Liu [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goizueta, Roberto [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sethi, Vijay [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

    2015-04-01

    GE Global Research, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and Western Research Institute (WRI) proposed to develop high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project sought to develop and then optimize new gas separations membrane systems at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel polyphosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project also sought to define the processes needed to coat the fiber support to manufacture composite hollow fiber membranes with high performance, ultra-thin separation layers. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components was considered via exposure and performance tests. Preliminary design, technoeconomic, and economic feasibility analyses were conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE) for a coal-fired plant including capture technologies. At the onset of the project, Membranes based on coupling a novel selective material polyphosphazene with an engineered hollow fiber support was found to have the potential to capture greater than 90% of the CO2 in flue gas with less than 35% increase in COE, which would achieve the DOE-targeted performance criteria. While lab-scale results for the polyphosphazene materials were very promising, and the material was incorporated into hollow-fiber modules, difficulties were encountered relating to the performance of these membrane systems over time. Performance, as measured by both flux of and selectivity for CO2 over other flue gas constituents was found to deteriorate over time, suggesting a system that was

  19. Stable isotopic composition of pedogenic carbonate in soils of Minusinsk Hollow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'chuk, Jessica; Krechetov, Pavel; Budantseva, Nadine; Chizhova, Julia; Vasil'chuk, Yurij

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of the research is to characterize the isotopic composition of carbonate neoformations in soils and estimate its correlation with isotopic composition of water and parent material. The study site is located in the Minusinsk Hollow that is situated among Kuznetsk Alatau and Sayan Mountains. Three key-sites with in different parts of hollow, under mainly steppe vegetation with calciphilic grasses and diverse parent material were studied including: 1) Kazanovka Khakass state national reserve in foothills of Kuznetsk Alatau 2) Hankul salt lake that is considered as natural monument 3) region of Sayanogorsk aluminum smelter on a left bank of the Yenisei river. The samples of pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates as well as water samples were analyzed using the Delta-V mass spectrometer with a standard option of a gas bench according to standard methods. Carbonate coatings (also called pendants or cutans) is one of the most common types of carbonate neoformations occurring in the region. Fine coatings' layers one over another usually can be found on the bottom sides of rubble and gravel inside the soil profile colour varies from white to brownish and yellowish (probably depending on the impurities of organic matter). In Petric Calcisols, Chernozems and Kastanozems δ18O values of coatings vary in a rather small range from - 8.9 to - 10.1 ‰ PDB. This probably shows that their forming took place approximately in the same climatic conditions. While δ18O values of carbonate parent rocks are close to them and are vary from - 11.1 to - 11.9 ‰ PDB. Also, δ13C values of coatings strongly decrease from inner (older) to outer (younger) layers, that can indicate differences connected with the diffusion of organic material. River waters' δ18O values also show a small range from - 16.62 to - 17.66‰ SMOW, while salt lakes' waters due to the fractionation evaporation effects demonstrate much heavier values from - 4.73 to - 9.22‰ SMOW. The groundwater shows δ18O

  20. Erythrocyte-like hollow carbon capsules and their application in proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Yu, Jong-Sung

    2010-12-14

    Hierarchical nanostructured erythrocyte-like hollow carbon (EHC) with a hollow hemispherical macroporous core of ca. 230 nm in diameter and 30-40 nm thick mesoporous shell was synthesized and explored as a cathode catalyst support in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The morphology control of EHC was successfully achieved using solid core/mesoporous shell (SCMS) silica template and different styrene/furfuryl alcohol mixture compositions by a nanocasting method. The EHC-supported Pt (20 wt%) cathodes prepared have demonstrated markedly enhanced catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) and greatly improved PEMFC polarization performance compared to carbon black Vulcan XC-72 (VC)-supported ones, probably due to the superb structural characteristics of the EHC such as uniform size, well-developed porosity, large specific surface area and pore volume. In particular, Pt/EHC cathodes exhibited ca. 30-60% higher ORR activity than a commercial Johnson Matthey Pt catalyst at a low catalyst loading of 0.2 mg Pt cm(-2).

  1. Mesoporous hollow carbon spheres for lithium–sulfur batteries: distribution of sulfur and electrochemical performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika C. Juhl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hollow carbon spheres (HCS with a nanoporous shell are promising for the use in lithium–sulfur batteries because of the large internal void offering space for sulfur and polysulfide storage and confinement. However, there is an ongoing discussion whether the cavity is accessible for sulfur. Yet no valid proof of cavity filling has been presented, mostly due to application of unsuitable high-vacuum methods for the analysis of sulfur distribution. Here we describe the distribution of sulfur in hollow carbon spheres by powder X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy along with results from scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen physisorption. The results of these methods lead to the conclusion that the cavity is not accessible for sulfur infiltration. Nevertheless, HCS/sulfur composite cathodes with areal sulfur loadings of 2.0 mg·cm−2 were investigated electrochemically, showing stable cycling performance with specific capacities of about 500 mAh·g−1 based on the mass of sulfur over 500 cycles.

  2. Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

  3. Diamond-Like Carbon Film Deposition Using DC Ion Source with Cold Hollow Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Shevchenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon diamond-like thin films on a silicon substrate were deposited by direct reactive ion beam method with an ion source based on Penning direct-current discharge system with cold hollow cathode. Deposition was performed under various conditions. The pressure (12–200 mPa and the plasma-forming gas composition consisting of different organic compounds and hydrogen (C3H8, CH4, Si(CH32Cl2, H2, the voltage of accelerating gap in the range 0.5–5 kV, and the substrate temperature in the range 20–850°C were varied. Synthesized films were researched using nanoindentation, Raman, and FTIR spectroscopy methods. Analysis of the experimental results was made in accordance with a developed model describing processes of growth of the amorphous and crystalline carbon materials.

  4. Supercapacitor Performance of Hollow Carbon Spheres by Direct Pyrolysis of Melamine-formaldehyde Resin Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Fang-wei; SUN Li-ping; ZHAO Hui; LI Qiang; HUO Li-hua; XIA Tian; GAO Shan

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen and oxygen co-doped hollow carbon spheres(HCSs) were prepared via a simple pyrolysis of solid melamine-formaldhyde resin spheres.The carbonization temperature has an important influence on the specific surface area,pore-size distribution and heteroatom contents of HCSs.The synergistic effects of those physical and chemical properties on supercapacitor performance were systematically investigated.Among the HCSs obtained at different temperatures,HCSs-800(co-doped HCSs at 800 ℃) exhibits the best reversible specific capacitance in 2 mol/L H2SO4 electrolyte and meanwhile maintains a high-class capacitance retention capability.The nitrogen heteroatoms were confirmed to play a crucial role in improving capacitance in an acid medium.This kind of nitrogen doped HCSs is a potential candidate for an efficient electrode material for supercapacitors.

  5. Silicon nanoparticles encapsulated in hollow graphitized carbon nanofibers for lithium ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Junhua; Yee, Wu Aik; Wei, Yuefan; Yang, Liping; Ang, Jia Ming; Phua, Si Lei; Wong, Siew Yee; Zhou, Rui; Dong, Yuliang; Li, Xu; Lu, Xuehong

    2013-03-01

    Silicon (Si) is a promising material for lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes due to its high specific capacity. To overcome its shortcomings such as insulation property and large volume change during the charge-discharge process, a novel hybrid system, Si nanoparticles encapsulated in hollow graphitized carbon nanofibers, is studied. First, electrospun polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-Si hybrid nanofibers were obtained using water as the collector. The loose nanofiber lumps suspended in water have large inter-fiber distance, allowing in situ coating of a thin layer of polydopamine (PDA), the source for graphitized carbon, uniformly throughout the system. The designed morphology and structure were then realized by etching and calcination, and the morphology and structure were subsequently verified by various analytical techniques. Electrochemical measurements show that the resulting hollow hybrid nanofibers (C-PDA-Si NFs) exhibit much better cycling stability and rate capacity than conventional C/Si nanofibers derived by electrospinning of PAN-Si followed by calcination. For instance, the capacity of C-PDA-Si NFs is as high as 72.6% of the theoretical capacity after 50 cycles, and a high capacity of 500 mA h g-1 can be delivered at a current density of 5 A g-1. The significantly improved electrochemical properties of C-PDA-Si NFs are due to the excellent electrical conductivity of the carbonized PDA (C-PDA) shell that compensates for the insulation property of Si, the high electrochemical activity of C-PDA, which has a layered structure and is N-doped, the hollow nature of the nanofibers and small size of Si nanoparticles that ensure smooth insertion-extraction of lithium ions and more complete alloying with them, as well as the buffering effect of the remaining PAN-derived carbon around the Si nanoparticles, which stabilizes the structure.Silicon (Si) is a promising material for lithium ion battery (LIB) anodes due to its high specific capacity. To overcome its shortcomings

  6. Mesoporous hollow nanospheres consisting of carbon coated silica nanoparticles for robust lithium-ion battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weili; Fu, Jijiang; Su, Jianjun; Wang, Lei; Peng, Xiang; Wu, Kai; Chen, Qiuyun; Bi, Yajun; Gao, Biao; Zhang, Xuming

    2017-03-01

    SiO2 as lithium ion batteries (LIBs) anode has drawn considerable attentions because of its low cost, high theoretical specific capacity and low discharge potentials but been limited by its low conductivity and electrochemical kinetics, resulting in obvious capacity decay and poor rate performance. Herein, we developed a simple approach to synthesize mesoporous hollow nanosphere (MHSiO2@C) assembled by conformal carbon coating tiny silica nanoparticles through chemical polymerization of dopamine inside the shell of MHSiO2. The continuous carbon can conformally coat on the surface of all primary SiO2 nanoparticles in the shell, which not only enhances the conductivity but also improves the structural stability of the MHSiO2. Compared to raw MHSiO2 and non-conformal carbon coated MHSiO2, the MHSiO2@C demonstrate a high reversible capacity of 440.7 mA h g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1 after 500 cycles and excellent rate performance due to synergetic effect of special structure of MHSiO2 and carbon conformal coating on each silica nanoparticle. Such a special structure will be a promising platform for LIBs. Significantly, this paper offers a direct evidence to prove the advantage of conformal carbon coating and provides consequentially guide in improving the energy storage performance of low-conductivity oxide based electrode materials.

  7. Controllable synthesis of nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres using ionic liquids as template for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aibing; Li, Yunqian; Liu, Lei; Yu, Yifeng; Xia, Kechan; Wang, Yuying; Li, Shuhui

    2017-01-01

    We have demonstrated a facile and controllable synthesis of monodispersed nitrogen-doped hollow mesoporous carbon spheres (N-HMCSs) using resorcinol/formaldehyde resin as a carbon precursor, tetraethyl orthosilicate as a structure-assistant agent, ionic liquids (ILs) as soft template, partial carbon sources, and nitrogen sources. The sizes and the architectures including hollow and yolk-shell of resultant carbon spheres can be efficiently controlled through the adjustment of the content of ILs. Alkyl chain length of the ILs also has an important effect on the formation of N-HMCSs. With proper alkyl chain length and content of ILs, the resultant N-HMCSs show monodispersed hollow spheres with high surface areas (up to 1158 m2 g-1), large pore volumes (up to 1.70 cm3 g-1), and uniform mesopore size (5.0 nm). Combining the hollow mesoporous structure, high porosity, large surface area, and nitrogen functionality, the as-synthesized N-HMCSs have good supercapacitor performance with good capacitance (up to 159 F g-1) and favorable capacitance retention (88% capacitive retention after 5000 cycles).

  8. Different distribution of in-situ thin carbon layer in hollow cobalt sulfide nanocages and their application for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Meng; Lu, Shi-Yu; Ma, Li; Gan, Meng-Yu; Lei, Yao; Zhang, Xiu-Ling; Fu, Gang; Yang, Pei-Shu; Yan, Mao-Fa

    2017-02-01

    Recently, cobalt sulfides emerge as a candidate for energy reserve and conversation. However, the problem of poor stability and low rate capability for cobalt sulfides restrict its practical application. Thin carbon layer (TCL) coated has been regarded as a promising constructing strategy for high performance supercapacitors, because TCL can promote the tremendous properties of bare materials. In this literature, we report a very interesting phenomenon that different distribution of in-situ carbon coated hollow CoS2 nanocages (external and both external and interior) can be synthesized only by adjusting sulfuration time, followed by calcination. Moreover, it is clearly observed that CoS2-C@TCL exhibits significant improvement for specific capacitance and good stability (better than CoS2@TCL and CoS2). These results compel us to design a series of experiments to figure out the reason and the more detailed mechanism is discussed in paper. More importantly, it will provide a new strategy for synthesis of special structure with in-situ carbon coated sulfide for energy conversion.

  9. Controllable modification of nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell and its application as templates in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaona; Xia, Min; Yan, Qingzhi; Ge, Changchun

    2016-10-01

    Controllable modification of hydrophilic groups on tubular nanostructured carbon with hollow macroporous core/mesoporous shell (TNC-HMC/MS) was systematically studied and the mesoporous structure of TNC-HMC/MS has been kept. Different oxidants were used to modify the TNC-HMC/MS. Results revealed that the TNC-HMC/MS could be modified with carboxyl or hydroxy by different oxidants. More importantly, the BET/BJH results indicated that the mesoporous shell of TNC-HMC/MS has not been destroyed. In addition, water-soluble ammonium metatungstate has been encapsulated into the hollow core of TNC-HMC/MS and formed nanodot, bamboo-like and nanowire morphology.

  10. A Pilot-Scale System for Carbon Molecular Sieve Hollow Fiber Membrane Manufacturing

    KAUST Repository

    Karvan, O.

    2012-12-21

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes offer advantages over traditional polymeric membrane materials, but scale-up of manufacturing systems has not received much attention. In the recent decade, there has been a dramatic increase in fundamental research on these materials with a variety of applications being studied. The results from a pilot-scale CMS production system are presented. This system was designed based on extensive laboratory research, and hollow fiber membranes produced in this system show similar performance compared to membranes produced using a smaller bench-scale system. After optimizing the system design, a 93% recovery of the precursor fibers for use in membrane module preparation were obtained. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Modeling and parametric analysis of hollow fiber membrane system for carbon capture from multicomponent flue gas

    KAUST Repository

    Khalilpour, Rajab

    2011-08-12

    The modeling and optimal design/operation of gas membranes for postcombustion carbon capture (PCC) is presented. A systematic methodology is presented for analysis of membrane systems considering multicomponent flue gas with CO 2 as target component. Simplifying assumptions is avoided by namely multicomponent flue gas represented by CO 2/N 2 binary mixture or considering the co/countercurrent flow pattern of hollow-fiber membrane system as mixed flow. Optimal regions of flue gas pressures and membrane area were found within which a technoeconomical process system design could be carried out. High selectivity was found to not necessarily have notable impact on PCC membrane performance, rather, a medium selectivity combined with medium or high permeance could be more advantageous. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  12. Encapsulation of fish oil into hollow solid lipid micro- and nanoparticles using carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junsi; Ciftci, Ozan Nazim

    2017-09-15

    Fish oil was encapsulated in hollow solid lipid micro- and nanoparticles formed from fully hydrogenated soybean oil (FHSO) using a novel green method based on atomization of supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2)-expanded lipid. The highest fish oil loading efficiency (97.5%, w/w) was achieved at 50%, w/w, initial fish oil concentration. All particles were spherical and in the dry free-flowing form; however, less smooth surface with wrinkles was observed when the initial fish oil concentration was increased up to 50%. With increasing initial fish oil concentration, melting point of the fish oil-loaded particles shifted to lower onset melting temperatures, and major polymorphic form transformed from α to β and/or β'. Oxidative stability of the loaded fish oil was significantly increased compared to the free fish oil (poil formulation, which makes the handling and storage feasible and convenient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. C3 as the dominant carbon cluster in high pressure discharges in graphite hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Khan, Sabih-ud-Din; Khalid, Rahila; Aleem, Abid; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2007-03-01

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C3 is the main feature but C4 and C5 are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C2 is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C3 is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C3 is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  14. Superior Electrochemical Properties of Nanofibers Composed of Hollow CoFe2 O4 Nanospheres Covered with Onion-Like Graphitic Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Jun; Cho, Jung Sang; Kang, Yun Chan

    2015-12-07

    Nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon are prepared by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to the electrospinning process. Amorphous carbon nanofibers embedded with CoFe2 @onion-like carbon nanospheres are prepared by reduction of the electrospun nanofibers. Oxidation of the CoFe2 -C nanofibers at 300 °C under a normal atmosphere produces porous nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon. CoFe2 nanocrystals are transformed into the hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres during oxidation through a well-known nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process. The discharge capacities of the carbon-free CoFe2 O4 nanofibers composed of hollow nanospheres and the nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon are 340 and 930 mA h g(-1) , respectively, for the 1000th cycle at a current density of 1 A g(-1) . The nanofibers composed of hollow CoFe2 O4 nanospheres covered with onion-like carbon exhibit an excellent rate performance even in the absence of conductive materials.

  15. Hollow mesoporous carbon as a near-infrared absorbing carrier compared with mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for chemo-photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian; Yan, Yue; Lin, Yuanzhe; Jiao, Jian; Wang, Da; Di, Donghua; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Tongying; Zhao, Qinfu; Wang, Siling

    2017-05-15

    In this study, hollow mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (HMCN) and mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCN) were used as near-infrared region (NIR) nanomaterials and drug nanocarriers were prepared using different methods. A comparison between HMCN and MCN was performed with regard to the NIR-induced photothermal effect and drug loading efficiency. The results of NIR-induced photothermal effect test demonstrated that HMCN-COOH had a better photothermal conversion efficacy than MCN-COOH. Given the prominent photothermal effect of HMCN-COOH in vitro, the chemotherapeutic drug DOX was chosen as a model drug to further evaluate the drug loading efficiencies and NIR-triggered drug release behaviors of the nanocarriers. The drug loading efficiency of DOX/HMCN-COOH was found to be up to 76.9%, which was higher than that of DOX/MCN-COOH. In addition, the use of an 808nm NIR laser markedly increased the release of DOX from both carbon carriers in pH 5.0 PBS and pH 7.4 PBS. Cellular photothermal tests involving A549 cells demonstrated that HMCN-COOH had a much higher photothermal efficacy than MCN-COOH. Cell viability experiments and flow cytometry were performed to evaluate the therapeutic effect of DOX/HMCN-COOH and the results obtained demonstrated that DOX/HMCN-COOH had a synergistic therapeutic effect in cancer treatment involving a combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy.

  16. Macro-mesoporous hollow carbon spheres as anodes for lithium-ion batteries with high rate capability and excellent cycling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinyang; Sun, Wang; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fang; Yang, Yuxiang; Lu, Chengyi; Wang, Zhenhua; Rooney, David; Sun, Kening

    2016-11-01

    In this work, nanostructured macro-mesoporous hollow carbon spheres (MMHCSs) with high surface areas (396 m2 g-1) were synthesized as anode materials via a facile template-based method. A macroporous structure was created on the surfaces of the mesoporous hollow carbon spheres without destroying their spherical structure by etching in 20% HF. The unique nanostructure (imperfect hollow spheres) and the beneficial characteristics of amorphous carbon gave the MMHCSs a high reversible capacity of 530 mAh g-1 at 2.5 A g-1 over 1000 cycles. Remarkably, the MMHCSs retained an excellent rate capability of 180 mAh g-1 at 60 A g-1, which was superior to that of perfectly structured mesoporous hollow carbon spheres (without macropore (MHCSs)).

  17. A composite of hollow carbon nanospheres and sulfur-rich polymers for lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shao-Zhong; Yao, Yuechao; Zeng, Xierong; He, Qianjun; Zheng, Xianfeng; Chen, Shuangshuang; Tu, Wenxuan; Zou, Jizhao

    2017-07-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are the most promising candidates for future high-energy applications because of the unparalleled capacity of sulfur (1675 mAh g-1). However, lithium-sulfur batteries have limited cycle life and rate capability due to the dissolution of polysulfides and the extremely low electronic conductivity of sulfur. To solve these issues, various porous carbons including hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNs) have been used for improving the conductivity. However, these methods still suffer from polysulfides dissolution/loss owing to their weak physical adsorption to polysulfides. Herein, we introduced a covalent grafting route to composite the HCNs and the vulcanized trithiocyanuric acid (TTCA). The composite exhibits a high loading of the vulcanized TTCA by the HCNs with high surface area and large pore volume, and covalent bonds to sulfur, effectively depressing the dissolution of polysulfides. The first discharge capacity of the composite reaches 1430 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C and 1227 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C.

  18. Pudding-typed cobalt sulfides/nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped hollow carbon spheres as a highly efficient and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junwu; Zhao, Chen; Hu, Chencheng; Xi, Jiangbo; Wang, Shuai

    2017-04-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are rarely reported to be grown at the templates due to the strong inherent driving force for crystallization. Herein, we report a pathway to successfully synthesize Zeolitic imidazolate framework-67 (ZIF-67) grown at the unmodified SiO2 spheres from amorphous precursors, and further construct Pudding-typed electrocatalysts, where cobalt sulfides (CoSx) nanocrystals are embedded into nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped hollow carbon spheres (N, S-HCS). CoSx/N, S-HCS show good catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and the optimized performance is achieved with (CoSx/N, S-HCS)700 with the positive half-wave potentials of 0.90 V vs RHE, high selectivity, good long-term stability, and excellent tolerance against methanol-crossover effect in alkaline medium, which are even superior to that of the as-reported MOFs-derived catalysts and commercial Pt/C catalysts. The remarkable catalytic performance is originated from high reactivity of catalytic active sites composed of cobalt sulfides and nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon matrices, and Pudding-typed hollow structure with proper graphitization degree to facilitate fast electron and ion transport and limit the dissolution and agglomeration of active sites during long-term operation.

  19. Template-free formation of carbon nanotube-supported cobalt sulfide@carbon hollow nanoparticles for stable and fast sodium ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Jun Tan, Clara Yi; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-coated cobalt sulfide (CoS) hollow nanoparticles on carbon nanotube (CNT) networks are synthesized by combining three simple approaches: direct growth of Co3O4 nanocrystals on the CNT backbones, chemical conversion of the Co3O4 nanocrystals to CoS hollow nanoparticles, and the spatial introduction of conformal surface modification by carbon. It is noteworthy that the CoS hollow nanoparticles with inner cavity of <50 nm and an average wall thickness of 6-8 nm are derived from a template-free method. Such a template-free-derived multifunctional nanostructure design achieves the amalgamation of the favorite traits of one-dimensional conducting networks, hollow nanoparticles, and surface modification, thus resulting in much enhanced charge transfer, ion transport, and upholding the integrity of the electrode and electrode/electrolyte interface. When applied the synthesized CoS-based material as anodes in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), excellent performance is observed. For instance, a reversible specific capacity of 562 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 and a capacity retention rate of 90% after 200 cycles at a higher current density of 500 mA g-1 are obtained. Moreover, a superior rate capability is observed with reversible specific capacities of 341 and 276 mAh g-1 at 2000 and at 5000 mA g-1, respectively.

  20. Three-dimensional interconnected cobalt oxide-carbon hollow spheres arrays as cathode materials for hybrid batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiye Zhan; Xinhui Xia n; Yu Zhong; Xiuli Wang; Jiangping Tu n

    2016-01-01

    Hierarchical porous metal oxides arrays is critical for development of advanced energy storage devices. Herein, we report a facile template-assisted electro-deposition plus glucose decomposition method for synthesis of multilayer CoO/C hollow spheres arrays. The CoO/C arrays consist of multilayer inter-connected hollow composite spheres with diameters of ∼350 nm as well as thin walls of ∼20 nm. Hierarchical hollow spheres architecture with 3D porous networks are achieved. As cathode of high-rate hybrid batteries, the multilayer CoO/C hollow sphere arrays exhibit impressive enhanced performances with a high capacity (73.5 mAh g?1 at 2 A g?1), and stable high-rate cycling life (70 mAh g?1 after 12,500 cycles at 2 A g?1). The improved electrochemical performance is owing to the composite hollow-sphere architecture with high contact area between the active materials and electrolyte as well as fast ion/electron transportation path.

  1. A novel extraction technique based on carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber solid/liquid microextraction for the measurement of piroxicam and diclofenac combined with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin-Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Chen, Juan

    2012-10-15

    A novel design of carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction (CNTs-HF-SLPME) was developed to determine piroxicam and diclofenac in different real water samples. Functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were held in the pores of hollow fiber with sol-gel technology. The pores and lumen of carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber were subsequently filled with a μL volume of organic solvent (1-octanol), and then the whole assembly was used for the extraction of the target analytes in direct immersion sampling mode. The target analytes were extracted from the sample by two extractants, one of which is organic solvent placed inside the pores and lumen of hollow fiber and the other one is CNTs held in the pores of hollow fiber. After extraction, the analytes were desorbed in acetonitrile and analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. This novel extraction mode showed more excellent extraction performance in comparison with conventional hollow fiber liquid microextraction (without adding CNTs) and carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber solid microextraction (CNTs held in the pores of hollow fiber, but no organic solvents placed inside the lumen of hollow fiber) under the respective optimum conditions. This method provided 47- and 184-fold enrichment factors for piroxicam and diclofenac, respectively, good inter-fiber repeatability and batch-to-batch reproducibility. Linearity was observed in the range of 20-960 μg L(-1) for piroxicam, and 10-2560 μg L(-1) for diclofenac, with correlation coefficients of 0.9985 and 0.9989, respectively. The limits of detection were 4.58 μg L(-1) for piroxicam and 0.40 μg L(-1) for diclofenac.

  2. Flexural Strength of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Repaired Cracked Rectangular Hollow Section Steel Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The flexural behavior of rectangular hollow section (RHS steel beams with initial crack strengthened externally with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP plates was studied. Eight specimens were tested under three-point loading to failure. The experimental program included three beams as control specimens and five beams strengthened with CFRP plates with or without prestressing. The load deflection curves were graphed and failure patterns were observed. The yield loads and ultimate loads with or without repairing were compared together with the strain distributions of the CFRP plate. It was concluded that yield loads of cracked beams could be enhanced with repairing. Meanwhile, the ultimate loads were increased to some extent. The effect of repair became significant with the increase of the initial crack depth. The failure patterns of the repaired specimens were similar to those of the control ones. Mechanical clamping at the CFRP plate ends was necessary to avoid premature peeling between the CFRP plate and the steel beam. The stress levels in CFRP plates were relatively low during the tests. The use of prestressing could improve the utilization efficiency of CFRP plates. It could be concluded that the patching repair could be used to restore the load bearing capacity of the deficient steel beams.

  3. High capacity and high rate capability of nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres for capacitive deionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Shanshan; Yan, Tingting; Wang, Hui; Chen, Guorong; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Jianping; Shi, Liyi; Zhang, Dengsong, E-mail: dszhang@shu.edu.cn

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres were prepared. • The obtained materials have a good capacitive deionization performance. • The electrodes show high salt adsorption rate and good regeneration performance. - Abstract: In this work, nitrogen-doped porous hollow carbon spheres (N-PHCS) were well prepared by using polystyrene (PS) spheres as hard templates and dopamine hydrochloride as carbon and nitrogen sources. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images demonstrate that the N-PHCS have a uniform, spherical and hollow structure. Nitrogen adsorption–desorption analysis shows that the N-PHCS have a high specific area of 512 m{sup 2}/g. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy result reveals that the nitrogen doping amount is 2.92%. The hollow and porous structure and effective nitrogen doping can contribute to large accessible surface area, efficient ion transport and good conductivity. In the electrochemical tests, we can conclude that the N-PHCS have a high specific capacitance value, a good stability and low inner resistance. The N-PHCS electrodes present a high salt adsorption capacity of 12.95 mg/g at a cell voltage of 1.4 V with a flow rate of 40 mL/min in a 500 mg/L NaCl aqueous solution. Moreover, the N-PHCS electrodes show high salt adsorption rate and good regeneration performance in the CDI process. With high surface specific area and effective nitrogen doping, the N-PHCS is promising to the CDI and other electrochemical applications.

  4. Olefins-selective asymmetric carbon molecular sieve hollow fiber membranes for hybrid membrane-distillation processes for olefin/paraffin separations

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, the development of asymmetric carbon molecular sieve (CMS) hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for olefin/paraffin separations based on the CMS membranes are reported. Membrane-based olefin/paraffin separations have been pursued extensively over the past decades. CMS membranes are promising to exceed the performance upper bound of polymer materials and have demonstrated excellent stability for gas separations. Previously, a substructure collapse phenomenon was found in Matrimid ® precursor derived CMS fiber. To overcome the permeance loss due to the increased separation layer thickness, 6FDA-DAM and 6FDA/BPDA-DAM precursors were selected as potential new precursors for carbon membrane formation. Defect-free asymmetric 6FDA-DAM and 6FDA/BPDA-DAM hollow fibers were successfully fabricated from a dry-jet/wet-quench spinning process. Polymer rigidity, glass-rubber transition and asymmetric morphology were correlated. CMS hollow fiber membranes produced from 6FDA-polymer precursors showed significant improvement in permeance for ethylene/ethane and propylene/propane separations. Further studies revealed that the CMS membranes are olefins-selective, which means the membranes are able to effectively separate olefins (ethylene and propylene) from paraffins (ethane and propane). This unique feature of CMS materials enables advanced hybrid membrane-distillation process designs. By using the olefins-selective membranes, these new processes may provide advantages over previously proposed retrofitting concepts. Further applications of the membranes are explored for hydrocarbons processes. Significant energy savings and even reduced footprint may be achieved in olefins production units. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  5. The function-led design of Z-scheme photocatalytic systems based on hollow carbon nitride semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dandan; Pang, Chenyang; Wang, Xinchen

    2015-12-21

    A ternary photocatalyst has been successfully constructed through the integration of Au, CdS and hollow carbon nitride nanospheres (HCNS), where Au nanoparticles were designed to shuttle interparticle transfer of charge carriers between CdS and HCNS photosensitizers to establish two-photon (Z-scheme) photocatalytic tandem systems for solar fuel production. The solid-state CdS-Au-HCNS Z-scheme nanocomposites were efficient for H2 evolution (with a quantum yield of 8.7% at 420 nm) and CO2 reduction catalysis with visible light irradiation. This work further proves the feasibility of employing hollow conjugated polymer photocatalysts in the function-led design of artificial Z-type photosynthetic machinery on soft material interfaces.

  6. Graphitic Carbon-Coated FeSe2 Hollow Nanosphere-Decorated Reduced Graphene Oxide Hybrid Nanofibers as an Efficient Anode Material for Sodium Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A novel one-dimensional nanohybrid comprised of conductive graphitic carbon (GC)-coated hollow FeSe2 nanospheres decorating reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanofiber (hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC-rGO) was designed as an efficient anode material for sodium ion batteries and synthesized by introducing the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into the electrospinning method. The electrospun nanofibers transformed into hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC-rGO hybrid nanofibers through a Fe@GC-rGO intermediate. The discharge capacities of the bare FeSe2 nanofibers, nanorod FeSe2-rGO-amorphous carbon (AC) hybrid nanofibers, and hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC-rGO hyrbid nanofibers at a current density of 1 A g-1 for the 150th cycle were 63, 302, and 412 mA h g-1, respectively, and their corresponding capacity retentions measured from the 2nd cycle were 11, 73, and 82%, respectively. The hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC-rGO hybrid nanofibers delivered a high discharge capacity of 352 mA h g-1 even at an extremely high current density of 10 A g-1. The enhanced electrochemical properties of the hollow nanosphere FeSe2@GC-rGO composite nanofibers arose from the synergetic effects of the FeSe2 hollow morphology and highly conductive rGO matrix.

  7. Highly uniform distribution of Pt nanoparticles on N-doped hollow carbon spheres with enhanced durability for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Qiurong; Zhu, Chengzhou; Engelhard, Mark H.; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-supported Pt nanostructures currently exhibited great potential in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. Nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres (NHCSs) with extra low density and high specific surface area are promising carbon support for loading Pt NPs. The doped heteroatom of nitrogen could not only contribute to the active activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), but also shows a strong interaction with Pt NPs for entrapping them from dissolution/migration. This synergetic effect/interaction resulted in the uniform dispersion and strong combination of the Pt NPs on the carbon support and thus play a significant role in hindering the degradation of the catalytic activities of Pt NPs. As expected, the as-obtained Pt/NHCSs displayed improved catalytic activity and superior durability toward ORR.

  8. A one-step carbonization route towards nitrogen-doped porous carbon hollow spheres with ultrahigh nitrogen content for CO 2 adsorption

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015. Nitrogen doped porous carbon hollow spheres (N-PCHSs) with an ultrahigh nitrogen content of 15.9 wt% and a high surface area of 775 m2 g-1 were prepared using Melamine-formaldehyde nanospheres as hard templates and nitrogen sources. The N-PCHSs were completely characterized and were found to exhibit considerable CO2 adsorption performance (4.42 mmol g-1).

  9. A novel enzymatic glucose sensor based on Pt nanoparticles-decorated hollow carbon spheres-modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luhana, Charles; Bo Xiangjie; Ju Jian; Guo Liping, E-mail: guolp078@nenu.edu.cn [Northeast Normal University, Faculty of Chemistry (China)

    2012-10-15

    A new glucose biosensor was developed based on hollow carbon spheres decorated with platinum nanoparticles (Pt/HCSs)-modified glassy carbon electrode immobilized with glucose oxidase (GOx) with the help of Nafion. The Pt nanoparticles were well dispersed on the HCSs with an average size of 2.29 nm. The detection of glucose was achieved via electrochemical detection of the enzymatically liberated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at +0.5 V versus Ag/AgCl at physiologic pH of 7.4. The Pt/HCSs-modified electrode exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activities toward both the oxidation and reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The glucose biosensor showed good electrocatalytic performance in terms of high sensitivity (4.1 {mu}A mM{sup -1}), low detection limit (1.8 {mu}M), fast response time <3 s, and wide linear range (0.04-8.62 mM). The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) and the maximum current density (i{sub max}) values for the biosensor were 10.94 mM and 887 {mu}A cm{sup -2} respectively. Furthermore, this biosensor showed an acceptable reproducibility and high stability. The interfering signals from ascorbic acid and uric acid at concentration levels normally found in human blood were not much compared with the response to glucose. Blood serum samples were also tested with this biosensor and a good recovery was achieved for the two spiked serum samples.

  10. Direct synthesis of solid and hollow carbon nanospheres over NaCl crystals using acetylene by chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra Kishore, S.; Anandhakumar, S.; Sasidharan, M.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanospheres (CNS) with hollow and solid morphologies have been synthesised by a simple chemical vapour deposition method using acetylene as a carbon precursor. Sodium chloride (NaCl) powder as a template was used for the direct growth of CNS via facile and low-cost approach. The effect of various temperatures (500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C) and acetylene flow rates were investigated to study the structural evolution on the carbon products. The purified CNS thus obtained was characterized by various physicochemical techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, and cyclicvoltametry. The synthesised hollow nanospheres were investigated as anode materials for Li-ion batteries. After 25 cycles of repeated charge/discharge cycles, the discharge and charge capacities were found to be 574 mAh/g and 570 mAh/g, respectively which are significantly higher than the commercial graphite samples.

  11. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  12. Novel bamboo leaf shaped CuO nanorod@hollow carbon fibers derived from plant biomass for efficient and nonenzymatic glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mian; Zhao, Zheng; Liu, Xiaotian; Xiong, Yueping; Han, Ce; Zhang, Yufan; Bo, Xiangjie; Guo, Liping

    2015-09-21

    The present paper reports on the preparation of novel bamboo leaf shaped CuO nanorod dispersed hollow carbon fibers (denoted as CuO NR@PCFs). Specially, the new-type hollow carbon fibers (containing abundant micro/meso/macropores and a large specific surface area) were prepared only by simple and fast pyrolysis of the natural product catkins without using any template or surfactant. Meanwhile, a facile method was used to prepare the bamboo leaf shaped CuO nanorod covered PCFs. Thanks to the abundant micro/meso/macropores, large specific surface area, and excellent electrical conduction efficiency of the PCF matrix, the as-prepared CuO NR@PCFs could also afford more catalytic sites, show more excellent reactant transport efficiency, and display more excellent electron transport rates compared with those for the pure CuO balls. Above all, these advantages will result in the excellent oxidation and detection efficiency of the CuO NR@PCF sample to glucose. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the CuO NR@PCF modified electrode can directly catalyze glucose oxidation and display an enhanced current response compared with the pure CuO balls (such as a response time within 4 s, wide linear ranges of 5 × 10(-3)-0.8 mM and 0.8-8.5 mM, good reproducibility, considerable stability, and excellent anti-interference to electroactive molecules and Cl(-)). The superior catalytic activity and selectivity make the CuO NR@PCF catalyst very promising for application in direct detection of glucose.

  13. Carbon Nanotube/Alumina/Polyethersulfone Hybrid Hollow Fiber Membranes with Enhanced Mechanical and Anti-Fouling Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Feng

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs were incorporated into alumina/polyethersulfone hollow fibre membranes to enhance the mechanical property and the efficiency of water treatment. Results show that the incorporation of CNTs can greatly limit the formation of large surface pores, decrease the void size in support layers and improve the porosity and pore connectivity of alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. As a result of such morphology change and pore size change, both improved flux and rejection were achieved in such CNTs/alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. Moreover, the CNTs/alumina/PES membranes show higher antifouling ability and the flux recoveries after being fouled by bovine serum albumin (BSA and humic acid were improved by 84.1% and 53.2% compared to the samples without CNT incorporation. Besides the improvement in water treatment performance, the incorporation of CNTs enhanced the tensile properties of inorganic/polymer membranes. Therefore, such CNTs/alumina/PES hollow fiber membranes are very promising candidates for good filter media in industry, considering their high efficiency and high mechanical properties.

  14. Carbon Nanotube/Alumina/Polyethersulfone Hybrid Hollow Fiber Membranes with Enhanced Mechanical and Anti-Fouling Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yi; Wang, Kun; Davies, Chris H J; Wang, Huanting

    2015-08-20

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were incorporated into alumina/polyethersulfone hollow fibre membranes to enhance the mechanical property and the efficiency of water treatment. Results show that the incorporation of CNTs can greatly limit the formation of large surface pores, decrease the void size in support layers and improve the porosity and pore connectivity of alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. As a result of such morphology change and pore size change, both improved flux and rejection were achieved in such CNTs/alumina/polyethersulfone membranes. Moreover, the CNTs/alumina/PES membranes show higher antifouling ability and the flux recoveries after being fouled by bovine serum albumin (BSA) and humic acid were improved by 84.1% and 53.2% compared to the samples without CNT incorporation. Besides the improvement in water treatment performance, the incorporation of CNTs enhanced the tensile properties of inorganic/polymer membranes. Therefore, such CNTs/alumina/PES hollow fiber membranes are very promising candidates for good filter media in industry, considering their high efficiency and high mechanical properties.

  15. Mussel-inspired polydopamine coated hollow carbon microspheres, a novel versatile filler for fabrication of high performance syntactic foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liying; Roy, Sunanda; Chen, Ye; Chua, Eng Kee; See, Kye Yak; Hu, Xiao; Liu, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Syntactic foams, which can be synthesized by mechanical mixing of hollow microspheres with a matrix material, are a special class of lightweight composite materials. Developing of high-performance syntactic foams remains challenges. In this work, a facile and environmentally friendly surface modification method employing polydopamine (PDA) as a surface treatment agent for hollow carbon microspheres (HCMs) was used, aiming to extend the application of syntactic foams to seldom touched areas. The PDA coating was used as a strategy for interfacial interaction enhancement and also as a platform for further metal coating meant for electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding. The stronger interfacial interaction between microspheres and polymer matrix provided effective interfacial stress transfer, as a result of the syntactic foams with high strength to weight ratio. Furthermore, the PDA coating on HCMs served as a versatile platform for the growth of noble metals on the surface of PDA-HCMs. Silver nanoparticles was grown by PDA medium. The silver coated HCMs (Ag-PDA-HCMs) impacted the complex permittivity of the syntactic foams leading to high EMI shielding effectiveness (SE). The specific EMI SE reached up to 46.3 dB·cm(3)/g, demonstrated the Ag-PDA-HCMs/epoxy syntactic foam as a promising candidate for lightweight high-performance EMI shielding material.

  16. Sulfur/graphitic hollow carbon sphere nano-composite as a cathode material for high-power lithium-sulfur battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eon Sung; Kim, Min-Seop; Cho, Won Il; Oh, Si Hyoung

    2013-08-03

    The intrinsic low conductivity of sulfur which leads to a low performance at a high current rate is one of the most limiting factors for the commercialization of lithium-sulfur battery. Here, we present an easy and convenient method to synthesize a mono-dispersed hollow carbon sphere with a thin graphitic wall which can be utilized as a support with a good electrical conductivity for the preparation of sulfur/carbon nano-composite cathode. The hollow carbon sphere was prepared from the pyrolysis of the homogenous mixture of the mono-dispersed spherical silica and Fe-phthalocyanine powder in elevated temperature. The composite cathode was manufactured by infiltrating sulfur melt into the inner side of the graphitic wall. The electrochemical cycling shows a capacity of 425 mAh g-1 at 3 C current rate which is more than five times larger than that for the sulfur/carbon black nano-composite prepared by simple ball milling.

  17. Biomimetic synthesis of hollow calcium carbonate with the existence of the agar matrix and bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jianhua, E-mail: fjh2008@126.com; Wu, Gang; Qing, Chengsong

    2016-01-01

    Proteins play important roles in the process of biomineralization. Vaterite and calcite have been synthesized by the reaction of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCl{sub 2} in the bovine serum albumin (BSA) and agar system. The samples have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The shape of CaCO{sub 3} crystal has been analyzed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). The results show that calcite is a single product in the absence of BSA, but the product is a mixture of calcite and vaterite in the presence of BSA. The spheral shell of CaCO{sub 3} crystal was obtained when the concentration of BSA increased to 9.0 mg/mL. - Highlights: • Biomimetic synthesis of hollow calcium carbonate • Calcification mechanisms in the presence of both protein and polysaccharides • Biomineralization under the action of protein and polysaccharides.

  18. C{sub 3} as the dominant carbon cluster in high pressure discharges in graphite hollow cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjua, Sohail Ahmad; Ahmad, Mashkoor; Khan, Sabih-ud-Din; Khalid, Rahila; Aleem, Abid; Ahmad, Shoaib [Carbon Based Nanotechnology and Accelerator Laboratory, PINSTECH, PO Box Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-03-07

    Results are presented that have been obtained while operating the graphite hollow cathode duoplasmatron ion source in dual mode under constant discharge current. This dual mode operation enabled us to obtain the mass and emission spectra simultaneously. In mass spectra C{sub 3} is the main feature but C{sub 4} and C{sub 5} are also prominent, whereas in emission spectra C{sub 2} is also there and its presence shows that it is in an excited state rather than in an ionic state. These facts provide evidence that C{sub 3} is produced due to the regeneration of a soot forming sequence and leave it in ionic state. C{sub 3} is a stable molecule and the only dominant species among the carbon clusters that survives in a regenerative sooting environment at high-pressure discharges.

  19. Carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for the determination of strychnine and brucine in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin-Yue; Shi, Yan-Ping; Chen, Juan

    2013-11-15

    A mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine strychnine and brucine in urine. This MMM was prepared by dispersing CNTs in water via surfactant assistance, and then immobilizing CNTs into the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber (CNTs-HF) was subsequently wetted by a few microliters of organic solvent (1-octanol), and then applied to extract the target analytes in direct immersion sampling mode. After extraction, analytes were desorbed via ultrasonic-assisted effect, and then detected via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). To achieve the highest extraction efficiency, main extraction parameters such as the type and amount of surfactant, the diameter and doping level of CNTs, extraction time, desorption condition, pH value, stirring rate and volume of the donor phase were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity ranges with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, good repeatability and batch-to-batch reproducibility with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 6% and 5% for strychnine and brucine, respectively, and low limits of detection (0.7 and 0.9 µg L(-1) for strychnine and brucine, respectively). The recoveries were in the range of 83.81-116.14% at three spiked levels. The developed method was successfully applied to real urine sample with mean relative recoveries of 94.28% and 91.30% for strychnine and brucine, respectively. The developed method shows comparable results against reference methods and is a simple, green, and cost-effective microextraction technique. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of Pd loading in Pd-Pt bimetallic catalysts doped into hollow core mesoporous shell carbon on performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fıçıcılar, Berker; Bayrakçeken, Ayşe; Eroğlu, İnci

    A significantly active Pd-Pt/carbon electrocatalyst for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells was synthesized by microwave irradiation using a hollow core mesoporous shell (HCMS) carbon as catalyst support that was prepared by template replication of core/shell spherical silica particles and two different carbon precursors. Pt/Pd percent weight ratios on carbon support were varied as 20/0, 15/5, 10/10, 5/15 to 0/20. As the average pore diameter of the carbon support was increased from 3.02 nm to 3.90 nm by changing the type of the carbon precursor, fuel cell performances of the HCMS carbon based Pd-Pt bimetallic catalysts were improved significantly.

  1. Hollow core-shell structured silicon@carbon nanoparticles embed in carbon nanofibers as binder-free anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanli; Hu, Yi; Shen, Zhen; Chen, Renzhong; He, Xia; Zhang, Xiangwu; Li, Yongqiang; Wu, Keshi

    2017-02-01

    Silicon is regarded as one of the most promising candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes owing to its large theoretical energy density (about 4200 mAh g-1) and low working potential (vs. Li/Li+). However, its practical application is limited by structure degradation and a comparatively poor capacity retention caused by large volume changes during cycling. In this study, we have prepared a novel nanofiber form of silicon/carbon with hollow core-shell structured silicon@carbon (Si@C) nanoparticles embedded in carbon nanofibers. Voids between the silicon nanoparticle (SiNP) core and carbon shell help to accommodate the volume expansion associated with the lithiation/delithiation process in a working electrode and allow formation of a stable solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film. The obtained electrodes exhibited good cycle performance with a high reversible capacity of 1020.7 mAh g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 0.2 A g-1, and also delivered excellent cycling performance at a high current density of 3.2 A g-1. The design of this new structure provides a potential method for developing other functional composite anode materials with high reversible capacities and long-term cycle stabilities.

  2. MOF-Derived Hollow Co9 S8 Nanoparticles Embedded in Graphitic Carbon Nanocages with Superior Li-Ion Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Dongdong; Kopold, Peter; Gu, Lin; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim; Yu, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Novel electrode materials consisting of hollow cobalt sulfide nanoparticles embedded in graphitic carbon nanocages (HCSP⊂GCC) are facilely synthesized by a top-down route applying room-temperature synthesized Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) as the template. Owing to the good mechanical flexibility and pronounced structure stability of carbon nanocages-encapsulated Co9 S8 , the as-obtained HCSP⊂GCC exhibit superior Li-ion storage. Working in the voltage of 1.0-3.0 V, they display a very high energy density (707 Wh kg(-1) ), superior rate capability (reversible capabilities of 536, 489, 438, 393, 345, and 278 mA h g(-1) at 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 5, and 10C, respectively), and stable cycling performance (≈26% capacity loss after long 150 cycles at 1C with a capacity retention of 365 mA h g(-1) ). When the work voltage is extended into 0.01-3.0 V, a higher stable capacity of 1600 mA h g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1) is still achieved.

  3. Polydopamine-coated, nitrogen-doped, hollow carbon-sulfur double-layered core-shell structure for improving lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weidong; Xiao, Xingcheng; Cai, Mei; Yang, Li

    2014-09-10

    To better confine the sulfur/polysulfides in the electrode of lithium-sulfur (Li/S) batteries and improve the cycling stability, we developed a double-layered core-shell structure of polymer-coated carbon-sulfur. Carbon-sulfur was first prepared through the impregnation of sulfur into hollow carbon spheres under heat treatment, followed by a coating polymerization to give a double-layered core-shell structure. From the study of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images, we demonstrated that the sulfur not only successfully penetrated through the porous carbon shell but also aggregated along the inner wall of the carbon shell, which, for the first time, provided visible and convincing evidence that sulfur preferred diffusing into the hollow carbon rather than aggregating in/on the porous wall of the carbon. Taking advantage of this structure, a stable capacity of 900 mA h g(-1) at 0.2 C after 150 cycles and 630 mA h g(-1) at 0.6 C after 600 cycles could be obtained in Li/S batteries. We also demonstrated the feasibility of full cells using the sulfur electrodes to couple with the silicon film electrodes, which exhibited significantly improved cycling stability and efficiency. The remarkable electrochemical performance could be attributed to the desirable confinement of sulfur through the unique double-layered core-shell architectures.

  4. A graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere as a novel photochemical internalization agent for targeted and stimuli-responsive cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoqun; Chen, Zhaowei; Wang, Zhenzhen; Li, Wei; Ju, Enguo; Yan, Zhengqing; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-01

    As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal stability, biocompatibility and cancer cell targeting ability. After CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis, the nanosystem is embedded in endo/lysosomal vesicles and HA could be specially degraded by hyaluronidase (Hyal), inducing open pores. In the following, with visible light illumination, GHCNS could produce ROS that effectively induced lipid peroxidation and caused endo/lysosomal membrane break, accelerating the cytoplasmic release of the drug in the targeted and irradiated cells. As a result, significantly increased therapeutic potency and specificity against cancer cells could be achieved.As a novel technique, photochemical internalization (PCI) has been employed as a new approach to overcome endo/lysosomal restriction, which is one of the main difficulties in both drug and gene delivery. However, the complicated synthesis procedure (usually requiring the self-assembly of polymers, photosensitizers and cargos) and payload specificity greatly limit its further application. In this paper, we employ a highly fluorescent graphitic hollow carbon nitride nanosphere (GHCNS) to simultaneously serve as a PCI photosensitizer, an imaging agent and a drug carrier. The surface modification of GHCNS with multifunctional polysaccharide hyaluronic acid (HA) endows the system with colloidal

  5. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on anatase TiO 2 hollow spheres/carbon nanotube composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jiaguo; Fan, Jiajie; Cheng, Bei

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on anatase TiO 2 hollow spheres (TiO2HS)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) nanocomposite films are prepared by a directly mechanical mixing and doctor blade method. The prepared samples are characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and N 2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The photoelectric conversion performances of the DSSCs based on TiO2HS/CNT composite film electrodes are also compared with commercial-grade Degussa P25 TiO 2 nanoparticles (P25)/CNT composite solar cells at the same film thickness. The results indicate that the photoelectric conversion efficiencies (η) of the TiO2HS/CNT composite DSSCs are dependent on CNT loading in the electrodes. A small amount of CNT clearly enhances DSSC efficiency, while excessive CNT loading significantly lowers their performance. The former is because CNT enhance the transport of electrons from the films to FTO substrates. The latter is due to high CNT loading shielding the visible light from being adsorbed by dyes.

  6. Nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres wrapped with graphene nanostructure for highly sensitive electrochemical sensing of parachlorophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yinhui; Zhu, Gangbing; Sun, Heng; Sun, Jianfan; Wu, Xiangyang

    2016-12-15

    Owing to awfully harmful to the environment and human health, the qualitative and quantitative determination of parachlorophenol (PCP) is of great significance. In this paper, by using silica@polydopamine as template, nitrogen-doped hollow carbon spheres wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (NHCNS@RG) nanostructure was prepared successfully via a self-assembly approach due to the electrostatic interaction, and the obtained NHCNS@RG could exhibit the unique properties of NHCNS and RG: the NHCNS could impede the aggregation tendency of RG and possess high electrocatalytic activity; the RG enlarges the contacting area and offers many area-normalized edge-plane structures and active sites. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and electrochemical method were used to characterize the morphology and structure of NHCNS@RG. Then, the NHCNS@RG hybrids were applied for the electrochemical sensing of PCP, under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of PCP obtained in this work is 0.01μM and the linear range is 0.03-38.00μM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of heat treatment temperature on microstructure and electrochemical properties of hollow carbon spheres prepared in high-pressure argon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boyang Liu; Yun Zhou; Dechang Jia; Pengjian Zuo; Yingfeng Shao; Jingwei Zhang

    2011-12-01

    Heat treatment was carried out between 800 and 1200°C to investigate its effects on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the hollow carbon spheres (HCSs) prepared in high-pressure argon. Samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms. The graphitization of the HCSs was improved with increase of heat treatment temperature. Mesopores of . 4 nm in diameter were created on the HCSs after the heat treatment. The results of electrochemical performance measurements for the HCSs as anode material for lithium ion batteries indicate that the discharge capacity of the HCSs is improved after heat treatment at 800°C compared with the as-prepared HCSs and have a maximum value of 357 mAh/g and still retains 303 mAh/g after 40 cycles. However, the discharge capacity of the HCSs decreases and the cycling performance is improved with the increase of heat treatment temperature.

  8. Application of β-cyclodextrin-modified, carbon nanotube-reinforced hollow fiber to solid-phase microextraction of plant hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xin-Yue; Ha, Wei; Chen, Juan; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2014-12-29

    A new, efficient, and environmental friendly solid-phase microextraction (SPME) medium based on β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)-modified carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and a hollow fiber (HF) was prepared. Functionalized β-CD was covalently linked to the surface of the carboxylic CNTs and then the obtained nanocomposite was immobilized into the wall pores of HFs under ultrasonic-assisted effect. The scanning electron microscope was used to inspect surface characteristics of fibers, demonstrating the presence of nanocomposites in their wall pores. The reinforced HF was employed in SPME, and its extraction performance was evaluated by analyzing 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2-naphthoxyacetic acid (2-NOA) in vegetables. Without any tedious clean-up procedure, analytes were extracted from the sample to the adsorbent and organic solvent immobilized in HFs and then desorbed in acetonitrile prior to chromatographic analysis. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the method provided 275- and 283-fold enrichment factors of NAA and 2-NOA, low limits of detection and quantification (at an ngg(-1) level), satisfactory spiked recoveries, good inter-fiber repeatability, and batch-to-batch reproducibility. The selectivity of the developed fiber was investigated to three structurally similar compounds and two reference compounds with recognition coefficients up to 3.18. The obtained results indicate that the newly developed fiber is a feasible, selective, green, and cost-effective microextraction medium and could be successfully applied for extraction and determination of naphthalene-derived plant hormones in complex matrices.

  9. Electrochemical properties of hollow-structured MnS-carbon nanocomposite powders prepared by a one-pot spray pyrolysis process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Min; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kang, Yun Chan

    2014-02-01

    Spherical, hollow MnS-C composite powders were prepared from a solution of manganese salt, thiourea, and sucrose by one-pot spray pyrolysis. The MnS-C composite powders were generated by direct sulfidation of MnO with hydrogen sulfide gas generated in situ by decomposition of thiourea during spray pyrolysis. Sucrose, which is used as a carbon source material, plays a key role in the formation of the MnS-C composite powders by improving the reducing atmosphere around the powders. Dot-mapping images of the composite powders demonstrated uniform distribution of the manganese, sulfur, and carbon components within the MnS-C composite powder. Fine crystals of MnS were uniformly mixed with carbon derived from polymerization and carbonization of sucrose. The carbon content of the MnS-C composite powders was 26 wt%. The discharge capacities of the MnS-C composite powders in the 2nd and 200th cycles were 863 and 967 mA h g(-1), respectively, at a current density of 1000 mA g(-1). The spherical and hollow morphology of the MnS-C composite powders was completely retained, even after 200 cycles. The enhanced cycling and rate performance of the MnS-C composite powders is ascribed to the structural stability of the composite powders.

  10. High-energy lithium-ion hybrid supercapacitors composed of hierarchical urchin-like WO3/C anodes and MOF-derived polyhedral hollow carbon cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juan; Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Lei; Cai, Qifa; Li, Qingwei; Gao, Biao; Zhang, Xuming; Huo, Kaifu; Chu, Paul K

    2016-09-22

    A lithium-ion hybrid supercapacitor (Li-HSC) comprising a Li-ion battery type anode and an electrochemical double layer capacitance (EDLC) type cathode has attracted much interest because it accomplishes a large energy density without compromising the power density. In this work, hierarchical carbon coated WO3 (WO3/C) with a unique mesoporous structure and metal-organic framework derived nitrogen-doped carbon hollow polyhedra (MOF-NC) are prepared and adopted as the anode and the cathode for Li-HSCs. The hierarchical mesoporous WO3/C microspheres assembled by radially oriented WO3/C nanorods along the (001) plane enable effective Li(+) insertion, thus exhibit high capacity, excellent rate performance and a long cycling life due to their high Li(+) conductivity, electronic conductivity and structural robustness. The WO3/C structure shows a reversible specific capacity of 508 mA h g(-1) at a 0.1 C rate (1 C = 696 mA h g(-1)) after 160 discharging-charging cycles with excellent rate capability. The MOF-NC achieved the specific capacity of 269.9 F g(-1) at a current density of 0.2 A g(-1). At a high current density of 6 A g(-1), 92.4% of the initial capacity could be retained after 2000 discharging-charging cycles, suggesting excellent cycle stability. The Li-HSC comprising a WO3/C anode and a MOF-NC cathode boasts a large energy density of 159.97 W h kg(-1) at a power density of 173.6 W kg(-1) and 88.3% of the capacity is retained at a current density of 5 A g(-1) after 3000 charging-discharging cycles, which are better than those previously reported for Li-HSCs. The high energy and power densities of the Li-HSCs of WO3/C//MOF-NC render large potential in energy storage.

  11. Pd Nanoparticles Decorated N-Doped Graphene Quantum Dots@N-Doped Carbon Hollow Nanospheres with High Electrochemical Sensing Performance in Cancer Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Jiangbo; Xie, Chuyi; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Xiao, Jian; Duan, Xianming; Ren, Jinghua; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Shuai

    2016-08-31

    The development of carbon based hollow-structured nanospheres (HNSs) materials has stimulated growing interest due to their controllable structure, high specific surface area, large void space, enhanced mass transport, and good biocompatibility. The incorporation of functional nanomaterials into their core and/or shell opens new horizons in designing functionalized HNSs for a wider spectrum of promising applications. In this work, we report a new type of functionalized HNSs based on Pd nanoparticles (NPs) decorated double shell structured N-doped graphene quantum dots (NGQDs)@N-doped carbon (NC) HNSs, with ultrafine Pd NPs and "nanozyme" NGQDs as dual signal-amplifying nanoprobes, and explore their promising application as a highly efficient electrocatalyst in electrochemical sensing of a newly emerging biomarker, i.e., hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), for cancer detection. Due to the synergistic effect of the robust and conductive HNS supports and catalytically active Pd NPs and NGQD in facilitating electron transfer, the NGQD@NC@Pd HNS hybrid material exhibits high electrocatalytic activity toward the direct reduction of H2O2 and can promote the electrochemical reduction reaction of H2O2 at a favorable potential of 0 V, which effectively restrains the redox of most electroactive species in physiological samples and eliminates interference signals. The resultant electrochemical H2O2 biosensor based hybrid HNSs materials demonstrates attractive performance, including low detection limit down to nanomole level, short response time within 2 s, as well as high sensitivity, reproducibility, selectivity, and stability, and have been used in real-time tracking of trace amounts of H2O2 secreted from different living cancer cells in a normal state and treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  12. Rapid analysis of phthalates in beverage and alcoholic samples by multi-walled carbon nanotubes/silica reinforced hollow fibre-solid phase microextraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Su, Qiong; Li, Ke-Yao; Sun, Chu-Feng; Zhang, Wen-Bo

    2013-12-15

    A novel procedure based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/silica reinforced hollow fibre solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry has been developed to analyse trace phthalate acid esters in beverage and alcoholic samples. Because of their excellent adsorption capability towards hydrophobic compounds, functionalized MWCNTs, acting as solid-phase sorbent, were co-deposited with silica particles in the pores of polypropylene hollow fibre through a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. The parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, such as pH values and ionic strength of sample solution, extraction time, temperature and desorption solvent were optimised. Recoveries for phthalates at spiking levels in different matrices were satisfactory (between 68% and 115%). Moreover, the results were further confirmed by comparing them with those obtained using a solvent extraction method according to the national standard of China.

  13. Closed hollow bulb obturator--one-step fabrication: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzayan, Muaiyed M; Ariffin, Yusnidar T; Yunus, Norsiah

    2013-10-01

    A method is described for the fabrication of a closed hollow bulb obturator prosthesis using a hard thermoforming splint material and heat-cured acrylic resin. The technique allowed the thickness of the thermoformed bulb to be optimized for weight reduction, while the autopolymerized seal area was covered in heat-cured acrylic resin, thus eliminating potential leakage and discoloration. This technique permits the obturator prosthesis to be processed to completion from the wax trial denture without additional laboratory investing, flasking, and processing.

  14. Hollow-spherical composites of Polyaniline/Cobalt Sulfide/Carbon nanodots with enhanced magnetocapacitance and electromagnetic wave absorption capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chuanjun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Jian; Jin, Feng; Liu, Jichang; Bi, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Hollow-spherical composites of polyaniline/cobalt sulfide/carbon nanodots (PANI/CoS/CDs-0.5T) have been synthesized by in situ polymerization under an applied magnetic field (MF) of 0.5 T. As a control, PANI/CoS/CDs-0T composites have been synthesized without a MF. Both composites acting as electrodes present obvious magnetocapacitances at a scan rate of 100 mV s-1 while the electrochemical cell tested under an external MF of 0.5 T. Notably, PANI/CoS/CDs-0.5T composites show larger magnetocapacitances than PANI/CoS/CDs-0T composites at different scan rates from 5 to 100 mV s-1. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) results indicate that MF can reduce charge transfer resistance at electrode/electrolyte interface. More importantly, PANI/CoS/CDs-0.5T composites show a much stronger electromagnetic wave (EMW) absorbing capability than PANI/CoS/CDs-0T in the range of 2-18 GHz which is attributed to an increased dielectric loss and a magnetic loss in low frequency range of 2-12.5 GHz. MF-induced ferromagnetic nanodomains of Co2+ clusters in the PANI/CoS/CDs-0.5T composites increase the complex permittivity and create more interfacial polarizations or the Maxwell-Wagner effect, which leads to increased dielectric loss. Compared with PANI/CoS/CDs-0T composites with diamagnetic behaviour, MF-induced weak ferromagnetism of CoS in the PANI/CoS/CDs-0.5T composites has caused additional magnetic loss. This work provides an efficient way for modulating electrochemical or electromagnetic properties of inorganic/polymer nanocomposites by employing an external MF.

  15. 炭化聚苯乙烯/聚苯胺核-壳聚合物颗粒制备中空炭球%Preparation of hollow carbon spheres by carbonization of polystyrene/polyaniline core-shell polymer particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代晓瑛; 张歆; 孟艺飞; 沈培康

    2011-01-01

    Hollow carbon spheres were synthesized using sulfonated polystyrene(PS)spheres as a core template and aniline monomer as carbon source.The spheres prepared were characterized by scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy,X-ray diffraction,Fourier infrared spectrometry,and thermogravimetry.The results showed that the as-prepared hollow carbon spheres were uniform in diameter with a shell thickness of 35 nm.The morphology,diameter,and wall thickness of the hollow carbon spheres can be tuned by varying the sulfonation rate of the PS core template.Sulfonation modification of PS spheres for 8 h was appropriate to prepare hollow carbon spheres.Owing to the presence of enough sulfonic acid groups on PS surface,the difference in the decomposition temperature between the PANI shells and the PS core was increased,resulting in the formation of the hollow carbon spheres with good sphericity and thick carbon shells by carbonizing sulfonated PS/PANI core-shell polymer spheres.%以磺化聚苯乙烯球为模板,苯胺为碳源,利用模板法制备了中空炭球结构.采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、透射电子显微镜(TEM)、X射线衍射(XRD)、傅立叶-红外光谱(FT-IR)和热重分析(TGA)对所制的样品进行了表征.结果表明:所制中空炭球的壁厚为35nm且粒径均匀,中空炭球的形貌和壳层厚度受聚苯乙烯模板磺化度的影响.磺酸化8h的聚苯乙烯球是制备中空炭球的最佳模板,由于聚苯乙烯球表面足够磺酸基团的存在,增大了聚苯乙烯核模板和聚苯胺壳层之间的热分解温度差,使得聚苯乙烯核模板具有较低的分解温度,而聚苯胺壳层则具有较高分解温度,从而利用炭化法制得球壳完整和球形良好的中空炭球结构.

  16. 胶质碳球为模板制备NiO空心球%Synthesis of NiO Hollow Spheres Using Colloidal Carbon Spheres as Template

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武拥建; 郑明涛; 谢春林; 靳权; 易观贵; 刘应亮

    2011-01-01

    以胶质碳球为模板、六亚甲基四胺为沉淀剂,在乙醇中溶剂热反应,再经500℃煅烧6h制备了NiO空心球.通过X射线衍射(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、透射电子显微镜(TEM)、傅里叶变换红外光谱(FTIR)和低温氮吸附-脱附,对NiO的结构和形貌进行了表征.结果表明溶剂热反应时间是制备完整NiO空心球的关键因素,溶剂热反应12h,再经空气中煅烧,可制得形貌均一的NiO空心球.所得产物是由NiO纳米粒子组装而成的具有多孔结构的空心球.同时,本文对NiO空心球结构的形成过程和可能机理进行了分析和讨论.%NiO hollow spheres were synthesized by a solvothermal reaction using colloidal carbon spheres (CCS) as sacricial template and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) as precipitating agent in ethanol,and then calcined at 500 ℃ for 6 h.The characteristics of these NiO hollow spheres samples were characterized by XRD,SEM,TEM,FTIR and low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms.The results show that solvothermal reaction time is crucial to the integrity of the hollow spheres.The well defined NiO hollow spheres can be synthesized through 12 h solvothermal treatment and then calcination in air.The as-synthesized NiO hollow spheres have the porous wall consisted of nanosized particles.Moreover,the formation mechanism of NiO hollow spheres is also discussed.

  17. Designed Functional Systems for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries Anode: From Solid to Hollow, and to Core-Shell NiCo2O4 Nanoparticles Encapsulated in Ultrathin Carbon Nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Zhang, Huijuan; Fang, Ling; Bai, Yuanjuan; Wang, Yu

    2016-02-01

    Binary metal oxides have been considered as ideal and promising anode materials, which can ameliorate and enhance the electrochemical performances of the single metal oxides, such as electronic conductivity, reversible capacity, and structural stability. In this research, we report a rational method to synthesize some novel sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C nanosheets arrays for the first time. The nanostructures exhibit the unique features of solid, hollow, and even core-shell NiCo2O4 nanoparticles encapsulated inside and a graphitized carbon layers coating outside. Compared to the previous reports, these composites demonstrate more excellent electrochemical performances, including superior rate capability and excellent cycling capacity. Therefore, the final conclusion would be given that these multifarious sandwich-like NiCo2O4@C composites could be highly qualified candidates for lithium-ion battery anodes in some special field, in which good capability and high capacity are urgently required.

  18. Synthesis of hollow silica nanosphere with high accessible surface area and their hybridization with carbon matrix for drastic enhancement of electrochemical property

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Mohammad Mydul; Yamahana, Haruki [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo-machi, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad [World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science - NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Luitel, Hom Nath; Zhao, Wenwen [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo-machi, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Yamauchi, Yusuke [World Premier International (WPI) Research Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science - NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Watari, Takanori; Noguchi, Hideyuki [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo-machi, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Nakashima, Kenichi, E-mail: nakashik@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo-machi, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Hollow silica nanosphere with large void space and high surface area is synthesized. • Carbon was doped into silica layer through glucose solution and resulting carbon/silica composite drastically enhanced electrochemical property. • Combination of core–shell–corona micelle template and doping method could be a new platform for developing functional materials. - Abstract: Hollow silica nanospheres with high accessible surface area have been synthesized by using core–shell–corona polymeric micelle of poly (styrene-b-2-vinyle pyridine-b-ethylene oxide) (PS45k-PVP26k-PEO82k) as a template. The size of the template polymeric micelle depends on the pH of the solution, i.e. ≈100 nm at pH 7 whereas ≈300 nm at pH 4. The enlarged size of the micelle is possibly due to the protonation of the PVP block, which also serves as reaction sites for silica precursor. The size of the obtained silica nanosphere measured with transmission electron microscope (TEM) is around ≈70 nm and shell thickness is ≈20 nm. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) data confirms that the polymer template is completely removed during calcination. Conductive carbon is doped into the silica nanosphere through glucose solution followed by hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis. It is found that the electrochemical performance and stability of the silica nanosphere is dramatically enhanced after carbon doping. The combined strategy of the core–shell–corona micelle as template and carbon doping could represent a new platform for the researchers to develop functional nanomaterials.

  19. N-Doped carbon coated hollow Ni(x)Co(9-x)S8 urchins for a high performance supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufei; Sun, Chencheng; Su, Haiquan; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2015-02-21

    N-doped carbon coated NixCo9-xS8 (NixCo9-xS8@C) hollow urchins have been synthesized via a two-step solvothermal synthesis and an in situ polymerization in dopamine together with a post-annealing process. The characterization indicated that NixCo9-xS8@C hollow urchins have urchin-like morphology and a uniform size distribution. Furthermore, there is a complete phrase transformation from the as obtained NiCo2S4/NixCo9-xS8 hybrid to NixCo9-xS8 during the thermal annealing process. More importantly, as electrochemical materials, NixCo9-xS8@C has a high specific capacitance (1404.0 F g(-1) at 2.0 A g(-1)) and excellent cycling performance (95.8% capacitance retention of the highest value after 2000 cycles). These results can be attributed to the coating of N-doped carbon, which gives the composite good conductivity. Additionally, the phase transformation from NiCo2S4/NixCo9-xS8 to NixCo9-xS8 during the thermal annealing greatly enhanced the redox reaction of the Co and Ni species.

  20. Preparation and Growth of N-Doped Hollow Carbon Nanospheres and Their Application as Catalyst Support in Direct Borohydride Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanzhen; Dong, Shujuan; Li, Sai; Liu, Yongning; Yan, Wei

    2015-05-01

    N-doped hollow carbon nanospheres (HCNSs) were prepared by electric arc discharge method in N2 atmosphere. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that their nitrogen content reaches up to 4.9 atom%. Both the low thermal conductivity of N2 and the doping of nitrogen atom make carbon unit bend to form hollow nanosphere structure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray diffusion (XRD) analysis prove the presence of detected defects and a poor crystallinity on the HCNSs shell. Moreover, annealing treatment of HCNSs was carried out at 1100 degrees C/10 h and 1400 degrees C/2 h to research their fracture extension. It is found that HCNSs could grow into closed-tubes even with a shell at high annealing temperature. HCNSs were applied in direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) to evaluate their catalytic performance. The electrochemical results show that pure HCNSs doesn't have any catalysis effect, but they can greatly promote the catalytic performance of CoO, and the largest polarization current density of which achieves 1.845 A x cm(-2) at -0.7 V (vs. Hg/HgO electrode).

  1. Carbon-covered Fe3O4 hollow cubic hierarchical porous composite as the anode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shouhui; Zhou, Rihui; Chen, Yaqin; Fu, Yuanyuan; Li, Ping; Song, Yonghai; Wang, Li

    2017-04-01

    In this work, Prussian blue nanocrystals, a kind of cubic metal-organic frameworks, was firstly covered by a uniform layer of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin, and then followed with heat treatment at different pyrolysis temperatures. The effects of pyrolysis temperature on the morphologies, phase, pore size, and electrochemical performance of the pyrolysis products were studied in this work. The composite generated at 600 ∘C, FexC600, was a hollow cubic composite of Fe3O4 covered by a thin RF-derived carbon layer. The carbon layer on FexC600 was a robust and conductive protective layer, which can accommodate Fe3O4 NPs and withstand the huge volume change of Fe3O4 during the process of discharge and charge. When used as anodes for lithium-ion batteries, FexC600 showed excellent electrochemical performance. It delivered a discharge capacity of 1126 mAh g-1 with a coulombic efficiency of 98.8% at the current density of 100 mA g-1 after 100 times discharge/charge cycling. It even delivered a capacity of 492 mAh g-1 at the current density of 500 mA g-1. This cubic hollow composite would be a promising alternative anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Poly(dopamine) coated gold nanocluster functionalized electrochemical immunosensor for brominated flame retardants using multienzyme-labeling carbon hollow nanochains as signal amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mouhong; Liu, Yingju; Chen, Xiaofen; Fei, Shidong; Ni, Chunlin; Fang, Yueping; Liu, Chengbin; Cai, Qingyun

    2013-07-15

    An electrochemical, signal amplified immunosensor was developed to detect 3-bromobiphenyl (BBP) by using a bio-inspired polydopamine (PDOP)/gold nanocluster (AuNc) as the sensor platform and multienzyme-labeled carbon hollow nanochains as the signal amplifier. The self-polymerized dopamine membrane on the AuNc-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle and electrochemical measurements. Such PDOP/AuNc platform featured the mild cross-linking reaction with the dense immobilization of BBP-antigens (BBP-Ag). Moreover, by using multiple horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and secondary antibodies (Ab2) modified one-dimensional carbon hollow nanochains (CHNc) as the signal enhancer, it held promise for improving the sensitivity and detection limit of the immunoassay. Based on the competitive immunoassay protocol, this immunosensor showed a linear range from 1 pM to 2 nM for BBP with a detection limit of 0.5 pM. Also, it exhibited high sensitivity, wide linear range, acceptable stability and reproducibility on a promising immobilization platform using a novel signal amplifier, which may extend its application in other environmental monitoring. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA-doped structurally controllable hollow mesoporous carbon for improving the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and in vivo tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Zhao, Yating; Cui, Yu; Yue, Yang; Gao, Yikun; Zhao, Qinfu; Liu, Jie; Wang, Siling

    2016-08-01

    A structurally controllable fluorescence-labeled hollow mesoporous carbon (HMC) was simply prepared to improve the oral bioavailability of insoluble drugs and further trace their delivery process in vivo. The hollow structure was derived from an inverse replica process using mesoporous silica as a template and the fluorescent label was prepared by doping the carboxylated HMC with a confinement of Eu3+/Gd3+-EDTA. The physicochemical properties of the composites were systematically characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectra tests prior to studying their effects on drug-release behavior and biodistribution. As a result, the thickness of the carrier’s shell was adjusted from 70 nm to 130 nm and the maximum drug loading was up to 73.6%. The model drug carvedilol (CAR) showed sustained release behavior compared to CAR commercial capsules, and the dissolution rate slowed down as the shells got thicker. AUC0-48h and Tmax were enlarged 2.2 and 6.5 fold, respectively, which demonstrated that oral bioavailability was successfully improved. Bioimaging tests showed that the novel carbon vehicle had a long residence time in the gastrointestinal tract. In short, the newly designed HMC is a promising drug carrier for both oral bioavailability improvement and in vivo tracing.

  4. Carbon markets proliferating despite difficulties, report notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-06-01

    Although some existing carbon markets are facing structural issues and economic difficulties in Europe have put a damper on the European Union emissions trading system, new carbon pricing initiatives are developing rapidly, and these initiatives could help slow down greenhouse gas emissions, according to a 29 May report from the World Bank.

  5. Rational design of carbon network cross-linked Si-SiC hollow nanosphere as anode of lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhenhai; Lu, Ganhua; Cui, Shumao; Kim, Haejune; Ci, Suqin; Jiang, Junwei; Hurley, Patrick T.; Chen, Junhong

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to realize controllable synthesis of Si-based nanostructures from common and easily accessible silica nanoparticles and to study their component/structure-dependent electrochemical performance as an anode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). To this end, a controllable route based on deliberate design has been developed to prepare hollow Si-based nanospheres with tunable composition and crystal structure at the nanoscale. The synthesis process started with coating silica nanoparticles with a carbonaceous polymer with a controllable thickness followed by magnesiothermic reduction. An Si-SiC-C composite was finally produced with a unique hollow sphere structure featuring Si-SiC nanoparticles encapsulated by a cross-linked carbon film network. In addition to the scalability of the synthetic route, the resulting composite exhibits a number of advantageous properties, including excellent electrical conductivity, highly accessible surfaces, structural coherence, and a favorable structure for the formation of a stable solid-electrolyte interphase, which makes it attractive and promising for advanced anode materials of LIBs.This study aims to realize controllable synthesis of Si-based nanostructures from common and easily accessible silica nanoparticles and to study their component/structure-dependent electrochemical performance as an anode of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). To this end, a controllable route based on deliberate design has been developed to prepare hollow Si-based nanospheres with tunable composition and crystal structure at the nanoscale. The synthesis process started with coating silica nanoparticles with a carbonaceous polymer with a controllable thickness followed by magnesiothermic reduction. An Si-SiC-C composite was finally produced with a unique hollow sphere structure featuring Si-SiC nanoparticles encapsulated by a cross-linked carbon film network. In addition to the scalability of the synthetic route, the resulting composite exhibits a

  6. Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow microspheres as anode and carbon fiber as cathode for high performance quantum dot and dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Veerappan; Kong, Eui-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Jang, Hyun Myung; Rhee, Shi-Woo

    2014-02-01

    Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a unique structure is used as an alternative counter electrode (CE) and compared with the standard platinum (Pt) CE. Their electrocatalytic properties are measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and Tafel-polarization. Under 1 sun illumination, solar cells made with hollow SnO2 photoanode sandwiched with the stable CNF CE showed a power conversion efficiency of 2.5% in QDSCs and 3.0% for DSCs, which is quite promising with the standard Pt CE (QDSCs: 2.1%, and DSCs: 3.6%).Cauliflower-like tin oxide (SnO2) hollow microspheres (HMS) sensitized with multilayer quantum dots (QDs) as photoanode and alternative stable, low-cost counter electrode are employed for the first time in QD-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Cauliflower-like SnO2 hollow spheres mainly consist of 50 nm-sized agglomerated nanoparticles; they possess a high internal surface area and light scattering in between the microspheres and shell layers. This makes them promising photoanode material for both QDSCs and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method and chemical bath deposition (CBD) are used for QD-sensitizing the SnO2 microspheres. Additionally, carbon-nanofiber (CNF) with a

  7. L-cysteine-assisted synthesis of hierarchical NiS2 hollow spheres supported carbon nitride as photocatalysts with enhanced lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chengzhang; Jiang, Zhifeng; Chen, Linlin; Qian, Kun; Xie, Jimin

    2017-03-01

    Novel hierarchical NiS2 hollow spheres modified by graphite-like carbon nitride were prepared using a facile L-cysteine-assisted solvothermal route. The NiS2/g-C3N4 composites exhibited excellent photocatalytic efficiency in rhodamine B, methyl orange and ciprofloxacin degradation as compared to single g-C3N4 and NiS2, which could be due to the synergistic effects of the unique hollow sphere-like structure, strong visible-light absorption and increased separation rate of the photoinduced electron–hole pairs at the intimate interface of heterojunctions. A suitable combination of g-C3N4 with NiS2 showed the best photocatalytic performance. In addition, an electron spin resonance and trapping experiment demonstrated that the photogenerated hydroxyl radicals and superoxide radicals were the two main photoactive species in photocatalysis. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of NiS2/g-C3N4 composites under visible light irradiation is also proposed. The strategy presented here can be extended to a general strategy for constructing 3D/2D heterostructured photocatalysts for broad applications in photocatalysis.

  8. Ultrathin 1T-phase MoS2 nanosheets decorated hollow carbon microspheres as highly efficient catalysts for solar energy harvesting and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Min-Chien; Chang, Chin-Yu; Niu, Li-Juan; Bai, Feng; Li, Lain-Jong; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lin, Jeng-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Wu

    2017-03-01

    The composite of MoS2 and hollow carbon sphere (MoS2@HCS) is prepared via a glucose-assisted one pot synthesis. The composite consists of hierarchical spheres with a diameter of 0.5-4 μm and these hollow spheres are decorated with a number of curled and interlaced MoS2 nanosheets. After the composite is subject to the lithium intercalation, the MoS2 is converted from 2H to 1T phase. In this current work, the activities of 1T-MoS2@HCS toward photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the reduction of I3- in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are systemically investigated. When evaluated as the photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, the amount of evolved hydrogen over 1T-MoS2@HCS can reach 143 μmol in 2 h, being 3.6 times higher than as-synthesized 2H-MoS2@HCS. Additionally, the 1T-MoS2@HCS can be employed as the counter electrode (CE) material in DSCs. The DSCs based on 1T-MoS2@HCS CE possesses the power conversion efficiency of 8.94%, being higher than that with 2H-MoS2@HCS CE (8.16%) and comparable to that with Pt CE (8.87%). Our study demonstrates that 1T-MoS2@HCS has a great potential as an inexpensive alternative to Pt catalysts.

  9. Carbon-Coated Fe3O4/VOx Hollow Microboxes Derived from Metal-Organic Frameworks as a High-Performance Anode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Wei; Wen, Tao; Liang, Kuang; Jiang, Yi-Fan; Zhou, Xiao; Shen, Cong-Cong; Xu, An-Wu

    2017-02-01

    As the ever-growing demand for high-performance power sources, lithium-ion batteries with high storage capacities and outstanding rate performance have been widely considered as a promising storage device. In this work, starting with metal-organic frameworks, we have developed a facile approach to the synthesis of hybrid Fe3O4/VOx hollow microboxes via the process of hydrolysis and ion exchange and subsequent calcination. In the constructed architecture, the hollow structure provides an efficient lithium ion diffusion pathway and extra space to accommodate the volume expansion during the insertion and extraction of Li(+). With the assistance of carbon coating, the obtained Fe3O4/VOx@C microboxes exhibit excellent cyclability and enhanced rate performance when employed as an anode material for lithium-ion batteries. As a result, the obtained Fe3O4/VOx@C delivers a high Coulombic efficiency (near 100%) and outstanding reversible specific capacity of 742 mAh g(-1) after 400 cycles at a current density of 0.5 A g(-1). Moreover, a remarkable reversible capacity of 556 mAh g(-1) could be retained even at a current density of 2 A g(-1). This study provides a fundamental understanding for the rational design of other composite oxides as high-performance electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Hollow nitrogen-doped carbon microspheres pyrolyzed from self-polymerized dopamine and its application in simultaneous electrochemical determination of uric acid, ascorbic acid and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chu, Xiaochen; Yang, Yan; Li, Xing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Chen, Jinhua

    2011-02-15

    Hollow nitrogen-doped carbon microspheres (HNCMS) as a novel carbon material have been prepared and the catalytic activities of HNCMS-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode towards the electro-oxidation of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA) and dopamine (DA) have also been investigated. Comparing with the bare GC and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) modified GC (CNTs/GC) electrodes, the HNCMS modified GC (HNCMS/GC) electrode has higher catalytic activities towards the oxidation of UA, AA and DA. Moreover, the peak separations between AA and DA, and DA and UA at the HNCMS/GC electrode are up to 212 and 136 mV, respectively, which are superior to those at the CNTs/GC electrode (168 and 114 mV). Thus the simultaneous determination of UA, AA and DA was carried out successfully. In the co-existence system of UA, AA and DA, the linear response range for UA, AA and DA are 5-30 μM, 100-1000 μM and 3-75 μM, respectively and the detection limits (S/N = 3) are 0.04 μM, 0.91 μM and 0.02 μM, respectively. Meanwhile, the HNCMS/GC electrode can be applied to measure uric acid in human urine, and may be useful for measuring abnormally high concentration of AA or DA. The attractive features of HNCMS provide potential applications in the simultaneous determination of UA, AA and DA.

  11. Lattice contracted Pd-hollow nanocrystals: Synthesis, structure and electrocatalysis for formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Mingjun; Chen, Ju; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Zou, Zhiqing; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Hollow metal nanocrystals with tuned electronic and geometric structure are highly desirable for the efficient catalytic and/or electrocatalytic reactions. Herein, we report the synthesis of carbon-supported Pd hollow nanocrystal (Pd-hollow/C) catalyst through a galvanic replacement reaction combined with Kirkendall effect without the use of polymeric stabilizer. The Pd-hollow structure is verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Noticeable lattice contraction in the Pd-hollow nanocrystal has been observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction with a decrease in the Pd (111) lattice distance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicates that the surface Pd atoms donate more electrons to the overlap with the sub-layer atoms, suggesting a strengthened d-hybridization and a down-shift of d-band center relative to the Fermi level on the surface. Electrochemical measurements show that the Pd-hollow/C catalyst exhibits a significantly enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation. The collective effects of the hollow structure and down-shift of Pd d-band center could explain well such an enhanced catalytic activity. The present study provides new insights into the relevancy of lattice parameter, electronic structure with catalytic property, and suggests design features for excellent nanostructured catalysts.

  12. Reconstruction of Temporal Hollowing Defect With Anterior-Lateral Thigh Free Flap Following Resection of Recurrent Ameloblastoma of the Infratemporal Fossa and Right Mandible (a Case Report).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melville, James C; Hornberger, John C; Young, Simon; Shum, Jonathan W

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent invasive ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa is an uncommonly encountered phenomenon in the practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery and presents many surgical challenges for the practitioner. This case report describes a patient who underwent previous resection of a mandibular ameloblastoma with multiple recurrences. The patient was diagnosed with a recurrent ameloblastoma of the infratemporal fossa that was subsequently resected and reconstructed using an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free tissue transfer. There are few reported cases of recurrent ameloblastomas in the infratemporal fossa and none that describe surgical resection and reconstruction of such a lesion. Owing to the uniqueness of the surgical defect, an ALT flap was used to correct the temporal hollowing. There have been multiple reported cases of reconstruction of temporal hollowing defects using autogenous fat or allograft; however, none have described the use of a de-epithelialized ALT microvascular reconstruction of a temporal hollowing defect. This case report describes a unique clinical situation of surgical resection and reconstruction that resulted in a satisfactory outcome for the patient. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrathin 1T-phase MoS2 nanosheets decorated hollow carbon microspheres as highly efficient catalysts for solar energy harvesting and storage

    KAUST Repository

    Hsiao, Min-Chien

    2017-02-08

    The composite of MoS2 and hollow carbon sphere (MoS2@HCS) is prepared via a glucose-assisted one pot synthesis. The composite consists of hierarchical spheres with a diameter of 0.5–4 μm and these hollow spheres are decorated with a number of curled and interlaced MoS2 nanosheets. After the composite is subject to the lithium intercalation, the MoS2 is converted from 2H to 1T phase. In this current work, the activities of 1T-MoS2@HCS toward photocatalytic hydrogen evolution and the reduction of I3− in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are systemically investigated. When evaluated as the photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution, the amount of evolved hydrogen over 1T-MoS2@HCS can reach 143 μmol in 2 h, being 3.6 times higher than as-synthesized 2H-MoS2@HCS. Additionally, the 1T-MoS2@HCS can be employed as the counter electrode (CE) material in DSCs. The DSCs based on 1T-MoS2@HCS CE possesses the power conversion efficiency of 8.94%, being higher than that with 2H-MoS2@HCS CE (8.16%) and comparable to that with Pt CE (8.87%). Our study demonstrates that 1T-MoS2@HCS has a great potential as an inexpensive alternative to Pt catalysts.

  14. Preliminary characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a possible solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Bérangère; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-François

    2012-01-01

    In microgravity, one of the major challenge encountered in biological life support systems (BLSS) is the gas-liquid transfer with, for instance, the necessity to provide CO2 (carbon source, pH control) and to recover the evolved O2 in photobioreactors used as atmosphere bioregenerative systems.This paper describes first the development of a system enabling the accurate characterization of the mass transfer limiting step for a PTFE membrane module used as a possible efficient solution to the microgravity gas-liquid transfer. This original technical apparatus, together with a technical assessment of membrane permeability to different gases, is associated with a balance model, determining thus completely the CO2 mass transfer problem between phases. First results are given and discussed for the CO2 mass transfer coefficient kLCO obtained in case of absorption experiments at pH 8 using the hollow fiber membrane module. The consistency of the proposed method, based on a gas and liquid phase balances verifying carbon conservation enables a very accurate determination of the kLCO value as a main limiting step of the whole process. Nevertheless, further experiments are still needed to demonstrate that the proposed method could serve in the future as reference method for mass transfer coefficient determination if using membrane modules for BLSS in reduced or microgravity conditions.

  15. Solid-phase microextraction of ultra-trace amounts of tramadol from human urine by using a carbon nanotube/flower-shaped zinc oxide hollow fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Maryam; Balali-Mood, Mahdi; Mozaffari, Sayed Ahmad; Amoli, Hossein Salar

    2016-11-01

    A new method is successfully developed for the separation and determination of a very low amount of tramadol in urine using functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/flower-shaped zinc oxide before solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography. Under ultrasonic agitation, a sol of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and flower-shaped zinc oxide were forced into and trapped within the pore structure of the polypropylene and the sol solution immobilized into the hollow fiber. Flower-shaped zinc oxide was synthesized and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The morphology of the fabricated solid-phase microextraction surface was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the method shows linearity in a wide range of 0.12-7680 ng/mL, and a low detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.03 ng/mL. The precision of the method was determined and a relative standard deviation of 3.87% was obtained. This method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of tramadol in urine samples. The relative recovery percentage obtained for the spiked urine sample at 1000 ng/mL was 94.2%.

  16. 微纳分级结构碳酸钙中空微球的可控制备%Controllable Fabrication of Calcium Carbonate Hollow Microspheres with Micro-nano Hierarchical Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹俭鹏; 杨洪志; 肖平; 潘一峰

    2016-01-01

    以CaCl2和Na2CO3为反应原料,以聚乙烯吡咯烷酮(PVP)和十二烷基磺酸钠(SDSN)为模板剂,在50℃采用化学沉淀反应,干燥、煅烧后成功制备了具有微纳分级结构的 CaCO3中空微球。采用扫描电子显微镜、透射电子显微镜和X射线衍射等检测手段对所制备的样品形貌、结构进行了表征,结果显示:所制备的微纳分级结构CaCO3中空微球直径为4~6μm,壳壁由直径约60 nm的CaCO3颗粒组成,壳层厚度约为200 nm, CaCO3中空微球晶相组成为方解石和球霰石的共混体。同时,在反应温度为50℃、PVP添加量为0.4 g, SDSN浓度为0.1 mol/L的条件下,所制备的微纳分级结构CaCO3中空微球分散性好,且形貌比较完整。%With polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDSN) as the template, calcium car-bonate hollow microspheres with micro-nano hierarchical structure were successfully synthesized using sodium carbonate and calcium chloride as starting materials through a precipitation reaction method at reaction temperature of 50℃. The products were characterized by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron micro-scope (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and other detection methods. The results show that the hollow calcium car-bonate microspheres with micro-nano hierarchical structure are about 4-6μm in diameter. The shell thickness of calcium carbonate hollow microspheres is about 200 nm, which consists of calcium carbonate particles with size about 60 nm. The phase of calcium carbonate hollow microspheres is composed of calcite and vaterite. Excellent dispersibility and spherical morphology of calcium carbonate hollow microspheres can be achieved with addition of 0.1 mol/L SDSN and 0.4 g PVP consequently.

  17. ONE CASE REPORT OF ACUTE POISONING BY BARIUM CARBONATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Qin-min; BIAN Fan; WANG Shu-yun; SHEN Sheng-hui

    2009-01-01

    @@ Most barium poisoning cases were caused by oral intake by mistake. Recent years, barium carbonate poisoning has been rare to be reported. Here we reported a case of acute barium carbonate toxication taken orally on purpose.

  18. Generation of a hollow laser beam by a multimode fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyu Ma; Huadong Cheng; Wenzhuo Zhang; Liang Liu; Yuzhu Wang

    2007-01-01

    A simple method to generate a hollow laser beam by multimode fiber is reported. A dark hollow laser beam is generated from a multimode fiber and the dependence of the output beam profile on the incident angle of laser beam is analyzed. The results show that this hollow laser beam can be used to trap and guide cold atoms.

  19. Hollow Alveolus-Like Nanovesicle Assembly with Metal-Encapsulated Hollow Zeolite Nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Chengyi; Zhang, Anfeng; Liu, Min; Gu, Lin; Guo, Xinwen; Song, Chunshan

    2016-08-23

    Inspired by the vesicular structure of alveolus which has a porous nanovesicle structure facilitating the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide, we designed a hollow nanovesicle assembly with metal-encapsulated hollow zeolite that would enhance diffusion of reactants/products and inhibit sintering and leaching of active metals. This zeolitic nanovesicle has been successfully synthesized by a strategy which involves a one-pot hydrothermal synthesis of hollow assembly of metal-containing solid zeolite crystals without a structural template and a selective desilication-recrystallization accompanied by leaching-hydrolysis to convert the metal-containing solid crystals into metal-encapsulated hollow crystals. We demonstrate the strategy in synthesizing a hollow nanovesicle assembly of Fe2O3-encapsulated hollow crystals of ZSM-5 zeolite. This material possesses a microporous (0.4-0.6 nm) wall of hollow crystals and a mesoporous (5-17 nm) shell of nanovesicle with macropores (about 350 nm) in the core. This hierarchical structure enables excellent Fe2O3 dispersion (3-4 nm) and resistance to sintering even at 800 °C; facilitates the transport of reactant/products; and exhibits superior activity and resistance to leaching in phenol degradation. Hollow nanovesicle assembly of Fe-Pt bimetal-encapsulated hollow ZSM-5 crystals was also prepared.

  20. Analysis of MESSENGER high-resolution images of Mercury's hollows and implications for hollow formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewett, David T.; Stadermann, Amanda C.; Susorney, Hannah C.; Ernst, Carolyn M.; Xiao, Zhiyong; Chabot, Nancy L.; Denevi, Brett W.; Murchie, Scott L.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Kinczyk, Mallory J.; Gillis-Davis, Jeffrey J.; Solomon, Sean C.

    2016-09-01

    High-resolution images from MESSENGER provide morphological information on the nature and origin of Mercury's hollows, small depressions that likely formed when a volatile constituent was lost from the surface. Because graphite may be a component of the low-reflectance material that hosts hollows, we suggest that loss of carbon by ion sputtering or conversion to methane by proton irradiation could contribute to hollows formation. Measurements of widespread hollows in 565 images with pixel scales <20 m indicate that the average depth of hollows is 24 ± 16 m. We propose that hollows cease to increase in depth when a volatile-depleted lag deposit becomes sufficiently thick to protect the underlying surface. The difficulty of developing a lag on steep topography may account for the common occurrence of hollows on crater central peaks and walls. Disruption of the lag, e.g., by secondary cratering, could restart growth of hollows in a location that had been dormant. Images at extremely high resolution (~3 m/pixel) show that the edges of hollows are straight, as expected if the margins formed by scarp retreat. These highest-resolution images reveal no superposed impact craters, implying that hollows are very young. The width of hollows within rayed crater Balanchine suggests that the maximum time for lateral growth by 1 cm is ~10,000 yr. A process other than entrainment of dust by gases evolved in a steady-state sublimation-like process is likely required to explain the high-reflectance haloes that surround many hollows.

  1. Interfacial Reaction Dependent Performance of Hollow Carbon NanoSphere – Sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eZheng

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lithium-sulfur (Li-S battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of technical challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycle life, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performances. These findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  2. In situ synthesis of cobalt ferrites-embedded hollow N-doped carbon as an outstanding catalyst for elimination of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Tao; Yu, Mingdong; Zhang, Haiyan; He, Zhiqiao; Zhang, Xiaole; Chen, Jianmeng; Song, Shuang

    2017-09-01

    Using polydopamine-metal ions complex as precursor, hollow mesoporous N-doped carbon microspheres encapsulating spinel ferrites nanocrystals (HM-NC/CoFe2O4) were facilely prepared with the aim of creating a novel heterogeneous catalyst for sulfate radical-based oxidation of organic contaminants. The surface morphology, structure and composition of HM-NC/CoFe2O4 catalyst were thoroughly investigated. The applicability of the catalyst was systematically assessed through numerous controlled trials, several operating parameters, as well as different model pollutants by means of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) activation. Outstanding efficiency and excellent reusability were achieved due to the unique structure and composition of HM-NC/CoFe2O4. The HM-NC scaffold with high porosity and surface area not only stabilizes the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles but also greatly facilitates the accessibility and adsorption of substrates to the active sites. In addition, both HM-NC and CoFe2O4 on the material surface can act as active sites. Sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals are identified as main active species and a possible enhancement mechanism of catalytic performance is also proposed. Due to the simple synthesis method, low-cost precursors, unique structure and excellent catalytic activity and stability, this novel composite have great potential as new strategic materials for remediation of water pollution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel platform for high sensitivity determination of PbP2a based on gold nanoparticles composited graphitized mesoporous carbon and doxorubicin loaded hollow gold nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Shen, Huawei; Zhang, Xing; Tao, Yiyi; Xiang, Hua; Xie, Guoming

    2016-03-15

    Gold nanoparticles composite graphitized mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (GMCs@AuNPs) biocomposite with the signal amplification capability was successfully synthesized for use in an immunoassay for penicillin binding protein 2 a (PbP2a). The polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were first electrodeposited onto the Au electrode can greatly increase the amount of the captured antibodies. Protein A was used to properly orientate immobilized antibody against PbP2a, which strongly improved specificity of the antigen-antibody binding. Hollow gold nanospheres (HGNPs) as effective nanocarriers have been synthesized by sacrificial galvanic replacement of cobalt nanoparticles capable of encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox). The obtained HGNPs@Dox bionanocomposite was used for further loading of detection antibody (Ab2) to form the HGNPs@Dox@Ab2 bioconjugate. Then, the differential pulse voltammetric signals related to the concentration of PbP2a for Dox could be detected, and the immunosensor exhibited a detection limit as low as 0.65 pg mL(-1) (at an S/N ratio of 3). The proposed method with an excellent differentiation ability showed high sensitivity and specificity. The morphologies and electrochemistry properties of the composites were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, electrochemical characterization, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrophotometer and Malvern laser particle size analyzer, respectively. In addition, the basic approach described here would be applicable towards developing biodetection assays against other important targets. Moreover, the bioconjugate of HGNPs@Dox is also a promising pattern to delivery Dox in vivo for anticancer therapy.

  4. Hollow microporous organic capsules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Buyi; Yang, Xinjia; Xia, Lingling; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Tan, Bien

    2013-01-01

    Fabrication of hollow microporous organic capsules (HMOCs) could be very useful because of their hollow and porous morphology, which combines the advantages of both microporous organic polymers and non-porous nanocapsules...

  5. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  6. Characterization of carbon dioxide transfer in a hollow fiber membrane module as a solution for gas-liquid transfer in microgravity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farges, Berangere; Duchez, David; Dussap, Claude-Gilles; Cornet, Jean-F.

    hollow fibre membrane module. The consistency of the proposed method, based on a gas and liquid phase balances CO and a carbon relation of conservation enables a very accurate determination of the kL 2 value as a main limiting step of the whole process. Considering then the wide range of different analytical tools available for the total inorganic carbon measurement in liquid samples, it could be envisaged in the future to prefer the procedure developed in this paper instead of using O classical kL 2 determination methods in the perspective of any accurate characterisation of gas-liquid mass transfer process (affected or not by reduced gravity).

  7. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...... is therefore going on in the Netherlands about the fire resistance of hollow-core slabs. In 2014 the producers of hollow-core slabs have published a report of a project called Holcofire containing a collection of 162 fire tests on hollow-core slabs giving for the first time an overview of the fire tests made....... The present paper analyses the evidence now available for assessment of the fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs. The 162 fire tests from the Holcofire report are compared against the requirements for testing from the product standard for hollow-core slabs EN1168 and knowledge about the possible...

  8. Graphitic carbon nitrides modified hollow fiber solid phase microextraction for extraction and determination of uric acid in urine and serum coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying-pei; Chen, Juan; Qi, Huan-yang; Shi, Yan-ping

    2015-11-01

    An elevated uric acid (UA) in urine or serum can affect renal function and blood pressure, which is an indicator of gout, cardiovascular and renal diseases, hypertension, etc. In this work, a new type of mixed matrix membrane (MMM), based on graphitic carbon nitrides (g-CNs) and hollow fiber (HF), was prepared and combined with solid phase microextraction (SPME) mode to determine UA in urine and serum followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The porous g-CNs were dispersed in ammonia, and then the exfoliated g-CNs nanosheets were held in the pores of HF by capillary forces and sonification. The prepared g-CNs modified HF (g-CNs-HF) was immersed in biofluid directly to extract UA with SPME mode and the solvent-free mode is convenient for further derivatization and analysis. To achieve the highest extraction efficiency (EF), main extraction and derivatization parameters, such as g-CNs-HF immobilizing time, sonification power and time of extraction, derivatization and desorption time, were optimized. Under the optimum extraction conditions, a favorable linearity of UA was obtained in the range 0.1-200μgmL(-1) with correlation coefficients higher than 0.9990, and the average recoveries at three spiked levels of UA in urine and serum ranged from 80.7% to 121.6%, from 84.7% to 101.1%, respectively. The obtained results demonstrated the developed g-CNs-HF-SPME is a simple, rapid, cost-effective, solvent-free method for the analysis of UA in biofluid.

  9. Investiagtion of Nanoscale Carbon Nitride Thin Films Grown Using DC HCD Hollow Cathode Discharge%用直流中空阴极放电方法(DC HCD)生长的纳米级碳的氮化物薄膜研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Y.H.; SHI Y.C.; YANG P.; TANG X.L.; FENG P.X.

    2005-01-01

    There is growing interest in the underlying physical processes in optoelectronic devices based on thin-film multilayer structures. Recently, many investigators have made great efforts on synthesizing the ultra - hard nanoscale carbon nitride thin films. Considering low cost and simple configuration, we used DC hollow cathode discharge (HCD) for deposition of nanoscale carbon nitride thin films.

  10. In situ chemical vapor deposition growth of carbon nanotubes on hollow CoFe2O4 as an efficient and low cost counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Jiao, Qingze; Zhang, Shenli; Zhao, Yun; Wu, Qin; Li, Hansheng

    2016-09-01

    The composites of hollow CoFe2O4 and carbon nanotubes (h-CoFe2O4@CNTs) are successfully prepared by using a simple hydrothermal process coupling with the in-situ chemical vapor deposition (CVD) as electrocatalytic materials for counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells. The CNTs are uniformly grown on the surface of hollow CoFe2O4 particles verified by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements. The electrochemical performances of hollow CoFe2O4@CNTs composites are evaluated by the EIS, Tafel polarization and CV measurements, and exhibiting high electrocatalytic performance for the reduction of triiodide. The presence of conductive polypyrrole nanoparticles could further improve the conductivity and catalytic performance of the resultant composites. Controlling the thickness of composites film, the optimum photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 6.55% is obtained, which is comparable to that of the cells fabricated with Pt counter electrode (6.61%). In addition, the composites exhibit a good long-term electrochemical stability in I3-/I- electrolyte.

  11. Hollow dimension of modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we are interested in the following general question: Given a module Mwhich has finite hollow dimension and which has a finite collection of submodules Ki (1≤i≤n) such that M=K1+... +Kn, can we find an expression for the hollow dimension of Min terms of hollow dimensions of modules built up in some way from K1 Kn? We prove the following theorem:Let Mbe an amply supplemented module having finite hollow dimension and let Ki (1≤i≤n) be a finite collection of submodules of Msuch that M=K1+...+Kn. Then the hollow dimension h(M) of Mis the sum of the hollow dimensions of Ki (1≤i≤n) ifand only if Ki is a supplement of K1+...+Ki-1+Ki+1+...+Kn in Mfor each 1≤i≤n.

  12. Modified technique to fabricate a hollow light-weight facial prosthesis for lateral midfacial defect: a clinical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Large oro-facial defects result from cancer treatment consequences in serious functional as well as cosmetic deformities. Acceptable cosmetic results usually can be obtained with a facial prosthesis. However, retention of a large facial prosthesis can be challenging because of its size and weight. This article describes prosthetic rehabilitation of a 57-year-old man having a right lateral mid-facial defect with intraoral-extraoral combination prosthesis. A modified technique to fabricate a hollow substructure in heat-polymerizing polymethyl-methacrylate to support silicone facial prosthesis was illustrated. The resultant facial prosthesis was structurally durable and light in weight facilitating the retention with magnets satisfactorily. This technique is advantageous as there is no need to fabricate the whole prosthesis again in case of damage of the silicone layer because the outer silicone layer can be removed and re-packed on the substructure if the gypsum-mold is preserved. PMID:21165271

  13. Carbon nanotube reinforced hollow fiber solid/liquid phase microextraction: a novel extraction technique for the measurement of caffeic acid in Echinacea purpurea herbal extracts combined with high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es'haghi, Zarrin; Golsefidi, Mazyar Ahmadi; Saify, Ali; Tanha, Ali Akbar; Rezaeifar, Zohre; Alian-Nezhadi, Zahra

    2010-04-23

    A new design of hollow fiber solid-liquid phase microextraction (HF-SLPME) was developed for the determination of caffeic acid in medicinal plants samples as Echinacea purpure. The membrane extraction with sorbent interface used in this research is a three-phase supported liquid membrane consisting of an aqueous (donor phase), organic solvent/nano sorbent (membrane) and aqueous (acceptor phase) system operated in direct immersion sampling mode. The multi-walled carbon nanotube dispersed in the organic solvent is held in the pores of a porous membrane supported by capillary forces and sonification. It is in contact with two aqueous phases: the donor phase, which is the aqueous sample, and the acceptor phase, usually an aqueous buffer. All microextraction experiments were supported using an Accurel Q3/2 polypropylene hollow fiber membrane (600 microm I.D., 200 microm wall thicknesses, and 0.2 microm pore size). The experimental setup is very simple and highly affordable. The hollow fiber is disposable, so single use of the fiber reduces the risk of cross-contamination and carry-over problems. The proposed method allows the very effective and enriched recuperation of an acidic analyte into one single extract. In order to obtain high enrichment and extraction efficiency of the analyte using this novel technique, the main parameters were optimized. Under the optimized extraction conditions, the method showed good linearity (0.0001-50 microg/L), repeatability, low limits of detection (0.00005 microg/L) and excellent enrichment (EF=2108). Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems; final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gundersen, P.; Berg, B.; Currie, W.S.; Dise, N.B.; Emmett, B.A.; Gauci, V.; Holmberg, M.; Kjønaas, O.J.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Salm, van der C.; Schmidt, I.K.; Tietema, A.; Wessel, W.W.; Vestgarden, L.S.; Akselsson, C.; Vries, de W.; Forsius, M.; Kros, H.; Matzner, E.; Moldan, F.; Nadelhoffer, K.J.; Nilsson, L.O.; Reinds, G.J.; Rosengren, U.; Stuanes, A.O.; Wright, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project 'Carbon' - Nitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems' (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C ac

  15. Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-05-01

    The Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report summarizes a workshop hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office on May 23–24, 2017, in Orlando, Florida. The event gathered stakeholder input through facilitated discussions focused on innovative technologies and business strategies for growing algae on waste carbon dioxide resources.

  16. Hierarchical (Ni,Co)Se 2 /Carbon Hollow Rhombic Dodecahedra Derived from Metal-Organic Frameworks for Efficient Water-Splitting Electrocatalysis

    KAUST Repository

    Ming, Fangwang

    2017-08-12

    In this work, we demonstrate that the electrocatalytic activity of transition metal chalcogenides can be greatly enhanced by simultaneously engineering the active sites, surface area, and conductivity. Using metal-organic frameworks-derived (Ni,Co)Se2/C hollow rhombic dodecahedra (HRD) as a demonstration, we show that the incorporation of Ni into CoSe2 could generates additional active sites, the hierarchical hollow structure promotes the electrolyte diffusion, the in-situ hybridization with C improves the conductivity. As a result, the (Ni,Co)Se2/C HRD exhibit superior performance toward the overall water-splitting electrocatalysis in 1M KOH with a cell voltage as low as 1.58V at the current density of 10mAcm−2, making the (Ni,Co)Se2/C HRD as a promising alternative to noble metal catalysts for water splitting.

  17. Manufacturing hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A resilient denture liner is placed in the part of the hollow obturator base that contacts to post hemimaxillectomy mucosa. Replacing the resilient denture liner can makes the hollow obturator has an intimate contact with the mucosa, so it can prevents the mouth liquid enter to the cavum nasi and sinus, also eliminates painful because of using the hollow obturator. Resilient denture liner is a soft and resilient material that applied to the fitting surface of a denture in order to allow a more distribution of load. A case was reported about using the hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy to overcome these problems.

  18. Final Project Report for "Interfacial Thermal Resistance of Carbon Nanotubes”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cumings, John [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-04-15

    This report describes an ongoing project to comprehensively study the interfacial thermal boundary resistance (Kapitza resistance) of carbon nanotubes. It includes a list of publications, personnel supported, the overall approach, accomplishments and future plans.

  19. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3) Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo Guanke; Guo He; Liu Hui; Zhang Jingyan; Hou Jing; Shen Guangxia; Cheng Ping; Guo Shouwu

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres sho...

  20. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  1. Engineering Stable Hollow Capsules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Scientists at the CAS Institute of Chemistry have been succeeded in fabricating stable hollow capsules by extending covalent layer-by-layer self-assembly(CSA)technique from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional systems.

  2. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  3. Hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles from a non-thermal plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Devin; Lopez, Thomas; Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles via a two-step process involving the non-thermal plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles, followed by their in-flight carbonization, also initiated by a non-thermal plasma. Simple geometric considerations associated with the expansion of the silicon lattice upon carbonization, in combination of the spherical geometry of the system, explain the formation of hollow nanostructures. This is in contrast with previous reports that justify the formation of hollow particles by means of out-diffusion of the core element, i.e., by the Kirkendall nanoscale effect. A theoretical analysis of the diffusion kinetics indicates that interaction with the ionized gas induces significant nanoparticle heating, allowing for the fast transport of carbon into the silicon particle and for the subsequent nucleation of the beta-silicon carbide phase. This work confirms the potential of non-thermal plasma processes for the synthesis of nanostructures composed of high-melting point materials, and suggests that such processes can be tuned to achieve morphological control.

  4. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, Jan; Olijslager, J.; Albers, J.H.M.; Rieke, J.C.; Greidanus, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Poly(l-lactide), (PLLA), hollow fibres were prepared using a dry-wet phase inversion spinning process. The effect of several spinning parameters (i.e. bore medium flow rate, spinning dope extrusion rate, fibre take-up rate, and spinning height) on the hollow fibre dimensions is reported. The use of

  5. Biodegradable hollow fibres for the controlled release of hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eenink, M.J.D.; Feijen, J.; Olijslager, J.; Albers, J.H.M.; Rieke, J.C.; Greidanus, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    Poly(l-lactide), (PLLA), hollow fibres were prepared using a dry-wet phase inversion spinning process. The effect of several spinning parameters (i.e. bore medium flow rate, spinning dope extrusion rate, fibre take-up rate, and spinning height) on the hollow fibre dimensions is reported. The use of

  6. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL

  7. Axisymmetric Vibration of Piezo-Lemv Composite Hollow Multilayer Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Nehru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Axisymmetric vibration of an infinite piezolaminated multilayer hollow cylinder made of piezoelectric layers of 6 mm class and an isotropic LEMV (Linear Elastic Materials with Voids layers is studied. The frequency equations are obtained for the traction free outer surface with continuity conditions at the interfaces. Numerical results are carried out for the inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by LEMV (It is hypothetical material layers and the dispersion curves are compared with that of a similar 3-layer model and of 3 and 5 layer models with inner, middle, and outer hollow piezoelectric layers bonded by CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced plastics.

  8. What Have We Learned About Arctic Carbon Since The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, E.

    2015-12-01

    Large pools of organic carbon were reported in The First State of the Carbon Cycle Report, but measurements from high latitude ecosystems, in particular for deeper soils >1m depth, remained scarce. A newly enlarged soil carbon database with an order of magnitude more numerous deep sampling sites has verified the widespread pattern of large quantities of carbon accumulated deep in permafrost (perennially frozen) soils. The known pool of permafrost carbon across the northern circumpolar permafrost zone is now estimated to be 1330-1580 Pg C, with the potential for an additional ~400 Pg C in deep permafrost sediments. In addition, an uncertainty estimate of plus/minus 15% has now been calculated for the soil carbon pool in the surface 0-3m. Laboratory incubations of these permafrost soils reveal that a significant fraction can be mineralized by microbes upon thaw and converted to carbon dioxide and methane on time scales of years to decades, with decade-long average losses from aerobic incubations ranging from 6-34% of initial carbon. Carbon emissions from the same soils incubated in an anaerobic environment are, on average, 78-85% lower than aerobic soils. But, the more potent greenhouse gas methane released under anaerobic conditions in part increases the climate impact of these emissions. While mean quantities of methane are only 3% to 7% that of carbon dioxide emitted from anaerobic incubations (by weight of C), these mean methane values represent 25% to 45% of the overall potential impact on climate when accounting for the higher global warming potential of methane. Taken together though, in spite of the more potent greenhouse gas methane, a unit of newly thawed permafrost carbon could have a greater impact on climate over a century if it thaws and decomposes within a drier, aerobic soil as compared to an equivalent amount of carbon within a waterlogged soil or sediment. Model projections tend to estimate losses of carbon in line with empirical measurements, but

  9. Porous wall hollow glass microspheres as a medium or substrate for storage and formation of novel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, George G; Serkiz, Steven M.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Heung, Leung K.

    2014-06-24

    Porous wall hollow glass microspheres are provided as a template for formation of nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes, In addition, the carbon nanotubes in combination with the porous wall hollow glass microsphere provides an additional reaction template with respect to carbon nanotubes.

  10. Direct fabrication of metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure as efficient cathode catalysts of fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanqi; Liu, Mingda; Nie, Huagui; Gu, Cancan; Liu, Ming; Yang, Zhi; Yang, Keqin; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    Despite the good progress in developing carbon catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the current metal-free carbon catalysts are still far from satisfactory for large-scale applications of fuel cell. Developing hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure is considered to be an ideal method to inhibit graphene stacking and improve their catalytic performance. Herein, we fabricated metal-free hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure, through using a new strategy that involves direct metal-free catalytic growth from assembly of SiO2 spheres. To our knowledge, although much researches involving the synthesis of graphene balls have been reported, investigations into the direct metal-free catalytic growth of hollow graphene balls are rare. Furthermore, the electrocatalytic performance shows that the resulting hollow graphene balls have significantly high catalytic activity. More importantly, such catalysts also possess much improved stability and better methanol tolerance in alkaline media during the ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalysts. The outstanding performances coupled with an easy and inexpensive preparing method indicated the great potential of the hollow graphene balls with a self-supporting structure in large-scale applications of fuel cell.

  11. Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.K.

    2005-04-12

    This paper reports the first observations of an anomalous hollow electron beam in the Duke storage ring. Created by exciting the single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, the hollow beam consists of a solid core inside and a large ring outside. We report the detailed measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern, spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying the transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wake field and the lattice nonlinearity. In addition, the hollow beam can be used as a powerful tool to study the linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  12. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  13. Self-templated chemically stable hollow spherical covalent organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandambeth, Sharath; Venkatesh, V.; Shinde, Digambar B.; Kumari, Sushma; Halder, Arjun; Verma, Sandeep; Banerjee, Rahul

    2015-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks are a family of crystalline porous materials with promising applications. Although active research on the design and synthesis of covalent organic frameworks has been ongoing for almost a decade, the mechanisms of formation of covalent organic frameworks crystallites remain poorly understood. Here we report the synthesis of a hollow spherical covalent organic framework with mesoporous walls in a single-step template-free method. A detailed time-dependent study of hollow sphere formation reveals that an inside-out Ostwald ripening process is responsible for the hollow sphere formation. The synthesized covalent organic framework hollow spheres are highly porous (surface area ~1,500 m2 g-1), crystalline and chemically stable, due to the presence of strong intramolecular hydrogen bonding. These mesoporous hollow sphere covalent organic frameworks are used for a trypsin immobilization study, which shows an uptake of 15.5 μmol g-1 of trypsin.

  14. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  15. Fabrication of Closed Hollow Bulb Obturator Using Thermoplastic Resin Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Bidhan; Hughes, E Richard; Kumar Singh, Raj; Suwal, Pramita; Parajuli, Prakash Kumar; Shrestha, Pragya; Sharma, Arati; Adhikari, Galav

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Closed hollow bulb obturators are used for the rehabilitation of postmaxillectomy patients. However, the time consuming process, complexity of fabrication, water leakage, and discoloration are notable disadvantages of this technique. This paper describes a clinical report of fabricating closed hollow bulb obturator using a single flask and one time processing method for an acquired maxillary defect. Hard thermoplastic resin sheet has been used for the fabrication of hollow bulb part of the obturator. Method. After fabrication of master cast conventionally, bulb and lid part of the defect were formed separately and joined by autopolymerizing acrylic resin to form one sized smaller hollow body. During packing procedure, the defect area was loaded with heat polymerizing acrylic resin and then previously fabricated smaller hollow body was adapted over it. The whole area was then loaded with heat cure acrylic. Further processes were carried out conventionally. Conclusion. This technique uses single flask which reduces laboratory time and makes the procedure simple. The thickness of hollow bulb can be controlled and light weight closed hollow bulb prosthesis can be fabricated. It also minimizes the disadvantages of closed hollow bulb obturator such as water leakage, bacterial infection, and discoloration.

  16. Role of hydrogen diffusion in temperature-induced transformation of carbon nanostructures deposited on metallic substrates by using a specially designed fused hollow cathode cold atmospheric pressure plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bikash; Kar, R.; Pal, Arup R.; Shilpa, R. K.; Dusane, R. O.; Patil, D. S.; Suryawanshi, S. R.; More, M. A.; Sinha, S.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on inconel substrates under two different experimental conditions using atmospheric pressure glow discharge radio-frequency (RF) PECVD process. A specially designed hollow cathode is used for this plasma generation. The growth is carried out at 610 and 660 °C substrate temperatures on inconel substrates. Our results show that CNFs and CNTs could be synthesized at 610 and 660 °C respectively irrespective of pre-treatment methods in either set. HRTEM results indicate that a temperature-induced transformation of CNFs into CNTs occur when the growth temperature is raised from 610 to 660 °C. With the help of characterization results and a schematic model, it is shown how an increase in hydrogen diffusion (~44% increase) plays a pivotal role in this transformation by providing a sink for hydrogen atoms. Field emission results show that most defective CNFs contribute to the maximum emission current density. This better field emission behavior is explained on the basis that the outer surfaces of CNFs are more defective due to the presence of the open edges of the graphene planes, which results in better field emission from the outer surfaces of the CNFs.

  17. Synthesis, characterization and properties of hollow nickel phosphide nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni Yonghong; Tao Ali; Hu Guangzhi; Cao Xiaofeng; Wei Xianwen; Yang Zhousheng [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Key Laboratory of Functional Molecular Solids, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2006-10-14

    Nickel phosphide (Ni{sub 12}P{sub 5}) hollow nanospheres with a mean diameter of 100 nm and a shell thickness of 15-20 nm have been successfully prepared by a hydrothermal-microemulsion route, using NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2} as a phosphorus source. XRD, EDS (HR)TEM, SEM and the SAED pattern were used to characterize the final product. Experiments showed that the as-prepared nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres could selectively catalytically degrade some organic dyes such as methyl red and Safranine T under 254 nm UV light irradiation. At the same time, the nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres showed a stronger ability to promote electron transfer between the glass-carbon electrode and adrenalin than nickel phosphide honeycomb-like particles prepared by a simple hydrothermal route. A possible formation process for nickel phosphide hollow nanospheres was suggested based on the experimental results.

  18. Hollow Nanostructured Anode Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hollow nanostructured anode materials lie at the heart of research relating to Li-ion batteries, which require high capacity, high rate capability, and high safety. The higher capacity and higher rate capability for hollow nanostructured anode materials than that for the bulk counterparts can be attributed to their higher surface area, shorter path length for Li+ transport, and more freedom for volume change, which can reduce the overpotential and allow better reaction kinetics at the electrode surface. In this article, we review recent research activities on hollow nanostructured anode materials for Li-ion batteries, including carbon materials, metals, metal oxides, and their hybrid materials. The major goal of this review is to highlight some recent progresses in using these hollow nanomaterials as anode materials to develop Li-ion batteries with high capacity, high rate capability, and excellent cycling stability.

  19. National Low-Level Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series. Volume 3, Carbon-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudin, M.J.; Garcia, R.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report, Volume 3 of the National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program Radionuclide Report Series, discusses the radiological and chemical characteristics of carbon-14. The report also discusses waste streams that contain carbon-14, waste forms that contain carbon-14, and carbon-14 behavior in the environment and in the human body.

  20. Photocatalytic hollow TiO2 and ZnO nanospheres prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justh, Nóra; Bakos, László Péter; Hernádi, Klára; Kiss, Gabriella; Réti, Balázs; Erdélyi, Zoltán; Parditka, Bence; Szilágyi, Imre Miklós

    2017-06-28

    Carbon nanospheres (CNSs) were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis, and coated with TiO2 and ZnO nanofilms by atomic layer deposition. Subsequently, through burning out the carbon core templates hollow metal oxide nanospheres were obtained. The substrates, the carbon-metal oxide composites and the hollow nanospheres were characterized with TG/DTA-MS, FTIR, Raman, XRD, SEM-EDX, TEM-SAED and their photocatalytic activity was also investigated. The results indicate that CNSs are not beneficial for photocatalysis, but the crystalline hollow metal oxide nanospheres have considerable photocatalytic activity.

  1. Analysis of the Microbial Community in an Acidic Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (Hf-MBfR) Used for the Biological Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Byoung Seung; Choi, Okkyoung; Kim, Hyun Wook; Um, Youngsoon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Sang, Byoung-In

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogenotrophic methanogens can use gaseous substrates, such as H2 and CO2, in CH4 production. H2 gas is used to reduce CO2. We have successfully operated a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (Hf-MBfR) for stable and continuous CH4 production from CO2 and H2. CO2 and H2 were diffused into the culture medium through the membrane without bubble formation in the Hf-MBfR, which was operated at pH 4.5–5.5 over 70 days. Focusing on the presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, we analyzed the structure of the microbial community in the reactor. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was conducted with bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA primers. Real-time qPCR was used to track changes in the community composition of methanogens over the course of operation. Finally, the microbial community and its diversity at the time of maximum CH4 production were analyzed by pyrosequencing methods. Genus Methanobacterium, related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated the microbial community, but acetate consumption by bacteria, such as unclassified Clostridium sp., restricted the development of acetoclastic methanogens in the acidic CH4 production process. The results show that acidic operation of a CH4 production reactor without any pH adjustment inhibited acetogenic growth and enriched the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, decreasing the growth of acetoclastic methanogens. PMID:26694756

  2. Analysis of the Microbial Community in an Acidic Hollow-Fiber Membrane Biofilm Reactor (Hf-MBfR Used for the Biological Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Chul Shin

    Full Text Available Hydrogenotrophic methanogens can use gaseous substrates, such as H2 and CO2, in CH4 production. H2 gas is used to reduce CO2. We have successfully operated a hollow-fiber membrane biofilm reactor (Hf-MBfR for stable and continuous CH4 production from CO2 and H2. CO2 and H2 were diffused into the culture medium through the membrane without bubble formation in the Hf-MBfR, which was operated at pH 4.5-5.5 over 70 days. Focusing on the presence of hydrogenotrophic methanogens, we analyzed the structure of the microbial community in the reactor. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE was conducted with bacterial and archaeal 16S rDNA primers. Real-time qPCR was used to track changes in the community composition of methanogens over the course of operation. Finally, the microbial community and its diversity at the time of maximum CH4 production were analyzed by pyrosequencing methods. Genus Methanobacterium, related to hydrogenotrophic methanogens, dominated the microbial community, but acetate consumption by bacteria, such as unclassified Clostridium sp., restricted the development of acetoclastic methanogens in the acidic CH4 production process. The results show that acidic operation of a CH4 production reactor without any pH adjustment inhibited acetogenic growth and enriched the hydrogenotrophic methanogens, decreasing the growth of acetoclastic methanogens.

  3. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  4. Facile Synthesis and High Photocatalytic Degradation Performance of ZnO-SnO2 Hollow Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changqing; Ge, Chenghai; Jian, Zengyun; Wei, Yongxing

    2016-11-01

    ZnO-SnO2 hollow spheres were successfully synthesized through a hydrothermal method-combined carbon sphere template. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The average diameter of hollow spheres is about 150 nm. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples was investigated by photodegrading Rhodamine B. The results indicated that the photocatalytic activities of ZnO-SnO2 hollow spheres are higher than ZnO hollow spheres. The degradation efficiency of the hollow spheres could reach 99.85% within 40 min, while the ZnO hollow spheres need 50 min.

  5. A NOVEL METHOD TO PREPARE CROSSLINKED POLYETHYLENEIMINE HOLLOW NANOSPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A novel method to prepare crosslinked polyethyleneimine (CPEI) hollow nanospheres was reported.Uniform silica nanospheres were used as templates,3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APS) was immobilized on the surface of silica nanospheres as couple agent.Aziridine was initiated ring-opening polymerization with the amino groups in APS to form polyethyleneimine (PEI) shell layer.1,4-Butanediol diacrylate was utilized to crosslink PEI polymeric shell.The silica nanospheres in core were etched by hydrofluoric acid to obtain hollow CPEI nanospheres.The hollow nanospheres were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  6. Effects of Hollow Glass Beads on Properties of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polypropylene%空心玻璃微珠对碳纤维增强聚丙烯性能的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄虹; 李道喜; 明浩; 李能文

    2012-01-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP) was modificated by the filling of the hollow glass beads (GB). The effects of the contents of GB on mechanical properties and flow properties of PP/CF composite were investigated.The result showed that the tensile strength and flexural strength of PP / CF filled with GB were both increased by analyzing the composite material's rheological properties, tensile properties, impact properties and tnicrostructure.%以碳纤维(CF)增强聚丙烯(PP)作为基础材料,添加空心玻璃微珠(GB)对其进行共混改性,研究GB的加入量对其流动性能和力学性能的影响.转矩流变性能、拉伸性能、冲击性能和微观形貌的分析与研究结果表明,GB对PP/CF复合材料具有增强增韧的作用.

  7. A Bi-layer Composite Film Based on TiO2 Hollow Spheres, P25, and Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Photoanode of Dye-sensitized Solar Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Putao Zhang; Zhiqiang Hu; Yan Wang; Yiying Qin; Wenqin Li; Jinmin Wang

    2016-01-01

    A bi-layer photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) was fabricated, in which TiO2 hollow spheres (THSs) were designed as a scattering layer and P25/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as an under-layer. The THSs were synthesized by a sacrifice template method and showed good light scattering ability as an over-layer of the pho-toanode. MWNTs were mixed with P25 to form an under-layer of the photoanode to improve the electron transmission ability of the photoanode. The power conversion efficiency of this kind of DSSC with bi-layer was enhanced to 5.13%, which is 14.25%higher than that of pure P25 DSSC. Graphical Abstract A bi-layer composite photoanode based on P25/MWNTs-THSs with improved light scattering and electron transmission, which will provide a new insight into fabrication and structure design of highly efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

  8. have a hollow leg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周立

    2003-01-01

    英语对话 A:We must prevent our family members from getting involved with drugs, really. B:That’s a sure thing.We must make sure that they never involve them- selves with that. A:By the way,does your husband drink a lot? B:Yeah.That’s the only thing that keeps worrying me.And he often boasts that he has a hollow leg and nobody can drink him under the ta- ble.

  9. Hollow nanoparticle cathode materials for sodium electrochemical cells and batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, Elena; Rajh, Tijana; Johnson, Christopher S.; Koo, Bonil

    2016-07-12

    A cathode comprises, in its discharged state, a layer of hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles disposed between two layers of carbon nanotubes, and preferably including a metallic current collector in contact with one of the layers of carbon nanotubes. Individual particles of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles comprise a crystalline shell of .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 including cation vacancies within the crystal structure of the shell (i.e., iron vacancies of anywhere between 3% to 90%, and preferably 44 to 77% of available octahedral iron sites). Sodium ions are intercalated within at least some of the cation vacancies within the crystalline shell of the hollow .gamma.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 nanoparticles.

  10. Formation and Characterization of CdS Hollow Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Peng; YU Haihu; DENG Jinyang; JIANG Desheng

    2008-01-01

    CdS hollow structures were built up by using the one pot method and using carbon disulfide (CS2) and ethylenediamine as starting materials. CS2 is insoluble in water and could form metastable oil droplets in the water at a moderate temperature. The oil droplets formed chains in the circumvolving water. CdS crystals grew and mineralized on the surfaces of the CS2 droplet chains, forming CdS shells around the unreacted CS2 cores. After the surrounding temperature was raised above the boiling point of CS2, the unreacted CS2 cores vaporized, leaving the CdS shelled hollow structures. The CdS hollow structures were characterized by using a transmission electron microscope, an X-ray diffractometer, a UV-Visible spectrophotometer and a fluorescence spectrophotometer. The CdS hollow structures were mainly tubes with closed ends. The exterior diameter and the interior diameter of tubes were about 50nm and about 15nm, respectively. Compared with the absorption onset wavelength of the bulk CdS, the CdS hollow structures exhibited a blue shift of about 57nm. While excited at 213nm. the CdS hollow structures emitted greenish blue light centered at 470nm.

  11. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Storlie, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zitney, Stephen E [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2014-03-05

    -ANOVA-UQ) for calibration and validation of CFD models. 8. A new basic data submodel in Aspen Plus format for a representative high viscosity capture solvent, 2-MPZ system. 9. An updated RM tool for CFD (REVEAL) that can create a RM from MFIX. A new lightweight, stand-alone version will be available in late 2013. 10. An updated RM integration tool to convert the RM from REVEAL into a CAPE-OPEN or ACM model for use in a process simulator. 11. An updated suite of unified steady-state and dynamic process models for solid sorbent carbon capture included bubbling fluidized bed and moving bed reactors. 12. An updated and unified set of compressor models including steady-state design point model and dynamic model with surge detection. 13. A new framework for the synthesis and optimization of coal oxycombustion power plants using advanced optimization algorithms. This release focuses on modeling and optimization of a cryogenic air separation unit (ASU). 14. A new technical risk model in spreadsheet format. 15. An updated version of the sorbent kinetic/equilibrium model for parameter estimation for the 1st generation sorbent model. 16. An updated process synthesis superstructure model to determine optimal process configurations utilizing surrogate models from ALAMO for adsorption and regeneration in a solid sorbent process. 17. Validation models for NETL Carbon Capture Unit utilizing sorbent AX. Additional validation models will be available for sorbent 32D in 2014. 18. An updated hollow fiber membrane model and system example for carbon capture. 19. An updated reference power plant model in Thermoflex that includes additional steam extraction and reinjection points to enable heat integration module. 20. An updated financial risk model in spreadsheet format.

  12. Pt monolayer shell on hollow Pd core electrocatalysts: Scale up synthesis, structure, and activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukmirovic Miomir B.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on synthesis, characterization and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR kinetics of Pt monolayer shell on Pd(hollow, or Pd-Au(hollow core electrocatalysts. Comparison between the ORR catalytic activity of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores and those of Pt solid and Pt hollow nanoparticles has been obtained using the rotating disk electrode technique. Hollow nanoparticles were made using Ni or Cu nanoparticles as sacrificial templates. The Pt ORR specific and mass activities of the electrocatalysts with hollow cores were found considerably higher than those of the electrocatalysts with the solid cores. We attribute this enhanced Pt activity to the smooth surface morphology and hollow-induced lattice contraction, in addition to the mass-saving geometry of hollow particles.

  13. Characterization of Black Carbon Mixing State Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davidovits, P. [Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA (United States); Lewis, E. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Onasch, T. B. [Aerodyne Research, Billerica, MA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Interpreting the temporal relationship between the scattering and incandescence signals recorded by the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Sedlacek et al. (2012) reported that 60% of the refractory black carbon containing particles in a plume containing biomass burning tracers exhibited non-core-shell structure. Because the relationship between the rBC (refractory black carbon) incandescence and the scattering signals had not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature, and to further evaluate the initial interpretation by Sedlacek et al., a series of experiments was undertaken to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance to characterize this signal relationship. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate), and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermochemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources. This work was communicated in a 2015 publication (Sedlacek et al. 2015)

  14. Mercury - the hollow planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothery, D. A.

    2012-04-01

    Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image

  15. The Hollow Cathode Phase of Pseudospark Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    THE HOLLOW CATHODE PHASE OF PSEUDOSPARK OPERATION L. Pitchford and J. P. Boeuf University Paul Sabatier, France V. Puech University De Paris-Sud...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University Paul Sabatier, France 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME...Appl. Phys. 53, 1699 (1988). [9] A. Anders, S. Anders, and M. Gundersen, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. [10] J. P. Boeuf and L. Pitchford , IEEE

  16. Hollow Polyimide Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiser, Erik S. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Echigo, Yoshiaki (Inventor); Kaneshiro, Hisayasu (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A shaped article composed of an aromatic polyimide has a hollow, essentially spherical structure and a particle size of about 100 to about 1500 micrometers, a density of about 1 to about 6 pounds/cubic foot and a volume change of 1 to about 20% by a pressure treatment of 30 psi for 10 minutes at room temperature. A syntactic foam, made of a multiplicity of the shaped articles which are bonded together by a matrix resin to form an integral composite structure, has a density of about 3 to about 30 pounds/cubic feet and a compression strength of about 100 to about 1400 pounds/sq inch.

  17. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  18. Birefringent hollow core fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, John

    2007-01-01

    Hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF), fabricated according to a nominally non-birefringent design, shows a degree of un-controlled birefringence or polarization mode dispersion far in excess of conventional non polarization maintaining fibers. This can degrade the output pulse in many...... and an increased overlap between the polarization modes at the glass interfaces. The interplay between these effects leads to a wavelength for optimum polarization maintenance, lambda(PM), which is detuned from the wavelength of highest birefringence. By a suitable fiber design involving antiresonance of the core...

  19. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Selective Membranes: A Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dushyant Shekhawat; David R. Luebke; Henry W. Pennline

    2003-12-01

    Carbon dioxide selective membranes provide a viable energy-saving alternative for CO2 separation, since membranes do not require any phase transformation. This review examines various CO2 selective membranes for the separation of CO2 and N2, CO2 and CH4, and CO2 and H2 from flue or fuel gas. This review attempts to summarize recent significant advances reported in the literature about various CO2 selective membranes, their stability, the effect of different parameters on the performance of the membrane, the structure and permeation properties relationships, and the transport mechanism applied in different CO2 selective membranes.

  20. Hollow antiresonant fibers with reduced attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardi, Walter; Knight, Jonathan C

    2014-04-01

    An improved design for hollow antiresonant fibers (HAFs) is presented. It consists of adding extra antiresonant glass elements within the air cladding region of an antiresonant hollow-core fiber. We use numerical simulations to compare fiber structures with and without the additional cladding elements in the near- and mid-IR regimes. We show that realizable fiber structures can provide greatly improved performance in terms of leakage and bending losses compared to previously reported antiresonant fibers. At mid-IR wavelengths, the adoption of this novel fiber design will lead to HAFs with reduced bending losses. In the near-IR, this design could lead to the fabrication of HAFs with very low attenuation.

  1. Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture and Storage Project Topical Report: Preliminary Public Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guy Cerimele

    2011-09-30

    This Preliminary Public Design Report consolidates for public use nonproprietary design information on the Mountaineer Commercial Scale Carbon Capture & Storage project. The report is based on the preliminary design information developed during the Phase I - Project Definition Phase, spanning the time period of February 1, 2010 through September 30, 2011. The report includes descriptions and/or discussions for: (1) DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, overall project & Phase I objectives, and the historical evolution of DOE and American Electric Power (AEP) sponsored projects leading to the current project; (2) Alstom's Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP) carbon capture retrofit technology and the carbon storage and monitoring system; (3) AEP's retrofit approach in terms of plant operational and integration philosophy; (4) The process island equipment and balance of plant systems for the CAP technology; (5) The carbon storage system, addressing injection wells, monitoring wells, system monitoring and controls logic philosophy; (6) Overall project estimate that includes the overnight cost estimate, cost escalation for future year expenditures, and major project risks that factored into the development of the risk based contingency; and (7) AEP's decision to suspend further work on the project at the end of Phase I, notwithstanding its assessment that the Alstom CAP technology is ready for commercial demonstration at the intended scale.

  2. Controlled thermal sintering of a metal-metal oxide-carbon ternary composite with a multi-scale hollow nanostructure for use as an anode material in Li-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwan Jin; Zhang, Kan; Choi, Jae-Man; Song, Min Sang; Park, Jong Hyeok

    2014-03-11

    We report a synthetic scheme for preparing a SnO2-Sn-carbon triad inverse opal porous material using the controlled sintering of Sn precursor-infiltrated polystyrene (PS) nanobead films. Because the uniform PS nanobead film, which can be converted into carbon via a sintering step, uptakes the precursor solution, the carbon can be uniformly distributed throughout the Sn-based anode material. Moreover, the partial carbonization of the PS nanobeads under a controlled Ar/oxygen environment not only produces a composite material with an inverse opal-like porous nanostructure but also converts the Sn precursor/PS into a SnO2-Sn-C triad electrode.

  3. Progress report to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources : Carbon Sequestration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a progress report on carbon sequestration studies in progress at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of the project are to: estimate carbon...

  4. Facile synthesis and properties of hierarchical double-walled copper silicate hollow nanofibers assembled by nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renxi; Yang, Yang; Xing, Yan; Chen, Li; Song, Shuyan; Jin, Rongchao

    2014-04-22

    The hierarchical assembly of multilevel, nonspherical hollow structures remains a considerable challenge. Here, we report a facile approach for synthesizing copper silicate hollow nanofibers with an ultrasmall nanotube-assembled, double-walled structure. The as-prepared hollow fibers possess a tailored complex wall structure, high length-to-diameter ratio, good structural stability, and a high surface area, and they exhibit excellent performance as an easily recycled adsorbent for wastewater treatment and as an ideal support for noble metal catalysts. In addition, this strategy can be extended as a general approach to prepare other double-walled, hollow, fibrous silica-templated materials.

  5. Molten carbonate fuel cell technology improvement. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes the work performed under Department of Energy Contract DEAC21-87MC23270, ``Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Technology Improvement.`` This work was conducted over a three year period and consisted of three major efforts. The first major effort was the power plant system study which reviewed the competitive requirements for a coal gasifier/molten carbonate fuel cell power plant, produced a conceptual design of a CG/MCFC, and defined the technology development requirements. This effort is discussed in Section 1 of the report. The second major effort involved the design and development of a new MCFC cell configuration which reduced the material content of the cell to a level competitive with competing power plants, simplified the cell configuration to make the components more manufacturable and adaptable to continuous low cost processing techniques, and introduced new-low-pressure drop flow fields for both reactant gases. The new flow fields permitted the incorporation of recirculation systems in both reactant gas systems, permitting simplified cooling techniques and the ability to operate on both natural gas and a wide variety of gasifier fuels. This cell technology improvement is discussed in Section 2. The third major effort involved the scaleup of the new cell configuration to the full-area, 8-sq-ft size and resulted in components used for a 25-kW, 20-cell stack verification test. The verification test was completed with a run of 2200 hours, exceeding the goal of 2000 hours and verifying the new cell design. TWs test, in turn, provided the confidence to proceed to a 100-kW demonstration which is the goal of the subsequent DOE program. The scaleup and stack verification tests are discussed in Sections 3, 4, 5, and 6 of this report.

  6. Carbon Dioxide Effects Research and Assessment Program. Carbon Dioxide Research Progress Report, fiscal year 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlman, R. C.; Gross, T.; Machta, L.; Elliott, W.; MacCracken, M.

    1980-04-01

    Research on the global carbon cycle and the effects of increased carbon dioxide on the global climate system is reported. Environmental and societal effects related to CO/sub 2/ and environmental control technology for CO/sub 2/ are also discussed. Lists of research projects and reports and publications of the Carbon Dioxide and Climate Research Program are included. An expanded CO/sub 2/ monitoring network is providing increased coverage for interpretation of patterns of sources and sinks seasonal variability, and documentation of the global growth of CO/sub 2/. Modeling studies emphasized that knowledge of the transport and mixing of surface ocean waters is important in understanding deep oceanic circulation. Initial studies in the equatorial Pacific are helping quantify estimates of the amount of outgassing CO/sub 2/ from tropical waters. During fiscal year 1979, there was a substantial increase in appreciation of the role of the ocean in controlling not only atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations but also the climatic response to changes in concentration. Model simulations of the effect of doubled CO/sub 2/ concentration carried out with fixed ocean temperatures a situation that is possible during perhaps the next 20 years, showed relatively small summer heating over land areas. On the other hand, simulations in which the oceanic temperatures could come into instantaneous equilibrium with atmospheric conditions continued to show global temperature increases of 3 +- 1.5/sup 0/C, accentuated at high latitudes. To improve understanding of possible regional climate changes, there were increased efforts to reconstruct regional climatic patterns prevailing during past warm periods that might serve as analogs of future climatic conditions. Particular attention was directed to the climates of the United States and other countries bordering the North Atlantic Ocean during the warm period 5000 to 7000 years ago.

  7. Activation of the Solid Silica Layer of Aerosol-Based C/SiO₂ Particles for Preparation of Various Functional Multishelled Hollow Microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangcun; Luo, Fan; He, Gaohong

    2015-05-12

    Double-shelled C/SiO2 hollow microspheres with an outer nanosheet-like silica shell and an inner carbon shell were reported. C/SiO2 aerosol particles were synthesized first by a one-step rapid aerosol process. Then the solid silica layer of the aerosol particles was dissolved and regrown on the carbon surface to obtain novel C/SiO2 double-shelled hollow microspheres. The new microspheres prepared by the facile approach possess high surface area and pore volume (226.3 m(2) g(-1), 0.51 cm(3) g(-1)) compared with the original aerosol particles (64.3 m(2) g(-1), 0.176 cm(3) g(-1)), providing its enhanced enzyme loading capacity. The nanosheet-like silica shell of the hollow microspheres favors the fixation of Au NPs (C/SiO2/Au) and prevents them from growing and migrating at 500 °C. Novel C/C and C/Au/C (C/Pt/C) hollow microspheres were also prepared based on the hollow nanostructure. C/C microspheres (482.0 m(2) g(-1), 0.92 cm(3) g(-1)) were ideal electrode materials. In particular, the Au NPs embedded into the two carbon layers (C/Au/C, 431.2 m(2) g(-1), 0.774 cm(3) g(-1)) show a high catalytic activity and extremely chemical stability even at 850 °C. Moreover, C/SiO2/Au, C/Au/C microspheres can be easily recycled and reused by an external magnetic field because of the presence of Fe3O4 species in the inner carbon shell. The synthetic route reported here is expected to simplify the fabrication process of double-shelled or yolk-shell microspheres, which usually entails multiple steps and a previously synthesized hard template. Such a capability can facilitate the preparation of various functional hollow microspheres by interfacial design.

  8. Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinskey, Anthony J. [MIT; Worden, Robert Mark [Michigan State University MSU; Brigham, Christopher [MIT; Lu, Jingnan [MIT; Quimby, John Westlake [MIT; Gai, Claudia [MIT; Speth, Daan [MIT; Elliott, Sean [Boston University; Fei, John Qiang [MIT; Bernardi, Amanda [MIT; Li, Sophia [MIT; Grunwald, Stephan [MIT; Grousseau, Estelle [MIT; Maiti, Soumen [MSU; Liu, Chole [MSU

    2013-12-16

    This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide

  9. Facile synthesis of magnetic hierarchical copper silicate hollow nanotubes for efficient adsorption and removal of hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Baoyu; Zhang, Yanwei; Li, Weizhen; Gan, Wenjun; Xu, Jingli

    2016-01-21

    This study reports the fabrication of magnetic copper silicate hierarchical hollow nanotubes, which are featured by a tailored complex wall structure and high surface area. Moreover, they exhibit excellent performance as an easily recycled adsorbent for protein separation. Particularly, this strategy can be extended as a general method to prepare other magnetic metal silicate hollow nanotubes.

  10. La2O3 hollow nanospheres for high performance lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Inoue, Masamichi; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Yoshio, Masaki; Nakashima, Kenichi

    2012-03-28

    An efficient and simple protocol for synthesis of novel La(2)O(3) hollow nanospheres of size about 30 ± 2 nm using polymeric micelles is reported. The La(2)O(3) hollow nanospheres exhibit high charge capacity and cycling performance in lithium-ion rechargeable batteries (LIBs), which was scrutinized for the first time among the rare-earth oxides.

  11. Water-dispersible Hollow Microporous Organic Network Spheres as Substrate for Electroless Deposition of Ultrafine Pd Nanoparticles with High Catalytic Activity and Recyclability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhifang; Chang, Jing; Hu, Yuchen; Yu, Yifu; Guo, Yamei; Zhang, Bin

    2016-11-22

    Microporous organic networks (MONs) have been considered as an ideal substrate to stabilize active metal nanoparticles. However, the development of highly water-dispersible hollow MONs nanostructures which can serve as both the reducing agent and stabilizer is highly desirable but still challenging. Here we report a template-assisted method to synthesize hollow microporous organic network (H-MON) spheres using silica spheres as hard template and 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene as the building blocks through a Glaser coupling reaction. The obtained water-dispersible H-MON spheres bearing sp- and sp(2) -hybridized carbon atoms possess a highly conjugated electronic structure and show low reduction potential; thus, they can serve as a reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd clusters to form a Pd/H-MON spherical hollow nanocomposite. Benefitting from their high porosity, large surface area, and excellent solution dispersibility, the as-prepared Pd/H-MON hollow nanocomposite exhibits a high catalytic performance and recyclability toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

  12. High photocatalytic activity of hierarchical SiO2@C-doped TiO2 hollow spheres in UV and visible light towards degradation of rhodamine B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Juanrong; Hua, Li; Li, Songjun; Zhang, Xuanxuan; Sheng, Weichen; Cao, Shunsheng

    2017-10-15

    Ongoing research activities are targeted to explore high photocatalytic activity of TiO2-based photocatalysts for the degradation of environmental contaminants under UV and visible light irradiation. In this work, we devise a facile, cost-effective technique to in situ synthesize hierarchical SiO2@C-doped TiO2 (SCT) hollow spheres for the first time. This strategy mainly contains the preparation of monodisperse cationic polystyrene spheres (CPS), sequential deposition of inner SiO2, the preparation of the sandwich-like CPS@SiO2@CPS particles, and formation of outer TiO2. After the one-step removal of CPS templates by calcination at 450°C, hierarchical SiO2@C-doped TiO2 hollow spheres are in situ prepared. The morphology, hierarchical structure, and properties of SCT photocatalyst were characterized by TEM. SEM, STEM Mapping, BET, XRD, UV-vis spectroscopy, and XPS. Results strongly confirm the carbon doping in the outer TiO2 lattice of SCT hollow spheres. When the as-synthesized SCT hollow spheres were employed as a photocatalyst for the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible-light and ultraviolet irradiation, the SCT photocatalyst exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity than commercial P25, effectively overcoming the limitations of poorer UV activity for many previous reported TiO2-based photocatalysts due to doping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Report on Carbon Nano Material Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Lubricating Grease Thickened by Carbon Nanotubes, presented at Carbon Nano Materials and Applications Workshop, Rapid City, SD, October 31–November 1...Carbon Nano Material Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities S. Acharya a , J. Alvarado b , D. Banerjee b , W. E. Billups c , G. Chen d , B. A. Cola e...Carbon Nano Material Workshop: Challenges and Opportunities 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  14. General synthesis route to fabricate uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guang; Zhang, Cuimiao; Ding, Shiwen; Wang, Liyong

    2011-08-01

    Uniform upconversion luminescent gadolinium oxide hollow spheres were successfully synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation method with carbon spheres as template followed by a calcination process. During the annealing process, the carbon spheres template can be effectively removed and the amorphous precursor has converted to crystalline Gd2O3, which can be confirmed by the XRD and TG-DSC analysis. SEM and TEM images indicate that the Gd2O3 hollow spheres with diameters of 300-400 nm are uniform in size and distribution. The rare earth activator ions Ln3+-doped Gd2O3 hollow spheres exhibit intense upconversion luminescence with different colors under 980 nm light excitation, which may find potential applications in the fields such as drug delivery or biological labeling. Moreover, the upconversion luminescent mechanisms of the hollow spherical phosphors were investigated in detail.

  15. A General Synthesis Strategy for Hierarchical Porous Metal Oxide Hollow Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huadong Fu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The hierarchical porous TiO2 hollow spheres were successfully prepared by using the hydrothermally synthesized colloidal carbon spheres as templates and tetrabutyl titanate as inorganic precursors. The diameter and wall thickness of hollow TiO2 spheres were determined by the hard templates and concentration of tetrabutyl titanate. The particle size, dispersity, homogeneity, and surface state of the carbon spheres can be easily controlled by adjusting the hydrothermal conditions and adding certain amount of the surfactants. The prepared hollow spheres possessed the perfect spherical shape, monodispersity, and hierarchically pore structures, and the further experiment verified that the present approach can be used to prepare other metal oxide hollow spheres, which could be used as catalysis, fuel cells, lithium-air battery, gas sensor, and so on.

  16. Carbon dioxide stripping in aquaculture. part 1: terminology and reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, John; Watten, Barnaby; Pfeiffer, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The removal of carbon dioxide gas in aquacultural systems is much more complex than for oxygen or nitrogen gas because of liquid reactions of carbon dioxide and their kinetics. Almost all published carbon dioxide removal information for aquaculture is based on the apparent removal value after the CO2(aq) + HOH ⇔ H2CO3 reaction has reached equilibrium. The true carbon dioxide removal is larger than the apparent value, especially for high alkalinities and seawater. For low alkalinity freshwaters (carbon dioxide removal.

  17. Submesothelial deposition of carbon nanoparticles after toner exposition: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippou Stathis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inhalation of carbon nanoparticles (CNP from toner dust has been shown to have impact on the respiratory health of persons exposed. Office printers are known emitters of CNP. We report about a female open office worker who developed weight loss and diarrhoea. Laparoscopy done for suspected endometriosis surprisingly revealed black spots within the peritoneum. Submesothelial aggregates of CNP with a diameter of 31-67 nm were found by scanning and transmission electron microscopy in these tissue specimens. Colon biopsies showed inflammatory bowel disease with typically signs of Crohn disease, but no dust deposits. Transport of CNP via lymphatic and blood vessels after inhalation in the lungs has to be assumed. In this case respiratory symptoms were not reported, therefore no lung function tests were done. We have shown that workers with toner dust exposure from laser printers can develop submesothelial deposition of CNP in the peritoneum. Impact of toner dust exposure on the respiratory health of office workers, as suspected in other studies, has to be evaluated further.

  18. PE-HD/CF/HGB三元复合材料的制备及力学性能%Preparation and Mechanical Properties of High Density Polyethylene/Carbon Fiber/Hollow Glass Bead Ternary Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄虹; 明浩; 王选伦; 李又兵

    2013-01-01

    High density polyethylene (PE-HD) / carbon fiber (CF) composites were prepared by twin-roll plasticization with PE-HD as matrix and CF as reinforcement material.Mechanical properties test results indicate that with the content of CF increasing,tensile and bending properties of the composites increase but notched impact strength decreases.PE-HD / CF / HGB ternary composites were prepared through adding hollow glass bead (HGB) into PE-HD / CF composites.Mechanical properties test results indicate that when the content of HGB is 10 phr and the content of CF is 15 phr,tensile strength,bending strength and notched impact strength of the binary composite are highest,and their values are 46.98 MPa,45.69 MPa and 8.17 KJ / m2,improve by 7.19%,4.17% and 10.4% respectively comparing with the composite without adding HGB.Scanning electron microscope observation results show that HGB can absorb impact energy through it's break and deformation and then improve the toughness.%以高密度聚乙烯(PE-HD)为基体、碳纤维(CF)为增强材料,采用双辊塑炼工艺制备了PE-HD/CF复合材料,力学性能测试结果表明该复合材料的拉伸和弯曲性能随CF含量的增加而增大,但缺口冲击强度逐渐下降.在该复合材料基础上添加空心玻璃微珠(HGB)制得PE-HD/CF/HGB三元复合材料,力学性能测试结果表明当HGB用量为10份且CF用量为15份时,三元复合材料的拉伸强度、弯曲强度和缺口冲击强度均达到最大,分别为46.98 MPa,45.69 MPa和8.17 kJ/m2,较未加HGB的PE-HD/CF复合材料分别提高了7.19%,4.17%和10.4%.扫描电子显微镜结果表明,HGB主要通过其变形和破坏来吸收冲击能量,从而提高复合材料的韧性.

  19. Annual report of 1995 groundwater monitoring data for the Kerr Hollow Quarry and Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ) and the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) are inactive waste management sites located at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The KHQ and CRSDB are regulated as treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The facilities were granted interim status in calendar year (CY) 1986 under Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Hazardous Waste Management Rule 1200-1-11-.05. Historical environmental monitoring data and baseline characterization under interim status indicated that releases of contaminants to groundwater had not occurred; thus, the detection monitoring was implemented at the sites until either clean closure was completed or post-closure permits were issued. The CRSDB was closed in Cy 1989 under a TDEC-approved RCRA closure plan. A revised RCRA PCPA for the CRSDB was submitted by DOE personnel to TDEC staff in September 1994. A final post-closure permit was issued by the TDEC on September 18, 1995. Closure activities at KHQ under RCRA were completed in October 1993. The Record of Decision will also incorporate requirements of the RCRA post-closure permit once it is issued by the TDEC.

  20. Switching a Nanocluster Core from Hollow to Non-hollow

    KAUST Repository

    Bootharaju, Megalamane Siddaramappa

    2016-03-24

    Modulating the structure-property relationship in atomically precise nanoclusters (NCs) is vital for developing novel NC materials and advancing their applications. While promising biphasic ligand-exchange (LE) strategies have been developed primarily to attain novel NCs, understanding the mechanistic aspects involved in tuning the core and the ligand-shell of NCs in such biphasic processes is challenging. Here, we design a single phase LE process that enabled us to elucidate the mechanism of how a hollow NC (e.g., [Ag44(SR)30]4-, -SR: thiolate) converts into a non-hollow NC (e.g., [Ag25(SR)18]-), and vice versa. Our study reveals that the complete LE of the hollow [Ag44(SPhF)30]4- NCs (–SPhF: 4-fluorobenzenethiolate) with incoming 2,4-dimethylbenzenethiol (HSPhMe2) induced distortions in the Ag44 structure forming the non-hollow [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- by a disproportionation mechanism. While the reverse reaction of [Ag25(SPhMe2)18]- with HSPhF prompted an unusual dimerization of Ag25, followed by a rearrangement step that reproduces the original [Ag44(SPhF)30]4-. Remarkably, both the forward and the backward reactions proceed through similar size intermediates that seem to be governed by the boundary conditions set by the thermodynamic and electronic stability of the hollow and non-hollow metal cores. Furthermore, the resizing of NCs highlights the surprisingly long-range effect of the ligands which are felt by atoms far deep in the metal core, thus opening a new path for controlling the structural evolution of nanoparticles.

  1. Final Report for Emergency Stabilization and Rehabilitation Treatment Monitoring of the Keeney Pass, Cow Hollow, Double Mountain, and Farewell Bend Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A strategy for monitoring post-fire seedings in the sagebrush steppe of the Intermountain West was developed and used to monitor four example fires in the Vale, Oregon District of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). We began to develop a potential approach by (1) reviewing previous vegetation monitoring manuals produced by the Federal government to determine what techniques and approaches had been approved for use, and (2) monitoring a set of example fire rehabilitation projects from 2006 through 2008. We reviewed seven vegetation monitoring manuals approved for use by the Federal government. From these seven manuals, we derived a set of design elements appropriate for monitoring post-fire rehabilitation and stabilization projects. These design elements consisted of objectives, stratification, control plots, random sampling, data quality, and statistical analysis. Additionally, we chose three quantitative vegetation field procedures that were objective and repeatable to be used in conjunction with these six design elements. During the spring and summer of 2006 to 2008, U.S. Geological Survey personnel monitored vegetation in seven post-fire seeding treatments in four burned areas in the Vale district of the BLM in eastern Oregon. Treatments monitored included a native and non-native seeding in each of the Farewell Bend, Double Mountain, and Keeney Pass fires, and a native seeding at the Cow Hollow fire. All fires occurred in 2005. There generally was a low level of plant establishment for all seedings by 2008. The quantitative objective established by the BLM was to achieve 5 seeded grass plants/m2 by the end of 3 years as a result of the seeding. There was an estimated 3.97 and 6.28 plants/m2 in 2006 and 1.06 and 0.85 plants/m2 seeded perennial grasses in 2008 from the Keeney Pass non-native and native seeding, respectively. The Cow Hollow seeding resulted in the lowest establishment of perennial seeded grasses of the four project areas with 0.69 plants/m2 in

  2. [Study on Hollow Brick Wall's Surface Temperature with Infrared Thermal Imaging Method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming-fang; Yin, Yi-hua

    2015-05-01

    To address the characteristic of uneven surface temperature of hollow brick wall, the present research adopts soft wares of both ThermaCAM P20 and ThermaCAM Reporter to test the application of infrared thermal image technique in measuring surface temperature of hollow brick wall, and further analyzes the thermal characteristics of hollow brick wall, and building material's impact on surface temperature distribution including hollow brick, masonry mortar, and so on. The research selects the construction site of a three-story-high residential, carries out the heat transfer experiment, and further examines the exterior wall constructed by 3 different hollow bricks including sintering shale hollow brick, masonry mortar and brick masonry. Infrared thermal image maps are collected, including 3 kinds of sintering shale hollow brick walls under indoor heating in winter; and temperature data of wall surface, and uniformity and frequency distribution are also collected for comparative analysis between 2 hollow bricks and 2 kinds of mortar masonry. The results show that improving heat preservation of hollow brick aid masonry mortar can effectively improve inner wall surface temperature and indoor thermal environment; non-uniformity of surface temperature decreases from 0. 6 to 0. 4 °C , and surface temperature frequency distribution changes from the asymmetric distribution into a normal distribution under the condition that energy-saving sintering shale hollow brick wall is constructed by thermal mortar replacing cement mortar masonry; frequency of average temperature increases as uniformity of surface temperature increases. This research provides a certain basis for promotion and optimization of hollow brick wall's thermal function.

  3. Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis L. Mcling

    2010-10-01

    The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idaho’s interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

  4. A microring multimode laser using hollow polymer optical fibre

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Kailasnath; V P N Nampoori; P Radhakrishnan

    2010-11-01

    We report the observation of multimode laser operation at wavelengths corresponding to whispering-gallery modes from a freestanding microring cavity based on rhodamine B dye-doped PMMA hollow optical fibre. Cylindrical microcavities with diameters 155, 340 and 615 m were fabricated from a dye-doped hollow polymer optical fibre preform. An average mode spacing of 0.17 nm was observed for the 340 m cavity. This shows that the laser mode intensity distribution is concentrated on the outer edge of the cavity.

  5. Raman lasing in a hollow, bottle-like microresonator

    CERN Document Server

    Ooka, Yuta; Ward, Jonathan; Chromaic, Síle Nic

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of an ultrahigh quality factor, bottle-like microresonator from a hollow microcapillary, and the realisation of Raman lasing therein at pump wavelengths of $1.55~\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ and $780~\\mathrm{nm}$. Third-order cascaded Raman lasing was observed when pumped at $780~\\mathrm{nm}$. The aerostatic pressure tunability of the Raman laser was also investigated. Thence, we demonstrate that a high dynamic range, high resolution pressure sensor can be realised using the Raman spectrum of the hollow, bottle-like microresonator.

  6. MnO2 Nanofilms on Nitrogen-Doped Hollow Graphene Spheres as a High-Performance Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiangmin; Xu, Jiaoxing; Wu, Chuxin; Zhang, Jianshuo; Guan, Lunhui

    2016-12-28

    Platinum is commonly chosen as an electrocatalyst used for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this study, we report an active catalyst composed of MnO2 nanofilms grown directly on nitrogen-doped hollow graphene spheres, which exhibits high activity toward ORR with positive onset potential (0.94 V vs RHE), large current density (5.2 mA cm(-2)), and perfect stability. Significantly, when it was used as catalyst for air electrode, a zinc-air battery exhibited a high power density (82 mW cm(-2)) and specific capacities (744 mA h g(-1)) comparable to that with Pt/C (20 wt %) as air cathode. The enhanced activity is ascribed to the synergistic interaction between MnO2 and the doped hollow carbon nanomaterials. This easy and cheap method paves a way of synthesizing high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR.

  7. Pressure effects in hollow and solid iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, N.J.O., E-mail: nunojoao@ua.pt [Departamento de Física and CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Saisho, S.; Mito, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu 804-8550 (Japan); Millán, A.; Palacio, F. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC - Universidad de Zaragoza. Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencias, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Cabot, A. [Universitat de Barcelona and Catalonia Energy Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain); Iglesias, Ò.; Labarta, A. [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona and Institut de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-06-15

    We report a study on the pressure response of the anisotropy energy of hollow and solid maghemite nanoparticles. The differences between the maghemite samples are understood in terms of size, magnetic anisotropy and shape of the particles. In particular, the differences between hollow and solid samples are due to the different shape of the nanoparticles and by comparing both pressure responses it is possible to conclude that the shell has a larger pressure response when compared to the core. - Highlights: ► Study of the pressure response of core and shell magnetic anisotropy. ► Contrast between hollow and solid maghemite nanoparticles. ► Disentanglement of nanoparticles core and shell magnetic properties.

  8. Hollow-Cuboid Li3VO4/C as High-Performance Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changkun; Liu, Chaofeng; Nan, Xihui; Song, Huanqiao; Liu, Yaguang; Zhang, Cuiping; Cao, Guozhong

    2016-01-13

    Li3VO4 has been demonstrated to be a promising anode material for lithium-ion batteries with a low, safe voltage and large capacity. However, its poor electronic conductivity hinders its practical application particularly at a high rate. This work reports that Li3VO4 coated with carbon was synthesized by a one-pot, two-step method with F127 ((PEO)100-(PPO)65-(PEO)100) as both template and carbon source, yielding a microcuboid structure. The resulting Li3VO4/C cuboid shows a stable capacity of 415 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C and excellent capacity stability at high rates (e.g., 92% capacity retention after 1000 cycles at 10 C = 4 A g(-1)). The lithiation/delithiation process of Li3VO4/C was studied by ex situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, which confirmed that Li3VO4/C underwent a reversible intercalation reaction during discharge/charge processes. The excellent electrochemical performance is attributed largely to the unique microhollow structure. The voids inside hollow structure can not only provide more space to accommodate volume change during discharge/charge processes but also allow the lithium ions insertion and extraction from both outside and inside the hollow structure with a much larger surface area or more reaction sites and shorten the lithium ions diffusion distance, which leads to smaller overpotential and faster reaction kinetics. Carbon derived from F127 through pyrolysis coats Li3VO4 conformably and thus offers good electrical conduction. The results in this work provide convincing evidence that the significant potential of hollow-cuboid Li3VO4/C for high-power batteries.

  9. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small

  10. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  11. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-21

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed "bottom-up" approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical "bottom" bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the "top" product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a "bottom-up" mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na(3.12)Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.

  12. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  13. Hollow waveguide for urology treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, H.; Němec, M.; Koranda, P.; Pokorný, J.; Kőhler, O.; Drlík, P.; Miyagi, M.; Iwai, K.; Matsuura, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The aim of our work was the application of the special sealed hollow waveguide system for the urology treatment - In our experimental study we have compared the effects of Ho:YAG (wavelength 2100 nm) and Er:YAG (wavelength 2940 nm) laser radiation both on human urinary stones (or compressed plaster samples which serve as a model) fragmentation and soft ureter tissue incision in vitro. Cyclic Olefin Polymer - coated silver (COP/Ag) hollow glass waveguides with inner and outer diameters 700 and 850 μm, respectively, were used for the experiment. To prevent any liquid to diminish and stop the transmission, the waveguide termination was utilized.

  14. Observations And Measurements of Anomalous Hollow Electron Beams in a Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.K.; Li, J.; /Duke U.; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2006-02-06

    Anomalous hollow electron beams have been recently observed in the Duke storage ring. With a single bunch beam in a lattice with a negative chromaticity, a hollow beam can be created. This beam consists of a solid core beam inside and a large ring beam outside. In this paper, we report the measurements of the hollow beam phenomenon, including its distinct image pattern and spectrum signature, and its evolution with time. By capturing the post-instability bursting beam, the hollow beam is a unique model system for studying transverse instabilities, in particular, the interplay of the wakefield and lattice nonlinearity. The hollow beam can also be used as a tool to study linear and nonlinear particle dynamics in the storage ring.

  15. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report: The Persistence and Vulnerability of Carbon in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, V. L.; Lajtha, K.

    2016-12-01

    Soils are a critical reservoir for the global C cycle, containing approximately 3 times the atmospheric C load, and more than twice the amount of C cycling in the surface oceans. Yet soil is not a stagnant reservoir, as evidenced by traditional classifications of different soils as C "sinks" or "sources." Soil C is highly dynamic and the soil C cycle shifts in response to land use, and to climate and weather perturbations. These shifts from nominally "stable" pools to "active" are likely a function of new litter inputs, microbial decomposition, and physical and chemical protection mechanisms; net losses include gas fluxes and run-off, both of which will significantly affect other global C compartments. These traits, and others, are being used to frame and advance soil C cycle models and also global C models to more accurately predict feedbacks from the soil to the physical Earth system via greenhouse gas emissions. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report comprehensively addresses the role of soils in the global C cycle for the United States, Canada, and Mexico.

  16. Nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on hollow gold/ruthenium nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ara; Kang, Minkyung; Cha, Areum; Jang, Hye Su [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Jun Ho [Department of Chemistry, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Nam-Suk [National Center for Nanomaterials Technology (NCNT), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myung Hwa [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Youngmi, E-mail: youngmilee@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chongmok, E-mail: cmlee@ewha.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry and Nano Science, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 120-750 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • We synthesized hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells for ascorbic acid sensing. • The hAu–Ru nanoshells showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² for ascorbic acid. • Good selectivity against glucose, uric acid, dopamine, 4-acetamidophenol, and NADH. • The linear dynamic range appeared from zero to 2.0 mM (R = 0.9995). • Response time (1.6 s) and low detection limit (2.2 μM) were obtained at pH 7.40. Abstract: We report a new nonenzymatic amperometric detection of ascorbic acid (AA) using a glassy carbon (GC) disk electrode modified with hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu–Ru) nanoshells, which exhibited decent sensing characteristics. The hAu–Ru nanoshells were prepared by the incorporation of Ru on hollow gold (hAu) nanoshells from Co nanoparticle templates, which enabled AA selectivity against glucose without aid of enzyme or membrane. The structure and electrocatalytic activities of the hAu–Ru catalysts were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The hAu–Ru loaded on GC electrode (hAu–Ru/GC) showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM⁻¹ cm⁻² (normalized to the GC disk area) for the linear dynamic range of <5 μM to 2 mM AA at physiological pH. The response time and detection limit were 1.6 s and 2.2 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the hAu–Ru/GC electrode displayed remarkable selectivity for ascorbic acid over all potential biological interferents, including glucose, uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA), 4-acetamidophenol (AP), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which could be especially good for biological sensing.

  17. [Carbon tetrachloride poisoning: a report of 3 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, E; Martínez Ara, J; Valencia, M E; Mostaza, J M; Miguel, J L; Sánchez Sicilia, L

    1989-09-01

    Carbon tetrachloride is a toxic solvent easily obtained in our country. 3 cases of poisoning by accidental inhalation at place of work. The main clinical manifestations were acute renal failure and toxic hepatopathy. All patients, had a good evolution with dialysis therapy after a few weeks. We comment on some possible additional therapies to be used in treating patients with severe poisoning due to carbon tetrachloride.

  18. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  19. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3) Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jing; Zuo, Guanke; Shen, Guangxia; Guo, He; Liu, Hui; Cheng, Ping; Zhang, Jingyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2009-07-17

    We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres showed large Brunauer-Emment-Teller specific area (33.8 m2 g-1), strong resistance to acids, and excellent ability to remove organic molecules such as dye and proteins from aqueous solutions. These illustrate that the hollow nanospheres of Na0.15WO3should be a useful adsorbent.

  20. Hollow Sodium Tungsten Bronze (Na0.15WO3 Nanospheres: Preparation, Characterization, and Their Adsorption Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo Guanke

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report herein a facile method for the preparation of sodium tungsten bronzes hollow nanospheres using hydrogen gas bubbles as reactant for chemical reduction of tungstate to tungsten and as template for the formation of hollow nanospheres at the same time. The chemical composition and the crystalline state of the as-prepared hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres were characterized complementarily, and the hollow structure formation mechanism was proposed. The hollow Na0.15WO3nanospheres showed large Brunauer–Emment–Teller specific area (33.8 m2 g−1, strong resistance to acids, and excellent ability to remove organic molecules such as dye and proteins from aqueous solutions. These illustrate that the hollow nanospheres of Na0.15WO3should be a useful adsorbent.

  1. Porous core-shell carbon fibers derived from lignin and cellulose nanofibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports a method to produce lignin and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) based porous core-shell carbon fibers via co-electrospinning followed by controlled carbonization. Lignin formed the shell of the fiber while CNF network formed the porous core. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was added to the lignin solution to increase its electrospinability. CNFs were surface acetylated and dispersed in silicon oil to obtain a homogenous dispersion for electrospinning the porous core. Hollow lignin fibers were also electrospun using glycerin as the core material. FT-IR measurements confirmed the CNF acetylation. SEM micrographs showed the core-shell and hollow fiber nanostructures before and after carbonization. The novel carbon fibers synthesized in this study exhibited increased surface area and porosity that are promising for many advanced applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Nonenzymatic amperometric sensor for ascorbic acid based on hollow gold/ruthenium nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ara; Kang, Minkyung; Cha, Areum; Jang, Hye Su; Shim, Jun Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Kim, Myung Hwa; Lee, Youngmi; Lee, Chongmok

    2014-03-28

    We report a new nonenzymatic amperometric detection of ascorbic acid (AA) using a glassy carbon (GC) disk electrode modified with hollow gold/ruthenium (hAu-Ru) nanoshells, which exhibited decent sensing characteristics. The hAu-Ru nanoshells were prepared by the incorporation of Ru on hollow gold (hAu) nanoshells from Co nanoparticle templates, which enabled AA selectivity against glucose without aid of enzyme or membrane. The structure and electrocatalytic activities of the hAu-Ru catalysts were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical techniques. The hAu-Ru loaded on GC electrode (hAu-Ru/GC) showed sensitivity of 426 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) (normalized to the GC disk area) for the linear dynamic range of <5 μM to 2 mM AA at physiological pH. The response time and detection limit were 1.6 s and 2.2 μM, respectively. Furthermore, the hAu-Ru/GC electrode displayed remarkable selectivity for ascorbic acid over all potential biological interferents, including glucose, uric acid (UA), dopamine (DA), 4-acetamidophenol (AP), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), which could be especially good for biological sensing.

  3. Fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon. Phase I final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, E.B.; Zondlo, J.W.; Cessna, T.J.

    1999-06-30

    This project involves the simultaneous production of clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon and sulfur, along with value-added carbon nanofibers. This can be accomplished because the nanofiber production process removes carbon via a catalyzed pyrolysis reaction, which also has the effect of removing 99.9% of the sulfur, which is trapped in the nanofibers. The reaction is mildly endothermic, meaning that net energy production with real reductions in greenhouse emissions are possible. In Phase I research, the feasibility of generating clean fossil fuel derivatives with reduced carbon was demonstrated by the successful design, construction and operation of a facility capable of utilizing coal as well as natural gas as an inlet feedstock. In the case of coal, for example, reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions can be as much as 70% (normalized according to kilowatts produced), with the majority of carbon safely sequestered in the form of carbon nanofibers or coke. Both of these products are value-added commodities, indicating that low-emission coal fuel can be done at a profit rather than a loss as is the case with most clean-up schemes. The main results of this project were as follows: (1) It was shown that the nanofiber production process produces hydrogen as a byproduct. (2) The hydrogen, or hydrogen-rich hydrocarbon mixture can be consumed with net release of enthalpy. (3) The greenhouse gas emissions from both coal and natural gas are significantly reduced. Because coal consumption also creates coke, the carbon emission can be reduced by 75% per kilowatt-hour of power produced.

  4. Investigation on luminescence properties of Er3+-Yb3+-Tm3+ co-doped Gd2O3 hollow microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang; Han, Wan-lei; Liu, Xiao-bo; Song, Ying-lin

    2011-06-01

    The Gd2O3 hollow microspheres have been successfully fabricated via carbonaceous polysaccharide microspheres as templates and urea as a precipitating agent, which involved the deposition of an inorganic coating on the surface of carbon microsphere, followed by heat treated 800°C for 4h. The obtained high uniform Gd2O3 microspheres with a spherical shape and hollow structure are uniform in size and distribution. The possible mechanism of evolution from glucose to carbonaceous polysaccharide microspheres and the chemical reaction of each step to form the final hollow spheres are proposed. The rare earth ion Ln3+ doped Gd2O3 (Ln = Er, Yb and Tm) hollow microspheres show bright up-conversion luminescence with different colors coming from different activator ions under ultraviolet or 980 nm light excitation, which may open new possibilities to synthesize other hollow spherical materials and extend their applications.

  5. Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldman, J.C.

    1980-06-01

    The work included in this report is part of an ongoing study (currently funded by the Solar Energy Research Institute - Subcontract No. XR-9-8144-1) on the inorganic carbon requirements of microalgae under mass culture conditions and covers the period June 1, 1978 through May 31, 1979. It is divided into two parts appended herein. The first part is a literature review on the inorganic carbon chemical system in relation to algal growth requirements, and the second part deals with the kinetics of inorganic carbon-limited growth of two freshwater chlorophytes including the effect of carbon limitation on cellular chemical composition. Additional experiment research covered under this contract was reported in the Proceedings of the 3rd Annual Biomass Energy Systems Conferences, pp. 25-32, Bioengineering aspects of inorganic carbon supply to mass algal cultures. Report No. SERI/TP-33-285.

  6. Abiotic degradation rates for carbon tetrachloride and chloroform: Final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amonette, James E.; Jeffers, Peter M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Russell, Colleen K.; Humphrys, Daniel R.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.

    2012-12-01

    This report documents the objectives, technical approach, and progress made through FY 2012 on a project initiated in FY 2006 to help address uncertainties related to the rates of hydrolysis in groundwater for carbon tetrachloride (CT) and chloroform (CF). The project also sought to explore the possible effects of contact with minerals and sediment (i.e., heterogeneous hydrolysis) on these rates. We conducted 114 hydrolysis rate experiments in sealed vessels across a temperature range of 20-93 °C for periods as long as 6 years, and used the Arrhenius equation to estimate activation energies and calculate half-lives for typical Hanford groundwater conditions (temperature of 16 °C and pH of 7.75). We calculated a half-life of 630 years for hydrolysis for CT under these conditions and found that CT hydrolysis was unaffected by contact with sterilized, oxidized minerals or Hanford sediment within the sensitivity of our experiments. In contrast to CT, hydrolysis of CF was generally slower and very sensitive to pH due to the presence of both neutral and base-catalyzed hydrolysis pathways. We calculated a half-life of 3400 years for hydrolysis of CF in homogeneous solution at 16 °C and pH 7.75. Experiments in suspensions of Hanford sediment or smectite, the dominant clay mineral in Hanford sediment, equilibrated to an initial pH of 7.2, yielded calculated half-lives of 1700 years and 190 years, respectively, at 16 °C. Experiments with three other mineral phases at the same pH (muscovite mica, albite feldspar, and kaolinite) showed no change from the homogeneous solution results (i.e., a half-life of 3400 years). The strong influence of Hanford sediment on CF hydrolysis was attributed to the presence of smectite and its ability to adsorb protons, thereby buffering the solution pH at a higher level than would otherwise occur. The project also determined liquid-vapor partition coefficients for CT under the temperatures and pressures encountered in the sealed vessels that

  7. Carbon-carbon composites for orthopedic prosthesis and implants. CRADA final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, T D; Klett, J W; Strizak, J P [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Baker, C [FMI, Biddeford, ME (United States)

    1998-01-21

    The prosthetic implant market is extensive. For example, because of arthritic degeneration of hip and knee cartilage and osteoporotic fractures of the hip, over 200,000 total joint replacements (TJRs) are performed in the United States each year. Current TJR devices are typically metallic (stainless steel, cobalt, or titanium alloy) and are fixed in the bone with polymethylacrylate (PMMA) cement. Carbon-carbon composite materials offer several distinct advantages over metals for TJR prosthesis. Their mechanical properties can be tailored to match more closely the mechanical properties of human bone, and the composite may have up to 25% porosity, the size and distribution of which may be controlled through processing. The porous nature of carbon-carbon composites will allow for the ingrowth of bone, achieving biological fixation, and eliminating the need for PMMA cement fixation.

  8. Physical and electrochemical characterization of CdS hollow microspheres prepared by a novel template free solution phase method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rengaraj, S., E-mail: rengaraj.selvaraj@uef.f [University of Eastern Finland, Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry (LAEC), Patteristonkatu 1, FI-50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Ferancova, A. [University of Eastern Finland, Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry (LAEC), Patteristonkatu 1, FI-50100 Mikkeli (Finland); Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 81237 Bratislava (Slovakia); Jee, S.H. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Wolgye, Nowon, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Venkataraj, S. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India); Kim, Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Wolgye, Nowon, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Labuda, J. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, 81237 Bratislava (Slovakia); Sillanpaeae, M. [University of Eastern Finland, Laboratory of Applied Environmental Chemistry (LAEC), Patteristonkatu 1, FI-50100 Mikkeli (Finland); LUT Faculty of Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Patteristonkatu 1, FI-50100 Mikkeli (Finland)

    2010-12-15

    Novel CdS hollow microspheres have been successfully synthesized via a facile template-free solution-phase reaction from cadmium nitrate and thioacetamide precursors. The morphology of CdS hollow microspheres depends strongly on the ratio between the precursors, cadmium nitrate to thioacetamide ratio. The physical properties of the hollow microspheres have systematically been studied by different characterization methods. The stoichiometry of the hollow microspheres studied by the energy dispersive X-ray diffraction spectroscopy confirmed that the synthesized CdS hollow microspheres are nearly stoichiometric bulk like CdS. The morphology of the hollow microspheres studied by high resolution scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations showed that the CdS hollow microspheres of the size of 2.5 {mu}m have hollow structure and are constructed by several nanoparticles of the size between 30 and 40 nm. The UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy studies showed that the band gap of the CdS hollow microspheres increased while increasing the cadmium nitrate to thioacetamide ratio. Further electrochemical characterization of CdS hollow microspheres was performed with glassy carbon electrode (GCE) after its chemical modification by CdS dispersed in dimethylformamide. The electrochemical studies showed that with decreasing the band gap energy the electron transfer resistance of CdS/GCE was also found decreased. Moreover, electrochemical impedance spectroscopic measurements showed enhanced DNA adsorption onto CdS/GCE in comparison to GCE. These experiments demonstrate that the CdS hollow microspheres act as an efficient electrode modifier that effectively decreased the charge transfer resistance and capacitance of the modified sensors, which can be used for electroanalytical purposes.

  9. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    Pasturelands account for 51 of the 212 Mha of privately held grazing land in the USA. Tall fescue is the most important cool-season perennial forage for many beef cattle producers in the humid region of the USA. A fungal endophyte, Neotyphodium coenophialum, infects the majority of tall fescue stands with a mutualistic association. Ergot alkaloids produced by the endophyte have negative impacts on cattle performance. However, there are indications that endophyte infection of tall fescue is a necessary component of productive and persistent pasture ecology. The objectives of this research were to characterize and quantify changes in soil organic carbon and associated soil properties under tall fescue pastures with and without endophyte infection of grass. Pastures with high endophyte infection had greater concentration of soil organic carbon, but lower concentration of biologically active soil carbon than pastures with low endophyte infection. A controlled experiment suggested that endophyte-infected leaf tissue may directly inhibit the activity of soil microorganisms. Carbon forms of soil organic matter were negatively affected and nitrogen forms were positively affected by endophyte addition to soil. The chemical compounds in endophyte-infected tall fescue (ergot alkaloids) that are responsible for animal health disorders were found in soil, suggesting that these chemicals might be persistent in the environment. Future research is needed to determine whether ergot alkaloids or some other chemicals are responsible for increases in soil organic matter. Scientists will be able to use this information to better understand the ecological impacts of animals grazing tall fescue, and possibly to identify and cultivate other similar associations for improving soil organic matter storage. Another experiment suggested that both dry matter production and soil microbial activity could be affected by the endophyte. Sampling of the cumulative effects of 20 years of tall fescue

  10. Structural evolution of carbon during oxidation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarofim, A.F.

    1998-04-01

    The examination of the structural evolution of carbon during oxidation has proven to be of scientific interest. Early modeling work of fluidized bed combustion showed that most of the reactions of interest occurs in the micropores, and this work has concentrated on these pores. This work has concentrated on evolution of macroporosity and microporosity of carbons during kinetic controlled oxidation using SAXS, CO{sub 2} and TEM analysis. Simple studies of fluidized bed combustion of coal chars has shown that many of the events considered fragmentation events previously may in fact be {open_quotes}hidden{close_quotes} or nonaccessible porosity. This makes the study of the microporous combustion characteristics of carbon even more important. The generation of a combustion resistant grid, coupled with measurements of the SAXS and CO{sub 2} surface areas, fractal analysis and TEM. Studies has confirmed that soot particles shrink during their oxidation, as previously suspected. However, this shrinkage results in an overall change in structure. This structure becomes, on a radial basis, much more ordered near the edges, while the center itself becomes transparent to the TEM beam, implying a total lack of structure in this region. Although complex, this carbon structure is probably burning as to keep the density of the soot particles nearly the same. The TEM techniques developed for examination of soots has also been applied to Spherocarb. The Spherocarb during oxidation also increases its ordering. This ordering, by present theories, would imply that the reactivity would go. However, the reactivity goes up, implying that structure of carbon is secondary in importance to catalytic effects.

  11. Cathode response model and literature review of metal solubility in carbonates. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    The research described in this report is intended to explain some of the aspects of molten carbonate fuel cell system. The research currently being investigated is an important part of MCFC performance development.

  12. 78 FR 60271 - Hollow Dam Power Company; Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hollow Dam Power Company; Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC; Notice of..., Hollow Dam Power Company (transferor) and Ampersand Hollow Dam Hydro, LLC (transferee) filed an application for transfer of license for the Hollow Dam Project, FERC No. 6972, located on the West Branch...

  13. FY 93 site characterization status report and data package for the carbon tetrachloride site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohay, V.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-09-28

    This report provides the status and accomplishments from fiscal year site characterization activities conducted as part of the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action and the Volatile Organic Compounds - Arid Integrated Demonstration. The report includes or references all available raw data collected as part of these tasks. During fiscal year 1993, the 200 West Area Carbon Tetrachloride Expedited Response Action and the Volatile Organic Compounds - Arid Integrated Demonstration programs focused on the carbon tetrachloride plume in the unsaturated zone underlying the 200 West Area at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington.

  14. Treatment of ranula using carbon dioxide laser--case series report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, J B; Poon, C Y

    2009-10-01

    Ranulas are mucus extravasation phenomenon formed after trauma to the sublingual gland or mucus retention from the obstruction of the sublingual ducts. There are various methods for treating ranulas, including marsupialization with or without open packing, excision of ranula with or without removal of sublingual gland, and laser excision and vaporization of ranula. The authors present a case series report on the use of carbon dioxide laser treatment for ranula and a literature review of cases treated using carbon dioxide laser. The authors' experience and reports in the literature indicate that carbon dioxide laser excision of ranula is safe with minimal or no recurrence.

  15. In Situ Formation of Co9 S8 /N-C Hollow Nanospheres by Pyrolysis and Sulfurization of ZIF-67 for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Peiyuan; Li, Jianwen; Ye, Ming; Zhuo, Kaifeng; Fang, Zhen

    2017-07-18

    Co9 S8 is considered a promising candidate as the anode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) because of its remarkable electrical conductivity, high theoretical capacity, and low cost. However, the practical application of Co9 S8 is greatly restricted because of its poor cycling stability and rate performance, which result mainly from the large volume expansion and dissolution of the polysulfide intermediates during the charge/discharge process. In this report, Co9 S8 embedded in N-rich carbon hollow spheres are successfully designed and synthesized through an in situ pyrolysis and sulfurization process, employing the well-known ZIF-67 as the precursor and ethanethiol as the sulfur source. Co9 S8 nanoparticles embedded in the N-rich hollow carbon shell exhibit excellent lithium storage properties at a high charge/discharge rate. A discharge capacity of 784 mAh g(-1) is obtained upon battery testing at a current density of 1 C (544 mA g(-1) ). Even upon cycling at a current density of 4 C, the as-prepared Co9 S8 /N-C can still deliver a discharge capacity of 518 mAh g(-1) . The excellent battery performance can be attributed to the hollow structure as well as the N-rich carbon encapsulation. Moreover, this metal-organic framework sulfurization route also shows good generality for the synthesis of other metal sulfide-carbon composites such as ZnS/N-C and Cu2 S/C. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Superamphiphobic surfaces constructed by cross-linked hollow SiO2 spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Weihao; Wang, Tao; Yan, Aili; Wang, Sheng

    2017-04-01

    By using stringed carbon spheres as template material, a series of hierarchical 3D cross-linked SiO2 coated carbon spheres and hollow SiO2 spheres were fabricated, and spray-coated on glass slides, followed by the fluorination treatment with per-fluorotrichlorosilane. The surface characterization and surface wettability data indicated that hollow SiO2 spheres spray-coated surfaces showed better superhydrophobicity and superoleophobcity properties than the corresponding solid C@SiO2 coated surface. This study further demonstrated that superamphiphobicity depends on two critical factors, namely a cavity- and spot-rich hierarchical structure and the size and shape of overhangs. Moreover, the optimal conditions for the preparation of hollow SiO2 coated glass slide were identified after a systematic investigation of various concentrations of the carbon precursor and tetraethylorthosilicate. It was found that when 0.10 g carbon spheres prepared from 1.0 M carbon precursor were used as the template and 20 mg/mL tetraethylorthosilicate was used as silica precursor, the hollow SiO2 coated glass slide exhibited the best superamphiphobic performance, with the highest contact angles and lowest sliding angles for various liquids, such as water, olive oil, n-hexadecane and n-dodecane.

  17. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  18. Carbon transport in the bottom boundary layer. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Asper, V.L.

    1997-09-01

    The authors objective was to characterize distributions of chloropigment fluorescence in relation to physical processes in the benthic boundary layer in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Ocean Margins Program`s (OMP) goal of quantifying carbon transport across the continental shelf. Their approach involved participation in the Ocean Margins Program (OMP) field experiment on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras by conducting multi-sensor fluorescence measurements of photosynthetic pigments. Specific tasks included (1) pre- and post-deployment calibration of multiple fluorescence sensors in conjunction with Woods Hole personnel; (2) collection and analysis of photosynthetic pigment concentrations and total particulate carbon in water column samples to aid in interpretation of the fluorescence time-series during the field experiment; (3) collaboration in the analysis and interpretation of 1994 and 1996 time-series data in support of efforts to quantify pigment and particulate organic carbon transport on the continental shelf off Cape Hatteras. This third component included analysis of data obtained with a multi-sensor fiber-optic fluorometer in the benthic boundary layer of the inner shelf off Cape Hatteras during summer 1994.

  19. Clumped isotope calibration data for lacustrine carbonates: A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripati, A.

    2015-12-01

    Our capacity to understand Earth's environmental history is highly dependent on the accuracy of reconstructions of past climates. Lake sediments provide important archives of terrestrial climate change, and represent an important tool for reconstructing paleohydrology, paleoclimate, paleoenvironment, and paleoaltimetry. Unfortunately, while multiple methods for constraining marine temperature exist, quantitative terrestrial proxies are scarcer - tree rings, speleothems, and leaf margin analyses have all been used with varying degrees of accuracy. Clumped isotope thermometry has the potential to be a useful instrument for determining terrestrial climates: multiple studies have shown the fraction of 13C—18O bonds in carbonates is inversely related to the temperature at which the rocks formed. We have been measuring the abundance of 13C18O16O in the CO2 produced by the dissolution of carbonate minerals in phosphoric acid in modern lake samples and comparing results to independently known estimates of lake water temperature. Here we discuss an extensive calibration dataset comprised of 132 analyses of 97 samples from 44 localities, including microbialites, tufas, and micrites endogenic carbonates, freshwater gastropods, bivalves, microbialites, and ooids.

  20. Hollow chain-like beams

    CERN Document Server

    Cherepko, Dmitriy; Popkov, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    To generate hollow chain-like beams the diffraction of the first order Bessel beam by zone plate with two odd open Fresnel zone has been investigated. It has been shown that the capsules size is influenced by the number of the second odd open Fresnel zone and by the zone plate focal length. A hollow chain-like beam has been experimentally generated as a result of the first order Bessel beam diffraction by zone plate with the first and the ninth open Fresnel zones. The orbital angular momentum presence has been proved experimentally. The main features of the beam have been investigated. Sufficiently good agreement between experimental and numerically calculated results has been demonstrated.

  1. Compact lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M; Watkins, Ronald M

    2010-08-01

    A compact lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode has been developed for space applications where size and mass are important and research and industrial applications where access for implementation might be limited. The cathode design features a refractory metal cathode tube that is easily manufactured, mechanically captured orifice and end plates to eliminate expensive e-beam welding, graphite sleeves to provide a diffusion boundary to protect the LaB6 insert from chemical reactions with the refractory metal tube, and several heater designs to provide long life. The compact LaB(6) hollow cathode assembly including emitter, support tube, heater, and keeper electrode is less than 2 cm in diameter and has been fabricated in lengths of 6-15 cm for different applications. The cathode has been operated continuously at discharge currents of 5-60 A in xenon. Slightly larger diameter versions of this design have operated at up to 100 A of discharge current.

  2. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  3. Purification of nanoparticles by hollow fiber diafiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeken, J.

    2012-09-01

    Hollow Fiber Diafiltration (Hollow Fiber Tangential Flow Filtration) is an efficient and rapid alternative to traditional methods of nanoparticle purification such as ultracentrifugation, stirred cell filtration, dialysis or chromatography. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration can be used to purify a wide range of nanoparticles including liposomes, colloids, magnetic particles and nanotubes. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration is a membrane based method where pore size determines the retention or transmission of solution components. It is a flow process where the sample is gently circulated through a tubular membrane. With controlled replacement of the permeate or (dialysate), pure nanoparticles can be attained. Hollow Fiber Diafiltration can be directly scaled up from R&D volumes to production. By adding more membrane fibers and maintaining the operating parameters, large volumes can be processed in the same time with the same pressure, and flow dynamics as bench-scale volumes. Keywords: hollow fiber, Diafiltration, filtration, purification, tangential flow filtration.

  4. Hollow-core grating fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillé, R.; Tajalli, P.; Roy, P.; Ahmadi-kandjani, S.; Kucharski, S.; Ortyl, E.

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new type of hollow-core fiber where the propagation is ensured by a photoinduced self-pattern acting as a surface relief grating (SRG). The SRG is written by launching a suitable laser beam with proper polarization in a capillary glass fiber with the inner surface previously coated with an azopolymer thin film. Such a grating acts as a wavelength/angle dependant reflective mirror and enhances the confinement and the propagation of the light.

  5. The Kirkendall effect and nanoscience: hollow nanospheres and nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Aziz El Mel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Hollow nanostructures are ranked among the top materials for applications in various modern technological areas including energy storage devices, catalyst, optics and sensors. The last years have witnessed increasing interest in the Kirkendall effect as a versatile route to fabricate hollow nanostructures with different shapes, compositions and functionalities. Although the conversion chemistry of nanostructures from solid to hollow has reached a very advanced maturity, there is still much to be discovered and learned on this effect. Here, the recent progress on the use of the Kirkendall effect to synthesize hollow nanospheres and nanotubes is reviewed with a special emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms occurring during such a conversion process. The discussion includes the oxidation of metal nanostructures (i.e., nanospheres and nanowires, which is an important process involving the Kirkendall effect. For nanospheres, the symmetrical and the asymmetrical mechanisms are both reviewed and compared on the basis of recent reports in the literature. For nanotubes, in addition to a summary of the conversion processes, the unusual effects observed in some particular cases (e.g., formation of segmented or bamboo-like nanotubes are summarized and discussed. Finally, we conclude with a summary, where the prospective future direction of this research field is discussed.

  6. Morphology conserving aminopropyl functionalization of hollow silica nanospheres in toluene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobó, Dorina G.; Berkesi, Dániel; Kukovecz, Ákos

    2017-07-01

    Inorganic nanostructures containing cavities of monodisperse diameter distribution find applications in e.g. catalysis, adsorption and drug delivery. One of their possible synthesis routes is the template assisted core-shell synthesis. We synthesized hollow silica spheres around polystyrene cores by the sol-gel method. The polystyrene template was removed by heat treatment leaving behind a hollow spherical shell structure. The surface of the spheres was then modified by adding aminopropyl groups. Here we present the first experimental evidence that toluene is a suitable alternative functionalization medium for the resulting thin shells, and report the comprehensive characterization of the amino-functionalized hollow silica spheres based on scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, N2 adsorption, FT-IR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrokinetic potential measurement. Both the presence of the amino groups and the preservation of the hollow spherical morphology were unambiguously proven. The introduction of the amine functionality adds amphoteric character to the shell as shown by the zeta potential vs. pH function. Unlike pristine silica particles, amino-functionalized nanosphere aqueous sols can be stable at both acidic and basic conditions.

  7. The Kirkendall effect and nanoscience: hollow nanospheres and nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Nakamura, Ryusuke; Bittencourt, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Hollow nanostructures are ranked among the top materials for applications in various modern technological areas including energy storage devices, catalyst, optics and sensors. The last years have witnessed increasing interest in the Kirkendall effect as a versatile route to fabricate hollow nanostructures with different shapes, compositions and functionalities. Although the conversion chemistry of nanostructures from solid to hollow has reached a very advanced maturity, there is still much to be discovered and learned on this effect. Here, the recent progress on the use of the Kirkendall effect to synthesize hollow nanospheres and nanotubes is reviewed with a special emphasis on the fundamental mechanisms occurring during such a conversion process. The discussion includes the oxidation of metal nanostructures (i.e., nanospheres and nanowires), which is an important process involving the Kirkendall effect. For nanospheres, the symmetrical and the asymmetrical mechanisms are both reviewed and compared on the basis of recent reports in the literature. For nanotubes, in addition to a summary of the conversion processes, the unusual effects observed in some particular cases (e.g., formation of segmented or bamboo-like nanotubes) are summarized and discussed. Finally, we conclude with a summary, where the prospective future direction of this research field is discussed.

  8. Cyclodextrin purification with hollow fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthod, A. (Univ. de Lyon 1, Villeubranne Cedex (France)); Jin, Heng Liang,; Armstrong, D.W. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Cyclodextrins are cyclic 1-4 linked oligomers of {alpha}-D-glucopyranose prepared from starch hydrolysis through enzymatic reactions. Mixtures of the three main cyclodextrins (CD), {alpha}-, {beta}-, and {gamma}-CDs, are always produced. A possible facile purification process is proposed. Permeation through hollow fibers made of a perfluorinated ionomer membrane. Nafion type, is shown to be an effective way to separate {alpha}-CD from {beta}- and {gamma}-CD. {Alpha}-CD with 95% purity was obtained after permeation through a Nafion hollow fiber of an equimolar 0.02 M solution of the three CDs. The fiber had a 56 cm{sup 2}/cm{sup 3} surface area per volume ratio. Kinetic studies and continuous extraction experiments with a 2-m coiled fiber showed that it is possible to obtain a 11.5 g {alpha}-CD solution with 92.4% purity or a 0.6 g {alpha}-CD solution with 97.2% purity, depending on the flow rate. The transport of CDs through the membrane could be due to moving water pools inside the ionomer. The small {alpha}-CD fits easily in such pools when the large {beta}- and {gamma}-CDs are excluded by steric hindrance. Temperature raises increased the permeation rates while decreasing the selectivity. The process could be scaled-up associating hollow fibers in bundle.

  9. A general route to hollow mesoporous rare-earth silicate nanospheres as a catalyst support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Renxi; Yang, Yang; Zou, Yongcun; Liu, Xianchun; Xing, Yan

    2014-02-17

    Hollow mesoporous structures have recently aroused intense research interest owing to their unique structural features. Herein, an effective and precisely controlled synthesis of hollow rare-earth silicate spheres with mesoporous shells is reported for the first time, produced by a simple hydrothermal method, using silica spheres as the silica precursors. The as-prepared hollow rare-earth silicate spheres have large specific surface area, high pore volume, and controllable structure parameters. The results demonstrate that the selection of the chelating reagent plays critical roles in forming the hollow mesoporous structures. In addition, a simple and low-energy-consuming approach to synthesize highly stable and dispersive gold nanoparticle-yttrium silicate (AuNPs/YSiO) hollow nanocomposites has also been developed. The reduction of 4-nitrophenol with AuNPs/YSiO hollow nanocomposites as the catalyst has clearly demonstrated that the hollow rare-earth silicate spheres are good carriers for Au nanoparticles. This strategy can be extended as a general approach to prepare multifunctional yolk-shell structures with diverse compositions and morphologies simply by replacing silica spheres with silica-coated nanocomposites.

  10. Space Charge Mitigation With Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  11. Space Charge Mitigation With Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Suitably, hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  12. Forest Carbon Monitoring and Reporting for REDD+: What Future for Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizachew, Belachew; Duguma, Lalisa A.

    2016-11-01

    A climate change mitigation mechanism for emissions reduction from reduced deforestation and forest degradation, plus forest conservation, sustainable management of forest, and enhancement of carbon stocks (REDD+), has received an international political support in the climate change negotiations. The mechanism will require, among others, an unprecedented technical capacity for monitoring, reporting and verification of carbon emissions from the forest sector. A functional monitoring, reporting and verification requires inventories of forest area, carbon stock and changes, both for the construction of forest reference emissions level and compiling the report on the actual emissions, which are essentially lacking in developing countries, particularly in Africa. The purpose of this essay is to contribute to a better understanding of the state and prospects of forest monitoring and reporting in the context of REDD+ in Africa. We argue that monitoring and reporting capacities in Africa fall short of the stringent requirements of the methodological guidance for monitoring, reporting and verification for REDD+, and this may weaken the prospects for successfully implementing REDD+ in the continent. We presented the challenges and prospects in the national forest inventory, remote sensing and reporting infrastructures. A North-South, South-South collaboration as well as governments own investments in monitoring, reporting and verification system could help Africa leapfrog in monitoring and reporting. These could be delivered through negotiations for the transfer of technology, technical capacities, and experiences that exist among developed countries that traditionally compile forest carbon reports in the context of the Kyoto protocol.

  13. Hollow fibers for compact infrared gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, A.; Hartwig, S.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2008-02-01

    Hollow fibers can be used for compact infrared gas sensors. The guided light is absorbed by the gas introduced into the hollow core. High sensitivity and a very small sampling volume can be achieved depending on fiber parameters i.e. attenuation, flexibility, and gas exchange rates. Different types of infrared hollow fibers including photonic bandgap fibers were characterized using quantum cascade lasers and thermal radiation sources. Obtained data are compared with available product specifications. Measurements with a compact fiber based ethanol sensor are compared with a system simulation. First results on the detection of trace amounts of the explosive material TATP using hollow fibers and QCL will be shown.

  14. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  15. Strength assessment of a cryostat used by the hollow electron test station.

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Filip

    2015-01-01

    The following report explains the work I have done on my summer student work project and the experience I have gained during the process. The work consisted of a strength assessment of a cryogenic vacuum insulated vessel according to European regulations. The cryogenic vacuum insulated vessel is used for the cooling of the solenoids. The solenoids are used in the hollow electron test station and create the magnetic fields used for testing electron guns and validating the concept of a hollow electron lens.

  16. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sahinidis, Nikolaos V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Zitney, Stephen E. [NETL; Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beattie, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco. Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify

  17. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sahinidis, Nikolaos V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Zitney, Stephen E. [NETL; Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beattie, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco. Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify

  18. Chalcogenide glass hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Désévédavy, Frédéric; Renversez, Gilles; Troles, Johann; Houizot, Patrick; Brilland, Laurent; Vasilief, Ion; Coulombier, Quentin; Traynor, Nicholas; Smektala, Frédéric; Adam, Jean-Luc

    2010-09-01

    We report the first hollow core photonic crystal fibers (HC PCF) in chalcogenide glass. To design the required HC PCF profiles for such high index glass, we use both band diagram analysis to define the required photonic bandgap and numerical simulations of finite size HC PCFs to compute the guiding losses. The material losses have also been taken into account to compute the overall losses of the HC PCF profiles. These fibers were fabricated by the stack and draw technique from TeAsSe (TAS) glass. The fibers we drew in this work are composed of six rings of holes and regular microstructures. Two profiles are presented, one is known as a kagome lattice and the other one corresponds to a triangular lattice. Geometrical parameters are compared to the expected parameters obtained by computation. Applications of such fibers include power delivery or fiber sensors among others.

  19. Nickel titanates hollow shells: nanosphere, nanorod, and their photocatalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuye; Xing, Yangyang; Zong, Lanlan; Li, Rui; Yang, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Two kinds of hollow shell structured nickel titanates (nanosphere, nanorod) were prepared by the microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using carbon material as the template. Their phase structure, morphology, and optical properties were well characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). Comparing with the template-free NiTiO3 (NiTiO3-TF), the two kinds of hollow shell structured NiTiO3 have larger Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface areas. Both NiTiO3 nanosphere (NiTiO3-NS) and nanorod (NiTiO3-NR) showed remarkably photocatalytic H2 evolution from the methanol aqueous solution under full-arc lamp and visible light. Additional, their photocatalytic activities were also determined by photo-degradation of methyl blue (MB), and the degradation yield reached nearly 100% within 100 min on NiTiO3-NR under visible light. Whatever in photocatalytic H2 evolution or MB degradation, their photocatalytic activities all followed the order: NiTiO3-NR > NiTiO3-NS > NiTiO3-TF. The higher photocatalytic activities of the hollow shelled NiTiO3 should be due to their larger BET surface areas and more utilization of the incident light.

  20. Hollow system with fin. Transient Green function method combination for two hollow cylinders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buikis Andris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop mathematical model for three dimensional heat equation for the system with hollow wall and fin and construct its analytical solution for two hollow cylindrical sample. The method of solution is based on Green function method for one hollow cylinder. On the conjugation conditions between both hollow cylinders we construct solution for system wall with fin. As result we come to integral equation on the surface between both hollow cylinders. Solution is obtained in the form of second kind Fredholm integral equation. The generalizing of Green function method allows us to use Green function method for regular non-canonical domains.

  1. Phaeocystis globosa (Prymnesiophyceae) colonies : Hollow structures built with small amounts of polysaccharides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijssel, M; Hamm, C.E.; Gieskes, W.W C

    In both field samples and cultures the total amount of sugar and of carbon in colonies of Phaeocystis globosa was correlated with colony surface area, suggesting a hollow structure. A conceptual model based on biochemical data and on the assumption that the mucus occurs as a layer of a Bred

  2. Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

  3. Black Carbon at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaffe, Dan A. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States); Sedlacek, Arthur [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Laing, James R. [Univ. of Washington, Bothell, WA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    This campaign was initiated to measure refractory black carbon (rBC, as defined in Schwarz et al. (2010)) at the Mt. Bachelor Observatory (MBO) using the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility single-particle soot photometer (SP2; unit 54). MBO is a high-elevation site located on the summit of Mt. Bachelor in central Oregon, USA (43.979°N, 121.687°W, 2,763 meters ASL). This site is operated by Professor Dan Jaffe’s group at the University of Washington Bothell and has been used continuously as an atmospheric observatory for the past 12 years (Jaffe et al., 2005; Gratz et al., 2014). The location of MBO allows frequent sampling of the free troposphere along with a wide array of plumes from regional and distant sources. MBO is currently supported with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to the Principal Investigator (PI; D. Jaffe) via the project “Influence of Free Tropospheric Ozone and PM on Surface Air Quality in the Western U.S.” (#1447832) covering the period 03/15/2015 to 02/28/2018. The SP2 instrument from Droplet Measurement Technologies provides particle-resolved measurements of rBC mass loading, size and mass distributions, and mixing state. The SP2 was installed at MBO on 6/27/2016 and ran through 9/23/2016. Additional measurements at MBO during this campaign included carbon monoxide (CO), fine particulate matter (PM1), aerosol light scattering coefficients (σscat) at three wavelengths using a TSI nephelometer, aerosol absorption coefficients (σabs) with the Brechtel tricolor absorption photometer (TAP), aerosol number size distributions with a scanning mobility particle sizer spectrometer (SMPS), and black carbon (eBC) with an aethalometer. BC data from this campaign have been submitted to the ARM Data Archive. Black carbon (BC) is the predominant light-absorbing aerosol constituent in the atmosphere, and is estimated to exert a positive radiative forcing second only to CO

  4. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teprovich, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gaillard, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sexton, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Ward, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Velten, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  5. Carbon tetrachloride/carbon disulfide exposures in grain fumigation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marano, D.E.; White, K.L.; Deer, H.; Alexander, G.

    1986-03-01

    The use of 80/20 compounds as liquid-fumigant mixtures in the grain-handling industry was considered. Worker exposures to carbon tetrachloride and carbon disulfide were measured at representative facilities throughout the industry. Work practices that may contribute to high exposure levels were cited. Approximately equal amounts of liquid fumigants and solid formulations of phosphine are used throughout the industry. As spraying is done on a sporadic basis, it does not appear likely to present a major problem such as might be encountered in continuous exposure situations. The authors conclude that grain workers do not appear to be an ideal study group for a neurotoxicity morbidity study due to the fact that the physical distance between study sites and the small number of workers at each site makes it difficult logistically. A concerted effort throughout the grain industry to educate those workers in the grain-handling portions of that industry toward the safe handling of fumigants should go far in alleviating any problems arising from exposure to fumigants.

  6. Optical properties of AgI/Ag infrared hollow fiber in the visible wavelength region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Ke-Rong; Shi, Yi-Wei; Tang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Xiao-Song; Iwai, Katsumasa; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2008-02-15

    We report on AgI/Ag infrared hollow fiber with low-loss in visible region. Improved methods of silver plating and iodination were proposed to fabricate the hollow fiber. The surface roughness of the silver layer and the silver iodide layer was reduced by the pretreatment with an SnCl2 solution and low iodination temperature. Losses for the Er:YAG and green laser light were 0.4 and 7dB/m. The loss property of green laser beam was low to deliver a pilot beam for the invisible infrared laser light. Owing to the smooth and uniform AgI film, the loss spectrum of the hollow fiber showed clear interference peaks in the visible region. An empirical formula for AgI material dispersion was derived, which is of special importance for the design of high-performance AgI/Ag hollow fiber.

  7. Synthesis of multi-shelled ZnO hollow microspheres and their improved photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangyun; Yang, Jiao; Shi, Liuxue; Li, Linjie; Gao, Meizhen

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we report an effective, facile, and low-cost route for preparing ZnO hollow microspheres with a controlled number of shells composed of small ZnO nanoparticles. The formation mechanism of multiple-shelled structures was investigated in detail. The number of shells is manipulated by using different diameters of carbonaceous microspheres. The products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The as-prepared ZnO hollow microspheres and ZnO nanoparticles were then used to study the degradation of methyl orange (MO) dye under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, and the triple-shelled ZnO hollow microspheres exhibit the best photocatalytic activity. This work is helpful to develop ZnO-based photocatalysts with high photocatalytic performance in addressing environmental protection issues, and it is also anticipated to other multiple-shelled metal oxide hollow microsphere structures.

  8. Traumatic and nontraumatic perforation of hollow viscera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, R; Rodríguez, A

    1997-12-01

    Hollow viscus injuries are usually managed with few complications. However, if their diagnosis is delayed, or if reparative suture closure should fail, the patient is placed at risk of multiple organ failure. This article presents diagnostic approaches, emphasizing imaging modalities, and therapeutic strategies for three clinical scenarios of hollow viscus perforation: 1) acute appendicitis, 2) gastroduodenal peptic ulcer disease, and 3) trauma.

  9. Radiation trapping inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Jen, H H; Lee, Kevin C J; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A

    2014-01-01

    We report the radiation trapping effect inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF). An optical dipole trap was used to load and confine the atoms in the PCF without contacting the wall of the fiber. The transmission of a probe light propagating through the PCF was studied experimentally and theoretically. With the experimental results and theoretical predictions, we conclude that the radiation trapping can play a significant role and should be taken into account in the spectroscopic measurements inside the PCF.

  10. Microwave characterization of submicrometer-sized nickel hollow sphere composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yida; Zhao, Ling; Shen, Bin; Liu, Lei; Hu, Wenbin

    2006-07-01

    In this work, we report on the microwave properties of the nickel hollow spheres (NHSs) synthesized by a facile autocatalytic reduction method. The resonance characterization of the NHS-polyvinyl butyral composite, due to the skin effect, is observed in the microwave frequency. It is shown that the resonant and the matching frequencies of the composite largely depend on the particle size of the spheres.

  11. Black carbon emissions from diesel sources in Russia. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kholod, Nazar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Evans, Meredydd [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    This report presents a detailed inventory of Russian BC emissions from diesel sources. Drawing on a complete Russian vehicle registry with detailed information about vehicle types and emission standards, this report analyzes BC emissions from diesel on-road vehicles. On-road diesel vehicles emitted 21 Gg of BC in 2014: heavy-duty trucks account for 60% of the on-road BC emissions, while cars represent only 5% (light commercial vehicles and buses account for the remainder). Using Russian activity data and fuel-based emission factors, the report also presents BC emissions from diesel locomotives and ships, off-road engines in industry, construction and agriculture, and generators. The total emissions from diesel sources in Russia are estimated to be 49 Gg of BC in 2014.

  12. Risoe energy report 7. Future low carbon energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Soenderberg Petersen, L. (eds.)

    2008-10-15

    This Risoe Energy Report, the seventh of a series that began in 2002, takes as its point of reference the recommendations of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2007. The IPCC states that if anticipated climate change is to remain in the order of 2 to 3 degrees centigrades over the next century, the world's CO{sub 2} emissions would have to peak within the next 10-15 years and ultimately be reduced to approximately 50% of their present level by the middle of the century. The IPCC states further that this would be possible, provided that serious action is taken now. The different regions and countries of the world are in various states of development, and hence have different starting points for contributing to these reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions. This report presents state-of-the-art and development perspectives for energy supply technologies, new energy systems, end-use energy efficiency improvements and new policy measures. It also includes estimates of the CO{sub 2} reduction potentials for different technologies. The technologies are characterized with regard to their ability to contribute either to ensuring a peak in CO{sub 2} emissions within 10-15 years, or to long-term CO{sub 2} reductions. The report outlines the current and likely future composition of energy systems in Denmark, and examines three groups of countries: i) Europe and the other OECD member nations; ii) large and rapidly growing developing economies, notably India and China; iii) typical least developed countries, such as many African nations. The report emphasises how future energy developments and systems might be composed in these three country groupings, and to what extent the different technologies might contribute. The report addresses the need for research and demonstration together with market incentives, and policy measures with focus on initiatives that can promote the development towards CO{sub 2} reductions. Specifically, the report identifies system

  13. Carbonyl Sulfide for Tracing Carbon Fluxes Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J. Elliott [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Berry, Joseph A. [Carnegie Inst. of Science, Stanford, CA (United States); Billesbach, Dave [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Torn, Margaret S [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zahniser, Mark [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Seibt, Ulrike [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Maseyk, Kadmiel [Pierre and Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France)

    2016-04-01

    The April-June 2012 campaign was located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site Central Facility and had three purposes. One goal was to demonstrate the ability of current instrumentation to correctly measure fluxes of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS). The approach has been describe previously as a critical approach to advancing carbon cycle science1,2, but requires further investigation at the canopy scale to resolve ecosystem processes. Previous canopy-scale efforts were limited to data rates of 1Hz. While 1 Hz measurements may work in a few ecosystems, it is widely accepted that data rates of 10 to 20 Hz are needed to fully capture the exchange of traces gases between the atmosphere and vegetative canopy. A second goal of this campaign was to determine if canopy observations could provide information to help interpret the seasonal double peak in airborne observations at SGP of CO2 and COS mixing ratios. A third goal was to detect potential sources and sinks of COS that must be resolved before using COS as a tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP).

  14. Biotic and abiotic carbon to sulfur bond cleavage. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.W.

    1994-05-01

    The microbial desulfurization of organosulfur compounds occurs by unprecedented and largely unexplored biochemical processes. A study of such biotic desulfurizations can be expected to give rise to new and useful chemistry and enzymology. The potential value of understanding and harnessing these processes is seen in relation to the need for methods for the removal of organically bound sulfur from coal and the degradation of organic sulfur-containing pollutants. This research effort has been directed towards an examination of desulfurization ability in well characterized microorganisms, the isolation of bacteria with desulfurization ability from natural sources, the characterization and mechanistic evaluation of the observed biocatalytic processes, the development of biomimetic synthetic organic chemistry based on biotic desulfurization mechanisms and the design and preparation of improved coal model compounds for use in microbial selection processes. A systematic approach to studying biodesulfurizations was undertaken in which organosulfur compounds have been broken down into classes based on the oxidation state of the sulfur atom and the structure of the rest of the organic material. Microbes have been evaluated in terms of ability to degrade organosulfur compounds with sulfur in its sulfonic acid oxidation state. These compounds are likely intermediates in coal desulfurization and are present in the environment as persistent pollutants in the form of detergents. It is known that oxygen bonded to sulfur lowers the carbon-sulfur bond energy, providing a thermodynamic basis for starting with this class of compounds.

  15. Biotechnology for removal of carbon disulfide emissions. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    Biological removal in a ``biofilter`` plant of carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide from the air effluent of a viscose plant at Teepak, Inc., is analyzed from process and economic standpoints by use of the Aspen Plus simulation program. The metabolic product from the biofilter, 3% sulfuric acid, must be transformed at the source into either a marketable or recyclable commodity (such as 95% sulfuric acid, high-quality sulfur, or high-quality gypsum) or a material with reasonable landfill costs (such as sulfur or gypsum). The simulations indicate that the total capital requirement for production of concentrated sulfuric acid is $48.9 million; for high-quality gypsum, $40.4 million; and for high-quality sulfur, $29.4 million. Production of concentrated sulfur for landfill is not economically practical. The process to neutralize the 3% acid effluent with limestone and landfill the resulting low-quality gypsum requires the lowest total investment of the processes simulated, $8.7 million, including the biofilter plant.

  16. Rapid Temperature Swing Adsorption using Polymeric/Supported Amine Hollow Fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chance, Ronald [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Chen, Grace [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Dai, Ying [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Fan, Yanfang [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jones, Christopher [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kalyanaraman, Jayashree [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kawajiri, Yoshiaki [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Koros, William [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Lively, Ryan [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); McCool, Benjamin [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Pang, Simon [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Realff, Matthew [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Rezaei, Fateme [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Searcy, Katherine [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sholl, David [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Subramanian, Swernath [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States); Pang, Simon [Georgia Tech Research Corporation, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This project is a bench-scale, post-combustion capture project carried out at Georgia Tech (GT) with support and collaboration with GE, Algenol Biofuels, Southern Company and subcontract to Trimeric Corporation. The focus of the project is to develop a process based on composite amine-functionalized oxide / polymer hollow fibers for use as contactors in a rapid temperature swing adsorption post-combustion carbon dioxide capture process. The hollow fiber morphology allows coupling of efficient heat transfer with effective gas contacting, potentially giving lower parasitic loads on the power plant compared to traditional contacting strategies using solid sorbents.

  17. Reluctance Machine for a Hollow Cylinder Flywheel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Hedlund

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A hollow cylinder flywheel rotor with a novel outer rotor switched reluctance machine (SRM mounted on the interior rim is presented, with measurements, numerical analysis and analytical models. Practical experiences from the construction process are also discussed. The flywheel rotor does not have a shaft and spokes and is predicted to store 181 Wh / kg at ultimate tensile strength (UTS according to simulations. The novel SRM is an axial flux machine, chosen due to its robustness and tolerance for high strain. The computed maximum tip speed of the motor at UTS is 1050 m / s . A small-scale proof-of-concept electric machine prototype has been constructed, and the machine inductance has been estimated from measurements of voltage and current and compared against results from analytical models and finite element analysis (FEA. The prototype measurements were used to simulate operation during maximal speed for a comparison towards other high-speed electric machines, in terms of tip speed and power. The mechanical design of the flywheel was performed with an analytical formulation assuming planar stress in concentric shells of orthotropic (unidirectionally circumferentially wound carbon composites. The analytical approach was verified with 3D FEA in terms of stress and strain.

  18. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Storlie, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zitney, Stephen E [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2014-03-05

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and leverages the Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories’ core strengths in modeling and simulation, bringing together the best capabilities at NETL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The CCSI’s industrial partners provide representation from the power generation industry, equipment manufacturers, technology providers and engineering and construction firms. The CCSI’s academic participants (Carnegie Mellon University, Princeton University, West

  19. Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhuitong@126.com [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Gansu Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Cai, Xiaodong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Qianping [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Key Laboratory of Gansu Polymer Materials, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. Solid spinel Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods for comparison. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be magnetically separated easily for reuse and no obvious loss of activity was observed when reused in six consecutive runs. - Highlights: • Uniform spinel ferrite hollow spheres were prepared by a simple method. • The catalyst has been proved much more efficient for styrene oxidation than the reported analogues. • The catalyst can be easily separated by external magnetic field and has exhibited excellent reusability. • The catalytic system is environmentally friendly. - Abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. For comparison, solid Mg–Cu ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods. All the samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} physisorption. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed, and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be

  20. POROUS WALL, HOLLOW GLASS MICROSPHERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sexton, W.

    2012-06-30

    Hollow Glass Microspheres (HGM) is not a new technology. All one has to do is go to the internet and Google{trademark} HGM. Anyone can buy HGM and they have a wide variety of uses. HGM are usually between 1 to 100 microns in diameter, although their size can range from 100 nanometers to 5 millimeters in diameter. HGM are used as lightweight filler in composite materials such as syntactic foam and lightweight concrete. In 1968 a patent was issued to W. Beck of the 3M{trademark} Company for 'Glass Bubbles Prepared by Reheating Solid Glass Particles'. In 1983 P. Howell was issued a patent for 'Glass Bubbles of Increased Collapse Strength' and in 1988 H. Marshall was issued a patent for 'Glass Microbubbles'. Now Google{trademark}, Porous Wall, Hollow Glass Microspheres (PW-HGMs), the key words here are Porous Wall. Almost every article has its beginning with the research done at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The Savannah River Site (SRS) where SRNL is located has a long and successful history of working with hydrogen and its isotopes for national security, energy, waste management and environmental remediation applications. This includes more than 30 years of experience developing, processing, and implementing special ceramics, including glasses for a variety of Department of Energy (DOE) missions. In the case of glasses, SRS and SRNL have been involved in both the science and engineering of vitreous or glass based systems. As a part of this glass experience and expertise, SRNL has developed a number of niches in the glass arena, one of which is the development of porous glass systems for a variety of applications. These porous glass systems include sol gel glasses, which include both xerogels and aerogels, as well as phase separated glass compositions, that can be subsequently treated to produce another unique type of porosity within the glass forms. The porous glasses can increase the surface area compared to &apos

  1. Displacement of oil by carbon dioxide. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Jr., F. M.; Taber, J. J.

    1981-05-01

    Results of a comprehensive research program on factors influencing CO/sub 2/ flooding are reported. Equipment constructed for static equilibrium measurements of phase volumes, compositions, densities and viscosities is described. Design of an apparatus used for a variety of displacement tests is also reported. Apparatus and experimental procedures are described for a new experiment in which equilibrium phase compositions can be measured rapidly and continuously. Results of displacements of crude oil from slim tubes, cores and mixing cells are presented and interpreted in terms of detailed measurements of the phase behavior and fluid properties of the CO/sub 2/-crude oil mixtures. The complex phase behavior of low temperature CO/sub 2/-crude oil mixtures is described and compared with similar behavior for CO/sub 2/-alkane mixtures. A simple correlation is offered for the ranges of reservoir temperature and pressure at which liquid-liquid and liquid-liquid-vapor phase behavior should be expected to occur. Direct evidence is presented of the efficiency with which a CO/sub 2/-rich liquid phase can extract hydrocarbons from a crude oil. A simple one-dimensional process simulator for CO/sub 2/ flooding applications is described. Simulation results are compared with experimental data from slim tube displacements. Good agreement is reported between calculated and experimental results as long as the volume change of CO/sub 2/ on mixing with the oil is not too great.Sensitivity of calculated results to phase behavior and fluid properties is discussed. Comparison of displacement results, phase behavior measurements, and model calculations provides strong evidence that the high displacement efficiency which can be obtained when pressure is high enough and viscous fingering is controlled is the result of efficient extraction of a broad range of hydrocarbons by a dense CO/sub 2/-rich phase which is a liquid if the temperature is below about 50/sup 0/C (130/sup 0/F).

  2. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Andreas J; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-17

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  3. Small-Pitch Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Jia; HOU Lan-Tian; ZHOU Gui-Yao; WANG Kang; CHEN Chao

    2008-01-01

    @@ A hollow-core photonic crystal fibre (HC-PCF) based on small-pitch kagome lattice cladding is designed and fabricated. The pitch of the fibre is only 2.45 μm and it corresponds to a region of low normalized frequency which has never been investigated before. Both experiments and calculations show that this kagome HC-PCF has a broad optical transmission band from 400 nm to 900 nm, covering the whole visible and near infrared region of the spectrum. Additionally, the loss curve of the fibre is fiat in the visible region and the minimum of the loss achieves 0.16d B/m, which is lower than the loss of the kagome HC-PCFs reported before. Furthermore, this fibre can well confine the modes in the air core. No surface modes can be detected in the surrounding silica of the hollow core.

  4. Low loss and broadband hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Gerome, F.; Humbert, G.; Blondy, J. M.; Benabid, F.

    2011-03-01

    We report on recent developments on fabrication and optical guidance of Kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). These include the design and fabrication of a hypocycloid-shaped core Kagome HC-PCF that combines a record optical attenuation with a baseline exhibiting ~180 dB/km over a transmission bandwidth larger than 200 THz. These results are corroborated with theoretical simulations which show that both the core-shape and the cladding ring number play role in inhibited coupling, inducing core-mode confinement for the fundamental transmission band. We also show that the inhibited coupling is weaker for the first higher-order transmission band by theoretically and experimentally comparing Kagome HC-PCF with a single anti-resonant ring hollow-core fiber.

  5. Hollow multilayer photonic bandgap fibers for NIR applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriki, Ken; Shapira, Ofer; Hart, Shandon D.; Benoit, Gilles; Kuriki, Yuka; Viens, Jean F.; Bayindir, Mehmet; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel

    2004-04-01

    Here we report the fabrication of hollow-core cylindrical photonic bandgap fibers with fundamental photonic bandgaps at near-infrared wavelengths, from 0.85 to 2.28 μm. In these fibers the photonic bandgaps are created by an all-solid multilayer composite meso-structure having a photonic crystal lattice period as small as 260 nm, individual layers below 75 nm and as many as 35 periods. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, the smallest period lengths and highest period counts reported to date for hollow PBG fibers. The fibers are drawn from a multilayer preform into extended lengths of fiber. Light is guided in the fibers through a large hollow core that is lined with an interior omnidirectional dielectric mirror. We extend the range of materials that can be used in these fibers to include poly(ether imide) (PEI) in addition to the arsenic triselenide (As2Se3) glass and poly(ether sulfone) (PES) that have been used previously. Further, we characterize the refractive indices of these materials over a broad wavelength range (0.25 - 15 μm) and incorporated the measured optical properties into calculations of the fiber photonic band structure and a preliminary loss analysis.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Gd2O3 Hollow Microspheres Using a Template-Directed Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uniform rare-earth gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3 hollow microspheres, as formed through a urea-assisted homogenous precipitation process using carbon spheres as a template and a subsequent heat treatment, were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Tellet surface area measurement. The results indicate that the final products can be indexed to a cubic Gd2O3 phase with high purity and have a uniform morphology at 500 nm in diameter and 20 nm in shell thickness. The as-synthesized Gd2O3 hollow microspheres exhibited a superior photooxidation activity to that of Gd2O3 powder and an effect similar to P25, significantly broadening the potential of Gd2O3 hollow microspheres for many practical applications.

  7. Biochemistry-directed hollow porous microspheres: bottom-up self-assembled polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bo; Li, Qiufeng; Liu, Baodong; Zhang, Sen; Deng, Chao

    2016-04-01

    Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of biological systems to guide molecule self-assembling facilitates the construction of distinctive architectures with desirable physicochemical characteristics. Herein, we report a biochemistry-directed ``bottom-up'' approach to construct hollow porous microspheres of polyanion materials for sodium ion batteries. Two kinds of polyanions, i.e. Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2, are employed as cases in this study. The microalgae cell realizes the formation of a spherical ``bottom'' bio-precursor. Its tiny core is subjected to destruction and its tough shell tends to carbonize upon calcination, resulting in the hollow porous microspheres for the ``top'' product. The nanoscale crystals of the polyanion materials are tightly enwrapped by the highly-conductive framework in the hollow microsphere, resulting in the hierarchical nano-microstructure. The whole formation process is disclosed as a ``bottom-up'' mechanism. Moreover, the biochemistry-directed self-assembly process is confirmed to play a crucial role in the construction of the final architecture. Taking advantage of the well-defined hollow-microsphere architecture, the abundant interior voids and the highly-conductive framework, polyanion materials show favourable sodium-intercalation kinetics. Both materials are capable of high-rate long-term cycling. After five hundred cycles at 20 C and 10 C, Na3V2(PO4)3 and Na3.12Fe2.44(P2O7)2 retain 96.2% and 93.1% of the initial capacity, respectively. Therefore, the biochemistry-directed technique provides a low-cost, highly-efficient and widely applicable strategy to produce high-performance polyanion-based cathodes for sodium ion batteries.Biochemistry-directed synthesis of functional nanomaterials has attracted great interest in energy storage, catalysis and other applications. The unique ability of

  8. Generations of dark hollow beams and their applications in laser cooling of atoms and all optical-type Bose-Einstein condensation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    印建平; 高伟建; 王海峰; 龙全; 王育竹

    2002-01-01

    We report on a new experimental result to generate dark hollow beams by using a geometric optical method.We propose two new methods to produce focused and localized hollow laser beams by using π-phase plates. UsingMonte-Carlo simulations, we have studied the Sisyphus cooling of alkali atoms in pyramidal hollow beam gravito-opticaltraps. We discuss some potential applications of the dark hollow beams in atom optics and the preparation of an alloptically-cooled and optically-trapped atomic Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC).Our research shows that an ultracoldatomic sample with a temperature of ~ 2μK can be obtained in the pyramidal hollow beam dipole trap and an alloptical-type BEC may be realized in a far blue-detuned, hollow beam trap.

  9. Research Update: Facile synthesis of CoFe2O4 nano-hollow spheres for efficient bilirubin adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, Rupali; Pal, Monalisa; Chaudhuri, Arka; Mandal, Madhuri; Mandal, Kalyan

    2015-11-01

    Herein, we report an unprecedented bilirubin (BR) adsorption efficiency of CoFe2O4 (CFO) nanostructures in contrast to the commercially available activated carbon and resin which are generally used for haemoperfusion and haemodialysis. We have synthesized CFO nanoparticles of diameter 100 nm and a series of nano-hollow spheres of diameter 100, 160, 250, and 350 nm using a simple template free solvothermal technique through proper variation of reaction time and capping agent, oleylamine (OLA), respectively, and carried out SiO2 coating by employing Stöber method. The comparative BR adsorption study of CFO and SiO2 coated CFO nanostructures indicates that apart from porosity and hollow configuration of nanostructures, the electrostatic affinity between anionic carboxyl group of BR and cationic amine group of OLA plays a significant role in adsorbing BR. Finally, we demonstrate that the BR adsorption capacity of the nanostructures can be tailored by varying the morphology as well as size of the nanostructures. We believe that our developed magnetic nanostructures could be considered as a potential material towards therapeutic applications against hyperbilirubinemia.

  10. Hollow Micro-/Nanostructures: Synthesis and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2008-11-03

    Hollow micro-nanostructures are of great interest in many current and emerging areas of technology. Perhaps the best-known example of the former is the use of fly-ash hollow particles generated from coal power plants as partial replacement for Portland cement, to produce concrete with enhanced strength and durability. This review is devoted to the progress made in the last decade in synthesis and applications of hollow micro-nanostructures. We present a comprehensive overview of synthetic strategies for hollow structures. These strategies are broadly categorized into four themes, which include well-established approaches, such as conventional hard-templating and soft-templating methods, as well as newly emerging methods based on sacrificial templating and template-free synthesis. Success in each has inspired multiple variations that continue to drive the rapid evolution of the field. The Review therefore focuses on the fundamentals of each process, pointing out advantages and disadvantages where appropriate. Strategies for generating more complex hollow structures, such as rattle-type and nonspherical hollow structures, are also discussed. Applications of hollow structures in lithium batteries, catalysis and sensing, and biomedical applications are reviewed. © 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA,.

  11. Sacrificial Template Synthesis and Properties of 3D Hollow-Silicon Nano- and Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölken, Iris; Neubüser, Gero; Postica, Vasile; Bumke, Lars; Lupan, Oleg; Baum, Martina; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Kienle, Lorenz; Adelung, Rainer

    2016-08-10

    Novel three-dimensional (3D) hollow aero-silicon nano- and microstructures, namely, Si-tetrapods (Si-T) and Si-spheres (Si-S) were synthesized by a sacrificial template approach for the first time. The new Si-T and Si-S architectures were found as most temperature-stable hollow nanomaterials, up to 1000 °C, ever reported. The synthesized aero-silicon or aerogel was integrated into sensor structures based on 3D networks. A single microstructure Si-T was employed to investigate electrical and gas sensing properties. The elaborated hollow microstructures open new possibilities and a wide area of perspectives in the field of nano- and microstructure synthesis by sacrificial template approaches. The enormous flexibility and variety of the hollow Si structures are provided by the special geometry of the sacrificial template material, ZnO-tetrapods (ZnO-T). A Si layer was deposited onto the surface of ZnO-T networks by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. All samples demonstrated p-type conductivity; hence, the resistance of the sensor structure increased after introducing the reducing gases in the test chamber. These hollow structures and their unique and superior properties can be advantageous in different fields, such as NEMS/MEMS, batteries, dye-sensitized solar cells, gas sensing in harsh environment, and biomedical applications. This method can be extended for synthesis of other types of hollow nanostructures.

  12. Suspension Plasma Spray Fabrication of Nanocrystalline Titania Hollow Microspheres for Photocatalytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Kun; Liu, Yi; He, Xiaoyan; Li, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Hollow inorganic microspheres with controlled internal pores in close-cell configuration are usually constructed by submicron-sized particles. Fast and efficient large-scale production of the microspheres with tunable sizes yet remains challenging. Here, we report a suspension plasma spray route for making hollow microspheres from nano titania particles. The processing permits most nano particles to retain their physiochemical properties in the as-sprayed microspheres. The microspheres have controllable interior cavities and mesoporous shell of 1-3 μm in thickness. Spray parameters and organic content in the starting suspension play the key role in regulating the efficiency of accomplishing the hollow sphere structure. For the ease of collecting the spheres for recycling use, ferriferous oxide particles were used as additives to make Fe3O4-TiO2 hollow magnetic microspheres. The spheres can be easily recycled through external magnetic field collection after each time use. Photocatalytic anti-bacterial activities of the hollow spheres were assessed by examining their capability of degrading methylene blue and sterilizing Escherichia coli bacteria. Excellent photocatalytic performances were revealed for the hollow spheres, giving insight into their potential versatile applications.

  13. An electrochemical exploration of hollow NiCo2O4 submicrospheres and its capacitive performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yirong; Wang, Jufeng; Wu, Zhibin; Jing, Mingjun; Hou, Hongshuai; Jia, Xinnan; Ji, Xiaobo

    2015-08-01

    Mesoporous NiCo2O4 hollow submicrospheres have been prepared through a facile and scalable soft template method utilizing a reflux route. The as-obtained mesoporous NiCo2O4 hollow submicrosphere electrode exhibits high specific capacitance of 987 F g-1 at 1 A g-1, superior capacity retention rate of 79.4 and 62.8% at 20 and 50 A g-1, and remarkable cycling stability with almost no capacity loss at 5 A g-1 over 5000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performances can be attributed to the unique mesoporous hollow structure with a large specific surface area (189.7 m2 g-1) and superior pore-size distribution (3-5 nm). To further demonstrate its practical application, an asymmetric supercapacitor based on the mesoporous NiCo2O4 hollow submicrospheres as the positive electrode and activated carbon as the negative electrode is fabricated, which manifests high energy density of 27.2 Wh kg-1 at the power density of 102 W kg-1 or high power density of 8.16 kW kg-1 at the energy density of 10.9 Wh kg-1 and exceptional long-term cycling stability with 108.1% of the initial capacity retention at 3 A g-1 over 10000 cycles. These impressive results render this NiCo2O4 hollow submicrospheres promising as one of the most attractive candidates for supercapacitors in practical applications.

  14. Bio-sequestration of CO2 Using Carbonic Anhydrase in situ Encapsulated Inside Electrospun Hollow Fibers%静电纺丝制备中空纤维原位固定化碳酸酐酶用于二氧化碳的吸收

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔建东; 李莹; 姬晓元; 边红杰; 张羽飞; 苏志国; 马光辉; 张松平

    2014-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase catalyzed bio-sequestration of CO2 to form HCO-3 , followed by trapping as solid CaCO3 is one of the most promising technologies for CO2 capturing. The effects of reaction condition on the CO2 hydration using free carbonic anhydrase were systematically investigated. In order to improve the stability of the enzyme and facility its recycling, the carbonic anhydrase was in situ encapsulated inside hollow fibers via a novel co-axial electrospinning technology. Compared with the free enzyme, the immobilized carbonic an-hydrase showed much improved thermal stability and suffered much reduced inhibitory effects from cation ions, such as Cu2+ and Fe3+. After 11 reuses, the immobilized enzyme retained about 81. 9% of its original activity by comparing the amount of formed CaCO3 precipitation. In the presence of immobilized carbonic anhydrase, both calcite and vaterite CaCO3 solid were formed;while in the absence of enzyme or with free carbonic anhy-drase, only calcite CaCO3 was observed.%考察了游离碳酸酐酶吸收CO2水合体系反应条件,并通过同轴共纺静电纺丝技术制备出中空结构纤维,实现了碳酸酐酶在中空纤维中的原位包埋,提高了酶的稳定性并便于回收和重复利用.实验结果表明,固定化碳酸酐酶的热稳定性显著增强,受Cu2+和Fe3+等金属离子的抑制作用大幅度降低.连续使用11次后所生成的CaCO3沉淀量仍能达到首次使用的81.9%.固定化酶体系生成的CaCO3沉淀包括方解石型和球文石型2种晶形,而无酶和加入游离碳酸酐酶的反应体系则主要生成方解石型CaCO3沉淀.

  15. Designing hollow nano gold golf balls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landon, Preston B; Mo, Alexander H; Zhang, Chen; Emerson, Chris D; Printz, Adam D; Gomez, Alan F; DeLaTorre, Christopher J; Colburn, David A M; Anzenberg, Paula; Eliceiri, Matthew; O'Connell, Connor; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-07-09

    Hollow/porous nanoparticles, including nanocarriers, nanoshells, and mesoporous materials have applications in catalysis, photonics, biosensing, and delivery of theranostic agents. Using a hierarchical template synthesis scheme, we have synthesized a nanocarrier mimicking a golf ball, consisting of (i) solid silica core with a pitted gold surface and (ii) a hollow/porous gold shell without silica. The template consisted of 100 nm polystyrene beads attached to a larger silica core. Selective gold plating of the core followed by removal of the polystyrene beads produced a golf ball-like nanostructure with 100 nm pits. Dissolution of the silica core produced a hollow/porous golf ball-like nanostructure.

  16. Hollow Core, Whispering Gallery Resonator Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Jonathan M; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2014-01-01

    A review of hollow core whispering gallery resonators (WGRs)is given. After a short introduction to the topic of whispering gallery resonators we provide a description of whispering gallery modes in hollow or liquid core WGRs. Next, whispering gallery mode (WGM) sensing mechanisms are outlined and some fabrication methods for microbubbles, microcapillaries and other tubular WGM devices are discussed. We then focus on the most common applications of hollow core WGRs, namely refractive index and temperature sensing, gas sensing, force sensing, biosensing, and lasing. The review highlights some of the key papers in this field and gives the reader a general overview of the current state-of-the-art.

  17. Report on the Recommended Method to Measure the Carbon Footprint of a USCG Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    21. No of Pages 128 22. Price Report on the Recommended Method to Measure the Carbon Footprint of a USCG Vessel iv UNCLAS//Public...Steel.. Operating welder, torch, etc.. Electricity, Steel, Argon, Oxygen, Acetylene , Welding Rods, flux Finished Product 8.1.2 Cleaning Tanks (oil

  18. [Suicidal carbon monoxide poisoning in an electric car. An unusual case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, M; Zollinger, U

    1994-01-01

    The authors report a case of a man who committed suicide by poisoning with carbon monoxide in his electric vehicle. He applied a small motor generator with no exhaust normally used for charging the vehicle's batteries at home, that was found on the loading space behind the seat. This demonstrates the value of a thorough scene investigation.

  19. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-09-27

    Hybrid alloys among gold, palladium and platinum become a new category of catalysts primarily due to their enhanced catalytic effects. Enhancement means not only their effectiveness, but also their uniqueness as catalysts for the reactions that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au compared to Ag, Pd, and Pt helps to produce hollow Au cores first, followed by Pd or Pt shell growth. Continuous and highly crystalline shell growth was observed in Au@Pd core-shell NPs, but the sporadic and porous-like structure was observed in Au@Pt core-shell NPs. Along with hollow core-shell NPs, hollow porous Pt and hollow Au NPs are also prepared from Ag seed NPs. Twin boundaries which are typically observed in large size (>20 nm) Au NPs were not observed in hollow Au NPs. This absence is believed to be due to the role of the hollows, which significantly reduce the strain energy of edges where the two lattice planes meet. In ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, hollow Au@Pd core-shell NPs show highest current density in forward scan. Hollow Au@Pt core-shell NPs maintain better catalytic activities than metallic Pt, which is thought to be due to the better crystallinity of Pt shells as well as the alloy effect of Au cores. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Master index for the carbon dioxide research state-of-the-art report series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, M P [ed.

    1987-03-01

    Four State of the Art (SOA) reports, ''Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle,'' ''Direct Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide on Vegetation,'' ''Detecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and ''Projecting the Climatic Effects of Increasing Carbon Dioxide,'' and two companion reports, ''Characterization of Information Requirements for Studies of CO/sub 2/ Effects: Water Resources, Agriculture, Fisheries, Forests and Human Health'' and ''Glaciers, Ice Sheets, and Sea Level: Effect of a CO/sub 2/-Induced Climatic Change,'' were published by the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Division. Considerable information on atmospheric carbon dioxide and its possible effects on world climate is summarized in these six volumes. Each volume has its own index, but to make the information that is distributed throughout the six volumes more accessible and usable, comprehensive citation and subject indexes have been compiled. The subject indexes of the individual volumes have been edited to provide a uniformity from volume to volume and also to draw distinctions not needed in the separate volumes' indexes. Also, the comprehensive subject index has been formatted in a matrix arrangement to graphically show the distribution of subject treatment from volume to volume. Other aids include cross references between the scientific and common names of the animals and plants referred to, a glossary of special terms used, tables of data and conversion factors related to the data, and explanations of the acronyms and initialisms used in the texts of the six volumes. The executive summaries of the six volumes are collected and reproduced to allow the readers interested in the contents of one volume to rapidly gain information on the contents of the other volumes.

  1. Fabricating a hollow bulb obturator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Sari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Obturators are generally used in the rehabilitation of the maxillectomy defects. Ideally, obturators should be light, properly fit and construction should be made easily. By decreasing the weight of the prosthesis, the retention and stability may be optimized to allow the obturator for function comfortably during mastication, phonation, and deglutition. In this case, a 65-year-old male patient underwent surgical removal of left part of the maxilla due to the squamous cell carcinoma. In this technique fabrication of a hollow bulb obturator prosthesis as a single unit in heat-cured acrylic resin using a single-step flasking procedure was described. The patient’s functional and esthetic expectations were satisfied.

  2. Hollow-core tapered coupler for large inner diameter hollow-core optical fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiyao Zhou(周桂耀); Zhiyun Hou(侯峙云); Lantian Hou(侯蓝田); Jigang Liu(刘继刚)

    2003-01-01

    A novel hollow-core tapered coupler has been theoretically designed and fabricated by fiber drawing machine. The coupler's inner wall is coated with a polycrystalline GeO2 film. The coupling loss of hollow-core tapered coupler is about 0.2 dB. Hollow-core tapered coupler reduces the transmission loss of hollow-core optical fiber (HCOF) by 0.5 dB/m, therefore the coupler is suitable for coupling high power CO2 laser in industrial application.

  3. Facile synthesis of Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres and their application in polluted water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanguang; Xu, Shihao; Xia, Hongyu; Zheng, Fangcai

    2016-11-01

    Nanostructured carbon-based materials, such as carbon nanotube arrays have shown respectable removal ability for heavy metal ions and organic dyes in aqueous solution. Although the carbon-based materials exhibited excellent removal ability, the separation of them from the aqueous solution is difficult and time-consuming. Here we demonstrated a novel and facile route for the large-scale fabrication of Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres, with using ferrocene as a single reagent and SiO2 as a template. The as-prepared Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres exhibited adsorption ability for heavy metal ions and organic dyes from aqueous solution, and can be easily separated by an external magnet. When the as-prepared Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres were mixed with the aqueous solution of Hg2+ within 15 min, the removal efficiency was 90.3%. The as-prepared Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres were also exhibited a high adsorption capacity (100%) as the adsorbent for methylene blue (MB). In addition, the as-prepared Fe3O4@C hollow nanospheres can be used as the recyclable sorbent for water treatment via a simple magnetic separation.

  4. A Temperature Total Fourier Series Solution For a Hollow Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Mahmudi Mehrizi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following pages, we exhibit an analytical solution of a two-dimensional temperature field in a hollow sphere under total periodic boundary condition. The material is assumed to be homogeneous and isotropic with time-independent thermal properties. Till now periodic boundary condition was derived with a harmonic vibration, whereas there is a noticeable difference in the practical conditions with harmonic vibration. In this essay, by means of Fourier analysis, we imagine the outside total periodic boundary condition, as aggregate of harmonic vibrations . To solve the problem, first we imagine the boundary condition as constant values and with separation of variables; we can obtain temperature distribution in the  sphere. Then Duhamel's theorem is used to calculate temperature field under fully periodic boundary condition. For confirmation of accurate solution, we can compare the result for a harmonic vibration and those reported by others. Also, solutions for a hollow sphere were compared with other present references. At last we can obtain thermal stresses which is caused by temperature field in the hollow sphere.

  5. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Bayindir, Mehmet, E-mail: bayindir@nano.org.tr [UNAM-National Nanotechnology Research Center, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Physics, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  6. Development of hollow anode penning ion source for laboratory application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, B. K.; Shyam, A.; Das, R.; Rao, A. D. P.

    2012-03-01

    The research work presented here focuses for the development of miniature penning type ion source. One hollow anode penning type ion source was developed in our laboratory. The size of the ion source is 38 mm diameter and 55 mm length. The ion source consists of two cathodes, a hollow anode and one piece of rare earth permanent magnet. The plasma was created in the plasma region between cathodes and the hollow anode. The J × B force in the region helps for efficient ionization of the gas even in the high vacuum region˜1×10 -5 Torr. The ions were extracted in the axial direction with help of the potential difference between the electrodes and the geometry of the extraction angle. The effect of the extraction electrode geometry for efficient extraction of the ions from the plasma region was examined. This ion source is a self extracted ion source. The self extracted phenomena reduce the cost and the size of the ion source. The extracted ion current was measured by a graphite probe. An ion current of more than 200 μA was observed at the probe placed 70 mm apart from the extraction electrode. In this paper, the structure of the ion source, effect of operating pressure, potential difference and the magnetic field on the extracted ion current is reported.

  7. Hollow rhodoliths increase Svalbard's shelf biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    Rhodoliths are coralline red algal assemblages that commonly occur in marine habitats from the tropics to polar latitudes. They form rigid structures of high-magnesium calcite and have a good fossil record. Here I show that rhodoliths are ecosystem engineers in a high Arctic environment that increase local biodiversity by providing habitat. Gouged by boring mussels, originally solid rhodoliths become hollow ecospheres intensely colonised by benthic organisms. In the examined shelf areas, biodiversity in rhodolith-bearing habitats is significantly greater than in habitats without rhodoliths and hollow rhodoliths yield a greater biodiversity than solid ones. This biodiversity, however, is threatened because hollow rhodoliths take a long time to form and are susceptible to global change and anthropogenic impacts such as trawl net fisheries that can destroy hollow rhodoliths. Rhodoliths and other forms of coralline red algae play a key role in a plurality of environments and need improved management and protection plans.

  8. optimizing compressive strength characteristics of hollow building ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This paper evaluates the compressive strength of sandcrete hollow building blocks when its sand fraction is partially replaced ... defines sandcrete blocks as composite materials made .... industry as well as the economy of Nigeria, if there is no.

  9. Reports from Ministry of Finance: China Nay Begin to Collect Carbon Tax in the Next Five Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The investigation team of Research Institute for Fiscal Science, Ministry of Finance, just published a report on the "Study on the Issue of Beginning to Levy Carbon Tax in China." The report said that the beginning of the collection of carbon tax could be considered in the next five years.

  10. 碳纤维/空心玻璃微珠/聚丙烯三元复合体系的制备及力学性能研究%Study on Preparation and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Fiber/Hollow Glass Beads/Polypropylene Ternary Composite System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄虹; 明浩; 王选伦; 李道喜; 李能文

    2012-01-01

    Taking polypropylene (PP) as matrix, carbon fiber (CF) as reinforcing material, hollow glass bead (HGB) as toughener to prepare CF/HGB/PP ternary composite system. The effects of CF and HGB content on mechanical properties of the composite system were studied. The microstructure of the composite system was also analyzed. The results show that when CF content is 5 phr, HGB content is 15 phr, the comprehensive mechanical properties of CF/HGB/PP ternary composite system are the best, its tensile strength and notched impact strength increase by 46.5% and 17.6% respectively compared with those of pure PP.%以聚丙烯(PP)为基体、碳纤维(CF)为增强材料、空心玻璃微珠(HGB)为增韧剂制备了CF/HGB/PP三元复合体系,研究了CF、HGB含量对复合体系力学性能的影响,并对复合体系的微观结构进行了分析.结果表明:当CF含量为5份、HGB含量为15份时,CF/HGB/PP三元复合体系的综合力学性能最佳,其拉伸强度和缺口冲击强度分别比纯PP提高了46.5%和17.6%.

  11. BOX-DEATH HOLLOW ROADLESS AREA, UTAH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Gordon W.; Lane, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Geologic mapping, geochemical sampling, and a search for prospects and mineralized rock in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area, Utah indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources in the area. Additional exploratory drilling by industry seems warranted if wells elsewhere in the region find oil or gas in strata as yet untested in the Box-Death Hollow Roadless Area.

  12. Mode characteristics of hollow core Bragg fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minning Ji; Zhidong Shi; Qiang Guo

    2005-01-01

    Analytical expression to calculate propagation constant and mode field of the hollow core Bragg fiber is derived. Numerical results are presented. It is shown that the fundamental mode of the hollow core Bragg fiber is circularly symmetric TE01 mode with no polarization degeneracy, while the higher order mode may be HE11, TM01, or TE02 etc.. This property is different from conventional optical fiber that its fundamental mode is the linearly polarized HE11 mode and is polarization degeneracy.

  13. Ultra-large bandwidth hollow-core guiding in all-silica bragg fibers with nano-supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienne, Guillaume; Xu, Yong; Jakobsen, Christian;

    2004-01-01

    We demonstrate a new class of hollow-core Bragg fibers that are composed of concentric cylindrical silica rings separated by nanoscale support bridges. We theoretically predict and experimentally observe hollow-core confinement over an octave frequency range. The bandwidth of bandgap guiding...... in this new class of Bragg fibers exceeds that of other hollow-core fibers reported in the literature. With only three rings of silica cladding layers, these Bragg fibers achieve propagation loss of the order of 1 dB/m....

  14. Novel titania hollow nanospheres of size 28 ± 1 nm using soft-templates and their application for lithium-ion rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Manickam; Nakashima, Kenichi; Gunawardhana, Nanda; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Inoue, Masamichi; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Yoshio, Masaki; Tatsumi, Takashi

    2011-06-28

    We report a novel protocol to prepare titania hollow nanospheres of size about 28 ± 1 nm with micelles of asymmetric triblock copolymers. The hollow particles exhibit unique electrochemical properties in lithium ion rechargeable batteries such as high capacity, very low irreversible capacity loss, and high cycling performance. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  15. Raman spectroscopy system with hollow fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-hong; Shi, Yi-Wei

    2012-11-01

    A Raman remote spectroscopy system was realized using flexible hollow optical fiber as laser emittion and signal collection probes. A silver-coated hollow fiber has low-loss property and flat transmission characteristics in the visible wavelength regions. Compared with conventional silica optical fiber, little background fluorescence noise was observed with optical fiber as the probe, which would be of great advantages to the detection in low frequency Raman shift region. The complex filtering and focusing system was thus unnecessary. The Raman spectra of CaCO3 and PE were obtained by using the system and a reasonable signal to noise ratio was attained without any lens. Experiments with probes made of conventional silica optical fibers were also conducted for comparisons. Furthermore, a silver-coated hollow glass waveguide was used as sample cell to detect liquid phase sample. We used a 6 cm-long hollow fiber as the liquid cell and Butt-couplings with emitting and collecting fibers. Experiment results show that the system obtained high signal to noise ratio because of the longer optical length between sample and laser light. We also give the elementary theoretical analysis for the hollow fiber sample cell. The parameters of the fiber which would affect the system were discussed. Hollow fiber has shown to be a potential fiber probe or sample cell for Raman spectroscopy.

  16. A Facile Preparation Method of ZrO2 Hollow Sphere Using PVA Microcapsule as a Template

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Dong-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we proposed a simple and facile preparation method of ZrO2 hollow sphere using PVA microcapsule as a template. The prepared hollow sphere was characterized by XRD, FESEM, N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms, FT-IR techniques. PVA microcapsule were prepared by polymerization in a water-in-oil emulsion and coated by adding of zirconia sol. Uniform and spherical shaped zirconia hollow sphere with very narrow size distribution was obtained after calcination at 700 °C by removing the PVA microcapsule template. No other carbon residues and carbon-zirconium compounds were observed. These results indicate that the zirconia capsule formed without deformation of the zirconia shell structure, and CO2 and H2O gases by decomposition of the PVA microcapsule during sintering process removed through the zirconia shell.

  17. Ag/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow microspheres: Preparation and application for hydrogen peroxide detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Xinyuan; Wu, Zhiping; Liao, Fang, E-mail: liaozhang2003@163.com; Zhang, Tingting; Guo, Tingting

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach for preparing α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres by mixing ferric nitrate aqueous and glucose in 180 °C. The glucose was found to act as a soft template in the process of α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres formation. Ag/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow nanocomposite was obtained under UV irradiation without additional reducing agents or initiators. Synthesized Ag/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow composites exhibited remarkable catalytic performance toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} reduction. The electrocatalytic activity mechanism of Ag/α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GCE were discussed toward the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Glucose is carbonized as carbon balls in the 180 °C hydrothermal carbonization process, which plays a role of a soft template. Carbon spherical shell is rich in many hydroxyls, which have good hydrophilicity and surface reactivity. When Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} is added to the aqueous solution of Glucose, the hydrophilic -OH will adsorb Fe{sup 3+} to form coordination compound by coordination bond. α-FeOOH is formed on the surface of carbon balls by hydrothermal reaction. After calcination at 500 °C, carbon spheres react with oxygen to form carbon dioxide, which disappears in the air. Meanwhile α-FeOOH is calcined to form α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres.

  18. Improved photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianbin; Du, Hejun; Sun, Xiao Wei; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Sun, Gengzhi; Li, Fengji; Zheng, Lianxi; Zhang, Sam

    2014-09-01

    We report synthesis of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures by using carbon cloth as substrates to obtain multiple hollow ZnO microtube-nanowire structures. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy analysis clearly show that carbon is doped into ZnO through substitution of carbon for oxygen in the growth and annealing processes. Upon exposure to 633-nm red laser, a distinct photoresponse can be observed, which indicates that carbon doping in ZnO can well extend its light harvesting to visible light region. Furthermore, a prototype of photovoltaic cell was fabricated to demonstrate the photovoltaic performance of multiple carbon-doped ZnO nanostructures under UV and visible light irradiation. This result shows that carbon-doped ZnO can act as effective photoactive materials for photoelectric components.

  19. Electrochemical properties of CuO hollow nanopowders prepared from formless Cu–C composite via nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Min [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hwa [Daegu Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, 80 Daehakro Bukgu, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yun Ju [Suncheon Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Suncheon 540-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jung Sang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yun Chan, E-mail: yckang@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-25

    Hollow CuO nanopowders are prepared using a simple spray drying process that relied on nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion; these nanopowders have potential applications in lithium-ion batteries. Citric acid is used as both the carbon source material and chelating agent and plays a key role in the preparation of the hollow nanopowders. The formless Cu–C composite that formed as an intermediate product transforms into slightly aggregated CuO hollow nanopowders after post-treatment at 300 and 400 °C under an air atmosphere. The CuO hollow nanopowders exhibit higher initial discharge capacities and better cycling performances than those of the filled-structured CuO nanopowders, which are prepared at a post-treatment temperature of 500 °C under an air atmosphere. The discharge capacities of the CuO nanopowders post-treated at 300, 400, and 500 °C for the 150{sup th} cycle at a current density of 1 A g{sup −1} are 793, 632, and 464 mA h g{sup −1}, respectively, and their capacity retentions calculated from the maximum discharge capacities are 88, 80, and 73%, respectively. The CuO nanopowders with hollow structures exhibit better structural stability for repeated lithium insertion and desertion processes than those with filled structures. - Highlights: • Hollow CuO nanopowders are prepared using a simple spray drying process. • Cu–C composite transforms into CuO hollow nanopowders by Kirkendall diffusion. • Hollow CuO nanopowders show good electrochemical properties for lithium-ion storage.

  20. Simple Synthesis of Molybdenum Disulfide/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite Hollow Microspheres as Supercapacitor Electrode Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MoS2/RGO composite hollow microspheres were hydrothermally synthesized by using SiO2/GO microspheres as a template, which were obtained via the sonication-assisted interfacial self-assembly of tiny GO sheets on positively charged SiO2 microspheres. The structure, morphology, phase, and chemical composition of MoS2/RGO hollow microspheres were systematically investigated by a series of techniques such as FE-SEM, TEM, XRD, TGA, BET, and Raman characterizations, meanwhile, their electrochemical properties were carefully evaluated by CV, GCD, and EIS measurements. It was found that MoS2/RGO hollow microspheres possessed unique porous hollow architecture with high-level hierarchy and large specific surface area up to 63.7 m2·g−1. When used as supercapacitor electrode material, MoS2/RGO hollow microspheres delivered a maximum specific capacitance of 218.1 F·g−1 at the current density of 1 A·g−1, which was much higher than that of contrastive bare MoS2 microspheres developed in the present work and most of other reported MoS2-based materials. The enhancement of supercapacitive behaviors of MoS2/RGO hollow microspheres was likely due to the improved conductivity together with their distinct structure and morphology, which not only promoted the charge transport but also facilitated the electrolyte diffusion. Moreover, MoS2/RGO hollow microsphere electrode displayed satisfactory long-term stability with 91.8% retention of the initial capacitance after 1000 charge/discharge cycles at the current density of 3 A·g−1, showing excellent application potential.

  1. Maxillary frenectomy using a carbon dioxide laser in a pediatric patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Kishore; Trajtenberg, Cynthia; Patel, Chandni; Streckfus, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Dental lasers contribute significantly to the field of cosmetic dentistry, providing an invaluable resource for clinicians who perform different types of esthetic procedures. An increasing number of general dentists are using the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser for surgical procedures. However, the literature about using a CO2 laser to perform oral soft tissue ablation in the pediatric patient is limited. This case report presents a successful case of a maxillary labial frenectomy in a pediatric patient using a CO2 laser.

  2. Hollow glass for insulating layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merticaru, Andreea R.; Moagar-Poladian, Gabriel

    1999-03-01

    Common porous materials, some of which will be considered in the chapters of this book, include concrete, paper, ceramics, clays, porous semiconductors, chromotography materials, and natural materials like coral, bone, sponges, rocks and shells. Porous materials can also be reactive, such as in charcoal gasification, acid rock dissolution, catalyst deactivation and concrete. This study continues the investigations about the properties of, so-called, hollow glass. In this paper is presented a computer simulation approach in which the thermo-mechanical behavior of a 3D microstructure is directly computed. In this paper a computer modeling approach of porous glass is presented. One way to test the accuracy of the reconstructed microstructures is to computed their physical properties and compare to experimental measurement on equivalent systems. In this view, we imagine a new type of porous type of glass designed as buffer layer in multilayered printed boards in ICs. Our glass is a variable material with a variable pore size and surface area. The porosity could be tailored early from the deposition phases that permitting us to keep in a reasonable balance the dielectric constant and thermal conductivity.

  3. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reece D. Gately

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications.

  4. RF-dressed Rydberg atoms in hollow-core fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The giant electro-optical response of Rydberg atoms manifests itself in the emergence of sidebands in the Rydberg excitation spectrum if the atom is exposed to a radio-frequency (RF) electric field. Here we report on the study of RF-dressed Rydberg atoms inside hollow-core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCF), a system that enables the use of low modulation voltages and offers the prospect of miniaturised vapour-based electro-optical devices. Narrow spectroscopic features caused by the RF field a...

  5. RF-dressed Rydberg atoms in hollow-core fibres

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. It is currently under an indefinite embargo pending publication by the Institute of Physics. The giant electro-optical response of Rydberg atoms manifests itself in the emergence of sidebands in the Rydberg excitation spectrum if the atom is exposed to a radio-frequency (RF) electric field. Here we report on the study of RF-dressed Rydberg atoms inside hollow-core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCF), a system that enables the use of low modulation volta...

  6. RF-dressed Rydberg atoms in hollow-core fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Veit, Christian; Kübler, Harald; Euser, Tijmen G; Russell, Philip St J; Löw, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The giant electro-optical response of Rydberg atoms manifests itself in the emergence of sidebands in the Rydberg excitation spectrum if the atom is exposed to a radio-frequency (RF) electric field. Here we report on the study of RF-dressed Rydberg atoms inside hollow-core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCF), a system that enables the use of low modulation voltages and offers the prospect of miniaturised vapour-based electro-optical devices. Narrow spectroscopic features caused by the RF field are observed for modulation frequencies up to 500 MHz.

  7. Extruded single ring hollow core optical fibers for Raman sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Rowland, K. J.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Spooner, N. A.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes. A lead-silicate glass billet is used to produce a preform through glass extrusion to create a larger-scale version of the final structure that is subsequently drawn to an optical fiber. The simple single suspended ring structure allows antiresonance reflection guiding. The resulting fibers were used to perform Raman sensing of liquid samples filling the length of the fiber, demonstrating its potential for fiber sensing applications.

  8. Accurate modelling of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Eric Numkam; Sandoghchi, Seyed Reza; Chen, Yong; Jasion, Gregory T; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Hayes, John R; Petrovich, Marco N; Richardson, David J; Poletti, Francesco

    2015-09-07

    We report a novel approach to reconstruct the cross-sectional profile of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers from scanning electron microscope images. Finite element simulations on the reconstructed geometries achieve a remarkable match with the measured transmission window, surface mode position and attenuation. The agreement between estimated scattering loss from surface roughness and measured loss values indicates that structural distortions, in particular the uneven distribution of glass across the thin silica struts on the core boundary, have a strong impact on the loss. This provides insight into the differences between idealized models and fabricated fibers, which could be key to further fiber loss reduction.

  9. Method for the production of fabricated hollow microspheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickramanayake, Shan; Luebke, David R.

    2015-06-09

    The method relates to the fabrication of a polymer microspheres comprised of an asymmetric layer surrounding a hollow interior. The fabricated hollow microsphere is generated from a nascent hollow microsphere comprised of an inner core of core fluid surrounded by a dope layer of polymer dope, where the thickness of the dope layer is at least 10% and less than 50% of the diameter of the inner core. The nascent hollow microsphere is exposed to a gaseous environment, generating a vitrified hollow microsphere, which is subsequently immersed in a coagulation bath. Solvent exchange produces a fabricated hollow microsphere comprised of a densified outer skin surrounding a macroporous inner layer, which surrounds a hollow interior. In an embodiment, the polymer is a polyimide or a polyamide-imide, and the non-solvent in the core fluid and the coagulation bath is water. The fabricated hollow microspheres are particularly suited as solvent supports for gas separation processes.

  10. Highly scalable ZIF-based mixed-matrix hollow fiber membranes for advanced hydrocarbon separations

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chen

    2014-05-29

    ZIF-8/6FDA-DAM, a proven mixed-matrix material that demonstrated remarkably enhanced C3H6/C3H8 selectivity in dense film geometry, was extended to scalable hollow fiber geometry in the current work. We successfully formed dual-layer ZIF-8/6FDA-DAM mixed-matrix hollow fiber membranes with ZIF-8 nanoparticle loading up to 30 wt % using the conventional dry-jet/wet-quench fiber spinning technique. The mixed-matrix hollow fibers showed significantly enhanced C3H6/C3H8 selectivity that was consistent with mixed-matrix dense films. Critical variables controlling successful formation of mixed-matrix hollow fiber membranes with desirable morphology and attractive transport properties were discussed. Furthermore, the effects of coating materials on selectivity recovery of partially defective fibers were investigated. To our best knowledge, this is the first article reporting successful formation of high-loading mixed-matrix hollow fiber membranes with significantly enhanced selectivity for separation of condensable olefin/paraffin mixtures. Therefore, it represents a major step in the research area of advanced mixed-matrix membranes. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  11. Study of AKR hollow pattern characteristics at sub-auroral regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Schwingenschuh, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is expected to exhibit a hollow pattern similar to that reported for the comparable emissions from Jupiter (e.g. Jovian decametric emissions - DAM). The hollow pattern is a hollow cone beam with apex at the point of AKR emission, axis tangent to the magnetic field direction, and an opening angle of the order of 80°. The properties of the hollow cone can be derived from the so-called dynamic spectrum which displays the radiation versus the observation time and the frequency. We analyze the auroral kilometric radiation recorded by the electric field experiment (ICE) onboard DEMETER micro-satellite. The dynamic spectra lead us to study the occurrence of the AKR recorded in the sub-auroral regions when the micro-satellite was at altitudes of about 700 km. We address in this contribution issues concerning the characteristics (occurrence, latitude and longitude) of the AKR hollow beam and their relations to the seasonal and solar activity variations.

  12. Synthesis and Characterization of Gd2O3 Hollow Microspheres Using a Template-Directed Method

    OpenAIRE

    Xueliang Jiang; Lu Yu; Chu Yao; Fuqing Zhang; Jiao Zhang; Chenjian Li

    2016-01-01

    Uniform rare-earth gadolinium oxide (Gd2O3) hollow microspheres, as formed through a urea-assisted homogenous precipitation process using carbon spheres as a template and a subsequent heat treatment, were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Brunauer-Emmett-Tellet surface area measurement. The results indicate that the final prod...

  13. LBNL deliverable to the Tricarb carbon sequestration partnership: Final report on experimental and numerical modeling activities for the Newark Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Pester, Nick [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Saldi, Giuseppe [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beyer, John [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Houseworth, Jim [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Knauss, Kevin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-09-04

    This report presents findings for hydrological and chemical characteristics and processes relevant to large-scale geologic CO2 sequestration in the Newark Basin of southern New York and northern New Jersey. This work has been conducted in collaboration with the Tri-Carb Consortium for Carbon Sequestration — comprising Sandia Technologies, LLC; Conrad Geoscience; and Schlumberger Carbon Services.

  14. Transmission properties of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Charlotte Ijeoma; Hald, Jan; Petersen, Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers.......Variations in optical transmission of four types of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are measured as a function of laser frequency. These variations influence the potential accuracy of gas sensors based on molecular spectroscopy in hollow-core fibers....

  15. A Raman cell based on hollow core photonic crystal fiber for human breath analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Kam Kong; Zeng, Haishan, E-mail: hzeng@bccrc.ca [Imaging Unit – Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3, Canada and Medical Physics Program – Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Short, Michael; Lam, Stephen; McWilliams, Annette [Imaging Unit – Integrative Oncology Department, British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1L3 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Breath analysis has a potential prospect to benefit the medical field based on its perceived advantages to become a point-of-care, easy to use, and cost-effective technology. Early studies done by mass spectrometry show that volatile organic compounds from human breath can represent certain disease states of our bodies, such as lung cancer, and revealed the potential of breath analysis. But mass spectrometry is costly and has slow-turnaround time. The authors’ goal is to develop a more portable and cost effective device based on Raman spectroscopy and hollow core-photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for breath analysis. Methods: Raman scattering is a photon-molecular interaction based on the kinetic modes of an analyte which offers unique fingerprint type signals that allow molecular identification. HC-PCF is a novel light guide which allows light to be confined in a hollow core and it can be filled with a gaseous sample. Raman signals generated by the gaseous sample (i.e., human breath) can be guided and collected effectively for spectral analysis. Results: A Raman-cell based on HC-PCF in the near infrared wavelength range was developed and tested in a single pass forward-scattering mode for different gaseous samples. Raman spectra were obtained successfully from reference gases (hydrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide gases), ambient air, and a human breath sample. The calculated minimum detectable concentration of this system was ∼15 parts per million by volume, determined by measuring the carbon dioxide concentration in ambient air via the characteristic Raman peaks at 1286 and 1388 cm{sup −1}. Conclusions: The results of this study were compared to a previous study using HC-PCF to trap industrial gases and backward-scatter 514.5 nm light from them. The authors found that the method presented in this paper has an advantage to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This SNR advantage, coupled with the better transmission of HC-PCF in the near-IR than in the

  16. 3D-printed PMMA Preform for Hollow-core POF Drawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubel, M. G.; Fasano, Andrea; Woyessa, Getinet

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the first, to our knowledge, 3D-printed hollow-core poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) preform for polymer optical fibre drawing. It was printed of commercial PMMA by means of fused deposition modelling technique. The preform was drawn to cane, proving good enough quality...... of drawing process and the PMMA molecular weight to be appropriate for drawing. This ascertains that the manufacturing process provides preforms suitable for hollow-core fibre drawing. The paper focuses on maximisation of transparency of PMMA 3D printouts by optimising printing process parameters: nozzle...

  17. Pulse dispersion in hollow optical waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, M.; Ilev, Ilko K.; Waynant, Ronald W.; Gannot, Israel

    2005-09-01

    A study of laser (near- and mid-infrared) pulse dispersion in hollow waveguides is presented. We developed an analytical model to describe the pulse dispersion in hollow waveguides and compared our theoretical calculations with measurements done by us and also by two other groups. The pulse dispersion was experimentally measured for a short Q-switched Er:YAG laser in the nanosecond range and for femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses transmitted by hollow optical waveguides. For analytical calculation of the pulse dispersion in these waveguides, a refined ray tracing program was developed. This approach took into account roughness of the internal reflecting and refracting inner layers. A comparison analysis between the measurements and calculations conducted at identical parameters demonstrates good correlation between theoretical and experimental results.

  18. Hollow glass waveguides for broadband infrared transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, T; Hirsch, J; Harrington, J A

    1994-07-15

    Broadband hollow glass waveguides have been fabricated with losses as low as 0.15 dB/m at 10.6 microm. We make these hollow glass waveguides by coating the inside of polyimide-coated silica-glass tubing with a metallic layer followed by a thin dielectric coating of a metal halide. The bore sizes of the guides range from 320 to 700 microm, and we have made lengths as long as 3 m. The bending radii of the waveguides are less than 5 cm for bore sizes less than 500 microm. We have used these waveguides to deliver greater than 80 W of CO(2) laser power and 5 W of Er:YAG laser power. The hollow glass guides are inexpensive, robust, and quite flexible and therefore a good infrared fiber for power and sensor applications.

  19. Sheet Plasma Produced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙; 张厚先; 杨宣宗; 冯春华; 乔宾; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field.The plasma is about 40cm in length,4 cm in width and 1cm in thickness.The electron density is about 108cm-3.The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening,which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode.A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma.The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage,pressure and the magnetic field vary.A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G-300 G are observed in the variation of electron density(or thickness of the sheet plasma)with the magnetic field.Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable.

  20. Hollow boron nitride nanospheres as boron reservoir for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Wang, Xiupeng; Zhang, Jun; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Wang, Xuebin; Weng, Qunhong; Ito, Atsuo; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2017-01-01

    High global incidence of prostate cancer has led to a focus on prevention and treatment strategies to reduce the impact of this disease in public health. Boron compounds are increasingly recognized as preventative and chemotherapeutic agents. However, systemic administration of soluble boron compounds is hampered by their short half-life and low effectiveness. Here we report on hollow boron nitride (BN) spheres with controlled crystallinity and boron release that decrease cell viability and increase prostate cancer cell apoptosis. In vivo experiments on subcutaneous tumour mouse models treated with BN spheres demonstrated significant suppression of tumour growth. An orthotopic tumour growth model was also utilized and further confirmed the in vivo anti-cancer efficacy of BN spheres. Moreover, the administration of hollow BN spheres with paclitaxel leads to synergetic effects in the suppression of tumour growth. The work demonstrates that hollow BN spheres may function as a new agent for prostate cancer treatment.

  1. Interconnected Silicon Hollow Nanospheres for Lithium-Ion Battery Anodes with Long Cycle Life

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Yan

    2011-07-13

    Silicon is a promising candidate for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. However, volume changes during cycling cause pulverization and capacity fade, and improving cycle life is a major research challenge. Here, we report a novel interconnected Si hollow nanosphere electrode that is capable of accommodating large volume changes without pulverization during cycling. We achieved the high initial discharge capacity of 2725 mAh g-1 with less than 8% capacity degradation every hundred cycles for 700 total cycles. Si hollow sphere electrodes also show a Coulombic efficiency of 99.5% in later cycles. Superior rate capability is demonstrated and attributed to fast lithium diffusion in the interconnected Si hollow structure. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Multiwavelength laser light transmission of hollow optical fiber from the visible to the mid-infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi Wei; Ito, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2005-11-01

    We report on low-loss multiwavelength laser delivery of hollow optical fiber in a wide wavelength region, from the visible to the infrared. Improved methods of liquid-phase coating were used to fabricate the hollow fiber with inner films of a silver and a cyclic olefin polymer (COP) layer. The surface roughness of the silver layer was reduced dramatically by pretreatment on the inner glass surface with an SnCl2 solution. The COP layer roughness was also decreased by using an ambient atmosphere of tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent during the COP layer formation. Owing to the smooth surfaces, hollow fiber with optimum COP film thickness for CO2 laser light simultaneously yields low losses for a Er:YAG laser and a red pilot beam. The power durability of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, as well as the loss properties for the pilot beam, is demonstrated.

  3. Multiwavelength laser light transmission of hollow optical fiber from the visible to the mid-infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi Wei; Ito, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    2005-11-01

    We report on low-loss multiwavelength laser delivery of hollow optical fiber in a wide wavelength region, from the visible to the infrared. Improved methods of liquid-phase coating were used to fabricate the hollow fiber with inner films of a silver and a cyclic olefin polymer (COP) layer. The surface roughness of the silver layer was reduced dramatically by pretreatment on the inner glass surface with an SnCl2 solution. The COP layer roughness was also decreased by using an ambient atmosphere of tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent during the COP layer formation. Owing to the smooth surfaces, hollow fiber with optimum COP film thickness for CO2 laser light simultaneously yields low losses for a Er:YAG laser and a red pilot beam. The power durability of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers, as well as the loss properties for the pilot beam, is demonstrated.

  4. Interconnected silicon hollow nanospheres for lithium-ion battery anodes with long cycle life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yan; McDowell, Matthew T; Ryu, Ill; Wu, Hui; Liu, Nian; Hu, Liangbing; Nix, William D; Cui, Yi

    2011-07-13

    Silicon is a promising candidate for the anode material in lithium-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. However, volume changes during cycling cause pulverization and capacity fade, and improving cycle life is a major research challenge. Here, we report a novel interconnected Si hollow nanosphere electrode that is capable of accommodating large volume changes without pulverization during cycling. We achieved the high initial discharge capacity of 2725 mAh g(-1) with less than 8% capacity degradation every hundred cycles for 700 total cycles. Si hollow sphere electrodes also show a Coulombic efficiency of 99.5% in later cycles. Superior rate capability is demonstrated and attributed to fast lithium diffusion in the interconnected Si hollow structure.

  5. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions (V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction (V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of Ni(12)P(5) hollow microspheres, characterization and photocatalytic degradation property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ni, Yonghong; Liao, Kaiming; Hong, Jianming

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, we report the successful synthesis of Ni(12)P(5) hollow spheres via a facile hydrothermal route, employing white phosphorus (WP) and nickel nitrate as the reactants in the presence of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polyethylene glycol 10000 (PEG-10000). The phase and morphology of the product were characterized by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HMT and surfactant (PEG-10000) played important roles in the formation of Ni(12)P(5) hollow microspheres. Furthermore, research also showed that the as-prepared Ni(12)P(5) hollow spheres could photocatalytically degrade some organic dyes such as Safranine T and Pyronine B under irradiation of 365 nm UV light.

  7. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  8. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Hendricks

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabatic heating from deep moist convection in the hurricane eyewall produces a towering annular structure of elevated potential vorticity (PV. This structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. The sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satisfies the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic-baroclinic instability. For thin enough annular structures, small perturbations grow exponentially, extract energy from the mean flow, and lead to hollow tower breakdown, with significant vortex structural and intensity change. The three-dimensional adiabatic rearrangements of two prototypical hurricane-like hollow PV towers (one thick and one thin are examined in an idealized framework. For both hollow towers, dynamic instability causes air parcels with high PV to be mixed into the eye preferentially at lower levels, where unstable PV wave growth rates are the largest. Little or no mixing is found to occur at upper levels. The mixing at lower and middle levels is most rapid for the breakdown of the thin hollow tower, consistent with previous barotropic results. For both hollow towers, this advective rearrangement of PV affects the tropical cyclone structure and intensity in a number of ways. First, the minimum central pressure and maximum azimuthal mean velocity simultaneously decrease, consistent with previous barotropic results. Secondly, isosurfaces of absolute angular momentum preferentially shift inward at low levels, implying an adiabatic mechanism by which hurricane eyewall tilt can form. Thirdly, a PV bridge, similar to that previously found in full-physics hurricane simulations, develops as a result of mixing at the isentropic levels where unstable PV waves grow most rapidly. Finally, the balanced mass field resulting from the PV rearrangement is warmer in the eye between 900 and 700 hPa. The location of this warming is consistent with observed warm anomalies in the eye, indicating that in certain instances the hurricane

  9. Hollow electrode loose plate SOFC design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, B.C.; Dongen, B.A.M. van; Monaster, G.A. [Seed Capital Investments B.V., Utrecht (Netherlands); Roosmalen, J.A.M. van; Plaisier, K.H.; Schoonman, J. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. for Applied Inorganic Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    A novel planar SOFC design is presented, based on the loose stacking of hollow electrode elements, conventional plate type electrolytes and interconnectors. This facilitates free thermal expansion during operation, and thermal cycling, thereby significantly improving prospects for reliable SOFC operation in power generation practice. Each individual element only consists of one material, eliminating the need for sealing and for matching thermal expansion coefficients of fuel cell components. Application of hollow electrodes results in an inherent manifolding of the gas streams eliminating the need for seals at the fuel cell stack itself. The design has been tested at laboratory scale and a small working prototype fuel cell has been successfully tested.

  10. Scaffold Characteristics for Functional Hollow Organ Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eberli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many medical conditions require surgical reconstruction of hollow organs. Tissue engineering of organs and tissues is a promising new technique without harvest site morbidity. An ideal biomaterial should be biocompatible, support tissue formation and provide adequate structural support. It should degrade gradually and provide an environment allowing for cell-cell interaction, adhesion, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Although tissue formation is feasible, functionality has never been demonstrated. Mainly the lack of proper innervation and vascularisation are hindering contractility and normal function. In this chapter we critically review the current state of engineering hollow organs with a special focus on innervation and vascularisation.

  11. Composite hollow fiber membranes for organic solvent-based liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Bolhuis-Versteeg, Lydia A.M.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Instability issues of liquid membranes extraction significantly limit its wide application in industry. We report research on the application of a new composite hollow fiber membrane to stabilizing liquid membrane extraction. These type of composite membranes have either a polysulfone (PSf) ultrafil

  12. Submicron hollow spot generation by solid immersion lens and structured illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, M.S.; Assafrao, A.C.; Scharf, T.; Wachters, A.J.H.; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, H.P.; Brun, M.; Olivier, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Herzig, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experimental and numerical demonstration of immersed submicron-size hollow focused spots, generated by structuring the polarization state of an incident light beam impinging on a micro-size solid immersion lens (μ-SIL) made of SiO2. Such structured focal spots are characterized by a

  13. Enzymatic conversion in ion-exchange mixed matrix hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, Joao; Borneman, Zandrie; Wessling, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the adsorption of glucose oxidase (GOx) in particle-loaded hollow fibers using polyethersulfone as the matrix and Lewatit strong cation-exchange resins as the functional support. The activity of adsorbed GOx was evaluated under the same pH conditions as the adsorption. Static

  14. Submicron hollow spot generation by solid immersion lens and structured illumination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, M.S.; Assafrao, A.C.; Scharf, T.; Wachters, A.J.H.; Pereira, S.F.; Urbach, H.P.; Brun, M.; Olivier, S.; Nicoletti, S.; Herzig, H.P.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the experimental and numerical demonstration of immersed submicron-size hollow focused spots, generated by structuring the polarization state of an incident light beam impinging on a micro-size solid immersion lens (μ-SIL) made of SiO2. Such structured focal spots are characterized by a

  15. Preparation and characterization of gas separation hollow fiber membranes based on polyethersulfone-polyimide miscible blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapantaidakis, G.C.; Koops, G.H.; Wessling, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the preparation and characterization of gas separation hollow fibers based on polyethersulfone Sumikaexcel (PES) and polyimide Matrimid 5218 (PI) blends are reported. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphological characteristics and structure of the asymme

  16. Composite hollow fiber membranes for organic solvent-based liquid-liquid extraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, T.; Versteeg, L.A.M.; Mulder, M.H.V.; Wessling, M.

    2004-01-01

    Instability issues of liquid membranes extraction significantly limit its wide application in industry. We report research on the application of a new composite hollow fiber membrane to stabilizing liquid membrane extraction. These type of composite membranes have either a polysulfone (PSf) ultrafil

  17. Low Bending Loss Nodeless Hollow-core Anti-Resonant Fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Shoufei; Liu, Xiaolu; Wang, Pu

    2016-01-01

    We report a high performance nodeless hollow-core anti-resonant fiber with a broadband guidance from 1050 nm to >1900 nm, a transmission attenuation of 200 dB/km, and a low bending loss of 0.25 dB/m for a 5 cm radius at wavelength of 1550 nm.

  18. The Hollow-Face Illusion in Infancy: Do Infants See a Screen Based Rotating Hollow Mask as Hollow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki Tsuruhara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether infants experience the hollow-face illusion using a screen-based presentation of a rotating hollow mask. In experiment 1 we examined preferential looking between rotating convex and concave faces. Adults looked more at the concave—illusory convex—face which appears to counter rotate. Infants of 7- to 8-month-old infants preferred the convex face, and 5- to 6-month-olds showed no preference. While older infants discriminate, their preference differed from that of adults possibly because they don't experience the illusion or counter rotation. In experiment 2 we tested preference in 7- to 8-month-olds for angled convex and concave static faces both before and after habituation to the stimuli shown in experiment 1. The infants showed a novelty preference for the static shape opposite to the habituation stimulus, together with a general preference for the static convex face. This shows that they discriminate between convex and concave faces and that habituation to either transfers across a change in view. Seven- to eight-month-olds have been shown to discriminate direction of rigid rotation on the basis of perspective changes. Our results suggest that this, perhaps together with a weaker bias to perceive faces as convex, allows these infants to see the screen-based hollow face as hollow even though adults perceive it as convex.

  19. Scalable synthesis of Na3V2(PO4)(3)/C porous hollow spheres as a cathode for Na-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, JF; Luo, C; Gao, T; Fan, XL; Wang, CS

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2(PO4)(3) (NVP) has been considered as a very promising cathode material for sodium-ion batteries (SIBs) due to its typical NASICON structure, which provides an open and three dimensional (3D) framework for Na+ migration. However, the low electronic conductivity of NVP limits its rate capability and cycling ability. In this study, carbon coated hollow structured NVP/C composites are synthesized via a template-free and scalable ultrasonic spray pyrolysis process, where the carbon coated NVP particles are uniformly decorated on the inner and outer surfaces of the porous hollow carbon spheres. When evaluated as a cathode material for SIBs, the unique NVP/C porous hollow sphere cathode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 99.2 mA h g(-1) and retains 89.3 mA h g(-1) after 300 charge/discharge cycles with a very low degradation rate of 0.035% per cycle. For comparison, the NVP/C composite, prepared by the traditional sol-gel method, delivers a lower initial discharge capacity of 97.4 mA h g(-1) and decreases significantly to 71.5 mA h g(-1) after 300 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance of NVP/C porous hollow spheres is attributed to their unique porous, hollow and spherical structures, as well as the carbon-coating layer, which provides a high contact area between electrode/electrolyte, high electronic conductivity, and high mechanical strength.

  20. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-01-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g−1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g−1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones. PMID:27033088

  1. Applying Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion for Template-Free, Kilogram-Scale Production of SnO2 Hollow Nanospheres via Spray Drying System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Ju, Hyeon Seok; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-04-01

    A commercially applicable and simple process for the preparation of aggregation-free metal oxide hollow nanospheres is developed by applying nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion to a large-scale spray drying process. The precursor powders prepared by spray drying are transformed into homogeneous metal oxide hollow nanospheres through a simple post-treatment process. Aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres are selected as the first target material for lithium ion storage applications. Amorphous carbon microspheres with uniformly dispersed Sn metal nanopowder are prepared in the first step of the post-treatment process under a reducing atmosphere. The post-treatment of the Sn-C composite powder at 500 °C under an air atmosphere produces carbon- and aggregation-free SnO2 hollow nanospheres through nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion. The hollow and filled SnO2 nanopowders exhibit different cycling performances, with their discharge capacities after 300 cycles being 643 and 280 mA h g‑1, respectively, at a current density of 2 A g‑1. The SnO2 hollow nanospheres with high structural stability exhibit superior cycling and rate performances for lithium ion storage compared to the filled ones.

  2. Overview of the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report Process, results and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, N.; Shrestha, G.; Najjar, R.; Romero-Lankao, P.; Mayes, M. A.; Reed, S.; Birdsey, R.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Cavallaro, N.; Zhu, Z.; Shrestha, G.

    2016-12-01

    With official kick-off in public engagement and writing in the early Spring of 2016, the 2nd State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR-2) is now set to be completed and published by the U.S. Government as a Highly Influential Scientific (Interagency) Assessment, a product of the Sustained National Climate Assessment, in late 2017. This presentation will highlight the planning process, the achievements so far, public engagement needs and the scientific community's contribution in the production of SOCCR-2.

  3. Neurobehavioral Aspects of the Delayed Encephalopathy of Carbon Monoxide Intoxication: Case Report and Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Mendez

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the neurobehavioral aspects of the delayed encephalopathy of carbon monoxide (CO intoxication in a 29 year old woman and review the literature. Four weeks after CO poisoning, the patient developed a frontal lobe syndrome, visuoperceptual impairment, and diffuse white matter lesions with an otherwise normal neurological examination. In contrast, patients with the classical syndrome also have a parkinsonian state or an akinetic–mute state. The delayed encephalopathy of CO poisoning usually results from demyelination of subcortical white matter, necrosis of the globus pallidus, or both. The clinical aspects, risk factors, neurobiological features, and therapy and prognosis are discussed.

  4. Spray Modeling for Outwardly-Opening Hollow-Cone Injector

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2016-04-05

    The outwardly-opening piezoelectric injector is gaining popularity as a high efficient spray injector due to its precise control of the spray. However, few modeling studies have been reported on these promising injectors. Furthermore, traditional linear instability sheet atomization (LISA) model was originally developed for pressure swirl hollow-cone injectors with moderate spray angle and toroidal ligament breakups. Therefore, it is not appropriate for the outwardly-opening injectors having wide spray angles and string-like film structures. In this study, a new spray injection modeling was proposed for outwardly-opening hollow-cone injector. The injection velocities are computed from the given mass flow rate and injection pressure instead of ambiguous annular nozzle geometry. The modified Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor (KH-RT) breakup model is used with adjusted initial Sauter mean diameter (SMD) for modeling breakup of string-like structure. Spray injection was modeled using a Lagrangian discrete parcel method within the framework of commercial CFD software CONVERGE, and the new model was implemented through the user-defined functions. A Siemens outwardly-opening hollow-cone spray injector was characterized and validated with existing experimental data at the injection pressure of 100 bar. It was found that the collision modeling becomes important in the current injector because of dense spray near nozzle. The injection distribution model showed insignificant effects on spray due to small initial droplets. It was demonstrated that the new model can predict the liquid penetration length and local SMD with improved accuracy for the injector under study.

  5. Shape-controlled synthesis of nanocarbons through direct conversion of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiong; Sun, Xianzhong; Ma, Yanwei

    2013-12-18

    Morphology control of carbon-based nanomaterials (nanocarbons) is critical to practical applications because their physical and chemical properties are highly shape-dependent. The discovery of novel shaped nanocarbons stimulates new development in carbon science and technology. Based on direct reaction of CO2 with Mg metal, we achieved controlled synthesis of several different types of nanocarbons including mesoporous graphene, carbon nanotubes, and hollow carbon nanoboxes. The last one, to our knowledge, has not been previously reported to this date. The method described here allows effective control of the shape and dimensions of nanocarbons through manipulation of reaction temperature. The formation mechanism of nanocarbons is proposed. As a proof of concept, the synthesized nanocarbons are used for electrodes in symmetrical supercapacitors, which exhibit high capacitance and good cycling stability. The reported protocols are instructive to production of nanocarbons with controlled shape and dimensions which are much desirable for many practical applications.

  6. Ethylene glycol assisted spray pyrolysis for the synthesis of hollow BaFe12O19 spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Park, J; Hong, YK; Lane, AM

    2015-04-01

    Hollow spherical BaFe12O19 particles were synthesized by spray pyrolysis from a solution containing ethylene glycol (EG) and precursors at 1000 degrees C. The effects of EG concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and magnetic properties were investigated. The hollow spherical particles were found to consist of primary particles, and higher EG concentration led to a bigger primary particle size. EG concentration did not show much effect on the hollow particle size. Better crystallinity and higher magnetic coercivity were obtained with higher EG concentration, which is attributed to further crystallization with the heat produced from EG combustion. Saturation magnetization (emu/g) decreased with increasing EG concentration due to residual carbon from EG incomplete combustion, contributing as a non-magnetic phase to the particles. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized Torlon®-silica hollow fiber sorbents for post-combustion CO2 capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials functionalized with amine-containing reagents are emerging as an important class of materials for capturing carbon dioxide from flue gas. Polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents are fabricated through the proven dry-jet/wet-quench spinning process. In our study, a new technique for functionalizing polymeric silica hollow fiber sorbents with poly(ethyleneimine), followed by a post-spinning infusion step was studied. This two step process introduces a sufficient amount of poly(ethyleneimine) to the polymeric silica hybrid material support to improve the CO2 sorption capacity due to the added amine groups. The poly(ethyleneimine) infused and functionalized hollow fiber sorbents are also characterized by a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) to assess their CO2 sorption capacities. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Template engaged synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guozhu; Rosei, Federico; Ma, Dongling

    2015-03-01

    Hollow ceria-based composites, which consist of noble metal nanoparticles or metal oxides as a secondary component, are being studied extensively for potential applications in heterogeneous catalysis. This is due to their unique features, which exhibit the advantages of a hollow structure (e.g. high surface area and low weight), and also integrate the properties of ceria and noble metals/metal oxides. More importantly, the synergistic effect between constituents in hollow ceria-based composites has been demonstrated in various catalytic reactions. In this feature article, we summarize the state-of-the-art in the synthesis of hollow ceria-based composites, including traditional hard-templates and more recently, sacrificial-template engaged strategies, highlighting the key role of selected templates in the formation of hollow composites. In addition, the catalytic applications of hollow ceria-based composites are briefly surveyed. Finally, challenges and perspectives on future advances of hollow ceria-based composites are outlined.

  9. Hollow-atom probing of surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limburg, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanisms governing the formation and decay of hollow atoms in front of (semi) conducting and insulating surfaces. First, the primary neutralization of the highly charged ions is treated in terms of the classical overbarrier model. Different views are presented. Then the mo

  10. Galvanic Synthesis of Hollow Gold Nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    pulses in the NIR.2 The advantage of hollow nanoshells over solid gold (Au) or silver (Ag) nanoparticles , or alloys thereof,3 is that the...Karna SP. Synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles and characterization of structural, optical, and electronic properties. Aberdeen Proving Ground...

  11. Formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the formation of defect-free 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber membranes. 6FDA-polyimides are of great interest for advanced gas separation membranes, and 6FDA-DAM polyimide is a representative polymer in this family with attractive dense film properties for several potential applications. The work reported here for the 6FDA-DAM polyimide provides insight for the challenging fabrication of defect-free asymmetric hollow fiber membranes for this class of 6FDA-polyimides, which behave rather different from lower free volume polymers. Specifically, the 6FDA based materials show relatively slow phase separation rate in water quench baths, which presents a challenge for fiber spinning. For convenience, we refer to the behavior as more "non-solvent resistant" in comparison to other lower free volume polymers, since the binodal phase boundary is displaced further from the conventional position near the pure polymer-solvent axis on a ternary phase diagram in conventional polymers like Matrimid® and Ultem®. The addition of lithium nitrate to promote phase separation has a useful impact on 6FDA-DAM asymmetric hollow fiber formation. 6FDA-DAM phase diagrams using ethanol and water as non-solvent are reported, and it was found that water is less desirable as a non-solvent dope additive for defect-free fiber spinning. Phase diagrams are also reported for 6FDA-DAM dope formulation with and without the addition of lithium nitrate, and defect-free asymmetric hollow fiber membranes are reported for both cases. The effect of polymer molecular weight on defect-free fiber spinning was also investigated. Gas transport properties and morphology of hollow fibers were characterized. With several thorough case studies, this work provides a systematic guideline for defect-free fiber formation from 6FDA-polymers. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property.

  13. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO

  14. Synthesis of Br-doped TiO2 hollow spheres with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhu, Shengli; Liang, Yanqin; Cui, Zhenduo; Yang, Xianjin; Liang, Chunyong; Inoue, Akihisa

    2017-02-01

    The Br-doped hollow TiO2 photocatalysts were prepared by a simple hydrothermal process on the carbon sphere template following with calcination at 400 °C. The structure and properties of photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscopy, N2 desorption-adsorption, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The TiO2 hollow spheres are in diameter of 500 nm with shell thickness of 50 nm. The shell is composed of small anatase nanoparticles with size of about 10 nm. The TiO2 hollow spheres exhibit high crystalline and high surface area of 89.208 m2/g. With increasing content of Br doping, the band gap of TiO2 hollow spheres decreased from 2.85 to 1.75 eV. The formation of impurity band in the band gap would narrow the band gap and result in the red shift of absorption edge from 395 to 517 nm, which further enhances the photocatalytic activity. The appropriate Br doping improves the photocatlytic activity significantly. The TiO2 hollow spheres with 1.55% Br doping (0.5Br-TiO2) exhibit the highest photocatalytic activity under full light. More than 98% of RhB, MO, and MB can be photodegraded using 0.5Br-TiO2 with concentration of 10 mg/L in 40, 30, and 30 min, respectively. The degradation rate of Br-doped photocatalysts was 40% faster than undoped ones.

  15. Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Resulting in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Chao Hsu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute carbon monoxide (CO poisoning with cardiac complications is well documented in the literature. However, ST segment elevation is a rare presentation, and most of these cases with ST elevation have revealed non-occlusive or normal coronary arteries. We report a case of CO poisoning complicated with ST elevation myocardial infarction. Emergency coronary angiography revealed total occlusion of the left anterior descending artery and primary percutaneous coronary intervention was performed. This report of a rare case should remind physicians that cardiovascular investigations, including electrocardiography, must be performed in cases with CO poisoning because mortality might increase if reperfusion therapy or appropriate medical treatments are not performed in patients with acute coronary artery occlusion.

  16. Carbon nano-strings as reporters in lateral flow devices for DNA sensing by hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalogianni, Despina P; Boutsika, Lemonia M; Kouremenou, Panagiota G; Christopoulos, Theodore K; Ioannou, Penelope C

    2011-05-01

    Presently, there is a growing interest in the development of lateral flow devices for nucleic acid analysis that enable visual detection of the target sequence (analyte) while eliminating several steps required for pipetting, incubation, and washing out the excess of reactants. In this paper, we present, for the first time, lateral flow tests exploiting oligonucleotide-functionalized and antibody-functionalized carbon nanoparticles (carbon nano-strings, CBNS) as reporters that enable confirmation of the target DNA sequence by hybridization. The CBNS reporters were applied to (a) the detection of PCR products and (b) visual genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms in human genomic DNA. Biotinylated PCR product was hybridized with a dA-tailed probe. In one assay configuration, the hybrid is captured at the test zone of the strip by immobilized streptavidin and detected by (dT)(30)-CBNS. In a second configuration, the hybrids are captured from immobilized (dA) strands and detected by antibiotin-CBNS. As low as 2.5 fmol of amplified DNA can be detected. For visual genotyping, allele-specific primers with a 5' oligo(dA) segment are extended by DNA polymerase with a concomitant incorporation of biotin moieties. Extension products are detected either by (dT)(30)-CBNS or by antibiotin-CBNS. Only three cycles of extension reaction are sufficient for detection. No purification of the PCR products or the extension product is required.

  17. Improving carbon monitoring and reporting in forests using spatially-explicit information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvenue, Céline; Smiley, Byron P; White, Joanne C; Kurz, Werner A; Wulder, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Understanding and quantifying carbon (C) exchanges between the biosphere and the atmosphere-specifically the process of C removal from the atmosphere, and how this process is changing-is the basis for developing appropriate adaptation and mitigation strategies for climate change. Monitoring forest systems and reporting on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and removals are now required components of international efforts aimed at mitigating rising atmospheric GHG. Spatially-explicit information about forests can improve the estimates of GHG emissions and removals. However, at present, remotely-sensed information on forest change is not commonly integrated into GHG reporting systems. New, detailed (30-m spatial resolution) forest change products derived from satellite time series informing on location, magnitude, and type of change, at an annual time step, have recently become available. Here we estimate the forest GHG balance using these new Landsat-based change data, a spatial forest inventory, and develop yield curves as inputs to the Carbon Budget Model of the Canadian Forest Sector (CBM-CFS3) to estimate GHG emissions and removals at a 30 m resolution for a 13 Mha pilot area in Saskatchewan, Canada. Our results depict the forests as cumulative C sink (17.98 Tg C or 0.64 Tg C year(-1)) between 1984 and 2012 with an average C density of 206.5 (±0.6) Mg C ha(-1). Comparisons between our estimates and estimates from Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System (NFCMARS) were possible only on a subset of our study area. In our simulations the area was a C sink, while the official reporting simulations, it was a C source. Forest area and overall C stock estimates also differ between the two simulated estimates. Both estimates have similar uncertainties, but the spatially-explicit results we present here better quantify the potential improvement brought on by spatially-explicit modelling. We discuss the source of the differences

  18. Electromagnetic Wave Interactions with 2D Arrays of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha A. Elwi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report, for the first time, the scattering, absorption, and reflection characteristics of 2D arrays of finite-length, armchair, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs in the visible frequency regime. The analysis is based on the Finite-Element-Method formulation of Maxwell's equations and a 3D quantum electrical conductivity function. Three geometrical models have been considered: solid cylinder, hollow cylinder, and honeycomb. We demonstrate that classical electromagnetic theory is sufficient to evaluate the scattering and absorption cross sections of SWNTs, which revealed excellent agreement against measurements without the need to invoke the effective impedance boundary conditions. The solid and hollow cylindrical models fail to provide accurate results, when both scattering and absorption are considered. Finally, it is shown that reflection and transmission characteristics of both individual and arrays of SWNTs, which are essential for solar cell applications, are strongly influenced by the length and the phenomenological parameters of the SWNT.

  19. 75 FR 75059 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 230 / Wednesday, December 1... sequestration of carbon dioxide and all other facilities that conduct injection of carbon dioxide. This rule... may determine''). These regulations will affect owners or operators of carbon dioxide (CO 2...

  20. Hollow ZIF-8 Nanoworms from Block Copolymer Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haizhou; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Neelakanda, Pradeep; Deng, Lin; Khashab, Niveen M.; Nunes, Suzana P.; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2015-10-01

    Recently two quite different types of “nano-containers” have been recognized as attractive potential drug carriers; these are wormlike filamenteous micelles (“filomicelles”) on the one hand and metal organic frameworks on the other hand. In this work we combine these two concepts. We report for the first time the manufacturing of metal organic framework nanotubes with a hollow core. These worm-like tubes are about 200 nm thick and several μm long. The preparation is simple: we first produce long and flexible filament-shaped micelles by block copolymer self-assembly. These filomicelles serve as templates to grow a very thin layer of interconnected ZIF-8 crystals on their surface. Finally the block copolymer is removed by solvent extraction and the hollow ZIF-8 nanotubes remain. These ZIF-NTs are surprisingly stable and withstand purification by centrifugation. The synthesis method is straightforward and can easily be applied for other metal organic framework materials. The ZIF-8 NTs exhibit high loading capacity for the model anti cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with a pH-triggered release. Hence, a prolonged circulation in the blood stream and a targeted drug release behavior can be expected.

  1. Hollow ZIF-8 Nanoworms from Block Copolymer Templates

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Haizhou

    2015-10-16

    Recently two quite different types of “nano-containers” have been recognized as attractive potential drug carriers; these are wormlike filamenteous micelles (“filomicelles”) on the one hand and metal organic frameworks on the other hand. In this work we combine these two concepts. We report for the first time the manufacturing of metal organic framework nanotubes with a hollow core. These worm-like tubes are about 200 nm thick and several μm long. The preparation is simple: we first produce long and flexible filament-shaped micelles by block copolymer self-assembly. These filomicelles serve as templates to grow a very thin layer of interconnected ZIF-8 crystals on their surface. Finally the block copolymer is removed by solvent extraction and the hollow ZIF-8 nanotubes remain. These ZIF-NTs are surprisingly stable and withstand purification by centrifugation. The synthesis method is straightforward and can easily be applied for other metal organic framework materials. The ZIF-8 NTs exhibit high loading capacity for the model anti cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with a pH-triggered release. Hence, a prolonged circulation in the blood stream and a targeted drug release behavior can be expected.

  2. Integrated hollow fiber membranes for gas delivery into optical waveguide based photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Syed Saad; Gumus, Abdurrahman; Jain, Aadhar; Angenent, Largus T; Erickson, David

    2015-09-01

    Compact algal reactors are presented with: (1) closely stacked layers of waveguides to decrease light-path to enable larger optimal light-zones; (2) waveguides containing scatterers to uniformly distribute light; and (3) hollow fiber membranes to reduce energy required for gas transfer. The reactors are optimized by characterizing the aeration of different gases through hollow fiber membranes and characterizing light intensities at different culture densities. Close to 65% improvement in plateau peak productivities was achieved under low light-intensity growth experiments while maintaining 90% average/peak productivity output during 7-h light cycles. With associated mixing costs of ∼ 1 mW/L, several magnitudes smaller than closed photobioreactors, a twofold increase is realized in growth ramp rates with carbonated gas streams under high light intensities, and close to 20% output improvement across light intensities in reactors loaded with high density cultures.

  3. Effects of CO 2 on a High Performance Hollow-Fiber Membrane for Natural Gas Purification

    KAUST Repository

    Omole, Imona C.

    2010-05-19

    A 6FDA-based, cross-linkable polyimide was characterized in the form of a defect-free asymmetric hollow-fiber membrane. The novel membrane was cross-linked at various temperatures and tested for natural gas purification in the presence of high CO2 partial pressures. The cross-linked membrane material shows high intrinsic separation performance for CO2 and CH4 (selectivity ∼49, CO2 permeability ∼161 barrer, with a feed at 65 psia, 35 °C, and 10% CO2). Cross-linked asymmetric hollow-fiber membranes made from the material show good resistance to CO2-induced plasticization. Carbon dioxide partial pressures as high as ∼400 psia were employed, and the membrane was shown to be promisingly stable under these aggressive conditions. The performance of the membrane was also analyzed using the dual-mode sorption/transport model. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  4. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  5. Characteristics of Left-Right Spiral Hollow Cylindrical Roller

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liming Lu; Qiping Chen; Yujiang Qin

    2015-01-01

    Based on new rolling⁃sliding compound bearings, the wear between the one⁃way spiral hollow cylindrical roller and the ribs of the inner and outer ring of rolling⁃sliding compound bearings is reduced by innovational structural design. A new left⁃right spiral hollow cylindrical roller is proposed to replace the one⁃way spiral hollow cylindrical roller. The finite element analysis models of ordinary cylindrical rollers, one⁃way spiral hollow cylindrical rollers and left⁃right spiral hollow cylindrical rollers are respectively established by ABAQUS. The axial displacement of their center mass and the stress distribution of left⁃right spiral hollow cylindrical rollers are compared and analyzed. Theoretical study results show that this new left⁃right spiral hollow cylindrical roller not only inherits the advantages of one⁃way spiral hollow cylindrical rollers, but also avoids the axial offset and the serious wear of the one⁃way spiral hollow cylindrical roller. And the theory research conclusion is verified by the experiment. The left⁃right spiral hollow cylindrical roller has the advantages to overcome boundary stress concentration like logarithmic convex roller. The rolling⁃sliding compound bearings equipped with the new rollers can be better to adapt to the impact of vibration load.

  6. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  7. Catalytically Active Bimetallic Nanoparticles Supported on Porous Carbon Capsules Derived From Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Bradley, Siobhan J; Chan, Andrew; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Nann, Thomas; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2016-09-14

    We report a new methodology for producing monometallic or bimetallic nanoparticles confined within hollow nitrogen-doped porous carbon capsules. The capsules are derived from metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals that are coated with a shell of a secondary material comprising either a metal-tannic acid coordination polymer or a resorcinol-formaldehyde polymer. Platinum nanoparticles are optionally sandwiched between the MOF core and the shell. Pyrolysis of the MOF-shell composites produces hollow capsules of porous nitrogen-doped carbon that bear either monometallic (Pt, Co, and Ni) or alloyed (PtCo and PtNi) metal nanoparticles. The Co and Ni components of the bimetallic nanoparticles are derived from the shell surrounding the MOF crystals. The hollow capsules prevent sintering and detachment of the nanoparticles, and their porous walls allow for efficient mass transport. Alloyed PtCo nanoparticles embedded in the capsule walls are highly active, selective, and recyclable catalysts for the hydrogenation of nitroarenes to anilines.

  8. Apparatus for producing carbon-coated nanoparticles and carbon nanospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C.; Phillips, Jonathan

    2015-10-20

    An apparatus for producing carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising a container for entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing an inlet for carbon-containing gas, providing an inlet for plasma gas, a proximate torch for mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and providing a collection device for gathering the resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for making hollow carbon nano- or micro-scale spheres.

  9. Chemical template-assisted synthesis of monodisperse rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres as drug carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Ruan, Weimin; Zou, Bingfang; Liu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yongqiang

    2017-08-01

    A chemical template strategy was put forward to synthesize monodisperse rattle-type magnetic carbon (Fe3O4@C) hollow microspheres. During the synthesis procedure, monodisperse Fe2O3 microspheres were used as chemical template, which released Fe(3+) ions in acidic solution and initiated the in-situ polymerization of pyrrole into polypyrrole (PPy) shell. With the continual acidic etching of Fe2O3 microspheres, rattle-type Fe2O3@PPy microspheres were generated with the cavity appearing between the PPy shell and left Fe2O3 core, which were then transformed into Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres through calcination in nitrogen atmosphere. Compared with traditional physical template, the shell and cavity of rattle-type hollow microspheres were generated in one step using the chemical template method, which obviously saved the complex procedures including the coating and removal of middle shells. The experimental results exhibited that the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres with different parameters could be regulated through controlled synthesis of the intermediate Fe2O3@PPy product. Moreover, when the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres were investigated as drug carrier, they manifested sustained-release behaviour of doxorubicin, justifying their promising applications as carriers in drug delivery. The aim of the present study was first to synthesize rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres through a simple synthesis method as a drug carrier. Here a chemical template synthesis of rattle-type hollow microspheres was developed, which saved the complex procedures including the coating and removal of middle shells in traditional physical template. Second, all the influence factors in the reaction processes were systematically investigated to obtain rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres with controlled parameters. Third, the rattle-type Fe3O4@C hollow microspheres were studied as drug carriers and the influences of their structural parameters on drug loading and

  10. Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Marcus A; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Rebecca H; Kumbhar, Amar S; Naskar, Amit K

    2012-05-08

    Carbon fibers having unique morphologies, from hollow circular to gear-shaped, are produced from a novel melt-processable precursor and method. The resulting carbon fiber exhibits microstructural and topological properties that are dependent on processing conditions, rendering them highly amenable to myriad applications.

  11. A Carbon Nanotube Reporter of miRNA Hybridization Events In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jackson D.; Jena, Prakrit V.; Baker, Hanan A.; Zerze, Gül H.; Williams, Ryan M.; Galassi, Thomas V.; Roxbury, Daniel; Mittal, Jeetain

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs and other small oligonucleotides in biofluids are promising disease biomarkers, yet conventional assays require complex processing steps that are unsuitable for point-of-care testing or for implantable or wearable sensors. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are an ideal material for implantable sensors, owing to their emission in the near-infrared spectral region, photostability and exquisite sensitivity. Here, we report an engineered carbon-nanotube-based sensor capable of real-time optical quantification of hybridization events of microRNA and other oligonucleotides. The mechanism of the sensor arises from competitive effects between displacement of both oligonucleotide charge groups and water from the nanotube surface, which result in a solvatochromism-like response. The sensor, which allows for detection via single-molecule sensor elements and for multiplexing by using multiple nanotube chiralities, can monitor toehold-based strand-displacement events, which reverse the sensor response and regenerate the sensor complex. We also show that the sensor functions in whole urine and serum, and can non-invasively measure DNA and microRNA after implantation in live mice. PMID:28845337

  12. Fabrication, testing, and analysis of anisotropic carbon/glass hybrid composites: volume 1: technical report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Kyle K. (Wetzel Engineering, Inc. Lawrence, Kansas); Hermann, Thomas M. (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas); Locke, James (Wichita state University, Wichita, Kansas)

    2005-11-01

    o} from the long axis for approximately two-thirds of the laminate volume (discounting skin layers), with reinforcing carbon fibers oriented axially comprising the remaining one-third of the volume. Finite element analysis of each laminate has been performed to examine first ply failure. Three failure criteria--maximum stress, maximum strain, and Tsai-Wu--have been compared. Failure predicted by all three criteria proves generally conservative, with the stress-based criteria the most conservative. For laminates that respond nonlinearly to loading, large error is observed in the prediction of failure using maximum strain as the criterion. This report documents the methods and results in two volumes. Volume 1 contains descriptions of the laminates, their fabrication and testing, the methods of analysis, the results, and the conclusions and recommendations. Volume 2 contains a comprehensive summary of the individual test results for all laminates.

  13. Experimental evaluation of a hollow glass fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, A; Croitoru, N

    1986-02-01

    Very high interest in making a low-loss fiber for the infrared has been stimulated by important applications in optical communication, surgery, cutting, welding, and heat treatment. The leaky waveguide is one of the most promising types of future fiber in the infrared region where low-loss materials are not available or not suitable for making fibers (i.e., CO2 laser light lambda = 10.6 microm). In this paper a comparative model of a He-Ne laser beam and an oxide glass leaky hollow fiber for a CO2 laser light beam and a chalcogenide glass leaky hollow fiber are studied. Measurements of attenuation, dependence of output power on diameter and angle, and the angular dependence of output angle vs input angle were made. The experimental data were compared with theoretical calculations, and the critical value of the wall thickness for minimum attenuation is given.

  14. Space Charge Mitigation by Hollow Bunches

    CERN Multimedia

    Oeftiger, AO

    2014-01-01

    To satisfy the requirements of the HL-LHC (High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider), the LHC injector chain will need to supply a higher brightness, i.e. deliver the same transverse beam emittances \\epsilon_{x,y} while providing a higher intensity N. However, a larger number of particles per bunch enhances space charge effects. One approach to mitigate the impact of space charge is to change the longitudinal phase space distribution: hollow bunches feature a depleted bunch centre and a densely populated periphery. Thus, the spatial line density maximum is depressed which ultimately decreases the tune spread imposed by space charge. Therefore, a higher intensity can be accepted while keeping the same overall space charge tune shift. 3 different methods to create hollow bunches in the PSBooster are simulated.

  15. Surface functionalized hollow silica particles and composites

    KAUST Repository

    Rodionov, Valentin

    2017-05-26

    Composition comprising hollow spherical silica particles having outside particle walls and inside particle walls, wherein the particles have an average particle size of about 10 nm to about 500 nm and an average wall thickness of about 10 nm to about 50 nm; and wherein the particles are functionalized with at least one organic functional group on the outside particle wall, on the inside particle wall, or on both the outside and inside particle walls, wherein the organic functional group is in a reacted or unreacted form. The organic functional group can be epoxy. The particles can be mixed with polymer precursor or a polymer material such as epoxy to form a prepreg or a nanocomposite. Lightweight but strong materials can be formed. Low loadings of hollow particles can be used.

  16. Characterizing the elasticity of hollow metal nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Changjiang; Park, Harold S [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2007-03-21

    We have performed atomistic simulations on solid and hollow copper nanowires to quantify the elastic properties of hollow nanowires (nanoboxes). We analyse variations in the modulus, yield stress and strain for <100> and <110> nanoboxes by varying the amount of bulk material that is removed to create the nanoboxes. We find that, while <100> nanoboxes show no improvement in elastic properties as compared to solid <100>nanowires, <110> nanoboxes can show enhanced elastic properties as compared to solid <110> nanowires. The simulations reveal that the elastic properties of the nanoboxes are strongly dependent on the relative strength of the bulk material that has been removed, as well as the total surface area of the nanoboxes, and indicate the potential of ultralight, high-strength nanomaterials such as nanoboxes.

  17. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  18. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  19. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  20. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Winton, Shea

    2010-12-31

    the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  1. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal Final Report - Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce; Shea, Winton

    2010-12-31

    addition to the research, technology transfer/outreach was a large component of CPCPC's activities. Efficient technology transfer was critical for the deployment of new technologies into the field. CPCPC organized and hosted technology transfer meetings, tours, and tutorials, attended outreach conferences and workshops to represent CPCPC and attract new members, prepared and distributed reports and publications, and developed and maintained a Web site. The second contract ended December 31, 2010, and it is apparent that CPCPC positively impacted the carbon industry and coal research. Statistics and information were compiled to provide a comprehensive account of the impact the consortium had and the beneficial outcomes of many of the individual projects. Project fact sheet, success stories, and other project information were prepared. Two topical reports, a Synthesis report and a Web report, were prepared detailing this information.

  2. Delayed Encephalopathy of Carbon Monoxide Intoxication and Treatment with Hyperbaric Oxygen: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Polat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Delayed encephalopathy (DE is a neuropsychiatric syndrome that can arise generally within 20 days of acute carbon monoxide (CO intoxication after apparent recovery and involves variable degrees of cognitive deficits, personality changes, movement disorders and focal neurologic deficits. We report a 35-year-old female patient with delayed encephalopathy due to CO intoxication, presenting with cognitive impairment and mild parkinsonism despite receiving hyberbaric oxigen therapy (HBO. Magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormal signal intensity and decreased diffusivity at both caudate nuclei and globus pallidus. She continued to receive additional HBO therapy and complete recovery was reached within six months. The positive effect of early HBO therapy of selected patients in reversing the acute effects of CO intoxication is appearant. We here also review the beneficial effect of HBO in preventing or limitating the late neurocognitive deficits associated with severe CO intoxication.

  3. Hollow Sucker Rod Applied in Production Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Tongbin; Liu Liandong; Hu Daoming; Jia Yanshan

    1997-01-01

    @@ Working Principle A positive cycle system or a working channel can be formed by means of hollow sucker rod and its mating parts in the oil tube ofa well, through which heat carriers (such as hot water,hot oil and steam), chemicals and heating cable can be pumped or put into the well so as to lower the viscosity of crude, dissolve the paraffin building-up and open the conduit, thus leading to the smooth oil flow out of well.

  4. Hollow Cone Spray Characterization and Integral Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Bollweg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The thesis presents a computationally efficient spray model for hollow cone sprays suitable for engine system simulation of direct injecting gasoline internal combustion engines. The model describes the transient evolution of the spray as a two-phase jet. Spatial gradients are resolved along the main injection direction. Momentum exchange, droplet heat-up, and fuel evaporation are accounted for. Diffusive transport of momentum, energy, and fuel species mass between the dense spray zone an...

  5. Chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiryaev, Vladimir S.

    2015-03-01

    The recent developments on chalcogenide glass hollow core microstructured optical fibers (HC-MOFs) are presented. The comparative analysis of simulated optical properties for chalcogenide HC-MOFs of negative-curvature with different size and number of capillaries is given. The technique for the manufacture of microstructured chalcogenide preforms, which includes the assembly of the substrate glass tube and 8-10 capillaries, is described. Further trends to improve the optical transmission in chalcogenide NCHCFs are considered.

  6. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  7. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power

  8. Sacrificial Silver Nanoparticles: Reducing GeI2 To Form Hollow Germanium Nanoparticles by Electroless Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Bradley M; Chan, Eric K; Zhang, Xinming; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; van Benthem, Klaus; Kauzlarich, Susan M

    2016-05-24

    Herein we report the electroless deposition of Ge onto sacrificial Ag nanoparticle (NP) templates to form hollow Ge NPs. The formation of AgI is a necessary component for this reaction. Through a systematic study of surface passivating ligands, we determined that tri-n-octylphosphine is necessary to facilitate the formation of hollow Ge NPs by acting as a transport agent for GeI2 and the oxidized Ag(+) cation (i.e., AgI product). Annular dark-field (ADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging of incomplete reactions revealed Ag/Ge core/shell NPs; in contrast, completed reactions displayed hollow Ge NPs with pinholes which is consistent with the known method for dissolution of the nanotemplate. Characterization of the hollow Ge NPs was performed by transmission electron microscopy, ADF-STEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The galvanic replacement reaction of Ag with GeI2 offers a versatile method for controlling the structure of Ge nanomaterials.

  9. Generation of high energy, 30 fs pulses at 527 nm by hollow-fiber compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J; Altucci, C; Amoruso, S; Bruzzese, R; Velotta, R; Wang, X

    2008-03-17

    The compression of 300-fs-long, chirp-free laser pulses at 527 nm down to 30 fs is reported. The laser pulses, originated from a frequency-doubled, mode-locked Nd:glass laser, were compressed by a 0.7-m-long, 150-microm-bore-diameter, argon-filled hollow fiber, and a pair of SF10 prisms with a final energy of 160 microJ. These are the shortest, high energy pulses ever produced by direct pulse compression at the central wavelength of 527 nm. The spectral broadening of the pulses propagating inside the hollow fiber was experimentally examined for various filling-gas pressures and input pulse energies. The spectral width of the pulses was broadened up to 25 nm, and 27 nm for argon- and krypton-filled hollow fiber, respectively, at a gas pressure lower than 2 bar. The physical limitations of the hollow-fiber pulse compression technique applied in the visible range are also studied.

  10. Hollow fiber membranes with different external corrugated surfaces for desalination by membrane distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Fernández, Loreto; García-Payo, Carmen; Khayet, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) hollow fiber membranes were prepared using the phase inversion spinning technique under a wet gap mode. Different corrugated outer surfaces were obtained by means of a micro-engineered spinneret, spraying the external coagulant on the nascent fiber along gap, and different spinning parameters, namely, the gap distance and the external coagulant flow rate. A quantitative evaluation of the corrugation size and shape was carried out by electron scanning microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The effect of the corrugation size and shape on the direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) performance has been studied. The corrugated outer surface acted as micro-turbulence promoters mitigating the temperature polarization effect and enhanced the external effective surface area for condensation. Both factors improved the DCMD permeability of the hollow fiber membranes. However, corrugations with V-shaped valleys depths greater than about 30 μm did not always improve the DCMD permeate flux. It was found that the membrane prepared with the spray wetting mode exhibited the best desalination performance. The salt rejection factor of all prepared hollow fiber membranes was greater than 99.9% and the highest DCMD permeate flux of this study was greater than those reported so far for the PVDF-HFP hollow fiber membranes.

  11. Individual hollow and mesoporous aero-graphitic microtube based devices for gas sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupan, Oleg; Postica, Vasile; Marx, Janik; Mecklenburg, Matthias; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Schulte, Karl; Fiedler, Bodo; Adelung, Rainer

    2017-06-01

    In this work, individual hollow and mesoporous graphitic microtubes were integrated into electronic devices using a FIB/SEM system and were investigated as gas and vapor sensors by applying different bias voltages (in the range of 10 mV-1 V). By increasing the bias voltage, a slight current enhancement is observed, which is mainly attributed to the self-heating effect. A different behavior of ammonia NH3 vapor sensing by increasing the applied bias voltage for hollow and mesoporous microtubes with diameters down to 300 nm is reported. In the case of the hollow microtube, an increase in the response was observed, while a reverse effect has been noticed for the mesoporous microtube. It might be explained on the basis of the higher specific surface area (SSA) of the mesoporous microtube compared to the hollow one. Thus, at room temperature when the surface chemical reaction rate (k) prevails on the gas diffusion rate (DK) the structures with a larger SSA possess a higher response. By increasing the bias voltage, i.e., the overall temperature of the structure, DK becomes a limiting step in the gas response. Therefore, at higher bias voltages the larger pores will facilitate an enhanced gas diffusion, i.e., a higher gas response. The present study demonstrates the importance of the material porosity towards gas sensing applications.

  12. Single-crystalline titanium dioxide hollow tetragonal nanocones with large exposed (101) facets for excellent photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengcui; Xue, Yejing; Zou, Zexian; Wang, Xia; Gao, Feng

    2017-03-15

    Crystal facet engineering and surface modification of semiconductor have become important strategies to improve photocatalytic activity by optimizing surface charge carrier separation/transfer and extending solar spectrum utilization. In this work, we report anatase single-crystalline TiO2 hollow tetragonal nanocones with large exposed (101) facets by a facile liquid-phase interfacial synthetic strategy, using the hydrolysis of tetrabutyltitanate with adscititious water in the organic solvent of cyclohexane and a capping agent of 1, 6-hexanediamine. The specific surface area of these TiO2 hollow tetragonal nanocones is as high as 331.3m(2)/g. Thanks to large exposed (101) facets and high surface area, these TiO2 hollow tetragonal nanocones exhibited excellent full-arc photocatalytic activities for the degradation of organic pollutants. Remarkably, the butoxy group could be modified onto TiO2 hollow tetragonal nanocones through post-synthesis treatment in tetrabutyltitanate glycol solution, which brought about eximious visible light photocatalytic activities for the degradation of colored dyes of RhB and MO, especially for RhB, by virtue of much improved electron trapping ability of the Ti-O group from the excited dye due to the strong electronegativity of the oxygen atom in the butoxy group. This work advances us to rationally tailor the atomic and electronic structure of the photocatalyst for outstanding photocatalytic properties in various environmental and energy-related applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

    2009-01-07

    The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other

  14. Formation of hollow atoms above a surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Jean Pierre; Phaneuf, Ronald; Terracol, Stephane; Xie, Zuqi

    2012-06-01

    Slow highly stripped ions approaching or penetrating surfaces are known to capture electrons into outer shells of the ions, leaving the innermost shells empty, and forming hollow atoms. Electron capture occurs above and below the surfaces. The existence of hollow atoms below surfaces e.g. Ar atoms whose K and L shells are empty, with all electrons lying in the M and N shells, was demonstrated in 1990 [1]. At nm above surfaces, the excited ions may not have enough time to decay before hitting the surfaces, and the formation of hollow atoms above surfaces has even been questioned [2]. To observe it, one must increase the time above the surface by decelerating the ions. We have for the first time decelerated O^7+ ions to energies as low as 1 eV/q, below the minimum energy gained by the ions due to the acceleration by their image charge. As expected, no ion backscattering (trampoline effect) above dielectric (Ge) was observed and at the lowest ion kinetic energies, most of the observed x-rays were found to be emitted by the ions after surface contact. [4pt] [1] J. P. Briand et al., Phys.Rev.Lett. 65(1990)159.[0pt] [2] J.P. Briand, AIP Conference Proceedings 215 (1990) 513.

  15. Efficient solar light harvesting CdS/Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} hollow cubes for Z-scheme photocatalytic water splitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Bocheng; Zhu, Qiaohong; Du, Mengmeng; Fan, Linggang; Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong [Key Lab. for Advanced Materials and Inst. of Fine Chemicals, School of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-03-01

    Hollow structures with an efficient light harvesting and tunable interior component offer great advantages for constructing a Z-scheme system. Controlled design of hollow cobalt sulfide (Co{sub 9}S{sub 8}) cubes embedded with cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) is described, using hollow Co(OH){sub 2} as the template and a one-pot hydrothermal strategy. The hollow CdS/Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} cubes utilize multiple reflections of light in the cubic structure to achieve enhanced photocatalytic activity. Importantly, the photoexcited charge carriers can be effectively separated by the construction of a redox-mediator-free Z-scheme system. The hydrogen evolution rate over hollow CdS/Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} is 134 and 9.1 times higher than that of pure hollow Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} and CdS QDs under simulated solar light irradiation, respectively. Moreover, this is the first report describing construction of a hollow Co{sub 9}S{sub 8} based Z-scheme system for photocatalytic water splitting, which gives full play to the advantages of light-harvesting and charges separation. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Space Charge MitigationWith Longitudinally Hollow Bunches

    CERN Document Server

    Oeftiger, Adrian; Rumolo, Giovanni; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    Suitably, hollow longitudinal phase space distributions have a flat profile and hence reduce the impact of transverse space charge. Dipolar parametric excitation with the phase loop feedback systems provides such hollow distributions under reproducible conditions. We present a procedure to create hollow bunches during the acceleration ramp of CERN’s PS Booster machine with minimal changes to the operational cycle. The improvements during the injection plateau of the downstream Proton Synchrotron are assessed in comparison to standard parabolic bunches.

  17. Interference Assembly and Fretting Wear Analysis of Hollow Shaft

    OpenAIRE

    Chuanjun Han; Jie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Fretting damage phenomenon often appears in the interference fit assembly. The finite element model of hollow shaft and shaft sleeve was established, and the equivalent stress and contact stress were computed after interference assembly. The assembly body of hollow shaft and shaft sleeve was in whirling bending load, and the contact status (sticking, sliding, and opening) and the distribution of stress along one typical contact line were computed under different loads, interferences, hollow d...

  18. Preparation of Nanocrystalline MoS2 Hollow Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline MoS2 with hollow spherical morphology has been prepared by the hydrothermal method. The products are characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results give the evidence that the sample is consists of hollow spheres 400~600 nm in diameter, and there is much whisker on the surface of MoS2 hollow sphere.

  19. Generation of a Dark Hollow Beam inside a Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; LU Xuan-Hui; CHEN Xu-Min; HE Sai-Ling

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new method is introduced to generate a hollow beam inside a cavity. Using a matrix eigenvalue method, the laser resonator with optical diffraction elements is theoretically analysed and simulated. The hollow beam can be obtained theoretically by controlling the parameters of the diffraction functions. After designed the diffraction components in the cavity, a hollow beam of good quality is realized experimentally using a YAG solid state laser.

  20. Optical properties of hollow calcium aluminate glass waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, T; Harrington, J A; Foy, P R

    1994-06-20

    Calcium aluminate glass has a refractive index less than 1 at 10.6 µ, and therefore it is a good candidate for a hollow fiber for the transmission of CO(2) laser energy. We have drawn hollow calcium aluminate glass fibers with inner diameters ranging from 380 to 500 µ. The loss for our 500-µm inner-diameter hollow glass fibers measured at 10.6 µm is 8.6 dB/m.

  1. Review of Synthetic Methods to Form Hollow Polymer Nanocapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Madeline T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-03-13

    Syntactic foams have grown in interest due to the widened range of applications because of their mechanical strength and high damage tolerance. In the past, hollow glass or ceramic particles were used to create the pores. This paper reviews literature focused on the controlled synthesis of hollow polymer spheres with diameters ranging from 100 –200 nm. By using hollow polymer spheres, syntactic foams could reach ultra-low densities.

  2. Silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes like diatomaceous earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masahiro; Shiokawa, Kumi; Sakakura, Ikuko; Nakahara, Yoshiko

    2006-12-01

    Artificial synthesis of hollow cell walls of diatoms is an ultimate target of nanomaterial science. The addition of some water-soluble polymers such as sodium polymethacrylate to a solution of water/oil/water emulsion system, which is an essential step of the simple synthetic procedure of silica hollow spheres (microcapsules), led to the formation of silica hollow spheres with nano-macroholes (>100 nm) in their shell walls, the morphologies of which are analogous to those of diatom earth.

  3. A facile one-pot hydrothermal method to prepare europium-doped titania hollow phosphors and their sensitized luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Xuan; Yang Ling; Zhang Nianchun [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, 601 Western Huangpu Road, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu Yingliang, E-mail: tliuyl@jnu.edu.c [Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanochemistry, Jinan University, 601 Western Huangpu Road, Guangzhou 510632 (China)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} The strongest emission intensity was observed with TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres and TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres calcining at 550 {sup o}C. Moreover, the strongest excitation of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres transferred from 400 to 500 {sup o}C and the effective nonradiative energy transfer from the TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres host matrix to Eu{sup 3+} ions crystal field states was realized due to changes of crystalline field in the environment around Eu{sup 3+} ions occupying Ti{sup 4+} sites. The proposed energy transfer mechanism was that UV light is absorbed in the band of TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres crystal and then the energy is relaxed to the defect states of TiO{sub 2} host. The energy can transfer to the crystal states of Eu{sup 3+} ions ({sup 7}F{sub j}, j = 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4), which results in efficient photoluminescence. The fluorescent intensity of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres was 2.2 times as strong as that of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} bulk material. - Abstract: Monodisperse europium-activated titania hollow phosphors had been synthesized by a facile one-pot hydrothermal method using carbon spheres as hard templates. Samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectrometer and photoluminescence spectrum. The strongest emission intensity was observed with TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres and TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres calcining at 550 {sup o}C. Moreover, the strongest excitation of TiO{sub 2}:Eu{sub 0.2} hollow spheres transferred from 400 to 500 {sup o}C and the effective nonradiative energy transfer from the TiO{sub 2} hollow spheres host matrix to Eu{sup 3+} ions crystal field states was realized due to changes of crystalline field in the environment around Eu{sup 3+} ions occupying Ti{sup 4+} sites. The proposed energy transfer mechanism was that UV light is absorbed in the band

  4. Complex Hollow Nanostructures: Synthesis and Energy-Related Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Le; Hu, Han; Wu, Hao Bin; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2017-04-01

    Hollow nanostructures offer promising potential for advanced energy storage and conversion applications. In the past decade, considerable research efforts have been devoted to the design and synthesis of hollow nanostructures with high complexity by manipulating their geometric morphology, chemical composition, and building block and interior architecture to boost their electrochemical performance, fulfilling the increasing global demand for renewable and sustainable energy sources. In this Review, we present a comprehensive overview of the synthesis and energy-related applications of complex hollow nanostructures. After a brief classification, the design and synthesis of complex hollow nanostructures are described in detail, which include hierarchical hollow spheres, hierarchical tubular structures, hollow polyhedra, and multi-shelled hollow structures, as well as their hybrids with nanocarbon materials. Thereafter, we discuss their niche applications as electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries and hybrid supercapacitors, sulfur hosts for lithium-sulfur batteries, and electrocatalysts for oxygen- and hydrogen-involving energy conversion reactions. The potential superiorities of complex hollow nanostructures for these applications are particularly highlighted. Finally, we conclude this Review with urgent challenges and further research directions of complex hollow nanostructures for energy-related applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes) are predo......Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...

  6. [Plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and transmission to other trophic levels]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    This program investigated how host plant responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide may be transmitted to other trophic levels, especially leaf eating insects, and alter consumption of leaves and impare their function. Study results included the following findings: increased carbon dioxide to plants alters feeding by insect herbivores; leaves produced under higher carbon conditions contain proportionally less nitrogen; insect herbivores may have decreased reproduction under elevated carbon dioxide.

  7. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) and ARM-ACME 2.5 Final Campaign Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tom, M. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sweeney, C. [NOAA Earth Systems Research Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We report on a 5-year multi-institution and multi-agency airborne study of atmospheric composition and carbon cycling at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, with scientific objectives that are central to the carbon-cycle and radiative-forcing goals of the U.S. Global Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) SGP region; 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative-forcing, convective processes, and CO2 concentrations over the ARM SGP region, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  8. Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

    2009-01-07

    The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other

  9. Synthesis of hollow CdS micro-/nanospheres by CoSP technique and their visible light photocatalytic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Neetesh, E-mail: neetesh16@gmail.com; Dutta, Viresh

    2014-01-01

    CdS hollow micro-/nanospheres with high yield, purity, and photocatalytic property have been successfully synthesized by a continuous spray pyrolysis (CoSP) technique. The experimental conditions mainly the temperature and the nature of solvent are found to influence the creation of hollow spheres. The synthesized products have been characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), UV–vis and photoluminescence spectra. The XRD analysis confirmed the hexagonal crystal structure of the CdS microspheres supported by the measured lattice spacing from HR-TEM. The effects of synthesis temperature and the electric field applied during the spray on the formation of hollow spheres and their visible light photocatalytic properties are reported. Photodegradation of methylene blue (MB) dye under visible light was used to evaluate the performance of these CoSP made CdS micro-/nanospheres. The MB photodegradation efficiency was maximum, ∼90% in 2 h, for CdS microspheres prepared at 500 °C. The importance of hollow morphology over solid morphology is also proven; the hollow sphere sample (CdS{sub 5}) is about twice efficient than solid sphere sample (CdS{sub 7}). The results show that the CoSP method is a simple and inexpensive technique for preparing highly photo-active CdS hollow spheres which can be extended to prepare other sulphide and oxide hollow spheres at a large scale. Typically 100 mg of the powder can be prepared from ∼100 ml of spray solution.

  10. Controlled Growth of Carbon Spheres Through the Mg-Reduction Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hailin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hollow spheres, hollow capsules and solid spheres of carbon were selectively synthesized by Mg-reduction of hexachlorobutadiene at appropriate reaction conditions. X-ray powder diffraction and Raman spectra reveal that the as-prepared materials have a well-ordered structure. A possible formation mechanism has been proposed.

  11. Growth of Hollow Transition Metal (Fe, Co, Ni) Oxide Nanoparticles on Graphene Sheets through Kirkendall Effect as Anodes for High-Performance Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianbo; Qu, Bin; Zhao, Yang; Li, Chunyan; Chen, Yujin; Sun, Chunwen; Gao, Peng; Zhu, Chunling

    2016-01-26

    A general strategy based on the nanoscale Kirkendall effect has been developed to grow hollow transition metal (Fe, Co or Ni) oxide nanoparticles on graphene sheets. When applied as lithium-ion battery anodes, these hollow transition metal oxide-based composites exhibit excellent electrochemical performance, with high reversible capacities and long-term stabilities at a high current density, superior to most transition metal oxides reported to date.

  12. Mathematical modeling of liquid/liquid hollow fiber membrane contactor accounting for interfacial transport phenomena: Extraction of lanthanides as a surrogate for actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    This report is divided into two parts. The second part is divided into the following sections: experimental protocol; modeling the hollow fiber extractor using film theory; Graetz model of the hollow fiber membrane process; fundamental diffusive-kinetic model; and diffusive liquid membrane device-a rigorous model. The first part is divided into: membrane and membrane process-a concept; metal extraction; kinetics of metal extraction; modeling the membrane contactor; and interfacial phenomenon-boundary conditions-applied to membrane transport.

  13. γ-Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres: preparation, formation mechanism, magnetic property, and application in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing-San; Zhu, Ying-Jie

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, we report the preparation of γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres by a solvothermal combined with precursor thermal conversion method. These γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres were constructed by three-dimensional self-assembly of nanosheets, forming porous nanostructures. The effects of experimental parameters including molar ratio of reactants and reaction temperature on the precursors were studied. The time-dependent experiments indicated that the Ostwald ripening was responsible for the formation of the hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres of the precursors. γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres were obtained by the thermal transformation of the precursor hollow microspheres. Both γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres exhibited a superparamagnetic property at room temperature and had the saturation magnetization of 44.2 and 55.4 emu/g, respectively, in the applied magnetic field of 20 KOe. Several kinds of organic pollutants including salicylic acid (SA), methylene blue (MB), and basic fuchsin (BF) were chosen as the model water pollutants to evaluate the removal abilities of γ-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) magnetic hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres. It was found that γ-Fe(2)O(3) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres showed a better adsorption ability over SA than MB and BF. However, Fe(3)O(4) hierarchically nanostructured hollow microspheres had the best performance for adsorbing MB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Angular output of hollow, metal-lined, waveguide Raman sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biedrzycki, Stephen; Buric, Michael P.; Falk, Joel; Woodruff, Steven D.

    2012-04-20

    Hollow, metal-lined waveguides used as gas sensors based on spontaneous Raman scattering are capable of large angular collection. The collection of light from a large solid angle implies the collection of a large number of waveguide modes. An accurate estimation of the propagation losses for these modes is required to predict the total collected Raman power. We report a theory/experimental comparison of the Raman power collected as a function of the solid angle and waveguide length. New theoretical observations are compared with previous theory appropriate only for low-order modes. A cutback experiment is demonstrated to verify the validity of either theory. The angular distribution of Raman light is measured using aluminum and silver-lined waveguides of varying lengths.

  15. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir

  16. Innovation with carbon materials---A report on the annual world conference on carbon, Carbon 2015%炭材料的革新--记Carbon 2015国际炭会议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强

    2015-01-01

    The annual world conference on carbon, Carbon 2015, was held in Dresden, Germany, and was hosted by the German Carbon Group and German Ceramic Society, during July 12~17, 2015. About 582 attendees from 40 countries participated in the conference, and 540 papers were accepted for discussion, including 4 plenary lectures, 256 oral presentations, and 280 posters in-volved in 12 topics, namely, activated carbon, biomass derived carbon, carbon black, carbon fiber and composites, granular/nucle-ar carbon, natural graphite, nanoforms, industrial, conversion process, physical &chemical properties, environmental &medical, and energy storage. Carbon fiber, graphite, carbon black, and carbon alloy were the subjects of the plenary lectures. The innovation of the traditional carbon materials and new nanocarbon, the critical role of carbon in energy, environment, and healthcare applica-tion, as well as the new insights on the relationship of structure and properties at the molecular scale were strongly considered in this event. Carbon materials required continuous innovation to meet the rising requirement of sustainable society.

  17. Preparation of Hollow Fe2O3 Nanorods and Nanospheres by Nanoscale Kirkendall Diffusion, and Their Electrochemical Properties for Use in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jung Sang; Park, Jin-Sung; Kang, Yun Chan

    2016-12-01

    A novel process for the preparation of aggregate-free metal oxide nanopowders with spherical (0D) and non-spherical (1D) hollow nanostructures was introduced. Carbon nanofibers embedded with iron selenide (FeSe) nanopowders with various nanostructures are prepared via the selenization of electrospun nanofibers. Ostwald ripening occurs during the selenization process, resulting in the formation of a FeSe-C composite nanofiber exhibiting a hierarchical structure. These nanofibers transform into aggregate-free hollow Fe2O3 powders via the complete oxidation of FeSe and combustion of carbon. Indeed, the zero- (0D) and one-dimensional (1D) FeSe nanocrystals transform into the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders via a nanoscale Kirkendall diffusion process, thus conserving their overall morphology. The discharge capacities for the 1000th cycle of the hollow-structured Fe2O3 nanopowders obtained from the FeSe-C composite nanofibers prepared at selenization temperatures of 500, 800, and 1000 °C at a current density of 1 A g‑1 are 932, 767, and 544 mA h g‑1, respectively; and their capacity retentions from the second cycle are 88, 92, and 78%, respectively. The high structural stabilities of these hollow Fe2O3 nanopowders during repeated lithium insertion/desertion processes result in superior lithium-ion storage performances.

  18. Supply of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery. Final report, October 15, 1976--September 1, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rump, W.M.; Hare, M.; Porter, R.E.

    1977-09-01

    Results are presented from a study of the carbon dioxide supply situation for miscible flooding operations to enhance oil recovery. Candidate oil reservoirs were identified, and the carbon dioxide requirements and the potential recoverable oil for some of these were estimated. A survey of carbon dioxide sources has been conducted within the geographic areas where candidate oil reservoirs exist. Sources considered were both high and low quality gases from combustion vents, chemical process stacks, and naturally occurring gas deposits. The survey shows more than enough carbon dioxide is available from above-ground sources alone to meet expected demands. Systems to purify and deliver the carbon dioxide were designed and the costs of the delivered carbon dioxide estimated. Lowest cost is carbon dioxide from natural source with credit for by-product methane. A more comprehensive survey of above-ground and natural sources is recommended.

  19. Failing the market, failing deliberative democracy: How scaling up corporate carbon reporting proliferates information asymmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Lippert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon footprint data has become ubiquitous. This data is also highly promissory. But as this paper argues, such data fails both consumers and citizens. The governance of climate change seemingly requires a strong foundation of data on emission sources. Economists approach climate change as a market failure, where the optimisation of the atmosphere is to be evidence based and data driven. Citizens or consumers, state or private agents of control, all require deep access to information to judge emission realities. Whether we are interested in state-led or in neoliberal ‘solutions’ for either democratic participatory decision-making or for preventing market failure, companies’ emissions need to be known. This paper draws on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Fortune 50 company’s environmental accounting unit to show how carbon reporting interferes with information symmetry requirements, which further troubles possibilities for contesting data. A material-semiotic analysis of the data practices and infrastructures employed in the context of corporate emissions disclosure details the situated political economies of data labour along the data processing chain. The explicit consideration of how information asymmetries are socially and computationally shaped, how contexts are shifted and how data is systematically straightened out informs a reflexive engagement with Big Data. The paper argues that attempts to automatise environmental accounting’s veracity management by means of computing metadata or to ensure that data quality meets requirements through third-party control are not satisfactory. The crossover of Big Data with corporate environmental governance does not promise to trouble the political economy that hitherto sustained unsustainability.

  20. Failing the market, failing deliberative democracy: How scaling up corporate carbon reporting proliferates information asymmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Lippert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon footprint data has become ubiquitous. This data is also highly promissory. But as this paper argues, such data fails both consumers and citizens. The governance of climate change seemingly requires a strong foundation of data on emission sources. Economists approach climate change as a market failure, where the optimisation of the atmosphere is to be evidence based and data driven. Citizens or consumers, state or private agents of control, all require deep access to information to judge emission realities. Whether we are interested in state-led or in neoliberal ‘solutions’ for either democratic participatory decision-making or for preventing market failure, companies’ emissions need to be known. This paper draws on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Fortune 50 company’s environmental accounting unit to show how carbon reporting interferes with information symmetry requirements, which further troubles possibilities for contesting data. A material-semiotic analysis of the data practices and infrastructures employed in the context of corporate emissions disclosure details the situated political economies of data labour along the data processing chain. The explicit consideration of how information asymmetries are socially and computationally shaped, how contexts are shifted and how data is systematically straightened out informs a reflexive engagement with Big Data. The paper argues that attempts to automatise environmental accounting’s veracity management by means of computing metadata or to ensure that data quality meets requirements through third-party control are not satisfactory. The crossover of Big Data with corporate environmental governance does not promise to trouble the political economy that hitherto sustained unsustainability.

  1. safety of carbon fibre reinforced plastic hollow sections in compression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMINUSER

    2014-01-06

    Jan 6, 2014 ... make them ideal for widespread applications in construction worldwide. .... adhesive between CFRP and steel/concrete may be affected by various ...... 201, pp 2528-2539. [16] Fawzia, S and Kabir, M. H., “A Review on.

  2. Calibration of effective optical path length for hollow-waveguide based gas cell using absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Du, Zhenhui; Li, Jinyi

    2016-10-01

    The Hollow Waveguide (HWG) has emerged as a novel tool to transmit laser power. Owing to its long Effective Optical Path Length (EOPL) within a relatively small volume, it is suitable for the application as a gas cell in concentration measurement by using laser spectroscopy. The measurement of effective optical path length for a hollow waveguide, which possesses the physical length of 284.0 cm, by using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) was demonstrated. Carbon dioxide was used as a sample gas for a hollow waveguide calibration. A 2004 nm Distributed Feed-Back (DFB) laser was used as the light source to cover a CO2 line near 2003 nm, which was selected as the target line in the measurement. The reference direct absorption spectroscopy signal was obtained by delivering CO2 into a reference cell possessing a length of 29.4 cm. Then the effective optical path length of HWG was calculated by least-squares fitting the measured absorption signal to the reference absorption signal. The measured EOPL of HWG was 282.8 cm and the repeatability error of effective optical path length was calculated as 0.08 cm. A detection limit of 0.057 cm (with integral time 5 s) characterized by the Allan variance, was derived. The effective optical path length is obtained as the significant parameter to calculate the concentration of gases and it is of great importance to precise measurement of absorption spectroscopy.

  3. Miniaturized Hollow-Waveguide Gas Correlation Radiometer (GCR) for Trace Gas Detection in the Martian Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, E. M.; Melroy, H. R.

    2012-01-01

    Gas correlation radiometry (GCR) has been shown to be a sensitive and versatile method for detecting trace gases in Earth's atmosphere. Here, we present a miniaturized and simplified version of this instrument capable of mapping multiple trace gases and identifying active regions on the Mars surface. Reduction of the size and mass of the GCR instrument has been achieved by implementing a lightweight, 1 mm inner diameter hollow-core optical fiber (hollow waveguide) for the gas correlation cell. Based on a comparison with an Earth orbiting CO2 gas correlation instrument, replacement of the 10 meter mUltipass cell with hollow waveguide of equivalent pathlength reduces the cell mass from approx 150 kg to approx 0.5 kg, and reduces the volume from 1.9 m x 1.3 m x 0.86 m to a small bundle of fiber coils approximately I meter in diameter by 0.05 m in height (mass and volume reductions of >99%). This modular instrument technique can be expanded to include measurements of additional species of interest including nitrous oxide (N2O), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanol (CH3OH), and sulfur dioxide (SO2), as well as carbon dioxide (CO2) for a simultaneous measure of mass balance.

  4. Hollow Porous VOx/C Nanoscrolls as High-Performance Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Bao-Rui; Qin, Ming-Li; Zhang, Zi-Li; Li, Shu-Mei; Zhang, De-Yin; Wu, Hao-Yang; Zhang, Lin; Lu, Xin; Qu, Xuan-Hui

    2016-10-05

    Novel hollow porous VOx/C nanoscrolls are synthesized by an annealing process with the VOx/octadecylamine (ODA) nanoscrolls as both vanadium and carbon sources. In the preparation, the VOx/ODA nanoscrolls are first achieved by a two-phase solvothermal method using ammonium metavanadat as the precursor. Upon subsequent heating, the intercalated amines between the vanadate layers in the VOx/ODA nanoscrolls decompose into gases, which escape from inside the nanoscrolls and leave sufficient pores in the walls. As the anodes of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), such hollow porous VOx/C nanoscrolls possess exceedingly high capacity and rate capability (904 mAh g(-1) at 1 A g(-1)) and long cyclic stability (872 mAh g(-1) after 210 cycles at 1 A g(-1)). The good performance is derived from the unique structural features of the hollow hierarchical porous nanoscrolls with low crystallinity, which could significantly suppress irreversible Li(+) trapping as well as improve Li(+) diffusion kinetics. This universal method of annealing amine-intercalated oxide could be widely applied to the fabrication of a variety of porous electrode materials for high-performance LIBs and supercapacitors.

  5. Metal-organic framework nanocrystals as sacrificial templates for hollow and exceptionally porous titania and composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Kruger, Paul E; Telfer, Shane G

    2015-10-05

    We report a strategy that employs metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals in two roles for the fabrication of hollow nanomaterials. In the first role the MOF crystals provide a template on which a shell of material can be deposited. Etching of the MOF produces a hollow structure with a predetermined size and morphology. In combination with this strategy, the MOF crystals, including guest molecules in their pores, can provide the components of a secondary material that is deposited inside the initially formed shell. We used this approach to develop a straightforward and reproducible method for constructing well-defined, nonspherical hollow and exceptionally porous titania and titania-based composite nanomaterials. Uniform hollow nanostructures of amorphous titania, which assume the cubic or polyhedral shape of the original template, are delivered using nano- and microsized ZIF-8 and ZIF-67 crystal templates. These materials exhibit outstanding textural properties including hierarchical pore structures and BET surface areas of up to 800 m(2)/g. As a proof of principle, we further demonstrate that metal nanoparticles such as Pt nanoparticles, can be encapsulated into the TiO2 shell during the digestion process and used for subsequent heterogeneous catalysis. In addition, we show that the core components of the ZIF nanocrystals, along with their adsorbed guests, can be used as precursors for the formation of secondary materials, following their thermal decomposition, to produce hollow and porous metal sulfide/titania or metal oxide/titania composite nanostructures.

  6. A novel hollowed CoO-in-CoSnO₃ nanostructure with enhanced lithium storage capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Cao; Li, Xianglin; Yu, Hong; Mao, Lu; Wong, Lydia Helena; Yan, Qingyu; Wang, John

    2014-11-21

    The search for well-defined porous/hollowed metal oxide nanocomposites for high performance energy storage is promising. Herein, atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been utilized for the construction of a novel hollowed wire-in-tube nanostructure of CoO-in-CoSnO3, for which Co2(OH)2CO3 nanowires are first obtained by a hydrothermal method and then deposited with ALD SnO2. After a proper thermal treatment, a CoO wire-void-CoSnO3 tube was formed with the decomposition of Co2(OH)2CO3 and its simultaneous reaction with the outer SnO2 layer. In this unique wire-in-tube structure, both CoO and CoSnO3 are promising materials for lithium ion battery anodes with high theoretical capacities, and the porous + hollow feature is essential for better electrode/electrolyte contact, shorter ion diffusion path and better structure stability. After a further facile carbon coating, the hollowed wire-in-tube structure delivered an improved capacity of 1162.1 mA h g(-1), which is much higher than that of the bare CoO nanowire. Enhanced rate capability and cycling stability have also been demonstrated with the structure, showing its promising application for the anode material of lithium ion battery. The work also demonstrated an effective way of using ALD SnO2 for electrochemical energy storage that ALD SnO2 plays a key role in the structure formation and also serves as both active material and surface coating.

  7. Storage and sustained release of volatile substances from a hollow silica matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jiexin [Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100029 (China); Ding Haomin [Research Center of the Ministry of Education for High Gravity Engineering and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Tao Xia [Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100029 (China); Chen Jianfeng [Key Lab for Nanomaterials, Ministry of Education, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2007-06-20

    Porous hollow silica nanospheres (PHSNSs) prepared by adopting a nanosized CaCO{sub 3} template were utilized for the first time as a novel carrier for the storage and sustained release of volatile substances. Two types of volatile substances, Indian pipal from perfumes and peroxyacetic acid from disinfectants, were selected and then tested by one simple adsorption process with two separate comparative carriers, i.e. activated carbon and solid porous silica. It was demonstrated that a high storage capacity (9.6 ml{sub perfume}/mg{sub carrier}) of perfume could be achieved in a PHSNS matrix, which was almost 14 times as much as that of activated carbon. The perfume release profiles showed that PHSNSs exhibited sustained multi-stage release behaviour, while the constant release of activated carbon at a low level was discerned. Further, a Higuchi model study proved that the release process of perfume in both carriers followed a Fickian diffusion mechanism. For peroxyacetic acid as a disinfectant model, PHSNSs also displayed a much better delayed-delivery process than a solid porous silica system owing to the existence of unique hollow frameworks. Therefore, the aforementioned excellent sustained-release behaviours would make PHSNSs a promising carrier for storage and sustained delivery applications of volatile substances.

  8. Porous-wall hollow glass microspheres as carriers for biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyi; Dynan, William S; Wicks, George; Serkiz, Steven

    2013-09-17

    The present invention includes compositions of porous-wall hollow glass microspheres and one or more biomolecules, wherein the one or more biomolecules are positioned within a void location within the hollow glass microsphere, and the use of such compositions for the diagnostic and/or therapeutic delivery of biomolecules.

  9. Preparation of spherical hollow alumina particles by thermal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wonkyung [Department of Chemical Engineering, INHA University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402‐751 (Korea, Republic of); Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402‐751 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sooseok [Center for Advance Research in Fusion Reactor Engineering, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151‐742 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung-Min [Daejoo Electronic Materials Co., 1236‐10 Jeongwang-dong, Siheung-si, Kyunggi-do 429‐848 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Dong-Wha, E-mail: dwpark@inha.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, INHA University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402‐751 (Korea, Republic of); Regional Innovation Center for Environmental Technology of Thermal Plasma (RIC-ETTP), INHA University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402‐751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-01

    Spherical hollow particles were prepared from solid alumina powders using DC arc thermal plasma, and then spray coating was performed with the as-prepared particles. Operating variables for the hollow particle preparation process were additional plasma gas, input power, and carrier gas flow rate. The spherical hollow alumina particles were produced in the case of using additive gas of H{sub 2} or N{sub 2}, while alumina surface was hardly molten in the pure argon thermal plasma. In addition, the hollow particles were well produced in high power and low carrier gas conditions due to high melting point of alumina. Hollow structure was confirmed by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy analysis. Morphology and size distribution of the prepared particles that were examined by field emission-scanning electron microscopy and phase composition of the particles was characterized by X-ray diffraction. In the spray coating process, the as-prepared hollow particles showed higher deposition rate. - Highlights: ► Spherical hollow alumina powder was prepared by non-transferred DC arc plasma. ► Diatomic gasses were added in Ar plasma for high power. ► Prepared hollow alumina powder was efficient for the plasma spray coating.

  10. Photoluminescence of hollow gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Weon-Sik Chae; Hee-Ok Lee; Seung-Lim Oh

    2011-01-01

    Hollow gold nanoparticles including silver were prepared by the galvanic replacement reaction of silver nanoparticles by gold. The resulting hollow gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles show notable blue-green emissions, which are studied using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  11. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, van 't Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  12. Wet spinning of asymmetric hollow fibre membranes for gas separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Hof, Jacob Adriaan

    1988-01-01

    This thesis describes the spinning and characterizatin of hollow fibre membranes for gas separation. The type of fibres studied here are made by a wet spinning process. A homogeneous solution is prepared, consisting of a polymer in a suitable organic solvent, and extruded as a hollow fibre. Both the

  13. Simple Spinning of Heterogeneous Hollow Microfibers on Chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yue; Wei, Wenbo; Wang, Yaqing; Xu, Cong; Guo, Yaqiong; Qin, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    A novel and simple chip-based microfluidic strategy is proposed for continuously controlled spinning of desirable hollow microfibers. These fabricated fiber-shaped materials exhibit extraordinary morphological and structural complexity, as well as a heterogeneous composition. The resulting specific hollow microfibers have potential applications in numerous chemical and biomedical fields.

  14. Photoluminescence of hollow gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weon-Sik Chae

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hollow gold nanoparticles including silver were prepared by the galvanic replacement reaction of silver nanoparticles by gold. The resulting hollow gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles show notable blue-green emissions, which are studied using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy.

  15. Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couny, F.; Roberts, John; Birks, T.A.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of silica square-lattice hollow core photonic crystal fibers optimized for low loss guidance over an extended frequency range in the mid-IR region of the optical spectrum. The fiber's linear optical properties include an ultra-low group...... velocity dispersion and a polarization cross-coupling as low as -13.4dB over 10m of fiber....

  16. Nonlinear optics and spectroscopy at the nanoscale with a hollow-pyramid aperture SNOM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagioni, P [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Celebrano, M [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Polli, D [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Labardi, M [PolyLab CNR-INFM, largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Zavelani-Rossi, M [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Cerullo, G [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Finazzi, M [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy); Duo, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2007-03-15

    We report on a novel near-field microscope in which ultrashort laser pulses are coupled into hollow-pyramid cantilever probes. The high throughput, absence of polarization pinning and absence of chirping, which are premium features of such probes, enable obtaining sufficient peak power in the near-field to perform nonlinear optical experiments. We show experimental results on second-harmonic generation from metal nanostructures and two-photon excitation of fluorescent conjugated polymers on the subwavelength scale.

  17. Electromagnetically induced transparency in Rb-filled coated hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, P. S.; Benabid, F.; Couny, F.; Maric, M.; Luiten, A. N.

    2007-05-01

    We report the observation of lambda-configuration electromagnetically induced transparency as well as optical pumping in rubidium-filled kagome-structure hollow-coated-core photonic crystal fiber. We show that a polydimethylsiloxane coating of the fiber core reduces the linewidth of the transparency below that which could be expected for an uncoated fiber. The measured 6 MHz linewidth was dominated by optical broadening.

  18. Ultra-high and persistent optical depths of caesium in Kagom\\'e-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Kaczmarek, Krzysztof T; Sprague, Michael R; Kolthammer, W Steven; Feizpour, Amir; Ledingham, Patrick M; Brecht, Benjamin; Poem, Eilon; Abdolvand, Amir; Russell, Philip St J; Walmsley, Ian A; Nunn, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Alkali-filled hollow-core fibres are a promising medium for investigating light-matter interactions, especially at the single-photon level, due to the tight confinement of light and high optical depths achievable by light-induced atomic desorption. However, until now these large alkali vapour densities could only be generated for seconds at most once per day, severely limiting the practicality of the technology. Here we report the generation of highest observed transient ($>10^5$ for minutes) and highest observed persistent (>2000 for hours) optical depths of alkali vapours in hollow-core fibres to date, using a caesium-filled Kagom\\'e-type hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. Our results pave the way to light-matter interaction experiments in confined geometries requiring long operation times and large atomic number densities, such as single-photon-level light-matter interaction experiments and fundamental investigations of hot dense atomic gases.

  19. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li

    2012-03-16

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by detailed characterizations. The Ag@Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core-shell structure with a hollow interior, which can be applied as high-performance catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  20. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li

    2012-03-01

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by detailed characterizations. The Ag@Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core-shell structure with a hollow interior, which can be applied as high-performance catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  1. NATURAL FREQUENCIES OF SUBMERGED PIEZOCERAMIC HOLLOW SPHERES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cai Jinbiao; Chen Weiqiu; Ye Guiru; Ding Haojiang

    2000-01-01

    An exact 3D analysis of free vibration of a piezoceramic hollow sphere submerged in a compressible fluid is presented in this paper.A separation method is adopted to simplify the basic equations for spherically isotropic piezoelasticity.It is shown that there are two independent classes of vibration.The first one is independent of the fluid medium as well as the electric field,while the second is associated with both the fluid parameter and the piezoelectric effect.Exact frequency equations are derived and numerical results are obtained.

  2. Hollow micro string based calorimeter device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a micron-scale calorimeter and a calorimetry method utilizing the micron-scale calorimeter. In accordance with the invention, there is provided a micron-scale calorimeter comprising a micro-channel string, being restrained at at least two longitudinally distanced...... positions so as to form a free released double clamped string in-between said two longitudinally distanced positions said micro-channel string comprising a microfluidic channel having a closed cross section and extending in the longitudinal direction of the hollow string, acoustical means adapted...

  3. Nonlinear sequential laminates reproducing hollow sphere assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idiart, Martín I.

    2007-07-01

    A special class of nonlinear porous materials with isotropic 'sequentially laminated' microstructures is found to reproduce exactly the hydrostatic behavior of 'hollow sphere assemblages'. It is then argued that this result supports the conjecture that Gurson's approximate criterion for plastic porous materials, and its viscoplastic extension of Leblond et al. (1994), may actually yield rigorous upper bounds for the hydrostatic flow stress of porous materials containing an isotropic, but otherwise arbitrary, distribution of porosity. To cite this article: M.I. Idiart, C. R. Mecanique 335 (2007).

  4. Anti-resonant hexagram hollow core fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R; Poletti, Francesco; Abokhamis, Mousavi S; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Richardson, David J

    2015-01-26

    Various simple anti-resonant, single cladding layer, hollow core fiber structures are examined. We show that the spacing between core and jacket glass and the shape of the support struts can be used to optimize confinement loss. We demonstrate the detrimental effect on confinement loss of thick nodes at the strut intersections and present a fabricated hexagram fiber that mitigates this effect in both straight and bent condition by presenting thin and radially elongated nodes. This fiber has loss comparable to published results for a first generation, multi-cladding ring, Kagome fiber with negative core curvature and has tolerable bend loss for many practical applications.

  5. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  6. Hollow ballistic pendulum for plasma momentum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, S. F.; Pashinin, P. P.; Perov, V. Y.; Serov, R. V.; Yanovsky, V. P.

    1988-05-01

    A novel pendulum design—hollow ballistic pendulum—is suggested for plasma momentum measurements. It has an advantage over the pendula used earlier in laser plasma experiments of being insensitive to a momentum of matter evaporated and scattered by the pendulum wall exposed to the plasma, which usually exceeds plasma momentum to be measured. Simple expressions describing pendulum performance are derived, and requirements of shape and size are established. Using this kind of pendulum in experiments on laser acceleration of thin foils made it possible to measure the momentum of accelerated foil with an accuracy of about 10%.

  7. Carbon nanotube filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  8. PREPARATION OF HOLLOW LATEX PARTICLES BY ALKALI-ACID TREATMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝冬梅; 王新灵; 朱卫华; 唐小真; 刘成岑; 施凯

    2001-01-01

    Hollow polymer latex particles were prepared by seeded emulsion polymerization. A seed latex consisting of styrene (St), butyl acrylate(BA) copolymer was first prepared, and seeded terpolymerization of St-BA-MA(methacrylic acid) were then carried out in the absence of surfactant. Final latex was treated by a two-step treatment under alkaline and acidic conditions, thus, the particles with hollow structure were obtained. We discussed the effects of pH value, temperature and time in alkali and acid treatment processes on hollow structure within the polymer latex particles and amount of carboxylic group on particle surface. The results show that the hollow polymer latex particles with the largest hollow size can be obtained under a certain condition (pH12.5, 90°C, 3 h in alkali treatment stage and pH2.5, 85°C, 3 h in acid treatment stage).

  9. Size-dependent deformation mechanisms in hollow silicon nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Even inherently brittle hollow silicon nanoparticles (NPs can withstand larger strain to failure than solid NPs. However, the influence of wall thickness on the mechanical behavior of hollow Si NPs is not fully understood. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the compressive behavior of hollow Si NPs. Three distinct failure mechanisms of hollow NPs are uncovered, and their strength and deformability are analyzed quantitatively. For extra-thick-walled NPs, dislocations will nucleate below the contact area and cut through the particles till failure. For mid-thick-walled NPs, however, dislocations will emit from the inner surface and slip towards the outer surface. For thin-walled NPs, elastic buckling is the cause of failure. Compared to solid NPs, hollow NPs with wall thickness being around half of its outer radius can achieve significant improvement in both strength and deformability.

  10. Hollow fiber bioreactor technology for tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghbali, Hadis; Nava, Michele M; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber bioreactors are the focus of scientific research aiming to mimic physiological vascular networks and engineer organs and tissues in vitro. The reason for this lies in the interesting features of this bioreactor type, including excellent mass transport properties. Indeed, hollow fiber bioreactors allow limitations to be overcome in nutrient transport by diffusion, which is often an obstacle to engineer sizable constructs in vitro. This work reviews the existing literature relevant to hollow fiber bioreactors in organ and tissue engineering applications. To this purpose, we first classify the hollow fiber bioreactors into 2 categories: cylindrical and rectangular. For each category, we summarize their main applications both at the tissue and at the organ level, focusing on experimental models and computational studies as predictive tools for designing innovative, dynamic culture systems. Finally, we discuss future perspectives on hollow fiber bioreactors as in vitro models for tissue and organ engineering applications.

  11. An Atomic Lens Using a Focusing Hollow Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏勇; 印建平; 王育竹

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new method to generate a focused hollow laser beam by using an azimuthally distributed 2π-phase plate and a convergent thin lens, and calculate the intensity distribution of the focused hollow beam in free propagation space. The relationship between the waist w0 of the incident collimated Gaussian beam and the dark spot size of the focused hollow beam at the focal point, and the relationship between the focal length f of the thin lens and the dark spot size are studied respectively. The optical potential of the blue-detuned focused hollow beam for 85Rb atoms is calculated. Our study shows that when the larger waist w of the incident Gaussian beam and the shorter focal length f of the lens are chosen, we can obtain an extremely small dark spot size of the focused hollow beam, which can be used to form an atomic lens with a resolution of several angstroms.

  12. Simulated Coal-Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    This final report summarizes the technical work performed under Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-91MC27393, ``Simulated Coal- Gas-Fueled Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Development Program.`` This work consists of five major tasks and their respective subtasks as listed below. A brief description of each task is also provided. The Stack Design Requirements task focused on requirements and specification for designing, constructing, and testing a nominal 100-kilowatt integrated stack and on requirements for the balance-of-plant equipment to support a 1000-kilowatt integrated stack demonstrator. The Stack Design Preparation task focused on the mechanical design of a 100-kilowatt stack comprised of 8-ft{sup 2} cells incorporating the new cell configuration and component technology improvements developed in the previous DOE MCFC contract. Electrode Casting focused on developing a faster drying solvent for use in the electrode tape casting process. Electrode Heat Treatment was directed at scaling up the laboratory continuous debinding process to a new full-size IFC debinding oven coupled to a continuous belt furnace that will both debind and sinter the electrodes in one continuous process train. Repeat Part Quality Assurance and Testing provided the appropriate effort to ensure consistent, high-quality, reproducible and comparable repeat parts.

  13. Removal and recovery of carbon disulfide emitted by the viscose process. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1992-02-01

    Teepak, Inc., which manufactures cellulose food casings by means of the viscose process, has a plant in Danville, Illinois, that emits approximately 400,000 cubic feet per minute (cfm) of water-saturated air containing approximately 100 parts per million (ppm) of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}). Both Teepak and the state of Illinois desire to reduce these emissions as soon as possible; however, the large air flow and very small CS{sub 2} concentration result in a difficult and costly separations problem without an obvious economically viable solution. One possibility is to incinerate the CS{sub 2}, but a more environmentally and economically acceptable alternative is to recover the CS{sub 2} for recycle to the process. The recovered CS{sub 2} would be worth about $700,000 annually to Teepak. Teepak has sponsored, with the Hazardous Waste Research and Information Center (HWRIC) of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to evaluate current gas- purification and recovery technology and to suggest a route of development that will lead to a CS{sub 2} recovery process. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs later provided on Illinois Challenge Grant to allow laboratory studies to supplement this effort. This report is a result of all those studies.

  14. New manuscript guidelines for the reporting of stable hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope-ratio data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-10-01

    To eliminate possible confusion in the reporting of isotopic abundances on non-corresponding scales, the Commission on Atomic Weights and Isotopic Abundances recommended at the 37{sup th} General Assembly at Lisbon, Portugal that (i) {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H relative ratios of all substances be expressed relative to VSMOW (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water) on a scale such that {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H of SLAP (Standard Light Antartic Precipitation) is 0.572 times that of VSMOW, (ii) {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C relative ratios of all substances be expressed relative to VPDB (Vienna Peedee belemnite) on a scale such that {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C of NBS 19 carbonate is 1.00195 times that of VPDB, and (iii) {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O ratios of all substances be expressed relative to either VSMOW or VPDB on scales such that {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O of SLAP is 0.9445 times that of VSMOW. (Author)

  15. The National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility: Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-03-01

    The Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) is a state-of-the-art test center sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and dedicated to the advancement of clean coal technology. In addition to the development of advanced coal gasification processes, the PSDF features the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) to study CO2 capture from coal-derived syngas and flue gas. The newly established NCCC will include multiple, adaptable test skids that will allow technology development of CO2 capture concepts using coal-derived syngas and flue gas in industrial settings. Because of the ability to operate under a wide range of flow rates and process conditions, research at the NCCC can effectively evaluate technologies at various levels of maturity. During the Budget Period One reporting period, efforts at the PSDF/NCCC focused on developing a screening process for testing consideration of new technologies; designing and constructing pre- and post-combustion CO2 capture facilities; developing sampling and analytical methods; expanding fuel flexibility of the Transport Gasification process; and operating the gasification process for technology research and for syngas generation to test syngas conditioning technologies.

  16. Using Carbon Dioxide to Enhance Recovery of Methane from Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: Final Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.; White, Mark D.; Zhu, Tao; Kulkarni, Abhijeet S.; Hunter, Robert B.; Patil, Shirish L.; Owen, Antionette T.; Martin, P F.

    2007-09-01

    Carbon dioxide sequestration coupled with hydrocarbon resource recovery is often economically attractive. Use of CO2 for enhanced recovery of oil, conventional natural gas, and coal-bed methane are in various stages of common practice. In this report, we discuss a new technique utilizing CO2 for enhanced recovery of an unconventional but potentially very important source of natural gas, gas hydrate. We have focused our attention on the Alaska North Slope where approximately 640 Tcf of natural gas reserves in the form of gas hydrate have been identified. Alaska is also unique in that potential future CO2 sources are nearby, and petroleum infrastructure exists or is being planned that could bring the produced gas to market or for use locally. The EGHR (Enhanced Gas Hydrate Recovery) concept takes advantage of the physical and thermodynamic properties of mixtures in the H2O-CO2 system combined with controlled multiphase flow, heat, and mass transport processes in hydrate-bearing porous media. A chemical-free method is used to deliver a LCO2-Lw microemulsion into the gas hydrate bearing porous medium. The microemulsion is injected at a temperature higher than the stability point of methane hydrate, which upon contacting the methane hydrate decomposes its crystalline lattice and releases the enclathrated gas. Small scale column experiments show injection of the emulsion into a CH4 hydrate rich sand results in the release of CH4 gas and the formation of CO2 hydrate

  17. Polyethyleneimine-Functionalized Polyamide Imide (Torlon) Hollow-Fiber Sorbents for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuyue Stephanie

    2013-05-24

    Carbon dioxide emitted from existing coal-fired power plants is a major environmental concern due to possible links to global climate change. In this study, we expand upon previous work focused on aminosilane-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents by introducing a new class of polyethyleneimine (PEI)-functionalized polymeric hollow-fiber sorbents for post-combustion carbon dioxide capture. Different molecular weight PEIs (Mn≈600, 1800, 10 000, and 60 000) were studied as functional groups on polyamide imide (PAI, Torlon) hollow fibers. This imide ring-opening modification introduces two amide functional groups and was confirmed by FTIR attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy. The carbon dioxide equilibrium sorption capacities of PEI-functionalized Torlon materials were characterized by using both pressure decay and gravimetric sorption methods. For equivalent PEI concentrations, PAI functionalized with lower molecular weight PEI exhibited higher carbon dioxide capacities. The effect of water in the ring-opening reaction was also studied. Up to a critical value, water in the reaction mixture enhanced the degree of functionalization of PEI to Torlon and resulted in higher carbon dioxide uptake within the functionalized material. Above the critical value, roughly 15 % w/w water, the fiber morphology was lost and the fiber was soluble in the solvent. PEI-functionalized (Mn≈600) PAI under optimal reaction conditions was observed to have the highest CO2 uptake: 4.9 g CO2 per 100 g of polymer (1.1 mmol g-1) at 0.1 bar and 35°C with dry 10 % CO2/90 % N2 feed for thermogravimetric analysis. By using water-saturated feeds (10 % CO2/90 % N2 dry basis), CO2 sorption was observed to increase to 6.0 g CO2 per 100 g of sorbent (1.4 mmol g-1). This material also demonstrated stability in cyclic adsorption-desorption operations, even under wet conditions at which some highly effective sorbents tend to lose performance. Thus, PEI-functionalized PAI fibers can be

  18. Report of the Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-08-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) refers to a set of technologies that can greatly reduce carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from new and existing coal- and gas-fired power plants, industrial processes, and other stationary sources of CO{sub 2}. In its application to electricity generation, CCS could play an important role in achieving national and global greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals. However, widespread cost-effective deployment of CCS will occur only if the technology is commercially available and a supportive national policy framework is in place. In keeping with that objective, on February 3, 2010, President Obama established an Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage composed of 14 Executive Departments and Federal Agencies. The Task Force, co-chaired by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), was charged with proposing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of CCS within ten years, with a goal of bringing five to ten commercial demonstration projects online by 2016. Composed of more than 100 Federal employees, the Task Force examined challenges facing early CCS projects as well as factors that could inhibit widespread commercial deployment of CCS. In developing the findings and recommendations outlined in this report, the Task Force relied on published literature and individual input from more than 100 experts and stakeholders, as well as public comments submitted to the Task Force. The Task Force also held a large public meeting and several targeted stakeholder briefings. While CCS can be applied to a variety of stationary sources of CO{sub 2}, its application to coal-fired power plant emissions offers the greatest potential for GHG reductions. Coal has served as an important domestic source of reliable, affordable energy for decades, and the coal industry has provided stable and quality high-paying jobs for American workers. At the same time, coal-fired power

  19. FutureGen 2.0 Pipeline and Regional Carbon Capture Storage Project - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Chris [Patrick Engineering Inc., Lisle, IL (United States); Wortman, David [Patrick Engineering Inc., Lisle, IL (United States); Brown, Chris [Battelle Memorial Inst., Richland, WA (United States); Hassan, Syed [Gulf Interstate Engineering, Houston, TX (United States); Humphreys, Ken [Futuregen Industrial Alliance, Inc., Washington, D.C. (United States); Willford, Mark [Futuregen Industrial Alliance, Inc., Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2016-03-31

    efforts are also documented in this report. All permit applications had been submitted to all agencies for those permits or approvals required prior to the start of project construction. Most of the requisite permits were received during Phase II. This report includes information on each permitting effort. Successes and lessons learned are included in this report that will add value to the next generation of carbon storage efforts.

  20. Ultem®/ZIF-8 mixed matrix hollow fiber membranes for CO2/N2 separations

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Ying

    2012-05-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid (mixed matrix) membranes can potentially extend the separation performance of traditional polymeric materials while maintaining processing convenience. Although many dense films studies have been reported, there have been few reported cases of these materials being successfully extended to asymmetric hollow fibers. In this work we report the first successful production of mixed matrix asymmetric hollow fiber membranes containing metal-organic-framework (MOF) ZIF-8 fillers. Specifically, we have incorporated ZIF-8 into a polyetherimide (Ultem ® 1000) matrix and produced dual-layer asymmetric hollow fiber membranes via the dry jet-wet quench method. The outer separating layer of these composite fibers contains 13wt% (17vol%) of ZIF-8 filler. These membranes have been tested over a range of temperatures and pressures for a variety of gas pairs. An increase in separation performance for the CO 2/N 2 gas pairs was observed for both pure gas and mixed gas feeds. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.