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Sample records for reported higher pretreatment

  1. Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Harrington, R.A. [Kaiser Engineers Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Quadrel, M.J. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This document provides the minutes from the Waste Separations and Pretreatment Workshop sponsored by the Underground Storage Tank-Integrated Demonstration in Salt Lake City, Utah, February 3--5, 1993. The Efficient Separations and Processing-Integrated Program and the Hanford Site Tank Waste Remediation System were joint participants. This document provides the detailed minutes, including responses to questions asked, an attendance list, reproductions of the workshop presentations, and a revised chart showing technology development activities.

  2. Optimization of steam explosion pretreatment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foody, P.

    1980-04-01

    Different operating conditions are required to optimize the yield from each of the various fractions in the substrate. Xylose recovery is maximized at short cooking times whereas maximum lignin recovery requires much longer cooking times. Peak glucose yield and rumen digestibility occur at intermediate times. If process conditions are set for maximum glucose yield we have achieved a yield of 68% of the theoretical, based on an average of a dozen substrates tested. Individual results ranged from 46 to 87%. If the process is optimized for maximum total sugars (i.e. glucose plus xylose) we have obtained an average yield of 60%, with a range of 31 to 75%. With rumen microflora, the average value of the in-vitro cellulose digestibility was 82%, with a range of 41 to 90%. The optimum operating conditions for total sugars are a pressure of 500 to 550 psig with a cooking time of 40 to 50 seconds and 35% starting moisture content. Particle size is not a significant factor, nor is pre-steaming or use of a constricting die in the gun nozzle. High quality lignin can be extracted with 80% yield. The Iotech lignin is very soluble, has a low molecular weight and is reactive. The unique properties of the lignin derive from the explosion at the end of the pretreatment. A lignin formaldehyde resin has been successfully formulated and tested. It represents a high value utilization of the lignin byproduct with immediate market potential. A detailed engineering design of the process gives an estimated operating cost of $7.50/OD ton of biomass. At this low cost, the Iotech process achieves many important pretreatment goals in a single step. The substrate has been sterilized; it has been pulverized into a powder; the cellulose has been accessible; and a highly reactive lignin fraction can be recovered and utilized.

  3. Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-12-23

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

  4. Pretreatment of cottonseed flakes with proteases and an amylase for higher oil yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassanein, Minar M.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of enzymatic pretreatment of cottonseed flakes on oil extractability was studied. The enzymes investigated included bacterial protease (Bp, papain (Pa, savinase (S, termamyl (T, pectinase (Pe and cellulase (C. The variables studied during the enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were: enzyme concentration, moisture: cottonseed flakes ratio, and time of hydrolysis. Enzymatic hydrolysis experiments were first carried out with a single enzyme, then with enzyme mixtures formulated according to the results of single enzyme treatments. Results were evaluated based on the relative increase in oil extractability, and some oil characteristics in comparison with untreated cottonseed flakes (control. Pretreatment with enzyme mixtures resulted in a relative increase in oil extractability that was higher than single enzyme pretreatment and the control. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (at 5% level between the control and all enzymatically treated oils as well as among different enzymatically treated oils. The relative increase in oil extractability due to pretreatment with enzyme mixtures were in the following order: S: Pe: Bp>S: P>S: C: Pe>S: Bp>S:T>S: C >S: Pa with values 44.9%, 38.9%, 37.1%, 34.9%, 30.1%, 28.9%, respectively. Enzymatic pretreatment of cottonseed flakes resulted in oils with fatty acid composition, acid value, iodine value and peroxide values that were generally comparable to the control.En este trabajo se estudió el efecto del pretratamiento con enzimas sobre la extractabilidad del aceite en hojuelas de semilla de algodón. Las enzimas que se investigaron fueron proteasa bacteriana (Bp, papaína (Pa, savinasa (S, temamil (T, pectinasa (Pe y celulasa (C. Las variables estudiadas durante los experimentos de hidrólisis enzimática fueron: concentración de la enzima, ratio humedad:cantidad de hojuelas y tiempo de hidrólisis. Estos experimentos se realizaron primeramente con una sola enzima y posteriormente con

  5. Higher Ambitions Summit. Rapporteur Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The Sutton Trust and Pearson two-day summit on higher ambitions in apprenticeships and vocational education drew more than 120 leaders in education, training and employment, policy makers, academics, and researchers to London. Delegates heard from political leaders stressing the importance they attach to high-quality apprenticeships. Presentations…

  6. PROJECT W-551 INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM TECHNOLOGY SELECTION SUMMARY DECISION REPORT AND RECOMMENDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CONRAD EA

    2008-08-12

    This report provides the conclusions of the tank farm interim pretreatment technology decision process. It documents the methodology, data, and results of the selection of cross-flow filtration and ion exchange technologies for implementation in project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This selection resulted from the evaluation of specific scope criteria using quantitative and qualitative analyses, group workshops, and technical expert personnel.

  7. GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives: Final Pretreatments Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chrome free pretreatments should be considered for use on Ground Support Equipment (OSE) and Electrical Ground Support Equipment (EOSE). Both of the hexavalent chrome free pretreatments (Metalast TCP HF and SurTec 650C) evaluated by this project met, and in some instances exceeded, the requirements ofMIL-DTL-5541 "Chemical Conversion Coatings on Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys". For DC resistance measurements, both Metalast TCP HF and SurTec (!50C met initial requirements following assembly and in many cases continued to maintain passing readings for the duration of testing.

  8. Pretreatment status report on the identification and evaluation of alternative processes. Milestone Report No. C064

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Beary, M.M.; Nicholson, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to support the development and demonstration of a pretreatment system that will (1) destroy organic materials and ferrocyanide in tank wastes so that the wastes can be stored safely, (2) separate the high-activity and low-activity fractions, (3) remove radionuclides and remove or destroy hazardous chemicals in LLW as necessary to meet waste form feed requirements, (4) support development and demonstration of vitrification technology by providing representative feeds to the bench-scale glass melter, (5) support full-scale HLW vitrification operations, including near-term operation, by providing feed that meets specifications, and (6) design and develop pretreatment processes that accomplish the above objectives and ensure compliance with environmental regulations. This report is a presentation of candidate technologies for pretreatment of Hanford Site tank waste. Included are descriptions of studies by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory of Battelle Memorial Institute; Science Applications International Corporation, an independent consultant; BNFL, Inc. representing British technologies; Numatec, representing French technologies; and brief accounts of other relevant activities.

  9. The Vanishing Higher-Education Reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As the Internet continues to drain readers and advertising, newspapers are left with no choice but to cut back on coverage. Many papers have settled on higher education as an expendable beat. At the National Education Writers Association, which represents education reporters and editors around the country, the e-mail list for elementary- and…

  10. Mild coal pretreatment to improve liquefaction reactivity. Final technical report, September 1990--February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.L.; Shams, K.G.

    1994-07-01

    Recent research efforts in direct coal liquefaction are focused on lowering the level of reaction severity, identification and determination of the causes of retrogressive reactions, and improving the economics of the process. Ambient pretreatment of coals using methanol and a trace amount of hydrochloric acid was extensively studied in connection with low severity coal liquefaction. Ambient pretreatment of eight Argonne coals using methanol/HCl improved THF-soluble conversions 24.5 wt % (maf basis) for Wyodak subbituminous coal and 28.4 wt % for Beulah-Zap lignite with an average increase of 14.9 wt % for the eight Argonne coals at 623 K (350{degrees}C) reaction temperature and 30 minutes reaction time. Optimal pretreatment conditions were determined using Wyodak and Illinois No. 6 coals. Acid concentration was the most important pretreatment variable studied; liquefaction reactivity increased with increasing acid concentration up to 2 vol %. The FTIR spectra of treated and untreated Wyodak coal samples demonstrated formation of carboxylic functional groups during pretreatment, a result of divalent (Ca, Mg) cationic bridge destruction. The extent of liquefaction reactivity directly correlated with the amount of calcium removed during pretreatment, and results from calcium ``addback`` experiments supported the observation that calcium adversely affected coal reactivity at low severity reaction conditions. Model compound studies using benzyl phenyl ether demonstrated that calcium cations catalyzed retrogressive reactions, inhibited hydrogenation reactions at low severity reaction conditions, and were more active at higher reaction temperatures. Based on kinetic data, mechanisms for hydrogenation-based inhibition and base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are proposed. The base-catalyzed retrogressive reactions are shown to occur via a hydrogen abstraction mechanism where hydrogenation inhibition reactions are shown to take place via a surface quenching mechanism.

  11. Catering Management in Higher Education. National Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This study identified the key management issues for senior managers and heads of catering services in higher education in developing and reviewing catering services. The study was conducted with the involvement of 76 universities and colleges with evidence drawn from questionnaires covering the Excellence Model's 9 criteria, an Expert Working…

  12. Ionic liquid pretreatment of biomass for sugars production: Driving factors with a plausible mechanism for higher enzymatic digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Tirath; Gaur, Ruchi; Dixit, Pooja; Gupta, Ravi P; Kagdiyal, V; Kumar, Ravindra; Tuli, Deepak K

    2016-09-20

    In this study, five ionic liquids (ILs) have been explored for biomass pretreatment for the production of fermentable sugar. We also investigated the driving factors responsible for improved enzymatic digestibility of various ILs treated biomass along with postulating the plausible mechanism thereof. Post pretreatment, mainly two factors impacted the enzymatic digestibility (i) structural deformation (cellulose I to II) along with xylan/lignin removal and (ii) properties of ILs; wherein, K-T parameters, viscosity and surface tension had a direct influence on pretreatment. A systematic investigation of these parameters and their impact on enzymatic digestibility is drawn. [C2mim][OAc] with β-value 1.32 resulted 97.7% of glucose yield using 10 FPU/g of biomass. A closer insight into the cellulose structural transformation has prompted a plausible mechanism explaining the better digestibility. The impact of these parameters on the digestibility can pave the way to customize the process to make biomass vulnerable to enzymatic attack.

  13. Waste pretreatment and interfacing system dynamic simulation model (ITHINK model) FY-96 year-end report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, R.W.

    1996-09-30

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation (ITHINK) Model (see WHC-SD-WM-DR-013) was originally created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates required to meet the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) waste vitrification milestones. The TPA milestones are satisfied by retrieving the TX tank farm (salt cake) single-shell tanks (SSTs)first and by utilizing a relatively constant retrieval rate to the year 2018 when retrieval is completed.

  14. Annual Report on Higher Education in New Mexico, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Santa Fe.

    The 1986 report of the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education first outlines responsibilities of the Commission and developments concerning the Board of Educational Finance and then considers the climate for higher education reform in New Mexico, including economic changes, career changes that require retraining and skill upgrading, and…

  15. Scottish Access Students in Higher Education. Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powney, Janet; Hall, Stuart

    This document is the final report on the experiences of mature students who had entered higher education through the Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP), a one-year course designed to provide an alternative route into higher education for adults and which utilizes a supportive environment plus an incremental, modular approach and small-group…

  16. Report of the Select Committee on Higher Education, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    A report of a study of issues in public higher education in Texas is presented, along with recommendations of the Select Committee on Higher Education to improve access, quality, and management. Attention is directed to: institutional role and mission statements, general funding policies, research and technology funding, faculty compensation,…

  17. Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This statistics report provides a comprehensive snapshot of national statistics on all parts of the sector for the year 2013, by bringing together data collected directly by TEQSA with data sourced from the main higher education statistics collections managed by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. The report provides…

  18. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  19. Simple bone cyst presenting as an incidental finding in pretreatment orthodontic radiograph: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salini G Sudha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment radiographs, especially panoramic and lateral cephalometric are routinely used as an aid in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Sometimes abnormalities may be detected as incidental findings in such radiographs that require medical or odontological management. Simple bone cyst is an uncommon lesion mostly occurring in young individuals; it is often asymptomatic and accidently discovered during routine radiological examination. Mostly the pathology presents as a unilocular radiolucency in the mandible between canine and third molar. A definite diagnosis is invariably achieved during surgery as it presents as an empty cavity without lining. We present a case of a simple bone cyst of the body of mandible identified during routine pretreatment orthodontic radiograph.

  20. HANFORD MEDIUM & LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 LAB REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HAMILTON, D.W.

    2006-01-30

    A fractional crystallization (FC) process is being developed to supplement tank waste pretreatment capabilities provided by the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). FC can process many tank wastes, separating wastes into a low-activity fraction (LAW) and high-activity fraction (HLW). The low-activity fraction can be immobilized in a glass waste form by processing in the bulk vitrification (BV) system.

  1. Biomass pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessey, Susan Marie; Friend, Julie; Elander, Richard T; Tucker, III, Melvin P

    2013-05-21

    A method is provided for producing an improved pretreated biomass product for use in saccharification followed by fermentation to produce a target chemical that includes removal of saccharification and or fermentation inhibitors from the pretreated biomass product. Specifically, the pretreated biomass product derived from using the present method has fewer inhibitors of saccharification and/or fermentation without a loss in sugar content.

  2. Quality Assurance in Transnational Higher Education. ENQA Workshop Report 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Bergan, Sjur; Cassar, Daniela; Hamilton, Marlene; Soinila, Michele; Sursock, Andree; Uvalic-Trumbic, Stamenka; Williams, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present report is the product of an ENQA (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education) Bologna Seminar "Quality Assurance in Transnational Education: from words to action" hosted by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA, UK) in London in December, 2008. The seminar discussed the current trends in Transnational…

  3. Higher Education Finance. An Annotated Bibliography, Report 96-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, William

    This annotated bibliography on higher education finance lists 79 journal articles, books, conference papers, and reports originally published from 1973 through 1995 with most published in the 1990s. Citations include lengthy analytical summaries and critiques. The bibliography is presented in six sections which cover the following topics: (1)…

  4. Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education: Interconnecting the Reporting Process and Organisational Change Management for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Ceulemans; Rodrigo Lozano; María del Mar Alonso-Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been a considerable increase in the publication of sustainability reports in the corporate world in the last decade, sustainability reporting in higher education institutions is still in its early stages. This study’s aim was to explore the relationship between sustainability reporting and organizational change management for sustainability in higher education. A survey was sent to higher education institutions worldwide that have published sustainability reports in the las...

  5. GREET Pretreatment Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adom, Felix K.; Dunn, Jennifer B.; Han, Jeongwoo

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. This report documents the material and energy flows that occur when fermentable sugars from four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar) are produced via dilute acid pretreatment and ammonia fiber expansion. These flows are documented for inclusion in the pretreatment module of the Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. Process simulations of each pretreatment technology were developed in Aspen Plus. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in the GREET pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  6. Preliminary assessment of hazardous-waste pretreatment as an air-pollution-control technique. Final report, 25 July 1983-31 July 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivey, J.J.; Allen, C.C.; Green, D.A.; Wood, J.P.; Stallings, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    The report evaluates twelve commercially available treatment techniques for their use in removing volatile constituents from hazardous and potentially hazardous waste streams. A case study of the cost of waste treatment is also provided for each technique. The results show that air stripping or evaporation coupled with carbon adsorption of the off gases; steam stripping; and batch distillation are the most widely applicable pretreatment techniques. The cost-effectiveness of pretreatment varies widely with waste-stream characteristics and type of pretreatment, with typical values being between $55 and $1,800 per megagram of volatile removed.

  7. Lime Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Rocio; Granda, Cesar Benigno; Holtzapple, Mark T.

    Lime pretreatment has proven to be a useful method for selectively reducing the lignin content of lignocellulosic biomass without significant loss in carbohydrates, thus realizing an important increase in biodigestibility. In lime pretreatment, the biomass is pretreated with calcium hydroxide and water under different conditions of temperature and pressure. It can be accomplished in one of three fashions: (1) short-term pretreatment that lasts up to 6 h, requires temperatures of 100-160°C, and can be applied with or without oxygen (pressure ~200 psig); (2) long-term pretreatment taking up to 8 weeks, requiring only 55-65°C, and capable of running with or without air (atmospheric pressure); and (3) simple pretreatment requiring 1 h in boiling water, without air or oxygen. Nonoxidative conditions are effective at low lignin contents (below ~18% lignin), whereas oxidative conditions are required for high lignin contents (above ~18% lignin).

  8. Docetaxel Rechallenge in a Heavily Pretreated Patient With Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; Pagliuca, Martina; Perillo, Teresa; Benincasa, Alfonso; Bosso, Davide; De Placido, Sabino; Buonerba, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Chemotherapy agents for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) include docetaxel and cabazitaxel. Although docetaxel is approved in the first-line treatment setting, a few studies have shown that selected patients can benefit from docetaxel rechallenge.We, here, report the case of a heavily pretreated mCRPC patient who reported clinical benefit from receiving docetaxel after previous exposure to docetaxel, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, and enzalutamide.After 4 cycles of treatment, patient's performance status had improved to 1, the hemoglobin level was 12.9 g/dL and his serum prostate specific antigen levels were reduced by >70%, with no treatment-related adverse events.Although docetaxel rechallenge is a therapeutic option for selected patients, the risk of cumulative toxicity described in literature must be carefully considered.As the risk of cabazitaxel-related cumulative toxicity is probably lower, retreatment with cabazitaxel rather than docetaxel may also be an option in the setting of heavily pretreated mCRPC patients.

  9. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to {approximately}2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  10. Pretreatment of Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge: Report for the period October 1990--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    The current mission of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site is one of environmental restoration. A major task within this mission is the disposal of large volumes of high-level wastes (HLW) that are stored in underground tanks on the site. Under the current planning assumptions, all high-level tank waste will be vitrified as borosilicate glass and then disposed of in a geologic repository. The costs associated with this disposal scheme are very high. Thus, methods to reduce the volume of glass required to vitrify these wastes are currently being investigated. Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) sludge is a unique transuranic waste that is stored in tank 241- SY-102 on the Hanford site. As the name implies, the bulk of this material consists of waste from operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant; but, other wastes have also been added (e.g., wastes from decontamination activities). Because the quantities of plutonium and americium in the PFP sludge are greater than 100 nCi/g, this sludge must be handled as a HLW. Approximately 6000 glass canisters would result from vitrifying this waste directly. Sludge washing would reduce the required number of canisters to [approximately]2500, with the volume of glass being driven by the low allowable concentration limit for Cr in the vitrification plant feed. The cost of production and subsequent geologic disposal of each canister of glass is expected to be $0.5 M to $1 M. Thus, an economic incentive exists to develop methods of pretreating the sludge to reduce the number of glass canisters needed to contain the final vitrified product.

  11. Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were

  12. Final Report - "Foaming and Antifoaming and Gas Entrainment in Radioactive Waste Pretreatment and Immobilization Processes"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasan, Darsh T.

    2007-10-09

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) and Hanford site are in the process of stabilizing millions of gallons of radioactive waste slurries remaining from production of nuclear materials for the Department of Energy (DOE). The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at SRS is currently vitrifying the waste in borosilicate glass, while the facilities at the Hanford site are in the construction phase. Both processes utilize slurry-fed joule-heated melters to vitrify the waste slurries. The DWPF has experienced difficulty during operations. The cause of the operational problems has been attributed to foaming, gas entrainment and the rheological properties of the process slurries. The rheological properties of the waste slurries limit the total solids content that can be processed by the remote equipment during the pretreatment and meter feed processes. Highly viscous material can lead to air entrainment during agitation and difficulties with pump operations. Excessive foaming in waste evaporators can cause carryover of radionuclides and non-radioactive waste to the condensate system. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the surface phenomena, suspension rheology and bubble generation of interactions that lead to foaming and air entrainment problems in the DOE High Level and Low Activity Radioactive Waste separation and immobilization processes were pursued under this project. The first major task accomplished in the grant proposal involved development of a theoretical model of the phenomenon of foaming in a three-phase gas-liquid-solid slurry system. This work was presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis (9). The second major task involved the investigation of the inter-particle interaction and microstructure formation in a model slurry by the batch sedimentation method. Both experiments and modeling studies were carried out. The results were presented in a recently completed Ph.D. thesis. The third task involved the use of laser confocal microscopy to study

  13. FY-2016 Methyl Iodide Higher NOx Adsorption Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2016 under the Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) Program Offgas Sigma Team to further research and advance the technical maturity of solid sorbents for capturing iodine-129 in off-gas streams during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Adsorption testing with higher levels of NO (approximately 3,300 ppm) and NO2 (up to about 10,000 ppm) indicate that high efficiency iodine capture by silver aerogel remains possible. Maximum iodine decontamination factors (DFs, or the ratio of iodine flowrate in the sorbent bed inlet gas compared to the iodine flowrate in the outlet gas) exceeded 3,000 until bed breakthrough rapidly decreased the DF levels to as low as about 2, when the adsorption capability was near depletion. After breakthrough, nearly all of the uncaptured iodine that remains in the bed outlet gas stream is no longer in the form of the original methyl iodide. The methyl iodide molecules are cleaved in the sorbent bed, even after iodine adsorption is no longer efficient, so that uncaptured iodine is in the form of iodine species soluble in caustic scrubber solutions, and detected and reported here as diatomic I2. The mass transfer zone depths were estimated at 8 inches, somewhat deeper than the 2-5 inch range estimated for both silver aerogels and silver zeolites in prior deep-bed tests, which had lower NOx levels. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity and silver utilization for these higher NOx tests, at about 5-15% of the original sorbent mass, and about 12-35% of the total silver, respectively, were lower than for trends from prior silver aerogel and silver zeolite tests with lower NOx levels. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to expand the database for organic iodide adsorption and increase the technical maturity if iodine adsorption processes.

  14. Prices, Productivity, and Investment: Assessing Financial Strategies in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Edward P.

    This analysis critically examines the cost controversy in higher education with an eye to resolving the crisis which is currently serving to exacerbate public willingness to fund higher education. An introduction touches on the role and influence of political ideologies and offers a framework to be used throughout the analysis for critically…

  15. Diversity Leadership in Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 32, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr., Ed.; Martinez, Ruben O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This monograph examines and discusses the context for diversity leadership roles and practices in higher education by using research and theoretical and applied literatures from a variety of fields, including the social sciences, business, and higher education. Framing the discussion on leadership in this monograph is the perspective that American…

  16. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  17. The Entrepreneurial Domains of American Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 34, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Matthew M.; Metcalf, Amy Scott

    2009-01-01

    This volume draws on a diverse set of literatures to represent the various ways in which entrepreneurship is understood in and applied to higher education. It provides a platform for debate for those considering applications of entrepreneurial principles to academic research and practices. Using academic entrepreneurship in the United States as…

  18. Peat Biogasification Development Program. Quarterly progress report No. 3, April 1-June 30, 1980. [Pretreatment; anaerobic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wise, D.L.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures for High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) are under development that will identify and quantify fermentable material contained in pretreated peat liquors. Several of the model compounds hypothesized to be a product of peat pretreatment have been identified with HPLC and confirmed with Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC). However, there are numerous unknown peaks of other products for which elution times and extinction coefficients must be determined in order to make HPLC a quantitative analytical tool for kinetic data.

  19. Strategies and Consequences. Managing the Costs in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggaman, John S.

    This report focuses on the need for better management of higher education resources in view of the rising costs and changing revenues now confronting higher education institutions in the United States. Rising costs and changing revenues are reflected in stagnating faculty salaries, a decline in enrollment, rising administrative and insurance…

  20. Strategic Reporting Tool: Balanced Scorecards in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyddon, Jan W.; McComb, Bruce E.

    2008-01-01

    In this toolbox article, the authors describe the recommended steps for creating a community college balanced scorecard that measures and reports on key performance indicators based on targets and signal values to end-users, college constituents and external stakeholders. Based on extensive experience in the field, the authors provide a…

  1. GREET Pretreatment Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adom, Felix K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Han, Jeongwoo [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    A wide range of biofuels and biochemicals can be produced from cellulosic biomass via different pretreatment technologies that yield sugars. Process simulations of dilute acid and ammonia fiber expansion pretreatment processes and subsequent hydrolysis were developed in Aspen Plus for four lignocellulosic feedstocks (corn stover, miscanthus, switchgrass, and poplar). This processing yields sugars that can be subsequently converted to biofuels or biochemical. Material and energy consumption data from Aspen Plus were then compiled in a new Greenhouses Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREETTM) pretreatment module. The module estimates the cradle-to-gate fossil energy consumption (FEC) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with producing fermentable sugars. This report documents the data and methodology used to develop this module and the cradle-to-gate FEC and GHG emissions that result from producing fermentable sugars.

  2. Danish MMR vaccination coverage is considerably higher than reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Nanna; Mygind, Anna; Bro, Flemming

    2017-02-01

    The Danish childhood vaccination programme offers protection against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). Nevertheless, many children appear to be unvaccinated according to the national registers. The aim of this study was to estimate the MMR1 vaccination coverage based on a medical record review of children whose vaccination status is negative according to the register-based data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 19 randomly selected general practices in the Central Denmark Region including 1,712 children aged 18-42 months. The practices received a registration form listing children with a negative MMR1 vaccination status in the register-based data. The general practices then validated the children's vaccination status by medical record review. In total, 94% of the children had been vaccinated according to the medical records in general practice compared with 86% according to the register-based data. Of the 246 children who were unvaccinated according to the register-based data, 135 (55%) had been vaccinated according to the medical records. This discrepancy was due mainly to administrative reimbursement errors. The MMR1 vaccination coverage in Denmark seems to be considerably higher than reflected in national registers. Using medical record review to re-assess the vaccination status revealed that most of the supposedly unvaccinated children had, in fact, been vaccinated. The Danish Research Foundation for General Practice and the General Practitioners' Foundation for Education and Development. not relevant.

  3. Construction of higher dimensional charged gravastars: a survey report

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, S; Guha, B K; Ray, Saibal

    2015-01-01

    We explore possibility to find out a new model of gravastars in the extended $D$-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell spacetime. The class of solutions as obtained by Mazur and Mottola of a neutral gravastar~\\cite{Mazur2001,Mazur2004} have been observed as an alternative to $D$-dimensional versions of the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole. To tackle the spherical system in a convenient way we have configured that the gravastar consists of three distinct regions with different equations of state as follows: [I] Interior region $0 \\leq r < r_1$,~$\\rho = -p$, [II] Thin shell region $r_1 \\leq r < r_2$,~$\\rho = p$, and [III] Exterior region $r_2 < r$,~$\\rho = p =0$. The outer region of this gravastar model therefore corresponds to a higher dimensional Reissner-Nordstr{\\"o}m black hole. In connection to this junction conditions are provided and therefore we have formulated mass and the related Equation of State of the gravastar. It has been shown that the model satisfies all the requirements of the physical fea...

  4. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  5. Pre-treatment of biofuels for power production. Final report (1998). K. Joule 3 - OPTEB, Task: No. 19/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, P.A.; Sander, B.; Dam-Johansen, K.

    1999-10-01

    Co-firing of straw and coal on existing pulverised coal fired power plants may cause problems with deposition, corrosion, deactivation of SCR catalysts and impedes the utilisation of the fly ash, because of the high chlorine and potassium content of straw. Experiments with co-combustion of straw and coal on boilers plants have shown, that when maximal 20% of straw on a thermal basis is applied the most serious problems is the deactivation of high dust SCR catalysts and the deterioration of fly ash quality. The objective of this work was to evaluate a large-scale pre-treatment process for straw. The process applies pyrolysis at a moderate temperature, where the alkaline is retained in the char. The char is then washed and char and pyrolysis gasses can be co-fired with coal without causing serious problems. Fundamental laboratory studies as well as technical investigations were conducted to evaluate the pre-treatment concept. The laboratory studies were mainly done to improve the understanding of potassium and chlorine release during pyrolysis and the extraction of char with water. Some work were also done with respect to particle characterisation, straw pyrolysis kinetic and straw char combustion. The technical evaluation of a plant with 20 tons/hour capacity included investigations of possible reactor technologies, waste water handling, power efficiency and investment costs. Based on the laboratory experiments a pyrolysis temperature of 500 to 600 deg. C is recommended for the pre-treatment process. A high degree of pyrolysis is obtained without a significant release of potassium to the gas, but a release of 30 to 60% of the chlorine can not be avoided. Extraction of potassium from char with water is a two-step process, where the first step is a fast dissolution of potassium salts and the second step is a slow release of potassium from the interior of the char particle. A high potassium removal during char wash could not be obtained for all types of char within

  6. PSA Response to Lenalidomide Therapy in a Pre-Treated Patient with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Refractory to Hormones and Chemotherapy: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Manel Gasent Blesa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Hormone-resistant prostate cancer (HRPC occurs when prostate cancer is no longer responsive to hormone therapy. Treatment options are limited, and there is a clear necessity for therapies that improve outcome. Preclinical and clinical evidence supports the role of the immunomodulatory agent lenalidomide in HRPC. In this paper, we report that lenalidomide showed antitumoral activity in a patient with HRPC and bone metastases pre-treated with chemotherapy, decreased the PSA level and improved the patient’s health status for the first 5 months. It is important to emphasize that it was not associated with hematologic toxicity.

  7. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2012-01-01

    A method combines solid phase acidification with two non-toxic biocides to prevent ammonia volatilization and microbial proliferation. The safe, non-oxidizing biocide combination consists of a quaternary amine and a food preservative. This combination has exhibited excellent stabilization of both acidified and unacidified urine. During pretreatment tests, composite urine collected from donors was challenged with a microorganism known to proliferate in urine, and then was processed using the nonhazardous urine pre-treatment method. The challenge microorganisms included Escherichia coli, a common gram-negative bacteria; Enterococcus faecalis, a ureolytic gram-positive bacteria; Candida albicans, a yeast commonly found in urine; and Aspergillus niger, a problematic mold that resists urine pre-treatment. Urine processed in this manner remained microbially stable for over 57 days. Such effective urine stabilization was achieved using non-toxic, non-oxidizing biocides at higher pH (3.6 to 5.8) than previous methods in use or projected for use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). ISS urine pretreatment methods employ strong oxidants including ozone and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a carcinogenic material, under very acidic conditions (pH = 1.8 to 2.4). The method described here offers a much more benign chemical environment than previous pretreatment methods, and will lower equivalent system mass (ESM) by reducing containment volume and mass, system complexity, and crew time needed to handle pre-treatment chemicals. The biocides, being non-oxidizing, minimize the potential for chemical reactions with urine constituents to produce volatile, airborne contaminants such as cyanogen chloride. Additionally, the biocides are active under significantly less acidic conditions than those used in the current system, thereby reducing the degree of required acidification. A simple flow-through solid phase acidification (SPA) bed is employed to overcome the natural buffering

  8. Reducing barriers to energy efficiency in the German higher education sector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, J.; Boede, U.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the empirical research into barriers to energy efficiency in the German higher education (HE) sector. It is one of nine such reports in the BARRIERS project. The report contains description and analysis of six case studies of energy management in German universities. The results are analysed using the theoretical framework developed for the BARRIERS project (Sorrell et al., 2000). The report also provides brief recommendations on how these barriers to the rational use of energy (RUE) may be overcome and how energy efficiency within the sector may be improved. The results of the study for the higher education sector in Germany are summarised in this executive summary under the following headings: - Characterising the higher education sector; - Case studies of energy management in the German higher education sector; - Evidence of barriers in the German higher education sector; - The role of energy service companies in the higher education sector; - Policy implications. (orig.)

  9. The Supply of Part-Time Higher Education in the UK. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Claire; Birkbeck, Anne Jamieson; Mason, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This report explores the supply of part-time higher education in the UK, with particular consideration to the study of part-time undergraduate provision in England. It is the final publication in the series of reports on individual student markets that were commissioned by Universities UK following the publication of the reports on the Future size…

  10. Higher Education in Kentucky. Final Report of the SCR 30 Study Committee. Program Evaluation. Research Report No. 222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Joseph; And Others

    A report on higher education in Kentucky is presented, with attention to governance, funding, tuition, financial aid, staffing and salary comparisons for administrators and faculty, enrollment, degree production, cooperation, and quality issues. The statutory organization of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education is specified, along with the…

  11. New Drugs for Pretreatment of Organophosphonate Intoxication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-20

    COPY A D L£> SRI PROJECT PYU-4681 NEW DRUGS FOR PRETREATMENT OF ORGANOPHOSPHONATE INTOXICATION FINAL REPORT AD-B145 250 Daniel W. Parish, Allen...BB WORK UNIT ACCESSION NO. 099 11. TITLE (indud* Security Oaofficattofl) New Drugs for Pretreatment of Organophosphonate Intoxication...undertaken for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (MRDC) under Contract DAMD17-88-C-8001, " New Drugs for Pretreatment of

  12. Chemical and Physicochemical Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Brodeur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Overcoming the recalcitrance (resistance of plant cell walls to deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals. The recalcitrance is due to the highly crystalline structure of cellulose which is embedded in a matrix of polymers-lignin and hemicellulose. The main goal of pretreatment is to overcome this recalcitrance, to separate the cellulose from the matrix polymers, and to make it more accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis. Reports have shown that pretreatment can improve sugar yields to higher than 90% theoretical yield for biomass such as wood, grasses, and corn. This paper reviews different leading pretreatment technologies along with their latest developments and highlights their advantages and disadvantages with respect to subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. The effects of different technologies on the components of biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin are also reviewed with a focus on how the treatment greatly enhances enzymatic cellulose digestibility.

  13. Chemical and physicochemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, Gary; Yau, Elizabeth; Badal, Kimberly; Collier, John; Ramachandran, K B; Ramakrishnan, Subramanian

    2011-01-01

    Overcoming the recalcitrance (resistance of plant cell walls to deconstruction) of lignocellulosic biomass is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals. The recalcitrance is due to the highly crystalline structure of cellulose which is embedded in a matrix of polymers-lignin and hemicellulose. The main goal of pretreatment is to overcome this recalcitrance, to separate the cellulose from the matrix polymers, and to make it more accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis. Reports have shown that pretreatment can improve sugar yields to higher than 90% theoretical yield for biomass such as wood, grasses, and corn. This paper reviews different leading pretreatment technologies along with their latest developments and highlights their advantages and disadvantages with respect to subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. The effects of different technologies on the components of biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin) are also reviewed with a focus on how the treatment greatly enhances enzymatic cellulose digestibility.

  14. A Methodology for Sustainability Evaluation and Reporting in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Ana C.; Carravilla, Maria Antonia; Oliveira, Jose F.; Costa, Carlos A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology that allows higher education institutions (HEIs) to promote, to evaluate and to report on sustainability. The ultimate goal of the afore-mentioned methodology is to help HEIs achieve sustainability. First, a model entitled Sustainability in Higher Education Institutions (SusHEI) that generally…

  15. Sources of Fluctuations and Growth of Investment in Higher Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Walter W.

    A study was undertaken to apply family investment techniques and public expenditure analysis to problems faced in higher education, treating expenditures for higher education as an investment in human resources. The report is addressed to economists, policy makers, and educators and students, and is both technical and nontechnical in its various…

  16. A Management Control Perspective of Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education: In Search of a Holistic View

    OpenAIRE

    Ceulemans, Kim; Van Caillie, Didier; Molderez, Ingrid; Van Liedekerke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions have been actively attempting to integrate sustainability in their curricula, research, operations, and outreach activities over the last decades. Despite the efforts undertaken, it is currently still challenging for their internal and external stakeholders to assess an institution’s sustainability-related activities and the extent of their implementation within the different activities of higher education. Since sustainability reporting in higher ...

  17. LANGUAGE POLICY AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA, FINAL DRAFT OF CONSULTANT'S REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOSS, RICHARD B.

    A FIELD INVESTIGATION FOR THIS REPORT WAS CONDUCTED FROM SEPTEMBER TO DECEMBER 1964 THROUGH THE FACILITIES OF THE JOINT UNESCO-IAU RESEARCH OFFICE ON HIGHER EDUCATION IN KUALA LUMPUR. IN FIVE OF THE EIGHT COUNTRIES COVERD BY THE REPORT (MALAYSIA, THAILAND, CAMBODIA, SOUTH VIETNAM, AND THE PHILIPPINES), IT WAS POSSIBLE TO MAKE "FAIRLY EXTENSIVE…

  18. Pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for the production of bioethanol - Comparison of five pretreatment technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Thygesen, Anders; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe

    2013-01-01

    A qualified estimate for pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for ethanol production was given, based on the experience of pretreatment of land-based biomass. C. linum was subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment (HTT), wet oxidation (WO), steam explosion (STEX), plasma......-assisted pretreatment (PAP) and ball milling (BM), to determine effects of the pretreatment methods on the conversion of C. linum into ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). WO and BM showed the highest ethanol yield of 44. g ethanol/100. g glucan, which was close to the theoretical ethanol...... yield of 57. g ethanol/100. g glucan. A 64% higher ethanol yield, based on raw material, was reached after pretreatment with WO and BM compared with unpretreated C. linum, however 50% of the biomass was lost during WO. Results indicated that the right combination of pretreatment and marine macroalgae...

  19. Comparing the performance of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in sulfuric acid based pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärcher, M A; Iqbal, Y; Lewandowski, I; Senn, T

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the suitability of Miscanthus x giganteus and wheat straw biomass in dilute acid catalyzed pretreatment. Miscanthus and wheat straw were treated in a dilute sulfuric acid/steam explosion pretreatment. As a result of combining dilute sulfuric acid- and steam explosion pretreatment the hemicellulose hydrolysis yields (96% in wheat straw and 90% in miscanthus) in both substrates were higher than reported in literature. The combined severity factor (=CSF) for optimal hemicellulose hydrolysis was 1.9 and 1.5 in for miscanthus and wheat straw respectively. Because of the higher CSF value more furfural, furfuryl alcohol, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and acetic acid was formed in miscanthus than in wheat straw pretreatment.

  20. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  1. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  2. Financing Higher Education in Francophone West Africa. An EDI Policy Seminar Report, Number 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Angela

    Meetings were held in Senegal in 1985, in Cote d'Ivoire in 1986, and in Zimbabwe in 1987, concerning the current state of higher education finance in Africa, the structure of unit costs, and the role of development assistance agencies and other sources of financial support. Reports are presented concerning the macroeconomic perspective, internal…

  3. Integrated analysis of hydrothermal flow through pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault-Leger Veronique

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of hydrothermal flowthrough (FT pretreatment severity on pretreatment and solubilization performance metrics was evaluated for three milled feedstocks (corn stover, bagasse, and poplar and two conversion systems (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using yeast and fungal cellulase, and fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum. Results Compared to batch pretreatment, FT pretreatment consistently resulted in higher XMG recovery, higher removal of non-carbohydrate carbon and higher glucan solubilization by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. XMG recovery was above 90% for FT pretreatment below 4.1 severity but decreased at higher severities, particularly for bagasse. Removal of non-carbohydrate carbon during FT pretreatment increased from 65% at low severity to 80% at high severity for corn stover, and from 40% to 70% for bagasse and poplar. Solids obtained by FT pretreatment were amenable to high conversion for all of the feedstocks and conversion systems examined. The optimal time and temperature for FT pretreatment on poplar were found to be 16 min and 210°C. At these conditions, SSF glucan conversion was about 85%, 94% of the XMG was removed, and 62% of the non carbohydrate mass was solubilized. Solubilization of FT-pretreated poplar was compared for C. thermocellum fermentation (10% inoculum, and for yeast-fungal cellulase SSF (5% inoculum, cellulase loading of 5 and 10 FPU/g glucan supplemented with β-glucosidase at 15 and 30 U/g glucan. Under the conditions tested, which featured low solids concentration, C. thermocellum fermentation achieved faster rates and more complete conversion of FT-pretreated poplar than did SSF. Compared to SSF, solubilization by C. thermocellum was 30% higher after 4 days, and was over twice as fast on ball-milled FT-pretreated poplar. Conclusions XMG removal trends were similar between feedstocks whereas glucan conversion trends were significantly

  4. Aqueous ionic liquid pretreatment of straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dongbao; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2011-07-01

    Pretreatment is the key to unlock the recalcitrance of lignocellulose for cellulosic biofuels production. Increasing attention has been drawn to ionic liquids (ILs) for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, because this approach has several advantages over conventional methods. However, cost and energy-intensive recycling of the solvents are major constraints preventing ILs from commercial viability. In this work, a mixture of ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate and water was demonstrated to be effective for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, evidenced by the removal of lignin and a reduction in cellulose crystallinity. A higher fermentable sugar yield (81%) was obtained than for pure ionic liquid pretreatment under the same conditions (67%). Aqueous ionic liquid pretreatment has the advantages of less usage and easier recycling of ILs, and reduced viscosity. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Status report: Pretreatment chemistry evaluation FY1997 -- Wash and leach factors for the single-shell tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, N.G.

    1997-08-01

    The wash factors will be used to partition the single-shell tank (SST) inventory into soluble and insoluble portions. The leach factors will be used to estimate the further removal of bulk analytes, such as chromium, aluminum, and phosphate, as well as minor components. Wash and leach factors are given here for 18 analytes, elements expected to drive the volume of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW). These factors are determined by a weighting methodology developed earlier by this task. Tank-specific analyte inventory values depicted in Tank Waste Data Summary Worksheets, are calculated from concentrations obtained from characterization reports; the waste density; and the tank waste volume. The experimentally determined percentage of analytes removed by washing and leaching in a particular tank waste are translated into a mass (metric tons) in Experimental Washing and Leaching Data Summary Worksheets.

  6. Public Policies, Prices, and Productivity in American Higher Education. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid increases in what colleges charge and what they spend per student have been and remain one of the most controversial aspects of American higher education. Tuition, fees, and other college charges have increased in both the public and private sectors at more than twice the rate of inflation for over a quarter century. Trends over time in what…

  7. Public Policies, Prices, and Productivity in American Higher Education. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid increases in what colleges charge and what they spend per student have been and remain one of the most controversial aspects of American higher education. Tuition, fees, and other college charges have increased in both the public and private sectors at more than twice the rate of inflation for over a quarter century. Trends over time in what…

  8. Blueprint or Blue Remembered Hills? The Relevance of the Robbins Report to the Present Reforms of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presents opposing interpretations of the Robbins Report, stating that British higher education is still guided by its principles. Examines the report's influence on the size and shape of the higher education system, the character of higher education regarding teaching and research, and higher education's place in modern society. (GEA)

  9. Blueprint or Blue Remembered Hills? The Relevance of the Robbins Report to the Present Reforms of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presents opposing interpretations of the Robbins Report, stating that British higher education is still guided by its principles. Examines the report's influence on the size and shape of the higher education system, the character of higher education regarding teaching and research, and higher education's place in modern society. (GEA)

  10. Methods for pretreating biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Chundawat, Shishir; Sousa, Leonardo

    2017-05-09

    A method for pretreating biomass is provided, which includes, in a reactor, allowing gaseous ammonia to condense on the biomass and react with water present in the biomass to produce pretreated biomass, wherein reactivity of polysaccharides in the biomass is increased during subsequent biological conversion as compared to the reactivity of polysaccharides in biomass which has not been pretreated. A method for pretreating biomass with a liquid ammonia and recovering the liquid ammonia is also provided. Related systems which include a biochemical or biofuel production facility are also disclosed.

  11. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.A.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1994-02-01

    In this quarter, progress has been made in the following two aspects: The influences of temperature, dispersed Mo catalyst, and solvent on the liquefaction conversion and composition of products from low-rank coals; and the hydrous pyrolysis of a lignite and spectroscopic characterization of its structural transformation during the hydrous pyrolysis. The analytical work described in this quarter also represents molecular-level characterization of products. The purpose of the first part of the work described in this quarter is to study the influences of temperature, solvent and dispersed Mo catalyst on the liquefaction conversion and chemical composition of the products. Many specialty chemicals, including one- to four-ring aromatics, could potentially be produced by liquefying coal. To achieve this goal, not only a high coal conversion but also a desirable product distribution is necessary. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand the structural changes of the coal during reaction and to investigate the conditions under which the aliphatics or aromatics can be removed from the macromolecular structure of coal. This quarterly report also describes the hydrous pyrolysis of Potapsco lignite and spectroscopic characterization of its structural transformation during the hydrous pyrolysis. This work has some implications both on the structural changes of low-rank coals during pretreatment and on the geochemical reactions during coalification stage. Vitrinite, a major component of most coals, is derived from degraded wood in ancient peat swamps. Organic geochemical studies conducted on a series of coalified wood samples derived mostly from gymnosperms have allowed the development of a chemical reaction series to characterize the major coalification reactions which lignin, the major coal-producing component of wood, undergoes.

  12. Comparison of different pretreatment strategies for enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat and barley straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosgaard, Lisa; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne S

    2007-12-01

    In biomass-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass is a critical requirement for enhancing the accessibility of the cellulose substrate to enzymatic attack. This report evaluates the efficacy on barley and wheat straw of three different pretreatment procedures: acid or water impregnation followed by steam explosion versus hot water extraction. The pretreatments were compared after enzyme treatment using a cellulase enzyme system, Celluclast 1.5 L from Trichoderma reesei, and a beta-glucosidase, Novozyme 188 from Aspergillus niger. Barley straw generally produced higher glucose concentrations after enzymatic hydrolysis than wheat straw. Acid or water impregnation followed by steam explosion of barley straw was the best pretreatment in terms of resulting glucose concentration in the liquid hydrolysate after enzymatic hydrolysis. When the glucose concentrations obtained after enzymatic hydrolyses were related to the potential glucose present in the pretreated residues, the highest yield, approximately 48% (g g-1), was obtained with hot water extraction pretreatment of barley straw; this pretreatment also produced highest yields for wheat straw, producing a glucose yield of approximately 39% (g g-1). Addition of extra enzyme (Celluclast 1.5 L+Novozyme 188) during enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in the highest total glucose concentrations from barley straw, 32-39 g L-1, but the relative increases in glucose yields were higher on wheat straw than on barley straw. Maldi-TOF MS analyses of supernatants of pretreated barley and wheat straw samples subjected to acid and water impregnation, respectively, and steam explosion, revealed that the water impregnated + steam-exploded samples gave a wider range of pentose oligomers than the corresponding acid-impregnated samples.

  13. Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) Integrated Test B Run Report--Caustic and Oxidative Leaching in UFP-VSL-T02A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geeting, John GH; Bredt, Ofelia P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Josephson, Gary B.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.

    2009-12-10

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed, constructed and operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” of the External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.( ) The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing.

  14. Spina bifida with higher position of sacral hiatus: a case report with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    Spina bifida is a developmental defect in the vertebral column, in which the laminae fail to fuse and thereby the spinal cord is relatively unprotected. We report a case of spina bifida, in a dried specimen of sacrum, characterized by a prominent S1 spine and a higher sacral hiatus. Conventional textbooks of anatomy provide less information about the clinical implications of such anomalies and research studies are the only source of information. The present study, discusses in detail, the structural and radiological aspects of spina bifida, with a higher sacral hiatus. Precise knowledge of normal and abnormal anatomy of the sacrum may be clinically important for anesthetists, neurologists, radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, in their clinical practice (Fig. 3, Ref. 16). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk

  15. Enzymic saccharification of pretreated wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallander, L; Eriksson, K E

    1985-05-01

    Studies of pretreatment of wheat and its subsequent saccharification by Trichoderma reesei cellulases are reported. Steam explosion was found to be the most effective of the pretreatment methods tested. Data are presented describing the effect of enzyme and substrate concentration on the rate and degree of hydrolysis. Significant inhibition of the cellulases was observed when sugar concentrations were 6% or higher. This inhibition increased when glucose and ethanol were present simultaneously. Adsorption of enzymes to the substrate was followed during a 24-h hydrolysis period. An initial rapid and extensive adsorption occurred, followed by a short desorption period that was followed in turn by a further increased adsorption peaking after 3 h. Intermediate removal of hydrolysate, particularly in combination with a second addition of enzyme, clearly improved the yield of saccharification compared to an uninterrupted hydrolysis over a 24-h period. Thus, a 74% yield of reducing sugars was obtained. Furthermore, an increase in the amount of recoverable enzymes was observed under these conditions. Evidence is presented that suggests that a countercurrent technique, whereby free enzymes in recovered hydrolysate are adsorbed onto new substrate, may provide a means of recirculating dissolved enzymes.

  16. Higher education and eesearch report of the hearing held on 8 December, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the hearing that took place on Tuesday 8th December 2015 from 1730 to 2000hrs. This was the second session in the series of the ‘LSE Commission on the Future of Britain in Europe’.\\ud Respected practitioners and experts in higher education and research took up our invitation to participate in the hearing to discuss the risks of a Brexit and how universities might act at this important moment in British life. Participants included those with high level and/or frontline expe...

  17. Urgent endarterectomy using pretreatment with free radical scavenger, edaravone, and early clamping of the parent arteries for cervical carotid artery stenosis with crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombus and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Inoue, Takashi; Saito, Hideo; Komoribayashi, Nobukazu; Suga, Yasunori; Ogawa, Akira

    2007-03-01

    A 68-year-old man with left cervical internal carotid artery stenosis suffered crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombus detected by carotid echography and secondary impairment of cerebral hemodynamic reserve demonstrated by positron emission tomography. Urgent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) was performed following pretreatment with edaravone and early clamping of the carotid arteries without intraluminal shunting. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography revealed no new cerebral ischemic lesions and no findings of cerebral hyperperfusion, respectively. The risks associated with CEA are higher for patients with evolving stroke or crescendo transient ischemic attacks than that for patients with stable disease. This case demonstrates that urgent endarterectomy for cervical carotid artery stenosis with crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombi and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia can be successfully performed following pretreatment with edaravone and early clamping of the carotid arteries.

  18. Comparison of different pretreatment strategies for enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat and barley straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosgaard, Lisa; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne Boye Strunge

    2007-01-01

    In biomass-to-ethanol processes a physico-chemical pretreatment of the lignocellulosic biomass is a critical requirement for enhancing the accessibility of the cellulose substrate to enzymatic attack. This report evaluates the efficacy on barley and wheat straw of three different pretreatment...... generally produced higher glucose concentrations after enzymatic hydrolysis than wheat straw. Acid or water impregnation followed by steam explosion of barley straw was the best pretreatment in terms of resulting glucose concentration in the liquid hydrolysate after enzymatic hydrolysis. When the glucose...... a glucose yield of similar to 39% (g g(-1)). Addition of extra enzyme (Celluclast 1.5 L (R)+Novozyme 188) during enzymatic hydrolysis resulted in the highest total glucose concentrations from barley straw, 32-39 g L-1, but the relative increases in glucose yields were higher on wheat straw than on barley...

  19. Hydrothermal pretreatment of palm oil empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanungkalit, Sabar Pangihutan; Mansur, Dieni; Nurhakim, Boby; Agustin, Astrid; Rinaldi, Nino; Muryanto, Fitriady, Muhammad Ariffudin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment methods in 2nd generation bioethanol production more profitable to be developed, since the conventional pretreatment, by using acids or alkalis, is associated with the serious economic and environmental constraints. The current studies investigate hydrothermal pretreatment of palm oil empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a batch tube reactor system with temperature and time range from 160 to 240 C and 15 to 30 min, respectively. The EFB were grinded and separated into 3 different particles sizes i.e. 10 mesh, 18 mesh and 40 mesh, prior to hydrothermal pretreatment. Solid yield and pH of the treated EFB slurries changed over treatment severities. The chemical composition of EFB was greatly affected by the hydrothermal pretreatment especially hemicellulose which decreased at higher severity factor as determined by HPLC. Both partial removal of hemicellulose and migration of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment caused negatively affect for enzymatic hydrolysis. This studies provided important factors for maximizing hydrothermal pretreatment of EFB.

  20. Pretreatment of Agave americana stalk for enzymatic saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiang; Pan, Xuejun

    2012-12-01

    Agave americana is one of commonly grown agave species but currently less valuable because its large flower stalk cannot be used for producing alcoholic beverage. In the present study, the stalk was pretreated with dilute acid (DA), sulfite (SPORL), and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) to preliminarily assess its potential as feedstock for bioethanol production. The changes of cell wall components during the pretreatments, enzymatic digestibility of the pretreated stalks, and the adsorption of cellulases on the substrates were investigated. Results indicated that the pretreatments significantly improved the enzymatic digestibility of the agave stalk. SPORL pretreatment gave higher substrate and sugar yields, while NaOH pretreated stalk had better digestibility under the investigated conditions. The better hydrolysability of NaOH-pretreated stalk was attributed to low lignin and hemicellulose content and high affinity to cellulases.

  1. Lime pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shushien

    Lignocellulose is a valuable alternative energy source. The susceptibility of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis is constrained due to its structural features, so pretreatment is essential to enhance enzymatic digestibility. Of the chemicals used as pretreatment agents, it has been reported that alkalis improve biomass digestibility significantly. In comparison with other alkalis such as NaOH and ammonia, lime (calcium hydroxide) has many advantages; it is very inexpensive, is safe, and can be recovered by carbonating wash water. The effects of lime pretreatment were explored on switchgrass and poplar wood, representing herbaceous and woody biomass, respectively. The effects of pretreatment conditions (time, temperature, lime loading, water loading, particle size, and oxygen pressure) have been systematically studies. Lime alone enhances the digestibility of switchgrass significantly; under the recommended conditions, the 3-d total sugar (glucose + xylose) yields of lime-treated switchgrass were 7 times that of untreated sample. When treating poplar wood, lime must be combined with oxygen to achieve high digestibility; oxidative lime pretreatment increased the 3-d total sugar yield of poplar wood to 12 times that of untreated sample. In a fundamental study, to determine why lime pretreatment is effective, the effects of three structural features on enzymatic digestibility were studied: lignin content, acetyl content, and crystallinity index (CrI). Poplar wood was treated with peracetic acid, potassium hydroxide, and ball milling to produce model lignocelluloses with a broad spectrum of lignin contents, acetyl contents, and CrI, respectively. Enzymatic hydrolysis was performed on the model lignocelluloses to determine the digestibility. Correlations between lignin/carbohydrate ratio, acetyl/carbohydrate ratio, CrI and digestibility were developed. The 95% prediction intervals show that the correlations predict the 1-h and 3-d total sugar conversions of

  2. Pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for the production of bioethanol--comparison of five pretreatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz-Jensen, Nadja; Thygesen, Anders; Leipold, Frank; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe; Roslander, Christian; Lilholt, Hans; Bjerre, Anne Belinda

    2013-07-01

    A qualified estimate for pretreatment of the macroalgae Chaetomorpha linum for ethanol production was given, based on the experience of pretreatment of land-based biomass. C. linum was subjected to hydrothermal pretreatment (HTT), wet oxidation (WO), steam explosion (STEX), plasma-assisted pretreatment (PAP) and ball milling (BM), to determine effects of the pretreatment methods on the conversion of C. linum into ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). WO and BM showed the highest ethanol yield of 44 g ethanol/100g glucan, which was close to the theoretical ethanol yield of 57 g ethanol/100g glucan. A 64% higher ethanol yield, based on raw material, was reached after pretreatment with WO and BM compared with unpretreated C. linum, however 50% of the biomass was lost during WO. Results indicated that the right combination of pretreatment and marine macroalgae, containing high amounts of glucan and cleaned from salts, enhanced the ethanol yield significantly.

  3. Pretreatment of food waste with high voltage pulse discharge towards methane production enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Lianpei; Ma, Chaonan; Liu, Jianyong; Li, Mingfei; Ye, Min; Qian, Guangren

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic batch tests were performed to investigate the methane production enhancement and solid transformation rates from food waste (FW) by high voltage pulse discharge (HVPD) pretreatment. The total cumulative methane production with HVPD pretreatment was 134% higher than that of the control. The final volatile solids transformation rates of FW with and without HVPD pretreatment were 54.3% and 32.3%, respectively. Comparison study on HVPD pretreatment with acid, alkali and ultrasonic pretreatments showed that the methane production and COD removal rates of FW pretreated with HVPD were more than 100% higher than the control, but only about 50% higher can be obtained with other pretreatments. HVPD pretreatment could be a promising pretreatment method in the application of energy recovery from FW.

  4. War and Peace among the Words: Rhetoric, Style and Propaganda in Response to National Reports on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Clifford

    Responses to national reports during October 1984 through May 1985 concerning the state of American higher education are analyzed. Quantitative content analysis and qualitative rehetorical criticism are used to examine responses to national reports. Three national reports are of concern: "Involvement in Learning,""A Nation at…

  5. Compendium on Financing of Higher Education: Final Report of the Financing the Students' Future Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Bethan; Charonis, George-Konstantinos; Haaristo, Hanna-Stella; Maurer, Moritz; Kaiser, Florian; Siegrist, Rahel; McVitty, Debbie; Gruber, Angelika; Heerens, Nik; Xhomaqi, Brikena; Nötzl, Tina; Semjonov, Meeli; Primožic, Rok

    2013-01-01

    Higher education plays a vital role in society and the quality, accessibility, and form of higher education is highly dependent on financing. Financing of higher education is conceived to be of central importance for the future creation and dissemination of knowledge and research. Therefore, the financing of higher education is a topic that has…

  6. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  7. Surfactant coupled sonic pretreatment of waste activated sludge for energetically positive biogas generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushani, U; Rajesh Banu, J; Tamilarasan, K; Kavitha, S; Tae Yeom, Ick

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate (DOSS, a surfactant) on lysis rate of sludge and specific energy required for sonic pretreatment of waste activated sludge (WAS). Different ultrasonic power levels, WAS concentrations, DOSS dosages, and specific energy levels were used to compare pretreatment efficiencies. At an optimum time of 10min with ultrasonic power level of 160W, DOSS coupled sonic pretreatment resulted in better lysis rate (24.7%) of sludge than sonic pretreatment (17.6%). Biodegradability estimation through non-linear regression modeling revealed that DOSS coupled ultrasound pretreatment of sludge showed better biodegradability with higher hydrolysis constant (about 0.25d(-1)) than sonic pretreatment (0.19d(-1)). Nearly six times less energy was required for DOSS coupled ultrasound pretreatment compared to that required for sonic pretreatment. Therefore, DOSS coupled ultrasound pretreatment makes the pretreatment process energetically positive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pretreatment methods for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaoyang; Huang, Fang

    2014-09-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass, such as wood, grass, agricultural, and forest residues, are potential resources for the production of bioethanol. The current biochemical process of converting biomass to bioethanol typically consists of three main steps: pretreatment, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation. For this process, pretreatment is probably the most crucial step since it has a large impact on the efficiency of the overall bioconversion. The aim of pretreatment is to disrupt recalcitrant structures of cellulosic biomass to make cellulose more accessible to the enzymes that convert carbohydrate polymers into fermentable sugars. This paper reviews several leading acidic, neutral, and alkaline pretreatments technologies. Different pretreatment methods, including dilute acid pretreatment (DAP), steam explosion pretreatment (SEP), organosolv, liquid hot water (LHW), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), sodium hydroxide/lime pretreatments, and ozonolysis are intensively introduced and discussed. In this minireview, the key points are focused on the structural changes primarily in cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin during the above leading pretreatment technologies.

  9. PRETREATING THORIUM FOR ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, J.G.; Schaer, G.R.

    1959-07-28

    A method is presented for pretreating a thorium surface prior to electroplating the surface. The pretreatment steps of the invention comprise cleaning by vapor blasting the surface, anodically pickling in a 5 to 15% by volume aqueous hydrochloric acid bath with a current of 125 to 250 amp/sq ft for 3 to 5 min at room temperature, chemically pickling the surface in a 5 to 15% by volume of aqueous sulfuric acid for 3 to 5 min at room temperature, and rinsing the surface with water.

  10. A Review of Two Higher Education Accountability Issues: Student Assessment and Faculty Workload. Report to Utah State Legislature. Report Number 91-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of the Legislative Auditor General, Salt Lake City.

    This report, in examining higher education accountability, reviews how student assessment is used nationally and in Utah to improve higher education accountability, and reviews the methods used in Utah to monitor faculty workload. Student assessments do provide a direct method of evaluating higher education effectiveness, and Utah's institutions…

  11. Institutional wide implementation of key advice for socially inclusive teaching in higher education. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Government policy and institutional initiatives have influenced increases in enrolment of non-traditional students to Australian universities. For these students, university culture is often incongruent with their own, making it difficult to understand the tacit requirements for participation and success. Academic teaching staff are important in creating socially inclusive learning experiences, particularly in first year subjects. This paper presents an institution-wide approach to enhancing socially inclusive teaching at one Australian university. Underpinned by a framework of ”bridging social-incongruity” the initiative was guided by six principles of socially inclusive teaching to support practice as proposed in the 2012 “Effective support of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds in higher education” report commissioned by the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching. Feedback from 150 academic teaching staff from various disciplines and campus locations, suggests this initiative was effective in increasing understanding of socially inclusive teaching practices with many participants indicating the teaching enhancements were applicable for their teaching context.

  12. Peracetic acid-ionic liquid pretreatment to enhance enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uju; Abe, Kojiro; Uemura, Nobuyuki; Oshima, Toyoji; Goto, Masahiro; Kamiya, Noriho

    2013-06-01

    To enhance enzymatic saccharification of pine biomass, the pretreatment reagents peracetic acid (PAA) and ionic liquid (IL) were validated in single reagent pretreatments or combination pretreatments with different sequences. In a 1h saccharification, 5-25% cellulose conversion was obtained from the single pretreatment of PAA or IL. In contrast, a marked enhancement in conversion rates was achieved by PAA-IL combination pretreatments (45-70%). The PAA followed by IL (PAA+IL) pretreatment sequence was the most effective for preparing an enzymatic digestible regenerated biomass with 250-fold higher glucose formation rates than untreated biomass and 2- to 12-fold higher than single pretreatments with PAA or IL alone. Structural analysis confirmed that this pretreatment resulted in biomass with highly porous structural fibers associated with the reduction of lignin content and acetyl groups. Using the PAA+IL sequence, biomass loading in the pretreatment step can be increased from 5% to 15% without significant decrease in cellulose conversion.

  13. EFFECT OF SCREW EXTRUSION PRETREATMENT ON PULPS FROM CHEMICAL PULPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Dong,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of compressive pretreatment before chemical pulping on the properties of poplar kraft and soda-AQ pulp was evaluated. Compressive pretreatment not only resulted in the dissolution of hemicellulose, but also leached extractives. Pulps made from compressive pretreated wood chips required lower beating energy than the untreated pulps to achieve the same beating degree of 45°SR, and the brightness of the handsheets was improved by 2% ISO. Compressive pretreatment allowed for efficient delignification and saved about 6% alkali consumption to achieve similar pulp screen yield. Furthermore, a higher content of fines and slightly lower mechanical properties were observed after the compressive treatment.

  14. Feasibility of Hydrothermal Pretreatment on Maize Silage for Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    The potential of maize silage as a feedstock to produce bioethanol was evaluated in the present study. The hydrothermal pretreatment with five different pretreatment severity factors (PSF) was employed to pretreat the maize silage and compared in terms of sugar recovery, toxic test, and ethanol...... the liquors from the five conditions were not toxic to the Baker’s yeast. Pretreatment under 195°C for 7 min had the similar PSF with that of 185°C for 15 min, and both gave the higher ethanol concentration of 19.92 and 19.98 g/L, respectively. The ethanol concentration from untreated maize silage was only 7...

  15. The dual role of oxygen functions in coal pretreatment and liquefaction: Crosslinking and cleavage reactions. First annual report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serio, M.A.; Kroo, E.; Teng, H.; Charpenay, S.; Solomon, P.R.

    1992-08-01

    The overall objective of this project is elucidate and model the dual role of oxygen functions in thermal pretreatment and liquefaction of low rank coals through the application of analytical techniques and theoretical models. The project will be an integrated study of model polymers representative of coal structures, raw coals of primarily low rank, and selectivity modified coals in order to provide specific information relevant to the reactions of real coals. The investigations will include liquefaction experiments in microautoclave reactors along with extensive analysis of intermediate solid, liquid and gaseous products. Attempts will be made to incorporate the results of experiments on the different systems into a liquefaction model.

  16. Comprehensive utilization of glycerol from sugarcane bagasse pretreatment to fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liqun; Zheng, Anqing; Zhao, Zengli; He, Fang; Li, Haibin

    2015-11-01

    In this study, the effects of glycerol pretreatment on subsequent glycerol fermentation and biomass fast pyrolysis were investigated. The liquid fraction from the pretreatment process was evaluated to be feasible for fermentation by Paenibacillus polymyxa and could be an economic substrate. The pretreated biomass was further utilized to obtain levoglucosan by fast pyrolysis. The pretreated sugarcane bagasse exhibited significantly higher levoglucosan yield (47.70%) than that of un-pretreated sample (11.25%). The promotion could likely be attributed to the effective removal of alkali and alkaline earth metals by glycerol pretreatment. This research developed an economically viable manufacturing paradigm to utilize glycerol comprehensively and enhance the formation of levoglucosan effectively from lignocellulose.

  17. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Advances in aluminum pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudour, Michel; Maintier, Philippe [PPG Industries France, 3 Z.A.E. Les Dix Muids, B.P. 89, F-59583 Marly (France); Simpson, Mark [PPG Industries Inc., 1200 Piedmont Troy, Michigan 48083 (United States); Quaglia, Paolo [PPG Industries Italia, Via Garavelli 21, I-15028 Quattordio (Italy)

    2004-07-01

    As automotive manufacturers continue to look for ways to reduce vehicle weight, aluminum is finding more utility as a body panel component. The substitution of cold-rolled steel and zinc-coated substrates with aluminum has led to new challenges in vehicle pretreatment. As a result, changes to traditional pretreatment chemistries and operating practices are necessary in order to produce an acceptable coating on aluminum body panels. These changes result in increased sludging and other undesirable characteristics. In addition to the chemistry changes, there are also process-related problems to consider. Many existing automotive pretreatment lines simply were not designed to handle aluminum and its increased demands on filtration and circulation equipment. To retrofit such a system is capital intensive and in addition to requiring a significant amount of downtime, may not be totally effective. Thus, the complexities of pre-treating aluminum body panels have actually had a negative effect on efforts to introduce more aluminum into new vehicle design programs. Recent research into ways of reducing the negative effects has led to a new understanding of the nature of zinc phosphate bath -aluminum interactions. Many of the issues associated with the pretreatment of aluminum have been identified and can be mitigated with only minor changes to the zinc phosphate bath chemistry. The use of low levels of soluble Fe ions, together with free fluoride, has been shown to dramatically improve the efficiency of a zinc phosphate system processing aluminum. Appearance of zinc phosphate coatings, coating weights and sludge are all benefited by this chemistry change. (authors)

  19. The Economics of Higher Education: A Report Prepared by the Department of the Treasury with the Department of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of the Treasury, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses the current state of higher education, with a brief high-level overview of the market and a more detailed discussion and analysis of the financial aid system. It also discusses the important changes President Obama has made to make higher education more accessible and affordable. The key findings are: (1) The economic returns…

  20. The Hunt Report and Higher Education Policy in the Republic of Ireland: "An International Solution to an Irish Problem?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John; Loxley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The "National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030" in the Republic of Ireland (universally known as the Hunt Report) represents the latest and most assertive attempt by the Irish state to re-construct higher education in accordance with economic utilitarian objectives. This paper sets out to analyse the historical context, key themes…

  1. Building on Success: Educational Diversity and Equity in Kentucky Higher Education. Choices before the Commonwealth. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, Angelo; Ledesma, Maria; Trent, William; Kurlaender, Michal; Yun, John; Lee, Chungmei; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve; Driscoll, Anne; Orfield, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This report is an effort to assess what has been accomplished in successfully diversifying and desegregating historically segregated and unequal higher educational institutions across Kentucky, and how this was done. The report discusses the changing legal setting for these initiatives, analyzes the educational achievements and challenges, and…

  2. Teaching Strategies Adopted by Teachers at Higher Education Level in Kerala: A Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesa, M.; Nisha, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    In the special context of entrepreneurship, employability skill development, Higher Education 2.0 and the Kovalam Declaration 2016, the present article presents a brief review of genres of teaching strategies at higher education level and attempts to bring to the attention of the readers an account of the teaching strategies adopted by teachers at…

  3. Biomass shock pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.; Madison, Maxine Jones; Ramirez, Rocio Sierra; Deimund, Mark A.; Falls, Matthew; Dunkelman, John J.

    2014-07-01

    Methods and apparatus for treating biomass that may include introducing a biomass to a chamber; exposing the biomass in the chamber to a shock event to produce a shocked biomass; and transferring the shocked biomass from the chamber. In some aspects, the method may include pretreating the biomass with a chemical before introducing the biomass to the chamber and/or after transferring shocked biomass from the chamber.

  4. Fungal cellulase/xylanase production and corresponding hydrolysis using pretreated corn stover as substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiaoqing; Ruan, Zhenhua; Liu, Ying; Niu, Xiaorui; Yue, Zhengbo; Li, Zhimin; Liao, Wei; Liu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Three pretreated corn stover (ammonia fiber expansion, dilute acid, and dilute alkali) were used as carbon source to culture Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 for cellulase and xylanase production. The results indicated that the cultures on ammonia fiber expansion and alkali pretreated corn stover had better enzyme production than the acid pretreated ones. The consequent enzymatic hydrolysis was performed applying fungal enzymes on pretreated corn stover samples. Tukey's statistical comparisons exhibited that there were significant differences on enzymatic hydrolysis among different combination of fungal enzymes and pretreated corn stover. The higher sugar yields were achieved by the enzymatic hydrolysis of dilute alkali pretreated corn stover.

  5. [Hydrothermal pretreatment of canteen waste for grease removal and digestibility improvement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Wang, Hong-Tao; Lu, Wen-Jing

    2009-05-15

    Canteen waste was hydrothermal pretreated to investigate the characters of degreasing, hydrolysis and digestibility by biochemical methane assays. Liquidization and hydrolysis were enhanced in hydrothermal pretreatment. pH of hydrolysate decreased, and SCOD and VFA increased significantly followed by increasing hydrothermal temperature. Floatable grease increased to appropriate ratio for removal, and digestion process completed in 4 days to 6 days with double degradation rate after pretreatment at 150 degrees C for 60 minutes. The 4-day incubation biogas yield was maximum after pretreatment at 170 degrees C, and the methane potential, however, was decreased at higher pretreatment temperature. Energy consumption of optimized pretreatment was recoverable with energy balance analysis.

  6. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 1 - effects of solvents, catalysts and temperature conditions on conversion and structural changes of low-rank coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lili [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Schobert, Harold H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Song, Chunshan [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    The main objectives of this project were to study the effects of low-temperature pretreatments on coal structure and their impacts on subsequent liquefaction. The effects of pretreatment temperatures, catalyst type, coal rank, and influence of solvent were examined. Specific objectives were to identify the basic changes in coal structure induced by catalytic and thermal pretreatments, and to determine the reactivity of the catalytically and thermally treated coals for liquefaction. In the original project management plan it was indicated that six coals would be used for the study. These were to include two each of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite rank. For convenience in executing the experimental work, two parallel efforts were conducted. The first involved the two lignites and one subbituminous coal; and the second, the two bituminous coals and the remaining subbituminous coal. This Volume presents the results of the first portion of the work, studies on two lignites and one subbituminous coal. The remaining work accomplished under this project will be described and discussed in Volume 2 of this report. The objective of this portion of the project was to determine and compare the effects of solvents, catalysts and reaction conditions on coal liquefaction. Specifically, the improvements of reaction conversion, product distribution, as well as the structural changes in the coals and coal-derived products were examined. This study targeted at promoting hydrogenation of the coal-derived radicals, generated during thermal cleavage of chemical bonds, by using a good hydrogen donor-solvent and an effective catalyst. Attempts were also made in efforts to match the formation and hydrogenation of the free radicals and thus to prevent retrogressive reaction.

  7. Reflections on the Future of Global Higher Education - WAAS Conference Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Šlaus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Education is the most important catalyst of social evolution. Today higher education is in the early stages of a revolutionary transition that will have immense impact on the future of global society. This article presents an overview of perspectives explored at the World Academy's Forum on Global Higher Education conducted at the University of California at Berkeley on October 2-3, 2013. It examines issues resulting from rapid changes in educational technology and organization that impact on accessibility, affordability, quality, relevance, employability and content of higher education. It envisions establishment of a World University Consortium as a network and umbrella group to facilitate educational partnerships and linkages with other interested stakeholders at the international level, to provide a centralized source of information about latest innovative ideas and developments in this field, and to explore creative solutions to enhance the reach, quality and relevance of higher education globally.

  8. Microwave pretreatment of switchgrass for bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshwani, Deepak Radhakrishin

    Lignocellulosic materials are promising alternative feedstocks for bioethanol production. These materials include agricultural residues, cellulosic waste such as newsprint and office paper, logging residues, and herbaceous and woody crops. However, the recalcitrant nature of lignocellulosic biomass necessitates a pretreatment step to improve the yield of fermentable sugars. The overall goal of this dissertation is to expand the current state of knowledge on microwave-based pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Existing research on bioenergy and value-added applications of switchgrass is reviewed in Chapter 2. Switchgrass is an herbaceous energy crop native to North America and has high biomass productivity, potentially low requirements for agricultural inputs and positive environmental impacts. Based on results from test plots, yields in excess of 20 Mg/ha have been reported. Environmental benefits associated with switchgrass include the potential for carbon sequestration, nutrient recovery from run-off, soil remediation and provision of habitats for grassland birds. Published research on pretreatment of switchgrass reported glucose yields ranging from 70-90% and xylose yields ranging from 70-100% after hydrolysis and ethanol yields ranging from 72-92% after fermentation. Other potential value-added uses of switchgrass include gasification, bio-oil production, newsprint production and fiber reinforcement in thermoplastic composites. Research on microwave-based pretreatment of switchgrass and coastal bermudagrass is presented in Chapter 3. Pretreatments were carried out by immersing the biomass in dilute chemical reagents and exposing the slurry to microwave radiation at 250 watts for residence times ranging from 5 to 20 minutes. Preliminary experiments identified alkalis as suitable chemical reagents for microwave-based pretreatment. An evaluation of different alkalis identified sodium hydroxide as the most effective alkali reagent. Under optimum pretreatment

  9. Assessing Pretreatment Reactor Scaling Through Empirical Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lischeske, James J.; Crawford, Nathan C.; Kuhn, Erik; Nagle, Nicholas J.; Schell, Daniel J.; Tucker, Melvin P.; McMillan, James D.; Wolfrum, Edward J.

    2016-12-01

    within the near-optimal space for total sugar yield for the LHR. This indicates that the ASE is a good tool for cost effectively finding near-optimal conditions for operating pilot-scale systems, which may be used as starting points for further optimization. Additionally, using a severity-factor approach to optimization was found to be inadequate compared to a multivariate optimization method. Finally, the ASE and the LHR were able to enable significantly higher total sugar yields after enzymatic hydrolysis relative to the ZCR, despite having similar optimal conditions and total xylose yields. This underscores the importance of incorporating mechanical disruption into pretreatment reactor designs to achieve high enzymatic digestibilities.

  10. Effect of liquid hot water pretreatment severity on properties of hardwood lignin and enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Ja Kyong; Kim, Youngmi; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Lignin, one of the major components of lignocellulosic biomass, plays an inhibitory role on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. This work examines the role of lignin in pretreated hardwood, where extents of cellulose hydrolysis decrease, rather than increase with increasing severity of liquid hot water pretreatment. Hardwood pretreated with liquid hot water at severities ranging from log Ro  = 8.25 to 12.51 resulted in 80-90% recovery of the initial lignin in the residual solids. The ratio of acid insoluble lignin (AIL) to acid soluble lignin (ASL) increased and the formation of spherical lignin droplets on the cell wall surface was observed as previously reported in the literature. When lignins were isolated from hardwoods pretreated at increasing severities and characterized based on glass transition temperature (Tg ), the Tg of isolated lignins was found to increase from 171 to 180°C as the severity increased from log Ro  = 10.44 to 12.51. The increase in Tg suggested that the condensation reactions of lignin molecules occurred during pretreatment and altered the lignin structure. The contribution of the changes in lignin properties to enzymatic hydrolysis were examined by carrying out Avicel hydrolysis in the presence of isolated lignins. Lignins derived from more severely pretreated hardwoods had higher Tg values and showed more pronounced inhibition of enzymatic hydrolysis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. KRONOS: A Monte Carlo event generator for higher order QED corrections at HERA — Status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Harald; Manakos, Panagiotis; Mannel, Thomas; Dahmen, Hans D.; Ohl, Thorsten

    1992-12-01

    We report on the status of the Monte Carlo event generator KRONOS for deep inelastic lepton hadron scattering at HERA. KRONOS focusses on the description of electronmagnetic corrections beyond the existing fixed order calculations.

  12. Higher Education for the 1980s. Challenges and Responses. Report of the Hiroshima International Seminar on Higher Education (2nd, Hiroshima, Japan, January 29-31, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Higher Education.

    The challenges of social change, values crises, societal needs for higher education, the internal dynamics of higher educational systems, and future reforms in higher education were discussed at the Second Hiroshima International Seminar on Higher Education. Topics discussed include: Higher Education in an Age of Internationalization (Michio…

  13. 2015 Global Information Technology Report: Consequences on Knowledge Management in Higher Education Institutions in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ololube, Nwachukwu Prince; Agbor, Comfort Nkogho; Major, Nanighe Baldwin; Agabi, Chinyere O.; Wali, Worlu I.

    2016-01-01

    This research is a continuation of a theoretical review that evaluated ICT Policy Outcomes for National Development in relation to Networked Readiness Index (NRI) and the impact it has on knowledge integration and management in higher education institutions in Nigeria. A new dawn in information technology (IT) has initiated new trends in…

  14. Special Report #6. Developing Trends in Content of Collective Bargaining Contracts in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, John

    The growth in the number of higher education collective bargaining contracts continues at a rapid pace, although it is taking longer for the initial contract to be negotiated. The data on 131 contracts covering 215 institutions is included in the statistical tables in this document. Collective bargaining has increased in the West and at least one…

  15. Report of the Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy, January 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education and the Economy of Connecticut, Inc., Hartford.

    The Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy's assessment of the Connecticut system and ways that the educational needs of the economy and the state can be met during a period of declining enrollments and fiscal constraints is presented. Working committees of the commission studied governance and management; business, labor, and…

  16. Brief Report: Joint Attention and Information Processing in Children with Higher Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Peter; Kim, Kwanguk; McIntyre, Nancy; Lerro, Lindsay; Jarrold, William

    2016-01-01

    Theory suggests that information processing during joint attention may be atypical in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This hypothesis was tested in a study of school-aged children with higher functioning ASD and groups of children with symptoms of ADHD or typical development. The results indicated that the control groups displayed…

  17. Higher Education Cost Containment. Performance Audit, November 1995. Report of the State Auditor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Office of State Auditor, Denver.

    Between June and September 1995, this performance audit examined Colorado higher education cost containment in debt refinancing and improvements to student loan processes according to generally accepted government auditing standards. With respect to debt refinancing, the audit concluded that in general, governing boards and institutions were…

  18. Prepared in Mind and Resources? A Report on Public Higher Education in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacbay, Armand; Poliakoff, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed into law the South Carolina Higher Education Efficiency and Administrative Policies Act, maintaining the transparency and accountability that lead to increased academic quality and affordability at colleges and universities. It is in this context that ACTA (American Council of Trustees and…

  19. Made in Maine: A State Report Card on Public Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, Eric; Poliakoff, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Maine is blessed with universities that have records of significant achievement. The seven campuses of the University of Maine System (UMS) together educated over 23,000 students (full-time equivalent) during the past year. But for good reason, in recent years public confidence in higher education throughout the nation has fallen. Half of the…

  20. Reporting the Use of Multiple Imputation for Missing Data in Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manly, Catherine A.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher education researchers using survey data often face decisions about handling missing data. Multiple imputation (MI) is considered by many statisticians to be the most appropriate technique for addressing missing data in many circumstances. In particular, it has been shown to be preferable to listwise deletion, which has historically been a…

  1. Toward a Definition of Verbal Reasoning in Higher Education. Research Report. ETS RR-09-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Nancy W.; Welsh, Cynthia; Kostin, Irene; VanEssen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the literatures of reading and reasoning in the last quarter century, focusing mainly on the disciplines of cognitive science, cognitive developmental psychology, linguistics, and educational psychology. These literatures were synthesized to create a framework for defining verbal reasoning in higher education. Eight…

  2. Interdisciplinarity: The Mutable Paradigm. AAHE/ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No 9, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayville, William V.

    The many forms of interdisciplinarity in higher education institutions and the various ways it has been used to advance curricular changes are examined. Definitions of interdisciplinarity and its variants (multi-, pluri-, and transdisciplinarity) provide a conceptual framework for the examination. In this study, interdisciplinarity is understood…

  3. Academic Judgment and Grievance Arbitration in Higher Education. Special Report No. 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Harold

    The first known analysis of a substantial number of arbitration awards in higher education is presented in an effort to determine whether arbitrators have confined their awards within the contract limitations. All of the arbitration awards generated by the four-year colleges of the State University of New York as well as the awards of the…

  4. European Union Students Studying in English Higher Education Institutions. DIUS Research Report 08-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marian; Rutt, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the pathways, intentions and relevant perceptions of (non-UK) European Union (EU) students entering English higher education. It sought to identify why students wished to obtain an English HE qualification, their attitudes towards the uptake and repayment of tuition fee loans and their future career plans. Drawing on…

  5. Cataloguing E-Books in UK Higher Education Libraries: Report of a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of a 2006 survey of UK Higher Education OPACs in order to provide a snapshot of cataloguing practices for e-books. Design/methodology/approach: The OPACs of 30 UK HE libraries were examined in July/August 2006 to determine which e-books were catalogued, and the level of cataloguing…

  6. 2014-2015 State of CRM Use in Higher Education Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) periodically undertakes research projects to keep themselves and the higher education community in general, informed about relevant current and emerging practices. The aim of this survey was to measure the extent of ownership of Constituent (or Customer)…

  7. Quality: Transforming Postsecondary Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle; Sherr, Lawrence A.

    Many colleges and universities, in responding to public demand for higher education and the external challenges it creates, are employing Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques to improve quality, increase productivity, and decrease costs. The quality improvement process itself (the tools for problem identification and developing solutions),…

  8. CEBAF at higher energies: Working group report on hadron spectroscopy and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)]| [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes topics in hadron spectroscopy and production which could be addressed at CEBAF with an energy upgrade to E{sub {gamma}} = 8 GeV and beyond. The topics discussed include conventional meson and baryon spectrocopy, spectroscopy of exotica (especially molecules and hybrids), CP and CPT tests using {phi} mesons, and new detector and accelerator options.

  9. Giving to Excellence: Generating Philanthropic Support for UK Higher Education. Ross-CASE Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Yashraj

    2016-01-01

    This report presents findings from the 2016 Ross-CASE Survey of Philanthropic Giving to Universities in UK. The project was conducted by CASE Europe and funded by HEFCE and the Ross-Group. This year's survey comes at a time of great change for the UK charity sector. The historical trend data of previous surveys will be invaluable in helping…

  10. 40 CFR 403.10 - Development and submission of NPDES State pretreatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS GENERAL PRE-TREAT-MENT REGULATIONS FOR EXIST-ING AND... conditions; and require compliance by Industrial Users with Pretreatment Standards; (ii) Ensure continuing... compliance by Industrial Users with Pretreatment Standards through the review of self-monitoring reports...

  11. Flipped Classroom Implementation: A Case Report of Two Higher Education Institutions in the United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; White, Paul J.; Khanova, Julia; Yuriev, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This case report explored the implementation of flipped classrooms at two higher education institutions. Experiences and publications from the institutions were used to identify and describe common themes, including successes and challenges encountered along with potential solutions to common misalignments, particularly as related to…

  12. Higher Education in Further Education Colleges: Indirectly Funded Partnerships: Codes of Practice for Franchise and Consortia Arrangements. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This report provides codes of practice for two types of indirectly funded partnerships entered into by higher education institutions and further education sector colleges: franchises and consortia. The codes of practice set out guidance on the principles that should be reflected in the franchise and consortia agreements that underpin indirectly…

  13. Higher Reported Levels of Depression, Stress, and Anxiety Are Associated with Increased Endorsement of ADHD Symptoms by Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Allyson G.; Alexander, Sandra J.; Armstrong, Irene T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which postsecondary students endorse symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and whether experienced level of stress, depression, or anxiety are associated with higher reporting of ADHD symptoms. Students attending a combined health and counseling service completed the Conners Adult ADHD Rating…

  14. Orthogonal Range Reporting: Query Lower Bounds, Optimal Structures in 3-d, and Higher Dimensional Improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Dalgaard

    2010-01-01

    Orthogonal range reporting is the problem of storing a set of n points in d-dimensional space, such that the k points in an axis-orthogonal query box can be reported efficiently. While the 2-d version of the problem was completely characterized in the pointer machine model more than two decades ago...... data structure for the d-dimensional orthogonal range reporting problem in the pointer machine model of computation that uses S(n) space must spend Ω((log n/ log(S(n)/n))⌊d/2⌋--1) time to answer queries. Thus, if S(n)/n is poly-logarithmic, then the query time is at least Ω((log n/ log log n)⌊d/2......) to Ω((log n/ log log n)2 + k) somewhere between three and six dimensions. Finally, we show that our techniques also lead to improved structures for point location in rectilinear subdivisions, that is, the problem of storing a set of n disjoint d-dimensional axis-orthogonal rectangles...

  15. Lignocellulosic Biomass Pretreatment Using AFEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Bals, Bryan; Chundawat, Shishir P. S.; Marshall, Derek; Dale, Bruce E.

    Although cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule, its susceptibility to hydrolysis is restricted due to the rigid lignin and hemicellulose protection surrounding the cellulose micro fibrils. Therefore, an effective pretreatment is necessary to liberate the cellulose from the lignin-hemicellulose seal and also reduce cellulosic crystallinity. Some of the available pretreatment techniques include acid hydrolysis, steam explosion, ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), alkaline wet oxidation, and hot water pretreatment. Besides reducing lignocellulosic recalcitrance, an ideal pretreatment must also minimize formation of degradation products that inhibit subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. AFEX is an important pretreatment technology that utilizes both physical (high temperature and pressure) and chemical (ammonia) processes to achieve effective pretreatment. Besides increasing the surface accessibility for hydrolysis, AFEX promotes cellulose decrystallization and partial hemicellulose depolymerization and reduces the lignin recalcitrance in the treated biomass. Theoretical glucose yield upon optimal enzymatic hydrolysis on AFEX-treated corn stover is approximately 98%. Furthermore, AFEX offers several unique advantages over other pretreatments, which include near complete recovery of the pretreatment chemical (ammonia), nutrient addition for microbial growth through the remaining ammonia on pretreated biomass, and not requiring a washing step during the process which facilitates high solid loading hydrolysis. This chapter provides a detailed practical procedure to perform AFEX, design the reactor, determine the mass balances, and conduct the process safely.

  16. Lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment using AFEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Venkatesh; Bals, Bryan; Chundawat, Shishir P S; Marshall, Derek; Dale, Bruce E

    2009-01-01

    Although cellulose is the most abundant organic molecule, its susceptibility to hydrolysis is restricted due to the rigid lignin and hemicellulose protection surrounding the cellulose micro fibrils. Therefore, an effective pretreatment is necessary to liberate the cellulose from the lignin-hemicellulose seal and also reduce cellulosic crystallinity. Some of the available pretreatment techniques include acid hydrolysis, steam explosion, ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), alkaline wet oxidation, and hot water pretreatment. Besides reducing lignocellulosic recalcitrance, an ideal pretreatment must also minimize formation of degradation products that inhibit subsequent hydrolysis and fermentation. AFEX is an important pretreatment technology that utilizes both physical (high temperature and pressure) and chemical (ammonia) processes to achieve effective pretreatment. Besides increasing the surface accessibility for hydrolysis, AFEX promotes cellulose decrystallization and partial hemicellulose depolymerization and reduces the lignin recalcitrance in the treated biomass. Theoretical glucose yield upon optimal enzymatic hydrolysis on AFEX-treated corn stover is approximately 98%. Furthermore, AFEX offers several unique advantages over other pretreatments, which include near complete recovery of the pretreatment chemical (ammonia), nutrient addition for microbial growth through the remaining ammonia on pretreated biomass, and not requiring a washing step during the process which facilitates high solid loading hydrolysis. This chapter provides a detailed practical procedure to perform AFEX, design the reactor, determine the mass balances, and conduct the process safely.

  17. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  18. Structural Analysis of Alkaline Pretreated Rice Straw for Ethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paripok Phitsuwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice straw (RS is an abundant, readily available agricultural waste, which shows promise as a potential feedstock for Asian ethanol production. To enhance release of glucose by enzymatic hydrolysis, RS was pretreated with aqueous ammonia (27% w/w at two pretreatment temperatures: room temperature and 60°C. Statistical analysis indicated similarity of enzymatic glucose production at both pretreatment temperatures after 3-day incubation. Chemical composition, FTIR, and EDX analyses confirmed the retention of glucan and xylan in the pretreated solid, but significant reduction of lignin (60.7% removal and silica. SEM analysis showed the disorganized surfaces and porosity of the pretreated RS fibers, thus improving cellulose accessibility for cellulase. The crystallinity index increased from 40.5 to 52.3%, indicating the higher exposure of cellulose. With 10% (w/v solid loadings of pretreated RS, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation yielded a final ethanol concentration of 24.6 g/L, corresponding to 98% of maximum theoretical yield. Taken together, aqueous ammonia pretreatment is an effective method to generate highly digestible pretreated RS for bioethanol production and demonstrates potential application in biorefinery industry.

  19. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  20. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  1. Higher Education of Specialists of Social Rehabilitation – Reports from Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Kusztal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is a another opinion in the matter of the education of the students of social rehabilitation. In 2012, on the pages of “Resocjalizacja Polska”, came out an article about contemporary status of the social rehabilitation educator and the process of his education in the era of the reform of higher education. The current text is the continuation of this article and also a presentation of an explorative sense and thoughts of the participants of the project, realized since 2011 within the statutory research of the Department of Social Prevention and Rehabilitation in Institiute of Pedagog y in Jagiellonian University and Department of Social Prevention and Rehabilitation in Institiute of Education in Jesuit University in Cracow.

  2. Effects of Ultrasonic and Acid Pretreatment on Food Waste Disintegration and Volatile Fatty Acid Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinglian Wu; Wanqian Guo∗; Shanshan Yang; Haichao Luo; Simai Peng; Nanqi Ren

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at investigating the effects of ultrasonic and acid pretreatment on food waste ( FW) disintegration and volatile fatty acid ( VFA ) production. Single⁃factor experiments are carried out to obtain optimal conditions of individual ultrasonic and acid pretreatment, and response surface method ( RSM ) is applied to optimize the conditions of the combination of ultrasonic and acid ( UA) pretreatment. Results show that the optimal acid, ultrasonic and UA pretreatments conditions are individual pH 2, individual ultrasonic energy density of 1�0 W/mL and the combination of ultrasonic energy density1�11 W/mL and pH 1�43, respectively. Correspondingly, the maximum disintegration degrees ( DD) of 46�90%, 57�38% and68�83%are obtained by acid, ultrasonic and UA pretreatments, respectively. After optimizing pretreatment conditions, batch experiments are operated to produce VFA from raw and pretreated FW under anaerobic fermentation process. Both the maximum VFA production ( 976�17 mg COD/gVS) and VFA/SCOD ( 72�89%) are obtained with ultrasonic pretreatment, followed by UA pretreatment, non⁃pretreatment and acid pretreatment, respectively. This observation demonstrates that a higher acidity on acid and UA pretreatments inhibits the generation of VFA. Results suggest that ultrasonic pretreatment is preferable to promote the disintegration degree of FW and VFA production.

  3. Synergetic effect of combined pretreatment for energy efficient biogas generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannah, R Yukesh; Kavitha, S; Rajesh Banu, J; Yeom, Ick Tae; Johnson, M

    2017-05-01

    Physiochemical disintegration of waste activated biosolids (WAB) through thermochemical (TC) pretreatment requires high energy and cost for efficient energy generation. Therefore in the present study, an attempt has been made to enhance the biodegrdability and to minimize the operational cost of TC pretreatment by combining it with ozonation. A higher solubilization of about 30.4% was achieved at lesser energy input of about 141.02kJ/kgTS and a ozone dosage of about 0.0012mgO3/mgSS through this combined thermo chemo ozone (TCO3) pretreatment. The methane production potential (0.32gCOD/gCOD) of TCO3 pretreatment was comparatively higher than the (0.19gCOD/gCOD) TC pretreatment. The energetic analysis and economic assessment of the proposed method of pretreatment can possibly reduces the energy requirement of TC pretreatment with a positive net profit of about 35.49$/ton of biosolids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Novel pretreatment of steam explosion associated with ammonium chloride preimpregnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongzhang; Li, Guanhua; Li, Hongqiang

    2014-02-01

    Improving nitrogen content and enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis are key processes involved in cellulosic ethanol production. Steam explosion (SE) associated with NH4Cl preimpregnation was carried out to investigate effects of the pretreatment on nitrogen content, enzymatic digestibility, and ethanol production. Results showed that nitrogen content in pretreated samples increased, which can be used as nitrogen resource for ethanol fermentation. The highest glucose yield of sample pretreated by 1.4MPa SE with 90g/l NH4Cl preimpregnation was 62.64%, which was 2.1 and 0.2 times higher than that of untreated sample and 1.4MPa SE pretreated sample, respectively. Ethanol yield of sample pretreated by 1.1MPa SE with 135g/l NH4Cl preimpregnation resulted in 1.93 and 0.69 times higher than that of untreated sample and 1.1MPa SE pretreated sample, respectively. This novel pretreatment improved nitrogen content and enhanced enzymatic digestibility under mild conditions, and could be recommended to further industrial application.

  5. Impact of thermal pretreatment on the fast pyrolysis conversion of Southern Pine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler L. Westover; Manunya Phanphanich; Micael L. Clark; Sharna R. Rowe; Steven E. Egan; Christopher T Wright; Richard D. Boardman; Alan H. Zacher

    2013-01-01

    Background: Thermal pretreatment of biomass ranges from simple (nondestructive) drying to more severe treatments that cause devolatization, depolymerization and carbonization. These pretreatments have demonstrated promise for transforming raw biomass into feedstock material that has improved milling, handling, storage and conversion properties. In this work, southern pine material was pretreated at 120, 180, 230 and 270 degrees C, and then subjected to pyrolysis tests in a continuous-feed bubbling-fluid bed pyrolysis system. Results: High pretreatment temperatures were associated with lower specific grinding energies, higher grinding rates and lower hydrogen and oxygen contents. Higher pretreatment temperatures were also correlated with increased char production, decreased total acid number and slight decrease in the oxygen content of the pyrolysis liquid fraction. Conclusion: Thermal pretreatment has both beneficial and detrimental impacts on fast pyrolysis conversion of pine material to bio-oil, and the effect of thermal pretreatment on upgrading of pyrolysis bio-oil requires further attention.

  6. Improvement of the structure of reports of Ukrainian higher educational institutions in terms of deregulation and state authority decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Ambarchian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the structure and content of financial and budgetary reports of domestic higher educational institutions, enhance of financial statements completeness in order to enable citizens to control a university activity. During the research both general scientific and specific scientific economic methods were implemented. The general methods include induction, deduction, analogy and comparison. Among specific methods of economic research grouping, table method, graphical method, method of informational and logical analysis were used. The paper characterizes legal documents which regulate the process of university financial statements preparation and presentation in different countries. Financial reports of Ukrainian, American and British universities are compared. The author determines the major directions of improvement of the structure and content of domestic university reports with the purpose of their completeness enhancing. As a result of the research performed the proper recommendations of improvement of domestic universities reporting are suggested. The author conforms the reporting information with the Managerial report which discloses the information about the reporting period achievements and the efficiency of budget resources expenditure.

  7. Optimization study on the hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and production of bioethanol from seaweed Ulva prolifera biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinping; Cui, Jiefen; Zhang, Gaoli; Liu, Zhengkun; Guan, Huashi; Hwang, Hueymin; Aker, Winfred G; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The seaweed Ulva prolifera, distributed in inter-tidal zones worldwide, contains a large percentage of cellulosic materials. The technical feasibility of using U. prolifera residue (UPR) obtained after extraction of polysaccharides as a renewable energy resource was investigated. An environment-friendly and economical pretreatment process was conducted using hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide pretreatment improved the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting yield of reducing sugar reached a maximum of 0.42g/g UPR under the optimal pretreatment condition (hydrogen peroxide 0.2%, 50°C, pH 4.0, 12h). The rate of conversion of reducing sugar in the concentrated hydrolysates to bioethanol reached 31.4% by Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation, which corresponds to 61.7% of the theoretical maximum yield. Compared with other reported traditional processes on Ulva biomass, the reducing sugar and bioethanol yield are substantially higher. Thus, hydrogen peroxide pretreatment is an effective enhancement of the process of bioethanol production from the seaweed U. prolifera.

  8. Enhanced hydrolysis and methane yield by applying microaeration pretreatment to the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jun Wei [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 06-08 CleanTech One, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Wang, Jing-Yuan, E-mail: jywang@ntu.edu.sg [Residues and Resource Reclamation Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 06-08 CleanTech One, 1 Cleantech Loop, Singapore 637141 (Singapore); School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Microaeration pretreatment was effective for brown water and food waste mixture. ► The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms. ► Enhanced solubilization, acidification and breakdown of SCFAs to acetate. ► Microaeration pretreatment improved methane yield by 10–21%. ► Nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration. - Abstract: Microaeration has been used conventionally for the desulphurization of biogas, and recently it was shown to be an alternative pretreatment to enhance hydrolysis of the anaerobic digestion (AD) process. Previous studies on microaeration pretreatment were limited to the study of substrates with complex organic matter, while little has been reported on its effect on substrates with higher biodegradability such as brown water and food waste. Due to the lack of consistent microaeration intensities, previous studies were not comparable and thus inconclusive in proving the effectiveness of microaeration to the overall AD process. In this study, the role of microaeration pretreatment in the anaerobic co-digestion of brown water and food waste was evaluated in batch-tests. After a 4-day pretreatment with 37.5 mL-O{sub 2}/L{sub R}-d added to the liquid phase of the reactor, the methane production of substrates were monitored in anaerobic conditions over the next 40 days. The added oxygen was consumed fully by facultative microorganisms and a reducing environment for organic matter degradation was maintained. Other than higher COD solubilization, microaeration pretreatment led to greater VFA accumulation and the conversion of other short chain fatty acids to acetate. This could be due to enhanced activities of hydrolytic and acidogenic bacteria and the degradation of slowly biodegradable compounds under microaerobic conditions. This study also found that the nature of inoculum influenced the effects of microaeration as a 21% and 10% increase in methane yield was observed when pretreatment was

  9. Biological pretreatment of Yellow River water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shu-guang; TANG Xiao-yan; WU Wei-zhong; WEN Dong-hui; WANG Zhan-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Bio-ceramic filter(BF) and moving-bed biofilm reactor(MBBR) were used for biological pretreatment of Yellow River water in this study. The BF only had slight advantage over MBBR for TOC and ammonia removal. However, like UV254, the average removal rate of THMFP in the BF was much higher than that in the MBBR. UV254 removal did not show obvious correlation with trihalomethane formation potential(THMFP) removal. Hexachlorocyclohexane could be effectively removed in both BF and MBBR. As for diatom and cyanobateria removal the MBBR had better performance than the BF, which was contrary to the average chlorophyll-a (Chi-a) removal rate. The proposal was made in this study that biological flocculation and sedimentation of sloughed biofilm should play a more important role on algae removal in the MBBR than in the BF. The BF and MBBR could effectively remove microcystins. Moreover, MBBR could be a promising technology for biological pretreatment.

  10. Radiation pretreatment of cellulose for energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, A. M.; Dela Mines, A. S.; Banzon, R. B.; Simbul-Nuguid, Z. F.

    The effect of radiation pretreatment of agricultural cellulosic wastes was investigated through hydrolytic reactions of cellulose. Gamma irradiation significantly increased the acid hydrolysis of rice straw, rice hull and corn husk. The yields of reducing sugar were higher with increasing radiation dose in these materials. The observed radiation effect varied with the cellulosic material but it correlated with neither the cellulose content nor the lignin content. Likewise, the radiation pretreatment accelerated the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of rice straw and rice hull by cellulase. The irradiated rice straw appeared to be a better growth medium for the cellulolytic microorganism, Myrothecium verrucaria, than the non-irradiated material. This was attributed to increased digestibility of the cellulose by the microorganism.

  11. Ammonia Pretreatment of Corn Stover Enables Facile Lignin Extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Kandemkavil, Sindhu; Reed, Michelle L.; Biddy, Mary J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2017-01-30

    /NaOH-extracted corn stover were higher by ~80% and ~60%, respectively, compared to untreated corn stover at 1% solids loadings. For digestions at 20% solids, a benefit of NaOH extraction is realized in achieving ~150 g/L of total monomeric sugars (glucose, xylose, and arabinose) in the enzymatic hydrolysates from AA-pretreated/NaOH-extracted corn stover. Overall, this process enables facile lignin extraction in tandem with a leading thermochemical pretreatment approach, demonstrating excellent retention of highly digestible polysaccharides in the solid phase and a highly depolymerized, soluble lignin-rich stream.

  12. Pretreatment of Latent Prints for Laser Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, E R

    1989-06-01

    The pretreatment procedures for laser detection of latent fingerprints is reviewed. The general features of laser detection and the operational aspects of the examination of physical evidence for laser fingerprint detection are enumerated in the initial sections. The literature review is divided into various pretreatment approaches. Cited studies prior to 1981 are primarily concerned with the demonstration of the viability of laser fingerprint detection, whereas work post-1981 addresses issues of compatibility with the traditional methods of fingerprint development, examination of difficult surfaces, and the routine implementation of laser detection by law enforcement agencies. Related topics of research, review articles, conference reports, case examinations, the research support climate, and future trends are also briefly addressed.

  13. Brief report: social and communication abilities and disabilities in higher functioning individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Celine A; Klin, Ami

    2007-04-01

    Individuals with higher functioning autism (HFA) fail to translate their cognitive potential into real-life adaptation, and the severity of their symptoms is considerable despite their intellectual ability. This paper reports on a subsample from a larger study (A. Klin et al., in press) analyzed here by autism spectrum subtypes. It focuses on the nature of ability and disability in HFA and Asperger syndrome (AS) in relation to age and IQ. Participants included 32 individuals with autism and 35 with AS. Individuals with AS had significantly higher Verbal IQ scores and less symptomatology than individuals with autism, but their Vineland scores were equally impaired, highlighting the adaptive deficits in ASD regardless of classification. No relationship was found between adaptive functioning and symptom severity.

  14. Evaluation of higher distribution and/or utilization voltages. Fourth interim report (August 1980): assessment of optimum distribution configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    This interim report provides documentation on the fourth task, Assessment of Optimum Distribution Configuration, of DOE Contract No. ET-78-C-01-2866, Evaluation of Higher Distribution and/or Utilization Voltages. The work performed under this task includes the development of a computer model for assessment of life cycle costs for the distribution and utilization systems, the development of an optimization algorithm to enable distribution system configuration optimization and a net energy analysis to determine potential net energy savings. Input data for this task derive from Task 3. The major output of this task is a documented computer code.

  15. Biomass pretreatment: fundamentals toward application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbor, Valery B; Cicek, Nazim; Sparling, Richard; Berlin, Alex; Levin, David B

    2011-01-01

    Development of sustainable energy systems based on renewable biomass feedstocks is now a global effort. Lignocellulosic biomass contains polymers of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, bound together in a complex structure. Liquid biofuels, such as ethanol, can be made from biomass via fermentation of sugars derived from the cellulose and hemicellulose within lignocellulosic materials, but the biomass must be subjected to pretreatment processes to liberate the sugars needed for fermentation. Production of value-added co-products along-side biofuels through integrated biorefinery processes creates the need for selectivity during pretreatment. This paper presents a survey of biomass pretreatment technologies with emphasis on concepts, mechanism of action and practicability. The advantages and disadvantages, and the potential for industrial applications of different pretreatment technologies are the highlights of this paper. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on emulsion polymerization of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatomo, Daichi; Horie, Takafumi; Hongo, Chizuru; Ohmura, Naoto

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of pretreatment of ultrasonic irradiation on emulsion polymerization of styrene to propose a process intensification method which gives high conversion, high reaction rate, and high energy efficiency. The solution containing styrene monomer was irradiated by a horn mounted on the ultrasonic transducer with the diameter of 5mm diameter and the frequency of 28 kHz before starting polymerization. The pretreatment of ultrasound irradiation as short as 1 min drastically improved monomer dispersion and increased reaction rate even under the agitation condition with low rotational speed of impeller. Furthermore, the ultrasonic pretreatment resulted in higher monomer concentration in polymer particles and produced larger polymer particles than conventional polymerization without ultrasonic pretreatment.

  17. Optimization of microwave pretreatment on wheat straw for ethanol production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Hongzhang; Kádár, Zsófia

    2011-01-01

    An orthogonal design (L9(34)) was used to optimize the microwave pretreatment on wheat straw for ethanol production. The orthogonal analysis was done based on the results obtained from the nine pretreatments. The effect of four factors including the ratio of biomass to NaOH solution, pretreatment...... time, microwave power, and the concentration of NaOH solution with three different levels on the chemical composition, cellulose/hemicellulose recoveries and ethanol concentration was investigated. According to the orthogonal analysis, pretreatment with the ratio of biomass to liquid at 80 g kg−1......, the NaOH concentration of 10 kg m−3, the microwave power of 1000 W for 15 min was confirmed to be the optimal condition. The ethanol yield was 148.93 g kg−1 wheat straw at this condition, much higher than that from the untreated material which was only 26.78 g kg−1....

  18. Modified A{sup ++}-standard refrigerator with 30% reduction of energy consumption. Higher efficiency by compressor modification - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, M.; Stahl, S.; Ganz, J.

    2010-06-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at how a modified refrigerator can be given a higher efficiency by modifying the compressor. The modified refrigerator was fitted with a variable-speed compressor. This compressor could be run at much lower speeds so that it was in operation for up to 90% of the time. It was shown that less electricity was consumed the more the compressor ran. The report discusses the aims of the work and presents details on the standard refrigerator used for the tests. The compressor normally used and the variable-speed compressor used in the test are described. Systems for temperature control and data acquisition during the tests are described. The results obtained are examined and the influence of various factors is discussed.

  19. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Clearing the Hurdles. A Survey on Strategies for Implementing Quality Management Practices in Higher Education. A GOAL/QPC Application Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel

    Based on a survey of Quality Management (QM) practitioners at 21 colleges, this study presents the 10 most difficult implementation hurdles to QM in higher education and a set of hurdle-clearing strategies. The hurdles are: (1) lack of time to implement QM; (2) perception that QM is something for janitorial and housing staffs but not applicable to…

  20. Bilingual Higher Education Summer Institute. Bilingual Higher Education: Foundations, Policy, and Practice. Report of Proceedings (Seton Hall University, August 24-29, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotayo, Rosa Maria, Ed.

    Papers are presented from the New Jersey Department of Higher Education Summer Institute. Focus is on sociolinguistic, anthropological, social psychological, pedagogical, and socio-political-economic considerations. Each analyzes particular factors that influence the form and quality of bilingual policy and instruction programs, and offers…

  1. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Clearing the Hurdles. A Survey on Strategies for Implementing Quality Management Practices in Higher Education. A GOAL/QPC Application Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel

    Based on a survey of Quality Management (QM) practitioners at 21 colleges, this study presents the 10 most difficult implementation hurdles to QM in higher education and a set of hurdle-clearing strategies. The hurdles are: (1) lack of time to implement QM; (2) perception that QM is something for janitorial and housing staffs but not applicable to…

  2. The Path to Excellence: Quality Assurance in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Research Reports, No. 1. FYI Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Lawrence R.; And Others

    There is an increasing interest by government in accountability for higher education. Efforts such as performance budgeting, performance auditing, and state review of academic programs are becoming more common. Opponents of government involvement assert that regional accreditation reviews are sufficient to maintain quality standards. However,…

  3. The Uses of Institutional Culture: Strengthening Identification and Building Brand Equity in Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 31, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, J. Douglas, Ed.; Dubrow, Greg, Ed.; Hartley, Matthew, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Institutional culture matters in higher education, and universities and colleges commonly express the need to strengthen their culture. A strong culture is perceived, correctly so, to engender a needed sense of connectedness between and among the varied constituents associated with a campus. Linking organizational culture and social cohesion is…

  4. Impact of surfactant type for ionic liquid pretreatment on enhancing delignification of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Lin; Chen, Xi-Mei; Wang, Xiao-Qin; Han, Ye-Ju; Potprommanee, Laddawan; Liu, Jing-Yong; Liao, Yu-Ling; Ning, Xun-An; Sun, Shui-Yu; Huang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    This work describes an environmentally friendly method for pretreating rice straw by using 1-Allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([AMIM]Cl) as an ionic liquid (IL) assisted by surfactants. The impacts of surfactant type (including nonionic-, anionic-, cationic- and bio-surfactant) on the ionic liquid pretreatment were investigated. The bio-surfactant+IL-pretreated rice straw showed significant lignin removal (26.14%) and exhibited higher cellulose conversion (36.21%) than the untreated (16.16%) rice straw. The cellulose conversion of the rice straw pretreated with bio-surfactant+IL was the highest and the lowest was observed for pretreated with cationic-surfactant+IL. Untreated and pretreated rice straw was thoroughly characterized through SEM and AFM. In conclusion, the results provided an effective and environmental method for pretreating lignocellulosic substrates by using green solvent (ionic liquid) and biodegradable bio-surfactant.

  5. The characteristic changes of betung bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper pretreated by fungal pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widya Fatriasari

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The fungal pretreatment effect on chemical structural and morphological changes of Betung Bamboo was evaluated based on its biomass components after being cultivated by white rot fungi, Trametes versicolor. Betung bamboo powder (15 g was exposed to liquid inoculum of white rot fungi and incubated at 270C for 15, 30 and 45 days. The treated samples were then characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, X-Ray diffraction and SEM-EDS analyses. Cultivation for 30 days with 5 and 10% loadings retained greater selectivity compared to that of the other treatments. FTIR spectra demonstrated that the fungus affected the decreasing of functional group quantities without changing the functional groups. The decrease in intensity at wave number of 1246 cm-1 (guaiacyl of lignin was greater than that at wave number of 1328 cm-1 (deformation combination of syringyl and xylan after fungal treatment. X-ray analysis showed the pretreated samples had a higher crystallinity than the untreated ones which might be due to the cleavage of amorphous fractions of cellulose. The pretreated samples have more fragile than the untreated ones confirmed by SEM. Crystalline allomorph calculated by XRD analysis showed that fungus pretreatment for 30 days has transformed triclinic structure of cellulose to monoclinic structure.

  6. Ultrasound and ozone assisted biological degradation of thermally pretreated and anaerobically pretreated distillery wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangave, Preeti C; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2007-05-01

    The present work is aimed at increasing the overall efficiency of the treatment process of distillery spent wash using a combination of different treatment techniques. Initially the effluent samples were subjected to Thermal Pretreatment (TPT-DW) and anaerobic treatment (ANA-DW). Advanced oxidation techniques, viz., Ultrasound (US) and Ozone were then used for further COD reduction followed by the conventional aerobic oxidation using mixed microbial consortium. Pretreatment of TPT-DW with US and Ozone (as stand alone techniques) enhanced the subsequent aerobic oxidation rate. For US treated sample, a maximum of 13% COD reduction was attained at the end of 48 h of aerobic oxidation, while for the ozone treated effluent a maximum of 45.6% COD reduction was obtained as compared to mere 1.8% COD reduction for the control (TPT-DW directly subjected to aerobic oxidation) indicating a 25 times increase in the rate of aerobic biodegradation of ozonated sample. Anaerobically treated effluent sample (ANA-DW) could be successfully treated aerobically. In this case, however, the use of advanced oxidation techniques did not result in any synergistic effects. The rate of the aerobic oxidation was slightly higher for the control (ANA-DW directly subjected to aerobic oxidation) as compared to the sample pretreated using ultrasound or ozonation. TOC analysis revealed that between the two pretreatments studied, ozone was found to be superior over US as it led to both COD as well as TOC reduction during the aerobic oxidation step for ANA-DW effluent stream.

  7. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J D

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  8. Processes for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, J.D.

    1992-11-01

    This paper reviews existing and proposed pretreatment processes for biomass. The focus is on the mechanisms by which the various pretreatments act and the influence of biomass structure and composition on the efficacy of particular pretreatment techniques. This analysis is used to identify pretreatment technologies and issues that warrant further research.

  9. Steam pretreatment for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanenko, Olga

    The objectives of this work are to test the application of steam pretreatment to direct coal liquefaction, to investigate the reaction of model compounds with water, and to explore the use of zeolites in these processes. Previous work demonstrated the effectiveness of steam pretreatment in a subsequent flash pyrolysis. Apparently, subcritical steam ruptures nearly all of the ether cross links, leaving a partially depolymerized structure. It was postulated that very rapid heating of the pretreated coal to liquefaction conditions would be required to preserve the effects of such treatment. Accordingly, a method was adopted in which coal slurry is injected into a hot autoclave containing solvent. Since oxygen is capable of destroying the pretreatment effect, precautions were taken for its rigorous exclusion. Tests were conducted with Illinois No. 6 coal steam treated at 340sp°C, 750 psia for 15 minutes. Both raw and pretreated samples were liquified in deoxygenated tetralin at high severity (400sp°C, 30 min.) and low severity (a: 350sp°C, 30 min., and b: 385sp°C, 15 min.) conditions under 1500 psia hydrogen. Substantial improvement in liquid product quality was obtained and the need for rapid heating and oxygen exclusion demonstrated. Under low severity conditions, the oil yield was more than doubled, going from 12.5 to 29 wt%. Also chemistry of the pretreatment process was studied using aromatic ethers as model compounds. alpha-Benzylnaphthyl ether (alpha-BNE), alpha-naphthylmethyl phenyl (alpha-NMPE), and 9-phenoxyphenanthrene were exposed to steam and inert gas at pretreatment conditions and in some cases to liquid water at 315sp°C. alpha-BNE and alpha-NMPE showed little difference in conversion in inert gas and in steam. Hence, these compounds are poor models for coal in steam pretreatment. Thermally stable 9-phenoxyphenanthrene, however, was completely converted in one hour by liquid water at 315sp°C. At pretreatment conditions mostly rearranged starting

  10. Long term storage of dilute acid pretreated corn stover feedstock and ethanol fermentability evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Shao, Shuai; Bao, Jie

    2016-02-01

    This study reported a new solution of lignocellulose feedstock storage based on the distributed pretreatment concept. The dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment (DDAP) was conducted on corn stover feedstock, instead of ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment. Then the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover was stored for three months during summer season with high temperature and humidity. No negative aspects were found on the physical property, composition, hydrolysis yield and ethanol fermentability of the long term stored pretreated corn stover, plus the additional merits including no chemicals recovery operation, anti-microbial contaminant environment from stronger acid and inhibitor contents, as well as the mild and slow hydrolysis in the storage. The new pretreatment method expanded the distributed pretreatment concept of feedstock storage with potential for practical application.

  11. Comparison of different pretreatments for the production of bioethanol and biomethane from corn stover and switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, G; Rodriguez, S; George, A; Schievano, A; Orzi, V; Sale, K L; Singh, S; Adani, F; Simmons, B A

    2015-05-01

    In this study the efficiency of mild ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment and pressurized hot water (PHW) is evaluated and compared in terms of bioethanol and biomethane yields, with corn stover (CS) and switchgrass (SG) as model bioenergy crops. Both feedstocks pretreated with the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C2C1Im][OAc] at 100°C for 3h exhibited lower glucose yield that those treated with harsher pretreatment conditions previously used. Compared to PHW, IL pretreatment demonstrated higher bioethanol yields; moreover IL pretreatment enhanced biomethane production. Taking into consideration both bioethanol and biomethane productions, results indicated that when using IL pretreatment, the total energy produced per kg of total solids was higher compared to untreated biomasses. Specifically energy produced from CS and SG was +18.6% and +34.5% respectively, as compared to those obtained by hot water treatment, i.e. +2.3% and +23.4% for CS and SG, respectively.

  12. Pretreatment on Anaerobic Sludge for Enhancement of Biohydrogen Production from Cassava Processing Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciele do Carmo Lamaison

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Methods for the enrichment of an anaerobic sludge with H2-producing bacteria have been compared by using cassava processing wastewater as substrate.The sludge was submitted to three different pretreatments: 1 heat pretreatment by boiling at 98 °C for 15 min., 2 heat pretreatment followed by sludge washout in a Continuous Stirring Tank Reactor (CSTR operated at a dilution rate (D of 0.021 h-1, and 3 sludge washout as the sole enrichment method. The pretreated sludge and the sludge without pretreatment (control were employed in the seeding of 4 batch bioreactors, in order to verify the volume and composition of the generated biogas. Maximum H2 production rates (Rm from the pretreated sludges, were estimated by the modified Gompertz model. Compared to the control, H2 production was ca. 4 times higher for the sludge submitted to the heat pretreatment only and for the sludge subjected to heat pretreatment combined with washout, and 10 times higher for washout. These findings demonstrated that the use of sludge washout as the sole sludge pretreatment method was the most effective in terms of H2 production, as compared to the heat and to the combined heat and washout pretreatments.

  13. Pretreatment method for immunoassay of polychlorinated biphenyls in transformer oil using multilayer capillary column and microfluidic liquid-liquid partitioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aota, Arata; Date, Yasumoto; Terakado, Shingo; Ohmura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent organic pollutants that are present in the insulating oil inside a large number of transformers. To aid in eliminating PCB-contaminated transformers, PCBs in oil need to be measured using a rapid and cost-effective analytical method. We previously reported a pretreatment method for the immunoassay of PCBs in oil using a large-scale multilayer column and a microchip with multiple microrecesses, which permitted concentrated solvent extraction. In this paper, we report on a more rapid and facile pretreatment method, without an evaporation process, by improving the column and the microchip. In a miniaturized column, the decomposition and separation of oil were completed in 2 min. PCBs can be eluted from the capillary column at concentrations seven-times higher than those from the previous column. The total volume of the microrecesses was increased by improving the microrecess structure, the enabling extraction of four-times the amount of PCBs achieved with the previous system. By interfacing the capillary column with the improved microchip, PCBs in the eluate from the column were extracted into dimethyl sulfoxide in microrecesses with high enrichment and without the need for evaporation. Pretreatment was completed within 20 min. The pretreated oil was analyzed using a flow-based kinetic exclusion immunoassay. The limit of detection of PCBs in oil was 0.15 mg kg(-1), which satisfies the criterion set in Japan of 0.5 mg kg(-1).

  14. Combined alkaline and ultrasonic pretreatment of sludge before aerobic digestion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Yiying; LI Huan; MAHAR Rasool Bux; WANG Zhiyu; NIE Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    Alkaline and ultrasonic sludge disintegration can both be used as pretreatments of waste activated sludge (WAS) for improving the subsequent anaerobic or aerobic digestion. The pretreatment has been carried out using different combination of these two methods in this study. The effect was evaluated based on the quantity of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) in the pretreated sludge as well as the degradation of organic matter in the following aerobic digestion. For WAS samples with combined pretreatment, the released COD was in high level than those with ultrasonic or alkaline treatment. When combined with the same ultrasonic treatment, NaOH treatment resulted in more solubilization of WAS than Ca(OH)2. For combined NaOH and ultrasonic treatments with different sequences, the released COD were in the order: simultaneous treatment > ultrasonic treatment following NaOH treatment > NaOH treatment following ultrasonic treatment. For simultaneous treatment, low NaOH dosage (100 g/kg dry solid), short duration (30 min) of NaOH treatment, and low ultrasonic specific energy (7 500 kJ/kg dry solid) were beneficial for sludge disintegration. Using combined NaOH and ultrasonic pretreatment with the optimium parameters, the degradation efficiency of organic matter was increased from 38.0% to 50.7%, which is much higher than with ultrasonic (42.5%) or with NaOH pretreatment (43.5%) in the subsequent aerobic digestion at the same retention time.

  15. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in triple iron ultra-triathletes than reported for ironman triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    "In a recent study of male and female ultra-marathoners in a 161-km ultra-marathon, the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was higher than reported for marathoners. Regarding triathletes, the prevalence of EAH has been investigated in Ironman triathletes, but not in Triple Iron ultra-triathletes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in male ultra-triathletes competing in a Triple Iron ultra-triathlon over 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma volume, plasma sodium concentration ([Na ⁺ ]) and urine specific gravity were determined in 31 male athletes with (means ± standard deviation) 42.1 ± 8.1 years of age, 77.0 ± 7.0 kg body mass, 1.78 ± 0.06 m body height and a BMI of 24.3 ± 1.7 kg/m² in the 'Triple Iron Triathlon Germany'. Of the 31 finishers, eight athletes (26%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and haematocrit decreased, plasma volume increased ( P Iron ultra-triathletes compared to existing reports on Ironman triathletes. Body fluid homeostasis remained stable in these ultra-triathletes although body mass decreased."

  16. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  17. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D.; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E.; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S.; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V.; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  18. Comparison of liquid hot water and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed for improved enzymatic digestibility and biogas energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danping; Ge, Xumeng; Zhang, Quanguo; Li, Yebo

    2016-09-01

    Liquid hot water (LHW) and alkaline pretreatments of giant reed biomass were compared in terms of digestibility, methane production, and cost-benefit efficiency for electricity generation via anaerobic digestion with a combined heat and power system. Compared to LHW pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment retained more of the dry matter in giant reed biomass solids due to less severe conditions. Under their optimal conditions, LHW pretreatment (190°C, 15min) and alkaline pretreatment (20g/L of NaOH, 24h) improved glucose yield from giant reed by more than 2-fold, while only the alkaline pretreatment significantly (pAlkaline pretreatment achieved 27% higher net electrical energy production than that of non-pretreatment (3859kJ/kg initial total solids), but alkaline liquor reuse is needed for improved net benefit.

  19. Conversion of lignocellulosic biomass from grass to bioethanol using materials pretreated with alkali and the white rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yee Liong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Grasses are abundant in many climatic regions of the world and have been regarded as weeds by many. This work investigated the use of Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass in the production of bioethanol. Two pretreated grasses were compared as the initial substance in the hydrolysis process followed by bacteria fermentation. For the purpose of breaking down lignin, alkali pretreatment, where grass was soaked in 7% NaOH, was used. For biological pretreatment, grass was incubated for 3 weeks with the white-rot fungus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Both types of pretreated materials were subjected to Trichoderma reesei ATCC 26921 enzyme hydrolysis. Glucose content from alkali-pretreated samples was 1.6-fold higher than fungus-pretreated samples. Hydrolysates from the pretreatments were fermented using the ethanol insensitive strain Escherichia coli K011. After 24 hours of fermentation, the ethanol yield from alkali-pretreated material was 1.5 times higher than the biological-pretreated material. It can be concluded that NaOH-pretreated enzyme hydrolysate had a better ethanol yield compared to biological-pretreated enzyme hydrolysate, but biological-pretreated enzyme hydrolysate had better ethanol conversion efficiency, which was 18.5 g/g. These results indicated that wild grass is capable of becoming an important biomass for small local bioethanol production.

  20. Thermochemical behavior of pretreated biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Amit Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Mankind has to provide a sustainable alternative to its energy related problems. Bioenergy is considered as one of the potential renewable energy resources and as a result bioenergy market is also expected to grow dramatically in future. However, logistic issues are of serious concern while considering biomass as an alternative to fossil fuel. It can be improved by introducing pretreated wood pellet. The main objective of this thesis is to address thermochemical behaviour of steam exploded pretreated biomass. Additionally, process aspects of torrefaction were also considered in this thesis. Steam explosion (SE) was performed in a laboratory scale reactor using Salix wood chips. Afterwards, fuel and thermochemical aspects of SE residue were investigated. It was found that Steam explosion pretreatment improved both fuel and pellet quality. Pyrolysis of SE residue reveals that alerted biomass composition significantly affects its pyrolysis behaviour. Contribution from depolymerized components (hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin) of biomass was observed explicitly during pyrolysis. When devolatilization experiment was performed on pellet produced from SE residue, effect of those altered components was observed. In summary, pretreated biomass fuel characteristics is significantly different in comparison with untreated biomass. On the other hand, Process efficiency of torrefaction was found to be governed by the choice of appropriate operating conditions and the type of biomass.

  1. Comparative data on effects of leading pretreatments and enzyme loadings and formulations on sugar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyman, Charles [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Balan, Venkatech [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Dale, Bruce E. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Elander, Richard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Falls, Matthew [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Hames, Bonnie [Ceres Corporation, Thousand Oaks, CA (United States); Holtzapple, Mark [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Ladisch, Michael R. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Lee, Y. Y. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Mosier, Nathan [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Pallapolu, Venkata R. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Shi, Jian [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Warner, Ryan E. [Genencor, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2011-06-16

    Dilute sulfuric acid (DA), sulfur dioxide (SO2), liquid hot water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), and lime pretreatments were applied to Alamo, Dacotah, and Shawnee switchgrass. Application of the same analytical methods and material balance approaches facil-itated meaningful comparisons of glucose and xylose yields from combined pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis. Use of a common supply of cellulase, beta-glucosidase, and xylanase also eased comparisons. All pretreatments enhanced sugar recovery from pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis substantially compared to untreated switchgrass. Adding beta-glucosidase was effective early in enzy-matic hydrolysis while cellobiose levels were high but had limited effect on longer term yields at the enzyme loadings applied. Adding xylanase improved yields most for higher pH pretreatments where more xylan was left in the solids. Harvest time had more impact on performance than switchgrass variety, and microscopy showed changes in different features could impact performance by different pretreatments.

  2. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Frison, A; Raga, R; Angelidaki, I

    2016-09-01

    Animal manure digestion is associated with limited methane production, due to the high content in fibers, which are hardly degradable lignocellulosic compounds. In this study, different mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment methods were applied to partially degradable fibers, separated from the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55°C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas plants can be increased by further exploiting the fraction of the digested manure fibers which are discarded in the post-storage tank.

  3. Comparison of Ultrasonic and CO2 Laser Pretreatment Methods on Enzyme Digestibility of Corn Stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Li Zuo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To decrease the cost of bioethanol production, biomass recalcitrance needs to be overcome so that the conversion of biomass to bioethanol becomes more efficient. CO2 laser irradiation can disrupt the lignocellulosic physical structure and reduce the average size of fiber. Analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, specific surface area, and the microstructure of corn stover were used to elucidate the enhancement mechanism of the pretreatment process by CO2 laser irradiation. The present work demonstrated that the CO2 laser had potential to enhance the bioconversion efficiency of lignocellulosic waste to renewable bioethanol. The saccharification rate of the CO2 laser pretreatment was significantly higher than ultrasonic pretreatment, and reached 27.75% which was 1.34-fold of that of ultrasonic pretreatment. The results showed the impact of CO2 laser pretreatment on corn stover to be more effective than ultrasonic pretreatment.

  4. Improving methane production from digested manure biofibers by mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Frison, A.

    2016-01-01

    Animal manure digestion is associated with limited methane production, due to the high content in fibers, which are hardly degradable lignocellulosic compounds. In this study, different mechanical and thermal alkaline pretreatment methods were applied to partially degradable fibers, separated from...... the effluent stream of biogas reactors. Batch and continuous experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficiency of these pretreatments. In batch experiments, the mechanical pretreatment improved the degradability up to 45%. Even higher efficiency was shown by applying thermal alkaline pretreatments......, enhancing fibers degradability by more than 4-fold. In continuous experiments, the thermal alkaline pretreatment, using 6% NaOH at 55 °C was proven to be the most efficient pretreatment method as the methane production was increased by 26%. The findings demonstrated that the methane production of the biogas...

  5. Making lignin accessible for anaerobic digestion by wet-explosion pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Biswas, Rajib; Ahamed, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a major part of the recalcitrant fraction of lignocellulose and in nature its degradation occurs through oxidative enzymes along with microbes mediated oxidative chemical actions. Oxygen assisted wet-explosion pretreatment promotes lignin solubility and leads to an increase biodegradation...... of lignin during anaerobic digestion processes. The pretreatment of feedlot manure was performed in a 10 L reactor at 170 C for 25 min using 4 bars oxygen and the material was fed to a continuous stirred tank reactor operated at 55 C for anaerobic digestion. Methane yield of untreated and pretreated...... material was 70 ± 27 and 320 ± 36 L/kg-VS/day, respectively, or 4.5 times higher yield as a result of the pretreatment. Aliphatic acids formed during the pretreatment were utilized by microbes. 44.4% lignin in pretreated material was actually converted in the anaerobic digestion process compared to 12...

  6. Carbonic Acid Pretreatment of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Peter van Walsum; Kemantha Jayawardhana; Damon Yourchisin; Robert McWilliams; Vanessa Castleberry

    2003-05-31

    This project sought to address six objectives, outlined below. The objectives were met through the completion of ten tasks. 1) Solidify the theoretical understanding of the binary CO2/H2O system at reaction temperatures and pressures. The thermodynamics of pH prediction have been improved to include a more rigorous treatment of non-ideal gas phases. However it was found that experimental attempts to confirm theoretical pH predictions were still off by a factor of about 1.8 pH units. Arrhenius experiments were carried out and the activation energy for carbonic acid appears to be substantially similar to sulfuric acid. Titration experiments have not yet confirmed or quantified the buffering or acid suppression effects of carbonic acid on biomass. 2) Modify the carbonic acid pretreatment severity function to include the effect of endogenous acid formation and carbonate buffering, if necessary. It was found that the existing severity functions serve adequately to account for endogenous acid production and carbonate effects. 3) Quantify the production of soluble carbohydrates at different reaction conditions and severity. Results show that carbonic acid has little effect on increasing soluble carbohydrate concentrations for pretreated aspen wood, compared to pretreatment with water alone. This appears to be connected to the release of endogenous acids by the substrate. A less acidic substrate such as corn stover would derive benefit from the use of carbonic acid. 4) Quantify the production of microbial inhibitors at selected reaction conditions and severity. It was found that the release of inhibitors was correlated to reaction severity and that carbonic acid did not appear to increase or decrease inhibition compared to pretreatment with water alone. 5) Assess the reactivity to enzymatic hydrolysis of material pretreated at selected reaction conditions and severity. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates increased with severity, but no advantage was detected for the use of carbonic

  7. Higher Education Reform for Quality Higher Education Management in the 21st Century: Economic, Technological, Social, and Political Forces Affecting Higher Education. Proceedings of the 1999 Six-Nation Summit (Hiroshima, Japan, September 20-21, 1999). RIHE International Seminar Reports, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Higher Education.

    This publication presents proceedings from a 1999 conference on higher education reform and quality that involved six countries: China, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Switzerland, and the United States. The first section, "Report of the Six-Nation Higher Education Project," presents "Summary of the Progress of the Higher Education…

  8. Stabilization of Chromobacterium viscosum Lipase (CVL) Against Ultrasound Inactivation by the Pretreatment with Polyethylene Glycol (PEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Md Mahabubur Rahman; Shiong, Simon Choo Sze

    2015-12-01

    Although ultrasound has been used to accelerate many enzymatic reactions, the low stability of enzymes in such a system still remains a critical issue, limiting its industrial application. Here, we have reported that polyethylene glycol (PEG) pretreatment stabilized Chromobacterium viscosum lipase (CVL) in ultrasound-assisted water-isooctane emulsion. PEGs of different molecular weights and concentrations were used to pretreat CVL, and the pretreated lipase activities for olive oil hydrolysis were investigated at different ultrasonic powers. The best result was attained with PEG400 at 100 mg/ml for a lipase concentration of 0.02 mg/ml and an ultrasonic power of 106 W. The half-life time of PEG400-treated lipase at 106 W was 54 min, a 27-fold higher than that attained using untreated lipase. Circular dichroism (CD) spectra suggested that PEG increased the rigidity of CVL structure, which favored the lipase stability against ultrasound inactivation. These results have important implications for the exploitation of ultrasound in biocatalytic process.

  9. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2017-04-01

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents (mean age 13.21, 49.4 % boys) from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children cross-sectional study. We assessed the associations of alcohol and energy drinks consumption with negative outcomes and their potential synergy, as measured by the synergy index (SI). Adolescents consuming both alcohol and energy drinks were at higher risk of negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drank only alcohol or energy drinks or were non-consumers. Consumers of alcohol and energy drinks were highly prone to be involved in fighting-the joint association of alcohol and energy drinks consumption was greater than sum of its associations separately in relation to fighting (SI 1.49; 95 % confidence interval 1.03-2.16). Preventive strategies should aim at increasing awareness of negative behavioural outcomes-especially aggressive behaviour associated with alcohol and energy drinks consumption among young adolescents.

  10. Physical and chemical characterizations of corn stover and poplar solids resulting from leading pretreatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Mago, Gaurav; Balan, Venkatesh; Wyman, Charles E

    2009-09-01

    In order to investigate changes in substrate chemical and physical features after pretreatment, several characterizations were performed on untreated (UT) corn stover and poplar and their solids resulting pretreatments by ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), ammonia recycled percolation (ARP), controlled pH, dilute acid, flowthrough, lime, and SO(2) technologies. In addition to measuring the chemical compositions including acetyl content, physical attributes determined were biomass crystallinity, cellulose degree of polymerization, cellulase adsorption capacity of pretreated solids and enzymatically extracted lignin, copper number, FT-IR responses, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) visualizations, and surface atomic composition by electron spectroscopy of chemical analysis (ESCA). Lime pretreatment removed the most acetyl groups from both corn stover and poplar, while AFEX removed the least. Low pH pretreatments depolymerized cellulose and enhanced biomass crystallinity much more than higher pH approaches. Lime pretreated corn stover solids and flowthrough pretreated poplar solids had the highest cellulase adsorption capacity, while dilute acid pretreated corn stover solids and controlled pH pretreated poplar solids had the least. Furthermore, enzymatically extracted AFEX lignin preparations for both corn stover and poplar had the lowest cellulase adsorption capacity. ESCA results showed that SO(2) pretreated solids had the highest surface O/C ratio for poplar, but for corn stover, the highest value was observed for dilute acid pretreatment with a Parr reactor. Although dependent on pretreatment and substrate, FT-IR data showed that along with changes in cross linking and chemical changes, pretreatments may also decrystallize cellulose and change the ratio of crystalline cellulose polymorphs (Ialpha/Ibeta).

  11. Enhanced biogas production from rice straw with various pretreatment : a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahriya Puspita Sari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rice straw is one of organic material that can be used for sustainable production of bioenergy and biofuels such as biogas (about 50-75% CH4 and 25-50% CO2. Out of all bioconversion technologies for biogas production, anaerobic digestion (AD is a most cost-effective bioconversion technology that has been implemented worldwide for commercial production of electricity, heat, and compressed natural gas (CNG from organic materials. However, the utilization of rice straw for biogas production via anaerobic digestion has not been widely adopted because the complicated structure of the plant cell wall makes it resistant to microbial attack. Pretreatment of recalcitrant rice straw is essential to achieve high biogas yield in the AD process. A number of different pretreatment techniques involving using physical pretreatment (hydrothermal and freeze, chemical pretreatment (sodium carbonate – sodium sulfite, hydrogen peroxide, NMMO, alkaline, and dilute acid and biological pretreatment (fungal pretreatment also combined pretretment (microwave irradiation and chemical approaches have been investigated, but there is no report that systematically compares the performance of these pretreatment methods for application on rice straw for biogas production. This paper reviews the methods that have been studied for pretreatment of rice straw for delignification, reducing sugar, and conversion to biogas. It describes the AD process, structural and compositional properties of rice straw, and various pretreatment techniques, including the pretreatment process, parameters, performance, and advantages vs. drawbacks.

  12. A new process for efficiently producing methane from waste activated sludge: alkaline pretreatment of sludge followed by treatment of fermentation liquid in an EGSB reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Chen, Yinguang; Zhao, Yuxiao; Ye, Zhengxiang

    2011-01-15

    In the literature the production of methane from waste activated sludge (WAS) was usually conducted in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) after sludge was pretreated. It was reported in our previous publication that compared with other pretreatment methods the methane production in CSTR could be significantly enhanced when sludge was pretreated by NaOH at pH 10 for 8 days. In order to further improve methane production, this study reported a new process for efficiently producing methane from sludge, that is, sludge was fermented at pH 10 for 8 days, which was adjusted by Ca(OH)(2), and then the fermentation liquid was treated in an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) for methane generation. First, for comparing the methane production observed in this study with that reported in the literature, the conventional operational model was applied to produce methane from the pH 10 pretreated sludge, that is, directly using the pH 10 pretreated sludge to produce methane in a CSTR. It was observed that the maximal methane production was only 0.61 m(3)CH(4)/m(3)-reactor/day. Then, the use of fermentation liquid of pH 10 pretreated sludge to produce methane in the reactors of up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB), anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) and EGSB was compared. The maximal methane production in UASB, ASBR, and EGSB reached 1.41, 3.01, and 12.43 m(3)CH(4)/m(3)-reactor/day, respectively. Finally, the mechanisms for EGSB exhibiting remarkably higher methane production were investigated by enzyme, adenosine-triphosphate (ATP), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses. It was found that the granular sludge in EGSB had the highest conversion efficiency of acetic acid to methane, and the greatest activity of hydrolysis and acidification enzymes and general physiology with much more Methanosarcinaceae.

  13. Different physical and chemical pretreatments of wheat straw for enhanced biobutanol production in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumangalah Thirmal, Yaser Dahman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to increase butanol product yields using wheat straw as the biomass. First this study examined different pretreatment and saccharification processes to obtain the maximum sugar concentration. Three different physical and chemical pretreatment methods for the wheat straws were examined in the present work in comparison with physical pretreatment alone as a reference. This included water, acidic, and alkaline pretreatment. For all cases, physical pretreatment represented by 1 mm size reduction of the straws was applied prior to each pretreatment. Results showed that 13.91 g/L glucose concentration was produced from saccharification with just the physical pretreatment (i.e., no chemical pretreatment. This represented ~5-20 % lower sugar release in saccharification compared to the other three pretreatment processes. Saccharification with acid pretreatment obtained the highest sugar concentrations, which were 18.77 g/L glucose and 12.19 g/L xylose. Second this study produced butanol from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF using wheat straw hydrolysate and Clostridium beijerinckii BA101. Water pretreatment was applied to separate lignin and polysaccharides from the wheat straw. Physical pretreatment was applied prior to water pretreatment where, wheat straw was grounded into fine particles less than 1 mm size. Another experiment was conducted where physical pretreatment was applied alone prior to SSF (i.e. no chemical pretreatment was applied. Both processes converted more than 10% of wheat straw into butanol product. This was 2% higher than previous studies. The results illustrated that SSF with physical pretreatment alone obtained 2.61 g/L butanol.

  14. Feasibility of hydrothermal pretreatment on maize silage for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-09-01

    The potential of maize silage as a feedstock to produce bioethanol was evaluated in the present study. The hydrothermal pretreatment with five different pretreatment severity factors (PSF) was employed to pretreat the maize silage and compared in terms of sugar recovery, toxic test, and ethanol production by prehydrolysis and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. After pretreatment, most of the cellulose remained in the residue, ranging between 85.87% by the highest PSF (185 degrees C, 15 min) and 92.90% obtained at the lowest PSF (185 degrees C, 3 min). A larger part of starch, varying from 71.64% by the highest PSF to 78.28% by the lowest, was liberated into liquor part, leaving 8.05-11.74% in the residues. Xylan recovery in the residues increased from 44.25% at the highest PSF to 82.95% at the lowest. The recovery of xylan in liquor changed from 20.13% to 50.33%. Toxic test indicated that all the liquors from the five conditions were not toxic to the Baker's yeast. Pretreatment under 195 degrees C for 7 min had the similar PSF with that of 185 degrees C for 15 min, and both gave the higher ethanol concentration of 19.92 and 19.98 g/L, respectively. The ethanol concentration from untreated maize silage was only 7.67 g/L.

  15. Pretreatment of moso bamboo with dilute phosphoric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Hong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment of moso bamboo materials was studied for producing high quality dissolving pulp for textile applications. The dynamics of dilute acid pretreatment were considered. The Saeman model was found to describe well the acid hydrolysis of moso bamboo hemicelluloses to their monomers under different temperatures and different dilute phosphoric acid concentrations. The initial degradation rate of hemicelluloses was much higher than its subsequent degradation rate, and the xylose generation rate increased with increasing temperature. The change rule of the pentose extraction rate was considered along with the pretreatment factor (P factor. Optimum dilute acid pretreatment conditions were 170 °C and 45 minutes. Based on the optimum conditions and a mass balance of sugars, a weight loss of 26.5% of the solid and liquid fractions combined was observed after the pretreatment. SEM results revealed that the moso bamboo fibers surfaces and cell wall were damaged. With the surface area increasing, the accessible pore areas also increased. At the same time, the crystallinity of the cellulose was reduced, which created a favorable environment for chemical penetration in the subsequent treatment.

  16. Activation of glassy carbon electrodes by photocatalytic pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumanli, Onur [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Art, Ondokuz Mayis University, Kurupelit, 55139 Samsun (Turkey); Onar, A. Nur [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Art, Ondokuz Mayis University, Kurupelit, 55139 Samsun (Turkey)], E-mail: nonar@omu.edu.tr

    2009-11-01

    This paper describes a simple and rapid photocatalytic pretreatment procedure that removes contaminants from glassy carbon (GC) surfaces. The effectiveness of TiO{sub 2} mediated photocatalytic pretreatment procedure was compared to commonly used alumina polishing procedure. Cyclic voltammetric and chronocoulometric measurements were carried out to assess the changes in electrode reactivity by using four redox systems. Electrochemical measurements obtained on photocatalytically treated GC electrodes showed a more active surface relative to polished GC. In cyclic voltammograms of epinephrine, Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} and ferrocene redox systems, higher oxidation and reduction currents were observed. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants (k{sup o}) were calculated for Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 3-/4-} and ferrocene which were greater for photocatalytic pretreatment. Chronocoulometry was performed in order to find the amount of adsorbed methylene blue onto the electrode and was calculated as 0.34 pmol cm{sup -2} for photocatalytically pretreated GC. The proposed photocatalytic GC electrode cleansing and activating pretreatment procedure was more effective than classical alumina polishing.

  17. Improvement of biomass properties by pretreatment with ionic liquids for bioconversion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Chang, Matthew Wook; Ching, Chi Bun; Lee, Jong-Min

    2012-05-01

    Cassava pulp residue and rice straw were used as a precursor for pretreatment with ionic liquids to study the effects of pretreatment conditions on product yield and properties. Cassava pulp residue is a potential biomass in the bioconversion process due to it requiring mild pretreatment conditions while providing a high sugar conversion. The maximum sugar conversion and lignin extraction are attained from pretreatment of biomasses with particle size of 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate at 120°C for 24h. The effectiveness of ionic liquid for biomass pretreatment process follows the sequence: 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate>1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate>1,3-Dimethylimidazolium methyl sulfate. The increase of pretreatment temperature from 25 to 120°C and decrease of biomass particle size renders higher sugar conversion, lignin extraction and lower crystallinity index. However, pretreatment at temperatures higher than 120°C shows a sharp decline of regenerated biomass yield, sugar conversion and lignin extraction and giving higher crystallinity index at pretreatment temperature of 180°C.

  18. Enhanced mesophilic anaerobic digestion of food waste by thermal pretreatment: Substrate versus digestate heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariunbaatar, Javkhlan; Panico, Antonio; Yeh, Daniel H; Pirozzi, Francesco; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni

    2015-12-01

    Food waste (FW) represents a source of high potential renewable energy if properly treated with anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreating the substrates could yield a higher biomethane production in a shorter time. In this study, the effects of thermal (heating the FW in a separate chamber) and thermophilic (heating the full reactor content containing both FW and inoculum) pretreatments at 50, 60, 70 and 80°C prior to mesophilic AD were studied through a series of batch experiments. Pretreatments at a lower temperature (50°C) and a shorter time (55°C) and longer operating times (>12h) yielded higher soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), but had a negative effect on the methanogenic activity. The thermal pretreatments at the same conditions resulted in a lower solubilization of COD. Based on net energy calculations, the enhanced biomethane production is sufficient to heat up the FW for the thermal, but not for the thermophilic pretreatment.

  19. Solids Control in Sludge Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beahm, E.C., Weber, C.F., Hunt, R.D., Dillow, T.A.

    1997-12-31

    Sludge pretreatment will likely involve washing, followed by caustic or acidic leaching and washing of sludge residues after leaching. The principal goal of pretreatment is to obtain a low-volume high-activity waste stream and a high-volume low-activity waste stream. Also, some waste constituents such as chromium and phosphate can be included in glass formulations only at very low concentrations; therefore, it is desirable to remove them from high-level waste streams. Two aspects of sludge treatment and subsequent separations should be well delineated and predictable: (1) the distribution of chemical species between aqueous solutions and solids and (2) potential problems due to chemical interactions that could result in process difficulties or safety concerns.Before any treatment technology is adopted, it must be demonstrated that the process can be carried out as planned. Three pretreatment methods were considered in the Tri-Party (Washington State Ecology, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and U.S. Department of Energy) negotiations: (1) sludge washing with corrosion- inhibiting water, (2) Enhanced Sludge Washing, and (3)acidic dissolution with separations processes. Enhanced Sludge Washing is the baseline process. In Enhanced Sludge Washing, sludge is first washed with corrosion-inhibiting water; it is then leached with caustic (sodium hydroxide solution) and washed again with corrosion- inhibiting water. The initial concern is whether a pretreatment technique is effective in separating sludge components. This can be evaluated by bench-scale tests with sludge specimens from underground storage tanks. The results give data on the distribution of important species such as aluminum, phosphate, and radionuclides between wash and leach solutions and solid sludge residues.

  20. Dilute Acid and Autohydrolysis Pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

    Exposure of cellulosic biomass to temperatures of about 120-210°C can remove most of the hemicellulose and produce cellulose-rich solids from which high glucose yields are possible with cellulase enzymes. Furthermore, the use of dilute sulfuric acid in this pretreatment operation can increase recovery of hemicellulose sugars substantially to about 85-95% of the maximum possible versus only about 65% if no acid is employed. The use of small-diameter tubes makes it possible to employ high solids concentrations similar to those preferred for commercial operations, with rapid heat-up, good temperature control, and accurate closure of material balances. Mixed reactors can be employed to pretreat larger amounts of biomass than possible in such small-diameter tubes, but solids concentrations are limited to about 15% or less to provide uniform temperatures. Pretreatment of large amounts of biomass at high solids concentrations is best carried out using direct steam injection and rapid pressure release, but closure of material balances in such “steam gun” devices is more difficult. Although flow of water alone or containing dilute acid is not practical commercially, such flow-through configurations provide valuable insight into biomass deconstruction kinetics not possible in the batch tubes, mixed reactors, or steam gun systems.

  1. Fluid mechanics relevant to flow through pretreatment of cellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault-Léger, Véronique; Lynd, Lee R

    2014-04-01

    The present study investigates fluid mechanical properties of cellulosic feedstocks relevant to flow through (FT) pretreatment for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass. The results inform identifying conditions for which FT pretreatment can be implemented in a practical context. Measurements of pressure drop across packed beds, viscous compaction and water absorption are reported for milled and not milled sugarcane bagasse, switchgrass and poplar, and important factors impacting viscous flow are deduced. Using biomass knife-milled to pass through a 2mm sieve, the observed pressure drop was highest for bagasse, intermediate for switchgrass and lowest for poplar. The highest pressure drop was associated with the presence of more fine particles, greater viscous compaction and the degree of water absorption. Using bagasse without particle size reduction, the instability of the reactor during pretreatment above 140kg/m(3) sets an upper bound on the allowable concentration for continuous stable flow.

  2. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  3. Hydrothermal pretreatment of biomass for pellet production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooyserkani, Z. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). Clean Energy Research Centre, Biomass and Bioenergy Research Group

    2010-07-01

    This presentation discussed innovative technologies for the production of wood pellets using the hydrothermal pre-treatment of biomass. Conventional techniques use low-cost mill residues, such as saw dust and shavings, as feedstock to produce durable, low-ash pellets. However, mill residues are becoming less available as a result of fewer saw mills, increased pellet production, and increased competition for saw dust. Advanced techniques use mixed biomass such as logging residue as feedstock, creating pellets that are durable for handling and long-term storage, of a higher energy density for transport and mixing with coal for co-firing, and a choice feedstock for biofuels. Advanced pellet production uses steam explosion/pre-treatment in which biomass receives a short-term high-pressure steam treatment followed by sudden decompression. Mild torrefaction seems to have positive feedback, and steam-treated pellets are durable with superior hydrophobicity. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. The pretreatment of corn stover with Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 for enzymatic hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Ziqing

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pretreatment is an essential step in the enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass for bio-ethanol production. The dominant concern in this step is how to decrease the high cost of pretreatment while achieving a high sugar yield. Fungal pretreatment of biomass was previously reported to be effective, with the advantage of having a low energy requirement and requiring no application of additional chemicals. In this work, Gloeophyllum trabeum KU-41 was chosen for corn stover pretreatment through screening with 40 strains of wood-rot fungi. The objective of the current work is to find out which characteristics of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum KU-41 determine the pretreatment method to be successful and worthwhile to apply. This will be done by determining the lignin content, structural carbohydrate, cellulose crystallinity, initial adsorption capacity of cellulase and specific surface area of pretreated corn stover. Results The content of xylan in pretreated corn stover was decreased by 43% in comparison to the untreated corn stover. The initial cellulase adsorption capacity and the specific surface area of corn stover pretreated with G. trabeum were increased by 7.0- and 2.5-fold, respectively. Also there was little increase in the cellulose crystallinity of pretreated corn stover. Conclusion G. trabeum has an efficient degradation system, and the results indicated that the conversion of cellulose to glucose increases as the accessibility of cellulose increases due to the partial removal of xylan and the structure breakage of the cell wall. This pretreatment method can be further explored as an alternative to the thermochemical pretreatment method.

  5. Synthetic activity enhancement of membrane-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis by pretreatment with isooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Xu, Yan; Teng, Yun

    2007-05-01

    The cell-bound lipase from Rhizopus chinensis CCTCC M201021 with high catalysis ability for ester synthesis was located as a membrane-bound lipase by the treatments of Yatalase firstly. In order to improve its synthetic activity in non-aqueous phase, the pretreatments of this enzyme with various organic solvents were investigated. The pretreatment with isooctane improved evidently the lipase synthetic activity, resulting in about 139% in relative synthetic activity and 115% in activity recovery. The morphological changes of mycelia caused by organic solvent pretreatments could influence the exposure of the membrane-bound enzyme from mycelia and the exhibition of the lipase activity. The pretreatment conditions with isooctane and acetone were further investigated, and the optimum effect was obtained by the isooctane pretreatment at 4 degrees C for 1 h, resulting in 156% in relative synthetic activity and 126% in activity recovery. When the pretreated lipases were employed as catalysts for the esterification production of ethyl hexanoate in heptane, higher initial reaction rate and higher final molar conversion were obtained using the lipase pretreated with isooctane, compared with the untreated lyophilized one. This result suggested that the pretreatment of the membrane-bound lipase with isooctane could be an effective method to substitute the lyophilization for preparing biocatalysts used in non-aqueous phase reactions.

  6. Volatile fatty acid recovery by anaerobic fermentation from blue-green algae: Effect of pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Uk; Kim, Hye Gyeong; Kim, Young Mo; Park, Jong Moon

    2017-05-17

    The aims of this study were to quantify how pretreatment affects production of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) from cyanobacterial biomass and production of subsequent microbial lipid by an oleaginous microorganism that uses the VFAs as carbon sources. The highest biomass solubilization was obtained using thermal-alkaline (th-alkaline) pretreatment (33.1%), followed by alkaline pretreatment (29.1%), and thermal pretreatment (7.2%), but the highest VFA yield was obtained using alkaline pretreatment (0.54±0.02g/gVS), followed by the untreated condition (0.47±0.03g/gVS), and th-alkaline pretreatment (0.44±0.02g/gVS). Although VFA yield was higher using alkaline pretreatment condition than in the untreated condition, the difference was not great. However, lipid productivity by Cryptococcus curvatus after the alkaline pretreatment condition was 2.0-fold higher than that under the untreated condition. This study confirmed the feasibility of using biologically produced VFAs from cyanobacterial biomass for microbial lipid production by the oleaginous microorganism. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Coumarin pretreatment alleviates salinity stress in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Ahmed Mahmoud; Madany, M M Y

    2015-03-01

    The potentiality of COU to improve plant tolerance to salinity was investigated. Wheat grains were primed with COU (50 ppm) and then grown under different levels of NaCl (50, 100, 150 mM) for two weeks. COU pretreatment improved the growth of wheat seedling under salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings, due to the accumulation of osmolytes such as soluble sugars and proline. Moreover, COU treatment significantly improved K(+)/Na(+) ratio in the shoots of both salt stressed and un-stressed seedlings. However, in the roots, this ratio increased only under non-salinity. In consistent with phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), phenolics and flavonoids were accumulated in COU-pretreated seedlings under the higher doses of salinity, relative to COU-untreated seedlings. COU primed seedlings showed higher content of the coumarin derivative, scopoletin, and salicylic, chlorogenic, syringic, vanillic, gallic and ferulic acids, under both salinity and non-salinity conditions. Salinity stress significantly improved the activity of peroxidase (POD) in COU-pretreated seedlings. However, the effect of COU on the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was only obtained at the highest dose of NaCl (150 mM). The present results suggest that COU pretreatment could alleviate the adverse effect of salinity on the growth of wheat seedlings through enhancing, at least partly, the osmoregulation process and antioxidant defense system.

  8. Pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse for enhanced ruminal digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, F C; Ramos, L P; Fontana, J D

    1996-01-01

    Crop residues, such as sugar cane bagasse (SCB), have been largely used for cattle feeding. However, the close association that exists among the three major plant cell-wall components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, limits the efficiency by which ruminants can degrade these materials. Previously, we have shown that pretreatment with 3% (w/w) phosphoric acid, under relatively mild conditions, increased considerably the nutritional value for SCB. However, in this preliminary study, pretreated residues were not washed prior to in situ degradability assays because we wanted to explore the high initial solvability of lowmol-wt substances that were produced during pretreatment. We have now studied the suitability of water-and/or alkali-washed residues to in situ ruminal digestion. Alkali washing increased substrate cellulose content by removing most of the lignin and other residual soluble substances. As a result the ruminal degradability of these cleaner materials had first-order rate constants five times higher than those substrates with higher lignin content (e.g., stem-exploded bagasse). However, alkali washing also increased the time of ruminal lag phase of the cellulosic residue, probably because of hemicellulose and/or lignin removal and to the development of substrates with higher degree of crystallinity. Therefore, longer lag phases appear to be related to low microbial adherence after extensive water and alkali extraction, as Novell as to the slower process of cellulase induction during ruminal growth. The kinetic data on ruminal digestion were shown to be very well adjusted by a nonlinear model. Although pretreatment enhances substrate accessibility, the occurrence of an exceedingly high amount of lignin byproducts within the pretreated material reduces considerably its potential degradability.

  9. The University of North Carolina Report on Expanding Access to Higher Education through State-Funded Distance Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of North Carolina General Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Legislation in 1998 provided enrollment funding for UNC distance education. This report documents the growth of UNC distance education programs and their role in meeting the high priority education and economic development needs of the State. As highlighted in the Executive Summary and documented throughout this report, state enrollment funding…

  10. Fungal pretreatment of straw for enhanced biogas yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xinmei; Pilar Castillo, Maria del; Schnuerer, Anna

    2013-07-01

    Among lignocellulosic materials from the agricultural sector, straw is considered to have the biggest potential as a biofuel and therefore also represents a big potential for biogas production. However, the degradation of lignocellulosic materials is somewhat restricted due to the high content of lignin that binds cellulose and hemicellulose and makes them unavailable for microbial degradation. Consequently, low methane yields are achieved. The biodegradability of the lignocellulosic material can be increased by a pretreatment. Optimally the pre-treatment should give an increase in the formation of sugars while avoiding the degradation or loss of carbohydrates and the formation of inhibitory by-products. The treatment should also be cost-effective. Different methods for pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material have been explored, for example thermal, acid, alkaline and oxidative pretreatments. However, they often have a high energy demand. Biological treatment with fungi represents an alternative method for pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials that could be comparably more environmentally friendly, easier to operate and with low energy input. The fungal groups of interest for lignocellulose degradation are the wood decaying fungi, such as the white-, brown-rot and cellulose degraders. The purpose with this work was to increase the biogas potential of straw by using a pretreatment with fungi. Straw was incubated with fungi at aerobic conditions under certain periods of time. The growth and colonization of the straw by the fungi was expected to increase the availability of the lignocellulosic structure of the straw and thus positively affect the biogas potential. In addition also, the spent lignocellulosic material from the cultivation of edible fungi was investigated. We hypothesized that also growth of edible fungi could give a more accessible material and thus give higher biogas potential compared to the substrate before fungal growth.

  11. Method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzhiyil, Najeeb M.; Brown, Robert C.; Dalluge, Dustin Lee

    2015-08-18

    The present invention relates to a method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass containing alkali and/or alkaline earth metal (AAEM). The method comprises providing a lignocellulosic biomass containing AAEM; determining the amount of the AAEM present in the lignocellulosic biomass; identifying, based on said determining, the amount of a mineral acid sufficient to completely convert the AAEM in the lignocellulosic biomass to thermally-stable, catalytically-inert salts; and treating the lignocellulosic biomass with the identified amount of the mineral acid, wherein the treated lignocellulosic biomass contains thermally-stable, catalytically inert AAEM salts.

  12. Television for Higher Technical Education of Workers. Final Report On a Pilot Project in Poland. Reports and Papers on Mass Communication Number 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Mass Communication.

    The "Television Polytechnic" program of 1966 - 1970 was a joint effort of the Polish Ministry of Higher Education and Polish Television to provide televised education for working students. The subjects taught were those normally included in the first two years of the higher technical schools--math, physics, geometry, chemistry, mechanics…

  13. Comparison of bamboo green, timber and yellow in sulfite, sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide pretreatments for enzymatic saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Zehui; Fei, Benhua; Cai, Zhiyong; Pan, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    The response and behavior of bamboo green, timber, and yellow of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) to three pretreatments, sulfite (SPORL), dilute acid (DA), and alkali (NaOH), were investigated and compared with varied chemical loadings at 180°C for 30 min with a 6.25:1 (v/w) liquor-to-bamboo ratio. All the pretreatments improved the enzymatic digestibility of bamboo substrates. Under the investigated conditions, the DA pretreatment achieved better enzymatic digestibility, but had lower sugar recovery yield, and formed more fermentation inhibitors. The results suggested that the SPORL pretreatment be able to generate more readily digestible bamboo substrate with higher sugar yield and fewer fermentation inhibitors than the corresponding DA pretreatment if hemicelluloses are sufficiently removed by adding more acid to bring down the pretreatment pH. Bamboo timber had higher sugar content and better enzymatic digestibility and therefore was a better feedstock for bioconversion than bamboo green and yellow.

  14. Effect of nitrogen oxide pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrevik, R.K.; Wilke, C.R.; Brink, D.L.

    1978-09-01

    This work considers the effect of nitrogen oxide pretreatments on the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by Trichoderma viride cellulase of the cellulose occurring in wheat straw; Triticum Aestivum-L, em. Thell. In the pretreatment scheme the straw is first reacted with nitric oxide and air, and then extracted in aqueous solution. In this way, overall sugar yields increased from 17% for the case of no pretreatment to 70%. The glucose yield increased from 20 to 60%. The yield of glucose during enzymatic hydrolysis is dependent on the reaction time of the gas phase reaction. For a 24 hour reaction the yield is 60%, but drops to 45% for a reaction time of 2 hours. Xylose, a potentially valuable side product of the pretreatment, is obtained by dilute acid hydrolysis during the extraction stage in yields of 90 to 96%. In acidic media, the kinetics of both the rate of formation and destruction of xylose were found to follow the first-order rate laws reported in the literature. These were determined to be 4.5 (liter/gmole)(hr./sup -1/) and 0.03 hr./sup -1/, respectively. However, the rate of formation is much greater (20.4 (liter/gmole) (hr./sup -1/)) when the extraction liquor is recycled. The most likely explanation for this is that the increased total acidity of the recycled liquor compensates for diffusional limitations. A preliminary design and cost analysis of the pretreatment-hydrolysis scheme indicates that glucose can be produced at 10.86 cents per pound, exclusive of straw cost. The corresponding cost per pound of total sugars produced is 5.0 cents. Sensitivity analyses indicate that 42% of the pretreatment cost (excluding hydrolysis) can be attributed to nitric oxide production, and the high yield of sugar obtained is advantageous when considering the cost of straw.

  15. INFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT ON THE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE OF WHEAT STRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cui,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw can solubilize a significant portion of the hemicellulosic component and enhance the enzymatic digestibility of the remaining cellulose for fermentation into ethanol. In this work, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different steam temperatures and retention times, and the chemical compositions of the raw and steam-exploded wheat straw were analyzed. Results showed that the content of hemicellulose decreased sharply at higher steam temperatures and longer retention times; however, the content of lignin changed inconspicuously. After pretreatment, the characteristics of the straw fiber were investigated by studying their proportion of microfibrils, SEM, and FTIR. To assess the differences among various pretreatment parameters, the concentration of the reducing sugar and glucose conversion were determined. The highest reducing sugar concentration and glucose conversion were achieved at the explosion conditions of a pretreatment temperature of 220 ºC and a residence time of 3 min.

  16. Steam explosion pretreatment for enhancing biogas production of late harvested hay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Alexander; Lizasoain, Javier; Theuretzbacher, Franz; Agger, Jane W; Rincón, María; Menardo, Simona; Saylor, Molly K; Enguídanos, Ramón; Nielsen, Paal J; Potthast, Antje; Zweckmair, Thomas; Gronauer, Andreas; Horn, Svein J

    2014-08-01

    Grasslands are often abandoned due to lack of profitability. Extensively cultivating grassland for utilization in a biogas-based biorefinery concept could mend this problem. Efficient bioconversion of this lignocellulosic biomass requires a pretreatment step. In this study the effect of different steam explosion conditions on hay digestibility have been investigated. Increasing severity in the pretreatment induced degradation of the hemicellulose, which at the same time led to the production of inhibitors and formation of pseudo-lignin. Enzymatic hydrolysis showed that the maximum glucose yields were obtained under pretreatment at 220 °C for 15 min, while higher xylose yields were obtained at 175 °C for 10 min. Pretreatment of hay by steam explosion enhanced 15.9% the methane yield in comparison to the untreated hay. Results indicate that hay can be effectively converted to methane after steam explosion pretreatment.

  17. Efficiency and Effectiveness in Higher Education: A Report by the Universities UK Efficiency and Modernisation Task Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness, efficiency and value for money are central concerns for the higher education sector. In England, decisions made by the current Government will effect a radical change in the funding for teaching. Institutions will be managing a reduction in public funding for teaching and the transition to the new system of graduate contributions,…

  18. Considering Teaching Excellence in Higher Education: 2007-2013. A Literature Review since the CHERI Report 2007. HEA Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Vicky; Fisk, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This research review explores both the research and the grey literature on university teaching excellence with a specific remit to update an earlier review, "Excellence in Teaching and Learning: a review of literature for the Higher Education Academy". Little, B., et al (2007) The two main aims are: (1) to suggest further areas of…

  19. Production of Doctorates in the Biosciences, 1975-1980: An Experimental Forecast. Higher Education Panel Reports, No. 34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    A survey was undertaken in 1976 to obtain short-term estimates of doctorate production directly from the heads of the science departments involved. These biosciences departments were surveyed in the 235 member institutions of the Higher Education Panel that grant doctorates: anatomy, biochemistry, biology, biometry/biostatistics/biomathematics,…

  20. Adult, Continuing, and In-Service Education and the Library in Higher Education: A Bibliographic Check List. Report No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nicholas G.

    As an aid for educational change, a bibliography has been prepared in the areas of: trends and developments in higher education; science, technology, civilization, and social change; the future and future research; the library-college concept; the articulation program; educational coordination; interinstitutional cooperation; transfer students;…

  1. Reuse of microalgae grown in full-scale wastewater treatment ponds: Thermochemical pretreatment and biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Fabiana; Felix, Leonardo; Rocha, Hemyle; Pereira, Jackson de Oliveira; de Aquino, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed thermochemical pretreatment of microalgae harvested from a full-scale wastewater treatment pond prior to its anaerobic digestion using acid and alkaline chemical doses combined with thermal pretreatment at 80°C. Results indicated that alkaline and thermal pretreatment contributed mostly to glycoprotein and pectin solubilisation; whilst acid pretreatment solubilised mostly hemicellulose, with lower effectiveness for proteins. Regarding the anaerobic biodegradability, biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests showed that final methane yield was enhanced after almost all pretreatment conditions when compared to non-pretreated microalgae, with the highest increase for thermochemical pretreatment at the lowest dose (0.5%), i.e. 82% and 86% increase for alkaline and acid, respectively. At higher doses, salt toxicity was revealed by K(+) concentrations over 5000mg/L. All BMP data from pretreated biomass was successfully described by the modified Gompertz model and optimal condition (thermochemical 0.5% HCl) showed an increase in final methane yield and the process kinetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Relationship between Reports of Psychological Capital and Reports of Job Satisfaction among Administrative Personnel at a Private Institution of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to investigate the relationship between administrative personnel's reports of psychological capital (Luthans, Youssef, & Avolio, 2007) and their reports of job satisfaction (Hackman & Oldham, 1980). Specifically, two surveys, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (Luthans, Youssef, &…

  3. Malaysia and the Knowledge Economy: Building a World-Class Higher Education System. Human Development Sector Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Omporn; Salmi, Jamil; Watkins, Alfred; Tan, Hong; Dawkins, John; Saroyan, Alenoush; Vestergaard, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the Government of Malaysia (GOM) as a contribution to the long term development objectives for the university sector under the Ninth Malaysia Plan. The GOM is considering new policy directions to make the country a more competitive player in the world economy. Such a strategy will require bold innovations…

  4. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. METHODS: We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolesce

  5. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents

  6. Piecing Together the Student Success Puzzle: Research, Propositions, and Recommendations. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 32, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, George D., Ed.; Kinzie, Jillian, Ed.; Buckley, Jennifer A., Ed.; Bridges, Brian K., Ed.; Hayek, John C., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This report is an abridged version of work performed for the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative to synthesize the relevant literature and emerging findings related to student success, broadly defined (Kuh and others, 2006). The author's purpose is to provide an informed perspective on policies, programs, and practices that can make a…

  7. Exploring the Validity and Robustness of a Competency Self-Report Instrument for Vocational and Higher Competence-Based Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaled, A.E.; Gulikers, J.T.M.; Tobi, H.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Oonk, C.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of competence-based education (CB-education) across educational contexts and levels requires a new evaluation measurement. This study explores the face validity, construct validity, and robustness of a competency self-report instrument that is aligned with contemporary

  8. Autohydrolysis Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qiang

    Autohydrolysis, a simple and environmental friendly process, has long been studied but often abandoned as a financially viable pretreatment for bioethanol production due to the low yields of fermentable sugars at economic enzyme dosages. The introduction of mechanical refining can generate substantial improvements for autohydrolysis process, making it an attractive pretreatment technology for bioethanol commercialization. In this study, several lignocellulosic biomass including wheat straw, switchgrass, corn stover, waste wheat straw have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment followed by mechanical refining to evaluate the total sugar recovery at affordable enzyme dosages. Encouraging results have been found that using autohydrolysis plus refining strategy, the total sugar recovery of most feedstock can be as high as 76% at 4 FPU/g enzymes dosages. The mechanical refining contributed to the improvement of enzymatic sugar yield by as much as 30%. Three non-woody biomass (sugarcane bagasse, wheat straw, and switchgrass) and three woody biomass (maple, sweet gum, and nitens) have been subjected to autohydrolysis pretreatment to acquire a fundamental understanding of biomass characteristics that affect the autohydrolysis and the following enzymatic hydrolysis. It is of interest to note that the nonwoody biomass went through substantial delignification during autohydrolysis compared to woody biomass due to a significant amount of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. It has been found that hardwood which has a higher S/V ratio in the lignin structure tends to have a higher total sugar recovery from autohydrolysis pretreatment. The economics of bioethanol production from autohydrolysis of different feedstocks have been investigated. Regardless of different feedstocks, in the conventional design, producing bioethanol and co-producing steam and power, the minimum ethanol revenues (MER) required to generate a 12% internal rate of return (IRR) are high enough to

  9. Process and technoeconomic analysis of leading pretreatment technologies for lignocellulosic ethanol production using switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Ling; Aden, Andy; Elander, Richard T; Pallapolu, Venkata Ramesh; Lee, Y Y; Garlock, Rebecca J; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E; Kim, Youngmi; Mosier, Nathan S; Ladisch, Michael R; Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T; Sierra, Rocio; Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat A; Redmond, Tim; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E; Hames, Bonnie; Thomas, Steve; Warner, Ryan E

    2011-12-01

    Six biomass pretreatment processes to convert switchgrass to fermentable sugars and ultimately to cellulosic ethanol are compared on a consistent basis in this technoeconomic analysis. The six pretreatment processes are ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX), dilute acid (DA), lime, liquid hot water (LHW), soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA), and sulfur dioxide-impregnated steam explosion (SO(2)). Each pretreatment process is modeled in the framework of an existing biochemical design model so that systematic variations of process-related changes are consistently captured. The pretreatment area process design and simulation are based on the research data generated within the Biomass Refining Consortium for Applied Fundamentals and Innovation (CAFI) 3 project. Overall ethanol production, total capital investment, and minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) are reported along with selected sensitivity analysis. The results show limited differentiation between the projected economic performances of the pretreatment options, except for processes that exhibit significantly lower monomer sugar and resulting ethanol yields.

  10. Brief Report: Parent-Adolescent Informant Discrepancies of Social Skill Importance and Social Skill Engagement for Higher-Functioning Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Camilla M.; Solomon, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Parent- and adolescent-report of social skill importance and social skill engagement on the Social Skills Rating System (Gresham and Elliott in The social skills rating system, American Guidance Service, Circle Pines, 1990) were assessed in higher-functioning adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Compared to parents, adolescents…

  11. Ultrasonic and Thermal Pretreatments on Anaerobic Digestion of Petrochemical Sludge: Dewaterability and Degradation of PAHs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available Effects of different pretreatment methods on sludge dewaterability and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs degradation during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion were studied. Results showed that the total biogas production volume in the thermal pretreatment system was 4 and 5 times higher than that in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system, and the corresponding volatile solid removal efficiencies reached 28%, 15%, and 8%. Phenanthrene, paranaphthalene, fluoranthene, benzofluoranthene, and benzopyrene removal rates reached 43.3%, 55.5%, 30.6%, 42.9%, and 41.7%, respectively, in the thermal pretreatment system, which were much higher than those in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system. Moreover, capillary suction time (CST of sludge increased after pretreatment, and then reduced after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, indicating that sludge dewaterability was greatly improved after anaerobic digestion. The decrease of protein and polysaccharide in the sludge could improve sludge dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. This study suggested that thermal pretreatment might be a promising enhancement method for petrochemical sludge solubilization, thus contributing to degradation of the PAHs, biogas production, and improvement of dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion.

  12. Ultrasonic and Thermal Pretreatments on Anaerobic Digestion of Petrochemical Sludge: Dewaterability and Degradation of PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Xu, Weizhong; Wong, Jonathan W. C.; Yong, Xiaoyu; Yan, Binghua; Zhang, Xueying; Jia, Honghua

    2015-01-01

    Effects of different pretreatment methods on sludge dewaterability and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) degradation during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion were studied. Results showed that the total biogas production volume in the thermal pretreatment system was 4 and 5 times higher than that in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system, and the corresponding volatile solid removal efficiencies reached 28%, 15%, and 8%. Phenanthrene, paranaphthalene, fluoranthene, benzofluoranthene, and benzopyrene removal rates reached 43.3%, 55.5%, 30.6%, 42.9%, and 41.7%, respectively, in the thermal pretreatment system, which were much higher than those in the ultrasound pretreatment and in the control system. Moreover, capillary suction time (CST) of sludge increased after pretreatment, and then reduced after 20 days of anaerobic digestion, indicating that sludge dewaterability was greatly improved after anaerobic digestion. The decrease of protein and polysaccharide in the sludge could improve sludge dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. This study suggested that thermal pretreatment might be a promising enhancement method for petrochemical sludge solubilization, thus contributing to degradation of the PAHs, biogas production, and improvement of dewaterability during petrochemical sludge anaerobic digestion. PMID:26327510

  13. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  14. Ultrasound pretreatment of filamentous algal biomass for enhanced biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanyong; Chantrasakdakul, Phrompol; Kim, Daegi; Kong, Mingeun; Park, Ki Young

    2014-06-01

    The filamentous alga Hydrodictyon reticulatum harvested from a bench-scale wastewater treatment pond was used to evaluate biogas production after ultrasound pretreatment. The effects of ultrasound pretreatment at a range of 10-5000 J/mL were tested with harvested H. reticulatum. Cell disruption by ultrasound was successful and showed a higher degree of disintegration at a higher applied energy. The range of 10-5000 J/mL ultrasound was able to disintegrated H. reticulatum and the soluble COD was increased from 250 mg/L to 1000 mg/L at 2500 J/mL. The disintegrated algal biomass was digested for biogas production in batch experiments. Both cumulative gas generation and volatile solids reduction data were obtained during the digestion. Cell disintegration due to ultrasound pretreatment increased the specific biogas production and degradation rates. Using the ultrasound approach, the specific methane production at a dose of 40 J/mL increased up to 384 mL/g-VS fed that was 2.3 times higher than the untreated sample. For disintegrated samples, the volatile solids reduction was greater with increased energy input, and the degradation increased slightly to 67% at a dose of 50 J/mL. The results also indicate that disintegration of the algal cells is the essential step for efficient anaerobic digestion of algal biomass. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Self-reported leadership styles of deans of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Marion E

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a lack of attention in the discipline paid to developing strong academic leaders. It is widely acknowledged that the role of the dean has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, with an increasing emphasis on interaction with and accountability to external constituencies at the university, community, and national levels. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the self-reported leadership styles, behaviors, and experiences of deans of schools of nursing in the United States. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) was sent to 655 deans who were members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing; 344 returned completed surveys for a return rate of 52.5%. Scores on the transformational scale (n = 321; 20 items) ranged from 2.75 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.79; transactional scores ranged from 1.3 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.3 and mode of 3.5. The passive leadership component was lowest, with a range of 0 to 3.75, mean of 1.1, and mode of 1.0. The highest scores for each dean were then examined and compared across the three components. Seventy-seven percent of the deans' highest scores fell on the transformational, 21% on the transactional, and 2% on the passive-avoidant scale. There were no significant differences in the most commonly reported leadership behaviors by gender, ethnicity, or terminal degree. Deans of nursing, compared with over 3,000 other leaders who have completed the MLQ, ranked in the 80th percentile for self-reported transformative behaviors and outcomes effectiveness. The findings from this sample, who were predominantly female, are congruent with previous research on women leaders. Recommendations for future research leadership development programs are presented.

  16. Biomass Pretreatment using Ionic Liquid and Glycerol Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Joan Goerss

    -ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc] or EMIM Ac) and 25% glycerol. Enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated solids gave glucose, mannose, and xylose yields up to 18 times that of the raw pine. Viscosity measurements of pure glycerol, [C2mim][O2CH], [C2mim][OAc], and IL-glycerol mixtures were very different at ambient temperature, but were similar at typical biomass pretreatment temperatures. Biomass pretreated by mixtures with higher viscosity tended to give better carbohydrate yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. Higher excess molar volumes, Vm E, tended to align with better carbohydrate yields after enzymatic hydrolysis. This phenomenon may relate to more energy put into shearing flow of the IL-glycerol-biomass system resulting in biomass particle shearing or stretching that allowed better solvent access into the biomass.

  17. Effect of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment on ethanol production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Mofoluwake M; Isroi; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2014-08-01

    Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB), a lignocellulosic residue of palm oil industries was examined for ethanol production. Milled OPEFB exposed to simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with enzymes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted just in 14.5% ethanol yield compared to the theoretical yield. Therefore, chemical pretreatment with phosphoric acid, a biological pretreatment with white-rot fungus Pleurotus floridanus, and their combination were carried out on OPEFB prior to the SSF. Pretreatment with phosphoric acid, combination of both methods and just fungal pretreatment improved the digestibility of OPEFB by 24.0, 16.5 and 4.5 times, respectively. During the SSF, phosphoric acid pretreatment, combination of fungal and phosphoric acid pretreatment and just fungal pretreatment resulted in the highest 89.4%, 62.8% and 27.9% of the theoretical ethanol yield, respectively. However, the recovery of the OPEFB after the fungal pretreatment was 98.7%, which was higher than after phosphoric acid pretreatment (36.5%) and combined pretreatment (45.2%).

  18. Sensitivity for Diagnosing Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis from Manufacturers is 10% Higher than Reported in Peer-Reviewed Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachhani, Raj; Patel, Toral; Centor, Robert M; Estrada, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses based on peer-reviewed publications report a sensitivity of approximately 85% for rapid antigen streptococcus tests to diagnose group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Because these meta-analyses excluded package inserts, we examined the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcal tests and molecular methods that manufacturers report in their package inserts. We included tests available in the US market (Food and Drug Administration, period searched 1993-2015) and used package insert data to calculate pooled sensitivity and specificity. To examine quality, we used the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. We excluded 26 tests having different trade names but identical methods and data. The study design was prospective in 41.7% (10 of 24). The pooled sensitivity of the most commonly used method, lateral flow/immunochromatographic, was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94-96) and the pooled specificity was 98% (96-98); 7108 patients. The pooled sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction or molecular methods was 98% (95% CI 96-98) and the pooled specificity was 96% (95% CI 95-97); 5685 patients. Package inserts include sponsored studies that overestimate the sensitivity of rapid tests to diagnose GAS pharyngitis by approximately 10%. Physicians should understand that package inserts overestimate diagnostic test utility; a negative test cannot be used to exclude GAS pharyngitis.

  19. Microwave Pretreatment For Hydrolysis Of Cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullingford, Hatice S.; George, Clifford E.; Lightsey, George R.

    1993-01-01

    Microwave pretreatment enhances enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic wastes into soluble saccharides used as feedstocks for foods, fuels, and other products. Low consumption of energy, high yield, and low risk of proposed hydrolysis process incorporating microwave pretreatment makes process viable alternative to composting.

  20. Chemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic agroindustrial waste for methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellera, Frantseska-Maria; Gidarakos, Evangelos

    2017-04-26

    This study investigates the effect of different chemical pretreatments on the solubilization and the degradability of different solid agroindustrial waste, namely winery waste, cotton gin waste, olive pomace and juice industry waste. Eight different reagents were investigated, i.e. sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), sodium chloride (NaCl), citric acid (H3Cit), acetic acid (AcOH), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), acetone (Me2CO) and ethanol (EtOH), under three condition sets resulting in treatments of varying intensity, depending on process duration, reagent dosage and temperature. Results indicated that chemical pretreatment under more severe conditions is more effective on the solubilization of lignocellulosic substrates, such as those of the present study and among the investigated reagents, H3Cit, H2O2 and EtOH appeared to be the most effective to this regard. At the same time, although chemical pretreatment in general did not improve the methane potential of the substrates, moderate to high severity conditions were found to generally be the most satisfactory in terms of methane production from pretreated materials. In fact, moderate severity treatments using EtOH for winery waste, H3Cit for olive pomace and H2O2 for juice industry waste and a high severity treatment with EtOH for cotton gin waste, resulted in maximum specific methane yield values. Ultimately, the impact of pretreatment parameters on the different substrates seems to be dependent on their characteristics, in combination with the specific mode of action of each reagent. The overall energy balance of such a system could probably be improved by using lower operating powers and higher solid to liquid ratios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of thermochemical pretreatment on the biodegradability of sludge from a biological wastewater treatment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ick-Tae Yeom

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermochemical pretreatment on the sludge biodegradability were examined. Two types of tests were conducted: aerobic biodegradation and denitrification using thermochemically pretreated sludge as carbon source. In the aerobic biodegradation tests, the biodegradation efficiency for the sludge pretreated at 60, 70, 80 and 90oC (pH 11 was 1.4-2.2 times higher than that for the untreated sludge. The biodegradation efficiency for the supernatant was also about 1.9 times higher than that for the particulates. The biodegradation enhancement for the thermochemically pretreated sludge was demonstrated in denitrification tests. The supernatant showed its potential as a carbon source for the denitrification process.

  2. Comparative study of sulfite pretreatments for robust enzymatic saccharification of corn cob residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bu Lingxi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corn cob residue (CCR is a kind of waste lignocellulosic material with enormous potential for bioethanol production. The moderated sulphite processes were used to enhance the hydrophily of the material by sulfonation and hydrolysis. The composition, FT-IR spectra, and conductometric titrations of the pretreated materials were measured to characterize variations of the CCR in different sulfite pretreated environments. And the objective of this study is to compare the saccharification rate and yield of the samples caused by these variations. Results It was found that the lignin in the CCR (43.2% had reduced to 37.8%, 38.0%, 35.9%, and 35.5% after the sulfite pretreatment in neutral, acidic, alkaline, and ethanol environments, respectively. The sulfite pretreatments enhanced the glucose yield of the CCR. Moreover, the ethanol sulfite sample had the highest glucose yield (81.2%, based on the cellulose in the treated sample among the saccharification samples, which was over 10% higher than that of the raw material (70.6%. More sulfonic groups and weak acid groups were produced during the sulfite pretreatments. Meanwhile, the ethanol sulfite treated sample had the highest sulfonic group (0.103 mmol/g and weak acid groups (1.85 mmol/g in all sulfite treated samples. In FT-IR spectra, the variation of bands at 1168 and 1190 cm-1 confirmed lignin sulfonation during sulfite pretreatment. The disappearance of the band at 1458 cm-1 implied the methoxyl on lignin had been removed during the sulfite pretreatments. Conclusions It can be concluded that the lignin in the CCR can be degraded and sulfonated during the sulfite pretreatments. The pretreatments improve the hydrophility of the samples because of the increase in sulfonic group and weak acid groups, which enhances the glucose yield of the material. The ethanol sulfite pretreatment is the best method for lignin removal and with the highest glucose yield.

  3. Effects of pretreatment in steam on the pyrolysis behavior of Loy Yang brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Zeng; George Favas; Hongwei Wu; Alan L. Chaffee; Jun-ichiro Hayashi; Chun-Zhu Li [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-01

    Dewatering/drying of Victorian brown coal will be an integral part of future brown coal utilization processes aimed at the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. This study aims to investigate the effects of the thermal pretreatment of brown coal in the presence of steam/water on its subsequent pyrolysis behavior. A Victorian (Loy Yang) brown coal was thermally pretreated in pressurized steam and inert atmospheres. The pyrolysis behavior of these pretreated coal samples was investigated in a wire-mesh reactor. While the pretreatment in steam at temperatures higher than 250{sup o}C increased the char yield of the steam-treated coal, it did not affect the overall pyrolysis char yield at 1000{sup o} C s{sup -1} if the weight loss during the pretreatment in steam was also considered. However, the tar yield decreased significantly after the pretreatment in the presence of steam. The UV-fluorescence spectroscopy of tars revealed that the release of large aromatic systems from the steam-treated coal was only affected by the pretreatment in steam if the treatment temperature was very high (e.g. 350{sup o}C). The loss of NaCl and the use of high pressure during the pretreatment of brown coal in steam were not the main reasons for the changes in the observed tar yield. The hydrolysis of O-containing structures such as ethers, esters, and carboxylates during the pretreatment in the presence of steam plays an important role in the fates of these O-containing structures during pretreatment and subsequent pyrolysis, leading to changes in the pyrolysis behavior of the brown coal. 36 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Microwave assisted acid and alkali pretreatment of Miscanthus biomass for biorefineries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongyuan Zhu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Miscanthus is a major bioenergy crop in Europe and a potential feedstock for second generation biofuels. Thermochemical pretreatment is a significant step in the process of converting lignocellulosic biomass into fermentable sugars. In this work, microwave energy was applied to facilitate NaOH and H2SO4 pretreatments of Miscanthus. This was carried out at 180 ℃ in a monomode microwave cavity at 300 W. Our results show that H2SO4 pretreatment contributes to the breakdown of hemicelluloses and cellulose, leading to a high glucose yield. The maximum sugar yield from available carbohydrates during pretreatment is 75.3% (0.2 M H2SO4 20 Min, and glucose yield is 46.7% under these conditions. NaOH and water pretreatments tend to break down only hemicellulose in preference to cellulose, contributing to high xylose yield. Compared to conventional heating NaOH/H2SO4 pretreatment, 12 times higher sugar yield was obtained by using microwave assisted pretreatment within half the time. NaOH pretreatments lead to a significantly enhanced digestibility of the residue, because the effective removal of lignin and hemicellulose makes cellulose fibres more accessible to cellulases. Morphological study of biomass shows that the tightly packed fibres in the Miscanthus were dismantled and exposed under NaOH condition. We studied sugar degradation under microwave assisted H2SO4 conditions. The results shows that 6-8% biomass was converted into levulinic acid (LA during pretreatment, showing the possibility of using microwave technology to produce LA from biomass. The outcome of this work shows great potential for using microwave in the thermo-chemical pretreatment for biomass and also selective production of LA from biomass.

  5. Innovative pretreatment strategies for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patinvoh, Regina J; Osadolor, Osagie A; Chandolias, Konstantinos; Sárvári Horváth, Ilona; Taherzadeh, Mohammad J

    2017-01-01

    Biogas or biomethane is traditionally produced via anaerobic digestion, or recently by thermochemical or a combination of thermochemical and biological processes via syngas (CO and H2) fermentation. However, many of the feedstocks have recalcitrant structure and are difficult to digest (e.g., lignocelluloses or keratins), or they have toxic compounds (such as fruit flavors or high ammonia content), or not digestible at all (e.g., plastics). To overcome these challenges, innovative strategies for enhanced and economically favorable biogas production were proposed in this review. The strategies considered are commonly known physical pretreatment, rapid decompression, autohydrolysis, acid- or alkali pretreatments, solvents (e.g. for lignin or cellulose) pretreatments or leaching, supercritical, oxidative or biological pretreatments, as well as combined gasification and fermentation, integrated biogas production and pretreatment, innovative biogas digester design, co-digestion, and bio-augmentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An EIAV field isolate reveals much higher levels of subtype variability than currently reported for the equine lentivirus family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Baoshan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV, a lentivirus that infects horses, has been utilized as an animal model for the study of HIV. Furthermore, the disease associated with the equine lentivirus poses a significant challenge to veterinary medicine around the world. As with all lentiviruses, EIAV has been shown to have a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, especially in its envelope (Env proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated Env variation to be a major determinant of vaccine efficacy, emphasizing the importance of defining natural variation among field isolates of EIAV. To date, however, published EIAV sequences have been reported only for cell-adapted strains of virus, predominantly derived from a single primary virus isolate, EIAVWyoming (EIAVWY. Results We present here the first characterization of the Env protein of a natural primary isolate from Pennsylvania (EIAVPA since the widely utilized and referenced EIAVWY strain. The data demonstrated that the level of EIAVPA Env amino acid sequence variation, approximately 40% as compared to EIAVWY, is much greater than current perceptions or published reports of natural EIAV variation between field isolates. This variation did not appear to give rise to changes in the predicted secondary structure of the proteins. While the EIAVPA Env was serologically cross reactive with the Env proteins of the cell-adapted reference strain, EIAVPV (derivative of EIAVWY, the two variant Envs were shown to lack any cross neutralization by immune serum from horses infected with the respective virus strains. Conclusion Taking into account the significance of serum neutralization to universal vaccine efficacy, these findings are crucial considerations towards successful EIAV vaccine development and the potential inclusion of field isolate Envs in vaccine candidates.

  7. Effect of pretreatment severity on xylan solubility and enzymatic breakdown of the remaining cellulose from wheat straw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabel, M.A.; Bos, G.; Zeevalking, J.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Schols, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of process conditions used for wheat straw pretreatments on the liquor- and residue-composition was studied. Hereto, the pretreatment conditions were expressed in a `combined severity -factor¿. The higher the combined severity factor () the more xylan was released from the wheat straw, bu

  8. Novel in situ pretreatment method for significantly enhancing the signal in MALDI-TOF MS of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Kakimoto

    Full Text Available The application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI-based mass spectrometry (MS to the proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissue presents significant technical challenges. In situ enzymatic digestion is frequently used to unlock formalin-fixed tissues for analysis, but the results are often unsatisfactory. Here, we report a new, simplified in situ pretreatment method for preparing tissue sections for MS that involves heating with vapor containing acetonitrile in a small airtight pressurized space. The utility of the novel method is shown using FFPE tissue of human colon carcinoma. The number and intensity of MALDI peaks obtained from analysis of pretreated tissue was significantly higher than control tissue not subjected to pretreatment. A prominent peak (m/z 850 apparently specific to cancerous tissue was identified as a fragment of histone H2A in FFPE tissue pretreated using our method. This highly sensitive treatment may enable MALDI-MS analysis of archived pathological FFPE samples, thus leading to the identification of new biomarkers.

  9. Novel in situ pretreatment method for significantly enhancing the signal in MALDI-TOF MS of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimoto, Yu; Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki; Yamamoto, Takushi; Furuta, Masaru; Kotani, Hirokazu; Ozeki, Munetaka; Yoshizawa, Akihiko; Haga, Hironori; Tamaki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The application of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI)-based mass spectrometry (MS) to the proteomic analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue presents significant technical challenges. In situ enzymatic digestion is frequently used to unlock formalin-fixed tissues for analysis, but the results are often unsatisfactory. Here, we report a new, simplified in situ pretreatment method for preparing tissue sections for MS that involves heating with vapor containing acetonitrile in a small airtight pressurized space. The utility of the novel method is shown using FFPE tissue of human colon carcinoma. The number and intensity of MALDI peaks obtained from analysis of pretreated tissue was significantly higher than control tissue not subjected to pretreatment. A prominent peak (m/z 850) apparently specific to cancerous tissue was identified as a fragment of histone H2A in FFPE tissue pretreated using our method. This highly sensitive treatment may enable MALDI-MS analysis of archived pathological FFPE samples, thus leading to the identification of new biomarkers.

  10. Chemical and Physicochemical Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Brodeur; Elizabeth Yau; Kimberly Badal; John Collier; Ramachandran, K.B.; Subramanian Ramakrishnan

    2011-01-01

    Overcoming the recalcitrance (resistance of plant cell walls to deconstruction) of lignocellulosic biomass is a key step in the production of fuels and chemicals. The recalcitrance is due to the highly crystalline structure of cellulose which is embedded in a matrix of polymers-lignin and hemicellulose. The main goal of pretreatment is to overcome this recalcitrance, to separate the cellulose from the matrix polymers, and to make it more accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis. Reports have sh...

  11. INFLUENCE OF STEAM EXPLOSION PRETREATMENT ON THE COMPOSITION AND STRUCTURE OF WHEAT STRAW

    OpenAIRE

    Li Cui; Zhong Liu; Chuanling Si,; Lanfeng Hui; Neng Kang,; Ting Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw can solubilize a significant portion of the hemicellulosic component and enhance the enzymatic digestibility of the remaining cellulose for fermentation into ethanol. In this work, wheat straw was pretreated by steam explosion using different steam temperatures and retention times, and the chemical compositions of the raw and steam-exploded wheat straw were analyzed. Results showed that the content of hemicellulose decreased sharply at higher steam ...

  12. Structural modification of lignin and characterization of pretreated wheat straw by ozonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bule, Mahesh V; Gao, Allan H; Hiscox, Bill; Chen, Shulin

    2013-04-24

    Ozonolysis is potentially an effective method for pretreating lignocellulosic biomass to improve the production of fermentable sugars via enzymatic hydrolysis. Further understanding of the ozonolysis process and identifying specific lignin structural changes are crucial for improving the pretreatment process. Investigation into pretreatment of wheat straw using ozonolysisis is reported in this paper, with special emphasis on selective modification/degradation of lignin subunits. The ozonolysis was performed for 2 h with less than 60 mesh particles in order to achieve maximum lignin oxidation. The results showed that the lignin structure was significantly modified under these conditions, leading to higher sugar recovery of more than 50% which increased from 13.11% to 63.17% corresponding to the control and ozone treated samples, respectively. Moisture content was found to be an important parameter for improving sugar recovery. Ninety percent (w/w) moisture produced the highest sugar recovery. The concentration of acid soluble lignin in the ozone treated sample increased from 4% to 11% after 2 h treatment. NMR analysis revealed that the S2/6 and G2 lignin units in the wheat straw were most prone to oxidation by ozone as the concentration of aromatic units decreased while the carboxylic acids became more abundant. The experimental data suggest the degradation of β-O-4 moieties and aromatic ring opening in lignin subunits. The pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry results revealed that the rate of lignin unit degradation was in the following order: syringyl > guaiacyl > p-hydroxyphenyl. Long ozone exposure resulted in few condensed lignin structure formation. In addition, the formation of condensed units during this process increased the activation energy from ASTM-E, 259.74 kJ/mol; Friedman-E, 270.08 kJ/mol to ASTM-E, 509.29 kJ/mol; Friedman-E, 462.17 kJ/mol. The results provide new information in overcoming lignin barrier for lignocellulose utilization.

  13. Reducing acid in dilute acid pretreatment and the impact on enzymatic saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ye; Stevens, Mark A; Zhu, Yongming; Holmes, Jason; Moxley, Geoffrey; Xu, Hui

    2012-05-01

    Dilute acid pretreatment is a leading pretreatment technology for biomass to ethanol conversion due to the comparatively low chemical cost and effective hemicellulose solubilization. The conventional dilute acid pretreatment processes use relatively large quantities of sulfuric acid and require alkali for pH adjustment afterwards. Significant amounts of sulfate salts are generated as by-products, which have to be properly treated before disposal. Wastewater treatment is an expensive, yet indispensable part of commercial level biomass-to-ethanol plants. Therefore, reducing acid use to the lowest level possible would be of great interest to the emerging biomass-to-ethanol industry. In this study, a dilute acid pretreatment process was developed for the pretreatment of corn stover. The pretreatment was conducted at lower acid levels than the conventional process reported in the literature while using longer residence times. The study indicates that a 50% reduction in acid consumption can be achieved without compromising pretreatment efficiency when the pretreatment time was extended from 1-5 min to 15-20 min. To avoid undesirable sugar degradation and inhibitor generation, temperatures should be controlled below 170°C. When the sulfuric acid-to-lignocellulosic biomass ratio was kept at 0.025 g acid/g dry biomass, a cellulose-to-glucose conversion of 72.7% can be achieved at an enzyme loading of 0.016 g/g corn stover. It was also found that acid loading based on total solids (g acid/g dry biomass) governs the pretreatment efficiency rather than the acid concentration (g acid/g pretreatment liquid). While the acid loading on lignocellulosic biomass may be achieved through various combinations of solids loading and acid concentration in the pretreatment step, this work shows that it is unlikely to reduce acid use without undermining pretreatment efficiency simply by increasing the solid content in pretreatment reactors, therefore acid loading on biomass is indicated

  14. [Effects of hot-NaOH pretreatment on Jerusalem artichoke stalk composition and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Qiu, Jingwen; Li, Yang; Shen, Fei

    2015-10-01

    In order to explore the possibility of Jerusalem artichoke stalk for bioenergy conversion, we analyzed the main composition of whole stalk, pitch, and core of the stalk. Meanwhile, these parts were pretreated with different NaOH concentrations at 121 degrees C. Afterwards, enzymatic hydrolysis was performed to evaluate the pretreatment efficiency. Jerusalem artichoke stalk was characterized by relatively high lignin content (32.0%) compared with traditional crop stalks. The total carbohydrate content was close to that of crop stalks, but with higher cellulose content (40.5%) and lower hemicellulose (19.6%) than those of traditional crop stalks. After pretreatment, the lignin content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased by 13.1%-13.4%, 8.3%-13.5%, and 19.9%-27.2%, respectively, compared with the unpretreated substrates. The hemicellulose content in the whole stalk, pitch, and core decreased 87.8%-96.9%, 87.6%-95.0%, and 74.0%-90.2%, respectively. Correspondingly, the cellulose content in the pretreated whole stalk, pitch, and core increased by 56.5%-60.2%, 52.2%-55.4%, and 62.7%-73.2%, respectively. Moreover, increase of NaOH concentration for pretreatment could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of the whole stalk and pitch by 2.3-2.6 folds and 10.3-18.5 folds, respectively. The hydrolysis of pretreated stalk core decreased significantly as 2.0 mol/L NaOH was employed, although the increased NaOH concentration can also improve its hydrolysis performance. Based on these results, hot-NaOH can be regarded as an option for Jerusalem artichoke stalk pretreatment. Increasing NaOH concentration was beneficial to hemicellulose and lignin removal, and consequently improved sugar conversion. However, the potential decrease of sugar conversion of the pretreated core by higher NaOH concentration suggested further optimization on the pretreatment conditions should be performed.

  15. Description of waste pretreatment and interfacing systems dynamic simulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbrick, D.J.; Zimmerman, B.D.

    1995-05-01

    The Waste Pretreatment and Interfacing Systems Dynamic Simulation Model was created to investigate the required pretreatment facility processing rates for both high level and low level waste so that the vitrification of tank waste can be completed according to the milestones defined in the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). In order to achieve this objective, the processes upstream and downstream of the pretreatment facilities must also be included. The simulation model starts with retrieval of tank waste and ends with vitrification for both low level and high level wastes. This report describes the results of three simulation cases: one based on suggested average facility processing rates, one with facility rates determined so that approximately 6 new DSTs are required, and one with facility rates determined so that approximately no new DSTs are required. It appears, based on the simulation results, that reasonable facility processing rates can be selected so that no new DSTs are required by the TWRS program. However, this conclusion must be viewed with respect to the modeling assumptions, described in detail in the report. Also included in the report, in an appendix, are results of two sensitivity cases: one with glass plant water recycle steams recycled versus not recycled, and one employing the TPA SST retrieval schedule versus a more uniform SST retrieval schedule. Both recycling and retrieval schedule appear to have a significant impact on overall tank usage.

  16. Comparison of different pretreatment methods for separation hemicellulose from straw during the lignocellulosic bioethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhuber, Katharina; Krennhuber, Klaus; Steinmüller, Viktoria; Kahr, Heike; Jäger, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    lead to increasing conversion of hemicellulose to xylose. In contrast, increasing sodium hydroxide concentrations degrade the hemicellulose to unknown derivates. Consequently, almost no sugars from hemicellulose remain for fermentation. The hydrolysis of sulfuric acid pretreated straw results in a maximum glucose concentration of 100 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 30 g/kg. Sodium hydroxide pretreated and hydrolyzed straw leads to a maximum glucose concentration of 90 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 20 g/kg. In comparison to the two chemical pretreatment methods (sodium hydroxide and sulfuric acid pretreatment), the steam explosion pretreatment (conditions: temperature 190°C, time 20 minutes) results in a higher glucose concentration of about 190 g/kg straw and a xylose concentration of nearly 75 g/kg straw after enzymatic hydrolysis of the dried straw. Because of the small effect the sodium hydroxide pretreatment has on xylose recovery, this method won't be used for separation and conversion of hemicellulose into xylose and arabinose. Although pretreatment with sulfuric acid achieved promising results, further research and economical considerations have to be performed. In conclusion, the steam explosion method is still the state of the art pretreatment method for the production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Alkaline methods destroy most of the xylose part of the sugar fraction and a loss of up to 25 % of the fermentable sugars is not acceptable for a sustainable biofuel production. The acid pretreatment yields high amounts of accessible hemicellulose and cellulose, but the consumption of chemicals for acid pretreatment and neutralization has to be taken into account when considering technical implementation.

  17. Final Report Project Activity Task ORD-FY04-002 Nevada System of Higher Education Quality Assurance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiecinski, Amy; Keeler, Raymond; Bertoia, Julie; Mueller, Terry; Roosa, Morris; Roosa, Barbara

    2008-03-07

    The principal purpose of DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232 is to develop and continue providing the public and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an independently derived, unbiased body of scientific and engineering data concerning the study of Yucca Mountain as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Under this agreement, the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), formerly the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN), performs scientific or engineering research, and maintains and fosters collaborative working relationships between government and academic researchers. In performing these activities, the NSHE has already developed and implemented a Quality Assurance (QA) program, which was accepted by the DOE Office of Quality Assurance, under the previous Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC28-98NV12081. The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 002 “Quality Assurance Program” under cooperative agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objective of this QA program was to assure that data produced under the cooperative agreement met the OCRWM QA Requirements and Description (QARD) requirements for quality-affecting (Q) data. The QA Program was written to address specific QARD requirements historically identified and incorporated in Q activities to the degree appropriate for the nature, scope, and complexity of the activity. Additional QARD requirements were integrated into the program when required to complete a specific activity. NSHE QA staff developed a detailed matrix to address each QARD element, identifying the applicable requirements and specifying where each requirement is addressed in the QA program procedures, or identify requirements as “not applicable” to the QA program. Controlled documents were prepared in the form of QA procedures (QAPs) and implementing procedures (IPs). NSHE identified new QAPs and IPs when needed. NSHE PIs

  18. Higher Childhood Peer Reports of Social Preference Mediates the Impact of the Good Behavior Game on Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Alison R; Roth, Kimberly B; Kellam, Sheppard G; Wang, Wei; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Hart, Shelley R; Wagner, Barry M; Wilcox, Holly C

    2016-02-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal classroom-based preventive intervention directed at reducing early aggressive, disruptive behavior and improving children's social adaptation into the classroom. The GBG is one of the few universal preventive interventions delivered in early elementary school that has been shown to reduce the risk for future suicide attempts. This paper addresses one potential mechanism by which the GBG lowers the risk of later suicide attempt. In this study, we tested whether the GBG, by facilitating social adaptation into the classroom early on, including the level of social preference by classmates, thereby lowers future risk of suicide attempts. The measure of social adaptation is based on first and second grade peer reports of social preference ("which children do you like best?"; "which children don't you like?"). As part of the hypothesized meditational model, we examined the longitudinal association between childhood peer social preference and the risk of future suicide attempt, which has not previously been examined. Data were from an epidemiologically based randomized prevention trial, which tested the GBG among two consecutive cohorts of first grade children in 19 public schools and 41 classrooms. Results indicated that peer social preference partially mediated the relationship between the GBG and the associated reduction of risk for later suicide attempts by adulthood, specifically among children characterized by their first grade teacher as highly aggressive, disruptive. These results suggest that positive childhood peer relations may partially explain the GBG-associated reduction of risk for suicide attempts and may be an important and malleable protective factor for future suicide attempt.

  19. Enzymatic Saccharification and Ethanol Fermentation of Reed Pretreated with Liquid Hot Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reed is a widespread-growing, inexpensive, and readily available lignocellulosic material source in northeast China. The objective of this study is to evaluate the liquid hot water (LHW pretreatment efficiency of reed based on the enzymatic digestibility and ethanol fermentability of water-insoluble solids (WISs from reed after the LHW pretreatment. Several variables in the LHW pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis process were optimized. The conversion of glucan to glucose and glucose concentrations are considered as response variables in different conditions. The optimum conditions for the LHW pretreatment of reed area temperature of 180°C for 20min and a solid-to-liquid ratio of 1 : 10. These optimum conditions for the LHW pretreatment of reed resulted in a cellulose conversion rate of 82.59% in the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis at 50°C for 72 h with a cellulase loading of 30 filter paper unit per gram of oven-dried WIS. Increasing the pretreatment temperature resulted in a higher enzymatic digestibility of the WIS from reed. Separate hydrolysis and fermentation of WIS showed that the conversion of glucan to ethanol reached 99.5% of the theoretical yield. The LHW pretreatment of reed is a suitable method to acquire a high recovery of fermentable sugars and high ethanol conversion yield.

  20. Variation of Particle Size and Pretreatment Temperature to the Crystallinity of Leucaena Leucocephala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Safaai Nor Sharliza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the effect of different particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena leucocephala. The leucaena was pretreated by ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3 methylimidazolium acetate [Emim]Ac. There were three different particle sizes that have been tested in this experiment; less than 0.3 mm, 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm. In the other hand, the pretreatment temperature tested were 30°C, 60°C and 90°C. The effect of particle size and pretreatment temperature to the crystallinity of leucaena was investigated by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The crystallinity index of the sample represents the percentage of crystalline materials. A lower in the cristallinity index indicated that the material has lower crystillinity, hence give more benefit to the cellulose hydrolysis. From XRD analysis, it shows that the cristallinity index of leucaena decreased with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. SEM analysis also shows that the structure of leucaena has more irregular, porous and destroyed structure with decreasing particle size and increasing pretreatment temperature. Thus, the result from this experiment shows that the smaller particle size and higher pretreatment temperature would provide a more accessible surface area to enhance the cellulose hydrolysis.

  1. Two-step sequential pretreatment for the enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of coffee spent waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Rajeev; Jaiswal, Swarna; Abu-Ghannam, Nissreen; Jaiswal, Amit K

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, eight different pretreatments of varying nature (physical, chemical and physico-chemical) followed by a sequential, combinatorial pretreatment strategy was applied to spent coffee waste to attain maximum sugar yield. Pretreated samples were analysed for total reducing sugar, individual sugars and generation of inhibitory compounds such as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF) which can hinder microbial growth and enzyme activity. Native spent coffee waste was high in hemicellulose content. Galactose was found to be the predominant sugar in spent coffee waste. Results showed that sequential pretreatment yielded 350.12mg of reducing sugar/g of substrate, which was 1.7-fold higher than in native spent coffee waste (203.4mg/g of substrate). Furthermore, extensive delignification was achieved using sequential pretreatment strategy. XRD, FTIR, and DSC profiles of the pretreated substrates were studied to analyse the various changes incurred in sequentially pretreated spent coffee waste as opposed to native spent coffee waste. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Physicochemical pretreatments and hydrolysis of furfural residues via carbon-based sulfonated solid acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bao Jun; Sun, Yuan; Lin, Ke Ying; Li, Bing; Liu, Wan Yi

    2014-03-01

    Potential commercial physicochemical pretreatment methods, NaOH/microwave and NaOH/ultrasound were developed, and the carbon-based sulfonated solid acid catalysts were prepared for furfural residues conversion into reducing sugars. After the two optimum pretreatments, both the content of cellulose increased (74.03%, 72.28%, respectively) and the content of hemicellulose (94.11%, 94.17% of removal rate, respectively) and lignin (91.75%, 92.09% of removal rate, respectively) decreased in furfural residues. The reducing sugar yields of furfural residues with the two physicochemical pretreatments on coal tar-based solid acid reached 33.94% and 33.13%, respectively, higher than that pretreated via NaOH alone (27%) and comparable to that pretreated via NaOH/H2O2 (35.67%). The XRD patterns, IR spectra and SEM images show microwave and ultrasound improve the pretreatment effect. The results demonstrate the carbon-based sulfonated solid acids and the physicochemical pretreatments are green, effective, low-cost for furfural residues conversion.

  3. Steroids pretreatment in assisted reproduction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, V; Streda, R; Mardesic, T; Tosner, J; Heracek, J

    2014-01-01

    The objective is to present an overview of trials and appreciate the relevant data on the effect of steroids pretreatment (oral contraceptives, 17β-estradiol and estradiol valerate) in assisted reproduction cycles. The subject of the study is to evaluate the clinical characteristics during steroids pretreatment cycles focused on the prevention of ovarian cysts, the positive contraceptive effect on the onset of regular period during long gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist protocol. In gonadotropin releasing hormone antagonist protocol the review is interested in supporting ovarian stimulation in low responders, the idea of cycle scheduling and improving treatment outcomes. The method is a review from MEDLINE/Pubmed database between 1994 and July 2012. We identified 15 randomised controlled trials (n=3069 patients). One trail (n=83 patients) assessed GnRH agonist protocol with or without steroids pretreatment, 8 trials (n=1884 patients) assessed GnRH antagonist protocols with or without steroids pretreatment and 6 trials (n=1102 patients) assessed GnRH antagonist protocols versus agonist ones with steroid pretreatment. Data demonstrates that oral contraceptives offer the effective prevention of functional ovarian cysts, the predictable onset of period during desensitisation. Existing data suggest that pretreatment with oral contraceptive pills or estradiol valerate give no advantage concerning number of oocytes or pregnancy rate. Pretreatment with oral contraceptive pills aiming to avoid weekend oocytes retrievals has to be more elucidated. In low responders oral contraceptive pill pretreatment may be beneficial in improving ovarian responses by reducing the amount of gonadotropins and the number of days required for ovarian stimulation. Current research indicates that also 17β-estradiol may be encouraging pretreatment in low responders and in cycle scheduling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  4. Temperature Modelling of the Biomass Pretreatment Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    In a second generation biorefinery, the biomass pretreatment stage has an important contribution to the efficiency of the downstream processing units involved in biofuel production. Most of the pretreatment process occurs in a large pressurized thermal reactor that presents an irregular temperature...... distribution. Therefore, an accurate temperature model is critical for observing the biomass pretreatment. More than that, the biomass is also pushed with a constant horizontal speed along the reactor in order to ensure a continuous throughput. The goal of this paper is to derive a temperature model...

  5. Characterization of Airborne Permethrin During the Manufacture of Army Combat Uniforms Using Pre-Treated Fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AIRBORNE PERMETHRIN DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF ARMY COMBAT UNIFORMS USING PRE-TREATED FABRIC by Melynda Perry Theodore Juarez* and Lyndsy Meyer...Final Report July 2013 – July 2015 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research...CHARACTERIZATION OF AIRBORNE PERMETHRIN DURING THE MANUFACTURE OF ARMY COMBAT UNIFORMS USING PRE-TREATED FABRIC 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  6. Pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME) using Moringa oleifera seeds as natural coagulant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Subhash; Othman, Zalina; Ahmad, Abdul Latif

    2007-06-25

    Moringa oleifera seeds, an environmental friendly and natural coagulant are reported for the pretreatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME). In coagulation-flocculation process, the M. oleifera seeds after oil extraction (MOAE) are an effective coagulant with the removal of 95% suspended solids and 52.2% reduction in the chemical oxygen demand (COD). The combination of MOAE with flocculant (NALCO 7751), the suspended solids removal increased to 99.3% and COD reduction was 52.5%. The coagulation-flocculation process at the temperature of 30 degrees C resulted in better suspended solids removal and COD reduction compared to the temperature of 40, 55 and 70 degrees C. The MOAE combined with flocculant (NALCO 7751) reduced the sludge volume index (SVI) to 210mL/g with higher recovery of dry mass of sludge (87.25%) and water (50.3%).

  7. Butyric acid fermentation from pre-treated wheat straw by a mutant clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baroi, George Nabin; Baumann, Ivan; Westermann, Peter;

    ’s platform for a variety of products for industrial use. Butyric acid is considered as a potential chemical building-block for the production of chemicals for e.g. polymeric compounds and the aim of this work was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces less acetic...... acid (higher selectivity), has a higher yield and a higher productivity of butyric acid from pre-treated lignocellulosic biomass. Pre-treated wheat straw was used as the main carbon source. After one year of serial adaptation and selection a mutant strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. This new...

  8. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of maleic acid-pretreated rice straw for ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Park, Hyun Min; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the feasibility of whole slurry (pretreated lignocellulose) saccharification and fermentation for producing ethanol from maleic acid-pretreated rice straw. The optimized conditions for pretreatment were to treat rice straw at a high temperature (190 °C) with 1 % (w/v) maleic acid for a short duration (3 min ramping to 190 °C and 3 min holding at 190 °C). Enzymatic digestibility (based on theoretical glucose yield) of cellulose in the pretreated rice straw was 91.5 %. Whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated rice straw resulted in 83.2 % final yield of ethanol based on the initial quantity of glucan in untreated rice straw. These findings indicate that maleic acid pretreatment results in a high yield of ethanol from fermentation of whole slurry even without conditioning or detoxification of the slurry. Additionally, the separation of solids and liquid is not required; therefore, the economics of cellulosic ethanol fuel production are significantly improved. We also demonstrated whole slurry saccharification and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulose, which has rarely been reported.

  9. Literature Review of Physical and Chemical Pretreatment Processes for Lignocellulosic Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, P.; Bakker, R. [Wageningen University and Research centre WUR, Food and Biobased Research WUR-FBR, Wageningen (Netherlands); Huijgen, W.J.J. [ECN Biomass, Coal and Environment, Petten (Netherlands); Bermudez Lopez, L. [Abengoa Bioenergia Nuevas Tecnologias ABNT (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    This literature review was performed within the BioSynergy project (2007-2010). BioSynergy is a European Integrated Project supported through the Sixth Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (038994-SES6). BioSynergy stands for 'BIOmass for the market competitive and environmentally friendly SYNthesis of bio-products together with the production of secondary enERGY carriers through the biorefinery approach'. Within the BioSynergy project the overall goal of the pretreatment routes being developed is to convert raw lignocellulosic biomass into its composing sugars and lignin in a market competitive and environmentally sustainable way. This report reviews lignocellulose pretreatment in general as well as specific pretreatment technologies that are developed within the BioSynergy project including steam explosion (ABNT), mechanical/alkaline fractionation (WUR) and organosolv fractionation (ECN). In addition to these pretreatment technologies, other pretreatment technologies are studied within the BioSynergy project such as acetic/formic acid pretreatment and mild- and strong acid pretreatment.

  10. The effect of dilute acid pre-treatment process in bioethanol production from durian (Durio zibethinus) seeds waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, K. A.; Salleh, S. F.; Riayatsyah, T. M. I.; Aditiya, H. B.; Mahlia, T. M. I.

    2016-03-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is one of the promising feedstocks for bioethanol production. The process starts from pre-treatment, hydrolysis, fermentation, distillation and finally obtaining the final product, ethanol. The efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass depends heavily on the effectiveness of the pre-treatment step which main function is to break the lignin structure of the biomass. This work aims to investigate the effects of dilute acid pre-treatment on the enzymatic hydrolysis of durian seeds waste to glucose and the subsequent bioethanol fermentation process. The yield of glucose from dilute acid pre-treated sample using 0.6% H2SO4 and 5% substrate concentration shows significant value of 23.4951 g/L. Combination of dilute acid pre-treatment and enzymatic hydrolysis using 150U of enzyme able to yield 50.0944 g/L of glucose content higher compared to normal pre-treated sample of 8.1093 g/L. Dilute acid pre-treatment sample also shows stable and efficient yeast activity during fermentation process with lowest glucose content at 2.9636 g/L compared to 14.7583g/L for normal pre-treated sample. Based on the result, it can be concluded that dilute acid pre-treatment increase the yield of ethanol from bioethanol production process.

  11. Resveratrol Pretreatment Ameliorates TNBS Colitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Gulserap; Yildiz, Yuksel; Ulutas, Pinar A; Yaylali, Asl; Ural, Muruvvet

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in humans constituting a major health concern today whose prevalence has been increasing over the world. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and disturbed capacity of antioxidant defense in IBD subjects have been reported. Antioxidants may play a significant role in IBD treatment. This study aimed at evaluating ameliorative effects of intraperitoneal resveratrol pretreatment on trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in rats. Thirty five Wistar-Albino female rats were divided equally into five groups. Inflammation was induced by the intrarectal administration of TNBS under anesthesia. Intraperitoneal administration of resveratrol (RSV) at a concentration of 10mg/kg/day for 5 days before the induction of colitis significantly reduced microscopy score and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and increased glutathione peroxidase (GSH Px) activity compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. Also an insignificant increase in catalase (CAT) activity was observed in the RSV treated group compared to TNBS and vehicle groups. In this paper, the most recent patent on the identification and treatment of IBD was indicated. In conclusion, antioxidant RSV proved to have a beneficial effect on TNBS colitis in rats. In light of these advantageous results, the RSV can be considered as adjuvant agent in IBD treatments.

  12. Prognostic significance of pretreatment serum levels of albumin, LDH and total bilirubin in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoan; Meng, Qing H; Ye, Yuanqing; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Gu, Jian; Wu, Xifeng

    2015-02-01

    Liver function tests (LFTs) have been reported as independent predictors of non-liver disease-related morbidity and mortality in general population and cancer patients. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between pretreatment serum LFTs and overall survival (OS) in non-metastatic Caucasian breast cancer patients. Seven LFTs, including albumin, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total bilirubin and total protein, were measured in pretreatment serum from 2425 female Caucasian patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed non-metastatic invasive breast cancer. Multivariate Cox model was used to estimate hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association of individual LFTs with 5-year OS while adjusting for age, smoking status, pathological characteristics and treatment regimen. We found that serum albumin, LDH and total bilirubin were significantly associated with 5-year OS in multivariate Cox analyses. Patients with higher albumin level exhibited 45% reduced risk of death (HR = 0.55, 95% CI: 0.40-0.75) compared with those with lower albumin level. Patients with higher total bilirubin level had a nearly 40% reduction in the risk of death (HR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45-0.85) and patients with higher LDH levels had a 1.42-fold increased risk of death (HR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.08-1.88). Furthermore, cumulative analysis showed a significant dose-response trend of significantly increasing risk of death with increasing number of unfavorable LFT levels. Our result highlighted the potential of using pretreatment serum levels of albumin, LDH and total bilirubin as prognostic factors for OS in patients with non-metastatic breast cancer.

  13. Industrial Pretreatment Program for New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Industrial Pretreatment Program prevents the discharge of pollutants to Publicly-Owned Treatment Works (POTWs) which will interfere with the operations of the POTW or its use and disposal of municipal biosolids.

  14. Understanding Ionic Liquid Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretreatment of biomass is essential for breaking apart highly ordered and crystalline plant cell walls and loosening the lignin and hemicellulose conjugation to cellulose microfibrills, thereby facilitating enzyme accessibility and adsorption and reducing costs of downstream saccharification proces...

  15. Extrusion Pretreatment of Lignocellulosic Biomass: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zheng

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to bioethanol has shown environmental, economic and energetic advantages in comparison to bioethanol produced from sugar or starch. However, the pretreatment process for increasing the enzymatic accessibility and improving the digestibility of cellulose is hindered by many physical-chemical, structural and compositional factors, which make these materials difficult to be used as feedstocks for ethanol production. A wide range of pretreatment methods has been developed to alter or remove structural and compositional impediments to (enzymatic hydrolysis over the last few decades; however, only a few of them can be used at commercial scale due to economic feasibility. This paper will give an overview of extrusion pretreatment for bioethanol production with a special focus on twin-screw extruders. An economic assessment of this pretreatment is also discussed to determine its feasibility for future industrial cellulosic ethanol plant designs.

  16. Exploring crystalline-structural variations of cellulose during alkaline pretreatment for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zhe; Chen, Sheng; Zhang, Xun; Xu, Feng

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to explore the crystallinity and crystalline structure of alkaline pretreated cellulose. The enzymatic hydrolysis followed by pretreatment was conducted for measuring the efficiency of sugar conversion. For cellulose Iβ dominated samples, alkaline pretreatment (cellulose crystallinity and depolymerized hemicelluloses, that were superimposed to affect the enzymatic conversion to glucose. Varying crystallite sizes and lattice spacings indicated the separation of cellulose crystals during mercerization (8-12wt% NaOH). Completion of mercerization was proved under higher alkaline concentration (14-18wt% NaOH), leading to distortion of crystalline cellulose to some extent. Cellulose II crystallinity showed a stimulative impact on enzymatic hydrolysis due to the weakened hydrophobic interactions within cellulose chains. The current study may provide innovative explanations for enhanced enzymatic digestibility of alkaline pretreated lignocellulosic materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wet Oxidation Pretreatment of Tobacco Stalks and Orange Waste for Bioethanol Production. Preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, Carlos; Fernandez, Teresa; Garcia, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) was used as a pretreatment method prior to enzymatic hydrolysis of tobacco stalks and orange waste. The pretreatment, performed at 195 degrees C and an oxygen pressure of 1.2 MPa, for 15 min, in the presence of Na2CO3, increased the cellulose content of the materials and gave...... cellulose recoveries of approximately 90%. The pretreatment enhanced the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest enzymatic convertibility, that of 64.9%, was achieved for pretreated tobacco stalks. The ethanolic fermentation of the WO filtrates, using Saccharomyces cerevisiae......, was inhibited compared to the fermentation of a reference glucose solution. Inhibition was more intense for the filtrate of tobacco stalks than for that of orange waste. The inhibition degree of the volumetric productivity of ethanol was higher (79.1-86.8%) than that of the ethanol yield (7.1-9.5%)....

  18. Dilute ammonia pretreatment of sorghum and its effectiveness on enzyme hydrolysis and ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Deepti A; Aita, Giovanna M; Robert, Diana; Bazan, Victor

    2010-05-01

    A new pretreatment technology using dilute ammonium hydroxide was evaluated for ethanol production on sorghum. Sorghum fibers, ammonia, and water at a ratio of 1:0.14:8 were heated to 160 degrees C and held for 1 h under 140-160 psi pressure. Approximately, 44% lignin and 35% hemicellulose were removed during the process. Hydrolysis of untreated and dilute ammonia pretreated fibers was carried out at 10% dry solids at an enzyme concentration of 60 FPU Spezyme CP and 64 CBU Novozyme 188/g glucan. Cellulose digestibility was higher (84%) for ammonia pretreated sorghum as compared to untreated sorghum (38%). Fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae D(5)A resulted in 24 g ethanol /100 g dry biomass for dilute ammonia pretreated sorghum and 9 g ethanol /100 g dry biomass for untreated sorghum.

  19. Pretreatment optimization of the biomass of Microcystis aeruginosa for efficient bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Lee, Moon Geon; Shin, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Jong Deog

    2017-12-01

    Microalgae are considered to be the future promising sources of biofuels and bio products. The algal carbohydrates can be fermented to bioethanol after pretreatment process. Efficient pretreatment of the biomass is one of the major requirements for commercialization of the algal based biofuels. In present study the microalga, M. aeruginsa was used for pretreatment optimization and bioethanol production. Treatment of algal biomass with CaO before acid and/or enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced the degradation of algal cells. Monomeric sugars yield was increased more than twice when biomass was pretreated with CaO. Similarly, an increase was noted in the amount of fermentable sugars when biomass was subjected to invertase saccharification after acid or lysozyme pretreatment. Highest yield of fermentable sugars (16 mM/ml) in the centrifuged algal juice was obtained. 4 Different microorganisms' species were used individually and in combination for converting centrifuged algal juice to bioethanol. Comparatively higher yield of bioethanol (60 mM/ml) was obtained when the fermenter microorganisms were used in combination. The results demonstrated that M. arginase biomass can be efficiently pretreated to get higher yield of fermentable sugars for enhanced yield of bioethanol production.

  20. Optimizing ethanol and methane production from steam-pretreated, phosphoric acid-impregnated corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondesson, Pia-Maria; Dupuy, Aurélie; Galbe, Mats; Zacchi, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Pretreatment is of vital importance in the production of ethanol and methane from agricultural residues. In this study, the effects of steam pretreatment with phosphoric acid on enzymatic hydrolysis (EH), simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF), anaerobic digestion (AD) and the total energy output at three different temperatures were investigated. The effect of separating the solids for SSF and the liquid for AD was also studied and compared with using the whole slurry first in SSF and then in AD. Furthermore, the phosphoric acid was compared to previous studies using sulphuric acid or no catalyst. Using phosphoric acid resulted in higher yields than when no catalyst was used. However, compared with sulphuric acid, an improved yield was only seen with phosphoric acid in the case of EH. The higher pretreatment temperatures (200 and 210 °C) resulted in the highest yields after EH and SSF, while the highest methane yield was obtained with the lower pretreatment temperature (190 °C). The highest yield in terms of total energy recovery (78 %) was obtained after pretreatment at 190 °C, but a pretreatment temperature of 200 °C is, however, the best alternative since fewer steps are required (whole slurry in SSF and then in AD) and high product yields were obtained (76 %).

  1. Steam explosion pretreatment of triticale (× Triticosecale Wittmack) straw for sugar production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudelo, Roberto A; García-Aparicio, María P; Görgens, Johann F

    2016-01-25

    Triticale, a non-food based, low-cost and well-adapted crop in marginal lands has been considered as a potential 1G and 2G feedstock for bio-ethanol production. In this work, triticale straw was evaluated as a source of fermentable sugars by combination of uncatalyzed steam explosion and enzymatic hydrolysis. Pretreatment conditions with severities from 3.05 to 4.12 were compared in order to identify conditions that favour the recovery of hemicellulose-derived sugars, cellulose digestibility or the combined sugars yield (CSY) from the pretreatment-enzymatic hydrolysis. Xylose oligosaccharide was the major sugar in hydrolysates from all pretreatment conditions. Maximum hemicellulose-sugars recovery (52% of the feedstock content) was obtained at 200 °C and 5 min. The highest cellulose digestibility (95%) was found at 200 °C - 15 min, although glucose recovery from hydrolysis was maximised at 200 °C - 10 min (digestibility >92%) due to higher mass yield of pretreated solids. The maximum CSY (nearly 77% of theoretical content) was obtained at 200 °C - 5 min. Sugar loss after pretreatment was observed to higher extent at harsher severities. However, the concentrations of sugar degradation products and acetic acid were at levels below tolerance limits of the downstream biological conversions. Steam explosion pretreatment without acid impregnation is a good technology for production of fermentable sugars from triticale straw. This work provides foundation for future autohydrolysis steam explosion optimization studies to enhanced sugars recovery and digestibility of triticale straw.

  2. Dilute acid pretreatment of black spruce using continuous steam explosion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Haixia; Deng, James; Zhang, Tony

    2011-02-01

    The pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials prior to the enzymatic hydrolysis is essential to the sugar yield and bioethanol production. Dilute acid hydrolysis of black spruce softwood chip was performed in a continuous high temperature reactor followed with steam explosion and mechanical refining. The acid-soaked wood chips were pretreated under different feeding rates (60 and 92 kg/h), cooking screw rotation speeds (7.2 and 14.4 rpm), and steam pressures (12 and 15 bar). The enzymatic hydrolysis was carried out on the acid-insoluble fraction of pretreated material. At lower feeding rate, the pretreatment at low steam pressure and short retention time favored the recovery of hemicellulose. The pretreatment at high steam pressure and longer retention time recovered less hemicellulose but improved the enzymatic accessibility. As a result, the overall sugar yields became similar no matter what levels of the retention time or steam pressure. Comparing with lower feeding rate, higher feeding rate resulted in consistently higher glucose yield in both liquid fraction after pretreatment and that released after enzymatic hydrolysis.

  3. Effectiveness of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) pretreatment systems in removing transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) substances

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Shang-Tse

    2015-05-01

    Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) have been reported as one of the main factors of membrane fouling in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) process. Research has been focused on algal TEP so far, overlooking bacterial TEP. This thesis investigated the effects of coagulation on removal of bacterial TEP/TEP precursors in seawater and subsequent reduction on TEP fouling in ultrafiltration (UF), as a pretreatment of SWRO. Furthermore, the performance of pretreatment (coagulation + UF) has been investigated on a bench-scale SWRO system. TEP/TEP precursors were harvested from a strain of marine bacteria, Pseudoalteromonas atlantica, isolated from the Red Sea. Isolated bacterial organic matter (BOM), containing 1.5 mg xanthan gum eq./L TEP/TEP precursors, were dosed in Red Sea water to mimic a high TEP concentration event. Bacterial TEP/TEP precursors added to seawater were coagulated with ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate at different dosages and pH. Results showed that ferric chloride had a better removal efficiency on TEP/TEP precursors. Afterwards, the non-coagulated/coagulated seawater were tested on a UF system at a constant flux of 130 L/m2h, using two types of commercially available membranes, with pore sizes of 50 kDa and 100 kDa, respectively. The fouling potential of coagulated water was determined by the Modified Fouling Index (MFI-UF). Transmembrane pressure (TMP) was also continuously monitored to investigate the fouling development on UF membranes. TEP concentrations in samples were determined by the alcian blue staining assay. Liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection (LC-OCD) was used to determine the removal of TEP precursors with particular emphasis on biopolymers. Finally, SWRO tests showed that TEP/TEP precursors had a high fouling potential as indicated by MFI-UF, corresponding to the TMP measurements. Coagulation could substantially reduce TEP/TEP precursors fouling in UF when its dosage was equal or higher than 0.2 mg Fe/L. The flux decline

  4. Pretreatment techniques for biofuels and biorefineries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Zhen (ed.) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, YN (China). Xishuangbanna Tropical Botonical Garden

    2013-02-01

    The first book focused on pretreatment techniques for biofuels contributed by the world's leading experts. Extensively covers the different types of biomass, various pretreatment approaches and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals. In addition to traditional pretreatment methods, novel techniques are also introduced and discussed. An accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries. This book includes 19 chapters contributed by the world's leading experts on pretreatment methods for biomass. It extensively covers the different types of biomass (e.g. molasses, sugar beet pulp, cheese whey, sugarcane residues, palm waste, vegetable oil, straws, stalks and wood), various pretreatment approaches (e.g. physical, thermal, chemical, physicochemical and biological) and methods that show the subsequent production of biofuels and chemicals such as sugars, ethanol, extracellular polysaccharides, biodiesel, gas and oil. In addition to traditional methods such as steam, hot-water, hydrothermal, diluted-acid, organosolv, ozonolysis, sulfite, milling, fungal and bacterial, microwave, ultrasonic, plasma, torrefaction, pelletization, gasification (including biogas) and liquefaction pretreatments, it also introduces and discusses novel techniques such as nano and solid catalysts, organic electrolyte solutions and ionic liquids. This book offers a review of state-of-the-art research and provides guidance for the future paths of developing pretreatment techniques of biomass for biofuels, especially in the fields of biotechnology, microbiology, chemistry, materials science and engineering. It intends to provide a systematic introduction of pretreatment techniques. It is an accessible reference work for students, researchers, academicians and industrialists in biorefineries.

  5. Comparative AMS radiocarbon dating of pretreated versus non-pretreated tropical wood samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrut, Adrian [Department of Chemistry, Babes-Bolyai University, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Reden, Karl F. von, E-mail: kvonreden@whoi.ed [NOSAMS Facility, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Lowy, Daniel A. [Nova Research Inc., Alexandria, VA 22308 (United States); Mayne, Diana H. [Baobab Trust, P.O. Box 1566, Parklands 2121, Johannesburg (South Africa); Elder, Kathryn E.; Roberts, Mark L.; McNichol, Ann P. [NOSAMS Facility, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Several wood samples collected from Dorslandboom, a large iconic African baobab (Adansonia digitata L.) from Namibia, were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating subsequent to pretreatment and, alternatively, without pretreatment. The comparative statistical evaluation of results showed that there were no significant differences between fraction modern values and radiocarbon dates of the samples analyzed after pretreatment and without pretreatment, respectively. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 993 +- 20 BP. Dating results also revealed that Dorslandboom is a multi-generation tree, with several stems showing different ages.

  6. Comparative AMS radiocarbon dating of pretreated versus non-pretreated tropical wood samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrut, Adrian; von Reden, Karl F.; Lowy, Daniel A.; Mayne, Diana H.; Elder, Kathryn E.; Roberts, Mark L.; McNichol, Ann P.

    2010-04-01

    Several wood samples collected from Dorslandboom, a large iconic African baobab ( Adansonia digitata L.) from Namibia, were investigated by AMS radiocarbon dating subsequent to pretreatment and, alternatively, without pretreatment. The comparative statistical evaluation of results showed that there were no significant differences between fraction modern values and radiocarbon dates of the samples analyzed after pretreatment and without pretreatment, respectively. The radiocarbon date of the oldest sample was 993 ± 20 BP. Dating results also revealed that Dorslandboom is a multi-generation tree, with several stems showing different ages.

  7. Impacts of microwave pretreatments on the semi-continuous anaerobic digestion of dairy waste activated sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uma Rani, R.; Adish Kumar, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Regional Centre of Anna University, Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamil Nadu (India); Kaliappan, S. [Department of Civil Engineering, Ponjesly College of Engineering, Nagercoil 629 003, Tamil Nadu (India); Yeom, IckTae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University (Korea, Republic of); Rajesh Banu, J., E-mail: rajeshces@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, Regional Centre of Anna University, Tirunelveli 627 007, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Microwave pretreatment of dairy WAS was studied. ► MW pretreatment at 70% intensity for 12 min, COD solubilization was 18.6%. ► Biogas production and SS reduction was 35% and 14% higher than control. ► In digester at 15 days SRT with medium OLR, SS and VS reduction was 67% and 64%. ► Biogas and methane production was 57% and 49% higher than control, in digesters. - Abstract: Microwave (MW) irradiation is one of the new and possible methods used for pretreating the sludge. Following its use in different fields, this MW irradiation method has proved to be more appropriate in the field of environmental research. In this paper, we focused on the effects of MW irradiation at different intensities on solubilization, biodegradation and anaerobic digestion of sludge from the dairy sludge. The changes in the soluble fractions of the organic matter, the biogas yield, the methane content in the biogas were used as control parameters for evaluating the efficiency of the MW pretreatment. Additionally, the energetic efficiency was also examined. In terms of an energetic aspect, the most economical pretreatment of sludge was at 70% intensity for 12 min irradiation time. At this, COD solubilization, SS reduction and biogas production were found to be 18.6%, 14% and 35% higher than the control, respectively. Not only the increase in biogas production was investigated, excluding protein and carbohydrate hydrolysis was also performed successfully by this microwave pretreatment even at low irradiation energy input. Also, experiments were carried out in semi continuous anaerobic digesters, with 3.5 L working volume. Combining microwave pretreatment with anaerobic digestion led to 67%, 64% and 57% of SS reduction, VS reduction and biogas production higher than the control, respectively.

  8. Digestibility of Betung Bamboo Fiber Following Fungal Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widya Fatriasari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the effect of fungal pretreatment of betung bamboo fibers and enzymatic- and microwave-assisted hydrolysis on the reducing sugar yield. The enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated biomass was carried out with cellulase and 10 and 20 FPU/g of substrate in a shaking incubator at 50 °C and 150 rpm for 48 h. The sulfuric acid concentration used in the microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis was 1.0, 2.5, and 5%, either with or without the addition of activated carbon. Microwave irradiation (330 Watt was applied for 5–12.5 min. The yield of reducing sugar was better with the microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis, and the yield tended to increase with an increase in the irradiation time. Based on the dry weight of the initial biomass (bamboo, pretreatment with 5% inoculum loading resulted in a higher reducing sugar yield (17.06% than with 10% inoculum loading (14.54%. At a 1% acid concentration, the formation of brown compounds decreased, followed by a reduction in the reducing sugar yield. The addition of activated carbon at a 1% acid concentration seemed to be of no benefit with respect to the yield in the microwave-assisted acid hydrolysis. The pretreatment with the 5% inoculum loading for 12.5 min at 1% acid concentration resulted in the highest reducing sugar yield. Under these conditions, the yield was 6.3-fold that of the reducing sugar yield using 20 FPU/g of cellulase. The rate of bamboo hollocellulose hydrolysis reached 22.75% of the maximum theoretical reducing sugar reducing sugar of dry biomass.

  9. Effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene and carotenoid content of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, A; Tiwari, B K; Tuohy, M G; O'Donnell, C P; Brunton, N

    2011-09-01

    The effect of ultrasound and blanching pretreatments on polyacetylene (falcarinol, falcarindiol and falcarindiol-3-acetate) and carotenoid compounds of hot air and freeze dried carrot discs was investigated. Ultrasound pretreatment followed by hot air drying (UPHD) at the highest amplitude and treatment time investigated resulted in higher retention of polyacetylenes and carotenoids in dried carrot discs than blanching followed by hot air drying. Freeze dried samples had a higher retention of polyacetylene and carotenoid compounds compared to hot air dried samples. Color parameters were strongly correlated with carotenoids (p<0.05). This study shows that ultrasound pretreatment is a potential alternative to conventional blanching treatment in the drying of carrots.

  10. Improving the biodegradability of grain distillery wastewater for use as UASB substrate by combinations of ozonation/enzymatic pre-treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigge, G O; Gie, L-M; Britz, T J

    2008-01-01

    The effect of ozonation and enzyme combination pre-treatments on the composition of grain distillery wastewater (GDWW) was investigated. Exposure of UASB granules to these pre-treated GDWW was evaluated by determining the effect on granule activity, visual appearance and lipid content of the granules. Pre-treatments involving a pre-ozonation step were found to be more effective in reducing the lipid and COD content of GDWW. The higher the lipid and COD reduction achieved by the pre-treatments the higher the granule activity after 24 d exposure, the lower the lipid content in the granule and the less severe the formation of an encapsulating layer.

  11. [Concordance between self-reported weight and height for nutritional assessment in adults aged between 25 and 50 years without higher education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matínez-Torres, Javier; Lee Osorno, Belinda Inés; Mendoza, Leylis; Mariotta, Sharom; López Epiayu, Yandra; Martínez, Yelitza; Jiménez, Nelly

    2014-11-01

    Overweight and obesity are metabolic disorders that have become a public health problem due to the current high prevalence; therefore, it is important to create simple monitoring systems to assess their trends. To determine the correlation between weight, height and body mass index reported by patients and the values measured directly in adults between 25 and 50 years old without higher education. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with participation of 207 adults between 25 and 50 years old. Each participant was asked weight and height; and body mass index was calculated with these data. Moreover, a qualified person determined the real value of these variables. The coefficient of intra-class correlation between self-reported and measurements was obtained. The body mass index measured for men was 25.8±3.7 kg/m2 and for women 26.0±4.1 kg/m2. Intraclass correlation coefficients were for weight 0.962 (IC95%: 0.950-0.971), height 0.909 (IC95%: 0.882-0.930), and body mass index 0.929 (IC95% 0.907-0.945); the real prevalence of people with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 was 52.1%, whereas the value obtained by self-reported data was 44%. Self-reported weight and height data are useful for obesity assessment in adults aged between 25 and 50 years without higher education at the population level. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Faster self-reported speed of eating is related to higher body mass index in a nationwide survey of middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sook Ling; Madden, Clara; Gray, Andrew; Waters, Debra; Horwath, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    This study is the first nationwide population survey to explore the association between speed of eating and degree of obesity. The objective was to cross-sectionally examine the relationship between self-reported speed of eating and body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) in a nationally representative sample of New Zealand women. In May 2009, a sample of 2,500 New Zealand women aged 40 to 50 years was randomly selected from the nationwide electoral rolls. A 66% participation rate was achieved. Potential participants were mailed a self-administered questionnaire containing questions on self-reported speed of eating, demographics, health conditions, menopause status, physical activity, height, and weight. Univariate models were used to examine the associations between demographic, health and behavioral variables, and BMI, while a multivariate model was developed to investigate the relationship between self-reported speed of eating and BMI. After adjusting for age, smoking status, menopause status, thyroid condition, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and physical activity, BMI statistically significantly increased by 2.8% (95% confidence interval: 1.5% to 4.1%; P<0.001) for each category increase in self-reported speed of eating. Although the direction of causality requires confirmation in longitudinal and randomized intervention studies, the results suggest that faster eating is associated with higher BMI in middle-aged women.

  13. The activation of the Sox2 RR2 pluripotency transcriptional reporter in human breast cancer cell lines is dynamic and labels cells with higher tumorigenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel eIglesias

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The striking similarity displayed at the mechanistic level between tumorigenesis and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and the fact that genes and pathways relevant for embryonic development are reactivated during tumor progression highlights the link between pluripotency and cancer. Based on these observations we tested whether it is possible to use a pluripotency-associated transcriptional reporter, whose activation is driven by the SRR2 enhancer from the Sox2 gene promoter (named S4+ reporter, to isolate cancer stem cells from breast cancer cell lines. The S4+ pluripotency transcriptional reporter allows the isolation of cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and its activation was switched on and off in the cell lines studied, reflecting a plastic cellular process. Microarray analysis comparing the populations in which the reporter construct is active vs. inactive showed that positive cells expressed higher mRNA levels of cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, TNF and genes (such as ATF3, SNAI2, KLF6 previously related with the cancer stem cell phenotype in breast cancer.

  14. Enhancement of biogas production from microalgal biomass through cellulolytic bacterial pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavitha, S; Subbulakshmi, P; Rajesh Banu, J; Gobi, Muthukaruppan; Tae Yeom, Ick

    2017-06-01

    Generation of bioenergy from microalgal biomass has been a focus of interest in recent years. The recalcitrant nature of microalgal biomass owing to its high cellulose content limits methane generation. Thus, the present study investigates the effect of bacterial-based biological pretreatment on liquefaction of the microalga Chlorella vulgaris prior to anaerobic biodegradation to gain insights into energy efficient biomethanation. Liquefaction of microalgae resulted in a higher biomass stress index of about 18% in the experimental (pretreated with cellulose-secreting bacteria) vs. 11.8% in the control (non-pretreated) group. Mathematical modelling of the biomethanation studies implied that bacterial pretreatment had a greater influence on sustainable methane recovery, with a methane yield of about 0.08 (g Chemical Oxygen Demand/g Chemical Oxygen Demand), than did control pretreatment, with a yield of 0.04 (g Chemical Oxygen Demand/g Chemical Oxygen Demand). Energetic analysis of the proposed method of pretreatment showed a positive energy ratio of 1.04. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Different Sugar Beet Pulp Pretreatments on Biogas Production Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemiński, Krzysztof; Kowalska-Wentel, Monika

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different sugar beet pulp (SBP) pretreatments on biogas yield from anaerobic digestion. SBP was subjected to grinding, thermal-pressure processing, enzymatic hydrolysis, or combination of these pretreatments. It was observed that grinding of SBP to 2.5-mm particles resulted in the cumulative biogas productivity of 617.2 mL/g volatile solids (VS), which was 20.2 % higher compared to the biogas yield from the not pretreated SBP, and comparable to that from not ground, enzymatically hydrolyzed SBP. The highest cumulative biogas productivity, 898.7 mL/g VS, was obtained from the ground, thermal-pressure pretreated and enzymatically hydrolyzed SBP. The latter pretreatment variant enabled to achieve the highest glucose concentration (24.765 mg/mL) in the enzymatic hydrolysates. The analysis of energy balance showed that the increase in the number of SBP pretreatment operations significantly reduced the gain of electric energy.

  16. Microbial pretreatment of corn stovers by solid-state cultivation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium for biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Wu, Shubiao; Pang, Changle; Li, Wei; Dong, Renjie

    2014-02-01

    The microbial pretreatment of corn stover and corn stover silage was achieved via the solid-state cultivation of Phanerochaete chrysosporium; pretreatment effects on the biodegradability and subsequent anaerobic production of biogas were investigated. The peak levels of daily biogas production and CH₄ yield from corn stover silage were approximately twice that of corn stover. Results suggested that ensiling was a potential pretreatment method to stimulate biogas production from corn stover. Surface morphology and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses demonstrated that the microbial pretreatment of corn stover silage improved biogas production by 10.5 to 19.7% and CH4 yield by 11.7 to 21.2% because pretreatment could decrease dry mass loss (14.2%) and increase substrate biodegradability (19.9% cellulose, 32.4% hemicellulose, and 22.6% lignin). By contrast, the higher dry mass loss in corn stover (55.3%) after microbial pretreatment was accompanied by 54.7% cellulose, 64.0% hemicellulose, and 61.1% lignin degradation but did not significantly influence biogas production.

  17. Supercritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of corn stover and switchgrass for lignocellulosic ethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Naveen; Faik, Ahmed; Goetz, Douglas J; Gu, Tingyue

    2011-07-01

    Supercritical CO(2) (SC-CO(2)), a green solvent suitable for a mobile lignocellulosic biomass processor, was used to pretreat corn stover and switchgrass at various temperatures and pressures. The CO(2) pressure was released as quickly as possible by opening a quick release valve during the pretreatment. The biomass was hydrolyzed after pretreatment using cellulase combined with β-glucosidase. The hydrolysate was analyzed for the amount of glucose released. Glucose yields from corn stover samples pretreated with SC-CO(2) were higher than the untreated sample's 12% glucose yield (12 g/100g dry biomass) and the highest glucose yield of 30% was achieved with SC-CO(2) pretreatment at 3500 psi and 150°C for 60 min. The pretreatment method showed very limited improvement (14% vs. 12%) in glucose yield for switchgrass. X-ray diffraction results indicated no change in crystallinity of the SC-CO(2) treated corn stover when compared to the untreated, while SEM images showed an increase in surface area.

  18. Improvement of methane production from waste paper by pretreatment with rumen fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Yasunori; Tada, Chika; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nakai, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose hydrolysis is the rate-limiting step in anaerobic digestion. In the present study, waste paper was used as a model of cellulosic biomass and was pretreated with rumen fluid prior to methane production. To achieve a high methane yield, the reaction time of the pretreatment was examined. Waste paper was soaked with rumen fluid for 6 and 24h at 37 °C. Various volatile fatty acids, especially acetate, were produced by the pretreatment. Semicontinuous methane production was carried out over a 20-day period. The best daily methane yield was obtained by the 6-h pretreatment. The amount was 2.6 times higher than that of untreated paper, which resulted in 73.4% of the theoretical methane yield. During methane production, the cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin degradabilities were improved by the pretreatment. Pretreatment by rumen fluid is therefore a powerful method to accelerate the methane yield from a cellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pretreatment of eucalyptus with recycled ionic liquids for low-cost biorefinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jikun; Liu, Bingchuan; Hou, Huijie; Hu, Jingping

    2017-06-01

    It is urgent to develop recycled ionic liquids (ILs) as green solvents for sustainable biomass pretreatment. The goal of this study is to explore the availability and performance of reusing 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([amim]Cl) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([bmim]OAc) for pretreatment, structural evolution, and enzymatic hydrolysis of eucalyptus. Cellulose enzymatic digestibility slightly decreased with the increased number of pretreatment recycles. The hydrolysis efficiencies of eucalyptus pretreated via 4th recycled ILs were 54.3% for [amim]Cl and 72.8% for [bmim]OAc, which were 5.0 and 6.7-folds higher than that of untreated eucalyptus. Deteriorations of ILs were observed by the relatively lower sugar conversion and lignin removal from eucalyptus after 4th reuse. No appreciable changes in fundamental framework and thermal stability of [amim]Cl were observed even after successive pretreatments, whereas the anionic structure of [bmim]OAc was destroyed or replaced. This study suggested that the biomass pretreatment with recycled ILs was a potential alternative for low-cost biorefinery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of the impact of ionic liquid pretreatment on recalcitrance of agave bagasse and switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Pimienta, Jose A; Lopez-Ortega, Monica G; Varanasi, Patanjali; Stavila, Vitalie; Cheng, Gang; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose represents a sustainable source of carbon for transformation into biofuels. Effective biomass to sugar conversion strategies are needed to lower processing cost without degradation of polysaccharides. Since ionic liquids (ILs) are excellent solvents for pretreatment/dissolution of biomass, IL pretreatment was carried out on agave bagasse (AGB-byproduct of tequila industry) and digestibility and sugar yield was compared with that obtained with switchgrass (SWG). The IL pretreatment was conducted using ([C2mim][OAc]) at 120 and 160 °C for 3h and 15% biomass loading. While pretreatment using [C2mim][OAc] was very effective in improving the digestibility of both feedstocks, IL pretreatment at 160 °C resulted in higher delignification for AGB (45.5%) than for SWG (38.4%) when compared to 120 °C (AGB-16.6%, SWG-8.2%), formation of a highly amorphous cellulose structure and a significant enhancement of enzyme kinetics. These results highlight the potential of AGB as a biofuel feedstock that can produce high sugar yields with IL pretreatment.

  1. Excimer laser pretreatment and metallization of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, H.; Beil, S.; Wesner, D. A.; Weichenhain, R.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1999-05-01

    Metal/polymer adhesion is a crucial factor of many applications in microelectronic or microsystem technologies. It depends on chemical and structural properties of the interface, often involving just a few atomic layers. Adhesion can be influenced by various pretreatments prior to metal deposition, e.g. thermal treatment, chemical etching or exposure to reactive plasmas. Irradiation with pulsed UV-laser radiation and or UV-excimer lamps can also affect adhesion and offers several technical advantages, among them area selective pretreatment and subsequent metallization. The pretreatment of polymer surfaces by UV-radiation is investigated as an alternative technique to common wet chemical, plasma or other pretreatment methods. Chemical and morphological changes in the polymer surface are investigated with poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) as a model substance, containing UV-absorbing (aromatic) chromophoric groups. Chemical changes in the surface are investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Analysis of the morphological changes in the polymer surface is done via optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The metallization of polymers pretreated by excimer laser radiation is performed via electroless plating of nickel followed by electrolytically deposited copper. The influence of excimer laser irradiation of the polymer on the adhesion of the metal overlayers is measured by tape and peel tests.

  2. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Alamo switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Matthew; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that oxidative lime pretreatment is an effective delignification method that improves the enzymatic digestibility of many biomass feedstocks. The purpose of this work is to determine the recommended oxidative lime pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, time, pressure, and lime loading) for Alamo switchgrass (Panicum virgatum). Enzymatic hydrolysis of glucan and xylan was used to determine the performance of the 52 studied pretreatment conditions. The recommended condition (110°C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min, 0.248 g Ca(OH)(2)/g biomass) achieved glucan and xylan overall yields (grams of sugar hydrolyzed/100 g sugar in raw biomass, 15 filter paper units (FPU)/g raw glucan) of 85.9 and 52.2, respectively. In addition, some glucan oligomers (2.6 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and significant levels of xylan oligomers (26.0 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor. Combining a decrystallization technique (ball milling) with oxidative lime pretreatment further improved the overall glucan yield to 90.0 (7 FPU/g raw glucan).

  3. Oxidative lime pretreatment of Dacotah switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falls, Matthew; Sierra-Ramirez, Rocio; Holtzapple, Mark T

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative lime pretreatment increases the enzymatic digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass primarily by removing lignin. In this study, recommended pretreatment conditions (reaction temperature, oxygen pressure, lime loading, and time) were determined for Dacotah switchgrass. Glucan and xylan overall hydrolysis yields (72 h, 15 FPU/g raw glucan) were measured for 105 different reaction conditions involving three different reactor configurations (very short term, short term, and long term). The short-term reactor was the most productive. At the recommended pretreatment condition (120 °C, 6.89 bar O(2), 240 min), it achieved an overall glucan hydrolysis yield of 85.2 g glucan hydrolyzed/100 g raw glucan and an overall xylan yield of 50.1 g xylan hydrolyzed/100 g raw xylan. At this condition, glucan oligomers (1.80 g glucan recovered/100 g glucan in raw biomass) and xylan oligomers (25.20 g xylan recovered/100 g xylan in raw biomass) were recovered from the pretreatment liquor, which compensate for low pretreatment yields.

  4. Implementation of a Quality Improvement Process Aimed to Deliver Higher-Value Physical Therapy for Patients With Low Back Pain: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Emily; McCathie, Becky

    2015-12-01

    The current state of health care demands higher-value care. Due to many barriers, clinicians routinely do not implement evidence-based care even though it is known to improve quality and reduce cost of care. The purpose of this case report is to describe a theory-based, multitactic implementation of a quality improvement process aimed to deliver higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. Patients were treated from January 2010 through December 2014 in 1 of 32 outpatient physical therapy clinics within an academic health care system. Data were examined from 47,755 patients (mean age=50.3 years) entering outpatient physical therapy for management of nonspecific low back pain, with or without radicular pain. Development and implementation tactics were constructed from adult learning and change management theory to enhance adherence to best practice care among 130 physical therapists. A quality improvement team implemented 4 tactics: establish care delivery expectations, facilitate peer-led clinical and operational teams, foster a learning environment focused on meeting a population's needs, and continuously collect and analyze outcomes data. Physical therapy utilization and change in functional disability were measured to assess relative cost and quality of care. Secondarily, charge data assessed change in physical therapists' application of evidence-based care. Implementation of a quality improvement process was measured by year-over-year improved clinical outcomes, decreased utilization, and increased adherence to evidence-based physical therapy, which was associated with higher-value care. When adult learning and change management theory are combined in quality improvement efforts, common barriers to implementing evidence-based care can be overcome, creating an environment supportive of delivering higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  5. Structural evaluation of sugar cane bagasse steam pretreated in the presence of CO2 and SO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrales Roberta Cristina Novaes Reis

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies on the use of SO2 and CO2 as impregnating agent for sugar cane bagasse steam treatment showed comparative and promising results concerning the cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis and the low formation of the inhibitors furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural for the use of CO2 at 205°C/15 min or SO2 at 190°C/5 min. In the present study sugar cane bagasse materials pretreated as aforementioned were analyzed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD and Infrared (FTIR spectroscopy aiming a better understanding of the structural and chemical changes undergone by the pretreated materials. Results SEM and TEM data showed that the structural modifications undergone by the pretreatment with CO2 were less pronounced in comparison to that using SO2, which can be directly related to the combined severity of each pretreatment. According to XRD data, untreated bagasse showed, as expected, a lower crystallinity index (CI = 48.0% when compared to pretreated samples with SO2 (CI = 65.5% or CO2 (CI = 56.4%, due to the hemicellulose removal of 68.3% and 40.5%, respectively. FTIR spectroscopy supported SEM, TEM and XRD results, revealing a more extensive action of SO2. Conclusions The SEM, TEM, XRD and FTIR spectroscopy techniques used in this work contributed to structural and chemical analysis of the untreated and pretreated bagasse. The images from SEM and TEM can be related to the severity of SO2 pretreatment, which is almost twice higher. The crystallinity index values obtained from XRD showed that pretreated materials have higher values when compared with untreated material, due to the partial removal of hemicellulose after pretreatment. FTIR spectroscopy supported SEM, TEM and XRD results. CO2 can actually be used as impregnating agent for steam pretreatment, although the present study confirmed a more extensive action of SO2.

  6. Effects of various pretreatments on biohydrogen production from sewage sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO BenYi; LIU JunXin

    2009-01-01

    The sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plant is a kind of biomass which contains many organics,mainly carbohydrates and proteins. Four pretreatments, acid pretreatment, alkaline pretreatment,thermal pretreatment and ultrasonic pretreatment, were used to enhance biohydrogen production from sewage sludge. The experimental results showed that the four pretreatments could all increase the soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) of sludge and decrease the dry solid (DS) and volatile solid(VS) because the pretreatments could disrupt the floc structure and even the microbial cells of sludge.The results of batch anaerobic fermentation experiments demonstrated that all of the four pretreat-ments could select hydrogen-producing microorganisms from the microflora of sludge and enhance the hydrogen production. The hydrogen yield of the alkaline pretreated sludge at initial pH of 11.5 was the maximal (11.68 mL H2/g VS) and that of the thermal pretreated sludge was the next (8.62 mL H2/g VS).The result showed that the hydrogen yield of pretreated sludge was correlative with its SCOD. The hydrogen yields of acid pretreated sludge and alkaline pretreated sludge were also influenced by their initial pH. No methane could be detected in the anaerobic fermentation of alkaline pretreated sludge and thermal pretreated sludge, which suggested that these pretreatments could fully inhibit the activity of methanogens. The volatile fatty acids (VFA) production in anaerobic fermentation of alkaline pretreated sludge was the maximum and the next is that of thermal pretreated sludge.

  7. Characterization of lignin during oxidative and hydrothermal pre-treatment processes of wheat straw and corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaparaju, Prasad; Felby, Claus

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize and map changes in lignin during hydrothermal and wet explosion pre-treatments of wheat straw and corn stover. Chemical composition, microscopic (atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy) and spectroscopic (attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, ATR-FTIR) analyses were performed. Results showed that both pre-treatments improved the cellulose and lignin content with substantial removal of hemicellulose in the pre-treated biomasses. These values were slightly higher for hydrothermal compared to wet explosion pre-treatment. ATR-FTIR analyses also confirmed these results. Microscopic analysis showed that pre-treatments affected the biomass by partial difibration. Lignin deposition on the surface of the hydrothermally pre-treated fibre was very distinct while severe loss of fibril integrity was noticed with wet exploded fibre. The present study thus revealed that the lignin cannot be removed by the studied pre-treatments. However, both pre-treatments improved the accessibility of the biomass towards enzymatic hydrolysis. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative performance of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on methane production from ensiled sorghum forage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollini, Manuela; Sambusiti, Cecilia; Musatti, Alida; Ficara, Elena; Retinò, Isabella; Malpei, Francesca

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatments on chemical composition and methane production from ensiled sorghum forage. Four commercial enzymatic preparations were tested and the two yielding the highest sugars release were added to evaluate any hydrolytic effect on both untreated and alkaline pretreated samples. In the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment trials, the highest sugar release was found with Primafast and BGL preparations (added at a final concentration 0.12 and 0.20 mL/g TS, respectively), with a total monomeric content of 12 and 6.5 g/L. Fibre composition analysis confirmed that the combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to cellulose (up to 32 %) and hemicelluloses (up to 56 %) solubilisation, compared to the enzymatic pretreatment alone. BMP tests were performed on both untreated and pretreated samples, and time courses of methane production were fitted. Both enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment led to a methane production increase (304 and 362 mL CH4/g VS), compared to that of untreated sorghum (265 mL CH4/g VS), as  +15 and  +37 %, respectively. Moreover, higher specific methane production rates, compared to that of untreated sorghum (20.31 mL CH4/g VS/d), were obtained by applying the enzymatic and combined alkaline-enzymatic pretreatment (33.94 and 31.65 mL CH4/g VS/d), respectively.

  9. Impact of co-pretreatment of calcium hydroxide and steam explosion on anaerobic digestion efficiency with corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jinli; Zhang, Jiyu; Yang, Liutianyi; He, Yanfeng; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Guangqing; Chen, Chang

    2016-09-29

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is an effective way to utilize the abundant resource of corn stover (CS). In this light, Ca(OH)2 pretreatment alone, steam explosion (SE) pretreatment alone, and co-pretreatment of Ca(OH)2 and SE were applied to improve the digestion efficiency of CS. Results showed that AD of co-pretreated CS with 1.0% Ca(OH)2 and SE at 1.5 MPa achieved the highest cumulative methane yield of [Formula: see text], which was 61.54% significantly higher (p pretreatment enhanced from 43.03% to 69.52%. Methane yield could be well fitted by the first-order model and the modified Gompertz model. In addition, composition and structural changes of CS after pretreatment were analyzed by a fiber analyzer, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The validated results indicated that co-pretreatment of Ca(OH)2 and SE was efficient to improve the digestion performance of CS and might be a suitable method for agricultural waste pretreatment in the future AD industry.

  10. Bisulfite pretreatment changes the structure and properties of oil palm empty fruit bunch to improve enzymatic hydrolysis and bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liping; Sun, Wan; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian; Qu, Yinbo; Choo, Yuen May; Loh, Soh Kheang

    2015-06-01

    Bisulfite pretreatment is a proven effective method for improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of empty fruit bunch (EFB) from oil palm for bioethanol production. In this study, we set out to determine the changes that occur in the structure and properties of EFB materials and fractions of hemicellulose and lignin during the bisulfite pretreatment process. The results showed that the crystallinity of cellulose in EFB increased after bisulfite pretreatment, whereas the EFB surface was damaged to various degrees. The orderly structure of EFB, which was maintained by hydrogen bonds, was destroyed by bisulfite pretreatment. Bisulfite pretreatment also hydrolyzed the glycosidic bonds of the xylan backbone of hemicellulose, thereby decreasing the molecular weight and shortening the xylan chains. The lignin fractions obtained from EFB and pretreated EFB were typically G-S lignin, and with low content of H units. Meanwhile, de-etherification occurred at the β-O-4 linkage, which was accompanied by polymerization and demethoxylation as a result of bisulfite pretreatment. The adsorption ability of cellulase differed for the various lignin fractions, and the water-soluble lignin fractions had higher adsorption capacity on cellulase than the milled wood lignin. In general, the changes in the structure and properties of EFB provided insight into the benefits of bisulfite pretreatment.

  11. Pretreatment of Corn Stalk by Steam Explosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵自强; 田永生; 谭惠民

    2003-01-01

    A steam explosion pretreatment, which is one of the best ways of pretreating plant stalk, is applied at various severities to corn stalk. It could effectively modify the super-molecular structure of corn stalk and defibrating corn stalk into individual components. The relationship between yield of reducing sugar and the operating conditions, including temperature, pressure of steam explosion pretreatment and acidity, is also established. Experimental results prove that the steam explosion substantially increases the yield of reducing sugar, and the optimal condition for steam explosion is as follows: the pressure is 2.0 MPa, the pressure-retaining time 300 s, the initial acid concentration 1% and the acid treatment time 24 h.

  12. Pretreatment imaging of peripheral vascular malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson JB

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Joshua B Johnson, Petrice M Cogswell, Michael A McKusick, Larry A Binkovitz, Stephen J Riederer, Phillip M Young Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Peripheral vascular malformations (VMs are complex and diverse vascular lesions which require individualized pretreatment planning. Pretreatment imaging using various modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging and time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography, is a valuable tool for classifying peripheral VMs to allow proper diagnosis, demonstrate complete extent, identify the nidus, and distinguish between low-flow and high-flow dynamics that determines the treatment approach. We discuss pretreatment imaging findings in four patients with peripheral VMs and how diagnostic imaging helped guide management. Keywords: time-resolved MRA, cartesian acquisition with projection-like reconstruction, endovascular treatment, magnetic resonance angiography

  13. Effect of steam explosion and enzymatic pre-treatments on pulping and bleaching of Hesperaloe funifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Sampedro, R; Eugenio, M E; Villar, J C

    2012-05-01

    A non-wood raw material with high potential for pulp and paper applications (Hesperaloe funifera) was subjected to a steam explosion pre-treatment, and the subsequent effect of this pretreatment on biopulping and biobleaching was studied. An increase in the delignification rate, bigger than that reported for autohydrolysis and acid hydrolysis pre-treatments, and a reduction in chemical consumption were found during kraft pulping of the exploded samples. However, biopulping with the laccase-mediator system (LMS) did not lead to a reduction in the kappa number in either non-exploded or exploded unbleached pulps. On the other hand, the steam explosion pretreatment boosted the advantages of the LMS pre-treatment (decrease in kappa number and increase in brightness) favored biobleaching, with a 53.1% delignification rate and a final brightness of 67% ISO. Finally, the steam explosion pre-treatment also improved the color properties of the bleached pulp and reduced the hydrogen peroxide consumption by 24.6%.

  14. Comparative performance of precommercial cellulases hydrolyzing pretreated corn stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohagheghi Ali

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulases and related hydrolytic enzymes represent a key cost factor for biochemical conversion of cellulosic biomass feedstocks to sugars for biofuels and chemicals production. The US Department of Energy (DOE is cost sharing projects to decrease the cost of enzymes for biomass saccharification. The performance of benchmark cellulase preparations produced by Danisco, DSM, Novozymes and Verenium to convert pretreated corn stover (PCS cellulose to glucose was evaluated under common experimental conditions and is reported here in a non-attributed manner. Results Two hydrolysis modes were examined, enzymatic hydrolysis (EH of PCS whole slurry or washed PCS solids at pH 5 and 50°C, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF of washed PCS solids at pH 5 and 38°C. Enzymes were dosed on a total protein mass basis, with protein quantified using both the bicinchoninic acid (BCA assay and the Bradford assay. Substantial differences were observed in absolute cellulose to glucose conversion performance levels under the conditions tested. Higher cellulose conversion yields were obtained using washed solids compared to whole slurry, and estimated enzyme protein dosages required to achieve a particular cellulose conversion to glucose yield were extremely dependent on the protein assay used. All four enzyme systems achieved glucose yields of 90% of theoretical or higher in SSF mode. Glucose yields were reduced in EH mode, with all enzymes achieving glucose yields of at least 85% of theoretical on washed PCS solids and 75% in PCS whole slurry. One of the enzyme systems ('enzyme B' exhibited the best overall performance. However in attaining high conversion yields at lower total enzyme protein loadings, the relative and rank ordered performance of the enzyme systems varied significantly depending upon which hydrolysis mode and protein assay were used as the basis for comparison. Conclusions This study provides extensive

  15. Hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated cellulose under mild hydrothermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimentão, R J; Lorente, E; Gispert-Guirado, F; Medina, F; López, F

    2014-10-13

    The hydrolysis of dilute acid-pretreated cellulose was investigated in a conventional oven and under microwave heating. Two acids--sulfuric and oxalic--were studied. For both hydrothermal conditions (oven and microwave) the resultant total organic carbon (TOC) values obtained by the hydrolysis of the cellulose pretreated with sulfuric acid were higher than those obtained by the hydrolysis of the cellulose pretreated with oxalic acid. However, the dicarboxylic acid exhibited higher hydrolytic efficiency towards glucose. The hydrolysis of cellulose was greatly promoted by microwave heating. The Rietveld method was applied to fit the X-ray patterns of the resultant cellulose after hydrolysis. Oxalic acid preferentially removed the amorphous region of the cellulose and left the crystalline region untouched. On the other hand, sulfuric acid treatment decreased the ordering of the cellulose by partially disrupting its crystalline structure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioconversion of paper mill sludge to bioethanol in the presence of accelerants or hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Raghu Nandan; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Lecher, Nicholas Joshua; Duncan, Shona M; Singsaas, Eric Lawrence; Alkasrawi, Malek

    2015-09-01

    In this study we investigated the technical feasibility of convert paper mill sludge into fuel ethanol. This involved the removal of mineral fillers by using either chemical pretreatment or mechanical fractionation to determine their effects on cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation to ethanol. In addition, we studied the effect of cationic polyelectrolyte (as accelerant) addition and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. We present results showing that removing the fillers content (ash and calcium carbonate) from the paper mill sludge increases the enzymatic hydrolysis performance dramatically with higher cellulose conversion at faster rates. The addition of accelerant and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment further improved the hydrolysis yields by 16% and 25% (g glucose / g cellulose), respectively with the de-ashed sludge. The fermentation process of produced sugars achieved up to 95% of the maximum theoretical ethanol yield and higher ethanol productivities within 9h of fermentation.

  17. Possibilities and evaluation of straw pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Niels Ole; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sander, Bo

    1998-01-01

    Biomass utilisation by cofiring of straw in a pulverised coal fire boiler is economically attractive compared to dedicated straw fired plants. However, the high content of potassium and chloride impedes utilisation of the fly ash, deactivates the de NOx catalysts in the flue gas cleaning system...... and may also lead to increased deposit formation. A pretreatment process is required to solve the problems. In this paper two pretreatment processes are considred, one based on straw wash and another based on pyrolysis and char wash. To evaluate and compare the processes, laboratory and technical...

  18. Pretreatment Capabilities and Benefits of Electrocoagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    PRETREATMENT CAPABILITIES AND BENEFITS OF ELECTROCOAGULATION Michael Mickley Mickley & Associates Boulder, Colorado...DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pretreatment Capabilities and Benefits of Electrocoagulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...4 2.1 Background for Electrocoagulation Technology ………………………. 4 2.1.1 Applications ……………………………………………………. 4 2.1.2

  19. Sugarcane bagasse pretreatment using three imidazolium-based ionic liquids; mass balances and enzyme kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatzos Sergios

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective pretreatment is key to achieving high enzymatic saccharification efficiency in processing lignocellulosic biomass to fermentable sugars, biofuels and value-added products. Ionic liquids (ILs, still relatively new class of solvents, are attractive for biomass pretreatment because some demonstrate the rare ability to dissolve all components of lignocellulosic biomass including highly ordered (crystalline cellulose. In the present study, three ILs, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C4mim]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([C2mim]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim]OAc are used to dissolve/pretreat and fractionate sugarcane bagasse. In these IL-based pretreatments the biomass is completely or partially dissolved in ILs at temperatures greater than 130°C and then precipitated by the addition of an antisolvent to the IL biomass mixture. For the first time mass balances of IL-based pretreatments are reported. Such mass balances, along with kinetics data, can be used in process modelling and design. Results Lignin removals of 10% mass of lignin in bagasse with [C4mim]Cl, 50% mass with [C2mim]Cl and 60% mass with [C2mim]OAc, are achieved by limiting the amount of water added as antisolvent to 0.5 water:IL mass ratio thus minimising lignin precipitation. Enzyme saccharification (24 h, 15FPU yields (% cellulose mass in starting bagasse from the recovered solids rank as: [C2mim]OAc(83% > >[C2mim]Cl(53% = [C4mim]Cl(53%. Composition of [C2mim]OAc-treated solids such as low lignin, low acetyl group content and preservation of arabinosyl groups are characteristic of aqueous alkali pretreatments while those of chloride IL-treated solids resemble aqueous acid pretreatments. All ILs are fully recovered after use (100% mass as determined by ion chromatography. Conclusions In all three ILs regulated addition of water as an antisolvent effected a polysaccharide enriched precipitate since some of the lignin

  20. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation presenting with steroid-responsive higher brain dysfunction: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeda Yasushi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 56-year-old man noticed discomfort in his left lower limb, followed by convulsion and numbness in the same area. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed white matter lesions in the right parietal lobe accompanied by leptomeningeal or leptomeningeal and cortical post-contrast enhancement along the parietal sulci. The patient also exhibited higher brain dysfunction corresponding with the lesions on MRI. Histological pathology disclosed β-amyloid in the blood vessels and perivascular inflammation, which highlights the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA-related inflammation. Pulse steroid therapy was so effective that clinical and radiological findings immediately improved. CAA-related inflammation is a rare disease, defined by the deposition of amyloid proteins within the leptomeningeal and cortical arteries associated with vasculitis or perivasculitis. Here we report a patient with CAA-related inflammation who showed higher brain dysfunction that improved with steroid therapy. In cases with atypical radiological lesions like our case, cerebral biopsy with histological confirmation remains necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  1. Evaluation of thermal, ultrasonic and alkali pretreatments on mixed-microalgal biomass to enhance anaerobic methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sunja; Park, Seonghwan; Seon, Jiyun; Yu, Jaechul; Lee, Taeho

    2013-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion was regarded as one of the ways to recover energy from mixed-microalgae biomass in this study. After applying thermal-, ultrasonic-, and alkali-pretreatments to raw microalgae biomass to promote the digestion efficiency, a biochemical methane potential was investigated to evaluate the effectiveness of the pre-treatments for the purpose. As the pretreatment intensity increased, the solubilization of the mixed microalgae increased. However, the increased solubilization was not followed proportionally by the increased methane production. The highest methane productivity was achieved by the thermal-pretreatment at 120 °C (405 mL CH4/g-VS), which was 1.2 times higher than that of the non-pretreatment condition (336 mL CH4/g-VS). The net energy analysis revealed that only the pretreatment adjusted to pH 9 yielded a slightly higher energy gains (12.8 kJ/g-VS) than that of non-pretreatment condition (11.9 kJ/g-VS). These findings recommend direct supply of microalgae biomass for anaerobic digestion.

  2. Enhanced solid-state anaerobic digestion of corn stover by alkaline pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiying; Wan, Caixia; Li, Yebo

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline pretreatment was applied to enhance biogas production from corn stover through solid-state anaerobic digestion. Different NaOH loadings (1%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% (w/w)) were tested for solid-state pretreatment of corn stover. Lignin degradation during pretreatment increased from 9.1% to 46.2% when NaOH concentration increased from 1.0% to 7.5%. The NaOH-pretreated corn stover was digested using effluent of liquid anaerobic digestion as inoculum and nitrogen source. NaOH loading of 1% did not cause significant improvement on biogas yield. The highest biogas yield of 372.4 L/kg VS was obtained with 5% NaOH-pretreated corn stover, which was 37.0% higher than that of the untreated corn stover. However, a higher NaOH loading of 7.5% caused faster production of volatile fatty acids during the hydrolysis and acidogenesis stages, which inhibited the methanogenesis. Simultaneous NaOH treatment and anaerobic digestion did not significantly improve the biogas production (P>0.05).

  3. Anaerobic biodegradation of polylactic acid under mesophilic condition using thermal-alkaline pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samitthiwetcharong, Sutisa; Kullavanijaya, Pratin; Chavalparit, Orathai

    2017-07-01

    The propose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal-alkaline pretreatment with emphasis on sodium hydroxide concentration (NaOH), temperature and reaction time, on enhancement of polylactic acid (PLA) films degradation and biogas production. The results found that NaOH concentration and reaction time were two main parameters influencing on PLA degradation. While, less significant was found for temperature. From the Response Surface Methodology (RSM), it was concluded that the optimum pretreatment conditions were at 0.5 M of NaOH, temperature of 60°C and 24 hr of reaction time. This was generated about 3.7 times (215.47 ml/gVSadded) higher gas production comparing to non-pretreated PLA films which was 58.28 ml/gVSadded. The maximum biodegradability of PLA film was 20.14%. This was estimated to be 4.7 times higher than non-pretreated PLA (4.32%). This finding demonstrated the benefit of thermal-alkaline pretreatment on surface of PLA films destruction. Consequently, the microbial enzymes could degrade PLA more easily, resulting in an increase of biogas production.

  4. Cellulose accessibility determines the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiman, Magnus; Dienes, Dora; Hansen, Mads A T; van der Meulen, Torbjörn; Zacchi, Guido; Lidén, Gunnar

    2012-12-01

    Spruce chips steam-pretreated at various conditions, according to a central composite design, were used for investigating the influence of pretreatment conditions on enzymatic hydrolysis, accounting for the individual effects of pretreatment temperature (194-220 °C), time (3-11 min) and sulfur dioxide uptake (0.7-2.5%). The materials were analyzed for several surface characteristics, including IR absorption, enzyme adsorption capacity, total surface area, cellulosic surface area, and cellulosic pore sizes. This work showed a clear correlation between rate of enzymatic hydrolysis and specific surface area. Although the lignin content of the particle surface increased at higher pretreatment temperature and residence time, the initial rate of enzymatic hydrolysis increased. Enzyme adsorption measurements and staining methods revealed that the higher rate of hydrolysis of these materials was due to increased accessibility of the cellulose. An accessible cellulose fraction is thus more important than a low surface lignin content for the enzymatic hydrolysis of steam-pretreated spruce. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Fungal pretreatment of sweet sorghum bagasse with supplements: improvement in lignin degradation, selectivity and enzymatic saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vartika; Jana, Asim K; Jana, Mithu Maiti; Gupta, Antriksh

    2017-06-01

    Sweet sorghum bagasse (SSB) from food processing and agricultural industry has attracted the attention for uses in production of biofuel, enzymes and other products. The alteration in lignocellulolytic enzymes by use of supplements in fungal pretreatment of SSB to achieve higher lignin degradation, selectivity value and enzymatic hydrolysis to fermentable sugar was studied. Fungal strain Coriolus versicolor was selected for pretreatment due to high ligninolytic and low cellulolytic enzyme production resulting in high lignin degradation and selectivity value. SSB was pretreated with supplements of veratryl alcohol, syringic acid, catechol, gallic acid, vanillin, guaiacol, CuSO4 and MnSO4. The best results were obtained with CuSO4, gallic acid and syringic acid supplements. CuSO4 increased the activities of laccase (4.9-fold) and polyphenol oxidase (1.9-fold); gallic acid increased laccase (3.5-fold) and manganese peroxidase (2.5-fold); and syringic acid increased laccase (5.6-fold), lignin peroxidase (13-fold) and arylalcohol oxidase (2.8-fold) resulting in enhanced lignin degradations and selectivity values than the control. Reduced cellulolytic enzyme activities resulted in high cellulose recovery. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated SSB yielded higher sugar due to degradation of lignin and reduced the crystallinity of cellulose. The study showed that supplements could be used to improve the pretreatment process. The results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric/differential thermogravimetric analysis of SSB.

  6. Pretreatment on Corn Stover with Low Concentration of Formic Acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2009-01-01

    the cellulose easily degraded into sugars and further fermented to ethanol. In this work, hydrothermal pretreatment on corn stover at 195 degrees for 15 min with and without lower concentration of formic acid was compared in terms of sugar recoveries and ethanol fermentation. For pretreatment with formic acid...... pretreatment without formic acid. Toxicity tests of liquor parts showed that there were no inhibitions found for both pretreatment conditions. After simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of the pretreated corn stover with Baker's yeast, the highest ethanol yield of 76.5% of the theoretical...... was observed from corn stover pretreated at 195 degrees for 15min with formic acid....

  7. Thermochemical pretreatment of lignocellulose to enhance methane fermentation: II. Evaluation and application of pretreatment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, K D; Levy, J A; McCarty, P L

    1988-01-01

    A model was developed and evaluated as a tool for predicting the formation of soluble products from staged thermochemical treatment of lignocellulosic materials under acidic conditions typical of autohydrolysis. The model was used to predict the general trend of hemi-cellulose and cellulose hydrolysis between pH 2 and 4 and temperatures of 170-230 degrees C, and results were compared with experimental data. When the model was evaluated for this range of temperatures and pH values, results indicated: (1) a relatively low temperature (175 degrees C) during the first stage allows hydrolysis of the hemi-cellulose polysaccharides without significant mono-saccharide decomposition, (2) subsequent stages at higher temperatures (equal or greater than 200 degrees C) are needed for significant cellulose hydrolysis, but glucose decomposition will also occur, and, (3) a pH in the range of 2-2.5 will enhance polysaccharide hydrolysis while limiting monosaccharide decomposition. The model's predictions, indicating that the formation of biodegradable products could be optimized using Pretreatments at pH 2-2.5 for the pH range evaluated, were confirmed in experiments with white fir as a representative lig nocellulose.

  8. Evaluation of soluble fraction and enzymatic residual fraction of dilute dry acid, ethylenediamine, and steam explosion pretreated corn stover on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Liu, Li; Li, Wen-Chao; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed to examine the inhibition of soluble fraction (SF) and enzymatic residual fraction (ERF) in dry dilute acid (DDA), ethylenediamine (EDA) and steam explosion (SE) pretreated corn stover (CS) on the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. SF of DDA, EDA and SE pretreated CS has high xylose, soluble lignin and xylo-oligomer content, respectively. SF of EDA pretreated CS leads to the highest inhibition, followed by SE and DDA pretreated CS. Inhibition of ERF of DDA and SE pretreated CS is higher than that of EDA pretreated CS. The inhibition degree (A0/A) of SF is 1.76 and 1.21 times to that of ERF for EDA and SE pretreated CS, respectively. The inhibition degree of ERF is 1.05 times to that of SF in DDA pretreated CS. The quantitative analysis shows that SF of EDA pretreated CS, SF and ERF of SE pretreated CS cause significant inhibition during enzymatic hydrolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermal pre-treatment of primary and secondary sludge at 70ºC prior to anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Gavala, H.N.; Lu, Jingquan

    2005-01-01

    biochemical reactions and higher growth rate of microorganisms resulting in an increased methanogenic potential at lower hydraulic retention times. Furthermore, thermal pre-treatment is suitable for the improvement of stabilization and could be realized at relatively low cost especially at low temperatures....... The present study investigates the effect of the pre-treatment at 70 degrees C on thermophilic (55 degrees C) anaerobic digestion of primary and secondary sludge in continuously operated digesters. Thermal pre-treatment of primary and secondary sludge at 70 degrees C enhanced the removal of organic matter...

  10. Dissolved organic nitrogen measurement using dialysis pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wontae; Westerhoff, Paul

    2005-02-01

    Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is important for ecological and engineering researches. Quantification of low DON concentrations in waters with elevated dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) using existing methods is inaccurate. In this study, a dialysis-based pretreatment technique was optimized and adopted to reduce the interference from DIN to the quantification of DON in natural water. A cellulose ester dialysis tube (nominal molecular weight cutoff = 100 Da) was used in batch and continuous-flow dialysis steps with model compounds, natural organic matter isolates, and bulk waters to develop a dialysis pretreatment approach that selectively reduces DIN from solutions containing DON. By reducing DIN concentrations, propagation of analytical variance in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) and DIN species concentrations allows more accurate determination of DON (DON = TDN - NO3 - NO2- - NH3/NH4+). Dialysis for 24 h against continuously flowing distilled water reduced DIN species by 70%. With dialysis pretreatment, DON recoveries of more than 95% were obtained for surface water and finished drinking water, but wastewater experienced a slight loss (approximately 10%) of DON possibly due to the adsorption of organics onto the dialysis membrane, permeation of low molecular weight fractions, or biodegradation. Dialysis experiments using surface water spiked with different DIN/TDN ratios concluded that dialysis pretreatment leads to more accurate DON determination than no dialysis when DIN/TDN ratios exceed 0.6 mg of N/mg of N.

  11. High-temperature pretreatment of biogas substrate by using district heating to increase the biogas production; Hoegtemperaturfoerbehandling av biogassubstrat med fjaerrvaerme foer oekad biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Pilar Castillo, Maria; Ascue, Johnny [JTI, Uppsala (Sweden); Olsson, Marcus; Henriksson, Gunilla; Nordman, Roger [SP, Boraas (Sweden)

    2011-12-15

    In this study, we have shown that pre-heating sludge from a waste water treatment plant can give a higher biogas production rate. However, pretreatment showed no effect on substrate from a biogas plant at the conditions tested in this study. The study has also shown that there is potential of using district heating in the biogas industry for thermal pretreatment of sludge.

  12. PROJECT W-551 DETERMINATION DATA FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI AR

    2008-08-11

    This report provides the detailed assessment forms and data for selection of the solids separation and cesium separation technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde resin. This data was used to prepare a cross-cutting technology summary, reported in RPP-RPT-37740.

  13. PROJECT W-551 SUMMARY INFORMATION FOR EARLY LAW INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM SELECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AR, TEDESCHI

    2008-08-11

    This report provides summary data for use by the decision board to assess and select the final technology for project W-551, Interim Pretreatment System. This project will provide early pretreated low activity waste feed to the Waste Treatment Plant to allow Waste Treatment Plan Low Activity Waste facility operation prior to construction completion of the Pretreatment and High Level Waste facilities. The candidate solids separations technologies are rotary microfiltration and crossflow filtration, and the candidate cesium separation technologies are fractional crystallization, caustic-side solvent extraction, and ion-exchange using spherical resorcinol-fonnaldebyde resin. This document provides a summary of comparative data against prior weighted criteria to support technology selection. Supporting details and background for this summary are documented in the separate report, RPP-RPT-37741.

  14. Alkaline/peracetic acid as a pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Lincoln Cambraia

    pretreatment improves enzymatic digestibility of hybrid poplar wood and sugar cane bagasse. Based on reduction of acetyl groups in the two lignocellulosic materials, alkaline pre-pretreatments are helpful in reducing peracetic acid requirements in the pretreatment and consequently diminishing growth inhibition of the bacteria that was observed using higher peracetic acid loadings.

  15. Efficient Fuel Pretreatment: Simultaneous Torrefaction and Grinding of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleh, Suriyati Binti; Hansen, Brian Brun; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2013-01-01

    Combining torrefaction and grinding of biomass in one reactor may be an attractive fuel pretreatment process. A combined laboratory torrefaction and ball mill reactor has been constructed for studies of the influence of temperature and residence time on the product yields and particle size......, and ash composition, where straw has a higher alkali content. This and other studies indicate that the large difference in the alkali contents of the biomasses is the main cause for the observed difference in torrefaction characteristics. Experiments with separate particle heating and grinding showed...... of straw for 90 min yielded a higher mass loss (27–60 wt %) and relative size reduction (59–95%) compared with spruce (mass loss of 10–56 wt % and size reduction of 20–60%). The two types of biomass investigated differ with respect to hemicellulose type, lignocellulosic composition, particle morphology...

  16. Kinetic studies of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis from pretreated corn cob

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanie, Jeannie; Kartawiria, Irvan; Abimanyu, Haznan

    2017-01-01

    Successful utilization of corn cob biomass as raw material in bioethanol production is depending on the hydrolysis process where high level of β-cellulose is converted into glucose. Enzymatic hydrolysis is the common process for this purpose. This study is focusing on the evaluation of hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob using Novozymes Cellic ® C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes to obtain the optimum reaction condition and its general reaction kinetics. The corn cob used was pretreated using 10% of NaOH solution. Hydrolysis reactions were conducted in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flask for 72 hour using mixture of C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes at the fixed ratio of 5:1 and glucose concentration were measured using HPLC. Reaction temperature of 40°C and quantity of 0.5 ml enzyme solution per gram substrate gives the highest reaction rate (0.0123 gram of glucose/gram sample.h) with the glucose yield being 0.089 g glucose/ g substrate. Total conversion of cellulose observed was 11.91 %. Corn cob hydrolysis using C-Tec2 and H-Tec2 enzymes also result in xylose (0.0202 g/g substrate), which can also contribute to bioethanol productivity in further fermentation process. The reaction is following zero order kinetics for the first 8 hours and reaches maximum yield within 10 hours; significantly shorter compared to previous studies of cellulosic material hydrolysis that may take up to 72 hour to complete. Prolonging the hydrolysis of pre-treated corn cob more than 24 hour gives no significant increase in glucose conversion and yield. Hydrolysis temperature range of 40°C to 60°C is in accordance with the manufacturer recommendation for the purpose; however the decrease of reaction rate is observable at temperature 50°C or higher.

  17. Enzymatic pretreatment of low-grade oils for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordblad, Mathias; Pedersen, Anders K; Rancke-Madsen, Anders; Woodley, John M

    2016-04-01

    The alkaline process for making biodiesel (fatty acid methyl esters, or FAME) is highly efficient at the transesterification of glycerides. However, its performance is poor when it comes to using oil that contain significant amounts of free fatty acids (FFA). The traditional approach to such feedstocks is to employ acid catalysis, which is slow and requires a large excess of methanol, or to evaporate FFA and convert that in a separate process. An attractive option would be to convert the FFA in oil feedstocks to FAME, before introducing it into the alkaline process. The high selectivity of enzyme catalysis makes it a suitable basis for such a pretreatment process. In this work, we present a characterization of the pretreatment of high-FFA rapeseed oil using immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435), focused on the impact of initial FFA and methanol concentration. Based on experimental results, we have identified limitations for the process in terms of FFA concentration in the feedstock and make suggestions for process operation. It was found that, using 5% catalyst and 4% methanol at 35°C, the FFA concentration could be reduced to 0.5% within an hour for feedstock containing up to 15% FFA. Further, the reaction was observed to be under kinetic control, in that the biocatalyst converts FFA (and FAME) at a much higher rate than glyceride substrates. There is thus, both a minimum and a maximum reaction time for the process to achieve the desired concentration of FFA. Finally, an assessment of process stability in a continuous packed bed system indicates that as much as 15 m(3) oil could potentially be pretreated by 1 kg of biocatalyst at the given process conditions.

  18. The relationship between pretreatment dietary composition and weight loss during a randomised trial of different diet approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVay, M A; Jeffreys, A S; King, H A; Olsen, M K; Voils, C I; Yancy, W S

    2015-02-01

    Identifying pretreatment dietary habits that are associated with weight-loss intervention outcomes could help guide individuals' selection of weight-loss approach among competing options. A pretreatment factor that may influence weight-loss outcomes is macronutrient intake. Overweight and obese Durham Veterans Affairs outpatients were randomised to a weight-loss intervention with a low-carbohydrate diet (n = 71) or orlistat medication therapy plus a low-fat diet (n = 73). Percentage fat, carbohydrate and protein intake prior to treatment were measured using 4-day food records. Linear mixed-effects models were used to determine whether pretreatment percentage macronutrient intake influenced weight trajectories and weight loss in each weight-loss condition. Participant's mean age was 53 years, baseline body mass index was 39.3 kg m(-2) and 72% were male. A higher pretreatment percentage carbohydrate intake was associated with less rapid initial weight loss (P = 0.02) and less rapid weight regain (P = 0.03) in the low-carbohydrate diet condition but was not associated with weight trajectories in the orlistat plus low-fat diet condition. In both conditions, a higher pretreatment percentage fat intake was associated with more rapid weight regain (P < 0.01). Pretreatment percentage protein intake was not associated with weight trajectories. None of the pretreatment macronutrients were associated with weight loss on study completion in either condition. Selection of a weight-loss approach on the basis of pretreatment macronutrient intake is unlikely to improve weight outcomes at the end of a 1-year treatment. However, pretreatment macronutrient intake may have implications for tailoring of interventions to slow weight regain after weight loss. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  19. Elucidation of the effect of ionic liquid pretreatment on rice husk via structural analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ang Teck

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the present study, three ionic liquids, namely 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([BMIM]Cl, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM]OAc, and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate ([EMIM]DEP, were used to partially dissolve rice husk, after which the cellulose were regenerated by the addition of water. The aim of the investigation is to examine the implications of the ionic liquid pretreatments on rice husk composition and structure. Results From the attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM results, the regenerated cellulose were more amorphous, less crystalline, and possessed higher structural disruption compared with untreated rice husk. The major component of regenerated cellulose from [BMIM]Cl and [EMIM]DEP pretreatments was cellulose-rich material, while cellulose regenerated from [EMIM]OAc was a matrix of cellulose and lignin. Cellulose regenerated from ionic pretreatments could be saccharified via enzymatic hydrolysis, and resulted in relatively high reducing sugars yields, whereas enzymatic hydrolysis of untreated rice husk did not yield reducing sugars. Rice husk residues generated from the ionic liquid pretreatments had similar chemical composition and amorphousity to that of untreated rice husk, but with varying extent of surface disruption and swelling. Conclusions The structural architecture of the regenerated cellulose and rice husk residues showed that they could be used for subsequent fermentation or derivation of cellulosic compounds. Therefore, ionic liquid pretreatment is an alternative in the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in addition to the conventional chemical pretreatments.

  20. Steam-explosion pretreatment for enhancing anaerobic digestion of municipal wastewater sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dereix, Marcela; Parker, Wayne; Kennedy, Kevin

    2006-05-01

    This study evaluated the use of steam explosion as a pretreatment for municipal wastewater treatment sludges and biosolids as a technique for enhancing biogas generation during anaerobic digestion. Samples of dewatered anaerobic digester effluent (biosolids) and a mixture of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) and biosolids were steam-exploded under differing levels of intensity in this study. The results indicate that steam explosion can solublize components of these sludge streams. Increasing the intensity of the steam-explosion pressure and temperature resulted in increased solublization. The steam-explosion pretreatment also increased the bioavailability of sludge components under anaerobic digestion conditions. Increasing the steam-explosion intensity increased the ultimate yield of methane during anaerobic digestion. Batch anaerobic digestion tests suggested that pretreatment at 300 psi was the most optimal condition for enhanced biogas generation while minimizing energy input. Semicontinuous anaerobic digestion revealed that the results that were observed in the batch tests were sustainable in prolonged operation. Semicontinuous digestion of the TWAS/biosolids mixture that was pretreated at 300 psi generated approximately 50% more biogas than the controls. Semicontinuous digestion of the pretreated biosolids resulted in a 3-fold increase in biogas compared with the controls. Based on capillary suction test results, steam-explosion pretreatment at 300 psi improved the dewaterability of the final digested sludge by 32 and 45% for the TWAS/ biosolids mixture and biosolids, respectively, compared with controls. The energy requirements of the nonoptimized steam-explosion process were substantially higher than the additional energy produced from enhanced digestion of the pretreated sludge. Substantial improvements in energy efficiency will be required to make the process viable from an energy perspective.

  1. Drying of red beetroot after osmotic pretreatment: Kinetics and quality considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalski Stefan J.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents experimental studies on drying kinetics and quality effects of red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L. after convective drying with a preliminary osmotic pretreatment. The effects of the osmotic agent (NaCl concentration and the osmotic bath time on the product colour and nutrient content preservation, the water activity, and rehydration ability after drying were analysed. Osmotic dehydration curves and Solid Gain (SG, Water Loss (WL, Weight Reduction (WR were determined. It was proved that drying of beetroot with osmotic pretreatment contributes to shorter drying time, smaller water activity, higher retention of betanin, better colour preservation, and a greater degree of water resorption.

  2. Effect of pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis of bovine collagen and formation of ACE-inhibitory peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yuhao; Olsen, Karsten; Grossi, Alberto Blak

    2013-01-01

    Bovine collagen was pre-treated (boiled or high pressure (HP)-treated) and then hydrolysed by 6 proteases. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) and the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of hydrolysates were measured. All enzymes used were able to partly degrade collagen and release...... ACEinhibitory peptides. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity was obtained with Alcalase. Pretreatment significantly influenced the DH and ACE-inhibition. For most enzymes, boiling for 5 min resulted in a significantly higher DH and ACE-inhibitory activity. With Alcalase and collagenase, hydrolysis and release...

  3. Effects of vitamin A pretreatment on nickel-induced lipid peroxidation and concentration of essential metals in liver, kidney and lung of mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Changyu [Graduate Institute of Medicine and School of Technology for Medical Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 807 (Taiwan, Province of China)]|[Department of Medical Technology, Foo-Yin Institute of Technology, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (Taiwan, Province of China); Huang Yeoulih; Lin Tehsien [Graduate Institute of Medicine and School of Technology for Medical Sciences, Kaohsiung Medical College, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 807 (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-05-01

    In the present study we report the effects of pretreatment with large doses of vitamin A (Vit A, retinol) on hepatic, renal and pulmonary lipid peroxidation, and Ni and essential metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Ca) concentrations in mice acutely exposed to nickel. Vitamin A (250 000 IU/kg per day) was administered by oral gavage to ICR mice for 7 days. On the 8th day, NiCl{sub 2} (5 mg Ni/kg body wt.) was injected i.p. to Vit A- or vehicle-pretreated mice. Vitamin A pretreatment alone did not alter lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and lung. Lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and lung was increased after treatment with NiCl{sub 2} alone. The extent of lipid peroxidation levels in Vit A+Ni treated mice was enhanced in liver, but reduced in kidney and lung. The Ni concentration in these three organs was below the detection limit (0.09 {mu}g/g) in control and Vit A-pretreated mice. The accumulation of Ni in Vit A+Ni treated mice was increased in liver, but decreased in kidney and lung compared to Ni-treated mice. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn and Ca in these organs were significantly increased in Ni-treated mice. In Vit A+Ni treated mice, compared to Ni-treated mice, hepatic Fe was significantly increased while Cu, Zn and Ca levels were reduced, but still higher than those of control and Vit A-treated mice. In the kidney of Vit A+Ni treated mice, the increase of Cu, Fe, and Zn but not Ca, was reduced and not significantly different from control and Vit A-treated mice. Pretreatment with Vit A reduced the increased Fe, Cu, Zn and Ca concentration in the lung caused by Ni injection. We therefore conclude that the effect of Vit A pretreatment on Ni toxicity is organ-dependent. (orig.) With 3 figs., 4 tabs., 35 refs.

  4. The impacts of pretreatment on the fermentability of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass: a comparative evaluation between ammonia fiber expansion and dilute acid pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Bruce E

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pretreatment chemistry is of central importance due to its impacts on cellulosic biomass processing and biofuels conversion. Ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX and dilute acid are two promising pretreatments using alkaline and acidic pH that have distinctive differences in pretreatment chemistries. Results Comparative evaluation on these two pretreatments reveal that (i AFEX-pretreated corn stover is significantly more fermentable with respect to cell growth and sugar consumption, (ii both pretreatments can achieve more than 80% of total sugar yield in the enzymatic hydrolysis of washed pretreated solids, and (iii while AFEX completely preserves plant carbohydrates, dilute acid pretreatment at 5% solids loading degrades 13% of xylose to byproducts. Conclusion The selection of pretreatment will determine the biomass-processing configuration, requirements for hydrolysate conditioning (if any and fermentation strategy. Through dilute acid pretreatment, the need for hemicellulase in biomass processing is negligible. AFEX-centered cellulosic technology can alleviate fermentation costs through reducing inoculum size and practically eliminating nutrient costs during bioconversion. However, AFEX requires supplemental xylanases as well as cellulase activity. As for long-term sustainability, AFEX has greater potential to diversify products from a cellulosic biorefinery due to lower levels of inhibitor generation and lignin loss.

  5. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD).

  6. The effect of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on crystallinity and solubility of kenaf cellulose membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidi, Anis Syuhada Mohd; Zakaria, Sarani; Chia, Chin Hua; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed; Padzil, Farah Nadia Mohammad [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Cellulose was extracted from kenaf core pulp (KCP) by series of bleaching steps in the sequence (DEED) where D and E are referred as acid and alkali treatment. The bleached kenaf pulp (BKCP) is then pretreated with acid hydrolysis at room temperature for 1 and 3 h respectively. The pretreated cellulose is dissolved in lithium hydroxide/urea (LiOH/urea) and cellulose solution produced was immersed in distilled water bath. BKCP without treatment was also conducted for comparison purpose. The effects of acid hydrolysis pretreatment on solubility and crystallinity are investigated. Higher solubility of cellulose solution is achieved for treated samples. Cellulose II formation and crystallinity index of the cellulose membrane were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  7. Electrochemical pretreatment of waste activated sludge: effect of process conditions on sludge disintegration degree and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Caihong; Yuan, Haiping; Dai, Xiaohu; Lou, Ziyang; Zhu, Nanwen

    2016-11-01

    Waste activated sludge (WAS) requires a long digestion time because of a rate-limiting hydrolysis step - the first phase of anaerobic digestion (AD). Pretreatment can be used prior to AD to facilitate the hydrolysis step and improve the efficiency of WAS digestion. This study evaluated a novel application of electrochemical (EC) technology employed as the pretreatment method prior to AD of WAS, focusing on the effect of process conditions on sludge disintegration and subsequent AD process. A superior process condition of EC pretreatment was obtained by reaction time of 30 min, electrolysis voltage of 20 V, and electrode distance of 5 cm, under which the disintegration degree of WAS ranged between 9.02% and 9.72%. In the subsequent batch AD tests, 206 mL/g volatile solid (VS) methane production in EC pretreated sludge was obtained, which was 20.47% higher than that of unpretreated sludge. The AD time was 19 days shorter for EC pretreated sludge compared to the unpretreated sludge. Additionally, the EC + AD reactor achieved 41.84% of VS removal at the end of AD. The analysis of energy consumption showed that EC pretreatment could be effective in enhancing sludge AD with reduced energy consumption when compared to other pretreatment methods.

  8. Floristics of Higher Plants in China——Report from Catalogue of Life: Higher Plants in China Database%中国高等植物编目信息系统进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Song WANG; Yu-Cheng ZHANG; Na-Xin XUE; Hai-Ning QIN

    2011-01-01

    Biodiversity research increasingly relies on distribution networks for dealing with large-scale primary data.Up-to-date information on biodiversity is critical for the proper management and conservation of any area. The first step towards conservation should be to compile an authoritative species inventory or checklist. Catalogue of Life:Higher Plants in China (CNPC) is an ongoing biodiversity informatics project with the aim to integrate existing higher plants inventory data, and provide access via an internet based web service to public user and the scientific com-munity. The CNPC, for the first time, provides integrated and authoritative taxonomic information on higher plant species found in China, and this database will be permanent, free and continously updated. Presently, a total of 34377 species have been included in the database. Among of them, 16 620 species are only found in China. Taxa are classified into 432 families and 3 941 genera. The CNPC will be an important source for scientists working on Chinese flora, and will play an important role in helping to achieve the targets set under the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation in the future.

  9. Assessing the effect of data pretreatment procedures for principal components analysis of chromatographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, John W; Smith, Ruth Waddell; McGuffin, Victoria L

    2015-12-01

    Following publication of the National Academy of Sciences report "Strengthening Forensic Science in the United States: A Path Forward", there has been increasing interest in the application of multivariate statistical procedures for the evaluation of forensic evidence. However, prior to statistical analysis, variance from sources other than the sample must be minimized through application of data pretreatment procedures. This is necessary to ensure that subsequent statistical analysis of the data provides meaningful results. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of pretreatment procedures on multivariate statistical analysis of chromatographic data obtained for a reference set of diesel fuels. Diesel was selected due to its chemical complexity and forensic relevance, both for fire debris and environmental forensic applications. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the untreated chromatograms to assess association of replicates and discrimination among the different diesel samples. The chromatograms were then pretreated by sequentially applying the following procedures: background correction, smoothing, retention-time alignment, and normalization. The effect of each procedure on association and discrimination was evaluated based on the association of replicates in the PCA scores plot. For these data, background correction and smoothing offered minimal improvement, whereas alignment and normalization offered the greatest improvement in the association of replicates and discrimination among highly similar samples. Further, prior to pretreatment, the first principal component accounted for only non-sample sources of variance. Following pretreatment, these sources were minimized and the first principal component accounted for significant chemical differences among the diesel samples. These results highlight the need for pretreatment procedures and provide a metric to assess the effect of pretreatment on subsequent multivariate statistical

  10. Efficacy of acidic pretreatment for the saccharification and fermentation of alginate from brown macroalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Damao; Yun, Eun Ju; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Do Hyoung; Seo, Nari; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae-Han; Cheong, Nam Yong; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2016-06-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of acidic pretreatment in increasing the enzymatic digestibility of alginate from brown macroalgae. Pretreatment with 1 % (w/v) sulfuric acid at 120 °C for 30 min produced oligosaccharides, mannuronic acid, and guluronic acid. Enzymatic saccharification of pretreated alginate by alginate lyases produced 52.2 % of the theoretical maximal sugar yield, which was only 7.5 % higher than the sugar yield obtained with unpretreated alginate. Mass spectrometric analyses of products of the two reactions revealed that acidic pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification produced saturated monomers (i.e., mannuronic and guluronic acid) with saturated oligosaccharides and unsaturated monomers (i.e., 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid; DEH), respectively. While DEH is further metabolized by microorganisms, mannuronic acid and guluronic acid are not metabolizable. Because of the poor efficacy in increasing enzymatic digestibility and owing to the formation of non-fermentable saturated monomers, acidic pretreatment cannot be recommended for enzymatic saccharification and fermentation of alginate.

  11. Effect of pelleting on the recalcitrance and bioconversion of dilute-acid pretreated corn stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison E Ray; Amber Hoover; Gary Gresham

    2012-07-01

    Background: Knowledge regarding the performance of densified biomass in biochemical processes is limited. The effects of densification on biochemical conversion are explored here. Methods: Pelleted corn stover samples were generated from bales that were milled to 6.35 mm. Low-solids acid pretreatment and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation were performed to evaluate pretreatment efficacy and ethanol yields achieved for pelleted and ground stover (6.35 mm and 2 mm) samples. Both pelleted and 6.35-mm ground stover were evaluated using a ZipperClave® reactor under high-solids, process-relevant conditions for multiple pretreatment severities (Ro), followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of the washed, pretreated solids. Results: Monomeric xylose yields were significantly higher for pellets (approximately 60%) than for ground formats (approximately 38%). Pellets achieved approximately 84% of theoretical ethanol yield (TEY); ground stover formats had similar profiles, reaching approximately 68% TEY. Pelleting corn stover was not detrimental to pretreatment efficacy for both low- and high-solids conditions, and even enhanced ethanol yields.

  12. Improving production of volatile fatty acids from food waste fermentation by hydrothermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Wang, Kun; Yang, Yuqiang; Shen, Dongsheng; Wang, Meizhen; Mo, Han

    2014-11-01

    Food waste (FW) was pretreated by a hydrothermal method and then fermented for volatile fatty acid (VFAs) production. The soluble substance in FW increased after hydrothermal pretreatment (⩽200 °C). Higher hydrothermal temperature would lead to mineralization of the organic compounds. The optimal temperature for organic dissolution was 180 °C, at which FW dissolved 42.5% more soluble chemical oxygen demand than the control. VFA production from pretreated FW fermentation was significantly enhanced compared with the control. The optimal hydrothermal temperature was 160 °C with a VFA yield of 0.908 g/g VSremoval. Butyrate and acetate were the prevalent VFAs followed by propionate and valerate. FW fermentation was inhibited after 200 °C pretreatment. The VFAs were extracted from the fermentation broth by liquid-liquid extraction. The VFA recovery was 50-70%. Thus, 0.294-0.411 g VFAs could be obtained per gram of hydrothermally pretreated FW (in dry weight) by this method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Optimization of thermal-dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment for enhancement of methane production from cassava residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jianhua; Mao, Zhonggui; Jiang, Li

    2011-02-01

    In this study, the pretreatment of cassava residues by thermal-dilute sulfuric acid (TDSA) hydrolysis was investigated by means of a statistically designed set of experiments. A three-factor central composite design (CCD) was employed to identify the optimum pretreatment condition of cassava residues for methane production. The individual and interactive effects of temperature, H(2)SO(4) concentration and reaction time on increase of methane yield (IMY) were evaluated by applying response surface methodology (RSM). After optimization, the resulting optimum pretreatment condition was 157.84°C, utilizing 2.99% (w/w TS) H(2)SO(4) for 20.15 min, where the maximum methane yield (248 mL/g VS) was 56.96% higher than the control (158 mL/g VS), which was very close to the predict value 56.53%. These results indicate the model obtained through RSM analysis is suit to predict the optimum pretreatment condition and there is great potential of using TDSA pretreatment of cassava residues to enhance methane yield.

  14. COMPARISON OF TWO CHEMICAL PRETREATMENTS OF RICE STRAW FOR BIOGAS PRODUCTION BY ANAEROBIC DIGESTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilin Song,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is considered the most abundant renewable resource that has the potential to contribute remarkably in the supply of biofuel. Previous studies have shown that chemical pretreatment prior to anaerobic digestion (AD can increase the digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass and methane yield. In the present study, the effect of rice straw pretreatment using ammonium hydroxide (NH3•H2O and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 on the biogasification performance through AD was investigated. A self-designed, laboratory-scale, and continuous anaerobic biogas digester was used for the evaluation. Results showed that the contents of the rice straw, i.e. the lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose were degraded significantly after the NH3•H2O and H2O2 treatments, and that biogas production from all pretreated rice straw increased. In addition, the optimal treatments for biogas production were the 4% and 3% H2O2 treatments (w/w, which yielded 327.5 and 319.7 mL/gVS, biogas, respectively, higher than the untreated sample. Biogas production from H2O2 pretreated rice straw was more favorable than rice straw pretreated with same concentration of ammonia, ranking in the order of 4% ≈ 3% > 2% > 1%. The optimal amount of H2O2 treatment for rice straw biogas digestion is 3% when economics and biogas yields are considered.

  15. Prognostic Impact of Pretreatment Plasma Fibrinogen in Patients with Locally Advanced Oral and Oropharyngeal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Holzinger

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the prognostic significance of pretreatment plasma fibrinigen in patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OOSCC.A cohort of 183 patients with locally advanced OOSCC receiving preoperative chemoradiotherapy was retrospectively examined. Using ROC curve analysis, a pretreatment plasma fibrinogen cutoff value of 447mg/dL was determined. The primary endpoints were overall survival and recurrence-free survival. A secondary endpoint was to determine whether pretreatment plasma fibrinogen could predict treatment response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier curves were used for survival analyses.Seventy-one patients had an elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen (fibrinogen >447mg/dL. Patients with high fibrinogen showed significantly higher pathologic stages after neoadjuvant treatment than those with low fibrinogen (p = 0.037. In univariate analysis, elevated fibrinogen was associated with poor overall survival (p = 0.005 and recurrence-free survival (p = 0.008 Multivariate analysis revealed that elevated fibrinogen remained an independent risk factor for death (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.09-2.90, p = 0.021 and relapse (hazard ratio 1.78, 95% CI 1.11-2.86, p = 0.016.Elevated pretreatment plasma fibrinogen is associated with lack of response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy and reduced OS and RFS in patients with OOSCC. Thus, plasma fibrinogen may emerge as a novel prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target in OOSCC.

  16. Variation in ultrasonic frequency and time as pre-treatments to air-drying of carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Ekow Abano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vegetable drying is an alternative method to curb post harvest decay of vegetables and a process to produce dried vegetables, which can be directly consumed or used as ingredients for the preparation of soups, stews, baby foods, cakes, puddings, and many other foods. In this study, the effect of ultrasound frequency and sonication time as pre-treatment prior to air drying at 70°C at an air velocity of 0.5 m/s, on carrot drying kinetics, flavour, colour, and non-enzymatic browning was investigated using a 3-level factorial response surface method. The result showed that an increase in sonication frequency and time did not significantly increase moisture diffusivity but in comparison with the control, water diffusivity increased after ultrasound application and the overall drying time was reduced. Application of the ultrasound pre-treatment in distilled water resulted in water gain and sugar loss, indicating that the ultrasonic pre-treatment can be an important step to produce low sugar content dried products. The brightness and redness to yellowness values of the ultrasonically pre-treated dried carrots were better than those without ultrasound application. In comparison with the flavour of the control, the ultrasound pre-treated samples recorded higher flavour response signals, indicating that the application of ultrasound improved the flavour of the dried carrot. The variation in sonication frequency and time did not significantly affect the non-enzymatic browning index of the dried products but were better than the control.

  17. Pretreatment of cellulosic waste sawdust into reducing sugars using mercerization and etherification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beomsoo Kim

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pretreatment of sawdust using a combination of sodium hydroxide (NaOH and monochloroacetic acid (MCA was investigated for the formation of reducing sugars. Optimum conditions for the pretreatment process were determined by the amount of reducing sugars formed during the enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated substrate. It was found that mercerization by NaOH played an important role in increasing the degree of substitution (DS and that the maximum solubility was achieved during the etherification by MCA. A maximum amount of 34.2% lignin was removed in the process. As the DS of the substrate was increased, the efficiency of the hydrolysis process increased, leading to the higher yield of reducing sugars. The optimum operating conditions for the pretreatment process were determined to be 75 oC at 90 rpm for 4 hours (2 hours for mercerization plus 2 hours for etherification. Under these operating conditions, with 1% (w/v NaOH and 2% (w/w MCA loading, a maximum DS of 0.2 and a solubility of 10.3% was attained. At 75 oC and after 48 hours of the hydrolysis process, cellulases from Aspergillus niger resulted in the production of 2.88 g/L of glucose with a yield of 62.72% reducing sugars. X-ray diffraction (XRD revealed reduced crystallinity of the sawdust and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM showed distortion of the structure after pretreatment.

  18. Microalgae pretreatment with liquid hot water to enhance enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tao; Li, Xiekun; Xiao, Shiyuan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Weizheng; Xu, Jingliang; Yuan, Zhenhong

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, microalgae are being considered as promising raw material for bioethanol production. In this work, three process variables during liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment prior to enzymatic hydrolysis by response surface methodology on Scenedesmus sp. WZKMT were investigated to enhance glucose recovery. Results indicated that the order of significance for three parameters was temperature>solid-to-liquid ratio>time. The optimal condition was 1:13 (w/v), 147°C and 40min. The concentration and recovery of glucose under this condition were 14.223g·L(-1) and 89.32%, respectively, which were up to 5-fold higher than the samples without LHW pretreatment. In addition, the surface morphologies of microalgae cells before and after LHW pretreatment were also verified using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). LHW pretreatment can greatly enhance the enzymatic efficiency, and can be regarded as an ideal pretreatment method for glucose recovery from microalgae. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Detoxification of Corncob Acid Hydrolysate with SAA Pretreatment and Xylitol Production by Immobilized Candida tropicalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li-Hong; Tang, Yong; Liu, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Xylitol fermentation production from corncob acid hydrolysate has become an attractive and promising process. However, corncob acid hydrolysate cannot be directly used as fermentation substrate owing to various inhibitors. In this work, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA) pretreatment was employed to reduce the inhibitors in acid hydrolysate. After detoxification, the corncob acid hydrolysate was fermented by immobilized Candida tropicalis cell to produce xylitol. Results revealed that SAA pretreatment showed high delignification and efficient removal of acetyl group compounds without effect on cellulose and xylan content. Acetic acid was completely removed, and the content of phenolic compounds was reduced by 80%. Furthermore, kinetic behaviors of xylitol production by immobilized C. tropicalis cell were elucidated from corncob acid hydrolysate detoxified with SAA pretreatment and two-step adsorption method, respectively. The immobilized C. tropicalis cell showed higher productivity efficiency using the corncob acid hydrolysate as fermentation substrate after detoxification with SAA pretreatment than by two-step adsorption method in the five successive batch fermentation rounds. After the fifth round fermentation, about 60 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for SAA pretreatment detoxification, while about 30 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for two-step adsorption detoxification. PMID:25133211

  20. Detoxification of Corncob Acid Hydrolysate with SAA Pretreatment and Xylitol Production by Immobilized Candida tropicalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol fermentation production from corncob acid hydrolysate has become an attractive and promising process. However, corncob acid hydrolysate cannot be directly used as fermentation substrate owing to various inhibitors. In this work, soaking in aqueous ammonia (SAA pretreatment was employed to reduce the inhibitors in acid hydrolysate. After detoxification, the corncob acid hydrolysate was fermented by immobilized Candida tropicalis cell to produce xylitol. Results revealed that SAA pretreatment showed high delignification and efficient removal of acetyl group compounds without effect on cellulose and xylan content. Acetic acid was completely removed, and the content of phenolic compounds was reduced by 80%. Furthermore, kinetic behaviors of xylitol production by immobilized C. tropicalis cell were elucidated from corncob acid hydrolysate detoxified with SAA pretreatment and two-step adsorption method, respectively. The immobilized C. tropicalis cell showed higher productivity efficiency using the corncob acid hydrolysate as fermentation substrate after detoxification with SAA pretreatment than by two-step adsorption method in the five successive batch fermentation rounds. After the fifth round fermentation, about 60 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for SAA pretreatment detoxification, while about 30 g xylitol/L fermentation substrate was obtained for two-step adsorption detoxification.

  1. pH dependency of hydrogen fermentation from alkali-pretreated sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Batch tests were carried out to study the possibility of hydrogen production from alkali-pre- treated sludge without seed and the pH dependency of hydrogen fermentation from alkali-pretreated sludge. Experimental results showed that the sewage sludge with alkali-pretreatment could be successfully applied to biologically producing hydrogen without seed and extra-feed. The results also showed that the initial pH value of sewage sludge was an important factor throughout the hydrogen fermentation of alkali-pretreated sludge. The maximum hydrogen yield was obtained at initial pH value of 11.0 (14.4 mL·g VS-1). The hydrogen yield of alkali-pretreated sludge at alkaline initial pH value was much higher than that of acidic or neutral initial pH value. The optimal pH value of hydrogen production from alkali- pretreated sludge was approximately 9.5. The consumption of hydrogen could be inhibited when the pH value of sludge was above 8.5. The change of hydrogen yield at various initial pH values was similar to that of sludge SCOD. The change of sludge pH value was slow and acetate was the major component of volatile fatty acids produced in the process of hydrogen production. The yield and the constitution of volatile fatty acids were sensitive to the initial pH value.

  2. Women and Minority Faculty in the Academic Workplace: Recruitment, Retention, and Academic Culture. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 27, Number 6. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr.

    In an attempt to address the need for substantive comparisons in the minority university faculty population, this monograph examines the relative differences in minority groups in the faculty population when the data permit comparisons. The report also examines research on the status of women faculty members. The discussion assembles a large…

  3. Hydroxyapatite coating on pretreated CoNiCrMo prosthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Tao; A. Dorner-Reisel

    2005-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of the bio-active coating on medical grade CoNiCrMo substrate, hydroxyapatite(HA) coatings were produced via low-temperature dip-coating route on substrates treated using various surface pre-treating methods. The surface and cross-sectional morphologies of HA coatings were observed by SEM, as well as the bonding strength between coatings and substrates after different pre-treatments were characterized according to ASTM C633. The low-temperature HA dip-coating method with the substrate merely oxidized at 600℃ can provide a high quality HA coating for CoNiCrMo, of which the bonding strength reaches (58±5)MPa, higher than that of the clinically used HA coatings on Ti-alloys produced via plasma spray route, as well as a HA coating with full crystallinity and high phase-purity, which is more in-vivo stable than plasma sprayed HA coating.

  4. Enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes to improve biogas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemiński, K; Romanowska, I; Kowalska, M

    2012-06-01

    The effect of enzymatic pretreatment of sugar beet pulp and spent hops prior to methane fermentation was determined in this study. These industrial residues were subjected to enzymatic digestion before anaerobic fermentation because of high fiber content (of 85.1% dry matter (DM) and 57.7% DM in sugar beet pulp and spent hops, respectively). Their 24h hydrolysis with a mix of enzymatic preparations Celustar XL and Agropect pomace (3:1, v/v), with endoglucanase, xylanase and pectinase activities, was most effective. Reducing sugars concentrations in hydrolysates of sugar beet pulp and spent hops were by 88.9% and 59.4% higher compared to undigested materials. The highest yield of biogas was obtained from the enzymatic hydrolysate of sugar beet pulp (183.39 mL/d from 1g COD at fermenter loading with organic matter of 5.43 g COD/L × d). Fermentation of sugar beet pulp gave 19% less biogas. Methane fermentation of spent hops hydrolysate yielded 121.47 mL/d biogas from 1g COD (at 6.02 g COD/L × d, 13% more than from spent hops). These results provide evidence that suitable enzymatic pretreatment of lignocellulosic wastes improve biogas yield from anaerobic fermentation.

  5. Raising aspirations: increasing the participation of students with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (Social Communication Difficulties) in Higher Education: report of the HEFCE strand two disability ASPIHE project

    OpenAIRE

    Blamires, M.; Gee, S; HEFCE strand two disability

    2002-01-01

    The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) funded a Social Communication and Understanding Project in Higher Education (ASPIHE) for a period of two years during 2000-2002. This was a strand two disability project, which aimed to promote and disseminate existing expertise and good practice across the higher education community. The focus was on support for students in higher education who have difficulties in social understanding and communication. This largely consists of studen...

  6. Alkali (NaOH) Pretreatment of Switchgrass by Radio Frequency-based Dielectric Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhu; Wang, Yifen; Wen, Zhiyou

    Radio-frequency (RF)-based dielectric heating was used in the alkali (NaOH) pre-treatment of switchgrass to enhance its enzymatic digestibility. Due to the unique features of RF heating (i.e., volumetric heat transfer, deep heat penetration of the samples, etc.), switchgrass could be treated on a large scale, high solid content, and uniform temperature profile. At 20% solid content, RF-assisted alkali pretreatment (at 0.1 g NaOH/g biomass loading and 90°C) resulted in a higher xylose yield than the conventional heating pretreatment. The enzymatic hydrolysis of RF-treated solids led to a higher glucose yield than the corresponding value obtained from conventional heating treatment. When the solid content exceeded 25%, conventional heating could not handle this high-solid sample due to the loss of fluidity, poor mixing, and heating transfer of the samples. As a result, there was a significantly lower sugar yield, but the sugar yield of the RF-based pretreatment process was still maintained at high levels. Furthermore, the optimal particle size and alkali loading in the RF pretreatment was determined as 0.25-0.50 mm and 0.25 g NaOH/g biomass, respectively. At alkali loading of 0.20-0.25 g NaOH/g biomass, heating temperature of 90°C, and solid content of 20%, the glucose, xylose, and total sugar yield from the combined RF pretreatment and the enzymatic hydrolysis were 25.3, 21.2, and 46.5 g/g biomass, respectively.

  7. Pretreatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis for Microbial Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Zheng

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The influences of five pretreatments on fungal growth and enzyme production during microbial transformation of Dioscorea zingiberensis (DZW were studied. The biomass, α-rhamnase and β-glucosidase activities in the fermentation system were employed in the study to determine how each method affected the efficiency of microbial transformation. The fungal strain grew better on the substrate which contained easily utilized carbon source. While lack of carbon source induced the strain produce more glucosidase. Among five pretreatment methods, complex enzymatic hydrolyzation can remove 84.3% starch and 76.5% fibre from DZW in form of sugar, which resulted in high α-rhamnase activity of 2.89 IU/mL and β-glucosidase activity of 8.17 IU/mL in fermentation broth.

  8. Effect of pretreatment severity in continuous steam explosion on enzymatic conversion of wheat straw: Evidence from kinetic analysis of hydrolysis time courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monschein, Mareike; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on continuous steam explosion, the influence of pretreatment severity due to varied acid loading on hydrolysis of wheat straw by Trichoderma reesei cellulases was investigated based on kinetic evaluation of the saccharification of each pretreated substrate. Using semi-empirical descriptors of the hydrolysis time course, key characteristics of saccharification efficiency were captured in a quantifiable fashion. Not only hydrolysis rates per se, but also the transition point of their bi-phasic decline was crucial for high saccharification degree. After 48h the highest saccharification was achieved for substrate pretreated at relatively low severity (1.2% acid). Higher severity increased enzyme binding to wheat straw, but reduced the specific hydrolysis rates. Higher affinity of the lignocellulosic material for cellulases does not necessarily result in increased saccharification, probably because of lignin modifications occurring at high pretreatment severities. At comparable severity, continuous pretreatment produced a substrate more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis than the batch process.

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF FUEL CELLS TO RECOVER ENERGY FROM LANDFILL GAS: PHASE II. PRETREATMENT SYSTEM PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes Phase II of a demonstration of the utilization of commercial phosphoric acid fuel cells to recover energy from landfill gas. This phase consisted primarily of the construction and testing of a Gas Pretreatment Unit (GPU) whose function is to remove those impu...

  10. Co-firing of biomass with coal: constraints and role of biomass pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewska, A.K.; Veringa, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Peteves, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    This report aims at introducing the aspects of co-firing of biomass with coal. The main focus is given to problems and constraints related to utilizing biomass together with coal for power generation, and the potential of biomass pre-treatment in mitigating these constraints. The work is based on a

  11. Co-firing of biomass with coal: constraints and role of biomass pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maciejewska, A.K.; Veringa, H.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Peteves, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    This report aims at introducing the aspects of co-firing of biomass with coal. The main focus is given to problems and constraints related to utilizing biomass together with coal for power generation, and the potential of biomass pre-treatment in mitigating these constraints. The work is based on a

  12. The association of pretreatment thrombocytosis with prognosis and clinicopathological significance in cervical cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Yan, Ronghua; Liang, Changyan; Wang, Jia; Yi, Mixuan

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies reported inconsistent findings about the relationship between pretreatment thrombocytosis and survival in patients with cervical cancer. This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in cervical cancer. We searched databases to identify relevant articles. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs), odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Fourteen studies including 3,394 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis. Overall, an elevated platelet count was significantly associated with inferior overall survival (OS, hazard ratio [HR]: 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.42–1.95, P thrombocytosis status was significantly associated with higher clinical stage (odd ratio [OR]: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.68–3.38, P thrombocytosis is an independent prognosis predictor in cervical cancer patients. It may be used as a readily available biomarker to refine clinical outcome prediction for cervical cancer patients. PMID:28212582

  13. Fuel ethanol production from corn stover under optimized dilute phosphoric acid pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethanol is a renewable oxygenated fuel. Dilute acid pretreatment is a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol. Generation of fermentable sugars from corn stover involves pretreatment and enzymatic saccharification. Pretreatment is crucial as nat...

  14. Mass loss controlled thermal pretreatment system to assess the effects of pretreatment temperature on organic matter solubilization and methane yield from food waste.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Minale Yeshanew

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of thermal pretreatment (TP on the main characteristics of food waste (FW and its biochemical methane potential (BMP and distribution of volatile fatty acids (VFAs under mesophilic condition (35 ⁰C were investigated. The TP experiments were carried out at 80 °C, 100 °C, 120 °C for 2 hour and 140 °C for 1 hour. The designed TP set-up was able to minimize the organic matter loss during the course of the pretreatments. Soluble organic fractions evaluated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (COD and soluble protein increased linearly with pretreatment temperature. In contrast, the carbohydrate solubilization was more enhanced (30 % higher solubilization by the TP at lower temperature (80 °C. A slight increment of soluble phenols was found, particularly for temperatures exceeding 100 °C. Thermally pretreated FW under all conditions exhibited an improved methane yield than the untreated FW, due to the increased organic matter solubilization. The highest cumulative methane yield of 442 (± 8.6 mL/gVSadded, corresponding to a 28.1 % enhancement compared to the untreated FW, was obtained with a TP at 80 °C. No significant variation in the VFAs trends were observed during the BMP tests under all investigated conditions.

  15. Study of Biogas Production Rate from Water Hyacinth by Hydrothermal Pretreatment with Buffalo Dung as a Starter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teguh Kurniawan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the effects of hydrothermal pretreatment on biogas enhancement production rates from water hyacinth mixed with buffalo dung. The focus of the experiment was on the time of hydrothermal pretreatment and the ratio of water hyacinth with buffalo dung. The hydrothermal pretreated substrates were characterized by TDS, BOD and pH. The hydrothermal pretreatment of 60 minutes with the ratio of water hyacinth to buffalo dung 1:2 showed the highest biogas production rate at 7889 ml/day. However, the highest methane composition was 52.82% which resulted on the hydrothermal treatment of 30 minutes with equal ratio of water hyacinth and buffalo dung. Thus, the optimum of methane yield obtained at hydrothermal pretreatment for 30 minutes with equal ratio of water hyacinth to buffalo dung is 2856 ml/day. The hydrothermal pretreatment increases the rate production of biogas 102% and the methane yield 51% relative to untreated water hyacinth. The ratio of water hyacinth and buffalo dung has a great impact on biogas production rate and compositions for hydrothermal pretreated substrates.

  16. Session 4: Improved middle distillate selectivity using pre-treated catalytic cracking catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimm, D.L.; Chia, D.A. [New South Wales Univ., School of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, Sydney (Australia)

    2004-07-01

    Demand for transport fuels has led to refining practices designed to maximize yields of middle distillate. One such practice involves the addition of light hydrocarbons to the bottom of the riser of a fluid catalytic cracker. Coke, deposited on the most acidic sites of a fresh catalyst, is suggested to limit over-cracking and maximize the yield of middle distillate. Mandal et al. found optimal results with the deposition of 0.2 - 0.3 wt % coke. An attempt to explore this finding using an equilibrated catalyst was unsuccessful and, as a result, the mechanism of the reaction has been explored using squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}) cracking as a test system. All catalyst testing was carried out using a standard micro-activity test unit. Squalane was injected through 0.1 - 5 g catalyst mounted in a heated reactor. Gases and liquids were analysed using gas chromatography. Industrially equilibrated catalyst was fully characterized. Significant changes in the physical and chemical properties of the original catalyst (AKZO Access 908 ABP) were observed. Separate samples were coked to 1.4, 2.5 and 3.4 mass %, and other samples were treated by soaking in 25 mass % ammonia solution, drying and calcining (523 K: 1 h: 923 K: 5.5 h). Results reported are the average of 10 experiments (standard deviation of less than 2%). Initial experiments were carried out to compare the reactions of squalane over equilibrium catalyst with and without pre-treatment. All pre-treatments were found to decrease conversion, with pre-coking having a significant effect on LCO yield and on further coke formation. The results were consistent with pore blocking effects, and comparisons were made with an ammonia pre-treated catalyst where the pore structure remained the same. Compared to the equilibrated catalyst, it was surprising to find higher yields of lower molecular weight compounds at the expense of C{sub 7}{sup +} products, both at 38 and 65 mass % conversion. Hydrogen transfer reactions are known to

  17. Short Term, Low Dose Simvastatin Pretreatment Alters Memory Immune Function Following Secondary Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smelser, Lisa K; Walker, Callum; Burns, Erin M; Curry, Michael; Black, Nathanael; Metzler, Jennifer A; McDowell, Susan A; Bruns, Heather A

    Statins are potent modulators of immune responses, resulting in their ability to enhance host survival from primary bacterial infections. Alterations in primary immune responses that may be beneficial for survival following infection may also result in alterations in the generation of the immunologic memory response and subsequently affect immune responses mounted during secondary bacterial infection. In this study, we report that levels of total serum IgG2c, following primary infection, were decreased in simvastatin pretreated mice, and investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment, prior to primary infection, on immune responses activated during secondary S. aureus infection. A secondary infection model was implemented whereby simvastatin pretreated and control mice were reinfected with S. aureus 14 days after primary infection, with no additional simvastatin treatment, and assessed for survival and alterations in immune function. While survivability to secondary S. aureus infection was not different between simvastatin pretreated and control mice, memory B and T lymphocyte functions were altered. Memory B cells, isolated 14 days after secondary infection, from simvastatin pretreated mice and stimulated ex vivo produced increased levels of IgG1 compared to memory B cells isolated from control mice, while levels of IgM and IgG2c remained similar. Furthermore, memory B and T lymphocytes from simvastatin pretreated mice exhibited a decreased proliferative response when stimulated ex vivo compared to memory cells isolated from control mice. These findings demonstrate the ability of a short term, low dose simvastatin treatment to modulate memory immune function.

  18. Ethanol Fermentation of Various Pretreated and Hydrolyzed Substrates at Low Initial pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kádár, Zsófia; Maltha, San Feng; Szengyel, Zsolt; Réczey, Kati; de Laat, Wim

    Lignocellulosic materials represent an abundant feedstock for bioethanol production. Because of their complex structure pretreatment is necessary to make it accessible for enzymatic attack. Steam pretreatment with or without acid catalysts seems to be one of the most promising techniques, which has already been applied for large variety of lignocellulosics in order to improve enzymatic digestibility. During this process a range of toxic compounds (lignin and sugar degradation products) are formed which inhibit ethanol fermentation. In this study, the toxicity of hemicellulose hydrolysates obtained in the steam pretreatment of spruce, willow, and corn stover were investigated in ethanol fermentation tests using a yeast strain, which has been previously reported to have a resistance to inhibitory compounds generated during steam pretreatment. To overcome bacterial contamination, fermentations were carried out at low initial pH. The fermentability of hemicellulose hydrolysates of pretreated lignocellulosic substrates at low pH gave promising results with the economically profitable final 5 vol% ethanol concentration corresponding to 85% of theoretical. Adaptation experiments have shown that inhibitor tolerance of yeast strain can be improved by subsequent transfer of the yeast to inhibitory medium.

  19. FEEDSTOCK PRETREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR PRODUCING ETHANOL FROM WOOD, BARK, AND FOREST RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Energy and environmental issues are among the major concerns facing the global community today. Transportation fuel represents a large proportion of energy consumption, not only in the US, but also world-wide. As fossil fuel is being depleted, new substitutes are needed to provide energy. Ethanol, which has been produced mainly from the fermentation of corn starch in the US, has been regarded as one of the main liquid transportation fuels that can take the place of fossil fuel. However, limitations in the supply of starch are creating a need for different substrates. Forest biomass is believed to be one of the most abundant sources of sugars, although much research has been reported on herbaceous grass, agricultural residue, and municipal waste. The use of biomass sugars entails pretreatment to disrupt the lignin-carbohydrate complex and expose carbohydrates to enzymes. This paper reviews pretreatment technologies from the perspective of their potential use with wood, bark, and forest residues. Acetic acid catalysis is suggested for the first time to be used in steam explosion pretreatment. Its pretreatment economics, as well as that for ammonia fiber explosion pretreatment, is estimated. This analysis suggests that both are promising techniques worthy of further exploration or optimization for commercialization.

  20. Nanoscale understanding of thermal aggregation of whey protein pretreated by transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan; Zhong, Qixin; Hu, Zhixiong

    2013-01-16

    Nanoscale structures of whey protein isolate (WPI) pretreated by microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) and subsequent heating were studied in this work and were correlated to zeta-potential, surface hydrophobicity, thermal denaturation properties, and macroscopic turbidity and viscosity. Dispersions of 5% w/v WPI were pretreated by individual or sequential steps of preheating at 80 °C for 15 min and mTGase, used at 2.0-10.2 U/g WPI for 1-15 h, before adjustment of the pH to 7.0 and to 0-100 mM NaCl for heating at 80 °C for 15 and 90 min. The zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity of WPI increased after all pretreatment steps. Preheating increased cross-linking reactivity of WPI by mTGase, corresponding to significantly increased denaturation temperature. Particle size analysis and atomic force microscopy revealed that structures of sequentially pretreated WPI remained stable after heating at 100 mM NaCl, corresponding to transparent dispersions. Conversely, WPI pretreated by one step aggregated at only 100 mM NaCl and resulted in turbid dispersions. Besides reporting a practical approach to produce transparent beverages, nanoscale phenomena in the present study are important for understanding whey protein structures in relevant applications.

  1. Pre-treatment attachment anxiety predicts change in depressive symptoms in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Leah; Tasca, Giorgio A; Bissada, Hany

    2015-03-01

    Individuals with eating disorders are prone to depressive symptoms. This study examines whether depressive symptoms can change in women who complete intensive day treatment for anorexia and bulimia nervosa (BN), and whether these changes are associated with pre-treatment attachment insecurity. Participants were 141 women with anorexia nervosa restricting type (n = 24), anorexia nervosa binge purge type (n = 30), and BN (n = 87) who completed a day hospital treatment programme for eating disorders. They completed a pre-treatment self-report measure of attachment, and a pre-treatment and post-treatment self-report measure of depressive symptoms. Participants experienced significant reductions in depressive symptoms at post-treatment. Eating disorder diagnosis was not related to these improvements. However, participants lower in attachment anxiety experienced significantly greater improvement in depressive symptoms than those who were higher in attachment anxiety. These results suggest that clinicians may tailor eating disorders treatments to patients' attachment patterns and focus on their pre-occupation with relationships and affect regulation to improve depressive symptoms. That depressive symptoms can decrease in women who complete day hospital treatment for anorexia and BN. That improvements in depressive symptoms do not vary according to eating disorder diagnosis in these women. That patients who complete treatment and who have higher attachment anxiety experience less improvements in depressive symptoms compared to those lower in attachment anxiety. That clinicians may attend to aspects of attachment anxiety, such as need for approval and up-regulation of emotions, to improve depressive symptoms in female patients with eating disorders. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  2. Key factors governing alkaline pretreatment of waste activated sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianli Shi; Li Deng; Fangfang Sun; Jieyu Liang; Xu Deng

    2015-01-01

    Alkaline pretreatment is an effective technology to disintegrate sewage sludge, where alkali dosage and sludge concentration are two important factors. pH value or alkali concentration is usually adjusted in order to deter-mine a proper dosage of alkali. Our work has found that this is not a good strategy. A new parameter, the ratio of alkali to sludge (Ra/s), is more sensitive in controlling the alkali dosage. The sludge concentration Cs and reten-tion time t are two other important factors to consider. The validity of these arguments is confirmed with model-ing and experiments. The individual effect of Ra/s, Cs and t was studied separately. Then the combined effect of these three factors was evaluated. The sludge disintegration degree of 44.7%was achieved with the optimized factors. Furthermore, an alkaline-microwave combined pretreatment process was carried out under these optimized conditions. A high disintegration degree of 62.3%was achieved while the energy consumption of microwave was much lower than previously reported.

  3. Hyaluronic acid pretreatment for Sendai virus-mediated cochlear gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurioka, T; Mizutari, K; Niwa, K; Fukumori, T; Inoue, M; Hasegawa, M; Shiotani, A

    2016-02-01

    Gene therapy with viral vectors is one of the most promising strategies for sensorineural hearing loss. However, safe and effective administration of the viral vector into cochlear tissue is difficult because of the anatomical isolation of the cochlea. We investigated the efficiency and safety of round window membrane (RWM) application of Sendai virus, one of the most promising non-genotoxic vectors, after pretreatment with hyaluronic acid (HA) on the RWM to promote efficient viral translocation into the cochlea. Sendai virus expressing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene was detected throughout cochlear tissues following application combined with HA pretreatment. Quantitative analysis revealed that maximum expression was reached 3 days after treatment. The efficiency of transgene expression was several 100-fold greater with HA pretreatment than that without. Furthermore, unlike the conventional intracochlear delivery methods, this approach did not cause hearing loss. These findings reveal the potential utility of gene therapy with Sendai virus and HA for treatment of sensorineural hearing loss.

  4. Addressing reverse osmosis fouling within water reclamation--a side-by-side comparison of low-pressure membrane pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Fraser C; Farahbakhsh, Khosrow

    2011-06-01

    A tertiary membrane filtration (TMF) pilot operating on secondary effluent and a membrane bioreactor (MBR) were setup in a side-by-side study as pretreatments for two identical reverse osmosis pilot systems. The water quality of the permeate from both low-pressure membrane pretreatment systems and the fouling rate of the reverse osmosis systems were compared to assess the capabilities of the two low-pressure membrane pretreatments to prevent organic fouling of the reverse osmosis systems. Both pretreatment pilots were setup using typical operating conditions (i.e., solids retention time and mixed-liquor suspended solids). A consistent difference in water quality and reverse osmosis performance was demonstrated during the 12-month study. The MBR permeate consistently had significantly lower total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand concentrations, but higher color and specific UV absorbance compared with the permeate from the TMF pretreatment. The pretreatment with the MBR gave an average reverse osmosis fouling rate over the entire study (0.27 Lmh/bar.month) that was less than half of the value found for the reverse osmosis with TMF pretreatment (0.60 Lmh/bar.month). A correlation of reverse osmosis feed TOC concentration with average reverse osmosis fouling rate also was established, independent of the pretreatment method used. Results from a cleaning analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and fourier transformed infrared reflectometry confirmed that the foulants were primarily organic in nature. It is concluded that, for this type of application and setup, MBR systems present an advantage over tertiary membrane polishing of secondary effluent for reverse osmosis pretreatment.

  5. Evaluation of high solids alkaline pretreatment of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Shen; Zheng, Yi; Yu, Chao Wei; Dooley, Todd M; Jenkins, Bryan M; VanderGheynst, Jean S

    2010-11-01

    Fresh-harvested, air-dried rice straw was pretreated at a water content of 5 g H(2)O/g straw using sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and compared to pretreatment at 10 g H(2)O/g straw by hydrated lime (Ca(OH)(2)). Full factorial experiments including parallel wash-only treatments were completed with both sources of alkali. The experiments were designed to measure the effects of alkaline loading and pretreatment time on delignification and sugar yield upon enzymatic hydrolysis. Reaction temperature was held constant at 95 degrees C for lime pretreatment and 55 degrees C for NaOH pretreatment. The range of delignification was 13.1% to 27.0% for lime pretreatments and was 8.6% to 23.1% for NaOH pretreatments. Both alkaline loading and reaction time had significant positive effects (p pretreatment at 95 degrees C, but there was little effect observed at 55 degrees C. Post-pretreatment washing of biomass was not necessary for subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. Maximum glucose yields were 176.3 mg/g dried biomass (48.5% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in lime-pretreated and unwashed biomass and were 142.3 mg/g dried biomass (39.2% conversion efficiency of total glucose) in NaOH-pretreated and unwashed biomass.

  6. Hydrolyzabilities of different corn stover fractions after aqueous ammonia pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongping; Ge, Xiaoyan; Xin, Donglin; Zhang, Junhua

    2014-02-01

    The effect of aqueous ammonia pretreatment on the hydrolysis of different corn stover fractions (rind, husk, leaf, and pith) by xylanase (XYL) with cellulases (CELs) was evaluated. The aqueous ammonia pretreatment had excellent delignification ability (above 66%) for different corn stover fractions. The corn rind exhibited the lowest susceptibility to aqueous ammonia pretreatment. The pretreated rind showed the lowest hydrolyzability by CEL and XYL, which was supported by a high content of crystalline cellulose in the hydrolyzed residues of rind, as confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD). With the addition of 1 mg XYL/g dry matter, a high glucose yield (above 90%) could be obtained from the pretreated rind by CEL. The results revealed that a high hydrolyzate yield of corn rind after aqueous ammonia pretreatment could be obtained with 1 mg xylanase/g dry matter, showing that aqueous ammonia pretreatment and xylanase addition to cellulases have great potential for the efficient hydrolysis of corn stover without previous fractionation.

  7. Dilute acid pretreatment of lignocellulose for whole slurry ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Young Hoon; Kim, In Jung; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Kyoung Heon

    2013-03-01

    Dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) followed by the whole slurry fermentation of the pretreated EFB slurry was investigated. The optimized pretreatment conditions were at 1% (w/v) sulfuric acid with 3 min ramping to 190 °C in a microwave digester. Pretreated and washed EFB exhibited enzymatic digestibility of 88.5% of theoretical glucose yield after 48 h of hydrolysis. When the whole slurry of pretreated and neutralized EFB was used in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) using cellulase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, sulfuric acid-pretreated EFB resulted in 52.5% of theoretical ethanol yield based on total glucan in the untreated initial EFB after 72 h of SSF. When pretreated EFB slurry was treated with activated carbon before subjecting to SSF, the SSF furnished 87.5% ethanol yield based on the initial glucan content in untreated EFB (after 48 h of SSF). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Recyclability of an ionic liquid for biomass pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerachanchai, Piyarat; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the possibility of reusing an ionic liquid for the pretreatment of biomass. The effects of lignin and water content in a pretreatment solvent on pretreatment products were examined, along with the recyclability of an ionic liquid for pretreatment. It was discovered that the presence of lignin and water within a pretreatment solvent resulted in a far less effective pretreatment process. 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate/ethanolamine (60/40 vol%) presents more promising properties than EMIM-AC, providing a small decrease in sugar conversion and also a small increase of lignin deposition with an increasing lignin amount in the pretreatment solvent. Deteriorations of the ionic liquid were observed from considerably low sugar conversions and lignin extraction after using the 5th and 7th batch, respectively. Furthermore, the changes of ionic liquid properties and lignin accumulation in ionic liquid were determined by analyzing their thermal decomposition behavior (TGA) and chemical functional groups (FTIR and (1)H NMR).

  9. Prewashing enhances the liquid hot water pretreatment efficiency of waste wheat straw with high free ash content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Wu, Xinxing; Huang, Yang; Lai, Chenhuan; Li, Xin; Yong, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    The effect of prewashing process prior to the liquid hot water (LHW) pretreatment of high free ash content waste wheat straw (WWS) was investigated. It was found that prewashing process decreased the ash content of WWS greatly, from 29.48% to 9.82%. This contributed to the lower pH value of prehydrolyzate and higher xylan removal in the following LHW pretreatment. More importantly, the prewashing process effectively increased the cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of pretreated WWS, from 53.04% to 84.15%. The acid buffering capacity (ABC) and cation exchange capacity (CEC) of raw and prewashed WWS were examined. The majority of free ash removal from WWS by prewashing resulted in the decrease of the ABC of the WWS from 211.74 to 61.81mmol/pH-kg, and potentially enhancing the efficiency of the follow-up LHW pretreatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of extruder temperature and screw speed on pretreatment of corn stover while varying enzymes and their ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanithy, Chinnadurai; Muthukumarappan, Kasiviswanathan

    2010-09-01

    Pretreatment is being the first and most expensive step, it has pervasive impacts on all other steps in overall conversion process. There are several pretreatment methods using physical, chemical, and biological principles which are under various stages of investigation. Extrusion can be used as one of the physical pretreatment methods towards biofuel production. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of barrel temperature and screw speed on sugar recovery from corn stover, to select a suitable enzyme combination and its ratio. Corn stover was pretreated in a single screw extruder with five screw speeds (25, 50, 75, 100, and 125 rpm) and five barrel temperatures (25, 50, 75, 100, and 125 degrees C). In order to select a suitable enzyme combination and ratio, different levels of cellulase and beta-glucosidase, multienzyme complex and beta-glucosidase were used during saccharification of pretreated corn stover. From the statistical analysis, it was found that screw speed and temperature had a significant effect on sugar recovery from corn stover. Higher glucose, xylose, and combined sugar recovery of 75, 49, and 61%, respectively, were recorded at 75 rpm and 125 degrees C. This pretreatment condition resulted in 2.0, 1.7, and 2.0 times higher than the control sample using 1:4 cellulase and beta-glucosidase combination.

  11. Exploring surface characterization and electrostatic property of Hybrid Pennisetum during alkaline sulfite pretreatment for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Wang, Jingfeng; Hou, Xincun; Wu, Juying; Fan, Xifeng; Jiang, Fan; Tao, Pan; Wang, Fan; Peng, Pai; Yang, Fangxia; Zhang, Junhua

    2017-11-01

    The surface characterization and electrostatic property of Hybrid Pennisetum (HP) after alkaline sulfite pretreatment were explored for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysability. The O/C ratio in HP increased from 0.34 to 0.60, and C1 concentration decreased from 62.5% to 31.6%, indicating that alkaline sulfite pretreatment caused poorer lignin but richer carbohydrate on HP surface. Zeta potential and sulfur element analysis indicated that more enzymes would preferably adsorb on the carbohydrate surface of alkaline sulfite pretreated HP because the lignin was sulfonated, which facilitated the decrease of non-productive adsorption. Glucose yield of alkaline sulfite pretreated HP reached to 100% by synergistic action of cellulase and xylanase in the hydrolysis, which was significantly higher than that of NaOH pretreated, and the concentration of glucose released was 1.52times higher. The results suggested that alkaline sulfite pretreatment had potential for improving the HP hydrolysability, and the surface characterization and electrostatic property facilitated the enzymatic digestibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of arabinogalactan and dihydroquercetin simultaneously from Larix gmelinii as a pretreatment for pulping and papermaking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Ma

    Full Text Available An ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE method using ethanol was applied for extracting arabinogalactan (AG and dihydroquercetin (DHQ simultaneously from larch wood, as a pretreatment for pulping and papermaking. The extraction parameters were optimized by a Box-Behnken experimental design with the yields of AG and DHQ as the response values. Under optimum conditions (three extractions, each using 40% ethanol, for 50 min, 200 W ultrasound power and 1∶18 solid-liquid ratio, the yields of AG and DHQ were 183.4 and 36.76 mg/g, respectively. After UAE pretreated, the wood chips were used for Kraft pulping (KP and high boiling solvent pulping (HBSP. The pulping yield after pretreatment was higher than that of untreated (the pulping yields of untreated HBSP and KP were 42.37% and 39.60%, and the pulping yields of HBSP and KP after UAE-pretreated were 44.23% and 41.50% respectively, as indicated by a lower kappa number (77.91 and 27.30 for untreated HBSP and KP; 77.01 and 26.83 for UAE-pretreated HBSP and KP. Furthermore, the characteristics of paper produced from pretreated wood chips were superior to those from the untreated chips: the basis weight was lower (85.67 and 82.48 g·cm(-2 for paper from untreated KP and HBSP; 79.94 and 80.25 g·cm(-2 for paper from UAE-pretreated KP and HBSP, and the tensile strengths, tearing strengths, bursting strengths, and folding strengths were higher than these of paper after UAE-pretreated, respectively.

  13. Application of high throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis system to thermochemical pretreatment. Part 2: Dilute alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjia; Gao, Xiadi; Demartini, Jaclyn D; Kumar, Rajeev; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    High throughput pretreatment (HTPH) and enzymatic hydrolysis systems are now vital for screening large numbers of biomass samples to investigate biomass recalcitrance over various pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Although hydrothermal pretreatment is currently being employed in most high throughput applications, thermochemical pretreatment at low and high pH conditions can offer additional insights to better understand the roles of hemicellulose and lignin, respectively, in defining biomass recalcitrance. Thus, after successfully applying the HTPH approach to dilute acid pretreatment [Gao et al. (2012) Biotechnol. Bioeng. 110(3): 754-762], extension to dilute alkali pretreatment was also achieved using a similar single-step neutralization and buffering concept. In the latter approach, poplar and switchgrass were pretreated with 1 wt% sodium hydroxide at 120°C for different reaction times. Following pretreatment, an H₂Cit⁻/HCit²⁻ buffer with a pH of 4.5 was used to condition the pretreatment slurry to a pH range of 4.69-4.89, followed by enzymatic hydrolysis for 72 h of the entire mixture. Sugar yields showed different trends for poplar and switchgrass with increases in pretreatment times, demonstrating the method provided a clearly discernible screening tool at alkali conditions. This method was then applied to selected Populus tremuloides samples to follow ring-by-ring sugar release patterns. Observed variations were compared to results from hydrothermal pretreatments, providing new insights in understanding the influence of biomass structural differences on recalcitrance.

  14. Pretreatment of Reed by Wet Oxidation and Subsequent Utilization of the Pretreated Fibers for Ethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szijarto, Nora; Kádár, Zsófia; Varga, Eniko

    2009-01-01

    lignocelluloses usually do. In the present study, wet oxidation was investigated as the pretreatment method to enhance the enzymatic digestibility of reed cellulose to soluble sugars and thus improve the convertibility of reed to ethanol. The most effective treatment increased the digestibility of reed cellulose...... by cellulases more than three times compared to the untreated control. During this wet oxidation, 51.7% of the hemicellulose and 58.3% of the lignin were solubilized, whereas 87.1% of the cellulose remained in the solids. After enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated fibers from the same treatment, the conversion......Common reed (Phragmites australis) is often recognized as a promising source of renewable energy. However, it is among the least characterized crops from the bioethanol perspective. Although one third of reed dry matter is cellulose, without pretreatment, it resists enzymatic hydrolysis like...

  15. Effect of Different Pretreatment of Sugar Cane Bagasse on Cellulase and Xylanases Production by the Mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 Grown in Submerged Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Marli Camassola; Dillon, Aldo J.P.

    2014-01-01

    The main limitation to the industrial scale hydrolysis of cellulose is the cost of cellulase production. This study evaluated cellulase and xylanase enzyme production by the cellulolytic mutant Penicillium echinulatum 9A02S1 using pretreated sugar cane bagasse as a carbon source. Most cultures grown with pretreated bagasse showed similar enzymatic activities to or higher enzymatic activities than cultures grown with cellulose or untreated sugar cane bagasse. Higher filter paper activity (1.25...

  16. Rheological evaluation of pretreated cladding removal waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, D.; Chan, M.K.C.; Lokken, R.O.

    1986-01-01

    Cladding removal waste (CRW) contains concentrations of transuranic (TRU) elements in the 80 to 350 nCi/g range. This waste will require pretreatment before it can be disposed of as glass or grout at Hanford. The CRW will be pretreated with a rare earth strike and solids removal by centrifugation to segregate the TRU fraction from the non-TRU fraction of the waste. The centrifuge centrate will be neutralized with sodium hydroxide. This neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) is expected to be suitable for grouting. The TRU solids removed by centrifugation will be vitrified. The goal of the Rheological Evaluation of Pretreated Cladding Removal Waste Program was to evaluate those rheological and transport properties critical to assuring successful handling of the NCRW and TRU solids streams and to demonstrate transfers in a semi-prototypic pumping environment. This goal was achieved by a combination of laboratory and pilot-scale evaluations. The results obtained during these evaluations were correlated with classical rheological models and scaled-up to predict the performance that is likely to occur in the full-scale system. The Program used simulated NCRW and TRU solid slurries. Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) provided 150 gallons of simulated CRW and 5 gallons of simulated TRU solid slurry. The simulated CRW was neutralized by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The physical and rheological properties of the NCRW and TRU solid slurries were evaluated in the laboratory. The properties displayed by NCRW allowed it to be classified as a pseudoplastic or yield-pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid. The TRU solids slurry contained very few solids. This slurry exhibited the properties associated with a pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid.

  17. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pretreated Coconut Coir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbarningrum Fatmawati

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to study the effect of concentration and temperature on the cellulose and lignin content, and the reducing sugars produced in the enzymatic hydrolysis of coconut coir. In this research, the coconut coir is pretreated using 3%, 7%, and 11% NaOH solution at 60oC, 80oC, and 100oC. The pretreated coir were assayed by measuring the amount of cellulose and lignin and then hydrolysed using Celluclast and Novozyme 188 under various temperature (30oC, 40oC, 50oC and pH (3, 4, 5. The hydrolysis results were assayed for the reducing sugar content. The results showed that the alkaline delignification was effective to reduce lignin and to increase the cellulose content of the coir. The best delignification condition was observed at 11% NaOH solution and 100oC which removed 14,53% of lignin and increased the cellulose content up to 50,23%. The best condition of the enzymatic hydrolysis was obtained at 50oC and pH 4 which produced 7,57 gr/L reducing sugar. © 2013 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 2nd October 2012; Revised: 31st January 2013; Accepted: 6th February 2013[How to Cite: Fatmawati, A., Agustriyanto, R., Liasari, Y. (2013. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Pre-treated Coconut Coir. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 8 (1: 34-39 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39[Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.8.1.4048.34-39] | View in  |

  18. Surface pretreatments for medical application of adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Michael

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Medical implants and prostheses (artificial hips, tendono- and ligament plasties usually are multi-component systems that may be machined from one of three material classes: metals, plastics and ceramics. Typically, the body-sided bonding element is bone. The purpose of this contribution is to describe developments carried out to optimize the techniques , connecting prosthesis to bone, to be joined by an adhesive bone cement at their interface. Although bonding of organic polymers to inorganic or organic surfaces and to bone has a long history, there remains a serious obstacle in realizing long-term high-bonding strengths in the in vivo body environment of ever present high humidity. Therefore, different pretreatments, individually adapted to the actual combination of materials, are needed to assure long term adhesive strength and stability against hydrolysis. This pretreatment for metal alloys may be silica layering; for PE-plastics, a specific plasma activation; and for bone, amphiphilic layering systems such that the hydrophilic properties of bone become better adapted to the hydrophobic properties of the bone cement. Amphiphilic layering systems are related to those developed in dentistry for dentine bonding. Specific pretreatment can significantly increase bond strengths, particularly after long term immersion in water under conditions similar to those in the human body. The bond strength between bone and plastic for example can be increased by a factor approaching 50 (pealing work increasing from 30 N/m to 1500 N/m. This review article summarizes the multi-disciplined subject of adhesion and adhesives, considering the technology involved in the formation and mechanical performance of adhesives joints inside the human body.

  19. Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2008-07-15

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

  20. Pomalidomide in heavily pretreated refractory multiple myeloma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmas, Angelo; Piras, Giovanna; Uras, Antonella; Asproni, Rosanna; Murineddu, Marco; Monne, Maria; Stradoni, Roberta; Latte, Giancarlo

    2017-02-01

    We present the case of a 70-year-old man diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2008, who after four therapy lines initiated a fifth-line treatment with pomalidomide (4 mg orally, days 1-21 of a 28-day cycle) and low-dose dexamethasone (40 mg weekly orally). The patient was treated with pomalidomide for almost 2 years achieving a complete remission after 12 cycles. Complete remission was maintained for 9 months. This case illustrates the potential of pomalidomide plus low-dose dexamethasone to overcome multiple myeloma refractoriness inducing a quick and very prolonged remission.

  1. Pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corredor, Deisy Y.

    The performance of soybean hulls and forage sorghum as feedstocks for ethanol production was studied. The main goal of this research was to increase fermentable sugars' yield through high-efficiency pretreatment technology. Soybean hulls are a potential feedstock for production of bio-ethanol due to their high carbohydrate content (≈50%) of nearly 37% cellulose. Soybean hulls could be the ideal feedstock for fuel ethanol production, because they are abundant and require no special harvesting and additional transportation costs as they are already in the plant. Dilute acid and modified steam-explosion were used as pretreatment technologies to increase fermentable sugars yields. Effects of reaction time, temperature, acid concentration and type of acid on hydrolysis of hemicellulose in soybean hulls and total sugar yields were studied. Optimum pretreatment parameters and enzymatic hydrolysis conditions for converting soybean hulls into fermentable sugars were identified. The combination of acid (H2SO4, 2% w/v) and steam (140°C, 30 min) efficiently solubilized the hemicellulose, giving a pentose yield of 96%. Sorghum is a tropical grass grown primarily in semiarid and dry parts of the world, especially in areas too dry for corn. The production of sorghum results in about 30 million tons of byproducts mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Forage sorghum such as brown midrib (BMR) sorghum for ethanol production has generated much interest since this trait is characterized genetically by lower lignin concentrations in the plant compared with conventional types. Three varieties of forage sorghum and one variety of regular sorghum were characterized and evaluated as feedstock for fermentable sugar production. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction were used to determine changes in structure and chemical composition of forage sorghum before and after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis

  2. Safety of Statin Pretreatment in Intravenous Thrombolysis for Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kadlecová, Pavla; Kobayashi, Adam; Czlonkowska, Anna; Brozman, Miroslav; Švigelj, Viktor; Csiba, Laszlo; Kõrv, Janika; Demarin, Vida; Vilionskis, Aleksandras; Jatuzis, Dalius; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Rudolf, Jobst; Krespi, Yakup; Mikulik, Robert

    2015-09-01

    A recent meta-analysis investigating the association between statins and early outcomes in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients treated with intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) indicated that prestroke statin treatment was associated with increased risk of 90-day mortality and symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. We investigated the potential association of statin pretreatment with early outcomes in a large, international registry of AIS patients treated with IVT. We analyzed prospectively collected data from the Safe Implementation of Treatments in Stroke-East registry (SITS-EAST) registry on consecutive AIS patients treated with IVT during an 8-year period. Early clinical recovery within 24 hours was defined as reduction in baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score of ≥10 points. Favorable functional outcome at 3 months was defined as modified Rankin Scale scores of 0 to 1. Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was diagnosed using National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, European-Australasian Acute Stroke Study-II and SITS definitions. A total of 1660 AIS patients treated with IVT fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Patients with statin pretreatment (23%) had higher baseline stroke severity compared with cases who had not received any statin at symptom onset. After adjusting for potential confounders, statin pretreatment was not associated with a higher likelihood of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage defined by any of the 3 definitions. Statin pretreatment was not related to 3-month all-cause mortality (odds ratio, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-1.49; P=0.741) or 3-month favorable functional outcome (odds ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.27; P=0.364). Statin pretreatment was independently associated with a higher odds of early clinical recovery (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-2.92; P=0.003). Statin pretreatment seems not to be associated with adverse outcomes in AIS patients treated with IVT. The effect

  3. A comparison of pretreatment methods for the analysis of phosphate oxygen isotope ratios in bioapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Vaughan; Pellegrini, Maura

    2013-02-15

    The integrity of the biological phosphate oxygen isotope (δ(18)O(p) ) signal is thought to be contingent upon the complete removal of competing sources of oxygen such as associated organic matter. A range of pretreatment methods to purify phosphate material from competing sources of oxygen has been reported, with contradictory evidence on the usefulness and efficiency of one or another. Yet, a systematic comparison of these techniques for bioapatite phosphate has not been conducted. Chemical and thermal pretreatment techniques were tested for their effectiveness at removing organic matter and the likelihood that they modify original δ(18)O values. The test was performed in inorganic (synthetic apatite and a phosphorite rock) and organic (bone and tooth tissues) phosphate materials for which we had an expectation of the actual original δ(18)O(p) value. Analysis of nitrogen content (wt.%), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were employed. We detected variable efficiency at removing organic matter between pretreatment methods with no correlation to any specific structural change. The δ(18)O(p) results showed considerable variation between samples pretreated with the different methods and the untreated samples, with a compositional range of up to 4.5 ‰ in the bone samples. Variations of the δ(18)O(p) values within error were found for tooth enamel, phosphorite rock and inorganic apatite. We recommend a cautious approach when interpreting and comparing δ(18)O(p) data from bone samples treated with different pretreatment protocols. In general, the untreated samples seem to show δ(18)O(p) values closer to the expected ones. According to our results, pretreatment is completely unnecessary in highly mineralized tissues. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.

  5. Evaluation of efficient glucose release using sodium hydroxide and phosphoric acid as pretreating agents from the biomass of Sesbania grandiflora (L.) Pers.: A fast growing tree legume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mund, Nitesh K; Dash, Debabrata; Barik, Chitta R; Goud, Vaibhav V; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Mishra, Prasannajit; Nayak, Nihar R

    2017-07-01

    Sesbania grandiflora (L.) Pers. is one of the fast growing tree legumes having the efficiency to produce around 50tha(-1) above ground dry matters in a year. In this study, biomass of 2years old S. grandiflora was selected for the chemical composition, pretreatments and enzymatic hydrolysis studies. The stem biomass with a wood density of 3.89±0.01gmcm(-3) contains about 38% cellulose, 12% hemicellulose and 28% lignin. Enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated biomass revealed that phosphoric acid (H3PO4) pretreated samples even at lower cellulase loadings [1 Filter Paper Units (FPU)], could efficiently convert about 86% glucose, while, even at higher cellulase loadings (60FPU) alkali pretreated biomass could convert only about 58% glucose. The effectiveness of phosphoric acid pretreatment was also supported by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optimization of alkaline sulfite pretreatment and comparative study with sodium hydroxide pretreatment for improving enzymatic digestibility of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Pang, Bo; Wang, Haisong; Li, Haiming; Lu, Jie; Niu, Meihong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, alkaline sulfite pretreatment of corn stover was optimized. The influences of pretreatments on solid yield, delignification, and carbohydrate recovery under different pretreatment conditions and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis were investigated. The effect of pretreatment was evaluated by enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency and the total sugar yield. The optimum pretreatment conditions were obtained, as follows: the total titratable alkali (TTA) of 12%, liquid/solid ratio of 6:1, temperature of 140 °C, and holding time of 20 min. Under those conditions, the solid yield was 55.24%, and the removal of lignin was 82.68%. Enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan for pretreated corn stover were 85.38% and 70.36%, and the total sugar yield was 74.73% at cellulase loading of 20 FPU/g and β-glucosidase loading of 10 IU/g for 48 h. Compared with sodium hydroxide pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 10.43%. Additionally, the corn stover pretreated under the optimum pretreatment conditions was beaten by PFI at 1500 revolutions. After beating, enzymatic hydrolysis rates of glucan and xylan were 89.74% and 74.06%, and the total sugar yield was 78.58% at the same enzymatic hydrolysis conditions. Compared with 1500 rpm of PFI beating after sodium pretreatment with the same amount of total titratable alkali, the total sugar yield was raised by about 14.05%.

  7. Pretreatment serum albumin as a predictor of cancer survival: A systematic review of the epidemiological literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis Christopher G

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are several methods of assessing nutritional status in cancer of which serum albumin is one of the most commonly used. In recent years, the role of malnutrition as a predictor of survival in cancer has received considerable attention. As a result, it is reasonable to investigate whether serum albumin has utility as a prognostic indicator of cancer survival in cancer. This review summarizes all available epidemiological literature on the association between pretreatment serum albumin levels and survival in different types of cancer. Methods A systematic search of the literature using the MEDLINE database (January 1995 through June 2010 to identify epidemiologic studies on the relationship between serum albumin and cancer survival. To be included in the review, a study must have: been published in English, reported on data collected in humans with any type of cancer, had serum albumin as one of the or only predicting factor, had survival as one of the outcome measures (primary or secondary and had any of the following study designs (case-control, cohort, cross-sectional, case-series prospective, retrospective, nested case-control, ecologic, clinical trial, meta-analysis. Results Of the 29 studies reviewed on cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, all except three found higher serum albumin levels to be associated with better survival in multivariate analysis. Of the 10 studies reviewed on lung cancer, all excepting one found higher serum albumin levels to be associated with better survival. In 6 studies reviewed on female cancers and multiple cancers each, lower levels of serum albumin were associated with poor survival. Finally, in all 8 studies reviewed on patients with other cancer sites, lower levels of serum albumin were associated with poor survival. Conclusions Pretreatment serum albumin levels provide useful prognostic significance in cancer. Accordingly, serum albumin level could be used in clinical trials to

  8. Hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments plus anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge for dewatering and biogas production: Bench-scale research and pilot-scale verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxing; Wang, Xingdong; Zhang, Guangyi; Yu, Guangwei; Lin, Jingjiang; Wang, Yin

    2017-06-15

    To test the feasibility and practicability of the process combing hydrothermal pretreatment for dewatering with biogas production for full utilization of sewage sludge, hydrothermal/alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments and in turn anaerobic digestion of the filtrates obtained after dewatering the pretreated sludge were performed at bench- and pilot-scales. The hydrothermal temperature fell within the range of 140 °C-220 °C and the pretreatment time varied from 30 min to 120 min. For the alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment the pH value of the sludge was adjusted to 9.0-11.0 by adding Ca(OH)2. The results showed that the dewaterability of the sewage sludge was improved with increasing pretreatment temperature but the impact of the pretreatment time was not significant. The addition of Ca(OH)2 gave better performance on the subsequent mechanical dewatering of the pretreated sludge compared to pure hydrothermal pretreatment, and the higher the pH value was, the better the dewaterability of the pretreated sludge was. The conditions of 180 °C/30 min and 160 °C/60 min/pH = 10.0 (for hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments, respectively) resulted in relatively good results in the theoretical energy balance, which were verified in the pilot-scale tests. Based on the data from the pilot tests, the alkaline hydrothermal process realized self-sufficiency in energy at the cost of a proper amount of CaO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of ultrasonic pretreatment on biomethane potential of two-phase olive mill solid waste: kinetic approach and process performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, B; Bujalance, L; Fermoso, F G; Martín, A; Borja, R

    2014-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound (US) pretreatment on two-phase olive mil solid waste (OMSW) composition and subsequent anaerobic biodegradation was evaluated by chemical oxygen demand solubilization and biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. OMSW was ultrasonically pretreated at a power of 200 W and frequency of 24 kHz for time periods of 20, 40, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes, corresponding to specific energies of 11367, 21121, 34072, 51284, 68557, and 106003 kJ/kg total solids, respectively. In order to evaluate the US pretreatment, a low, medium, and high exposure time, that is, 20, 90, and 180 min, were selected for BMP tests. Methane yields of 311 ± 15, 393 ± 14, and 370 ± 20 mL CH₄/g VSadded (VS: volatile solids) were obtained for 20, 90, and 180 minutes, respectively, while the untreated OMSW gave 373 ± 4 mL CH₄/g VSadded. From a kinetic point of view, the BMP tests showed a first exponential stage and a second sigmoidal stage. In the first stage, the kinetic constant obtained for US pretreated OMSW at 20 minutes was 46% higher than those achieved for the pretreated OMSW at 90 and 180 minutes and 48% higher than that for untreated OMSW. The maximum methane production rate achieved was 12% higher than that obtained for untreated OMSW.

  10. Effect of Ultrasonic Pretreatment on Biomethane Potential of Two-Phase Olive Mill Solid Waste: Kinetic Approach and Process Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, B.; Bujalance, L.; Fermoso, F. G.; Martín, A.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of ultrasound (US) pretreatment on two-phase olive mil solid waste (OMSW) composition and subsequent anaerobic biodegradation was evaluated by chemical oxygen demand solubilization and biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests. OMSW was ultrasonically pretreated at a power of 200 W and frequency of 24 kHz for time periods of 20, 40, 60, 90, 120, and 180 minutes, corresponding to specific energies of 11367, 21121, 34072, 51284, 68557, and 106003 kJ/kg total solids, respectively. In order to evaluate the US pretreatment, a low, medium, and high exposure time, that is, 20, 90, and 180 min, were selected for BMP tests. Methane yields of 311 ± 15, 393 ± 14, and 370 ± 20 mL CH4/g VSadded (VS: volatile solids) were obtained for 20, 90, and 180 minutes, respectively, while the untreated OMSW gave 373 ± 4 mL CH4/g VSadded. From a kinetic point of view, the BMP tests showed a first exponential stage and a second sigmoidal stage. In the first stage, the kinetic constant obtained for US pretreated OMSW at 20 minutes was 46% higher than those achieved for the pretreated OMSW at 90 and 180 minutes and 48% higher than that for untreated OMSW. The maximum methane production rate achieved was 12% higher than that obtained for untreated OMSW. PMID:25197705

  11. Hydrothermal pretreatment conditions to enhance ethanol production from poplar biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negro, Maria José; Manzanares, Paloma; Ballesteros, Ignacio; Oliva, Jose Miguel; Cabañas, Araceli; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2003-01-01

    Pretreatment has been recognized as a key step in enzyme-based conversion processes of lignocellulose biomass to ethanol. The aim of this study is to evaluate two hydrothermal pretreatments (steam explosion and liquid hot water) to enhance ethanol production from poplar (Populus nigra) biomass by a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. The composition of liquid and solid fractions obtained after pretreatment, enzymatic digestibility, and ethanol production of poplar biomass pretreated at different experimental conditions was analyzed. The best results were obtained in steam explosion pretreatment at 210 C and 4 min, taking into account cellulose recovery above 95%, enzymatic hydrolysis yield of about 60%, SSF yield of 60% of theoretical, and 41% xylose recovery in the liquid fraction. Large particles can be used for poplar biomass in both pretreatments, since no significant effect of particle size on enzymatic hydrolysis and SSF was obtained.

  12. The effect of microwave power and heating time pretreatment on biogas production from fresh and dried water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumardiono, Siswo; Budiyono, Mardiani, Dini Tri

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effect of microwave pretreatment of fresh and dried water hyacinth on biogas production. The variations of microwave power levels are 240; 400; 560 and 800 W. The variations of microwave heating time are 5; 7 and 9 min. The unpretreated fresh and dried water hyacinth are used as control. The result of research showed that almost all pretreated water hyacinth produced biogas were higher compare tounpretreated water hyacinth. The maximum of biogas production from fresh and dried water hyacinthwere obtained at 560 W for 7 min and 400 W for 7 min of microwave pretreatment. In this condition, pretreated fresh and dried water hyacinth resulted biogas production of 75,12 and 53,06 mL/g TS, respectively. The unpretreated fresh and dried water hyacinth produced biogas of 37,56 and 33,56 mL/g TS, respectively. The microwave pretreatment of water hyacinth improved biogas production. Microwave pretreatment had a positive impact on anaerobic biodegradability of water hyacinth.

  13. Thermal pretreatment of algae for anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolek, Michael D; Kendall, Elizabeth; Thompson, Phillip L; Shuman, Teodora Rutar

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the benefit of thermal pretreatment on biogas yield from microalgae-fed anaerobic digester mesocosms. Replicate Nanochloropsis oculata cultures were heated for 4h at 30, 60, and 90°C, as well as at a constant temperature of 90°C for 1, 3.5, and 12h. Net biogas production increased from 0.28L biogas/g volatile solids added (VSa) for the control to 0.39 L biogas/g VSa (p<0.01) when heated at 90°C, but there was no improvement at 30 or 60°C. Increased biogas production correlated with increased soluble chemical oxygen demand (COD). Net biogas production increased as a function of heating time, from 0.32 L biogas/g VSa for the control, to 0.41, 0.43, and 0.44 L biogas/g VSa (p<0.05 for all combinations vs. control) when preheated at 90°C for 1, 3.5, and 12h, respectively. However, despite enhanced biogas production the energy balance is negative for thermal pretreatment.

  14. Improvement of Soybean Oil Solvent Extraction through Enzymatic Pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Grasso

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate multienzyme hydrolysis as a pretreatment option to improve soybean oil solvent extraction and its eventual adaptation to conventional processes. Enzymatic action causes the degradation of the cell structures that contain oil. Improvements in terms of extraction, yield, and extraction rate are expected to be achieved. Soybean flakes and collets were used as materials and hexane was used as a solvent. Temperature, pH, and incubation time were optimized and diffusion coefficients were estimated for each solid. Extractions were carried out in a column, oil content was determined according to time, and a mathematical model was developed to describe the system. The optimum conditions obtained were pH 5.4, 38°C, and 9.7 h, and pH 5.8, 44°C, and 5.8h of treatment for flakes and collets, respectively. Hydrolyzed solids exhibited a higher yield. Diffusion coefficients were estimated between 10-11 and 10-10. The highest diffusion coefficient was obtained for hydrolyzed collets. 0.73 g oil/mL and 0.7 g oil/mL were obtained at 240 s in a column for collets and flakes, respectively. Hydrolyzed solids exhibited a higher yield. The enzymatic incubation accelerates the extraction rate and allows for higher yield. The proposed model proved to be appropriate.

  15. Simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic residues pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Kim, Nag-Jong; Jiang, Min; Kang, Jong Won; Chang, Ho Nam

    2009-07-01

    Bermudagrass, reed and rapeseed were pretreated with phosphoric acid-acetone and used for ethanol production by means of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) with a batch and fed-batch mode. When the batch SSF experiments were conducted in a 3% low effective cellulose, about 16 g/L of ethanol were obtained after 96 h of fermentation. When batch SSF experiments were conducted with a higher cellulose content (10% effective cellulose for reed and bermudagrass and 5% for rapeseed), higher ethanol concentrations and yields (of more than 93%) were obtained. The fed-batch SSF strategy was adopted to increase the ethanol concentration further. When a higher water-insoluble solid (up to 36%) was applied, the ethanol concentration reached 56 g/L of an inhibitory concentration of the yeast strain used in this study at 38 degrees C. The results show that the pretreated materials can be used as good feedstocks for bioethanol production, and that the phosphoric acid-acetone pretreatment can effectively yield a higher ethanol concentration.

  16. FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION LABORATORY TESTING WITH INTERIM PRETREATMENT SYSTEM FEEDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-17

    The fractional crystallization process was developed as a pretreatment method for saltcake waste retrieved from Hanford single-shell tanks (SST). The process separates the retrieved SST waste into a high-level waste stream containing the bulk of the radionuclides and a low-activity waste stream containing the bulk of the nonradioactive sodium salts. The Interim Pretreatment System project shifted the focus on pretreatment planning from SST waste to double-shell tank waste.

  17. Optimization of Enzymatic Saccharification of Alkali Pretreated Parthenium sp. Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pandiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parthenium sp. is a noxious weed which threatens the environment and biodiversity due to its rapid invasion. This lignocellulosic weed was investigated for its potential in biofuel production by subjecting it to mild alkali pretreatment followed by enzymatic saccharification which resulted in significant amount of fermentable sugar yield (76.6%. Optimization of enzymatic hydrolysis variables such as temperature, pH, enzyme, and substrate loading was carried out using central composite design (CCD in response to surface methodology (RSM to achieve the maximum saccharification yield. Data obtained from RSM was validated using ANOVA. After the optimization process, a model was proposed with predicted value of 80.08% saccharification yield under optimum conditions which was confirmed by the experimental value of 85.80%. This illustrated a good agreement between predicted and experimental response (saccharification yield. The saccharification yield was enhanced by enzyme loading and reduced by temperature and substrate loading. This study reveals that under optimized condition, sugar yield was significantly increased which was higher than earlier reports and promises the use of Parthenium sp. biomass as a feedstock for bioethanol production.

  18. Cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, alemtuzumab, and rituximab as salvage therapy for heavily pretreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, Xavier C.; Keating, Michael J.; Wang, Xuemei; O'Brien, Susan M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Burger, Jan; Koller, Charles; Lerner, Susan; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2011-01-01

    Patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and high-risk features, such as fludarabine refractoriness, complex karyotype, or abnormalities of chromosome 17p, experience poor outcomes after standard fludaradine-based regimens. Alemtuzumab is a chimeric CD52 monoclonal antibody with activity in CLL patients with fludarabine-refractory disease and 17p deletion. We report the outcome for 80 relapsed or refractory patients with CLL enrolled in a phase 2 study of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, alemtuzumab, and rituximab (CFAR). All patients were assessed for response and progression according to the 1996 CLL-working group criteria. For the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 65%, including 29% complete response. The estimated progression-free survival was 10.6 months and median overall survival was 16.7 months. Although we noted higher complete response in high-risk patients after CFAR compared with a similar population who had received fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab as salvage therapy, there was no significant improvement in progression-free survival and overall survival appeared worse. CFAR was associated with a high rate of infectious complications with 37 patients (46%) experiencing a serious infection during therapy and 28% of evaluable patients experiencing late serious infections. Although CFAR produced good response rates in this highly pretreated high-risk group of patients, there was no benefit in survival outcomes. PMID:21670470

  19. Biologically Pre-Treated Habitation Waste Water as a Sustainable Green Urine Pre-Treat Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W. Andrew; Thompson, Bret; Sevanthi, Ritesh; Morse, Audra; Meyer, Caitlin; Callahan, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to recover water from urine and flush water is a critical process to allow long term sustainable human habitation in space or bases on the moon or mars. Organic N present as urea or similar compounds can hydrolyze producing free ammonia. This reaction results in an increase in the pH converting ammonium to ammonia which is volatile and not removed by distillation. The increase in pH will also cause precipitation reactions to occur. In order to prevent this, urine on ISS is combined with a pretreat solution. While use of a pretreatment solution has been successful, there are numerous draw backs including: storage and use of highly hazardous solutions, limitations on water recovery (less than 85%), and production of brine with pore dewatering characteristics. We evaluated the use of biologically treated habitation wastewaters (ISS and early planetary base) to replace the current pretreat solution. We evaluated both amended and un-amended bioreactor effluent. For the amended effluent, we evaluated "green" pretreat chemicals including citric acid and citric acid amended with benzoic acid. We used a mock urine/air separator modeled after the urine collection assembly on ISS. The urine/air separator was challenged continually for >6 months. Depending on the test point, the separator was challenged daily with donated urine and flushed with amended or un-amended reactor effluent. We monitored the pH of the urine, flush solution and residual pH in the urine/air separator after each urine event. We also evaluated solids production and biological growth. Our results support the use of both un-amended and amended bioreactor effluent to maintain the operability of the urine /air separator. The ability to use bioreactor effluent could decrease consumable cost, reduce hazards associated with current pre-treat chemicals, allow other membrane based desalination processes to be utilized, and improve brine characteristics.

  20. Cobalt protoporphyrin pretreatment protects human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro and increases graft size and vascularization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jun; Weaver, Matthew S; Cao, Baohong; Dennis, James E; Van Biber, Benjamin; Laflamme, Michael A; Allen, Margaret D

    2014-06-01

    Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) can regenerate infarcted myocardium. However, when implanted into acutely infarcted hearts, few cells survive the first week postimplant. To improve early graft survival, hESC-CMs were pretreated with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a transcriptional activator of cytoprotective heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). When hESC-CMs were challenged with an in vitro hypoxia/reoxygenation injury, mimicking cell transplantation into an ischemic site, survival was significantly greater among cells pretreated with CoPP versus phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-pretreated controls. Compared with PBS-pretreated cells, CoPP-pretreated hESC-CM preparations exhibited higher levels of HO-1 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and vascular endothelial growth factor production, with reduced apoptosis, and a 30% decrease in intracellular reactive oxygen species. For in vivo translation, 1 × 10(7) hESC-CMs were pretreated ex vivo with CoPP or PBS and then injected intramyocardially into rat hearts immediately following acute infarction (permanent coronary ligation). At 1 week, hESC-CM content, assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for human Alu sequences, was 17-fold higher in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. On histomorphometry, cardiomyocyte graft size was 2.6-fold larger in hearts receiving CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells, occupying up to 12% of the ventricular area. Vascular density of host-perfused human-derived capillaries was significantly greater in grafts composed of CoPP- than PBS-pretreated cells. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate that ex vivo pretreatment of hESC-CMs with a single dose of CoPP before intramyocardial implantation more than doubled resulting graft size and improved early graft vascularization in acutely infarcted hearts. These findings open the door for delivery of these, or other, stem cells during acute interventional therapy following myocardial infarction or ischemia.

  1. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A nonhazardous urine pretreatment system prototype is proposed that will stabilize urine against biological growth or chemical instabilities without using hazardous...

  2. 40 CFR 405.64 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS DAIRY PRODUCTS PROCESSING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Natural and Processed Cheese Subcategory § 405.64 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source subject...

  3. Nonhazardous Urine Pretreatment Method for Future Exploration Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel urine pretreatment that will prevent biological growth or chemical instabilities in urine without using hazardous chemicals is proposed. Untreated urine...

  4. Value added liquid products from waste biomass pyrolysis using pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Oisik; Sarmah, Ajit K

    2015-12-15

    Douglas fir wood, a forestry waste, was attempted to be converted into value added products by pretreatments followed by pyrolysis. Four different types of pretreatments were employed, namely, hot water treatment, torrefaction, sulphuric acid and ammonium phosphate doping. Subsequently, pyrolysis was done at 500°C and the resulting bio-oils were analysed for their chemical composition using Karl Fischer titration, thermogravimetry, ion exchange, and gas chromatography. Pretreatment with acid resulted in the highest yield of bio-oil (~60%). The acid and salt pretreatments were responsible for drastic reduction in the lignin oligomers and enhancement of water content in the pyrolytic liquid. The quantity of xylose/mannose reduced as a result of pretreatments. Although, the content of fermentable sugars remained similar across all the pretreatments, the yield of levoglucosan increased. Pretreatment of the biomass with acid yielded the highest amount of levoglucosan in the bio-oil (13.21%). The acid and salt pretreatments also elevated the amount of acetic acid in the bio-oils. Addition of acid and salt to the biomass altered the interaction of cellulose-lignin in the pyrolysis regime. Application of pretreatments should be based on the intended end use of the liquid product having a desired chemical composition.

  5. An approach to the utilisation of CO2 as impregnating agent in steam pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse and leaves for ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franke Ana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conditions for steam pretreatment of sugar cane bagasse and leaves were studied using CO2 as an impregnating agent. The following conditions were investigated: time (5 to 15 min and temperature (190 to 220°C. The pretreatment was assessed in terms of glucose and xylose yields after enzymatic hydrolysis and inhibitor formation (furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural in the pretreatment. Results from pretreatment using SO2 as impregnating agent was used as reference. Results For sugar cane bagasse, the highest glucose yield (86.6% of theoretical was obtained after pretreatment at 205°C for 15 min. For sugar cane leaves the highest glucose yield (97.2% of theoretical was obtained after pretreatment at 220°C for 5 min. The reference pretreatment, using impregnation with SO2 and performed at 190°C for 5 min, resulted in an overall glucose yield of 79.7% and 91.9% for bagasse and leaves, respectively. Conclusions Comparable pretreatment performance was obtained with CO2 as compared to when SO2 is used, although higher temperature and pressure were needed. The results are encouraging as some characteristics of CO2 are very attractive, such as high availability, low cost, low toxicity, low corrosivity and low occupational risk.

  6. Pretreatment of Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME Using Magnetic Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan is a natural organic polyelectrolyte of high molecular weight and charge density; obtained from deacetylation of chitin. This study explored the potential and effectiveness of applying chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite particles as a primary coagulant and flocculent, in comparison with chitosan for pre-treatment of palm oil mill effluent (POME. A series of batch coagulation processes with chitosan-magnetite nanocomposite particles and chitosan under different conditions, i.e. dosage and pH were conducted, in order to determine their optimum conditions. The performance was assessed in terms of turbidity, total suspended solids (TSS and chemical oxygen demand (COD reductions. Chitosan-magnetite particles showed better parameter reductions with much lower dosage consumption, compared to chitosan, even at the original pH of POME, i.e. 4.5. At pH 6, the optimum chitosan-magnetite dosage of 250 mg/L was able to reduce turbidity, TSS and COD levels by 98.8%, 97.6% and 62.5% respectively. At this pH, the coagulation of POME by chitosan-magnetite was brought by the combination of charge neutralization and polymer bridging mechanism. On the other hand, chitosan seems to require much higher dosage, i.e. 370 mg/L to achieve the best turbidity, TSS and COD reductions, which were 97.7%, 91.7% and 42.70%, respectively. The synergistic effect of cationic character of both the chitosan amino group and the magnetite ion in the pre-treatment process for POME brings about enhanced performance for effective agglomeration, adsorption and coagulation.

  7. Strong metal-support interaction in novel core-shell Au-CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhihua; Fu, Huifen; Tian, Ziwei; Han, Dongmei; Gu, Fubo

    2016-03-21

    Yolk-shell Au/CeO2 (Y-Au/CeO2) and encapsulated Au/CeO2 (E-Au/CeO2) nanocatalysts were prepared by using silica templates. A strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) in the Au/CeO2 nanostructures induced by different pretreatment atmospheres and its influence on CO oxidation were studied. E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 had the best performance, followed by Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, and E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2. The reasons for the different activities were discussed. There were two kinds of strong metal-support interactions (SMSI) between Au and CeO2 termed as R-SMSI (pretreated in reductive atmosphere) and O-SMSI (pretreated in oxidation atmosphere). Because of the smaller size of the Au and the larger contact area, both the R-SMSI and O-SMSI of E-Au/CeO2 were larger than those of Y-Au/CeO2. The O-SMSI was accompanied by the formation of cationic Au species that were beneficial to the enhancing of activity. As expected, the activity of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with a Au size less than 5 nm was higher than that of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in O2 with 25 nm Au. However, it is surprisingly found that the activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with 25 nm Au was higher than that of E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 with a Au size less than 5 nm. R-SMSI resulted in the formation of a AuCe alloy that had a negative effect on the activity. Compared with E-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2, Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2 exhibited a smaller relative content of the AuCe alloy, leading to a better activity of Y-Au/CeO2 pretreated in H2.

  8. Ethanol and biogas production after steam pretreatment of corn stover with or without the addition of sulphuric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    pretreatment was divided into a solid fraction and a liquid fraction. The solid fraction was subjected to SSF, while the liquid fraction, together with the filtered residual from SSF, was used in AD. Using sulphuric acid in AD did not inhibit the reaction, which may be due to the low concentration of sulphuric acid used. In contrast, a pretreatment step without sulphuric acid resulted not only in higher concentrations of inhibitors, which affected the ethanol yield, but also in lower methane production. PMID:23356481

  9. Ethanol and biogas production after steam pretreatment of corn stover with or without the addition of sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondesson Pia-Maria

    2013-01-01

    which the slurry from the pretreatment was divided into a solid fraction and a liquid fraction. The solid fraction was subjected to SSF, while the liquid fraction, together with the filtered residual from SSF, was used in AD. Using sulphuric acid in AD did not inhibit the reaction, which may be due to the low concentration of sulphuric acid used. In contrast, a pretreatment step without sulphuric acid resulted not only in higher concentrations of inhibitors, which affected the ethanol yield, but also in lower methane production.

  10. Effect of purification pretreatment on the recovery of magnetite from waste ferrous sulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yu; Ying-lin Peng; Ya-jie Zheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the influence of impurities in waste ferrous sulfate on its recovery of magnetite. Ferrous sulfate solution was purified by the addition of NaOH solution to precipitate impurities, and magnetite was recovered from fer-rous sulfate solution without and with purification pretreatment. Calcium hydroxide was added to the solution of ferrous sulfate as a pre-cipitator. A mixed product of magnetite and gypsum was subsequently obtained by air oxidation and heating. Wet-milling was performed prior to magnetic separation to recover magnetite from the mixed products. The results show that with the purification pretreatment, the grade of iron in magnetite concentrate increased from 62.05%to 65.58%and the recovery rate of iron decreased from 85.35%to 80.35%. The pu-rification pretreatment reduced the conglutination between magnetite and gypsum, which favors their subsequent magnetic separation. In summary, a higher-grade magnetite with a better crystallinity and a larger particle size of 2.35 μm was obtained with the purification pretreatment.

  11. Fungal pretreatment by Phanerochaete chrysosporium for enhancement of biogas production from corn stover silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Li, Xin; Wu, Shubiao; He, Jing; Pang, Changle; Deng, Yu; Dong, Renjie

    2014-11-01

    Corn stover silage (CSS) was pretreated by Phanerochaete chrysosporium in solid-state fermentation (SSF), to enhance methane production via subsequent anaerobic digestion (AD). Effects of washing of corn stover silage (WCSS) on the lignocellulosic biodegradability in the fungal pretreatment step and on methane production in the AD step were investigated with comparison to the CSS. It was found that P. chrysosporium had the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin of CSS up to 19.9, 32.4, and 22.6 %, respectively. Consequently, CSS pretreated by 25 days achieved the highest methane yield of 265.1 mL/g volatile solid (VS), which was 23.0 % higher than the untreated CSS. However, the degradation of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin in WCSS after 30 days of SSF increased to 45.9, 48.4, and 39.0 %, respectively. Surface morphology and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy analyses also demonstrated that the WCSS improved degradation of cell wall components during SSF. Correspondingly, the pretreatment of WCSS improved methane production by 19.6 to 32.6 %, as compared with untreated CSS. Hence, washing and reducing organic acids (such as lactic acid, acetic acid, propionic acid, and butyric acid) present in CSS has been proven to further improve biodegradability in SSF and methane production in the AD step.

  12. Low Thermal Pretreatment as Method for Increasing the Bioavailability of Organic Matters in Domestic Mixed Sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seswoya Roslinda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In practice, primary and secondary sludge are fed into anaerobic digestion. However, the microbial cell exists in secondary sludge are an unfavorable substrate for biodegradation. Thermal pretreatment is proved to increase the bioavailability of organic and improve the biodegradation subsequently. During low thermal pretreatment, both intracellular (within the microbial cell and extracellular (within the polymeric network materials were extracted. This process increases the bioavailability meaning that organic compounds are accessible to the microorganisms for their degradation. This research aims to investigate the effect of thermal pretreatment on domestic mixed sludge disintegration. Domestic mixed sludge was thermally treated at 70°C for various holding times. The pre-thermally treated domestic mixed sludge was measured for protein and carbohydrates following the Lowry Method, and Phenol-Sulphuric Acid Method respectively. DR 6000 UV-Vis spectrophotometer, DRB200 Reactor (digester and COD vial (TNT plus 822 were used for COD determination, based on Reactor Digestion Method approved by USEPA. The results showed that the organic matter in domestic mixed sludge is efficiently solubilised during thermal treatment organic matter. The higher soluble yield for each monitored parameter determined in this study indicated that low thermal pretreatment improve bioavailability.

  13. Steam pretreatment of spruce forest residues: optimal conditions for biogas production and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzon, Ron; Schütt, Fokko; Oldenburg, Saskia; Fischer, Elmar; Körner, Ina; Saake, Bodo

    2014-01-16

    Steam refining of non-debarked spruce forest residues was investigated as pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis as well as for biogas production. Pretreatment conditions were varied in the range of 190-220 °C, 5-10 min and 0-3.7% SO₂ according to a statistical design. For both applications highest product yields were predicted at 220 °C and 2.4% SO₂, whereas the reaction time had only a minor influence. The conformity of the model results allows the conclusion that enzymatic hydrolysis is a suitable test method to evaluate the degradability of lignocellulosic biomass in the biogas process. In control experiments under optimal conditions the results of the model were verified. The yield of total monomeric carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis was equivalent to 55% of all theoretically available polysaccharides. The corresponding biogas yield from the pretreated wood amounted to 304 mL/gODM. Furthermore, furans produced under optimal process conditions showed no inhibitory effect on biogas production. It can be concluded that steam refining opens the structure of wood, thus improving the enzymatic hydrolysis of the polysaccharides to fermentable monomeric sugars and subsequently enabling a higher and faster production of biogas. Anaerobic fermentation of pretreated wood is a serious alternative to alcoholic fermentation especially when low quality wood grades and residues are used. Anaerobic digestion should be further investigated in order to diversify the biorefinery options for lignocellulosic materials.

  14. Optimization of the pretreatment of Prosopis nigra sawdust for the production of fermentable sugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana P. Dagnino

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The black carob tree (Prosopis nigra is a particularly valued species in Chaco, Argentina on account of its hard wood. Finding a use for the sawdust, the main industrial residue of wood, could be useful within the furniture industry of any country in the tropics seeking to apply the biorefinery concept. For the conversion of wood carbohydrates to bioethanol, a pretreatment stage is necessary. The objective of this work was to find the acid pretreatment conditions that maximize the extraction of xylose with minimum degradation, while maximizing the concentration of glucans in the pretreated solid to obtain better enzymatic accessibility, using black carob tree sawdust as the raw material. The optimization was carried out by use of a central composite design (CCD with two independent variables: the concentration of the sulfuric acid solution and the heating time. Optimal enzymatic hydrolysis occurred at the mean values of the tested acid solution concentration (1.2% and after shorter heating times (10.2 min. The concentration of sugars after the enzymatic hydrolysis of the pretreated solid over a time period of 72 h was three times higher than the untreated solid.

  15. Pretreatment of Rice Straw by Hydrogen Peroxide for Enhanced Methane Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zi-lin; YAG Gai-he; FENG Yong-zhong; REN Guang-xin; HAN Xin-hui

    2013-01-01

    A pretreatment process for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was optimized to enhance the biodegradation performance of rice straw and increase biogas yield. A determination experiment was conducted under predicted optimal conditions. Optimization was implemented using response surface methodology. The effects of biodegradation and the interactive effects of pretreatment time (PT), H2O2 concentration (HC), and substrate to inoculum ratio (S/I) on methane yield were investigated. The lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose of rice straw were significantly degraded with increasing HC. The optimal conditions for the use of pretreated rice straw in anaerobic digestion were a 6.18-d PT, 2.68%HC (w/w total solid), and 1.08 S/I;these conditions result in a methane yield of 288 mL g-1 volatile solids (VS). A determination coefficient of 95.2%was obtained, indicating that the model used to predict the anabolic digestion process has a favorable fit with the experimental parameters. The determination experiment resulted in a methane yield of 290 mL g-1 VS, 88.0%higher than that of untreated rice straw. Thus, H2O2 pretreatment of rice straw can be used to improve methane yields during biogas production.

  16. Characteristics and Gel Properties of Gelatin from Goat Skin as Influenced by Alkaline-pretreatment Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Mad-Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics and properties of gelatin from goat skin pretreated with NaOH solutions (0.50 and 0.75 M for various times (1 to 4 days were investigated. All gelatins contained α-chains as the predominant component, followed by β-chain. Gelling and melting temperatures of those gelatins were 23.02°C to 24.16°C and 33.07°C to 34.51°C, respectively. Gel strength of gelatins increased as NaOH concentration and pretreatment time increased (p<0.05. Pretreatment for a longer time yielded gelatin with a decrease in L*-value but an increase in b*-value. Pretreatment of goat skin using 0.75 M NaOH for 2 days rendered the highest yield (15.95%, wet weight basis as well as high gel strength (222.42 g, which was higher than bovine gelatin (199.15 g. Gelatin obtained had the imino acid content of 226 residues/1,000 residues and the gelatin gel had a fine and ordered structure. Therefore, goat skin gelatin could be used as a potential replacer of commercial gelatin.

  17. Effect of purification pretreatment on the recovery of magnetite from waste ferrous sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wang; Peng, Ying-lin; Zheng, Ya-jie

    2016-08-01

    The present study was conducted to elucidate the influence of impurities in waste ferrous sulfate on its recovery of magnetite. Ferrous sulfate solution was purified by the addition of NaOH solution to precipitate impurities, and magnetite was recovered from ferrous sulfate solution without and with purification pretreatment. Calcium hydroxide was added to the solution of ferrous sulfate as a precipitator. A mixed product of magnetite and gypsum was subsequently obtained by air oxidation and heating. Wet-milling was performed prior to magnetic separation to recover magnetite from the mixed products. The results show that with the purification pretreatment, the grade of iron in magnetite concentrate increased from 62.05% to 65.58% and the recovery rate of iron decreased from 85.35% to 80.35%. The purification pretreatment reduced the conglutination between magnetite and gypsum, which favors their subsequent magnetic separation. In summary, a higher-grade magnetite with a better crystallinity and a larger particle size of 2.35 μm was obtained with the purification pretreatment.

  18. Evaluation energy efficiency of bioconversion knot rejects to ethanol in comparison to other thermochemically pretreated biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaojiang; Qin, Menghua; Zhu, J Y; Tian, Guoyu; Li, Zongquan

    2013-02-01

    Rejects from sulfite pulp mill that otherwise would be disposed of by incineration were converted to ethanol by a combined physical-biological process that was comprised of physical refining and simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). The energy efficiency was evaluated with comparison to thermochemically pretreated biomass, such as those pretreated by dilute acid (DA) and sulfite pretreatment to overcome recalcitrance of lignocelluloses (SPORL). It was observed that the structure deconstruction of rejects by physical refining was indispensable to effective bioconversion but more energy intensive than that of thermochemically pretreated biomass. Fortunately, the energy consumption was compensated by the reduced enzyme dosage and the elevated ethanol yield. Furthermore, adjustment of disk-plates gap led to reduction in energy consumption with negligible influence on ethanol yield. In this context, energy efficiency up to 717.7% was achieved for rejects, much higher than that of SPORL sample (283.7%) and DA sample (152.8%). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fungal pretreatment of yard trimmings for enhancement of methane yield from solid-state anaerobic digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Zheng, Yi; Li, Yebo

    2014-03-01

    Yard trimmings were pretreated by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, a white-rot fungus that selectively degrades lignin, to enhance methane production via solid-state anaerobic digestion. Effects of moisture content (MC), at 45%, 60%, and 75%, on the degradation of holocellulose and lignin in the fungal pretreatment step and on methane production in the digestion step were studied with comparison to the control group (autoclaved without inoculation) and raw yard trimmings. It was found that C. subvermispora had a high lignin degradation of 20.9% but limited cellulose degradation of 7.4% at 60% MC. Consequently, samples pretreated at 60% MC achieved the highest methane yield of 44.6L/kg volatile solid (VS) in the digestion step, which was 106% and 154% higher than the control group (21.6L/kg VS) and the raw yard trimmings (17.6L/kg VS), respectively. The increase in methane production was probably caused by the degradation of lignin during the pretreatment.

  20. Strategies of xylanase supplementation for an efficient saccharification and cofermentation process from pretreated wheat straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvira, Pablo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Negro, María José; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic raw materials includes a pretreatment step before enzymatic hydrolysis (EH). Pretreated substrates contain complex hemicelluloses in the solid fraction that can protect the cellulose from enzymatic attack. In addition, soluble xylooligomers are contained in the pretreated materials and may have an inhibitory effect on cellulase activity. In this context, several approaches for xylanase supplementation have been studied to increase EH yields. In this study, the whole slurry obtained after steam explosion pretreatment of wheat straw has been used as substrate. EH experiments were performed using commercial cellulase preparations supplemented with an endoxylanase (XlnC) from Aspergillus nidulans. Among different strategies of XlnC supplementation, the 24-h xylanase treatment before cellulase addition yielded an increase of 40.1 and 10.1% in glucose and xylose production, respectively. Different XlnC addition strategies were integrated in a simultaneous saccharification and cofermentation process (SSCF) using the xylose fermenting strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae F12. Ethanol production in SSCF was 28.4% higher when comparing to a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process.

  1. PRE-TREATMENTS EFFECTS ON Hovenia dulcis Thunb. WOOD DRYING RATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnos Alan Vivian

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-treatments on drying rate of uva-do-japão wood (Hovenia dulcis Thunb.. For this, samples of wood species concerned with dimensions of 2,0 x 10,0 x 20,0 cm (E x L x C, were subjected to pre-treatment of soaking in hot water and freezing. The pre- treatments of heating and freezing were conducted in a thermal tank at 85ºC and a freezer at -18ºC, respectively, where the samples remained for 12 and 24 hours for both treatments. After the pre-treatments, the wood samples were dried in an electric oven at temperatures of 60 and 90°C until the final moisture content. Thedrying rate was significantly influenced by pre-treatments, drying temperature and their duration of them. This rate presented a different behavior according to the duration of treatment: the warning was higher with 12hours whereas the freezing, with 24 hours, was more evident. The increasing duration and temperature observed showed that the tendency of the drying rate is to increase.

  2. Wheat straw pretreatment with KOH for enhancing biomethane production and fertilizer value in anaerobic digestion☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Muhammad Jaffar; Yunzhi Pang; Hairong Yuan; Dexun Zou; Yanping Liu; Baoning Zhu; Rashid Mustafa Korai; Xiujin Li

    2016-01-01

    Wheat straw biodegradability during anaerobic digestion was improved by treatment with potassium hydroxide (KOH) to decrease digestion time and enhance biomethane production and fertility value. KOH concentrations of 1%(K1), 3%(K2), 6%(K3) and 9%(K4) were tested for wheat straw pretreatment at ambient temperature with a C:N ratio of 25:1. 86%of total solids (TS), 89%of volatile solids (VS) and 22%of lignocel ulose, cellulose and hemi-cellulose (LCH) (22%) were decomposed effectively with the wheat straw pretreated by 6%KOH. Enhanced bio-gas production and cumulative biomethane yield of 258 ml·(g VS)−1 were obtained increased by 45%and 41%respectively, compared with untreated wheat straw. Pretreated wheat straw digestion also yielded a digestate with higher fertilizer values potassium (138%), calcium (22%) and magnesium (16%). These results show that TS, VS and LCH can be effectively removed from wheat straw pretreated with KOH, improving biodegradability biomethane production and fertilizer value.

  3. Pretreatment of sweet sorghum bagasse for hydrogen production by Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagiotopoulos, I.A. [Bioresource Technology Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens, GR 15700 (Greece); Wageningen UR Food and Biobased Research, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Bakker, R.R.; de Vrije, T.; Claassen, P.A.M. [Wageningen UR Food and Biobased Research, P.O. Box 17, 6700 AA Wageningen (Netherlands); Koukios, E.G. [Bioresource Technology Unit, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens, GR 15700 (Greece)

    2010-08-15

    Pretreatment of sweet sorghum bagasse, an energy crop residue, with NaOH for the production of fermentable substrates, was investigated. Optimal conditions for the alkaline pretreatment of sweet sorghum bagasse were realized at 10% NaOH (w/w dry matter). A delignification of 46% was then observed, and improved significantly the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. Under hydrolysis conditions without pH control, up to 50% and 41% of the cellulose and hemicellulose contained in NaOH-pretreated sweet sorghum bagasse were converted by 24 h enzymatic hydrolysis to soluble monomeric sugars. The extreme thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus showed normal growth on hydrolysates of NaOH-pretreated biomass up to a sugar concentration of 20 g/L. Besides hydrogen, the main metabolic products detected in the fermentations were acetic and lactic acid. The maximal hydrogen yield observed in batch experiments under controlled conditions was 2.6 mol/mol C6 sugar. The maximal volumetric hydrogen production rate ranged from 10.2 to 10.6 mmol/(L h). At higher substrate concentrations the production of lactic acid increased at the expense of hydrogen production. (author)

  4. Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, G.F.

    1994-10-24

    A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

  5. Comparative effects of biomass pre-treatments for direct and indirect transesterification to enhance microalgal lipid recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough eGhasemi Naghdi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal lipid recovery for biodiesel production is currently considered suboptimal, but pre-treatment of algal biomass, the use of solvent mixtures and the positioning of transesterification can lead to increased yields. Here, the effect of various reportedly successful pre-treatments and solvent mixtures were directly compared to each other and combined with direct and indirect transesterification methods using the oleaginous microalga Tetraselmis sp. M8. Microwave and thermal pre-treatments were applied and the total lipid and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME recoveries were investigated. The application of pre-treatments increased FAME recovery through indirect transesterification when a Soxhlet system was used but they had no significant effect for direct transesterification. Gravimetric analyses of total lipids revealed that lipid recovery was highest when utilizing the chloroform-based Bligh and Dyer extraction method; however FAME yield was the highest when applying a Soxhlet system utilizing a solvent mixture of hexane-ethanol (3:1. Total lipid recovery did not necessarily correlate with the recovery of FAMEs. The highest FAME recovery was achieved from thermal or microwave pre-treated biomass followed by indirect transesterification through Soxhlet extraction. FAME recovery could be more than doubled (increase of up to 171% under these conditions. We conclude that a simple thermal pre-treatment (80°C for 10 min in combination with solvent mixture extraction through indirect transesterification may present a cost-effective and scalable option for large-scale lipid extraction from microalgae.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of straw and corn stover: The effect of biological process optimization and pre-treatment on total bio-methane yield and energy performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Serena; Wei, Qiao; D'Imporzano, Giuliana; Dong, Renjie; Adani, Fabrizio

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is a useful method for producing renewable energy/biofuel. Today, biogas production uses a large amount of energy crops (EC), with the effect of increasing AD costs and creating conflict between food/feed vs. energy use. A partial solution to this might be the substitution of EC with agricultural wastes, e.g. straw. Straw and corn stover are widely available in the world and approximately 1600millionMgyear(-1) of these substrates are available. Straw can be useful used for biogas production but its characteristics limit its performance so that sometimes the energetic balance can be negative. In this review, the limits for the conversion of this substrate into biogas were investigated and solutions/proposals for getting higher straw biogas production performance are reported. In addition, energetic balances for untreated and pre-treated substrates are reported, giving indicative evaluations of the sustainability of straw and corn stover use for biogas production.

  7. Higher Education: Use of New Data Could Help Improve Oversight of Distance Education. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-12-39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, George A.

    2011-01-01

    As the largest provider of financial aid in higher education, with about $134 billion in Title IV funds provided to students in fiscal year 2010, the Department of Education (Education) has a considerable interest in distance education. Distance education--that is, offering courses by the Internet, video, or other forms outside the classroom--has…

  8. Brief Report: Higher Stage of Disease is associated with Bilateral Mastectomy among Patients with Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Rachel A.; Kouri, Elena M.; West, Dee W.; Rosenberg, Shoshana; Partridge, Ann H.; Lii, Joyce; Keating, Nancy L.

    2017-01-01

    Background The reasons for increasing rates of bilateral mastectomy for unilateral breast cancer are incompletely understood and associations of disease stage with bilateral surgery have been inconsistent. We examined associations of clinical and sociodemographic factors, including stage, with surgery type and reconstruction receipt among women with breast cancer. Patients/Methods We surveyed a diverse population-based sample of women from northern California cancer registries with stage 0–III breast cancer diagnosed during 2010–2011 (participation rate=68.5%). Using multinomial logistic regression, we examined factors associated with bilateral and unilateral mastectomy (vs. breast conservation [BCS]), adjusting for tumor and sociodemographic characteristics. In a second model, we examined factors associated with reconstruction for mastectomy-treated patients. Results Among 487 participants, 58% had BCS, 32% had unilateral mastectomy, and 10% underwent bilateral mastectomy. In adjusted analyses, women with stage III (vs. stage 0) cancers had higher odds of bilateral mastectomy (odds ratio [O.R]=8.28; 95% Confidence Interval=2.32–29.50); women with stage II and III (vs. stage 0) disease had higher odds of unilateral mastectomy. Higher (vs. lower) income was also associated with bilateral mastectomy, while age ≥60 (vs. mastectomy-treated patients (n=206), bilateral mastectomy, unmarried status, higher education and income were all associated with reconstruction (Psmastectomy despite a lack of clear medical benefit, raising concern for over-treatment. Our findings highlight the need for interventions to assure women are making informed surgical decisions. PMID:26410475

  9. The Impact of ERASMUS on European Higher Education: Quality, Openness and Internationalisation; Final Report by the consortium of CHEPS, INCHER-Kassel and ECOTEC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossensteyn, Johan J.; Beerkens-Soo, M.; Cremonini, Leon; Antonowitsch, Dominic; Epping, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    This study explores the impact of the ERASMUS programme on quality improvement in European higher education in particular in the areas of teaching, research, student services and the openness to society with a focus at the institutional and system level. The study puts an emphasis on the

  10. Energy Costs and Energy Conservation Programs in Colleges and Universities: 1972-73, 1974-75. Higher Education Panel Reports, Number 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    A survey was initiated at the request of the U.S. Office of Education and the Energy Task Force to: (1) measure the increase in energy expenditures since the OPEC oil embargo of 1973-74; (2) assess changes in energy consumption over a two-year period; and (3) examine some of the specific conservation practices of higher education institutions.…

  11. 1994 AASL Research Grant Award Interim Report: The Information Search Process: A Study of Cognitive Strategies for Teaching Higher-Level Thinking Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Provides a summary of a research project that is investigating how increased involvement by the library media specialist in teaching specific cognitive strategies affect students' achievement and satisfaction with their learning. Higher-level thinking skills, learning processes, students' use of information, teaching strategies, and teachers'…

  12. Higher Education: Improved Tax Information Could Help Families Pay for College. Report to the Committee on Finance, U.S. Senate. GAO-12-560

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James R.; Scott, George A.

    2012-01-01

    The federal government provides billions of dollars in assistance each year to students and families through federal student aid programs authorized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965 and through tax expenditures, such as credits and deductions. GAO was asked to (1) describe the size and distribution of Title IV student aid and tax…

  13. Assessing Critical Thinking in Higher Education: Current State and Directions for Next-Generation Assessment. Research Report. ETS RR-14-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ou Lydia; Frankel, Lois; Roohr, Katrina Crotts

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking is one of the most important skills deemed necessary for college graduates to become effective contributors in the global workforce. The first part of this article provides a comprehensive review of its definitions by major frameworks in higher education and the workforce, existing assessments and their psychometric qualities,…

  14. Planning Our Future. A Staff Background Paper on Long-Range Enrollment and Facilities Planning in California Public Higher Education. Commission Report 89-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Kirk L.

    A background paper on long-range enrollment and facilities planning in California's public segments of higher education is designed to: (1) establish a policy framework within which the Postsecondary Education Commission can examine and assess the planning processes of the segments; and (2) describe the processes, identifying major differences…

  15. A Review of the Ford Foundation Study Titled: "State Higher Education Systems and College Completion." Research Report No. 93-06R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Cathy; Brann, Herman I.

    In November 1992, the Ford Foundation published a study entitled "State Higher Education Systems and College Completion," which argued that states that relied heavily on community colleges in their postsecondary educational system, such as California, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, and Wisconsin, were not efficient in producing bachelor degree (BA)…

  16. Assessing Digital Information Literacy in Higher Education: A Review of Existing Frameworks and Assessments with Recommendations for Next-Generation Assessment. Research Report. ETS RR-16-32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Jesse R.; Katz, Irvin R.; Beile, Penny M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital information literacy (DIL)--generally defined as the ability to obtain, understand, evaluate, and use information in a variety of digital technology contexts--is a critically important skill deemed necessary for success in higher education as well as in the global networked economy. To determine whether college graduates possess the…

  17. Mechanical hulling and thermal pre-treatment effects on rapeseed oil antioxidant capacity and related lipophilic and hydrophilic bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rękas, Agnieszka; Wroniak, Małgorzata; Siger, Aleksander; Ścibisz, Iwona; Derewiaka, Dorota; Anders, Andrzej

    2017-02-20

    In this study, the effect of rapeseed mechanical hulling and thermal pre-treatment by microwaves (from 2 to 10 min with 2-min intervals, 800 W) and roasting (from 20 to 100 min with 20-min intervals, 165 °C) on the content of phytochemicals in the oil was investigated. Results showed that both pre-treatments applied differentiated the oils in terms of the content of bioactive compounds. In general, oils pressed from hulled and thermally pre-treated seeds contained higher content of tocopherols, PC-8 and phytosterols, while oils pressed from non-hulled and pre-processed seeds had significantly higher concentration of polyphenols. Both microwaving and roasting contributed to an increase of antioxidant capacity of studied oils. The increase of radical scavenging activity of oils was seen mainly in hydrophilic fraction of oil, which was highly positively correlated with the amount of canolol formed during seeds heating.

  18. [Study of pretreatment on microfiltration of huanglian jiedu decoction with ceramic membranes based on solution environment regulation theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhang, Lian-Jun; Guo, Li-Wei; Fu, Ting-Ming; Zhu, Hua-Xu

    2014-01-01

    To optimize the pretreatment of Huanglian Jiedu decoction before ceramic membranes and verify the effect of different pretreatments in multiple model system existed in Chinese herb aqueous extract. The solution environment of Huanglian Jiedu decoction was adjusted by different pretreatments. The flux of microfiltration, transmittance of the ingredients and removal rate of common polymers were as indicators to study the effect of different solution environment It was found that flocculation had higher stable permeate flux, followed by vacuuming filtration and adjusting pH to 9. The removal rate of common polymers was comparatively high. The removal rate of protein was slightly lower than the simulated solution. The transmittance of index components were higher when adjust pH and flocculation. Membrane blocking resistance was the major factor in membrane fouling. Based on the above indicators, the effect of flocculation was comparatively significant, followed by adjusting pH to 9.

  19. Application of high throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis system to thermochemical pretreatment. Part 1: dilute acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiadi; Kumar, Rajeev; DeMartini, Jaclyn D; Li, Hongjia; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-03-01

    Because conventional approaches for evaluating sugar release from the coupled operations of pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis are extremely time and material intensive, high throughput (HT) pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis systems have become vital for screening large numbers of lignocellulosic biomass samples to identify feedstocks and/or processing conditions that significantly improve performance and lower costs. Because dilute acid pretreatment offers many important advantages in rendering biomass highly susceptible to subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, a high throughput pretreatment and co-hydrolysis (HTPH) approach was extended to employ dilute acid as a tool to screen for enhanced performance. First, a single-step neutralization and buffering method was developed to allow effective enzymatic hydrolysis of the whole pretreated slurry. Switchgrass and poplar were then pretreated with 0.5% and 1% acid loadings at a 5% solids concentration, the resulting slurry conditioned with the buffering approach, and the entire mixture enzymatically hydrolyzed. The resulting sugar yields demonstrated that single-step neutralizing and buffering was capable of adjusting the pH as needed for enzymatic saccharification, as well as overcoming enzyme inhibition by compounds released in pretreatment. In addition, the effects of pretreatment conditions and biomass types on susceptibility of pretreated substrates to enzymatic conversion were clearly discernible, demonstrating the method to be a useful extension of HTPH systems.

  20. Effect of varying feedstock-pretreatment chemistry combinations on the formation and accumulation of potentially inhibitory degradation products in biomass hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Bowen; Sharma, Lekh N; Becker, Christopher; Chen, Shou-Feng; Mowery, Richard A; van Walsum, G Peter; Chambliss, C Kevin

    2010-10-15

    A variety of potentially inhibitory degradation products are produced during pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass. Qualitative and quantitative interrogation of pretreatment hydrolysates is paramount to identifying potential correlations between pretreatment chemistries and microbial inhibition in downstream bioconversion processes. In the present study, corn stover, poplar, and pine feedstocks were pretreated under eight different chemical conditions, which are representative of leading pretreatment processes. Pretreatment processes included: 0.7% H(2)SO(4), 0.07% H(2)SO(4), liquid hot water, neutral buffer solution, aqueous ammonia, lime, lime with oxygen pressurization, and wet oxidation. Forty lignocellulosic degradation products resulting from pretreatment were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography in combination with UV spectroscopy or tandem mass spectrometry detection (HPLC-PDA-MS/MS) and ion chromatography (IC). Of these compounds, several have been reported to be inhibitory, including furfural, hydroxymethyl furfural, ferulic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, syringic acid among others. Formation and accumulation of monitored compounds in hydrolysates is demonstrated to be a function of both the feedstock and pretreatment conditions utilized.

  1. Understanding of alkaline pretreatment parameters for corn stover enzymatic saccharification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Ye

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research on alkaline pretreatment has mainly focused on optimization of the process parameters to improve substrate digestibility. To achieve satisfactory sugar yield, extremely high chemical loading and enzyme dosages were typically used. Relatively little attention has been paid to reduction of chemical consumption and process waste management, which has proven to be an indispensable component of the bio-refineries. To indicate alkali strength, both alkali concentration in pretreatment solution (g alkali/g pretreatment liquor or g alkali/L pretreatment liquor and alkali loading based on biomass solids (g alkali/g dry biomass have been widely used. The dual approaches make it difficult to compare the chemical consumption in different process scenarios while evaluating the cost effectiveness of this pretreatment technology. The current work addresses these issues through pretreatment of corn stover at various combinations of pretreatment conditions. Enzymatic hydrolysis with different enzyme blends was subsequently performed to identify the effects of pretreatment parameters on substrate digestibility as well as process operational and capital costs. Results The results showed that sodium hydroxide loading is the most dominant variable for enzymatic digestibility. To reach 70% glucan conversion while avoiding extensive degradation of hemicellulose, approximately 0.08 g NaOH/g corn stover was required. It was also concluded that alkali loading based on total solids (g NaOH/g dry biomass governs the pretreatment efficiency. Supplementing cellulase with accessory enzymes such as α-arabinofuranosidase and β-xylosidase significantly improved the conversion of the hemicellulose by 6–17%. Conclusions The current work presents the impact of alkaline pretreatment parameters on the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover as well as the process operational and capital investment costs. The high chemical consumption for alkaline

  2. Pretreatment methods for aquatic plant biomass as carbon sources for potential use in treating eutrophic water in subsurface-flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiang-Feng; Liu, Xin; Shang, Jia-Jia; Feng, Yi; Liu, Jia; Lu, Li-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Plant biomass is usually added to constructed wetlands (CW) to enhance denitrification. In this study, we investigated effects of different pretreatments on two common external plant carbon sources, cattail and reed litter. We determined the average ratio of chemical oxygen demand (COD) to total nitrogen (TN), designated as C/N, in water samples after addition of litter subjected to various pretreatments. The C/N in the water samples ranged from 4.8 to 6.4 after addition of NaOH-pretreated cattail litter, which was four to six times greater than that of water from the Yapu River and 3.84-39.15% higher than that of systems that received untreated cattail litter. The C/N of systems that received H(2)SO(4)-pretreated carbon sources varied from 1.7 to 3.6. These two methods resulted in TN and total phosphorus (TP) levels lower than those in river water. The C/N was 1.4-1.7 after addition of CH(3)COOH-pretreated reed litter, which was 34.87-53.83% higher than that of river water. The C/N was 2.5 in systems that received mild alkali/oxidation-pretreated reeds, which was 30.59% higher than that of systems that received non-pretreated reeds. The residue rates of cattail and reed litter subjected to various pretreatments were greater than 60%. Our results showed that NaOH, H(2)SO(4), and mild alkali/oxidation pretreatments were useful to rapidly improve the C/N of river water and enhance denitrification.

  3. Comparison of five pretreatments for the production of fermentable sugars obtained from Pinus pseudostrobus L. wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farías-Sánchez, Juan Carlos; López-Miranda, Javier; Castro-Montoya, Agustín Jaime; Saucedo-Luna, Jaime; Carrillo-Parra, Artemio; López-Albarrán, Pablo; Pineda-Pimentel, María Guadalupe; Rutiaga-Quiñones, José Guadalupe

    2015-01-01

    To benefit from the use of a waste product such as pine sawdust from a sawmill in Michoacán, Mexico, five different pretreatments for the production of reducing sugars by enzymatic hydrolysis were evaluated (sodium hydroxide, sulfuric acid, steam explosion, organosolv and combined method nitric acid / sodium hydroxide). The main finding of the study was that the pretreatment with 6 % HNO3 and 1 % NaOH led to better yields than those obtained with sodium hydroxide, dilute sulfuric acid, steam explosion, and organosolv pretreatments. Also, HNO3 yields were maximized by the factorial method. With those results the maxima concentration of reducing sugar found was 97.83 ± 1.59, obtained after pretreatment with 7.5 % HNO3 at 120 °C for 30 minutes; followed by 1 % of NaOH at 90 °C for 30 minutes at pH 4.5 for 168 hours with a load enzyme of 25 FPU/g of total carbohydrates. Comparing the results obtained by the authors with those reported in the literature, the combined method was found to be suitable for use in the exploitation of sawdust. PMID:26535036

  4. Impacts of Coagulation Pretreatment on MF Filtration and a Comparative Study of Different Membrane Module Types

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Qi-feng; Kim Seung-hyun; Yun Jong-sup; Moon Seong-yong

    2006-01-01

    Changes in the regulatory requirements and the forthcoming Disinfectant/Disinfection By-Products (D/DBP)Rule will require that drinking water treatment facilities be operated to achieve maximum removals of particles and disinfectant tolerant microorganisms as well as natural organic matter (NOM). For drinking water production, the use of membrane filtration processes such as microfiltration and ultrafiltration (MF/UF) alone to satisfy the turbidity, particle and microorganism removal a requirement of the surface water treatment regulation (SWTR) is not enough. MF/UF treatment processes can achieve only nominal (10 percent) removal of disinfection by-products (DBP) precursors (James, et al., 1995). On the other hand, too fast fouling can make the filtration processes more difficult to carry on. To solve these problems, many authors have been interested in installing coagulation pretreatment before membrane filtration to improve membrane performance. However, previous studies reported conflicting results. Some supported the effectiveness of coagulation pretreatment, while others contended that coagulation aggravated membrane performance. This research aims to identify the effects of coagulation pretreatment on membrane filtration through a pilot study using PVDF membrane in combination with analyzing the rationale of coagulation. Another objective of this research was to evaluate the different impacts on membrane performance of using different membrane modules (the submerged module and pressured module). The results showed that coagulation pretreatment greatly improved the membrane performance, extending the filtration time as well as reducing the permeated organic level, and that the submerged module is much more efficient than the pressured module.

  5. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChunMei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L−1·d−1 of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%–62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%–56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5–9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production.

  6. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, ChunMei; Yuan, HaiRong; Zou, DeXun; Liu, YanPing; Zhu, BaoNing; Li, XiuJin

    2015-01-01

    This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L(-1)·d(-1) of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%-62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%-56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5-9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production.

  7. Protective effects of pretreatment with Radix Paeoniae Rubra on acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/ reperfusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang; ZHANG Fan; XIA Zhong-yuan; LIN Hui; MO An-sheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of pretreatment with Radix Paeoniae Rubra (RPR) on acute lung injury induced by intestinal ischemia/reperfusion in rats and its protective mechanism.Methods:n lung tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry and morphometry computer image analysis. Arterial blood gas analysis, lung permeability index, malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) contents in lungs were measured. The histological changes of lung tissue were observed under light microscope.Results:The expression of HO-1 in RPR-pretreatment group and hemin group was obviously higher than that in sham-operation group and I/R group (P < 0.01). The level of MDA and lung permeability index in RPR-pretreatment and hemin group were significantly lower than those in I/R group (P<0.01 or P<0.05), while the activity of SOD in RPR-pretreatment and hemin group was obviously higher than that in I/R group (P<0.01 ). Under light microscope, the pathologic changes induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by RPR.Conclusion : Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion may result in acute lung injury and pretreatment with RPR injection can attenuate the injury. The protective effect of RPR on the acute lung injury is related to its property of inducing HO-1 expression and inhibiting lipid peroxidation.

  8. Thermophilic hydrogen production from sludge pretreated by thermophilic bacteria: analysis of the advantages of microbial community and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, He-Shan; Guo, Wan-Qian; Yang, Shan-Shan; Feng, Xiao-Chi; Du, Juan-Shan; Zhou, Xian-Jiao; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the effects of thermophilic bacteria pretreatment and elevated fermentation temperature on hydrogen production from sludge were examined. The highest hydrogen yield of 19.9mlH2g(-1) VSS was achieved at 55°C by using pretreated sludge, which was 48.6% higher than raw sludge without pretreatment, and 28.39% higher than when fermented at 35°C. To explore the internal factors of this superior hydrogen production performance, the microbial community and the metabolism analysis were performed by using high-throughput sequencing and excitation-emission matrix. The pretreated sludge showed better utilization of dissolved organic matter and less inhibition of metabolism, especially at thermophilic condition. The 454 sequencing data indicated that microbial abundance was distinctly reduced and extremely high proportion of hydrogen-producing bacteria was found in the thermophilic community (Thermoanaerobacterium accounted for 93.75%). Thus, the pretreated sludge and thermophilic condition showed significant advantages in the hydrogen production using waste sludge as substrate.

  9. Improving Biomethane Production and Mass Bioconversion of Corn Stover Anaerobic Digestion by Adding NaOH Pretreatment and Trace Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, ChunMei; Yuan, HaiRong; Zou, DeXun; Liu, YanPing; Zhu, BaoNing; Li, XiuJin

    2015-01-01

    This research applied sodium hydroxide (NaOH) pretreatment and trace elements to improve biomethane production when using corn stover for anaerobic digestion. Full-factor experimental tests identified the best combination of trace elements with the NaOH pretreatment, indicating that the best combination was with 1.0, 0.4, and 0.4 mg·L−1·d−1 of elements Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. The cumulative biomethane production adding NaOH pretreatment and trace elements was 11,367 mL; total solid bioconversion rate was 55.7%, which was 41.8%–62.2% higher than with NaOH-pretreatment alone and 22.2%–56.3% higher than with untreated corn stover. The best combination was obtained 5–9 days shorter than T90 and maintained good system operation stability. Only a fraction of the trace elements in the best combination was present in the resulting solution; more than 85% of the total amounts added were transferred into the solid fraction. Adding 0.897 g of Fe, 0.389 g of Co, and 0.349 g of Ni satisfied anaerobic digestion needs and enhanced biological activity at the beginning of the operation. The results showed that NaOH pretreatment and adding trace elements improve corn stover biodegradability and enhance biomethane production. PMID:26137469

  10. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Progress report, July 1, 1990--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  11. Fiscal Profiles, 2010: The Seventeenth in a Series of Factbooks about the Financing of California Higher Education. Report 10-22

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report contains and analyzes statistical information about the financing of California postsecondary education from the 1965-66 fiscal year through 2010-11. CPEC (California Postsecondary Education Commission) compiles, analyzes, and disseminates this information to provide policymakers with comprehensive and comparable financial data that…

  12. Distance Education in European Higher Education--The Potential. Report 3 (of 3) of the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning Project. Extended Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Boampong, Angela; Holmberg, Carl

    2015-01-01

    This report is the third in a series published by the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning) project. The IDEAL project ran from October 2013 to September 2015 with financial support from the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The project aims to: (1) offer insights on the needs of adult learners to both policymakers and distance…

  13. Distance Education in European Higher Education--The Students. Report 2 (of 3) of the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, Chripa; Holmberg, Carl

    2014-01-01

    This report is the second in a series published by the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning) project. The IDEAL project ran from October 2013 to September 2015 with financial support from the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The project aims to: (1) offer insights on the needs of adult learners to both policymakers and distance…

  14. Distance Education in European Higher Education--The Offer. Report 1 (of 3) of the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneller, Chripa; Holmberg, Carl

    2014-01-01

    This report is the first in a series published by the IDEAL (Impact of Distance Education on Adult Learning) project. The IDEAL project ran from October 2013 to September 2015 with financial support from the EU Lifelong Learning Programme. The project aims to: (1) offer insights on the needs of adult learners to both policymakers and distance…

  15. Report of the Task Force on Student Financial Aid. Expanding Opportunities for Higher Education for the Commonwealth: Quality, Access, and Choice [with] Recommendations of Chancellor Franklyn G. Jenifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts State Board of Regents of Higher Education, Boston.

    The Task Force on Student Financial Aid was formed to recommend ways in which Massachusetts' student aid programs might be modified in light of nationwide trends of rising college costs, reduced availability of federal student assistance, and a decline in the ability of many families to pay for college. The first chapter of the task force report,…

  16. Student Loans in Higher Education: 2. Asia. Report of an IIEP Educational Forum. IIEP Dissemination Programme, Educational Forum Series, No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhall, Maureen

    This report summarizes an educational forum organized by the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) and held in Genting, Malaysia on November 6-8, 1990, to discuss the experience of student loans in Australia, the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand. In…

  17. Optimisation of sludge pretreatment by low frequency sonication under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Ngoc Tuan; Julcour-Lebigue, Carine; Barthe, Laurie; Delmas, Henri

    2016-01-01

    This work aims at optimizing sludge pretreatment by non-isothermal sonication, varying frequency, US power (PUS) and intensity (IUS varied through probe size), as well as hydrostatic pressure and operation mode (continuous vs. sequential - or pulsed - process). Under non isothermal sonication sludge solubilization results from both ultrasound disintegration and thermal hydrolysis which are conversely depending on temperature. As found in isothermal operation: - For a given specific energy input, higher sludge disintegration is still achieved at higher PUS and lower sonication time. - US effects can be highly improved by applying a convenient pressure. - 12 kHz always performs better than 20 kHz. Nevertheless the optimum pressure depends not only on PUS and IUS, but also on temperature evolution during sonication. Under adiabatic mode, a sequential sonication using 5 min US-on at 360 W, 12 kHz, and 3.25 bar and 30 min US-off gives the best sludge disintegration, while maintaining temperature in a convenient range to prevent US damping.

  18. Higher Education: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Richard P.; Dietrich, Greta L.; Phillips, Gabriele; McCormack, Kevin A.

    This report provides a review of higher education systems in selected developed countries and compares higher education in the United States and other countries. The report draws on data from the Indicators of National Education Systems Project of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) of the Organisation for Economic…

  19. Effects of pilot-plant photochemical pre-treatment (UV/H2O2) on the biodegradability of aqueous linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS)

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The effects of the photochemical pre-treatment by using a pilot-plant UV/H2O2 process on the biodegradability of aqueous linear alkylbenzene sulfonate (LAS) were studied. It was observed that the photochemical pre-treatment of the LAS solutions by UV-254/H2O2 increased the biodegradability of LAS solutions. Aqueous solutions with higher concentrations of LAS (> 100 mg/L) were non-biodegradable. The ratio of BOD5/COD of the pre-treated LAS solutions was increased, indicating that the ...

  20. Optimization of the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootstra, A.M.J.; Beeftink, H.H.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Background - In this study, the dilute maleic acid pretreatment of wheat straw is optimized, using pretreatment time, temperature and maleic acid concentration as design variables. A central composite design was applied to the experimental set up. The response factors used in this study are: (1) glu

  1. 40 CFR 417.84 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS SOAP AND DETERGENT MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Manufacture of Liquid Soaps Subcategory § 417.84 Pretreatment standards for existing sources. Any existing source... works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. In addition, the following pretreatment standard establishes the...

  2. Ensiling as pretreatment of grass for lignocellulosic biomass conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten

    method with low cost and low energy requirements, plus brings about multiple advantages with regards to agricultural management. However, the pretreatment effect of ensiling, and the overall effects for further conversion are limited. In this study, ensiling was evaluated as a method of pretreatment...

  3. Efficacy of pretreatment and treatment against soman intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippens, I.H.C.H.M.; Jongsma, M.J.; Vanwersch, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The efficacy against lethality and post-intoxication incapacitation after 2x LD50 soman of different subacute pretreatment scenarios of 12 days was tested with or without post-intoxication therapy in guinea pigs. These pretreatment regimes were 1) the currently used pyridostigmine (PYR, 0.04 mg/kg/h

  4. Wet explosion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biswas, Rajib; Uellendahl, Hinrich; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2014-01-01

    Wet explosion pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse was investigated in pilot-scale with the aim of obtaining the highest possible sugar yield after pretreatment. The temperatures used were 155, 170, 185 and 200 C with or without addition of oxygen (0.6 MPa pressure). Enzymatic hydrolysis of washed...

  5. Biological pretreatment of softwood Pinus densiflora by three white rot fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Won; Gwak, Ki-Seob; Park, Jun-Yeong; Park, Mi-Jin; Choi, Don-Ha; Kwon, Mi; Choi, In-Gyu

    2007-12-01

    The effects of biological pretreatment on the Japanese red pine Pinus densiflora, was evaluated after exposure to three white rot fungi Ceriporia lacerata, Stereum hirsutum, and Polyporus brumalis. Change in chemical composition, structural modification, and their susceptibility to enzymatic saccharification in the degraded wood were analyzed. Of the three white rot fungi tested, S. hirsutum selectively degraded the lignin of this sortwood rather than the holocellulose component. After eight weeks of pretreatment with S. hirsutum, total weight loss was 10.7%, while lignin loss was the highest at 14.52% among the tested samples. However, holocellulose loss was lower at 7.81% compared to those of C. lacerata and P. brumalis. Extracelluar enzymes from S. hirsutum showed higher activity of ligninase and lower activity of cellulase than those from other white rot fungi. Thus, total weight loss and changes in chemical composition of the Japanese red pine was well correlated with the enzyme activities related with lignin- and cellulose degradation in these fungi. Based on the data obtained from analysis of physical characterization of degraded wood by X-ray Diffractometry (XRD) and pore size distribution, S. hirsutum was considered as an effective potential fungus for biological pretreatment. In particular, the increase of available pore size of over 120 nm in pretreated wood powder with S. hirsutum made enzymes accessible for further enzymatic saccharification. When Japanese red pine chips treated with S. hirsutum were enzymatically saccharified using commercial enzymes (Cellulclast 1.5 L and Novozyme 188), sugar yield was greatly increased (21.01%) compared to non-pretreated control samples, indicating that white rot fungus S. hirsutum provides an effective process in increasing sugar yield from woody biomass.

  6. Enhancement of thermophilic anaerobic digestion of thickened waste activated sludge by combined microwave and alkaline pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongzhi Chi; Yuyou Li; Xuening Fei; Shaopo Wang; Hongying Yun

    2011-01-01

    Pretreatment of thickened waste activated sludge (TWAS) by combined microwave and alkaline pretreatment (MAP) was studied to improve thermophilic anaerobic digestion efficiency.Uniform design was applied to determine the combination of target temperature (110-210℃),microwave holding time (1-51 min),and NaOH dose (0-2.5 g NaOH/g suspended solids (SS)) in terms of their effect on volatile suspended solids (VSS) solubilization.Maximum solubilization ratio (85.1%) of VSS was observed at 210℃ with 0.2 g-NaOH/g-SS and 35 min holding time.The effects of 12 different pretreatment methods were investigated in 28 thermophilic batch reactors by monitoring cumulative methane production (CMP).Improvements in methane production in the TWAS were directly related to the microwave and alkaline pretreatment of the sludge.The highest CMP was a 27% improvement over the control.In spite of the increase in soluble chemical oxygen demand concentration and the decrease in dewaterability of digested sludge,a semi-continuous thennophilic reactor fed with pretreated TWAS without neutralization (at 170℃ with 1 rain holding time and 0.05 g NaOH/g SS) was stable and functioned well,with volatile solid (VS) and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) reductions of 28% and 18%,respectively,which were higher than those of the control system.Additionally,methane yields (L@STP/g-CODadded,at standard temperature and pressure (STP) conditions of 0℃ and 101.325 kPa) and (L@STP/g VSadded) increased by 17% and 13%,respectively,compared to the control reactor.

  7. Free ammonia pre-treatment of secondary sludge significantly increases anaerobic methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Dongbo; Sun, Jing; Wang, Qilin

    2017-07-01

    Energy recovery in the form of methane from sludge/wastewater is restricted by the poor and slow biodegradability of secondary sludge. An innovative pre-treatment technology using free ammonia (FA, i.e. NH3) was proposed in this study to increase anaerobic methane production. The solubilisation of secondary sludge was significantly increased after FA pre-treatment at up to 680 mg NH3-N/L for 1 day, under which the solubilisation (i.e. 0.4 mg SCOD/mg VS; SCOD: soluble chemical oxygen demand; VS: volatile solids) was >10 times higher than that without FA pre-treatment (i.e. 0.03 mg SCOD/mg VS). Biochemical methane potential assays showed that FA pre-treatment at above 250 mg NH3-N/L is effective in improving anaerobic methane production. The highest improvement in biochemical methane potential (B0) and hydrolysis rate (k) was achieved at FA concentrations of 420-680 mg NH3-N/L, and was determined as approximately 22% (from 160 to 195 L CH4/kg VS added) and 140% (from 0.22 to 0.53 d(-1)) compared to the secondary sludge without pre-treatment. More analysis revealed that the FA induced improvement in B0 and k could be attributed to the rapidly biodegradable substances rather than the slowly biodegradable substances. Economic and environmental analyses showed that the FA-based technology is economically favourable and environmentally friendly. Since this FA technology aims to use the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) waste (i.e. anaerobic digestion liquor) to enhance methane production from the WWTPs, it will set an example for the paradigm shift of the WWTPs from 'linear economy' to 'circular economy'. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pretreatment blood concentrations of chloroquine in patients with malaria infection: relation to response to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quashie, Neils Ben; Akanmori, Bartholomew D; Goka, Bamenla Q

    2005-01-01

    Resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine has been reported in many areas in Ghana. Most of these reports, which are from hospital-based studies, indicate RI and RII rather than RIII type of resistance. Since high pretreatment levels of chloroquine have also been measured in patients...... with treatment outcomes in 231 paediatric malaria patients, referred to a major hospital in Ghana. The rate of parasite clearance and prevalence of recrudescence, 14 days post-treatment, were determined for each patient. Results from this study showed no correlation between pretreatment chloroquine levels...... and day 0 parasitaemia. Two hundred and seven patients (89.6 per cent) had parasites that were sensitive to chloroquine whilst 24 (10.4 per cent) had resistant parasites. Of the latter group 17, six, and one patients had P. falciparum parasites, which were resistant at RI, RII and RIII levels...

  9. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma pretreatment on hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangmin, HUANG; Zhouyang, LONG; Sa, LIU; Zhenglong, Qin

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was used as a pretreatment method for downstream hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The degree of polymerization (DP) of MCC decreased after it was pretreated by DBD plasma under a carrier gas of air/argon. The effectiveness of depolymerization was found to be influenced by the crystallinity of MCC when under the pretreatment of DBD plasma. With the addition of tert-butyl alcohol in the treated MCC water suspension solution, depolymerization effectiveness of MCC was inhibited. When MCC was pretreated by DBD plasma for 30 min, the total reducing sugar concentration (TRSC) and liquefaction yield (LY) of pretreated-MCC (PMCC) increased by 82.98% and 34.18% respectively compared with those for raw MCC.

  10. Pretreatment of Biomass by Aqueous Ammonia for Bioethanol Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Gupta, Rajesh; Lee, Y. Y.

    The methods of pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass using aqueous ammonia are described. The main effect of ammonia treatment of biomass is delignification without significantly affecting the carbohydrate contents. It is a very effective pretreatment method especially for substrates that have low lignin contents such as agricultural residues and herbaceous feedstock. The ammonia-based pretreatment is well suited for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) because the treated biomass retains cellulose as well as hemicellulose. It has been demonstrated that overall ethanol yield above 75% of the theoretical maximum on the basis of total carbohydrate is achievable from corn stover pretreated with aqueous ammonia by way of SSCF. There are two different types of pretreatment methods based on aqueous ammonia: (1) high severity, low contact time process (ammonia recycle percolation; ARP), (2) low severity, high treatment time process (soaking in aqueous ammonia; SAA). Both of these methods are described and discussed for their features and effectiveness.

  11. Evaluation of wet oxidation pretreatment for enzymatic hydrolysis of softwood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palonen, H.; Thomsen, A.B.; Tenkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    , and the compositions of solid and liquid fractions were analyzed. The solid fraction after wet oxidation contained 58-64% cellulose, 2-16% hemicellulose, and 24-30% lignin. The pretreatment series gave information about the roles of lignin and hemicellulose in the enzymatic hydrolysis. The temperature......The wet oxidation pretreatment (water, oxygen, elevated temperature, and pressure) of softwood (Picea abies) was investigated for enhancing enzymatic hydrolysis. The pretreatment was preliminarily optimized. Six different combinations of reaction time, temperature, and pH were applied...... of the pretreatment, the residual hemicellulose content of the substrate, and the type of the commercial cellulase preparation used were the most important factors affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis. The highest sugar yield in a 72-h hydrolysis, 79% of theoretical, was obtained using a pretreatment of 200degrees...

  12. Dielectric barrier discharge plasma pretreatment on hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Fangmin; Long, Zhouyang; Liu, Sa; Qin, Zhenglong

    2017-04-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma was used as a pretreatment method for downstream hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The degree of polymerization (DP) of MCC decreased after it was pretreated by DBD plasma under a carrier gas of air/argon. The effectiveness of depolymerization was found to be influenced by the crystallinity of MCC when under the pretreatment of DBD plasma. With the addition of tert-butyl alcohol in the treated MCC water suspension solution, depolymerization effectiveness of MCC was inhibited. When MCC was pretreated by DBD plasma for 30 min, the total reducing sugar concentration (TRSC) and liquefaction yield (LY) of pretreated-MCC (PMCC) increased by 82.98% and 34.18% respectively compared with those for raw MCC.

  13. Natural deep eutectic solvent mediated pretreatment of rice straw: bioanalytical characterization of lignin extract and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated biomass residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Adepu K; Parikh, Bhumika S; Pravakar, Mohanty

    2016-05-01

    The present investigation demonstrated pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass rice straw using natural deep eutectic solvents (NADESs), and separation of high-quality lignin and holocellulose in a single step. Qualitative analysis of the NADES extract showed that the extracted lignin was of high purity (>90 %), and quantitative analysis showed that nearly 60 ± 5 % (w/w) of total lignin was separated from the lignocellulosic biomass. Addition of 5.0 % (v/v) water during pretreatment significantly enhanced the total lignin extraction, and nearly 22 ± 3 % more lignin was released from the residual biomass into the NADES extract. X-ray diffraction studies of the untreated and pretreated rice straw biomass showed that the crystallinity index ratio was marginally decreased from 46.4 to 44.3 %, indicating subtle structural alterations in the crystalline and amorphous regions of the cellulosic fractions. Thermogravimetric analysis of the pretreated biomass residue revealed a slightly higher T dcp (295 °C) compared to the T dcp (285 °C) of untreated biomass. Among the tested NADES reagents, lactic acid/choline chloride at molar ratio of 5:1 extracted maximum lignin of 68 ± 4 mg g(-1) from the rice straw biomass, and subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of the residual holocellulose enriched biomass showed maximum reducing sugars of 333 ± 11 mg g(-1) with a saccharification efficiency of 36.0 ± 3.2 % in 24 h at 10 % solids loading.

  14. In vivo metabolism of CCl sub 4 by gerbils pretreated with chlordecone, phenobarbital, or mirex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Z.; Mehendale, H.M. (Univ. of Mississippi, Jackson (United States))

    1990-02-26

    Gerbils are known to be much more sensitive to CCl{sub 4} lethality than rats as indicated by 48 hours LD{sub 50} (0.08 vs 2.8 ml/kg). On the other hand, gerbils are refractory to chlordecone (CD) potentiation of CCl{sub 4} toxicity. To investigate the possible mechanism underlying gerbil's high sensitivity to CCl{sub 4} lethality, the authors studied in vivo metabolism of CCl{sub 4} in gerbils pretreated with dietary CD (10 ppm), phenobarbital (PB, 225 ppm) or mirex (M, 10 ppm). The hepatic content of CCl{sub 4}, the expiration of {sup 14}CCl{sub 4} and {sup 14}CCl{sub 4}-derived Co{sub 2}, and lipid peroxidation were measured and the results were compared with our previous data for rats. After 15-day dietary pretreatment, male gerbils (60-80 g) received {sup 14}CCl{sub 4} (80 ml/kg; sp act: 0.04 mCi/mmol) ip in corn oil and the expired air was collected for 6 hours. More than 80% of the dose administered was expired as parent compound in 6 hours regardless of pretreatments. Expiration of {sup 14}CCl{sub 4} derived {sup 14}CO{sub 2} in control gerbils was 3.5-fold more than in control rats and was increased significantly in pretreated gerbils (M>PB>CD). PB and M pretreatments resulted in significant increase of {sup 14}C label bound to non-lipid fraction of hepatic content as compared with CD or control gerbils. The radiolabel present in hepatic content of control gerbils was 5-fold higher than that of control rats. In vivo liquid peroxidation measured as diene conjugation in lipid extracts from the livers was lower in gerbils than in rats, and there were no significant differences among control and pretreated gerbils. These data indicate that the more extensive metabolism of CCl{sub 4} in gerbils may partially explain their high sensitivity to CCl{sub 4} toxicity. However, the significantly enhanced metabolism of CCl{sub 4} found in CD, PB, or M pretreated gerbils did not lead to amplification of CCl{sub 4} hepatotoxic and lethal effects.

  15. Enhancement of pigment extraction from B. braunii pretreated using CO2 rapid depressurization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Uquiche

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Extraction of compounds from microalgae requires cell disruption as a pretreatment to increase extraction yield. Botryococcus braunii is a microalga with a significant content of carotenoids and other antioxidant compounds, such as chlorophylls. Cell disruption of B. braunii using CO2 rapid depressurization was studied as a pretreatment for the extraction of carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments. We studied the effect of temperature (21–49 °C and pressure (6–13 MPa during static compression on pigment recovery with supercritical CO2 at 40 °C, 30 MPa and solvent flow of 4.7 L NPT/min. Within the experimental region, the extraction yield of carotenoids and chlorophylls increased by 2.4- and 2.2-fold respectively. Static compression conditions of high pressure and low temperature increased the extraction of carotenoids and especially chlorophylls. We selected 21 °C and 13 MPa as the cell disruption condition, which produced 1.91 g/kg d.s. of carotenoids and 14.03 mg/kg d.s. of chlorophylls. Pretreated microalga gave a 10-fold higher chlorophyll extraction yield compared to the untreated sample. While for carotenoids and tocopherols were 1.25 and 1.14-fold higher, respectively. Additionally, antioxidant activity of pretreated microalga (33.22 mmol TE/kg oil was significantly higher than the value for the untreated samples (29.11 mmol TE/kg oil (p ≤ 0.05. Confocal microscopy images showed morphological differences between micro-colonies with and without disruption treatment, suggesting that partial cell disruption by rapid depressurization improved the extraction of microalga compounds.

  16. Enhancement of pigment extraction from B. braunii pretreated using CO2 rapid depressurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uquiche, Edgar; Antilaf, Ivette; Millao, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Extraction of compounds from microalgae requires cell disruption as a pretreatment to increase extraction yield. Botryococcus braunii is a microalga with a significant content of carotenoids and other antioxidant compounds, such as chlorophylls. Cell disruption of B. braunii using CO2 rapid depressurization was studied as a pretreatment for the extraction of carotenoid and chlorophyll pigments. We studied the effect of temperature (21-49°C) and pressure (6-13MPa) during static compression on pigment recovery with supercritical CO2 at 40°C, 30MPa and solvent flow of 4.7LNPT/min. Within the experimental region, the extraction yield of carotenoids and chlorophylls increased by 2.4- and 2.2-fold respectively. Static compression conditions of high pressure and low temperature increased the extraction of carotenoids and especially chlorophylls. We selected 21°C and 13MPa as the cell disruption condition, which produced 1.91g/kg d.s. of carotenoids and 14.03mg/kg d.s. of chlorophylls. Pretreated microalga gave a 10-fold higher chlorophyll extraction yield compared to the untreated sample. While for carotenoids and tocopherols were 1.25 and 1.14-fold higher, respectively. Additionally, antioxidant activity of pretreated microalga (33.22mmol TE/kg oil) was significantly higher than the value for the untreated samples (29.11mmol TE/kg oil) (p≤0.05). Confocal microscopy images showed morphological differences between micro-colonies with and without disruption treatment, suggesting that partial cell disruption by rapid depressurization improved the extraction of microalga compounds. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

  18. Review of technologies for the pretreatment of retrieved single-shell tank waste at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of the study reported here was to identify and evaluate innovative processes that could be used to pretreat mixed waste retrieved from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site. The information was collected as part of the Single Shell Tank Waste Treatment project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The project is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company under their SST Disposal Program.

  19. Phenotypic selection of a wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation of AFEX pretreated corn stover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingie Jin; Cory Sarks; Christa Gunawan; Benjamin D. Bice; Shane P. Simonett; Ragothaman Avanasi Narasimhan; Laura B. Willis; Bruce E. Dale; Venkatesh Balan; Trey K. Sato

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) process involves enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass and fermentation of glucose and xylose in one bioreactor. The optimal temperatures for enzymatic hydrolysis are higher than the standard fermentation temperature of ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover,...

  20. Metabolic shift and electron discharge pattern of anaerobic consortia as a function of pretreatment method applied during fermentative hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth, S.; Venkata Mohan, S.; Lalit Babu, V.; Sarma, P.N. [Bioengineering and Environmental Centre, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad 500 607, AP (India)

    2010-10-15

    We have made an attempt to evaluate the variation in the electron discharge (ED) pattern of anaerobic consortia as a function of pretreatment viz., chemical, heat-shock, acid and oxygen-shock in comparison with untreated mixed consortia during fermentative hydrogen (H{sub 2}) production. Experiments were performed with dairy wastewater as substrate using anaerobic mixed consortia as biocatalyst (pretreated individually and in combination). Cyclic voltammetry (CV) elucidated significant variation in the ED pattern of mixed consortia along with H{sub 2} production and substrate degradation (SD) as a function of pretreatment method applied. Higher ED was observed with all pretreated consortia which can be attributed to the stable proton (H{sup +}) shuttling due to the suppression of methanogenic activity. Oxygen-shock method and untreated consortia showed lower H{sub 2} production and higher SD among the variations studied, while, combined pretreated consortia resulted higher H{sub 2} production and lower SD. Lower ED observed with untreated consortia suggests the H{sup +} reduction during methanogenesis rather than the inter-conversion of metabolites, which is presumed to be necessary for H{sub 2} production. ED observed with combined pretreated consortia corroborated well with the observed H{sub 2} production. Redox pairs were visualized on the voltammograms with almost all the experimental variations studied except untreated consortia. The potentials (E{sub 0}) of redox pairs observed were corresponding to intracellular electron carriers viz., NAD{sup +}/NADH (E{sub 0} -0.32 V) and FAD{sup +}/FADH{sub 2} (E{sub 0} -0.24 V). (author)