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Sample records for reported higher lifetime

  1. Final report on reliability and lifetime prediction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillen, Kenneth T; Wise, Jonathan; Jones, Gary D.; Causa, Al G.; Terrill, Edward R.; Borowczak, Marc

    2012-12-01

    This document highlights the important results obtained from the subtask of the Goodyear CRADA devoted to better understanding reliability of tires and to developing better lifetime prediction methods. The overall objective was to establish the chemical and physical basis for the degradation of tires using standard as well as unique models and experimental techniques. Of particular interest was the potential application of our unique modulus profiling apparatus for assessing tire properties and for following tire degradation. During the course of this complex investigation, extensive relevant information was generated, including experimental results, data analyses and development of models and instruments. Detailed descriptions of the findings are included in this report.

  2. Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚祎

    2004-01-01

    @@ 继ESPN刊出同名杂志之后,2003年赫斯特公司(Hearst Corp.)和迪斯尼(Walt Disney Co.)的合作促成了一本新杂志的诞生:(Lifetime),其目标读者是成百万收看同名有线电视网节目的妇女们.

  3. Is it All About the Money? Not All Surgical Subspecialization Leads to Higher Lifetime Revenue when Compared to General Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimas-George, Maria; Fleischer, Brian; Slakey, Douglas; Kandil, Emad; Korndorffer, James R; DuCoin, Christopher

    2017-07-10

    It is believed that spending additional years gaining expertise in surgical subspecialization leads to higher lifetime revenue. Literature shows that more surgeons are pursuing fellowship training and dedicated research years; however, there are no data looking at the aggregate economic impact when training time is accounted for. It is hypothesized that there will be a discrepancy in lifetime income when delay to practice is considered. Data were collected from the Medical Group Management Association's 2015 report of average annual salaries. Fixed time of practice was set at 30 years, and total adjusted revenue was calculated based on variable years spent in research and fellowship. All total revenue outcomes were compared to general surgery and calculated in US dollars. The financial data on general surgeons and 9 surgical specialties (vascular, pediatric, plastic, breast, surgical oncology, cardiothoracic, thoracic primary, transplant, and trauma) were examined. With fellowship and no research, breast and surgical oncology made significantly less than general surgery (-$1,561,441, -$1,704,958), with a difference in opportunity cost equivalent to approximately 4 years of work. Pediatric and cardiothoracic surgeons made significantly more than general surgeons, with an increase of opportunity cost equivalent to $5,301,985 and $3,718,632, respectively. With 1 research year, trauma surgeons ended up netting less than a general surgeon by $325,665. With 2 research years, plastic and transplant surgeons had total lifetime revenues approximately equivalent to that of a general surgeon. Significant disparities exist in lifetime total revenue between surgical subspecialties and in comparison, to general surgery. Although most specialists do gross more than general surgeons, breast and surgical oncologists end up netting significantly less over their lifetime as well as trauma surgeons if they do 1 year of research. Thus, the economic advantage of completing additional

  4. Lifetime Extension Report: Progress on the SAVY-4000 Lifetime Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Cynthia F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Weis, Eric M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Blair, Michael W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Manufacturing Engineering and Technology; Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Karns, Tristan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Meincke, Linda Jeanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Torres, Joseph Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Weaver, Brian Phillip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences. Statistical Sciences; Adams, Jillian Cathleen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials

    2016-09-20

    The 3-year accelerated aging study of the SAVY-4000 O-ring shows very little evidence of significant degradation to samples subjected to aggressive elevated temperature and radiation conditions. Whole container thermal aging studies followed by helium leakage testing and compression set measurements were used to establish an estimate for a failure criterion for O-ring compression set of ≥65 %. The whole container aging studies further show that the air flow and efficiency functions of the filter do not degrade significantly after thermal aging. However, the degradation of the water resistant function leads to water penetration failure after four months at 210°C, but does not cause failure after 10 months at 120°C (130°C is the maximum operating temperature for the PTFE membrane). The thermal aging data for O-ring compression set do not meet the assumptions of standard time-temperature superposition analysis for accelerated aging studies. Instead, the data suggest that multiple degradation mechanisms are operative, with a reversible mechanism operative at low aging temperatures and an irreversible mechanism dominating at high aging temperatures. To distinguish between these mechanisms, we have measured compression set after allowing the sample to physically relax, thereby minimizing the effect of the reversible mechanism. The resulting data were analyzed using two distinct mathematical methods to obtain a lifetime estimate based on chemical degradation alone. Both methods support a lifetime estimate of greater than 150 years at 80°C. Although the role of the reversible mechanism is not fully understood, it is clear that the contribution to the total compression set is small in comparison to that due to the chemical degradation mechanism. To better understand the chemical degradation mechanism, thermally aged O-ring samples have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC

  5. Lifetime Extension Report: Progress on the SAVY-4000 Lifetime Extension Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Cynthia F. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Smith, Paul Herrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Weis, Eric M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Blair, Michael W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Stone, Timothy Amos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Veirs, Douglas Kirk [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Manufacturing Engineering and Technology; Reeves, Kirk Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Karns, Tristan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Oka, Jude M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Process Infrastructure; Keller, Jennie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Meincke, Linda Jeanne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Torres, Joseph Angelo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Herman, Matthew Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Weaver, Brian Phillip [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences. Statistical Sciences; Adams, Jillian Cathleen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials; Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology. Engineered Materials

    2016-09-20

    The 3-year accelerated aging study of the SAVY-4000 O-ring shows very little evidence of significant degradation to samples subjected to aggressive elevated temperature and radiation conditions. Whole container thermal aging studies followed by helium leakage testing and compression set measurements were used to establish an estimate for a failure criterion for O-ring compression set of ≥65 %. The whole container aging studies further show that the air flow and efficiency functions of the filter do not degrade significantly after thermal aging. However, the degradation of the water-resistant function leads to water penetration failure after four months at 210°C, but does not cause failure after 10 months at 120°C (130°C is the maximum operating temperature for the PTFE membrane). The thermal aging data for O-ring compression set do not meet the assumptions of standard time-temperature superposition analysis for accelerated aging studies. Instead, the data suggest that multiple degradation mechanisms are operative, with a reversible mechanism operative at low aging temperatures and an irreversible mechanism dominating at high aging temperatures. To distinguish between these mechanisms, we have measured compression set after allowing the sample to physically relax, thereby minimizing the effect of the reversible mechanism. The resulting data were analyzed using two distinct mathematical methods to obtain a lifetime estimate based on chemical degradation alone. Both methods support a lifetime estimate of greater than 150 years at 80°C. Although the role of the reversible mechanism is not fully understood, it is clear that the contribution to the total compression set is small in comparison to that due to the chemical degradation mechanism. To better understand the chemical degradation mechanism, thermally aged O-ring samples have been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC

  6. Lifetime interpersonal violence and self-reported chlamydia trachomatis diagnosis among California women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jennifer; Pavao, Joanne; Mack, Katelyn P; Chow, Joan M; Baumrind, Nikki; Kimerling, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    To examine the relationship between cumulative exposure to various types of interpersonal violence throughout the life span and self-reported history of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) diagnosis in a population-based sample of California women. This was a cross-sectional analysis of a population-based survey of California women aged 18-44 years (n = 3521). Participants reported their experience of multiple types of interpersonal violence: physical or sexual abuse in childhood or adulthood and intimate partner violence (IPV) in the past 12 months. Current posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms were also reported. Separate logistic regression models assessed the association between experiencing each type of interpersonal violence, as well as women's cumulative exposure to violence, and past CT diagnosis, adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, and poverty, as well as mental health problems. Six percent of women reported a past diagnosis of CT, and 40.8% reported experiencing at least one type of interpersonal violence in their lifetime. All types of violence were significantly associated with higher odds of having a past CT diagnosis even after controlling for sociodemographics. Women who reported experiencing four or more types of violence experiences had over five times the odds of reporting a lifetime CT diagnosis compared with women who never experienced interpersonal violence (adjusted odds ratio = 5.71, 95% CI 3.27-9.58). Current PTSD and depressive symptoms did not significantly affect the relationship between a woman's cumulative experience of violence and her risk of past CT diagnosis. There is a robust association between experiencing multiple forms of violence and having been diagnosed with CT. Women who seek treatment for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), such as CT, should be assessed for their lifetime history of violence, especially violence in their current intimate relationships. Sexual risk reduction counseling may also be important

  7. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  8. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  9. Status report of the neutron lifetime experiment tau-SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karch, Jan Peter; Beck, Marcus; Dragisic, Simo; Haak, Jan; Heil, Werner; Kories, Fabian; Kunz, Simon; Stepanow, Dietmar [Institut fuer Physik, University of Mainz (Germany); Geppert, Christopher; Karpuk, Sergei [Institut fuer Kernchemie, University of Mainz (Germany); Sobolev, Yury [Institut fuer Physik, University of Mainz (Germany); Institut fuer Kernchemie, University of Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The decay of the free neutron into a proton, electron and antineutrino is the prototype of the semi-leptonic weak decay and plays a key role in particle physics and astrophysics. Nowadays, the accuracy achieved is limited by systematic errors, mainly caused by anomalous losses during storage of neutrons (ultracold neutrons) in material vessels. The magnetic storage of neutrons aims to avoid these systematic limitations and is expected to reach an accuracy of 0.1-0.3 s in the lifetime of the neutron. In this talk, the magnetic spectrometer tau-SPECT is presented, which uses a combination of magnetic multipole fields for radial storage and the field configuration of the superconducting aSPECT magnet for longitudinal storage of ultracold neutrons. This storage experiment benefits greatly from the new ultracold neutron source at the pulsable TRIGA reactor Mainz. The talk gives an overview of the experimental status: Proton detection system and adiabatic fast passages device.

  10. Lower reflectivity and higher minority carrier lifetime of hand-tailored porous silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Nansheng; Ma Zhongquan; Zhou Chengyue; He Bo

    2009-01-01

    con layer is measured to be ~3.19 μs. These values are very close to the reflectivity and the minority carrier lifetime of Si3N4 as a passivation layer on a bulk silicon-based solar cell (0.33% and 3.03/μs, respectively).

  11. Higher Ambitions Summit. Rapporteur Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Ian

    2014-01-01

    The Sutton Trust and Pearson two-day summit on higher ambitions in apprenticeships and vocational education drew more than 120 leaders in education, training and employment, policy makers, academics, and researchers to London. Delegates heard from political leaders stressing the importance they attach to high-quality apprenticeships. Presentations…

  12. Stable Early Maternal Report of Behavioral Inhibition Predicts Lifetime Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronis-Tuscano, Andrea; Degnan, Kathryn Amey; Pine, Daniel S.; Perez-Edgar, Koraly; Henderson, Heather A.; Diaz, Yamalis; Raggi, Veronica L.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2009-01-01

    The odds of a lifetime diagnosis of social anxiety disorder increased by 3.79 times for children who had a stable report of behavioral inhibition from their mothers. This finding has important implications for the early identification and prevention of social anxiety disorder.

  13. Lifetime forecasting of electrofusion joining systems for polyethylene gas pipes. Final report, 1990-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhlman, C.J.; Chell, G.G.; Kanninen, M.F.; Deel, G.W.

    1996-04-01

    There were three specific objectives of this research. First, a short time acceptance test for EF fittings that is fundamentally related to the long time field performance was to be developed that would permit the use of existing lifetime forecasting procedures to quantify joint lifetimes. The second objective was to determine the effects of the various design and installation variables such as power input, heating time, cool-down time, initial pipe-coupler clearance and ambient temperature on the service performance. The third objective was to investigate and quantify the effects of surface preparation and cleanliness on joint integrity. Four final reports have been published to cover the diversified technology developed in this research.

  14. The Vanishing Higher-Education Reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Richard

    2008-01-01

    As the Internet continues to drain readers and advertising, newspapers are left with no choice but to cut back on coverage. Many papers have settled on higher education as an expendable beat. At the National Education Writers Association, which represents education reporters and editors around the country, the e-mail list for elementary- and…

  15. Detailed report of the MuLan measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi constant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, V.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Peng, Q.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B.L.; Webber, D. M.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis, and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100% polarized surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing plastic scintil

  16. Detailed Report of the MuLan Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Tishchenko, V; Carey, R M; Chitwood, D B; Crnkovic, J; Debevec, P T; Dhamija, S; Earle, W; Gafarov, A; Giovanetti, K; Gorringe, T P; Gray, F E; Hartwig, Z; Hertzog, D W; Johnson, B; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Kizilgul, S; Kunkle, J; Lauss, B; Logashenko, I; Lynch, K R; McNabb, R; Miller, J P; Mulhauser, F; Onderwater, C J G; Peng, Q; Phillips, J; Rath, S; Roberts, B L; Webber, D M; Winter, P; Wolfe, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100%-polarized, surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing, plastic scintillator array. The measurement employed two target arrangements; a magnetized ferromagnetic target with a ~4 kG internal magnetic field and a crystal quartz target in a 130 G external magnetic field. Approximately 1.6 x 10^{12} positrons were accumulated and together the data yield a muon lifetime of tau_{mu}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps (1.0 ppm), thirty times more precise than previous generations of lifetime experiments. The lifetime measurement yields the most accurate value of the Fermi constant G_F (MuLan) = 1.1663787(6) x 10^{-5} GeV^{-2} (0.5 ppm). It also enables new precision studies of weak interactions via lifetime measurements of muonic atoms.

  17. Catering Management in Higher Education. National Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This study identified the key management issues for senior managers and heads of catering services in higher education in developing and reviewing catering services. The study was conducted with the involvement of 76 universities and colleges with evidence drawn from questionnaires covering the Excellence Model's 9 criteria, an Expert Working…

  18. Lifetime Assessments of Weapon Organics and Polymers FY05 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, S; Maxwell, R; Sawvel, A; Madabhushi, R; Dinh, L; Solyom, D; Cohenour, R

    2006-11-01

    Non-nuclear organics, while not yet regarded to be at risk, figure in a large percentage of Significant Findings Investigations. Further, early application of advanced lifetime, compatibility, and base-lining assessments for LEP replacement materials and emerging materials for the Reliable Replacement Warhead (RRW) provides data for rational material choices. This task is currently assessing the chemical and mechanical characteristics of a variety of weapon organics prioritized by the risk-consequence of material aging. The majority of effort to date has been dedicated to silicone elastomer components known to lose their load resistance with age, with additional effort dedicated to urethane adhesives. This fiscal year, we have focused on initial aging studies of UNI620-3, a candidate replacement material for DC745U, and Adiprene (LW520). Aging studies of S5455, originally scheduled for testing in FY05, were postponed until FY07. We have initiated aging studies on these materials by employing accelerated aging tests with exposure to Co-60 {gamma}-radiation and elevated temperatures and studying their mechanical properties using a variety of analytical tools including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Additionally, we have investigated aging signatures present in parts returned from surveillance as well as initiated long and short term stress relaxation studies for a thorough understanding of compression set occurring in silicone elastomers components. Additional investigations of aging processes in fluoropolymer binders and the combined effects of radiation and tensile set on silicone pads were performed. Finally, we have used temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies to significantly improve the accuracy of our H{sub 2}O outgassing model in comparison with last year through the use of the isoconversion technique as well as to measure the equilibrium vapor pressure of hydrogenated

  19. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Zock, Jan-Paul; Serra, Ignasi; Antó, Josep M; de Batlle, Jordi; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel; Donaire-González, David; Benet, Marta; Balcells, Eva; Monsó, Eduard; Gayete, Angel; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients. We studied 338 patients hospitalized for a first exacerbation of COPD in 9 Spanish hospitals, obtaining full occupational history in a face-to-face interview; job codes were linked to a job exposure matrix for semi-quantitative estimation of exposure to mineral/biological dust, and gases/fumes for each job held. Patients underwent spirometry, diffusing capacity testing and analysis of gases in stable conditions. Quality of life, dyspnea and chronic bronchitis symptoms were determined with a questionnaire interview. A high- resolution CT scan was available in 133 patients. 94% of the patients included were men, with a mean age of 68(8.5) years and a mean FEV1% predicted 52 (16). High exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and exposure to mineral dust and gases/fumes was associated with higher scores for symptom perception in the St. George's questionnaire. No occupational agent was associated with a lower FEV1. High exposure to all occupational agents was associated with better lung diffusion capacity, in long-term quitters. In the subgroup with CT data, patients with emphysema had 18% lower DLCO compared to those without emphysema. In our cohort of COPD patients, high exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and high exposure to all occupational agents was consistently associated with better diffusion capacity in long-term quitters.

  20. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Rodríguez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients. METHODS: We studied 338 patients hospitalized for a first exacerbation of COPD in 9 Spanish hospitals, obtaining full occupational history in a face-to-face interview; job codes were linked to a job exposure matrix for semi-quantitative estimation of exposure to mineral/biological dust, and gases/fumes for each job held. Patients underwent spirometry, diffusing capacity testing and analysis of gases in stable conditions. Quality of life, dyspnea and chronic bronchitis symptoms were determined with a questionnaire interview. A high- resolution CT scan was available in 133 patients. RESULTS: 94% of the patients included were men, with a mean age of 68(8.5 years and a mean FEV1% predicted 52 (16. High exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and exposure to mineral dust and gases/fumes was associated with higher scores for symptom perception in the St. George's questionnaire. No occupational agent was associated with a lower FEV1. High exposure to all occupational agents was associated with better lung diffusion capacity, in long-term quitters. In the subgroup with CT data, patients with emphysema had 18% lower DLCO compared to those without emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: In our cohort of COPD patients, high exposure to gases or fumes was associated with chronic bronchitis, and high exposure to all occupational agents was consistently associated with better diffusion capacity in long-term quitters.

  1. The Sprint to Lifetime Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    Describes the trend in high school physical education programs toward lifetime sports, defined by the author as physical activities that will serve the interests of students for a lifetime. Included are a special report on program costs and a model of a performance-based lifetime sports program. (Author/DN)

  2. Lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive outdoor study of polymer solar cells and modules for duration of one year was conducted. Different sample geometries and encapsulations were employed in order to study the spread in the lifetimes. The study is a complimentary report to previous work that focused on indoor ageing...... tests. Comparison of the indoor and outdoor lifetimes was performed by means of the o-diagram, which constitutes the initial steps towards establishing a method for predicting the lifetime of an organic photovoltaic device under real operational conditions based on a selection of accelerated indoor...

  3. Annual Report on Higher Education in New Mexico, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Mexico State Commission on Postsecondary Education, Santa Fe.

    The 1986 report of the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education first outlines responsibilities of the Commission and developments concerning the Board of Educational Finance and then considers the climate for higher education reform in New Mexico, including economic changes, career changes that require retraining and skill upgrading, and…

  4. Scottish Access Students in Higher Education. Research Report Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powney, Janet; Hall, Stuart

    This document is the final report on the experiences of mature students who had entered higher education through the Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP), a one-year course designed to provide an alternative route into higher education for adults and which utilizes a supportive environment plus an incremental, modular approach and small-group…

  5. Report of the Select Committee on Higher Education, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    A report of a study of issues in public higher education in Texas is presented, along with recommendations of the Select Committee on Higher Education to improve access, quality, and management. Attention is directed to: institutional role and mission statements, general funding policies, research and technology funding, faculty compensation,…

  6. Statistics Report on TEQSA Registered Higher Education Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Government Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This statistics report provides a comprehensive snapshot of national statistics on all parts of the sector for the year 2013, by bringing together data collected directly by TEQSA with data sourced from the main higher education statistics collections managed by the Australian Government Department of Education and Training. The report provides…

  7. QSO Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, P

    2003-01-01

    The QSO lifetime t_Q is one of the most fundamental quantities for understanding black hole and QSO evolution, yet it remains uncertain by several orders of magnitude. If t_Q is long, then only a small fraction of galaxies went through a luminous QSO phase. In contrast, a short lifetime would require most galaxies today to have undergone a QSO phase in their youth. The current best estimates or constraints on t_Q from black hole demographics and the radiative properties of QSOs vary from at least 10^6 to 10^8 years. This broad range still allows both possibilities: that QSOs were either a rare or a common stage of galaxy evolution. These constraints also do not rule out the possibility that QSO activity is episodic, with individual active periods much shorter than the total active lifetime. In the next few years a variety of additional observational constraints on the lifetimes of QSOs will become available, including clustering measurements and the proximity effect. These new constraints can potentially dete...

  8. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  9. Quality Assurance in Transnational Higher Education. ENQA Workshop Report 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Bergan, Sjur; Cassar, Daniela; Hamilton, Marlene; Soinila, Michele; Sursock, Andree; Uvalic-Trumbic, Stamenka; Williams, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present report is the product of an ENQA (European Association for Quality Assurance in Higher Education) Bologna Seminar "Quality Assurance in Transnational Education: from words to action" hosted by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA, UK) in London in December, 2008. The seminar discussed the current trends in Transnational…

  10. Higher Education Finance. An Annotated Bibliography, Report 96-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, William

    This annotated bibliography on higher education finance lists 79 journal articles, books, conference papers, and reports originally published from 1973 through 1995 with most published in the 1990s. Citations include lengthy analytical summaries and critiques. The bibliography is presented in six sections which cover the following topics: (1)…

  11. Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education: Interconnecting the Reporting Process and Organisational Change Management for Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Ceulemans; Rodrigo Lozano; María del Mar Alonso-Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Although there has been a considerable increase in the publication of sustainability reports in the corporate world in the last decade, sustainability reporting in higher education institutions is still in its early stages. This study’s aim was to explore the relationship between sustainability reporting and organizational change management for sustainability in higher education. A survey was sent to higher education institutions worldwide that have published sustainability reports in the las...

  12. Perception of neighborhood safety and reported childhood lifetime asthma in the United States (U.S.: a study based on a national survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Subramanian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have emphasized the role of psychosocial stressors as a determinant of asthma, and neighborhoods can be a potential source of such stressors. We investigated the association between parental perception of neighborhood safety and reported lifetime asthma among children. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data for the study came from the 2003-04 National Survey of Children Health (NSCH; a nationally representative cross-sectional sample of children aged 0-17 years. Demographic, socioeconomic and behavioral covariates were included in the study. Models were estimated after taking account of weighting and complex survey design. Parental report of whether the child has ever been diagnosed with asthma by a physician was used to define the outcome. Parental report of perception of neighborhood safety was the main exposure. In unadjusted models, the odds ratio (OR for reporting asthma associated with living in neighborhoods that were perceived to be sometimes or never safe was 1.36 (95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.21, 1.53 compared to living in neighborhoods that were perceived to be always safe. Adjusting for covariates including exposure to second hand tobacco smoke, mother's self-rated health, child's physical activity and television viewing attenuated this association (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08, 1.43. In adjusted models, the increased odds ratio for reporting asthma was also higher among those who perceived neighborhoods as being usually safe (OR 1.15 95% CI 1.06, 1.26, as compared to always safe, suggestive of a dose-response relationship, with the differentials for usually safe and never safe being statistically significant (p = 0.009. CONCLUSION: Psychosocial stressors may be important risk factors that may impact the pathogenesis of asthma and/or contribute to asthma morbidity by triggering exacerbations through neuroimmunologic mechanisms, as well as social mechanisms.

  13. Lifestyle and metabolic syndrome in adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Webb A; Li, Chenghong; Nottage, Kerri A; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Armstrong, Gregory T; Lanctot, Jennifer Q; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Laver, Joseph H; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Ness, Kirsten K

    2014-09-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCS) are at an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetSyn), which may be reduced with lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize lifestyle habits and associations with MetSyn among CCS. CCS who were ≥ 10 years from diagnosis, aged > 18 years, and participating in the St. Jude Lifetime Cohort Study completed medical and laboratory tests and a food frequency questionnaire. The Third Report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel criteria were used to classify participants with MetSyn. Anthropometric, food frequency questionnaire, and self-reported physical activity data were used to characterize lifestyle habits according to World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) recommendations. Those who met ≥ 4 of 7 recommendations were classified as having followed guidelines. Sex-stratified log-binomial regression models were used to evaluate associations between dietary/lifestyle habits and MetSyn, adjusted for age, age at cancer diagnosis, receipt of cranial radiotherapy, education, and household income. Among 1598 CCS (49.2% of whom were male, with a median age of 32.7 years [range, 18.9 years-60.0 years]), 31.8% met criteria for MetSyn and 27.0% followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Females who did not follow WCRF/AICR guidelines were 2.4 times (95% confidence interval, 1.7-3.3) and males were 2.2 times (95% confidence interval, 1.6-3.0) more likely to have MetSyn than those who followed WCRF/AICR guidelines. Adherence to a heart-healthy lifestyle is associated with a lower risk of MetSyn among CCS. There is a need to determine whether lifestyle interventions prevent or remediate MetSyn in CCS. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. Association of different cognitive domains with lifetime history of psychosis and reported antipsychotic-treatment adverse events in bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałwa, Agnieszka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study. The present work aimed to assess the association between cognitive functions, the lifetime occurrence of psychotic symptoms, and reported adverse effects of antipsychotic treatments inpatients with bipolar disorders.Methods. In the present work, 44 bipolar disorder inpatients hospitalized in the Affective Disorders Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in Warsaw, were investigated. All of them met the criteria of remission and were prepared for release from the hospital unit. Twenty-two patients were hospitalized in the manic stage of the illness, and 22 were in the depressive stage of illness. Both groups were assessed using adequate psychiatric rating scales (HDRS or YMRS and CAMRS and neuropsychological tests (WCST, TMT, Stroop Test and Verbal Fluency Test.Results. Patients who had a prior history of psychotic symptoms had poorer verbal functioning in comparison to subjects without such a history. However, individuals hospitalized in the manic state of disease, and who reported more adverse events after antipsychotic medication during the whole course of illness, had worse results in some parameters of executive function measurements in the WCST test, namely occurring in a greater percentage of nonperseverative errors and a lower number of completed categories.Discussion. Generally the results confirm findings according to which, patients with the history of psychosis performe worse on neurocognitive tasks. However, the nature of dysfunctions found, generates questions about its relations with the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment. Conclusion: Different aspects of cognitive dysfunctions may be related to the experience of psychosis and antipsychotic treatment in patients with bipolar disorders.

  15. Lifetime report of perceived stress at work and cancer among men: A case-control study in Montreal, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc-Lapierre, Audrey; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Weiss, Deborah; El-Zein, Mariam; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Élise

    2017-03-01

    The association between perceived workplace psychological stress, over the entire work career, and cancer among men has never been assessed. This was explored in the context of a population-based case-control study conducted in Montreal, Canada. 3103 incident cancer cases (11 types) diagnosed in 1979-1985 and 512 population controls were interviewed. Subjects described in detail each job held during their lifetime, including the occurrence of stress, and its reason. Logistic regression estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between perceived workplace stress and its duration, and each cancer site, adjusting for lifestyle and occupational factors. Employment in at least one stressful job was associated with increased odds of cancers of the lung (OR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.01-1.75), colon (OR=1.51, 95% CI: 1.15-1.98), bladder (OR=1.37, 95% CI: 1.03-1.81), rectal (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.10-2.10), and stomach (OR=1.53, 95% CI: 1.08-2.15). A duration-response trend was found for cancers of the lung, colon, rectum, stomach, and for NHL. Subjects reported changes in stress level over their career. Perceived stress was ascribed to several sources, including high demand and time pressure, financial issues, job insecurity, and hazardous conditions. Prolonged exposure to perceived stress at work was associated with greater odds of cancer at 5 out of 11 sites. While over reporting of stress by cases cannot be fully ruled out, these associations, if substantiated, would bear important public health significance. Prospective studies building on detailed stress assessment protocols considering all sources and changes over the career are necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lifetimes of Rydberg states of Eu atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Hua; Ye, Shi-Wei; Dai, Chang-Jian

    2015-01-01

    The radiative lifetimes of the Eu 4f76snp (8PJ or 10PJ) Rydberg states with J = 5/2 and 11/2 are investigated with a combination of multi-step laser excitation and pulsed electric field ionization, from which their dependence on the effective principal quantum number is observed. The lifetimes of 21 states are reported along with an evaluation of their experimental uncertainty. The influence of blackbody radiation, due to the oven temperature, on the lifetime of the higher-n states is detected. The non-hydrogen behavior of the investigated states is also observed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174218).

  17. Visualizing Higher Order Finite Elements: FY05 Yearly Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, David; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2005-11-01

    This report contains an algorithm for decomposing higher-order finite elementsinto regions appropriate for isosurfacing and proves the conditions under which thealgorithm will terminate. Finite elements are used to create piecewise polynomialapproximants to the solution of partial differential equations for which no analyticalsolution exists. These polynomials represent fields such as pressure, stress, and mo-mentim. In the past, these polynomials have been linear in each parametric coordinate.Each polynomial coefficient must be uniquely determined by a simulation, and thesecoefficients are called degrees of freedom. When there are not enough degrees of free-dom, simulations will typically fail to produce a valid approximation to the solution.Recent work has shown that increasing the number of degrees of freedom by increas-ing the order of the polynomial approximation (instead of increasing the number offinite elements, each of which has its own set of coefficients) can allow some typesof simulations to produce a valid approximation with many fewer degrees of freedomthan increasing the number of finite elements alone. However, once the simulation hasdetermined the values of all the coefficients in a higher-order approximant, tools donot exist for visual inspection of the solution.This report focuses on a technique for the visual inspection of higher-order finiteelement simulation results based on decomposing each finite element into simplicialregions where existing visualization algorithms such as isosurfacing will work. Therequirements of the isosurfacing algorithm are enumerated and related to the placeswhere the partial derivatives of the polynomial become zero. The original isosurfacingalgorithm is then applied to each of these regions in turn.3 AcknowledgementThe authors would like to thank David Day and Louis Romero for their insight into poly-nomial system solvers and the LDRD Senior Council for the opportunity to pursue thisresearch. The authors were

  18. FY-2016 Methyl Iodide Higher NOx Adsorption Test Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2016 under the Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT) Program Offgas Sigma Team to further research and advance the technical maturity of solid sorbents for capturing iodine-129 in off-gas streams during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Adsorption testing with higher levels of NO (approximately 3,300 ppm) and NO2 (up to about 10,000 ppm) indicate that high efficiency iodine capture by silver aerogel remains possible. Maximum iodine decontamination factors (DFs, or the ratio of iodine flowrate in the sorbent bed inlet gas compared to the iodine flowrate in the outlet gas) exceeded 3,000 until bed breakthrough rapidly decreased the DF levels to as low as about 2, when the adsorption capability was near depletion. After breakthrough, nearly all of the uncaptured iodine that remains in the bed outlet gas stream is no longer in the form of the original methyl iodide. The methyl iodide molecules are cleaved in the sorbent bed, even after iodine adsorption is no longer efficient, so that uncaptured iodine is in the form of iodine species soluble in caustic scrubber solutions, and detected and reported here as diatomic I2. The mass transfer zone depths were estimated at 8 inches, somewhat deeper than the 2-5 inch range estimated for both silver aerogels and silver zeolites in prior deep-bed tests, which had lower NOx levels. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity and silver utilization for these higher NOx tests, at about 5-15% of the original sorbent mass, and about 12-35% of the total silver, respectively, were lower than for trends from prior silver aerogel and silver zeolite tests with lower NOx levels. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to expand the database for organic iodide adsorption and increase the technical maturity if iodine adsorption processes.

  19. Prices, Productivity, and Investment: Assessing Financial Strategies in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Edward P.

    This analysis critically examines the cost controversy in higher education with an eye to resolving the crisis which is currently serving to exacerbate public willingness to fund higher education. An introduction touches on the role and influence of political ideologies and offers a framework to be used throughout the analysis for critically…

  20. Diversity Leadership in Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 32, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr., Ed.; Martinez, Ruben O., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    This monograph examines and discusses the context for diversity leadership roles and practices in higher education by using research and theoretical and applied literatures from a variety of fields, including the social sciences, business, and higher education. Framing the discussion on leadership in this monograph is the perspective that American…

  1. The Entrepreneurial Domains of American Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 34, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Matthew M.; Metcalf, Amy Scott

    2009-01-01

    This volume draws on a diverse set of literatures to represent the various ways in which entrepreneurship is understood in and applied to higher education. It provides a platform for debate for those considering applications of entrepreneurial principles to academic research and practices. Using academic entrepreneurship in the United States as…

  2. Strategies and Consequences. Managing the Costs in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggaman, John S.

    This report focuses on the need for better management of higher education resources in view of the rising costs and changing revenues now confronting higher education institutions in the United States. Rising costs and changing revenues are reflected in stagnating faculty salaries, a decline in enrollment, rising administrative and insurance…

  3. Estimation of luminescence lifetime in frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fu-Jun; Xu Zheng; Zhao Su-Ling; Lou Zhi-Dong; Yang Sheng-Yi; Xu Xu-Rong

    2006-01-01

    Absorption is the origin of luminescence. But it must be noticed that the lifetime of luminescence might reversely influence the rate of absorption. In this paper, it is reported that the luminescence intensity of copper and manganese changes with the driving frequency at constant voltage. The variation of luminescent intensity depends only on the lifetime of luminescence but not on the type of quenching or other factors. Generally the rate of absorption is dominantly determined by the material property and the lifetime of luminescence centres, the absorption of shorter lifetime centre will be larger than that of the longer lifetime centre at the same excited condition.

  4. Strategic Reporting Tool: Balanced Scorecards in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyddon, Jan W.; McComb, Bruce E.

    2008-01-01

    In this toolbox article, the authors describe the recommended steps for creating a community college balanced scorecard that measures and reports on key performance indicators based on targets and signal values to end-users, college constituents and external stakeholders. Based on extensive experience in the field, the authors provide a…

  5. Danish MMR vaccination coverage is considerably higher than reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Nanna; Mygind, Anna; Bro, Flemming

    2017-02-01

    The Danish childhood vaccination programme offers protection against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR). Nevertheless, many children appear to be unvaccinated according to the national registers. The aim of this study was to estimate the MMR1 vaccination coverage based on a medical record review of children whose vaccination status is negative according to the register-based data. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 19 randomly selected general practices in the Central Denmark Region including 1,712 children aged 18-42 months. The practices received a registration form listing children with a negative MMR1 vaccination status in the register-based data. The general practices then validated the children's vaccination status by medical record review. In total, 94% of the children had been vaccinated according to the medical records in general practice compared with 86% according to the register-based data. Of the 246 children who were unvaccinated according to the register-based data, 135 (55%) had been vaccinated according to the medical records. This discrepancy was due mainly to administrative reimbursement errors. The MMR1 vaccination coverage in Denmark seems to be considerably higher than reflected in national registers. Using medical record review to re-assess the vaccination status revealed that most of the supposedly unvaccinated children had, in fact, been vaccinated. The Danish Research Foundation for General Practice and the General Practitioners' Foundation for Education and Development. not relevant.

  6. Construction of higher dimensional charged gravastars: a survey report

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, S; Guha, B K; Ray, Saibal

    2015-01-01

    We explore possibility to find out a new model of gravastars in the extended $D$-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell spacetime. The class of solutions as obtained by Mazur and Mottola of a neutral gravastar~\\cite{Mazur2001,Mazur2004} have been observed as an alternative to $D$-dimensional versions of the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole. To tackle the spherical system in a convenient way we have configured that the gravastar consists of three distinct regions with different equations of state as follows: [I] Interior region $0 \\leq r < r_1$,~$\\rho = -p$, [II] Thin shell region $r_1 \\leq r < r_2$,~$\\rho = p$, and [III] Exterior region $r_2 < r$,~$\\rho = p =0$. The outer region of this gravastar model therefore corresponds to a higher dimensional Reissner-Nordstr{\\"o}m black hole. In connection to this junction conditions are provided and therefore we have formulated mass and the related Equation of State of the gravastar. It has been shown that the model satisfies all the requirements of the physical fea...

  7. Enhancing the lifetime of SOFC stacks for combined heat and power applications SOF-CH - Final report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sfeir, J.; Hocker, T.; Herle, J. Van; Nakajo, A.; Tanasini, P.; Galinski, H.; Kuebler, J.

    2007-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work done in 2007 by the Swiss SOF Consortium SOF-CH on research concerned with various aspects of fuel cell technology. Members of the consortium include several Swiss Institutes of Technology and Materials Research, Universities of Applied Sciences as well is important commercial players in the fuel cell area. The work done on various aspects of fuel cell technology and the co-operation between the various institutions and companies are reviewed. The five work packages defined in the project are reported on. Follow-up projects are noted.

  8. Lifetime of Organic Photovoltaics: Status and Predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Madsen, Morten Vesterager; Roth, Bérenger

    2016-01-01

    The results of a meta-analysis conducted on organic photovoltaics (OPV) lifetime data reported in the literature is presented through the compilation of an extensive OPV lifetime database based on a large number of articles, followed by analysis of the large body of data. We fully reveal the prog...

  9. Neurocognitive Outcomes Decades After Treatment for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Report From the St Jude Lifetime Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krull, Kevin R.; Brinkman, Tara M.; Li, Chenghong; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Ness, Kirsten K.; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Gurney, James G.; Kimberg, Cara; Krasin, Matthew J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Hudson, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine rates, patterns, and predictors of neurocognitive impairment in adults decades after treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients and Methods Survivors of childhood ALL treated at St Jude Children's Research Hospital who were still alive at 10 or more years after diagnosis and were age ≥ 18 years were recruited for neurocognitive testing. In all, 1,014 survivors were eligible, 738 (72.8%) agreed to participate, and 567 (76.8%) of these were evaluated. Mean age was 33 years; mean time since diagnosis was 26 years. Medical record abstraction was performed for data on doses of cranial radiation therapy (CRT) and cumulative chemotherapy. Multivariable modeling was conducted and glmulti package was used to select the best model with minimum Akaike information criterion. Results Impairment rates across neurocognitive domains ranged from 28.6% to 58.9%, and those treated with chemotherapy only demonstrated increased impairment in all domains (all P values < .006). In survivors who received no CRT, dexamethasone was associated with impaired attention (relative risk [RR], 2.12; 95% CI, 1.11 to 4.03) and executive function (RR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.20 to 4.91). The impact of CRT was dependent on young age at diagnosis for intelligence, academic, and memory functions. Risk for executive function problems increased with survival time in a CRT dose-dependent fashion. In all survivors, self-reported behavior problems increased by 5% (RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.09) with each year from diagnosis. Impairment was associated with reduced educational attainment and unemployment. Conclusion This study demonstrates persistent and significant neurocognitive impairment in adult survivors of childhood ALL and warrants ongoing monitoring of brain health to facilitate successful adult development and to detect early onset of decline as survivors mature. PMID:24190124

  10. Computing Battery Lifetime Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, L.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetime depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  11. Computing Battery Lifetime Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, Lucia; Jongerden, Marijn R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.

    2007-01-01

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetime depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  12. Direct Measurements of the Lifetime of Heavy Hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, X; Margaryan, A; Achenbach, P; Ahmidouch, A; Albayrak, I; Androic, D; Asaturyan, A; Asaturyan, R; Ates, O; Badui, R; Baturin, P; Boeglin, W; Bono, J; Brash, E; Carter, P; Chen, C; Chen, X; Chiba, A; Christy, E; Dalton, M M; Danagoulian, S; De Leo, R; Doi, D; Elaasar, M; Ent, R; Fenker, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, M; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Garibaldi, F; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Gogami, T; Hashimoto, O; Horn, T; Hu, B; Hungerford, E V; Jones, M; Kanda, H; Kaneta, M; Kawai, M; Kawama, D; Khanal, H; Kohl, M; Liyanage, A; Luo, W; Maeda, K; Markowitz, P; Maruta, T; Matsumura, A; Maxwell, V; Mkrtchyan, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Nagao, S; Nakamura, S N; Narayan, A; Neville, C; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, M I; Nunez, A; Nuruzzaman,; Okayasu, Y; Petkovic, T; Pochodzalla, J; Reinhold, J; Rodriguez, V M; Samanta, C; Sawatzky, B; Seva, T; Shichijo, A; Tadevosyan, V; Taniya, N; Tsukada, K; Veilleux, M; Vulcan, W; Wesselmann, F R; Wood, S A; Ya, L; Yamamoto, T; Ye, Z; Yokota, K; Yuan, L; Zhamkochyan, S; Zhu, L

    2012-01-01

    The lifetime of a Lambda particle embedded in a nucleus (hypernucleus) decreases from that of free Lambda decay due to the opening of the Lambda N to NN weak decay channel. However, it is generally believed that the lifetime of a hypernucleus attains a constant value (saturation) for medium to heavy hypernuclear masses, yet this hypothesis has been difficult to verify. The present paper reports a direct measurement of the lifetime of medium-heavy hypernuclei produced with a photon-beam from Fe, Cu, Ag, and Bi targets. The recoiling hypernuclei were detected by a fission fragment detector using low-pressure multi-wire proportional chambers. The experiment agrees remarkably well with the only previously-measured single-species heavy-hypernucleus lifetime, that of Fe56_Lambda at KEK, and has significantly higher precision. The experiment disagrees with the measured lifetime of an unknown combination of heavy hypernuclei with 180

  13. Lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A; Barber, Jacques P

    2011-10-01

    To determine lifetime prevalence rates of sleep paralysis. Keyword term searches using "sleep paralysis", "isolated sleep paralysis", or "parasomnia not otherwise specified" were conducted using MEDLINE (1950-present) and PsychINFO (1872-present). English and Spanish language abstracts were reviewed, as were reference lists of identified articles. Thirty five studies that reported lifetime sleep paralysis rates and described both the assessment procedures and sample utilized were selected. Weighted percentages were calculated for each study and, when possible, for each reported subsample. Aggregating across studies (total N=36,533), 7.6% of the general population, 28.3% of students, and 31.9% of psychiatric patients experienced at least one episode of sleep paralysis. Of the psychiatric patients with panic disorder, 34.6% reported lifetime sleep paralysis. Results also suggested that minorities experience lifetime sleep paralysis at higher rates than Caucasians. Sleep paralysis is relatively common in the general population and more frequent in students and psychiatric patients. Given these prevalence rates, sleep paralysis should be assessed more regularly and uniformly in order to determine its impact on individual functioning and better articulate its relation to psychiatric and other medical conditions. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Self-reported history of childhood smoking is associated with an increased risk for peripheral arterial disease independent of lifetime smoking burden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Priest

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic disorders are well known to be associated with obesity, lipid profile, smoking, hypertension and other medical comorbidities, and large cohort studies have explored the childhood correlates to these adult risk factors. However, there has been little investigation into the childhood risk factors for peripheral arterial disease (PAD. We endeavored to better understand the role of smoking in childhood in the risk for PAD in a well described cohort of 1,537 adults at high risk for cardiovascular disease. In a multivariate regression model, we observed an increased risk of PAD among those who reported a history of smoking during childhood (OR = 2.86; 95% CI, 1.99-4.11; P<0.001, which remained statistically significant after controlling for lifetime smoking burden (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.00-2.41; P = 0.049. Our novel observation of disproportionate risk of PAD conferred by a history of childhood smoking may reflect an unrecognized biological mechanism such as a unique susceptibility to vascular injury or an unaccounted for covariate such as secondhand smoke exposure in childhood. This observation suggests further investigation is required into the pathophysiology of smoking in the developing vasculature and the need for detailed clinical data about patterns of childhood smoking and smoke exposure.

  15. Measurement of Charm Meson Lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J. [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Lipeles, E.; Schmidtler, M.; Shapiro, A.; Sun, W.M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jaffe, D.E.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Potter, E.M.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Asner, D.M.; Eppich, A.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Korte, C.M.; Lange, D.J.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Roberts, D.; Tajima, H. [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Behrens, B.H.; Ford, W.T.; Gritsan, A.; Krieg, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Alexander, J.P.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D.G.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; von Dombrowski, S.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Hopman, P.I.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Meyer, T.O.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Thayer, J.G.; Thies, P.G.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Prescott, C.; Rubiera, A.I.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Browder, T.E.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L.; Yamamoto, H. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D; and others

    1999-06-01

    We report measurements of the D{sup 0} , D{sup +} , and D{sup +}{sub s} meson lifetimes using 3.7 fb{sup {minus}1} of e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation data collected near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the CLEO detector. The measured lifetimes of the D{sup 0} , D{sup +} , and D{sup +}{sub s} mesons are 408.5{plus_minus}4.1{sup +3.5}{sub {minus}3.4} fs , 1033.6{plus_minus}22.1{sup +9.9}{sub {minus}12.7} fs , and 486.3{plus_minus}15.0{sup +4.9}{sub {minus}5.1} fs . The precisions of these lifetimes are comparable to those of the best previous measurements, and the systematic errors are very different. In a single experiment we find that the ratio of the D{sup +}{sub s} and D{sup 0} lifetimes is 1.19{plus_minus}0.04 . {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  16. Reducing barriers to energy efficiency in the German higher education sector. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleich, J.; Boede, U.

    2000-12-01

    This report describes the empirical research into barriers to energy efficiency in the German higher education (HE) sector. It is one of nine such reports in the BARRIERS project. The report contains description and analysis of six case studies of energy management in German universities. The results are analysed using the theoretical framework developed for the BARRIERS project (Sorrell et al., 2000). The report also provides brief recommendations on how these barriers to the rational use of energy (RUE) may be overcome and how energy efficiency within the sector may be improved. The results of the study for the higher education sector in Germany are summarised in this executive summary under the following headings: - Characterising the higher education sector; - Case studies of energy management in the German higher education sector; - Evidence of barriers in the German higher education sector; - The role of energy service companies in the higher education sector; - Policy implications. (orig.)

  17. The Supply of Part-Time Higher Education in the UK. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, Claire; Birkbeck, Anne Jamieson; Mason, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This report explores the supply of part-time higher education in the UK, with particular consideration to the study of part-time undergraduate provision in England. It is the final publication in the series of reports on individual student markets that were commissioned by Universities UK following the publication of the reports on the Future size…

  18. Measuring Lifetime Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hoy; Buhong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an axiomatic framework for measuring life time poverty over multiple periods. For an individual, we argue that lifetime poverty is influenced by both the snapshot poverty of each period and the poverty level of the "permanent" lifetime consumption; it is also influenced by how poverty spells are distributed over the life time. Two obvious candidates for aggregation are to aggregate over time and then across individuals, or vice versa. For a society, we consider a path-inde...

  19. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  20. Higher Education in Kentucky. Final Report of the SCR 30 Study Committee. Program Evaluation. Research Report No. 222.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiala, Joseph; And Others

    A report on higher education in Kentucky is presented, with attention to governance, funding, tuition, financial aid, staffing and salary comparisons for administrators and faculty, enrollment, degree production, cooperation, and quality issues. The statutory organization of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education is specified, along with the…

  1. A Methodology for Sustainability Evaluation and Reporting in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Ana C.; Carravilla, Maria Antonia; Oliveira, Jose F.; Costa, Carlos A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology that allows higher education institutions (HEIs) to promote, to evaluate and to report on sustainability. The ultimate goal of the afore-mentioned methodology is to help HEIs achieve sustainability. First, a model entitled Sustainability in Higher Education Institutions (SusHEI) that generally…

  2. Sources of Fluctuations and Growth of Investment in Higher Education. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Walter W.

    A study was undertaken to apply family investment techniques and public expenditure analysis to problems faced in higher education, treating expenditures for higher education as an investment in human resources. The report is addressed to economists, policy makers, and educators and students, and is both technical and nontechnical in its various…

  3. A Management Control Perspective of Sustainability Reporting in Higher Education: In Search of a Holistic View

    OpenAIRE

    Ceulemans, Kim; Van Caillie, Didier; Molderez, Ingrid; Van Liedekerke, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions have been actively attempting to integrate sustainability in their curricula, research, operations, and outreach activities over the last decades. Despite the efforts undertaken, it is currently still challenging for their internal and external stakeholders to assess an institution’s sustainability-related activities and the extent of their implementation within the different activities of higher education. Since sustainability reporting in higher ...

  4. LANGUAGE POLICY AND HIGHER EDUCATION IN SOUTHEAST ASIA, FINAL DRAFT OF CONSULTANT'S REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NOSS, RICHARD B.

    A FIELD INVESTIGATION FOR THIS REPORT WAS CONDUCTED FROM SEPTEMBER TO DECEMBER 1964 THROUGH THE FACILITIES OF THE JOINT UNESCO-IAU RESEARCH OFFICE ON HIGHER EDUCATION IN KUALA LUMPUR. IN FIVE OF THE EIGHT COUNTRIES COVERD BY THE REPORT (MALAYSIA, THAILAND, CAMBODIA, SOUTH VIETNAM, AND THE PHILIPPINES), IT WAS POSSIBLE TO MAKE "FAIRLY EXTENSIVE…

  5. Mobility-lifetime product and interface property in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, H.; Kida, H.; Nonomura, S.; Fukumoto, K.; Hamakawa, Y.

    1983-06-01

    A technique for evaluating the mobility-lifetime product of electrons and holes for amorphous Si solar cells is reported and used to assay the variation of the products with impurity doping, temperature, and prolonged light exposure. The product was examined as a significant indicator of solar cell performance and durability. The a-Si:H cells examined were prepared by an rf technique, and the spectral response of the photocurrent was examined in monochromatic light. The maximum products were observed when small amounts of boron atoms were used as the dopant. The hole lifetime dominated the photoconductivity in undoped and phosphorus doped cells, while the electron lifetime was dominant in boron doped cells. The mobility-lifetime product controlled the effective surface recombination factor. The method was concluded useful for optimizing the material, structure, and manufacturing processes for producing higher performance, reproducible, and stable a-Si:H pin solar cells.

  6. Charm Lifetimes and Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, H W K

    2002-01-01

    A review of the latest results on charm lifetimes and D-mixing is presented. The e+e- collider experiments are now able to measure charm lifetimes quite precisely, however comparisons with the latest results from fixed-target experiments show that possible systematic effects could be evident. The new D-mixing results from the B-factories have changed the picture that is emerging. Although the new world averaged value of y_CP is now consistent with zero, there is still a very interesting and favoured scenario if the strong phase difference between the Doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed and the Cabibbo-flavoured D0 -> Kpi decay is large.

  7. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  8. Addressing the Declining Productivity of Higher Education Using Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Douglas N.

    2013-01-01

    Higher education productivity, as measured by academic degrees granted by American colleges and universities, is declining. Since the early 1990s, real expenditures on higher education have grown by more than 25 percent, now amounting to 2.9 percent of US gross domestic product (GDP)--greater than the percentage of GDP spent on higher education in…

  9. Nutritional intake and dietary patterns in pregnancy: a longitudinal study of women with lifetime eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micali, Nadia; Northstone, Kate; Emmett, Pauline; Naumann, Ulrike; Treasure, Janet L

    2012-12-14

    There is limited knowledge about dietary patterns and nutrient/food intake during pregnancy in women with lifetime eating disorders (ED). The objective of the present study was to determine patterns of food and nutrient intake in women with lifetime ED as part of an existing longitudinal population-based cohort: the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Women with singleton pregnancies and no lifetime psychiatric disorders other than ED (n 9723) were compared with women who reported lifetime (ever) ED: (anorexia nervosa (AN, n 151), bulimia nervosa (BN, n 186) or both (AN+BN, n 77)). Women reported usual food consumption using a FFQ at 32 weeks of gestation. Nutrient intakes, frequency of consumption of food groups and overall dietary patterns were examined. Women with lifetime ED were compared with control women using linear regression and logistic regression (as appropriate) after adjustment for relevant covariates, and for multiple comparisons. Women with lifetime ED scored higher on the 'vegetarian' dietary pattern; they had a lower intake of meat, which was compensated by a higher consumption of soya products and pulses compared with the controls. Lifetime AN increased the risk for a high ( ≥ 2500 g/week) caffeine consumption in pregnancy. No deficiencies in mineral and vitamin intake were evident across the groups, although small differences were observed in macronutrient intakes. In conclusion, despite some differences in food group consumption, women with lifetime ED had similar patterns of nutrient intake to healthy controls. Important differences in relation to meat eating and vegetarianism were highlighted, as well as high caffeine consumption. These differences might have an important impact on fetal development.

  10. Our Allotted Lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that measured by the internal clock of heartbeats or breathing, all mammals live a similar lifespan. This is based on the fact that mammals, regardless of size, breathe about 200 million times in their lifetime at a rate of 1 breath for every 4 heartbeats. (AJ)

  11. Positronium lifetime in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, Abel

    2004-01-01

    A model describing the relationship between the ortho--positronium lifetime and the volume of a void, located in a synthetic zeolite, is analyzed. Our idea, which allows us to take into account the effects of temperature, comprises the introduction of a non--hermitian term in the Hamiltonian, which accounts for the annihilation of the ortho--positronium. The predictions of the present model are also confronted against an already known experimental result.

  12. The College Payoff: Education, Occupations, Lifetime Earnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Anthony P.; Rose, Stephen J.; Cheah, Ban

    2011-01-01

    A college degree pays off--but by just how much? In this report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, the authors examine just what a college degree is worth--and what else besides a degree might influence an individual's potential earnings. This report examines lifetime earnings for all education levels and…

  13. Financing Higher Education in Francophone West Africa. An EDI Policy Seminar Report, Number 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, Angela

    Meetings were held in Senegal in 1985, in Cote d'Ivoire in 1986, and in Zimbabwe in 1987, concerning the current state of higher education finance in Africa, the structure of unit costs, and the role of development assistance agencies and other sources of financial support. Reports are presented concerning the macroeconomic perspective, internal…

  14. Public Policies, Prices, and Productivity in American Higher Education. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid increases in what colleges charge and what they spend per student have been and remain one of the most controversial aspects of American higher education. Tuition, fees, and other college charges have increased in both the public and private sectors at more than twice the rate of inflation for over a quarter century. Trends over time in what…

  15. Public Policies, Prices, and Productivity in American Higher Education. Stretching the Higher Education Dollar. Special Report 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptman, Arthur M.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid increases in what colleges charge and what they spend per student have been and remain one of the most controversial aspects of American higher education. Tuition, fees, and other college charges have increased in both the public and private sectors at more than twice the rate of inflation for over a quarter century. Trends over time in what…

  16. Blueprint or Blue Remembered Hills? The Relevance of the Robbins Report to the Present Reforms of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presents opposing interpretations of the Robbins Report, stating that British higher education is still guided by its principles. Examines the report's influence on the size and shape of the higher education system, the character of higher education regarding teaching and research, and higher education's place in modern society. (GEA)

  17. Blueprint or Blue Remembered Hills? The Relevance of the Robbins Report to the Present Reforms of Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presents opposing interpretations of the Robbins Report, stating that British higher education is still guided by its principles. Examines the report's influence on the size and shape of the higher education system, the character of higher education regarding teaching and research, and higher education's place in modern society. (GEA)

  18. Lifetime Measurement of 26O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redpath, Thomas; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    An interesting property of some neutron-unbound systems is true two-neutron emission where the neutrons are emitted simultaneously as opposed to a sequential decay through an intermediate state. Since neutrons are only affected by the angular momentum barrier, the timescale for this process is much shorter than for two proton emission which is dominated by the Coulomb barrier. One such case is 26O where a very low decay energy was measured and the two valence neutrons are expected to occupy d-wave orbitals. Also, the ground state of 25O is located 700 keV higher. In a first experiment, the MoNA collaboration extracted a lifetime of 4 .5-1 . 5 + 1 . 1 (stat) +/- 3(syst) ps with a confidence level of 82%. Recently, an experiment dedicated to measuring the 26O lifetime in order to improve the confidence level of the measurement was performed at NSCL. The experiment utilized a newly developed segmented target which increased the statistics without degrading the resolution. Preliminary results will be presented. NSF PHY-1002511, DOE-NNSA DE-NA0000979.

  19. Physical and sexual lifetime violence: prevalence and influence on fear of childbirth before, during and after delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Anne-Mette; Tabor, Ann; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of self-reported lifetime violence and to assess whether women exposed to any physical violence or sexual violence (SEV) had a higher risk of having fear of childbirth (FOC) before, during or after delivery compared with women without such history.......To estimate the prevalence of self-reported lifetime violence and to assess whether women exposed to any physical violence or sexual violence (SEV) had a higher risk of having fear of childbirth (FOC) before, during or after delivery compared with women without such history....

  20. Physical and sexual lifetime violence: prevalence and influence on fear of childbirth before, during and after delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroll, Anne-Mette; Tabor, Ann; Kjaergaard, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of self-reported lifetime violence and to assess whether women exposed to any physical violence or sexual violence (SEV) had a higher risk of having fear of childbirth (FOC) before, during or after delivery compared with women without such history.......To estimate the prevalence of self-reported lifetime violence and to assess whether women exposed to any physical violence or sexual violence (SEV) had a higher risk of having fear of childbirth (FOC) before, during or after delivery compared with women without such history....

  1. A Lifetime Prediction Method for LEDs Considering Real Mission Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai; Zhan, Xiaoqing; Blaabjerg, Frede; Chung, Henry Shu-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The Light-Emitting Diode (LED) has become a very promising alternative lighting source with the advantages of longer lifetime and higher efficiency than traditional ones. The lifetime prediction of LEDs is important to guide the LED system designers to fulfill the design specifications and to benchmark the cost-competitiveness of different lighting technologies. However, the existing lifetime data released by LED manufacturers or standard organizations are usually applicable only for some spe...

  2. Lifetimes and HQE

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: $\\tau (B^+) / \\tau (B_d) = 1.04^{+0.05}_{-0.01} \\pm 0.02 \\pm 0.01$, $\\tau (B_s) / \\tau (B_d) = 1.001 \\pm 0.002$, $\\tau (\\Lambda_b)/ \\tau (B_d) = 0.935 \\pm 0.054$ and $\\bar {\\tau} (\\Xi_b^0) / \\bar{\\tau} (\\Xi_b^+) = 0.95 \\pm 0.06$. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  3. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Reitsma, K.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence d

  4. Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Schwartz, Lyle H.; Faber, Katherine T.; Cargill III, G. Slade; Houston, Betsy

    2003-10-28

    A report, in the form of abbreviated notes, of the 17th Biennial Conference on National Materials Policy ''Materials Education: Opportunities over a Lifetime'' held May 20-21, 2002 in College Park, MD, sponsored by the Federation of Materials Societies and the University Materials Council.

  5. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  6. A lifetime prediction method for LEDs considering mission profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai; Zhan, Xiaoqing

    2016-01-01

    Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) has become a very promising alternative lighting source with the advantages of longer lifetime and higher efficiency than traditional ones. The lifetime prediction of LEDs is important to guide the LED system designers to fulfill the design specifications...... and to benchmark the cost-competitiveness of different lighting technologies. The existing lifetime data released by LED manufacturers or standard organizations are usually applicable only for specific temperature and current levels. Significant lifetime discrepancies may be observed in field operations due...... available from accelerated degradation testing. It identifies also the key variables (e.g., heat sink parameters and lifetime-matching of LED drivers) that can be designed to achieve a specified lifetime and reliability level. Two case studies of an indoor residential lighting and an outdoor street lighting...

  7. Lifetimes of Vibro-Rotational Levels in Excited Electronic States of Diatomic Hydrogen Isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astashkevich, S. A.; Lavrov, B. P.

    2015-06-01

    The current situation in studies of lifetimes of excited rovibronic levels for the H2, D2, T2, HD, HT, and DT molecules is analyzed. All measured lifetime values (792 entries for 618 different vibro-rotational levels of 33 electronic states) reported in 61 publications before April 2015 are compiled and listed in tabular format together with an annotated bibliography. Experimental data are only available for the H2, HD, and D2 molecules. The data collected in the present work show fragmentariness of experimental data. For the vast majority of the levels, the lifetime values were reported in one paper only and up to now are without independent experimental verification. A complete bibliography of publications concerning semiempirical determination and nonempirical calculations of the lifetimes is presented. Numerical results obtained in the framework of these two approaches are listed only in cases when experimental data are available. For more than half of the levels, the differences between measured and calculated values are three times higher than experimental errors. These discrepancies show necessity of more precise experimental and nonempirical studies. For some 79 rovibronic levels, our analysis makes it possible to propose certain set of recommended lifetime values.

  8. Lifetimes of Vibro-Rotational Levels in Excited Electronic States of Diatomic Hydrogen Isotopologues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astashkevich, S. A., E-mail: astashkevich@mail.ru; Lavrov, B. P., E-mail: b.lavrov@spbu.ru [Faculty of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    The current situation in studies of lifetimes of excited rovibronic levels for the H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, and DT molecules is analyzed. All measured lifetime values (792 entries for 618 different vibro-rotational levels of 33 electronic states) reported in 61 publications before April 2015 are compiled and listed in tabular format together with an annotated bibliography. Experimental data are only available for the H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2} molecules. The data collected in the present work show fragmentariness of experimental data. For the vast majority of the levels, the lifetime values were reported in one paper only and up to now are without independent experimental verification. A complete bibliography of publications concerning semiempirical determination and nonempirical calculations of the lifetimes is presented. Numerical results obtained in the framework of these two approaches are listed only in cases when experimental data are available. For more than half of the levels, the differences between measured and calculated values are three times higher than experimental errors. These discrepancies show necessity of more precise experimental and nonempirical studies. For some 79 rovibronic levels, our analysis makes it possible to propose certain set of recommended lifetime values.

  9. Spina bifida with higher position of sacral hiatus: a case report with clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srijit, D; Shipra, P

    2007-01-01

    Spina bifida is a developmental defect in the vertebral column, in which the laminae fail to fuse and thereby the spinal cord is relatively unprotected. We report a case of spina bifida, in a dried specimen of sacrum, characterized by a prominent S1 spine and a higher sacral hiatus. Conventional textbooks of anatomy provide less information about the clinical implications of such anomalies and research studies are the only source of information. The present study, discusses in detail, the structural and radiological aspects of spina bifida, with a higher sacral hiatus. Precise knowledge of normal and abnormal anatomy of the sacrum may be clinically important for anesthetists, neurologists, radiologists and orthopedic surgeons, in their clinical practice (Fig. 3, Ref. 16). Full Text (Free, PDF) www.bmj.sk

  10. Are immigrants and nationals born to immigrants at higher risk for delayed or no lifetime breast and cervical cancer screening? The results from a population-based survey in Paris metropolitan area in 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Rondet

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This study aims to compare breast cancer screening (BCS and cervical cancer screening (CCS practices of French women born to French parents with those of immigrants and nationals born to immigrants, taking their socioeconomic status into account. METHODS: The study is based on data collected in 2010 in the Paris metropolitan area among a representative sample of 3000 French-speaking adults. For women with no history of breast or cervical cancer, multivariate logistic regressions and structural equation models were used to investigate the factors associated with never having undergone BCS or CCS. RESULTS: We confirmed the existence of a strong gradient, with respect to migration origin, for delaying or never having undergone BCS or CCS. Thus, being a foreign immigrant or being French of immigrant parentage were risk factors for delayed and no lifetime screening. Interestingly, we found that this gradient persisted (at least partially after adjusting for the women's socioeconomic characteristics. Only the level of income seemed to play a mediating role, but only partially. We observed differences between BCS and CCS which suggest that organized CCS could be effective in reducing socioeconomic and/or ethnic inequities. CONCLUSION: Socioeconomic status partially explained the screening nonparticipation on the part of French women of immigrant origin and foreign immigrants. This was more so the case with CCS than with BCS, which suggests that organized prevention programs might reduce social inequalities.

  11. FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALA, JR; Gratton, E; PRENDERGAST, FG

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most ...

  12. Higher education and eesearch report of the hearing held on 8 December, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the hearing that took place on Tuesday 8th December 2015 from 1730 to 2000hrs. This was the second session in the series of the ‘LSE Commission on the Future of Britain in Europe’.\\ud Respected practitioners and experts in higher education and research took up our invitation to participate in the hearing to discuss the risks of a Brexit and how universities might act at this important moment in British life. Participants included those with high level and/or frontline expe...

  13. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes: Phase 2, Improved refractory fiber and industrial benefit development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yifang; Curtis, J.M.; DePoorter, G.L.; Martin, P.C.; Munoz, D.R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering

    1995-05-01

    This is Phase II of a three-phase study for the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes, for use in the aluminum, glass, cement, and iron and steel industries. Fiberization of 24 out of 25 compositions in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Si0{sub 2}-Zr0{sub 2} system were achieved. These 24 and three existing fiber compositions were evaluated: The shrinkage and the crystalline and vitreous phases were determined vs heat treatment time and temperature. Four theoretical models were developed: Shrinkage, devitrification kinetics, density change, and fiberization. Although some of the fibers formed during Phase II had properties as good as the reference ASZ fiber, no fiber had a significantly improved performance. This work, although not entirely successful, did produce significant benefits to refractory insulating fiber manufacturers and users: Mechanisms of both linear and thickness shrinkage for vitreous refractory fibers were determined, devitrification kinetics were quantified and used in models to predict shrinkage during service, and the mechanism of fiber formation in the melt spinning process was studied.

  14. Lifetime-weighted photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, A.; Shao, P.; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been utilized to quantify the lifetime profile of exogenous agents using a series of pump-probe pulses with a varying time delay; however, current techniques typically lead to long acquisition times which are sensitive to motion and cause absorption or photobleaching. We introduce a technique called lifetime-weighted imaging, which uses only three laser pulses to preferentially weight signals from chromophores with long lifetimes (including exogenous contrast agents with triplet excited states such as methylene blue and porphyrins) while nulling chromophores with short picosecond- to nanosecond-scale lifetimes (including hemoglobin). This technique detects the PA signal from a probe pulse either with or without a pump pulse. By subtracting the probe-only signal from the pump-present probe signal, we effectively eliminate signals from chromophores with short lifetimes while preserving PA signals from chromophores with long-lifetimes. We demonstrate the oxygen-dependent lifetime of both methylene blue and porphyrin-lipids and demonstrate both ground-state recovery and excited-state lifetime-weighted imaging. Lifetime-weighted PA imaging may have applications in many molecular imaging application including: photodynamic therapy dosimetry guidance and oxygen sensing.

  15. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Ian M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schiller, Steven R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Todd, Annika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Billingsley, Megan A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwartz, Lisa C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  16. Copulas Between Wealth and Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Dongyan

    2009-01-01

    The life insurance industry is very interested in how a person's lifetime is related to his wealth with financial advisors interested in how even a person's portfolio choice affects his lifetime. This paper presents a statistical analysis combined with intuitive relationships between lifetime and wealth. Key properties of this relationship are given and then various copulas are analyzed to see whether they have these properties. Other advantages and disadvantages of these copulas for describing the dependence are stated. The results show that some copulas are not appropriate for relating lifetime and wealth, including the Gaussian family.

  17. Lifetime of Mechanical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, K.

    1999-07-01

    The gas plant at Kaarstoe was built as part of the Statpipe gas transport system and went on stream in 1985. In 1993 another line was routed from the Sleipner field to carry condensate, and the plant was extended accordingly. Today heavy additional supply- and export lines are under construction, and the plant is extended more than ever. The main role of the factory is to separate the raw gas into commercial products and to pump or ship it to the markets. The site covers a large number of well-known mechanical equipment. This presentation deals with piping, mechanical and structural disciplines. The lifetime of mechanical equipment is often difficult to predict as it depends on many factors, and the subject is complex. Mechanical equipment has been kept in-house, which provides detailed knowledge of the stages from a new to a 14 years old plant. The production regularity has always been very high, as required. The standard of the equipment is well kept, support systems are efficient, and human improvisation is extremely valuable.

  18. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  19. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  20. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  1. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  2. Utilization of Tabula Rasa to Stabilize Bulk Lifetimes in n-Cz Silicon for High-Performance Solar Cell Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Jensen, Mallory Ann; Youssef, Amanda; Nemeth, William; Page, Matthew; Buonassisi, Tonio; Stradins, Paul

    2016-11-21

    We investigate a high temperature, high cooling-rate anneal Tabula Rasa (TR) and report its implications on n-type Czochralski-grown silicon (n-Cz Si) for photovoltaic fabrication. Tabula Rasa aims at dissolving and homogenizing oxygen precipitate nuclei that can grow during the cell process steps and degrade the cell performance due to their high internal gettering and recombination activity. The Tabula Rasa thermal treatment is performed in a clean tube furnace with cooling rates >100 degrees C/s. We characterize the bulk lifetime by Sinton lifetime and photoluminescence mapping just after Tabula Rasa, and after the subsequent cell processing. After TR, the bulk lifetime surprisingly degrades to <; 0.1ms, only to recover to values equal or higher than the initial non-treated wafer (several ms), after typical high temperature cell process steps. Those include boron diffusion and oxidation; phosphorus diffusion/oxidation; ambient annealing at 850 degrees C; and crystallization annealing of tunneling-passivating contacts (doped polycrystalline silicon on 1.5 nm thermal oxide). The drastic lifetime improvement during high temperature cell processing is attributed to improved external gettering of metal impurities and annealing of intrinsic point defects. Time and injection dependent lifetime spectroscopy further reveals the mechanisms of lifetime improvement after Tabula Rasa treatment. Additionally, we report the efficacy of Tabula Rasa on n-type Cz-Si wafers and its dependence on oxygen concentration, correlated to position within the ingot.

  3. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... The population analyzed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analyzed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive...

  4. War and Peace among the Words: Rhetoric, Style and Propaganda in Response to National Reports on Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Clifford

    Responses to national reports during October 1984 through May 1985 concerning the state of American higher education are analyzed. Quantitative content analysis and qualitative rehetorical criticism are used to examine responses to national reports. Three national reports are of concern: "Involvement in Learning,""A Nation at…

  5. Compendium on Financing of Higher Education: Final Report of the Financing the Students' Future Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Bethan; Charonis, George-Konstantinos; Haaristo, Hanna-Stella; Maurer, Moritz; Kaiser, Florian; Siegrist, Rahel; McVitty, Debbie; Gruber, Angelika; Heerens, Nik; Xhomaqi, Brikena; Nötzl, Tina; Semjonov, Meeli; Primožic, Rok

    2013-01-01

    Higher education plays a vital role in society and the quality, accessibility, and form of higher education is highly dependent on financing. Financing of higher education is conceived to be of central importance for the future creation and dissemination of knowledge and research. Therefore, the financing of higher education is a topic that has…

  6. Radiative lifetime measurements of odd-parity highly-excited levels of Sn I by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jia-Xin; Feng Yan-Yan; Sun Gui-Juan; Dai Zhen-Wen

    2009-01-01

    Natural radiative lifetimes of five higher-lying odd-parity levels 5pTs 3p1o,5p5d 1p1o,5p6d 3F2o,3D1o and 3F3o in neutral tin are measured by the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TR-LIF) technique and the atomic beam method. All these lifetimes are not longer than 100 ns and they are found to be shorter than the lifetimes of evenparity levels in the same energy region. The results reported in this paper provide important transition parameters for highly-excited atomic Sn,which may be useful for theoretically calculating excited heavy atoms.

  7. $B$ mixing and lifetimes at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Piedra, J.

    2006-04-01

    The Tevatron collider at Fermilab provides a very rich environment for the study of b-hadrons. Both the D0 and CDF experiments have collected a sample of about 1 fb{sup -1}. they report results on three topics: b-hadron lifetimes, polarization amplitudes and the decay width difference in B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, and B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  8. Natural gas conversion to higher hydrocarbons using plasma interactions with surfaces. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.; Morgan, B.L.; Airey, R.W.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments are reported in which a methane plasma is created, and the methyl ions and hydrogen ions are accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 10 eV to greater than 100 eV, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces causes the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}m C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}m and C{sub 8} molecules. There is a decreasing percentage of larger molecules produced, in comparison with the C{sub 2} and C{sub 3} types. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The yield of the higher hydrocarbons depends upon the external voltage used, and voltage can be used as a control parameter to adjust the output mixture proportions. A conversion energy of 2.59 kilowatt hours/killogram of output has been demonstrated, and a reduction of this by a factor of 10 is possible using known techniques. In batch experiments, the selectivity for C{sub 2} has varied from 47% to 88%, and selectivity for C{sub 6} has ranged from 0% to 12.8%. Other hydrocarbon selectivities also span a wide and useful range. The estimated costs for hydrocarbons produced with this technology are in the range of $200 per tonne, in production quantities, depending upon natural gas costs. Pilot production experiments are recommended to make these estimates more precise, and to address strategies for scaling the technology up to production levels. Applications are discussed.

  9. PV String to 3-Phase Inverter with Highest Voltage Capabilities, Highest Efficiency and 25 Year Lifetime: Final Technical Report, November 7, 2011 - November 6, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, R.

    2012-12-01

    Final report for Renewable Power Conversion. The overall objective of this project was to develop a prototype PV inverter which enables a new utility-scale PV system approach where the cost, performance, reliability and safety benefits of this new approach have the potential to make all others obsolete.

  10. A Review of Two Higher Education Accountability Issues: Student Assessment and Faculty Workload. Report to Utah State Legislature. Report Number 91-03.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of the Legislative Auditor General, Salt Lake City.

    This report, in examining higher education accountability, reviews how student assessment is used nationally and in Utah to improve higher education accountability, and reviews the methods used in Utah to monitor faculty workload. Student assessments do provide a direct method of evaluating higher education effectiveness, and Utah's institutions…

  11. Lifetime of {sup 44}Ti as probe for supernova models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goerres, J.; Meissner, J.; Schatz, H.; Stech, E.; Tischhauser, P.; Wiescher, M. [Univ. of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Bazin, D.; Harkewicz, R.; Hellstroem, M.; Sherrill, B.; Steiner, M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Boyd, R.N. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Buchmann, L. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hartmann, D.H. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States); Hinnefeld, J.D. [Indiana Univ. South Bend, South Bend, IN (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The recent observation of {sup 44}Ti radioactivity in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A with the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory allows the determination of the absolute amount of {sup 44}Ti. This provides a test for current supernova models. The main uncertainty is the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti. We report a new measurement of the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti applying a novel technique. A mixed radioactive beam containing {sup 44}Ti as well as {sup 22}Na was implanted and the resulting {gamma}-activity was measured. This allowed the determination of the lifetime of {sup 44}Ti relative to the lifetime of {sup 22}Na, {tau} = (87.0 {+-} 1.9) y. With this lifetime, the {sup 44}Ti abundance agrees with theoretical predictions within the remaining observational uncertainties. (orig.)

  12. Institutional wide implementation of key advice for socially inclusive teaching in higher education. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Government policy and institutional initiatives have influenced increases in enrolment of non-traditional students to Australian universities. For these students, university culture is often incongruent with their own, making it difficult to understand the tacit requirements for participation and success. Academic teaching staff are important in creating socially inclusive learning experiences, particularly in first year subjects. This paper presents an institution-wide approach to enhancing socially inclusive teaching at one Australian university. Underpinned by a framework of ”bridging social-incongruity” the initiative was guided by six principles of socially inclusive teaching to support practice as proposed in the 2012 “Effective support of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds in higher education” report commissioned by the Australian Office of Learning and Teaching. Feedback from 150 academic teaching staff from various disciplines and campus locations, suggests this initiative was effective in increasing understanding of socially inclusive teaching practices with many participants indicating the teaching enhancements were applicable for their teaching context.

  13. Lifetime cover in private insurance markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, H Shelton; Connelly, Luke B

    2005-03-01

    In the last few decades, private health insurance rates have declined in many countries. In countries and states with community rating, a major cause is adverse selection. In order to address age-based adverse selection, Australia has recently begun a novel approach which imposes stiff penalties for buying private insurance later in life, when expected costs are higher. In this paper, we analyze Australia's Lifetime Cover in the context of a modified version of the Rothschild-Stiglitz insurance model (Rothschild and Stiglitz, 1976). We allow empirically-based probabilities to increase by age for low-risk types. The model highlights the shortcomings of the Australian plan. Based on empirically-based probabilities of illness, we predict that Lifetime Cover will not arrest adverse selection. The model has many policy implications for government regulation encouraging long-term health coverage.

  14. Increasing precision of lifetime determination in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is increasing, as commercial FLIM modules become available for confocal and multi-photon microscopy. In biological FLIM applications, low fluorescence signals from samples can be a challenge, and this causes poor precision in lifetime. In this study, for the first time, we applied wavelet-based denoising methods in time-domain FLIM, and compared them with our previously developed total variation (TV) denoising methods. They were first tested using artificial FLIM images. We then applied them to lowlight live-cell images. The results demonstrated that our TV methods could improve lifetime precision multi-fold in FLIM images and preserve the overall lifetime and pre-exponential term values when improving local lifetime fitting, while wavelet-based methods were faster. The results here can enhance the precision of FLIM, especially for low-light and / or fast video-rate imaging, to improve current and rapidly emerging new applications of FLIM such as live-cell, in vivo whole-animal, or endoscopic imaging.

  15. Lifetime of piezoceramic multilayer actuators : interplay of material properties and actuator design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Bos, B.; Groen, W.A.; Dortmans, L.M.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    We report an investigation into factors limiting the functional lifetime of multilayer piezoceramic actuators. The study consists of a combination of lifetime experiments by means of an accelerated lifetime test, inspection of the actuator microstructure at different stages of the accelerated lifeti

  16. Lifetime of piezoceramic multilayer actuators : interplay of material properties and actuator design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ende, D.A. van den; Bos, B.; Groen, W.A.; Dortmans, L.M.J.G.

    2009-01-01

    We report an investigation into factors limiting the functional lifetime of multilayer piezoceramic actuators. The study consists of a combination of lifetime experiments by means of an accelerated lifetime test, inspection of the actuator microstructure at different stages of the accelerated

  17. Report of an EU-US symposium on understanding nutrition-related consumer behavior: strategies to promote a lifetime of healthy food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Karl E; Rowe, Sylvia; Bellows, Laura L; Johnson, Susan L; Hetherington, Marion M; de Froidmont-Görtz, Isabelle; Lammens, Veerle; Hubbard, Van S

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes an EU-US Task Force on Biotechnology Research symposium on healthy food choices and nutrition-related purchasing behaviors. This meeting was unique in its transdisciplinary approach to obesity and in bringing together scientists from academia, government, and industry. Discussion relevant to funders and researchers centered on (1) increased use of public-private partnerships, (2) the complexity of food behaviors and obesity risk and multilevel aspects that must be considered, and (3) the importance of transatlantic cooperation and collaboration that could accelerate advances in this field. A call to action stressed these points along with a commitment to enhanced communication strategies. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  18. Physiologic frailty as a sign of accelerated aging among adult survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the St Jude Lifetime cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Kirsten K; Krull, Kevin R; Jones, Kendra E; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Armstrong, Gregory T; Green, Daniel M; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Smith, Webb A; Wilson, Carmen L; Sklar, Charles A; Shelton, Kyla; Srivastava, Deo Kumar; Ali, Sabeen; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M

    2013-12-20

    Frailty, a phenotype reported among 9.9% of individuals 65 years old and older (9.6% of women; 5.2% of men), has not been assessed among adult childhood cancer survivors (CCS). We estimated the prevalence of frailty and examined associations with morbidity and mortality. Participants included 1,922 CCS at least 10 years from original cancer diagnosis (men, 50.3%; mean age, 33.6 ± 8.1 years) and a comparison population of 341 participants without cancer histories. Prefrailty and frailty were defined as two and ≥ three of the following conditions: low muscle mass, self-reported exhaustion, low energy expenditure, slow walking speed, and weakness. Morbidity was defined as grade 3 to 4 chronic conditions (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0). Fisher's exact tests were used to compare, by frailty status, percentages of those with morbidity. In a subset of 162 CCS who returned for a second visit, Poisson regression was used to evaluate associations between frailty and new onset morbidity. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to evaluate associations between frailty and death. The prevalence of prefrailty and frailty were 31.5% and 13.1% among women and 12.9% and 2.7% among men, respectively, with prevalence increasing with age. Frail CCS were more likely than nonfrail survivors to have a chronic condition (82.1% v 73.8%). In models adjusted for existing chronic conditions, baseline frailty was associated with risk of death (hazard ratio, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.2) and chronic condition onset (relative risk, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2 to 4.2). The prevalence of frailty among young adult CCS is similar to that among adults 65 years old and older, suggesting accelerated aging.

  19. Long lifetimes in optical ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Lambrecht, Alexander; Weckesser, Pascal; Debatin, Markus; Karpa, Leon; Schaetz, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    We report on single Barium ions confined in a near-infrared optical dipole trap for up to three seconds in absence of any radio-frequency fields. Additionally, the lifetime in a visible optical dipole trap is increased by two orders of magnitude as compared to the state-of-the-art using an efficient repumping method. We characterize the state-dependent potentials and measure an upper bound for the heating rate in the near-infrared trap. These findings are beneficial for entering the regime of ultracold interaction in atom-ion ensembles exploiting bichromatic optical dipole traps. Long lifetimes and low scattering rates are essential to reach long coherence times for quantum simulations in optical lattices employing many ions, or ions and atoms.

  20. The Economics of Higher Education: A Report Prepared by the Department of the Treasury with the Department of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of the Treasury, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This report discusses the current state of higher education, with a brief high-level overview of the market and a more detailed discussion and analysis of the financial aid system. It also discusses the important changes President Obama has made to make higher education more accessible and affordable. The key findings are: (1) The economic returns…

  1. The Hunt Report and Higher Education Policy in the Republic of Ireland: "An International Solution to an Irish Problem?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, John; Loxley, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The "National Strategy for Higher Education to 2030" in the Republic of Ireland (universally known as the Hunt Report) represents the latest and most assertive attempt by the Irish state to re-construct higher education in accordance with economic utilitarian objectives. This paper sets out to analyse the historical context, key themes…

  2. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  3. Building on Success: Educational Diversity and Equity in Kentucky Higher Education. Choices before the Commonwealth. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, Angelo; Ledesma, Maria; Trent, William; Kurlaender, Michal; Yun, John; Lee, Chungmei; Siegel-Hawley, Genevieve; Driscoll, Anne; Orfield, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This report is an effort to assess what has been accomplished in successfully diversifying and desegregating historically segregated and unequal higher educational institutions across Kentucky, and how this was done. The report discusses the changing legal setting for these initiatives, analyzes the educational achievements and challenges, and…

  4. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  5. Teaching Strategies Adopted by Teachers at Higher Education Level in Kerala: A Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesa, M.; Nisha, E. V.

    2017-01-01

    In the special context of entrepreneurship, employability skill development, Higher Education 2.0 and the Kovalam Declaration 2016, the present article presents a brief review of genres of teaching strategies at higher education level and attempts to bring to the attention of the readers an account of the teaching strategies adopted by teachers at…

  6. Experimental and theoretical lifetimes and transition probabilities in Sb I

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Henrik; Engström, Lars; Lundberg, Hans; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biémont, Emile; 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.052512

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental atomic lifetimes for 12 levels in Sb I, out of which seven are reported for the first time. The levels belong to the 5p$^2$($^3$P)6s $^{2}$P, $^{4}$P and 5p$^2$($^3$P)5d $^{4}$P, $^{4}$F and $^{2}$F terms. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence. In addition, we report new calculations of transition probabilities in Sb I using a Multiconfigurational Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The physical model being tested through comparisons between theoretical and experimental lifetimes for 5d and 6s levels. The lifetimes of the 5d $^4$F$_{3/2, 5/2, 7/2}$ levels (19.5, 7.8 and 54 ns, respectively) depend strongly on the $J$-value. This is explained by different degrees of level mixing for the different levels in the $^4$F term.

  7. Lifetime Prevalence of Investigating Child Maltreatment Among US Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunil; Wildeman, Christopher; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2017-02-01

    To estimate the lifetime prevalence of official investigations for child maltreatment among children in the United States. We used the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System Child Files (2003-2014) and Census data to develop synthetic cohort life tables to estimate the cumulative prevalence of reported childhood maltreatment. We extend previous work, which explored only confirmed rates of maltreatment, and we add new estimations of maltreatment by subtype, age, and ethnicity. We estimate that 37.4% of all children experience a child protective services investigation by age 18 years. Consistent with previous literature, we found a higher rate for African American children (53.0%) and the lowest rate for Asians/Pacific Islanders (10.2%). Child maltreatment investigations are more common than is generally recognized when viewed across the lifespan. Building on other recent work, our data suggest a critical need for increased preventative and treatment resources in the area of child maltreatment.

  8. Influence of the lifetime parameter on the rotation rate of sunspots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarello, F.

    1993-05-01

    Recent investigations on the photospheric angular velocity pattern have shown that young and short- living tracers show rotation rates higher than those determined both by older tracers and by photospheric plasma. As a direct relationship between the age of the tracer and the angular velocity determination has been found (Zappalà & Zuccarello 1991), it seemed very interesting to investigate whether also the "lifetime" parameter might have a role on angular velocity determinations. We have therefore analyzed the sunspot-group data reported in the Greenwich Photoheliographic Results during the 1874-1976 period. 9000 objects were selected as young sunspot-groups (YSG) and, using the lifetime parameter as selecting rule, we could catalogue 4463 objects having a lifetime between 2 and 10 d. The rotation rate of these objects as a function of their lifetime was calculated and the results obtained may be summarized in the following main points: 1. Independently of their lifetime, sunspots rotate during the first 2-3 days of life in the photosphere, at a higher rate than that of recurrent sunspots. 2. Sunspots with a lifetime ranging from 2 to 8 d are more efficiently decelerated than YSG, while 11-day living sunspots are less efficiently decelerated. 3. Sunspots in the equatorial belt (0-10°) having a lifetime comparable to that of supergranule cells, rotate slower than the cells themselves. 4. The angular velocity measured during the last day of life is lower both than that of YSG and than that deduced by sunspots which disappear the day after. These results have been analyzed in the scenario of the sunspots cluster model ( 1987). According to the conclusions drawn, the initial higher angular velocity of young and short-living sunspots is not a function of the cluster "aggregation capability"; the rate of rise of the merging level through the convection zone is influenced by (or influences) the ability of the cluster to keep coalesced; finally, when the merging level

  9. Lifetimes and Reliabilities of Bevel-Gear Drive Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, D.; Cox, J.; Savage, M.; Brikmanis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical methods used to predict system lifetimes from component lifetimes. Report shows how to use information to determine system life of drive train, using methods of probability and statistics. Presents life and reliability model for bevel-gear drive trains. Bevel-gear and support-bearing lives analyzed for each gear and bearing in drive train, with results statistically combined to produce system life for entire drive train. Numerical example included.

  10. Reflections on the Future of Global Higher Education - WAAS Conference Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Šlaus

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Education is the most important catalyst of social evolution. Today higher education is in the early stages of a revolutionary transition that will have immense impact on the future of global society. This article presents an overview of perspectives explored at the World Academy's Forum on Global Higher Education conducted at the University of California at Berkeley on October 2-3, 2013. It examines issues resulting from rapid changes in educational technology and organization that impact on accessibility, affordability, quality, relevance, employability and content of higher education. It envisions establishment of a World University Consortium as a network and umbrella group to facilitate educational partnerships and linkages with other interested stakeholders at the international level, to provide a centralized source of information about latest innovative ideas and developments in this field, and to explore creative solutions to enhance the reach, quality and relevance of higher education globally.

  11. Spectroscopic analysis of transition state energy levels - Bending-rotational spectrum and lifetime analysis of H3 quasibound states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meishan; Mladenovic, Mirjana; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.; Sharafeddin, Omar

    1989-01-01

    Converged quantum mechanical calculations of scattering matrices and transition probabilities are reported for the reaction of H with H2 with total angular momentum 0, 1, and 4 as functions of total energy in the range 0.85-1.15 eV on an accurate potential energy surface. The resonance structure is illustrated with Argand diagrams. State-to-state reactive collision delay times and lifetimes are presented. For J = 0, 1, and 4, the lowest-energy H3 resonance is at total energies of 0.983, 0.985, and 1.01 eV, respectively, with lifetimes of about 16-17 fs. For J = 1 and 4 there is a higher-energy resonance at 1.10-1.11 eV. For J = 1 the lifetime is about 4 fs and for J = 4 it is about 1 fs.

  12. A Lifetime Prediction Method for LEDs Considering Real Mission Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qu, Xiaohui; Wang, Huai; Zhan, Xiaoqing

    2017-01-01

    The Light-Emitting Diode (LED) has become a very promising alternative lighting source with the advantages of longer lifetime and higher efficiency than traditional ones. The lifetime prediction of LEDs is important to guide the LED system designers to fulfill the design specifications...... and to benchmark the cost-competitiveness of different lighting technologies. However, the existing lifetime data released by LED manufacturers or standard organizations are usually applicable only for some specific temperature and current levels. Significant lifetime discrepancies may be seen in the field...... properties of the life data available from accelerated degradation testing. The electrical and thermal characteristics of LEDs are measured by a T3Ster system, used for the electro-thermal modeling. It also identifies key variables (e.g., heat sink parameters) that can be designed to achieve a specified...

  13. Positron lifetime in polycrystalline gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, A.M.; Serna, J. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica del Estado Solido)

    1984-06-16

    Positron lifetimes are measured on polycrystalline gadolinium between 15 and 25 /sup 0/C taking into account the microstructure of the specimens, especially the grain sizes of untreated or annealed sheets. Results show the existence of a trapping effect of positrons in Gd due to different trapping centers such as point defects, dislocations, grain boundaries, and other defects.

  14. KRONOS: A Monte Carlo event generator for higher order QED corrections at HERA — Status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Harald; Manakos, Panagiotis; Mannel, Thomas; Dahmen, Hans D.; Ohl, Thorsten

    1992-12-01

    We report on the status of the Monte Carlo event generator KRONOS for deep inelastic lepton hadron scattering at HERA. KRONOS focusses on the description of electronmagnetic corrections beyond the existing fixed order calculations.

  15. Higher Education for the 1980s. Challenges and Responses. Report of the Hiroshima International Seminar on Higher Education (2nd, Hiroshima, Japan, January 29-31, 1980).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Higher Education.

    The challenges of social change, values crises, societal needs for higher education, the internal dynamics of higher educational systems, and future reforms in higher education were discussed at the Second Hiroshima International Seminar on Higher Education. Topics discussed include: Higher Education in an Age of Internationalization (Michio…

  16. 2015 Global Information Technology Report: Consequences on Knowledge Management in Higher Education Institutions in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ololube, Nwachukwu Prince; Agbor, Comfort Nkogho; Major, Nanighe Baldwin; Agabi, Chinyere O.; Wali, Worlu I.

    2016-01-01

    This research is a continuation of a theoretical review that evaluated ICT Policy Outcomes for National Development in relation to Networked Readiness Index (NRI) and the impact it has on knowledge integration and management in higher education institutions in Nigeria. A new dawn in information technology (IT) has initiated new trends in…

  17. Special Report #6. Developing Trends in Content of Collective Bargaining Contracts in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andes, John

    The growth in the number of higher education collective bargaining contracts continues at a rapid pace, although it is taking longer for the initial contract to be negotiated. The data on 131 contracts covering 215 institutions is included in the statistical tables in this document. Collective bargaining has increased in the West and at least one…

  18. Report of the Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy, January 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Governor's Blue Ribbon Commission on Higher Education and the Economy of Connecticut, Inc., Hartford.

    The Governor's Commission on Higher Education and the Economy's assessment of the Connecticut system and ways that the educational needs of the economy and the state can be met during a period of declining enrollments and fiscal constraints is presented. Working committees of the commission studied governance and management; business, labor, and…

  19. Brief Report: Joint Attention and Information Processing in Children with Higher Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Peter; Kim, Kwanguk; McIntyre, Nancy; Lerro, Lindsay; Jarrold, William

    2016-01-01

    Theory suggests that information processing during joint attention may be atypical in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This hypothesis was tested in a study of school-aged children with higher functioning ASD and groups of children with symptoms of ADHD or typical development. The results indicated that the control groups displayed…

  20. Higher Education Cost Containment. Performance Audit, November 1995. Report of the State Auditor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Office of State Auditor, Denver.

    Between June and September 1995, this performance audit examined Colorado higher education cost containment in debt refinancing and improvements to student loan processes according to generally accepted government auditing standards. With respect to debt refinancing, the audit concluded that in general, governing boards and institutions were…

  1. Prepared in Mind and Resources? A Report on Public Higher Education in South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacbay, Armand; Poliakoff, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley signed into law the South Carolina Higher Education Efficiency and Administrative Policies Act, maintaining the transparency and accountability that lead to increased academic quality and affordability at colleges and universities. It is in this context that ACTA (American Council of Trustees and…

  2. Made in Maine: A State Report Card on Public Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markley, Eric; Poliakoff, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Maine is blessed with universities that have records of significant achievement. The seven campuses of the University of Maine System (UMS) together educated over 23,000 students (full-time equivalent) during the past year. But for good reason, in recent years public confidence in higher education throughout the nation has fallen. Half of the…

  3. Reporting the Use of Multiple Imputation for Missing Data in Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manly, Catherine A.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2015-01-01

    Higher education researchers using survey data often face decisions about handling missing data. Multiple imputation (MI) is considered by many statisticians to be the most appropriate technique for addressing missing data in many circumstances. In particular, it has been shown to be preferable to listwise deletion, which has historically been a…

  4. Toward a Definition of Verbal Reasoning in Higher Education. Research Report. ETS RR-09-33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Nancy W.; Welsh, Cynthia; Kostin, Irene; VanEssen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the literatures of reading and reasoning in the last quarter century, focusing mainly on the disciplines of cognitive science, cognitive developmental psychology, linguistics, and educational psychology. These literatures were synthesized to create a framework for defining verbal reasoning in higher education. Eight…

  5. Interdisciplinarity: The Mutable Paradigm. AAHE/ERIC/Higher Education Research Report No 9, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayville, William V.

    The many forms of interdisciplinarity in higher education institutions and the various ways it has been used to advance curricular changes are examined. Definitions of interdisciplinarity and its variants (multi-, pluri-, and transdisciplinarity) provide a conceptual framework for the examination. In this study, interdisciplinarity is understood…

  6. Academic Judgment and Grievance Arbitration in Higher Education. Special Report No. 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Harold

    The first known analysis of a substantial number of arbitration awards in higher education is presented in an effort to determine whether arbitrators have confined their awards within the contract limitations. All of the arbitration awards generated by the four-year colleges of the State University of New York as well as the awards of the…

  7. European Union Students Studying in English Higher Education Institutions. DIUS Research Report 08-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Marian; Rutt, Simon

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the pathways, intentions and relevant perceptions of (non-UK) European Union (EU) students entering English higher education. It sought to identify why students wished to obtain an English HE qualification, their attitudes towards the uptake and repayment of tuition fee loans and their future career plans. Drawing on…

  8. Cataloguing E-Books in UK Higher Education Libraries: Report of a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Jacqueline

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of a 2006 survey of UK Higher Education OPACs in order to provide a snapshot of cataloguing practices for e-books. Design/methodology/approach: The OPACs of 30 UK HE libraries were examined in July/August 2006 to determine which e-books were catalogued, and the level of cataloguing…

  9. 2014-2015 State of CRM Use in Higher Education Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) periodically undertakes research projects to keep themselves and the higher education community in general, informed about relevant current and emerging practices. The aim of this survey was to measure the extent of ownership of Constituent (or Customer)…

  10. Quality: Transforming Postsecondary Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report No. 3, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffee, Ellen Earle; Sherr, Lawrence A.

    Many colleges and universities, in responding to public demand for higher education and the external challenges it creates, are employing Total Quality Management (TQM) techniques to improve quality, increase productivity, and decrease costs. The quality improvement process itself (the tools for problem identification and developing solutions),…

  11. Positron Lifetimes in Pure and Doped Ice and in Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Mogensen, O.; Trumpy, Georg

    1972-01-01

    for the other components show a complex behavior. The spectra for mono- and polycrystalline light ice and for polycrystalline heavy ice are identical. For water long lifetime components attributed to ortho-Ps are 1.86 nsec, 27% for H2O and 2.01 nsec, 22% for D2O. Theoretical explanations are suggested. Fast......Positron lifetime spectra were measured in mono- and polycrystalline light ice, polycrystalline heavy ice, doped light ice, as well as in light and heavy water. All spectra were resolved into three components. At temperatures between −196° and −100°C the lifetimes and relative intensities...... of the spectra are found by heating above approximately −120°C. Measurements on a number of fast frozen aqueous solutions of acids, bases, and salts are reported, none of them showing as strong influence on the ortho-Ps lifetime as HF. ©1972 The American Institute of Physics...

  12. CEBAF at higher energies: Working group report on hadron spectroscopy and production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)]| [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes topics in hadron spectroscopy and production which could be addressed at CEBAF with an energy upgrade to E{sub {gamma}} = 8 GeV and beyond. The topics discussed include conventional meson and baryon spectrocopy, spectroscopy of exotica (especially molecules and hybrids), CP and CPT tests using {phi} mesons, and new detector and accelerator options.

  13. Giving to Excellence: Generating Philanthropic Support for UK Higher Education. Ross-CASE Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Yashraj

    2016-01-01

    This report presents findings from the 2016 Ross-CASE Survey of Philanthropic Giving to Universities in UK. The project was conducted by CASE Europe and funded by HEFCE and the Ross-Group. This year's survey comes at a time of great change for the UK charity sector. The historical trend data of previous surveys will be invaluable in helping…

  14. Lifetime of Bentonites study: hydrothermal stability of saponites; Estudio de longevidad en bentonitas: estabilidad hidrotermal de saponitas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguey, S.; Cuevas, J.; Garralon, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Quimica Agricola, Geologia y Geoquimica, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The report studies the lifetime of bentonite and the hydrothermal stability of saponites. The testing comprised determination of physical and chemical properties of clays, the stability of the mineral porosity, lifetime and the wall of clay.

  15. Flipped Classroom Implementation: A Case Report of Two Higher Education Institutions in the United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.; White, Paul J.; Khanova, Julia; Yuriev, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This case report explored the implementation of flipped classrooms at two higher education institutions. Experiences and publications from the institutions were used to identify and describe common themes, including successes and challenges encountered along with potential solutions to common misalignments, particularly as related to…

  16. Higher Education in Further Education Colleges: Indirectly Funded Partnerships: Codes of Practice for Franchise and Consortia Arrangements. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This report provides codes of practice for two types of indirectly funded partnerships entered into by higher education institutions and further education sector colleges: franchises and consortia. The codes of practice set out guidance on the principles that should be reflected in the franchise and consortia agreements that underpin indirectly…

  17. Higher Reported Levels of Depression, Stress, and Anxiety Are Associated with Increased Endorsement of ADHD Symptoms by Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Allyson G.; Alexander, Sandra J.; Armstrong, Irene T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which postsecondary students endorse symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and whether experienced level of stress, depression, or anxiety are associated with higher reporting of ADHD symptoms. Students attending a combined health and counseling service completed the Conners Adult ADHD Rating…

  18. Angular distributions as lifetime probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Grossman, Yuval [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  19. Angular Distributions as Lifetime Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Dror, Jeff Asaf

    2013-01-01

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  20. Orthogonal Range Reporting: Query Lower Bounds, Optimal Structures in 3-d, and Higher Dimensional Improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Dalgaard

    2010-01-01

    Orthogonal range reporting is the problem of storing a set of n points in d-dimensional space, such that the k points in an axis-orthogonal query box can be reported efficiently. While the 2-d version of the problem was completely characterized in the pointer machine model more than two decades ago...... data structure for the d-dimensional orthogonal range reporting problem in the pointer machine model of computation that uses S(n) space must spend Ω((log n/ log(S(n)/n))⌊d/2⌋--1) time to answer queries. Thus, if S(n)/n is poly-logarithmic, then the query time is at least Ω((log n/ log log n)⌊d/2......) to Ω((log n/ log log n)2 + k) somewhere between three and six dimensions. Finally, we show that our techniques also lead to improved structures for point location in rectilinear subdivisions, that is, the problem of storing a set of n disjoint d-dimensional axis-orthogonal rectangles...

  1. Lifetime of MCP-PMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2016-05-01

    The hadron identification in the PANDA experiment at FAIR will be done with DIRC detectors. Because of design and space reasons the sensors of the DIRCs have to be placed inside the strong magnetic field of the solenoid. As the favored photon sensors microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs) were identified. However, these devices showed serious aging problems until very recently, which manifest themselves by a fast degrading quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC). This is mainly due to feedback ions from the residual gas. In this paper we discuss the recently accomplished huge improvements in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. With innovative countermeasures applied to the MCP-PMTs in the attempt to reduce the aging effects the manufacturers were able to increase the lifetime of MCP-PMT prototypes by almost two orders of magnitude compared to the former commercially available devices. Our group has studied the aging of MCP-PMTs for more than four years by simultaneously illuminating different types of lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMTs at the same photon rate. Gain, dark count rate, and QE as a function of the wavelength and the PC surface were measured in regular time intervals and studied in dependence of the integrated anode charge. We observe that MCP-PMTs treated with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique are by far the best devices available now. A lifetime of up to 10 C/cm2 integrated anode charge was reached with these sensors. This is sufficient for both PANDA DIRCs.

  2. Lifetime environmental tobacco smoke exposure and the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balmes John

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS, which contains potent respiratory irritants, may lead to chronic airway inflammation and obstruction. Although ETS exposure appears to cause asthma in children and adults, its role in causing COPD has received limited attention in epidemiologic studies. Methods Using data from a population-based sample of 2,113 U.S. adults aged 55 to 75 years, we examined the association between lifetime ETS exposure and the risk of developing COPD. Participants were recruited from all 48 contiguous U.S. states by random digit dialing. Lifetime ETS exposure was ascertained by structured telephone interview. We used a standard epidemiologic approach to define COPD based on a self-reported physician diagnosis of chronic bronchitis, emphysema, or COPD. Results Higher cumulative lifetime home and work exposure were associated with a greater risk of COPD. The highest quartile of lifetime home ETS exposure was associated with a greater risk of COPD, controlling for age, sex, race, personal smoking history, educational attainment, marital status, and occupational exposure to vapors, gas, dusts, or fumes during the longest held job (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.09 to 2.21. The highest quartile of lifetime workplace ETS exposure was also related to a greater risk of COPD (OR 1.36; 95% CI 1.002 to 1.84. The population attributable fraction was 11% for the highest quartile of home ETS exposure and 7% for work exposure. Conclusion ETS exposure may be an important cause of COPD. Consequently, public policies aimed at preventing public smoking may reduce the burden of COPD-related death and disability, both by reducing direct smoking and ETS exposure.

  3. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  4. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  5. Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullet, J.E.

    1995-11-10

    The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

  6. Higher Education of Specialists of Social Rehabilitation – Reports from Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Kusztal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is a another opinion in the matter of the education of the students of social rehabilitation. In 2012, on the pages of “Resocjalizacja Polska”, came out an article about contemporary status of the social rehabilitation educator and the process of his education in the era of the reform of higher education. The current text is the continuation of this article and also a presentation of an explorative sense and thoughts of the participants of the project, realized since 2011 within the statutory research of the Department of Social Prevention and Rehabilitation in Institiute of Pedagog y in Jagiellonian University and Department of Social Prevention and Rehabilitation in Institiute of Education in Jesuit University in Cracow.

  7. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  8. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  9. Improving, characterizing and predicting the lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorgyan, Suren A.; Heckler, Ilona Maria; Bundgaard, Eva; Corazza, Michael; Hösel, Markus; Søndergaard, Roar R.; Alves dos Reis Benatto, Gisele; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C.

    2017-03-01

    This review summarizes the recent progress in the stability and lifetime of organic photovoltaics (OPVs). In particular, recently proposed solutions to failure mechanisms in different layers of the device stack are discussed comprising both structural and chemical modifications. Upscaling is additionally discussed from the perspective of stability presenting the challenges associated with device packaging and edge protection. An important part of device stability studies is the characterization, and this review provides a short overview of the most advanced techniques for stability characterization reported recently. Lifetime testing and determination is another challenge in the field of organic solar cells and the final sections of this review discuss the testing protocols as well as the generic marker for device lifetime and the methodology for comparing all the lifetime landmarks in one common diagram. These tools were used to determine the baselines for OPV lifetime tested under different ageing conditions. Finally, the current status of lifetime for organic solar cells is presented and predictions are made for progress in the near future.

  10. Adult separation anxiety in patients with complicated grief versus healthy control subjects: relationships with lifetime depressive and hypomanic symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell'Osso Liliana

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Around 9% to 20% of bereaved individuals experience symptoms of complicated grief (CG that are associated with significant distress and impairment. A major issue is whether CG represents a distinctive nosographic entity, independent from other mental disorders, particularly major depression (MD, and the role of symptoms of adult separation anxiety. The purpose of this study was to compare the clinical features of patients with CG versus a sample of healthy control subjects, with particular focus on adult separation anxiety and lifetime mood spectrum symptoms. Methods A total of 53 patients with CG and 50 healthy control subjects were consecutively recruited and assessed by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I disorders (SCID-I/P, Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG, Adult Separation Anxiety Questionnaire (ASA-27, Work and Social Adjustment Scale (WSAS and Mood Spectrum-Self Report (MOODS-SR lifetime version. Results Patients with CG reported significantly higher scores on the MOODS-SR, ASA-27, and WSAS with respect to healthy control subjects. The scores on the ASA-27 were significantly associated with the MOODS-SR depressive and manic components amongst both patients and healthy control subjects, with a stronger association in the latter. Conclusions A major limitation of the present study is the small sample size that may reduce the generalizability of the results. Moreover, lifetime MOODS-SR does not provide information about the temporal sequence of the manic or depressive symptoms and the loss. The frequent comorbidity with MD and the association with both depressive and manic lifetime symptoms do not support the independence of CG from mood disorders. In our patients, CG is associated with high levels of separation anxiety in adulthood. However, the presence of lifetime mood instability, as measured by the frequent presence of depressive and hypomanic lifetime symptoms, suggests that cyclothymia

  11. UV fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum and magnesium nanoapertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshan; Jiao, Xiaojin; Peterson, Eric M.; Harris, Joel M.; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Blair, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-violet (UV) fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanoapertures are reported in this manuscript. Nanoapertures with diameter ranging from 30nm to 90nm are fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB). Largest lifetime reduction are observed for apertures with smallest diameters and undercuts into glass substrate. For Al nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 5.30×, larger than perviously reported 3.50×.1 For Mg nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 6.90×, which is the largest lifetime reduction of UV fluorescence dye reported so far in literature. The dependence of count rate per molecule (CRM) on aperture size and undercut is also investigated, revealing that CRM increases with increasing undercut, however, the CRM is small (less than 2) for the entire range of aperture size and undercut we investigated. FDTD simulation were conducted and in order to favorably compare experimental results with simulated results, it is critical to take into account the exact shape and material properties of the nano aperture. Simulation results revealed the fundamental difference between Al and Mg nano aperture under 266nm illumination-Mg nano aperture presents a waveguide mode in which the maximum field enhancement and Purcell factor is within the nano aperture instead of on the surface which is the case for Al nano aperture.

  12. Minority carrier lifetime in indium phosphide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Phillip; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Weinberg, Irving; Kneisel, Keith

    1991-01-01

    Transient photoluminescence is used to measure the minority carrier lifetime on n-type and p-type InP wafers. The measurements show that unprocessed InP wafers have very high minority carrier lifetimes. Lifetimes of 200 ns and 700 ns were observed for lightly-doped p- and n-type material respectively. Lifetimes over 5 ns were found in heavily doped n-type material.

  13. Lifetime suicide attempts in juvenile assessment center youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolen, Scott; McReynolds, Larkin S; DeComo, Robert E; John, Reni; Keating, Joseph M; Wasserman, Gail A

    2008-01-01

    To describe suicide risk in youth seen at a Juvenile Assessment Center (JAC), we examined relationships among self-reported lifetime attempts and demographic, justice, and psychiatric data via logistic regression. Similar to other settings, youth reporting lifetime attempts were more likely to be older, female, not living with both parents and currently arrested for a violent or felony crime. Mood, substance use, and behavior disorder each increased prediction substantially. Anxiety Disorder was associated with elevated attempt rates for boys only. JACs need to develop protocols for identifying suicide risk; further, since suicide history predicts future attempts, Anxiety Disordered boys may be at particular risk.

  14. Radiative lifetimes of odd-parity levels in Nb I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Nakhate, S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Radiative lifetimes are reported for 37 odd-parity energy levels of neutral niobium (Nb I), out of which 33 have been measured for the first time. The levels belong to electronic configurations 4d35s5p and 4d45p between 18,790 and 35,730 cm-1. The time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique was employed. The Nb atoms were generated in a free-jet by laser vaporization of niobium metal. Lifetime values reported in this work fall in the range 12-340 ns and are accurate to ±10%.

  15. Lifetime models of female labor supply, wage rates, and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carliner, G; Robinson, C; Tomes, N

    1984-01-01

    A simple 1 period lifetime model is specified in which schooling is part of the lifetime period. This implies that an adding-up constraint is imposed on the uses of time in the lifetime including schooling, which may induce a negative correlation between years of schooling and years in the market, while producing a positive correlation between years of schooling and the fraction of the postschool lifetime spent in the market. The model is used to interpret empirical analyses based on alternative measures of lifetime labor supply and on alternative specifications of which variables may be treated as exogenous. In the empirical analysis the retrospective and longitudinal aspects of the newly available National Longitudinal Survey of Women is used to construct a measure of the fraction of the lifetime supplied to the market and measures of the lifetime wage rates of both the husband and the wife. The empirical results take the lifetime model of labor supply seriously in that the empirical measures of labor supply and wage rates bear a much closer resemblance to the theoretical concepts than measures typically employed in the literature. The estimates indicate that the "plausible assumptions" required for the true coefficient on fertility in a labor supply equation to be zero are fulfilled. These estimates are compared with those obtained using current measures as proxies for lifetime variables. Based on these estimates, an explanation is offered for the apparent contradiction between the findings of studies using a simultaneous equations approach that report no effect of fertility on female labor supply and the strong depressing effect of children on (current) labor supply obtained from research that treats children as exogenous. Current female hours appear more responsive to husbands' current earnings and female education than is the case with the lifetime variables. There are marked differences in the effects of race. The lifetime hours of white women are only some

  16. Improvement of the structure of reports of Ukrainian higher educational institutions in terms of deregulation and state authority decentralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S. Ambarchian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Improvement of the structure and content of financial and budgetary reports of domestic higher educational institutions, enhance of financial statements completeness in order to enable citizens to control a university activity. During the research both general scientific and specific scientific economic methods were implemented. The general methods include induction, deduction, analogy and comparison. Among specific methods of economic research grouping, table method, graphical method, method of informational and logical analysis were used. The paper characterizes legal documents which regulate the process of university financial statements preparation and presentation in different countries. Financial reports of Ukrainian, American and British universities are compared. The author determines the major directions of improvement of the structure and content of domestic university reports with the purpose of their completeness enhancing. As a result of the research performed the proper recommendations of improvement of domestic universities reporting are suggested. The author conforms the reporting information with the Managerial report which discloses the information about the reporting period achievements and the efficiency of budget resources expenditure.

  17. Personality, IQ, and Lifetime Earnings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensowski, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Talented individuals are seen as drivers of long-term growth, but how do they realize their full potential? In this paper, I show that lifetime earnings of high-IQ men and women are substantially influenced by their personality traits, in addition to intelligence and education. Personality traits......, as identified in a factor model, significantly affect earnings, but not for young workers. The effects are furthermore heterogeneous by educational attainment. For women, personality traits do not affect family earnings in the same way as own earnings. Personality and IQ also influence earnings indirectly...

  18. Healthy and Creative Tap Dance: Teaching a Lifetime Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Barbara L. Michiels; Ozmun, Michelle; Keeton, Gladys

    2013-01-01

    As a result of competitive dance television shows, interest in tap dance seems to have increased in the past few years. Tap dance is a challenging and fun lifetime physical activity that is appropriate for people of all ages. It is an excellent activity for K-12 physical education programs, higher education, parks and recreation facilities,…

  19. Healthy and Creative Tap Dance: Teaching a Lifetime Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Barbara L. Michiels; Ozmun, Michelle; Keeton, Gladys

    2013-01-01

    As a result of competitive dance television shows, interest in tap dance seems to have increased in the past few years. Tap dance is a challenging and fun lifetime physical activity that is appropriate for people of all ages. It is an excellent activity for K-12 physical education programs, higher education, parks and recreation facilities,…

  20. Improved Determination of the Neutron Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Yue, A T; Gilliam, D M; Greene, G L; Laptev, A B; Nico, J S; Snow, W M; Wietfeldt, F E

    2013-01-01

    The most precise determination of the neutron lifetime using the beam method was completed in 2005 and reported a result of tau_n = (886.3 +/- 1.2 [stat] +/- 3.2 [sys]) s. The dominant uncertainties were attributed to the absolute determination of the fluence of the neutron beam (2.7 s). The fluence was measured with a neutron monitor that counted the neutron-induced charged particles from absorption in a thin, well-characterized 6Li deposit. The detection efficiency of the monitor was calculated from the areal density of the deposit, the detector solid angle, and the ENDF/B-VI 6Li(n,t)4He thermal neutron cross section. In the current work, we have measured the detection efficiency of the same monitor used in the neutron lifetime measurement with a second, totally-absorbing neutron detector. This direct approach does not rely on the 6Li(n,t)4He cross section or any other nuclear data. The detection efficiency is consistent with the value used in 2005 but was measured with a precision of 0.057 %, which represe...

  1. Probabilistic Prediction of Lifetimes of Ceramic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Powers, Lynn; Reh, Stefan; Baker, Eric H.

    2006-01-01

    ANSYS/CARES/PDS is a software system that combines the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) software with a modified version of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) Version 6.0 software. [A prior version of CARES/Life was reported in Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts (LEW-16018), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 20, No. 3 (March 1996), page 28.] CARES/Life models effects of stochastic strength, slow crack growth, and stress distribution on the overall reliability of a ceramic component. The essence of the enhancement in CARES/Life 6.0 is the capability to predict the probability of failure using results from transient finite-element analysis. ANSYS PDS models the effects of uncertainty in material properties, dimensions, and loading on the stress distribution and deformation. ANSYS/CARES/PDS accounts for the effects of probabilistic strength, probabilistic loads, probabilistic material properties, and probabilistic tolerances on the lifetime and reliability of the component. Even failure probability becomes a stochastic quantity that can be tracked as a response variable. ANSYS/CARES/PDS enables tracking of all stochastic quantities in the design space, thereby enabling more precise probabilistic prediction of lifetimes of ceramic components.

  2. Using the TOF method to measure the electron lifetime in long-drift CdZnTe detectors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe S.; Chen, Eric; Cui, Yonggang; Gul, Rubi; Dedic, Václav; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Fried, Jack; Hossain, Anwar; MacKenzie, Jason M.; Sellin, Paul; Taherion, Saeid; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; El-hanany, Uri; James, Ralph B.

    2016-09-01

    The traditional method for electron lifetime measurements of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors relies on using the Hecht equation. The procedure involves measuring the dependence of the detector response on the applied bias and applying the Hecht equation to evaluate the mu-tau product, which in turn can be converted into the carrier lifetime if the mobility is known. Despite general acceptance of this technique, which is very convenient for comparative testing of different CZT materials, the assumption of a constant electric field inside a detector is unjustified. In the Hecht equation, this assumption means that the drift time would be a linear function of the drift distance. This condition is rarely fulfilled in practice at low applied biases where the Hecht equation is most sensitive to the mu-tau product. As a result, researchers usually take measurements at relatively high biases, which work well in the case of the low mu-tau material, Technologies. The TOF-based techniques are traditionally used for monitoring the electronegative impurity concentrations in noble gas detectors by measuring the electron lifetimes. We found the electron mu-tau product of tested crystals is in the range 0.1-0.2 cm2/V, which is an order of the magnitude higher than any value previously reported for CZT material. In this work, we reported the measurement procedure and the results. We will also discuss the applicability criteria of the Hecht equation for measuring the electron lifetime in high mu-tau product CZT.

  3. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P., E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  4. Lifetimes and stabilities of familiar explosives molecular adduct complexes during ion mobility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Alan; DeBord, John Daniel; Ridgeway, Mark; Park, Melvin; Eiceman, Gary; Fernandez-Lima, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Trapped ion mobility spectrometry coupled to mass spectrometry (TIMS-MS) was utilized for the separation and identification of familiar explosives in complex mixtures. For the first time, molecular adduct complex lifetimes, relative stability, binding energies and candidate structures are reported for familiar explosives. Experimental and theoretical results showed that the adduct size and reactivity, complex binding energy and the explosive structure tailors the stability of the molecular adduct complex. TIMS flexibility to adapt the mobility separation as a function of the molecular adduct complex stability (i.e., short or long IMS experiments / low or high IMS resolution) permits targeted measurements of explosives in complex mixtures with higher confidence levels. PMID:26153567

  5. Carrier lifetimes in thin-film photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Dohyun

    2015-09-01

    The carrier lifetimes in thin-film solar cells are reviewed and discussed. Shockley-Read-Hall recombination is dominant at low carrier density, Auger recombination is dominant under a high injection condition and high carrier density, and surface recombination is dominant under any conditions. Because the surface photovoltage technique is insensitive to the surface condition, it is useful for bulk lifetime measurements. The photoconductance decay technique measures the effective recombination lifetime. The time-resolved photoluminescence technique is very useful for measuring thin-film semiconductor or solar-cell materials lifetime, because the sample is thin, other techniques are not suitable for measuring the lifetime. Many papers have provided time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) lifetimes for copper-indium-gallium-selenide (CIGS) and CdTe thin-film solar cell. The TRPL lifetime strongly depends on open-circuit voltage and conversion efficiency; however, the TRPL life time is insensitive to the short-circuit current.

  6. Corrosion Preventive Compounds Lifetime Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Stephanie M.; Kammerer, Catherine C.; Copp, Tracy L.

    2007-01-01

    Lifetime Testing of Corrosion Preventive Compounds (CPCs) was performed to quantify performance in the various environments to which the Space Shuttle Orbiter is exposed during a flight cycle. Three CPCs are approved for use on the Orbiter: RD Calcium Grease, Dinitrol AV-30, and Braycote 601 EF. These CPCs have been rigorously tested to prove that they mitigate corrosion in typical environments, but little information is available on how they perform in the unique combination of the coastal environment at the launch pad, the vacuum of low-earth orbit, and the extreme heat of reentry. Currently, there is no lifetime or reapplication schedule established for these compounds that is based on this combination of environmental conditions. Aluminum 2024 coupons were coated with the three CPCs and exposed to conditions that simulate the environments to which the Orbiter is exposed. Uncoated Aluminum 2024 coupons were exposed to the environmental conditions as a control. Visual inspection and Electro- Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were performed on the samples in order to determine the effectiveness of the CPCs. The samples were processed through five mission life cycles or until the visual inspection revealed the initiation of corrosion and EIS indicated severe degradation of the coating.

  7. Carrier Bulk-Lifetime Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Solcansky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the measurement of the minority carrier bulk-lifetime the characterization method MW-PCD is used, where the result of measurement is the effective carrier lifetime, which is very dependent on the surface recombination velocity and therefore on the quality of a silicon surface passivation. This work deals with an examination of a different solution types for the chemical passivation of a silicon surface. Various solutions are tested on silicon wafers for their consequent comparison. The main purpose is to find optimal solution, which suits the requirements of a time stability and start-up velocity of passivation, reproducibility of the measurements and a possibility of a perfect cleaning of a passivating solution remains from a silicon surface, so that the parameters of a measured silicon wafer will not worsen and there will not be any contamination of the other wafers series in the production after a repetitive return of the measured wafer into the production process. The cleaning process itself is also a subject of a development.

  8. A novel measurement of $B^0_s$ and $D^-_s$ lifetimes using semileptonic decays at LHCb arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Tonelli, Diego

    I report new, world-leading LHCb results on heavy meson lifetimes. We use a novel approach that suppresses the shortcomings typically associated with reconstruction of semileptonic decays, allowing for precise measurements of lifetimes and other properties in collider experiments. We achieve a 15% and a $2\\times$ improvement over current best determinations of the flavor-specific $B^0_s$ lifetime and $D^-_s$ lifetime, respectively.

  9. Heavy Quark Lifetimes, Mixing and CP Violation

    CERN Document Server

    Blaylock, G

    2000-01-01

    This paper emphasizes four topics that represent some of the year's highlights in heavy quark physics. First of all, a review is given of charm lifetime measurements and how they lead to better understanding of the mechanisms of charm decay. Secondly, the CLEO collaboration's new search for charm mixing is reported, which significantly extends the search for new physics in that sector. Thirdly, important updates in Bs mixing are summarized, which result in a new limit on the mass difference, and which further constrain the unitarity triangle. Finally, the first efforts to measure CP violation in the B system are discussed. Results are shown for the CDF and ALEPH measurements of sin(2beta), as well as the CLEO branching fraction measurements of B-->Kpi,pipi, which have implications for future measurements of alpha.

  10. The Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment. II - Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, R. A.; Lovelock, J. E.

    1983-10-01

    The calibration standards used in the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment (ALE) for CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CH3CCl3, and CCl4 are described. This includes the preparation of the primary standards by static dilution and their propagation and stability for the period 1977-1982. Two independent assessments of the absolute concentrations of the primary standards used to initiate the ALE measurements in 1977-1978 are reported. For consistency in the ALE program the values assigned to the primary standards and subsequent working standards used in the field were not altered during the experiment when results of better estimates of the original concentration values were obtained. Rather, the appropriate factors by which the ALE mixing ratios for a given species should be multiplied to obtain the best estimate of the current concentration of a given species, are provided.

  11. High Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells with Long Operating Lifetimes

    KAUST Repository

    Peters, Craig H.

    2011-04-20

    Organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells comprising poly[N-9\\'-hepta-decanyl- 2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(4\\',7\\'-di-2-thienyl-2\\', 1\\',3\\'-benzothiadiazole) (PCDTBT) are systematically aged and demonstrate lifetimes approaching seven years, which is the longest reported lifetime for polymer solar cells. An experimental set-up is described that is capable of testing large numbers of solar cells, holding each device at its maximum power point while controlling and monitoring the temperature and light intensity. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Preliminary Ξc+ Lifetime Measurement from SELEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgun, U.; Selex Collaboration

    2007-05-01

    We report the results of a new Ξc+ lifetime measurement from hadroproduction data taken by the SELEX (E781) experiment. Fermilab charged hyperon beam ( Σ, π and p) at 600 GeV is used to produce charm particles in Cu and diamond targets. This measurement was made using decays into the Ξc+→Ξππ, Ξc+→pKπ, and Ξc+→ΣKπ modes. We used binned maximum likelihood method and 301 ± 31 events yield a lifetime of 430 ± 22 ± 9 fs.

  13. Brief report: social and communication abilities and disabilities in higher functioning individuals with autism and Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Celine A; Klin, Ami

    2007-04-01

    Individuals with higher functioning autism (HFA) fail to translate their cognitive potential into real-life adaptation, and the severity of their symptoms is considerable despite their intellectual ability. This paper reports on a subsample from a larger study (A. Klin et al., in press) analyzed here by autism spectrum subtypes. It focuses on the nature of ability and disability in HFA and Asperger syndrome (AS) in relation to age and IQ. Participants included 32 individuals with autism and 35 with AS. Individuals with AS had significantly higher Verbal IQ scores and less symptomatology than individuals with autism, but their Vineland scores were equally impaired, highlighting the adaptive deficits in ASD regardless of classification. No relationship was found between adaptive functioning and symptom severity.

  14. Personality, IQ, and Lifetime Earnings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gensowski, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    , as identified in a factor model, significantly affect earnings, but not for young workers. The effects are furthermore heterogeneous by educational attainment. For women, personality traits do not affect family earnings in the same way as own earnings. Personality and IQ also influence earnings indirectly...... through education, which has sizeable positive rates of return for men in this sample. Women’s returns to education past a bachelor’s degree are lowered through worse marriage prospects, which offset gains to education in terms of own earnings. The causal effect of education is identified through matching......Talented individuals are seen as drivers of long-term growth, but how do they realize their full potential? In this paper, I show that lifetime earnings of high-IQ men and women are substantially influenced by their personality traits, in addition to intelligence and education. Personality traits...

  15. Evaluation of higher distribution and/or utilization voltages. Fourth interim report (August 1980): assessment of optimum distribution configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-04-01

    This interim report provides documentation on the fourth task, Assessment of Optimum Distribution Configuration, of DOE Contract No. ET-78-C-01-2866, Evaluation of Higher Distribution and/or Utilization Voltages. The work performed under this task includes the development of a computer model for assessment of life cycle costs for the distribution and utilization systems, the development of an optimization algorithm to enable distribution system configuration optimization and a net energy analysis to determine potential net energy savings. Input data for this task derive from Task 3. The major output of this task is a documented computer code.

  16. Modified A{sup ++}-standard refrigerator with 30% reduction of energy consumption. Higher efficiency by compressor modification - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegrist, M.; Stahl, S.; Ganz, J.

    2010-06-15

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) takes a look at how a modified refrigerator can be given a higher efficiency by modifying the compressor. The modified refrigerator was fitted with a variable-speed compressor. This compressor could be run at much lower speeds so that it was in operation for up to 90% of the time. It was shown that less electricity was consumed the more the compressor ran. The report discusses the aims of the work and presents details on the standard refrigerator used for the tests. The compressor normally used and the variable-speed compressor used in the test are described. Systems for temperature control and data acquisition during the tests are described. The results obtained are examined and the influence of various factors is discussed.

  17. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Clearing the Hurdles. A Survey on Strategies for Implementing Quality Management Practices in Higher Education. A GOAL/QPC Application Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel

    Based on a survey of Quality Management (QM) practitioners at 21 colleges, this study presents the 10 most difficult implementation hurdles to QM in higher education and a set of hurdle-clearing strategies. The hurdles are: (1) lack of time to implement QM; (2) perception that QM is something for janitorial and housing staffs but not applicable to…

  18. Bilingual Higher Education Summer Institute. Bilingual Higher Education: Foundations, Policy, and Practice. Report of Proceedings (Seton Hall University, August 24-29, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotayo, Rosa Maria, Ed.

    Papers are presented from the New Jersey Department of Higher Education Summer Institute. Focus is on sociolinguistic, anthropological, social psychological, pedagogical, and socio-political-economic considerations. Each analyzes particular factors that influence the form and quality of bilingual policy and instruction programs, and offers…

  19. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Clearing the Hurdles. A Survey on Strategies for Implementing Quality Management Practices in Higher Education. A GOAL/QPC Application Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel

    Based on a survey of Quality Management (QM) practitioners at 21 colleges, this study presents the 10 most difficult implementation hurdles to QM in higher education and a set of hurdle-clearing strategies. The hurdles are: (1) lack of time to implement QM; (2) perception that QM is something for janitorial and housing staffs but not applicable to…

  20. The Path to Excellence: Quality Assurance in Higher Education. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Research Reports, No. 1. FYI Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Lawrence R.; And Others

    There is an increasing interest by government in accountability for higher education. Efforts such as performance budgeting, performance auditing, and state review of academic programs are becoming more common. Opponents of government involvement assert that regional accreditation reviews are sufficient to maintain quality standards. However,…

  1. The Uses of Institutional Culture: Strengthening Identification and Building Brand Equity in Higher Education. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 31, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, J. Douglas, Ed.; Dubrow, Greg, Ed.; Hartley, Matthew, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    Institutional culture matters in higher education, and universities and colleges commonly express the need to strengthen their culture. A strong culture is perceived, correctly so, to engender a needed sense of connectedness between and among the varied constituents associated with a campus. Linking organizational culture and social cohesion is…

  2. Computing lifetimes for battery-powered devices

    OpenAIRE

    Jongerden, Marijn; Haverkort, Boudewijn

    2010-01-01

    The battery lifetime of mobile devices depends on the usage pattern of the battery, next to the discharge rate and the battery capacity. Therefore, it is important to include the usage pattern in battery lifetime computations. We do this by combining a stochastic workload, modeled as a continuous-time Markov model, with a well-known battery model. For this combined model, we provide new algorithms to efficiently compute the expected lifetime and the distribution and expected value of the deli...

  3. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  4. Systems and methods for circuit lifetime evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, Timothy L. (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor); Bowerman, Paul N. (Inventor); Everline, Chester J. (Inventor); Shalom, Eddy (Inventor); Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods for estimating the lifetime of an electrical system in accordance with embodiments of the invention are disclosed. One embodiment of the invention includes iteratively performing Worst Case Analysis (WCA) on a system design with respect to different system lifetimes using a computer to determine the lifetime at which the worst case performance of the system indicates the system will pass with zero margin or fail within a predetermined margin for error given the environment experienced by the system during its lifetime. In addition, performing WCA on a system with respect to a specific system lifetime includes identifying subcircuits within the system, performing Extreme Value Analysis (EVA) with respect to each subcircuit to determine whether the subcircuit fails EVA for the specific system lifetime, when the subcircuit passes EVA, determining that the subcircuit does not fail WCA for the specified system lifetime, when a subcircuit fails EVA performing at least one additional WCA process that provides a tighter bound on the WCA than EVA to determine whether the subcircuit fails WCA for the specified system lifetime, determining that the system passes WCA with respect to the specific system lifetime when all subcircuits pass WCA, and determining that the system fails WCA when at least one subcircuit fails WCA.

  5. Cosmology in Mr. Tompkins' Lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Rudi Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mr. Tompkins, the hero of George Gamow's most famous book, was born in the first decade of the twentieth century and lived until its end. A bank clerk by day, Mr. Tompkins had wide-ranging interests, and his curiosity led him to popular scientific presentations, and these in turn brought him a long and happy marriage to Maud, the daughter of a professor of physics. His lifetime offers an appropriate framework for a meditation on the history of cosmology during the century in which cosmology became a scientific enterprise. As it happens, Mr. Tompkins' first exposure to cosmology, in which he observed both the expansion and contraction of an oscillating universe in 1939, happened during the long night of relativity, the generation in which relativity specialists became few and, like the galaxies, far between. This talk will consider the heyday of early relativistic cosmology from 1917 to 1935, the causes and consequences of the "long night" from 1935 until 1963, and the renaissance of cosmology, which, occurring as it did upon the retirement of Mr. Tompkins, afforded him great pleasure in his later years.

  6. The Lifetime of Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Eby, Joshua; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by $V({\\cal A})=m^2 f^2 [1-\\cos({\\cal A}/f)]$, where $m$ and $f$ are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, $\\cal A$, is self adjoint. As a result the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty $\\Delta x \\sim R \\sim 1/(m_a \\Delta)$, where $R$ is the radius of the star and $\\Delta = \\sqrt{1-E_0^2/m_a^2}$. Here $m_a$ and $E_0$ are the mass and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of $\\Delta p \\sim m_a\\Delta$. At strong binding, $\\Delta={\\cal O}(1)$, bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transiti...

  7. Baselines for Lifetime of Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Ciammaruchi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The process of accurately gauging lifetime improvements in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) or other similar emerging technologies, such as perovskites solar cells is still a major challenge. The presented work is part of a larger effort of developing a worldwide database of lifetimes that can help e...

  8. Computing lifetimes for battery-powered devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The battery lifetime of mobile devices depends on the usage pattern of the battery, next to the discharge rate and the battery capacity. Therefore, it is important to include the usage pattern in battery lifetime computations. We do this by combining a stochastic workload, modeled as a

  9. Computing lifetimes for battery-powered devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, Marijn; Haverkort, Boudewijn

    2010-01-01

    The battery lifetime of mobile devices depends on the usage pattern of the battery, next to the discharge rate and the battery capacity. Therefore, it is important to include the usage pattern in battery lifetime computations. We do this by combining a stochastic workload, modeled as a continuous-ti

  10. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  11. Modelling lifetime data with multivariate Tweedie distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Siti Rohani Mohd; Yusof, Fadhilah; Bahar, Arifah

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to measure the dependence between individual lifetimes by applying multivariate Tweedie distribution to the lifetime data. Dependence between lifetimes incorporated in the mortality model is a new form of idea that gives significant impact on the risk of the annuity portfolio which is actually against the idea of standard actuarial methods that assumes independent between lifetimes. Hence, this paper applies Tweedie family distribution to the portfolio of lifetimes to induce the dependence between lives. Tweedie distribution is chosen since it contains symmetric and non-symmetric, as well as light-tailed and heavy-tailed distributions. Parameter estimation is modified in order to fit the Tweedie distribution to the data. This procedure is developed by using method of moments. In addition, the comparison stage is made to check for the adequacy between the observed mortality and expected mortality. Finally, the importance of including systematic mortality risk in the model is justified by the Pearson's chi-squared test.

  12. Lifetime exposure to traumatic and other stressful life events and hair cortisol in a multi-racial/ethnic sample of pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Ritz, Thomas; Coull, Brent A; Gennings, Chris; Wright, Robert O; Wright, Rosalind J

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether lifetime exposure to stressful and traumatic events alters hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning, as indexed by hair cortisol, regardless of associated psychopathology, among pregnant women of different racial/ethnic backgrounds. 180 women provided hair samples for measurement of integrated cortisol levels throughout pregnancy and information regarding their lifetime exposure to stressful and traumatic life events. Results indicate that increased lifetime exposure to traumatic events was associated with significantly greater hair cortisol over the course of pregnancy. Similarly, greater lifetime exposure to stressful and traumatic events weighted by reported negative impact (over the previous 12 months) was associated with significantly greater hair cortisol during pregnancy. All analyses controlled for maternal age, education, body mass index (BMI), use of inhaled corticosteroids, race/ethnicity, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms. Following stratification by race/ethnicity, associations between stressful and traumatic life events and hair cortisol were found among Black women only. This is the first study to consider associations between lifetime stress exposures and hair cortisol in a sociodemographically diverse sample of pregnant women. Increased exposure to stressful and traumatic events, independent of PTSD and depressive symptoms, was associated with higher cortisol production, particularly in Black women. Future research should investigate the influence of such increased cortisol exposure on developmental outcomes among offspring.

  13. The lifetime of axion stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 -cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 - E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(-pδx) ˜exp(-Δ-1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  14. Higher prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia in triple iron ultra-triathletes than reported for ironman triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    "In a recent study of male and female ultra-marathoners in a 161-km ultra-marathon, the prevalence of exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was higher than reported for marathoners. Regarding triathletes, the prevalence of EAH has been investigated in Ironman triathletes, but not in Triple Iron ultra-triathletes. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EAH in male ultra-triathletes competing in a Triple Iron ultra-triathlon over 11.4 km swimming, 540 km cycling, and 126.6 km running. Changes in body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, total body water, haematocrit, plasma volume, plasma sodium concentration ([Na ⁺ ]) and urine specific gravity were determined in 31 male athletes with (means ± standard deviation) 42.1 ± 8.1 years of age, 77.0 ± 7.0 kg body mass, 1.78 ± 0.06 m body height and a BMI of 24.3 ± 1.7 kg/m² in the 'Triple Iron Triathlon Germany'. Of the 31 finishers, eight athletes (26%) developed asymptomatic EAH. Body mass, fat mass, skeletal muscle mass, and haematocrit decreased, plasma volume increased ( P Iron ultra-triathletes compared to existing reports on Ironman triathletes. Body fluid homeostasis remained stable in these ultra-triathletes although body mass decreased."

  15. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  16. Higher Drop in Speed during a Repeated Sprint Test in Soccer Players Reporting Former Hamstring Strain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røksund, Ola D.; Kristoffersen, Morten; Bogen, Bård E.; Wisnes, Alexander; Engeseth, Merete S.; Nilsen, Ann-Kristin; Iversen, Vegard V.; Mæland, Silje; Gundersen, Hilde

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Hamstring strain injury is common in soccer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical capacity of players who have and have not suffered from hamstring strain injury in a sample of semi-professional and professional Norwegian soccer players in order to evaluate characteristics and to identify possible indications of insufficient rehabilitation. Method: Seventy-five semi-professional and professional soccer players (19 ± 3 years) playing at the second and third level in the Norwegian league participated in the study. All players answered a questionnaire, including one question about hamstring strain injury (yes/no) during the previous 2 years. They also performed a 40 m maximal sprint test, a repeated sprint test (8 × 20 m), a countermovement jump, a maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) test, strength tests and flexibility tests. Independent sample t-tests were used to evaluate differences in the physical capacity of the players who had suffered from hamstring strain injury and those who had not. Mixed between-within subject's analyses of variance was used to compare changes in speed during the repeated sprint test between groups. Results: Players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous two years (16%) had a significantly higher drop in speed (0.07 vs. 0.02 s, p = 0.007) during the repeated sprint test, compared to players reporting no previous hamstring strain injury. In addition, there was a significant interaction (groups × time) (F = 3.22, p = 0.002), showing that speed in the two groups changed differently during the repeated sprint test. There were no significant differences in relations to age, weight, height, body fat, linear speed, countermovement jump height, leg strength, VO2max, or hamstring flexibility between the groups. Conclusion: Soccer players who reported hamstring strain injury during the previous 2 years showed significant higher drop in speed during the repeated sprint test compared to players with no hamstring

  17. Lifetime prevalence of traumatic brain injury with loss of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, John D; Yang, Jingzhen; Singichetti, Bhavna; Manchester, Kara; Bogner, Jennifer

    2017-08-28

    To determine the prevalence of lifetime history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) with loss of consciousness (LOC) among adult, non-institutionalised residents of Ohio. We analysed data from 2014 Ohio Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which included a state-specific module designed to elicit lifetime history of TBI. Of non-institutionalised adults 18 years and over living in Ohio, 21.7% reported at least one lifetime TBI with LOC, 2.6% experienced at least one moderate or severe such injury, 9.1% experienced a TBI with LOC before age 15 years and 10.8% experienced either TBI with LOC before age 15 years or a moderate or severe injury. Males, those with lower incomes and those unable to work were more likely to have incurred at least one TBI with LOC, multiple TBIs with LOC, a moderate or severe TBI and a TBI with LOC before age15. One in five adults experienced TBIs of sufficient severity to cause LOC; 3% experienced at least one moderate or severe TBI and almost 10% experienced a first TBI with LOC before the age of 15 years. The prevalence of lifetime TBI in the present study suggests that there may be a substantially greater burden of injury than concluded from previous prevalence estimates. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  18. Nuclear Power Plant Lifetime Management Study (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sung Yull; Jeong, Ill Seok; Jang, Chang Heui; Song, Taek Ho; Song, Woo Young [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Tae Eun [Korea Power Engineering Company Consulting and Architecture Engineers, (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Chul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    As the operation-year of nuclear power plant increases and finding sites for new nuclear power plant becomes harder, a comprehensive and systematic nuclear plant lifetime management(PLIM) program including life extension has to be established for stable and safe supply of electricity. A feasibility study was conducted to systematically evaluate technical, economic and regulatory aspect of plant lifetime managements and plant life extension for Kori-1 nuclear power plant. For technical evaluation of nuclear power plant, 13 major components were selected for lifetime evaluation by screening system. structure, and components(SSCs) of the plant. It was found that except reactor pressure vessel, which needs detailed integrity analysis, and low pressure turbine, which is scheduled to be replaced, 11 out of 13 major components have sufficient service life, for more than 40 years. Because domestic rules and regulations related to license renewal has not yet been written, review on the regulatory aspect of life extensions was conducted using US NRC rules and regulations. A cooperative effort with nuclear regulatory body is needed for early completion of license renewal rules and regulations. For economic evaluation of plant lifetime extension, a computer program was developed and used. It was found that 10 to 20 year of extension operation of Kori-1 nuclear power plant was proved. Based on the results, next phase of plant lifetime management program for detailed lifetime evaluation and presenting detailed implementation schedule for plant refurbishment for lifetime extension should be followed. (author). 74 refs., figs.

  19. The association between lifetime cigarette smoking and dysphonia in the Korean general population: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Haewon

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relationship between current smoking and lifetime amount smoked and the incidence of dysphonia using data from a national cross-sectional survey that represents the Korean population. Subjects were 3,600 non-institutionalised civilian adults over the age of 19 (1,501 males and 2,099 females) who completed the laryngeal examination of the 2008 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). For lifetime amount smoked, subjects were classified as light smokers (≤26.7 pack years), medium smokers (26.7-40.5 pack years), heavy smokers (40.5-55.5 pack years), and very heavy smokers (55.5-156 pack years) based on pack years (packs smoked per day × years as a smoker). The odds ratio (OR) for the statistical test was presented using hierarchical logistic regression. When adjusted for covariates (age, gender, level of education, income, occupation, alcohol consumption and pain/discomfort during the last two weeks), current smokers had a 1.8 times (OR = 1.77, 95% CI [1.17-2.68]) higher risk for self-reported voice problems than non-smokers. Moreover, current smokers had a 1.6 times (OR = 1.56, 95% CI [1.02-2.38]) higher risk of laryngeal disorder (p lifetime smoking amount and dysphonia.

  20. Models for Battery Reliability and Lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G. H.; Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2014-03-01

    Models describing battery degradation physics are needed to more accurately understand how battery usage and next-generation battery designs can be optimized for performance and lifetime. Such lifetime models may also reduce the cost of battery aging experiments and shorten the time required to validate battery lifetime. Models for chemical degradation and mechanical stress are reviewed. Experimental analysis of aging data from a commercial iron-phosphate lithium-ion (Li-ion) cell elucidates the relative importance of several mechanical stress-induced degradation mechanisms.

  1. Family of lifetime sensors for medical purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.; Draxler, Sonja

    1995-05-01

    A family of indicators has been developed for fluorescence lifetime-based measurement of oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, and potassium, all the indicators being derivatives of the same chemical compound and having identical spectral and lifetime properties. The indicators show an absorption accessible to low- cast light sources, a large Stokes shift, and long fluorescence decay time. all indicators can be excited at the same excitation wavelength, monitored at the same emission wavelength, and measured within the same time range. This opens the possibility of building a compact lifetime-based instrument to simultaneously measure blood gases and cations.

  2. Lifetimes and configuration mixing in 110Cd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Yu. N.; Efimov, A. D.; Pasternak, A. A.

    Lifetimes of excited states in 110Cd have been measured by the Doppler shift attenuation method in the reaction (α,2nγ) at Eα= 25 MeV. Lifetime values for 8 states and lifetime limits for 3 states were obtained. The band structures of 110Cd have been interpreted in terms of a modified version of the interacting boson model (IBM + 2 q.p.). The calculations explain well the excitation energies and electromagnetic transition probabilities up to Jπ= 16+, except for the 10+1 state. The structural features are discussed in terms of collective and two quasiparticle excitations.

  3. Statistical Models and Methods for Lifetime Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lawless, Jerald F

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition"An indispensable addition to any serious collection on lifetime data analysis and . . . a valuable contribution to the statistical literature. Highly recommended . . ."-Choice"This is an important book, which will appeal to statisticians working on survival analysis problems."-Biometrics"A thorough, unified treatment of statistical models and methods used in the analysis of lifetime data . . . this is a highly competent and agreeable statistical textbook."-Statistics in MedicineThe statistical analysis of lifetime or response time data is a key tool in engineering,

  4. Recording Lifetime Behavior and Movement in an Invertebrate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Sige; Liedo, Pablo; Altamirano-Robles, Leopoldo; Cruz-Enriquez, Janeth; Morice, Amy; Ingram, Donald K.; Kaub, Kevin; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Carey, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of lifetime behavioral changes is essential for understanding aging and aging-related diseases. However, such studies are scarce partly due to the lack of efficient tools. Here we describe and provide proof of concept for a stereo vision system that classifies and sequentially records at an extremely fine scale six different behaviors (resting, micro-movement, walking, flying, feeding and drinking) and the within-cage (3D) location of individual tephritid fruit flies by time-of-day throughout their lives. Using flies fed on two different diets, full sugar-yeast and sugar-only diets, we report for the first time their behavioral changes throughout their lives at a high resolution. We have found that the daily activity peaks at the age of 15–20 days and then gradually declines with age for flies on both diets. However, the overall daily activity is higher for flies on sugar-only diet than those on the full diet. Flies on sugar-only diet show a stronger diurnal localization pattern with higher preference to staying on the top of the cage during the period of light-off when compared to flies on the full diet. Clustering analyses of age-specific behavior patterns reveal three distinct young, middle-aged and old clusters for flies on each of the two diets. The middle-aged groups for flies on sugar-only diet consist of much younger age groups when compared to flies on full diet. This technology provides research opportunities for using a behavioral informatics approach for understanding different ways in which behavior, movement, and aging in model organisms are mutually affecting. PMID:21559058

  5. Lifetime Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Proinflammatory Cytokine Levels Across the Perinatal Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson Blackmore, Emma; Mittal, Mona; Cai, Xueya; Moynihan, Jan A; Matthieu, Monica M; O'Connor, Thomas G

    2016-10-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a public health concern, affecting one-third of US women. Prior research suggests an association between exposure to IPV and poor maternal perinatal health, but the underlying biological correlates are not well understood. This study examined the relationship between exposure to IPV and proinflammatory cytokine levels, a candidate mechanism accounting for poor psychiatric and obstetric outcomes, across the perinatal period. Data were obtained from a prospective, longitudinal cohort study of 171 women receiving obstetrical care from a hospital-based practice serving a predominantly low-income minority population. Participants completed questionnaires on IPV exposure, psychiatric symptoms, and psychosocial and obstetric factors and provided blood samples at 18 and 32 weeks of gestation and 6 weeks and 6 months postpartum. Serum levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were assayed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Thirty-five (20.5%) women reported lifetime exposure to IPV and 7 (4.1%) reported being physically hurt in the preceding 12 months (4 while pregnant). Lifetime exposure to IPV was associated with increased likelihood of experiencing perinatal depression and smoking during pregnancy. Women with a history of IPV had significantly higher levels of TNF-α at 18 weeks (z = -2.29, p < 0.05), but significantly smaller changes in levels of IL-6 (β = -0.36, p = 0.04) across time. Lifetime exposure to IPV was associated with a range of adverse mental health outcomes and may affect proinflammatory cytokine levels in pregnancy.

  6. Higher Education Reform for Quality Higher Education Management in the 21st Century: Economic, Technological, Social, and Political Forces Affecting Higher Education. Proceedings of the 1999 Six-Nation Summit (Hiroshima, Japan, September 20-21, 1999). RIHE International Seminar Reports, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Higher Education.

    This publication presents proceedings from a 1999 conference on higher education reform and quality that involved six countries: China, Germany, Japan, Singapore, Switzerland, and the United States. The first section, "Report of the Six-Nation Higher Education Project," presents "Summary of the Progress of the Higher Education…

  7. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2017-04-01

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents (mean age 13.21, 49.4 % boys) from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children cross-sectional study. We assessed the associations of alcohol and energy drinks consumption with negative outcomes and their potential synergy, as measured by the synergy index (SI). Adolescents consuming both alcohol and energy drinks were at higher risk of negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drank only alcohol or energy drinks or were non-consumers. Consumers of alcohol and energy drinks were highly prone to be involved in fighting-the joint association of alcohol and energy drinks consumption was greater than sum of its associations separately in relation to fighting (SI 1.49; 95 % confidence interval 1.03-2.16). Preventive strategies should aim at increasing awareness of negative behavioural outcomes-especially aggressive behaviour associated with alcohol and energy drinks consumption among young adolescents.

  8. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  9. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  10. Experimentally Measured Radiative Lifetimes and Oscillator Strengths in Neutral Vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, C. E.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Nilsson, H.; Engström, L.; Hartman, H.; Lundberg, H.; Belmonte, M. T.

    2016-06-01

    We report a new study of the V i atom using a combination of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence and Fourier transform spectroscopy that contains newly measured radiative lifetimes for 25 levels between 24,648 cm-1 and 37,518 cm-1 and oscillator strengths for 208 lines between 3040 and 20000 Å from 39 upper energy levels. Thirteen of these oscillator strengths have not been reported previously. This work was conducted independently of the recent studies of neutral vanadium lifetimes and oscillator strengths carried out by Den Hartog et al. and Lawler et al., and thus serves as a means to verify those measurements. Where our data overlap with their data, we generally find extremely good agreement in both level lifetimes and oscillator strengths. However, we also find evidence that Lawler et al. have systematically underestimated oscillator strengths for lines in the region of 9000 ± 100 Å. We suggest a correction of 0.18 ± 0.03 dex for these values to bring them into agreement with our results and those of Whaling et al. We also report new measurements of hyperfine structure splitting factors for three odd levels of V i lying between 24,700 and 28,400 cm-1.

  11. The total lifetime costs of smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Prescott, Eva; Sørensen, Thorkild I A;

    2004-01-01

    Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy.......Net costs of smoking in a lifetime perspective and, hence, the economic interests in antismoking policies have been questioned. It has been proposed that the health-related costs of smoking are balanced by smaller expenditure due to shorter life expectancy....

  12. Lifetime measurement in {sup 195}Po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grahn, T.; Page, R.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Dewald, A.; Jolie, J.; Melon, B.; Pissulla, T. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Greenlees, P.T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Maierbeck, P. [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department E12, Garching (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    The lifetime of the 17/2{sup +} yrast state in {sup 195}Po has been measured using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique to be {tau}=43(11) ps. The lifetime was extracted from the singles {gamma}-ray spectra obtained by using the recoil-decay tagging method. The present work provides more information of the coupling schemes, shapes and configuration mixing in neutron-deficient odd-mass Po nuclei. (orig.)

  13. The lifetime production of Bovec and Improved Bovec sheep breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Gorjanc

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Production data of Bovec and Improved (with East-Friesian Bovec sheep born between years 1989 and 2006 were used for the analysis of culling dynamics and lifetime production. Lifetime production was calculated as the sum of production at each lambing (number of born and liveborn lambs and litter birth weight, weaning (number of weaned lambs and litter weaning weight or during each lactation (milk yield, fat (6.5 % and protein (5.8 % corrected milk yield (FPC; Pulina et al., 2005., and fat and protein yield for culled sheep. Animals with any missing records from the first till the last lambing, weaning or lactation were removed from the analysis. Animals that left the system of animal recording alive, due to selling or the cancellation of recording by a breeder were also excluded. Dataset included records for 2254 sheep: 1734 of Bovec and 520 of Improved Bovec breed. Data preparation and statistical analysis were performed with the use of a statistical program R (R Development Core Team, 2007. and additional packages Zelig (Imai et al., 2007; Bailey and Alimadhi, 2007; Imai et al., 2008 and lme4 (Bates and DebRoy, 2004; Bates, 2007. Results have shown that in the period ≤1996 Bovec breed had on average 4.4 lactations in their lifetime, which was almost one lactation more than in Improved Bovec breed. In the period after the year 1996 the highest proportion of animals were culled in the first lactation (as expected due to culling dynamics, with slightly higher proportion in Improved Bovec breed than in Bovec breed. Lifetime number of born, liveborn and weaned lambs was higher for about one lamb in Improved Bovec breed. Lifetime lamb weight gain did not differ between breeds, due to the high frequency of early weaning in Improved Bovec breed. During lifetime, Improved Bovec sheep produced around 200 kg (~34 % more milk, around 190 kg (~32 % more FPC milk, around 12 kg (~32 % more milk fat, and around 10 kg (~34 % more milk protein than Bovec

  14. New Heterogeneous Clustering Protocol for Prolonging Wireless Sensor Networks Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Golam Rashed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Clustering in wireless sensor networks is one of the crucial methods for increasing of network lifetime. The network characteristics of existing classical clustering protocols for wireless sensor network are homogeneous. Clustering protocols fail to maintain the stability of the system, especially when nodes are heterogeneous. We have seen that the behavior of Heterogeneous-Hierarchical Energy Aware Routing Protocol (H-HEARP becomes very unstable once the first node dies, especially in the presence of node heterogeneity. In this paper we assume a new clustering protocol whose network characteristics is heterogeneous for prolonging of network lifetime. The computer simulation results demonstrate that the proposed clustering algorithm outperforms than other clustering algorithms in terms of the time interval before the death of the first node (we refer to as stability period. The simulation results also show the high performance of the proposed clustering algorithm for higher values of extra energy brought by more powerful nodes.

  15. Positron annihilation lifetime and photoluminescence studies on single crystalline ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, A [Department of Physics, Bangabasi Morning College, 19 Rajkumar Chakraborty Sarani, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Chakrabarti, Mahuya [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Ray, S K [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India); Bhowmick, D; Sanyal, D, E-mail: dirtha@vecc.gov.in [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-04-20

    The room temperature positron annihilation lifetime for single crystalline ZnO has been measured as 164 {+-} 1 ps. The single component lifetime value is very close to but higher than the theoretically predicted value of {approx} 154 ps. Photoluminescence study (at 10 K) indicates the presence of hydrogen and other defects, mainly acceptor related, in the crystal. Defects related to a lower open volume than zinc vacancies, presumably a complex with two hydrogen atoms, are the major trapping sites in the sample. The bulk positron lifetime in ZnO is expected to be a little less than 164 ps.

  16. Early-photon guided reconstruction method for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhang; Chuangjian Cai; Yanlu Lv; Jianwen Luo

    2016-01-01

    A reconstruction method guided by early-photon fluorescence yield tomography is proposed for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography (FLT) in this study.The method employs the early-arriving photons to reconstruct a fluorescence yield map,which is utilized as a priori information to reconstruct the FLT via all the photons along the temporal-point spread functions.Phantom experiments demonstrate that,compared with the method using all the photons for reconstruction of fluorescence yield and lifetime maps,the proposed method can achieve higher spatial resolution and reduced crosstalk between different targets without sacrificing the quantification accuracy of lifetime and contrast between heterogeneous targets.

  17. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan;

    2016-01-01

    In-memory caching of intermediate data and eager combining of data in shuffle buffers have been shown to be very effective in minimizing the re-computation and I/O cost in distributed data processing systems like Spark and Flink. However, it has also been widely reported that these techniques would...... create a large amount of long-living data objects in the heap, which may quickly saturate the garbage collector, especially when handling a large dataset, and hence would limit the scalability of the system. To eliminate this problem, we propose a lifetime-based memory management framework, which......, by automatically analyzing the user-defined functions and data types, obtains the expected lifetime of the data objects, and then allocates and releases memory space accordingly to minimize the garbage collection overhead. In particular, we present Deca, a concrete implementation of our proposal on top of Spark...

  18. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan;

    2016-01-01

    , by automatically analyzing the user-defined functions and data types, obtains the expected lifetime of the data objects, and then allocates and releases memory space accordingly to minimize the garbage collection overhead. In particular, we present Deca, a concrete implementation of our proposal on top of Spark......In-memory caching of intermediate data and eager combining of data in shuffle buffers have been shown to be very effective in minimizing the re-computation and I/O cost in distributed data processing systems like Spark and Flink. However, it has also been widely reported that these techniques would...... create a large amount of long-living data objects in the heap, which may quickly saturate the garbage collector, especially when handling a large dataset, and hence would limit the scalability of the system. To eliminate this problem, we propose a lifetime-based memory management framework, which...

  19. Measurement of the Lambda_b lifetime using semileptonic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clement, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutíerrez, P; Gutíerrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewin, M; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pompo, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-01-01

    We report a measurement of the Lambda_b lifetime using a sample corresponding to 1.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected by the D0 experiment in 2002--2006 during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The Lambda_b baryon is reconstructed via the decay Lambda_b -> mu nu Lambda_c X. Using $4437 \\pm 329$ signal candidates, we measure the Lambda_b lifetime to be $\\tau(Lambda_b)$ = 1.290^{+0.119}_{-0.110}(stat) ^{+0.087}_{-0.091} (syst) ps, which is among the most precise measurements in semileptonic Lambda_b decays. This result is in good agreement with the world average value.

  20. Extending hydraulic lifetime of iron walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, P.D. [General Electric Corp. Research and Development Center, Schenectady, NY (United States); Sivavec, T.M.; Horney, D.P.

    1997-12-31

    Iron walls for control of groundwaters contaminated with chlorinated solvents and reducible metals are becoming much more widely used and field studies of this technology have proven successful to date. However, there is still much uncertainty in predicting long-term performance. This work focuses on two factors affecting the lifetime of the iron media: plugging at the treatment zone entrance and precipitation in the bulk iron media. Plugging at the system entrance is due principally to dissolved oxygen in the incoming water and is an issue in aerobic aquifers or in ex-situ canister tests. In an in-situ treatment system, plugging would result in a dramatic reduction in flow through the iron zone. Designs to minimize plugging in field applications include use of larger iron particles and admixing sand of comparable size with the iron particles. Mineral precipitation in the bulk iron media can lead to porosity losses in the media, again reducing flow through the treatment zone. Decreases in reactivity of the iron media may also occur. The nature of the mineral precipitation and the factors that affect extent of mineral precipitation are examined by a variety of tools, including tracer tests, aqueous inorganic profiles, and surface analysis techniques. At short treatment times, measured porosity losses are due mainly to entrapment of a film of H{sub 2} gas on the iron surfaces and also to Fe(OH){sub 2} precipitation. Over longer treatment times precipitation of Fe(OH){sub 2} and FeCO{sub 3} in low carbonate waters and of Fe(OH){sub 2}, FeCO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} in higher carbonate waters will begin to dominate porosity losses. Preliminary results of an on-going study to control pH in an iron zone by admixing iron sulfide with iron show no difference in extent of carbonate precipitation versus a 100% iron system, suggesting that these systems are supersaturated with respect to carbonate precipitation.

  1. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  2. Radiative Lifetime Measurements of Even-Parity Levels of Singly Ionized Erbium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huai-Liang(徐淮良); JIANG Hong-Mei(蒋红梅); LIU Qian(刘倩); JIANG Zhan-Kui(蒋占魁); S.Svanberg

    2004-01-01

    Radiative lifetime measurements were performed by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for eight even-parity levels of the astrophysically importantion Er+ over the energy range from 33753 to 55317 cm-1.Free erbium ions were generated by a laser-induced plasma. A narrow bandwidth UV laser pulse (1 ns) was employed to populate selectively the short-lived upper levels, and the lifetime value were evaluated from the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The lifetimes reported fall in the range of 3-35 ns with the experimental accuracy 5-8%.

  3. An Evaluation of the Reliability of Complex Systems Using Shadowed Sets and Fuzzy Lifetime Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olgierd Hryniewicz

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of the evaluation of system reliability using statistical data obtained from reliability tests of its elements, in which the lifetimes of elements are described using an exponential distribution. We assume that this lifetime data may be reported imprecisely and that this lack of precision may be described using fuzzy sets. As the direct application of the fuzzy sets methodology leads in this case to very complicated and time consuming calculations, we propose simple approximations of fuzzy numbers using shadowed sets introduced by Pedrycz (1998). The proposed methodology may be simply extended to the case of general lifetime probability distributions.

  4. Estimation of effective dose and lifetime attributable risk from multiple head CT scans in ventriculoperitoneal shunted children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aw-Zoretic, J., E-mail: Jaw@luriechildrens.org [Department of Medical Imaging, Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children' s Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Seth, D.; Katzman, G.; Sammet, S. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this review is to determine the averaged effective dose and lifetime attributable risk factor from multiple head computed tomography (CT) dose data on children with ventriculoperitoneal shunts (VPS). Method and materials: A total of 422 paediatric head CT exams were found between October 2008 and January 2011 and retrospectively reviewed. The CT dose data was weighted with the latest IRCP 103 conversion factor to obtain the effective dose per study and the averaged effective dose was calculated. Estimates of the lifetime attributable risk were also calculated from the averaged effective dose using a conversion factor from the latest BEIR VII report. Results: Our study found the highest effective doses in neonates and the lowest effective doses were observed in the 10–18 years age group. We estimated a 0.007% potential increase risk in neonates and 0.001% potential increased risk in teenagers over the base risk. Conclusion: Multiple head CTs in children equates to a slight potential increase risk in lifetime attributable risk over the baseline risk for cancer, slightly higher in neonates relative to teenagers. The potential risks versus clinical benefit must be assessed.

  5. Dust Destruction Rates and Lifetimes in the Magellanic Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Temim, Tea; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Boyer, Martha L; Meixner, Margaret; Gall, Christa; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The nature, composition, abundance, and size distribution of dust in galaxies is determined by the rate at which it is created in the different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetime and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust in these galaxies. We find dust lifetimes of 22 +- 13 Myr (30 +- 17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 +- 32 Myr (72 +- 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass, and the fact that the dust-destroying isolated SNe in the MCs seem to be preferentially occurring in regions with higher than average dust-to...

  6. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, A., E-mail: lehmann@physik.uni-erlangen.de [Physikalisches Institut IV, Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F. [Physikalisches Institut IV, Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈6C/cm{sup 2} integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  7. Lifetime of B hadrons from CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Ting; CDF Collaboration

    1996-08-01

    A review of the lifetimes of {ital B} hadrons measured by the CDF collaboration at Fermilab is presented. The data corresponds to 110 pb{sup -1} of {ital p}{ital {anti p}} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV. The inclusive {ital B} hadron lifetime is measured using a high statistics sample of {ital B} {r_arrow} {ital J}/{Psi}{Chi} decays. Species specific lifetimes of the {ital B}{sup +}, {ital B}{sup 0}, {ital B}{sup 0}{sub s}, and {Lambda}{sup 0}{sub b} are determined using both fully reconstructed decays and partially reconstructed decays consisting of a lepton associated with a charm hadron.

  8. Improved lifetime of microchannel-plate PMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Uhlig, F.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Höhler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Dodokhov, V. Kh.; Düren, M.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Montgomery, R.; Rosner, G.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.; Bühler, P.; Gruber, L.; Marton, J.; Suzuki, K.

    2014-12-01

    The charged particle identification at the PANDA experiment will be mainly performed with DIRC detectors. Because of their advantageous properties the preferred photon sensors are MCP-PMTs. However, until recently these devices showed serious aging problems which resulted in a diminishing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode. By applying innovative countermeasures against the aging causes, the manufacturers recently succeeded in drastically improving the lifetime of MCP-PMTs. Especially the application of an ALD coating technique to seal the material of the micro-channels proves very powerful and results in a lifetime of ≈ 6 C /cm2 integrated anode charge without a substantial QE degradation for the latest PHOTONIS XP85112. This paper will present a comparative measurement of the lifetime of several older and recent MCP-PMTs demonstrating this progress.

  9. Measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The mean lifetime of the \\tau lepton is measured in a sample of 25700 \\tau pairs collected in 1992 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. A new analysis of the 1-1 topology events is introduced. In this analysis, the dependence of the impact parameter sum distribution on the daughter track momenta is taken into account, yielding improved precision compared to other impact parameter sum methods. Three other analyses of the one- and three-prong \\tau decays are updated with increased statistics. The measured lifetime is 293.5 \\pm 3.1 \\pm 1.7 \\fs. Including previous (1989--1991) ALEPH measurements, the combined \\tau lifetime is 293.7 \\pm 2.7 \\pm 1.6 \\fs.

  10. The neutron lifetime experiment PENeLOPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, Wolfgang [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Collaboration: PENeLOPE-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The neutron lifetime τ{sub n}=880.3±1.1 s is an important parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics and in Big Bang cosmology. Several systematic corrections of previously published results reduced the PDG world average by several σ in the last years and call for a new experiment with complementary systematics. The experiment PENeLOPE, currently under construction at the Physik-Department of Technische Universitaet Muenchen, aims to determine the neutron lifetime with a precision of 0.1 s. It will trap ultra-cold neutrons in a magneto-gravitational trap using a large superconducting magnet and will measure their lifetime by both neutron counting and online proton detection. This presentation gives an overview over the latest developments of the experiment.

  11. Simulation studies of age-specific lifetime major depression prevalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon-Brown Lee

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lifetime prevalence (LTP of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is the proportion of a population having met criteria for MDD during their life up to the time of assessment. Expectation holds that LTP should increase with age, but this has not usually been observed. Instead, LTP typically increases in the teenage years and twenties, stabilizes in adulthood and then begins to decline in middle age. Proposed explanations for this pattern include: a cohort effect (increasing incidence in more recent birth cohorts, recall failure and/or differential mortality. Declining age-specific incidence may also play a role. Methods We used a simulation model to explore patterns of incidence, recall and mortality in relation to the observed pattern of LTP. Lifetime prevalence estimates from the 2002 Canadian Community Health Survey, Mental Health and Wellbeing (CCHS 1.2 were used for model validation and calibration. Results Incidence rates predicting realistic values for LTP in the 15-24 year age group (where mortality is unlikely to substantially influence prevalence lead to excessive LTP later in life, given reasonable assumptions about mortality and recall failure. This suggests that (in the absence of cohort effects incidence rates decline with age. Differential mortality may make a contribution to the prevalence pattern, but only in older age categories. Cohort effects can explain the observed pattern, but only if recent birth cohorts have a much higher (approximately 10-fold greater risk and if incidence has increased with successive birth cohorts over the past 60-70 years. Conclusions The pattern of lifetime prevalence observed in cross-sectional epidemiologic studies seems most plausibly explained by incidence that declines with age and where some respondents fail to recall past episodes. A cohort effect is not a necessary interpretation of the observed pattern of age-specific lifetime prevalence.

  12. Tremendously increased lifetime of MCP-PMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, A.; Britting, A.; Eyrich, W.; Pfaffinger, M.; Uhlig, F.; Belias, A.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Kalicy, G.; Krebs, M.; Lehmann, D.; Nerling, F.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Zühlsdorf, M.; Düren, M.; Etzelmüller, E.; Föhl, K.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Kröck, B.; Merle, O.; Rieke, J.; Schmidt, M.; Cowie, E.; Keri, T.; Achenbach, P.; Cardinali, M.; Hoek, M.; Lauth, W.; Schlimme, S.; Sfienti, C.; Thiel, M.

    2017-02-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) PMTs are very attractive photon sensors for low light level applications in strong magnetic fields. However, until recently the main drawback of MCP-PMTs was their aging behavior which manifests itself in a limited lifetime due to a rapidly decreasing quantum efficiency (QE) of the photo cathode (PC) as the integrated anode charge (IAC) increases. In the latest models of PHOTONIS, Hamamatsu, and BINP novel techniques are applied to avoid these aging effects which are supposed to be mainly caused by feedback ion impinging on the PC and damaging it. For more than four years we are running a long-term aging test with new lifetime-enhanced MCP-PMT models by simultaneously illuminating various PMTs with roughly the same photon rate. This allows a fair comparison of the lifetime of all investigated MCP-PMTs and will give some insight into the best techniques to be applied for a lifetime enhancement. In this paper the results of comprehensive aging tests will be discussed. Gain, dark count rate and QE were investigated for their dependence on the IAC. The QE was measured spectrally resolved and as a function of the position across the PC to identify regions where the damage develops first. For the best performing tubes the lifetime improvement compared to former MCP-PMTs is a factor of ∼ 50 based on an IAC of meanwhile > 10 C /cm2. This breakthrough in the lifetime of MCP-PMTs was achieved by coating the MCP pores with an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique.

  13. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  14. B lifetimes and mixing at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedeschi, Franco; /INFN, Pisa

    2005-05-01

    The authors present recent results on b-hadron lifetimes and mixing obtained from the analysis of the data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF and D0 Collaborations in the period 2002-2004. Many lifetime measurements have been updated since the Summer 2004 conferences, sometimes improving significantly the accuracy. Likewise the measurement of the B{sub d} oscillation frequency has been updated. New limits on the B{sub s} oscillation frequency have been determined using for the first time Run II data.

  15. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Dao-Wu; LIU Jun-Hui; ZHANG Zhi-Ming; WANG Bao-Yi; ZHANG Tian-Bao; WEI Long

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800(a fast photomultiplier)to form the small size γ-ray detectors,a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments.The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the coincidence counting rate -8 cps/μCi were achieved.A lifetime value of 219±1 ps of positron annihilation in well annealed Si was tested,which is in agreement with the typical values published in the previous lectures.

  16. Measurement of the Bs0 lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Karger, C.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Ross, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kimfn 19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 has been measured in a data sample of 8890000 hadronic events recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP. After background subtraction 30.8 ± 6.9 events are attributed to the semileptonic decay of the Bs0 to a Ds- and an opposite-sign lepton. A maximum-likelihood fit to the distribution of the proper times of these events yields a Bs0 lifetime of τBs = 1.92 -0.35+0.45 ± 0.04 ps.

  17. An approach for longer lifetime MCFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Tatsumi, Masahiko; Hayano, Takuro [MCFC Research Association, Tokyo (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    For entering into commercialization of MCFC power plants in the beginning of the 21st century, we will devote to research for increasing lifetime as long as 40,000 hours with cell performance decay rate of 0.25 %/1000hrs as the target in FY 1999. This paper will discuss on our approach for longer lifetime MCFCs through electrolyte-loss management and NiO precipitation management as well as micro-structural control of electrodes and matrix plates. Cell voltage decay rate will be estimated by simulation through series of experiments on accelerated conditions.

  18. A Study on Criteria for Barrel Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马吉胜; 郑坚; 邓辉咏

    2012-01-01

    Several criteria for barrel lifetime were summarized and discussed. Based on large amount of test data, the ad- vantages and disadvantages of the criteria were analyzed and the requirements for the easy and practical criterion were put forward. Then, a new criterion based on the radical wear at the start points of the barrel lands was proposed. The close in- terrelationship between the radical wear and interior ballistic characteristics was illuminated theoretically and experimental- ly. The research results show the great value of this criterion to solve the problem of barrel lifetime.

  19. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  20. The University of North Carolina Report on Expanding Access to Higher Education through State-Funded Distance Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of North Carolina General Administration, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Legislation in 1998 provided enrollment funding for UNC distance education. This report documents the growth of UNC distance education programs and their role in meeting the high priority education and economic development needs of the State. As highlighted in the Executive Summary and documented throughout this report, state enrollment funding…

  1. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  2. Developing an 'atomic clock' for fission lifetime measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilschut, H.W.; Kravchuk, V.L

    2004-04-05

    The relevance of measuring fission lifetimes of hot nuclei is briefly discussed. It is shown that K X-ray emission prior to fission can be used to measure fission lifetimes. The preparation of the K-shell hole, the simultaneous nuclear excitation, and the analysis of the X-ray spectra is described. First results of a measurement using a {sup 20}Ne beam of 30 MeV/nucleon on a {sup 232}Th target are reported.

  3. Measurement of $B^0_s$ and $D^-_s$ meson lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Tenglin; Li, Yiming; Li, Zhuoming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Nogay, Alla; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Chen; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Gonzalo, David; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevens, Holger; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    We report on a measurement of the flavor-specific $B^{0}_{s}$ lifetime and of the $D^{-}_{s}$ lifetime using proton-proton collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment and corresponding to 3.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. Approximately 407 000 $B^{0}_{s} \\rightarrow D^{(*)-}_{s} \\mu^{+}\

  4. Improved charge carrier lifetime in planar perovskite solar cells by bromine doping

    OpenAIRE

    Kiermasch, David; Rieder, Philipp; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Baumann, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The charge carrier lifetime is an important parameter in solar cells as it defines, together with the mobility, the diffusion length of the charge carriers, thus directly determining the optimal active layer thickness of a device. Herein, we report on charge carrier lifetime values in bromine doped planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells determined by transient photovoltage. The corresponding charge carrier density has been derived from charge carrier extraction. We found incre...

  5. Lifetimes of ultra-long-range strontium Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Camargo, F; Ding, R; Sadeghpour, H R; Yoshida, S; Burgdörfer, J; Dunning, F B; Killian, T C

    2015-01-01

    The lifetimes of the lower-lying vibrational states of ultralong-range strontium Rydberg molecules comprising one ground-state 5s2 1S0 atom and one Rydberg atom in the 5s38s 3S1 state are reported. The molecules are created in an ultracold gas held in an optical dipole trap and their numbers determined using ?eld ionization, the product electrons being detected by a microchannel plate. The measurements show that, in marked contrast to earlier measurements involving rubidium Rydberg molecules, the lifetimes of the low-lying molecular vibrational states are very similar to those of the parent Rydberg atoms. This results because the strong p-wave resonance in low-energy electronrubidium scattering, which plays an important role in determining the molecular lifetimes, is not present for strontium. The absence of this resonance o?ers advantages for experiments involving strontium Rydberg atoms as impurities in quantum gases and for testing theories of molecular formation and decay.

  6. Television for Higher Technical Education of Workers. Final Report On a Pilot Project in Poland. Reports and Papers on Mass Communication Number 67.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Dept. of Mass Communication.

    The "Television Polytechnic" program of 1966 - 1970 was a joint effort of the Polish Ministry of Higher Education and Polish Television to provide televised education for working students. The subjects taught were those normally included in the first two years of the higher technical schools--math, physics, geometry, chemistry, mechanics…

  7. Experiencing Lifetime Domestic Violence: Associations with Mental Health and Stress among Pregnant Women in Rural Bangladesh: The MINIMat Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frith, Amy Lynn; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte; Naved, Ruchira Tabassum

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience of domestic violence has negative mental health consequences for women. The association of cumulative and specific forms of domestic violence, particularly emotional violence and controlling behavior, with common mental disorders and stress has rarely been studied in pregnant women. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations of specific and multiple forms of lifetime domestic violence and controlling behavior with distress and cortisol level during pregnancy in rural Bangladeshi women. Methods and findings In this observational sub-study of larger MINIMat trial, 3504 pregnant women were interviewed using a shortened Conflict Tactic Scale about their lifetime experience of domestic violence including physical, sexual, emotional domestic violence and controlling behavior. Women’s levels of emotional distress were assessed using the self-reported questionnaire (SRQ-20) developed by WHO, and levels of morning salivary cortisol were measured in a subsample (n = 1300) of women during week 28–32 of pregnancy. Regression analyses were used to estimate the associations of lifetime physical, sexual, emotional domestic violence and controlling behavior with levels of distress and cortisol during pregnancy. The prevalence of lifetime domestic violence was 57% and emotional distress was 35% in these pregnant women. All forms of domestic violence were associated with higher levels of emotional distress. Women who experienced either emotional violence or controlling behavior had the highest levels of emotional distress. There was a dose-response relationship between cumulative number of the different forms of domestic violence and women’s levels of emotional distress. There was no association between women’s experience of domestic violence and level of morning salivary cortisol. Conclusion Including emotional violence and controlling behavior as major types of violence in future research and health interventions is warranted. Furthermore, the

  8. Ruby fluorescence lifetime measurements for temperature determinations at high (p, T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes D.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Winkler, Björn

    2012-06-01

    The lifetime of the ruby R1 fluorescence line was measured as a function of pressure (up to about 20 GPa) and temperature (550 K) in an externally heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). At constant temperatures, the lifetime is increasing linearly with increasing pressure. The slope of the pressure dependence is constant up to a temperature of 450 K and it is decreasing at higher temperatures. At constant pressure, the lifetime is exponentially decreasing with increasing temperature. The (p, T)-dependence can be parametrized by the combination of a linear and an exponential function. This allows an accurate p, T-determination by the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy using Sm2+-doped strontium tetraborate and lifetime measurements of ruby, as the energy of the Sm2+ fluorescence is nearly temperature-independent.

  9. Distribution Network Design for Fixed Lifetime Perishable Products: A Model and Solution Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Firoozi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many distribution networks deal with the distribution and storage of perishable products. However, distribution network design models are largely based on assumptions that do not consider time limitations for the storage of products within the network. This study develops a model for the design of a distribution network that considers the short lifetime of perishable products. The model simultaneously determines the network configuration and inventory control decisions of the network. Moreover, as the lifetime is strictly dependent on the storage conditions, the model develops a trade-off between enhancing storage conditions (higher inventory cost to obtain a longer lifetime and selecting those storage conditions that lead to shorter lifetimes (less inventory cost. To solve the model, an efficient Lagrangian relaxation heuristic algorithm is developed. The model and algorithm are validated by sensitivity analysis on some key parameters. Results show that the algorithm finds optimal or near optimal solutions even for large-size cases.

  10. Measurements of Lifetimes and a Limit on the Lifetime Difference in the Neutral D-Meson System

    CERN Document Server

    Aitala, E M; Anjos, J C; Appel, J A; Ashery, D; Banerjee, S; Bediaga, I; Blaylock, G; Bracker, S B; Burchat, Patricia R; Burnstein, R A; Carter, T; Carvalho, H S; Copty, N J; Cremaldi, L M; Darling, C; Denisenko, K; Fernández, A; Fox, G F; Gagnon, P; Göbel, C; Gounder, K; Halling, A M; Herrera-Corral, G; Hurvits, G; James, C; Kasper, P A; Kwan, S; Langs, D C; Leslie, J; Lundberg, B; May Tal-Beck, S; Meadows, B; De Mello-Neto, J R T; Mihalcea, D; Milburn, R H; De Miranda, J M; Napier, A; Nguyen, A; D'Oliveira, A B; O'Shaughnessy, K; Peng, K C; Perera, L P; Purohit, M V; Quinn, B; Radeztsky, S; Rafatian, A; Reay, N W; Reidy, J J; Dos Reis, A C; Rubin, H A; Sanders, D A; Santha, A K S; Santoro, A F S; Schwartz, A J; Sheaff, M; Sidwell, R A; Slaughter, A J; Sokoloff, M D; Solano, J; Stanton, N R; Stefanski, R J; Stenson, K; Summers, D J; Takach, S F; Thorne, K; Tripathi, A K; Watanabe, S; Weiss-Babai, R; Wiener, J; Witchey, N; Wolin, E; Yang, S M; Yi, D; Yoshida, S; Zaliznyak, R; Zhang, C

    1999-01-01

    Using the large hadroproduced charm sample collected in experiment E791 at Fermilab, we report the first directly measured constraint on the decay-width difference Delta Gamma for the mass eigenstates of the D0-D0bar system. We obtain our result from lifetime measurements of the decays D0 --> K-pi+ and D0 --> K-K+, under the assumption of CP invariance, which implies that the CP eigenstates and the mass eigenstates are the same. The lifetime of D0 --> K-K+ (the CP-even final state is \\tau_KK = 0.410 +/- 0.011 +/- 0.006 ps, and the lifetime of D0 --> K-pi+ (an equal mixture of CP-odd and CP-even final states is tau_Kpi = 0.413 +/- 0.003 +/- 0.004 ps. The decay-width difference is Delta Gamma = 2(Gamma_KK - Gamma_Kpi) = 0.04 +/- 0.14 +/- 0.05 ps^-1. We relate these measurements to measurements of mixing in the neutral D-meson system.

  11. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant to Part-per-Million Precision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, D. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Peng, Q.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 ppm; it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2 X 10(12) decays. Two different stoppin

  12. Efficiency and Effectiveness in Higher Education: A Report by the Universities UK Efficiency and Modernisation Task Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness, efficiency and value for money are central concerns for the higher education sector. In England, decisions made by the current Government will effect a radical change in the funding for teaching. Institutions will be managing a reduction in public funding for teaching and the transition to the new system of graduate contributions,…

  13. Considering Teaching Excellence in Higher Education: 2007-2013. A Literature Review since the CHERI Report 2007. HEA Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Vicky; Fisk, Anna

    2014-01-01

    This research review explores both the research and the grey literature on university teaching excellence with a specific remit to update an earlier review, "Excellence in Teaching and Learning: a review of literature for the Higher Education Academy". Little, B., et al (2007) The two main aims are: (1) to suggest further areas of…

  14. Production of Doctorates in the Biosciences, 1975-1980: An Experimental Forecast. Higher Education Panel Reports, No. 34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atelsek, Frank J.; Gomberg, Irene L.

    A survey was undertaken in 1976 to obtain short-term estimates of doctorate production directly from the heads of the science departments involved. These biosciences departments were surveyed in the 235 member institutions of the Higher Education Panel that grant doctorates: anatomy, biochemistry, biology, biometry/biostatistics/biomathematics,…

  15. Adult, Continuing, and In-Service Education and the Library in Higher Education: A Bibliographic Check List. Report No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nicholas G.

    As an aid for educational change, a bibliography has been prepared in the areas of: trends and developments in higher education; science, technology, civilization, and social change; the future and future research; the library-college concept; the articulation program; educational coordination; interinstitutional cooperation; transfer students;…

  16. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2003-01-01

    By indirect estimation of mortality from smoking and life table methods we estimated expected lifetime without musculoskeletal diseases among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers. We found that although life expectancy of a heavy smoker is 7 years shorter than that of a never smoker, heavy...

  17. Lifetime Reliability Assessment of Concrete Slab Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A procedure for lifetime assesment of the reliability of short concrete slab bridges is presented in the paper. Corrosion of the reinforcement is the deterioration mechanism used for estimating the reliability profiles for such bridges. The importance of using sensitivity measures is stressed. Fi...

  18. Smoking expands expected lifetime with musculoskeletal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Juel, Knud

    2003-01-01

    By indirect estimation of mortality from smoking and life table methods we estimated expected lifetime without musculoskeletal diseases among never smokers, ex-smokers, and smokers. We found that although life expectancy of a heavy smoker is 7 years shorter than that of a never smoker, heavy...... smokers can expect to live more than 2 years longer with musculoskeletal diseases than never smokers....

  19. A compact positron annihilation lifetime spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李道武; 刘军辉; 章志明; 王宝义; 张天保; 魏龙

    2011-01-01

    Using LYSO scintillator coupled on HAMAMATSU R9800 (a fast photomultiplier) to form the small size γ-ray detectors, a compact lifetime spectrometer has been built for the positron annihilation experiments. The system time resolution FWHM=193 ps and the co

  20. Assessing the inequality of lifetime healthcare expenditures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, Albert; Boshuizen, Hendriek; Polder, Johan; Ferreira, José António

    2016-01-01

    The rise in healthcare expenditures has raised doubts about the sustainability of health systems and instigated a discussion on their design. Policy making in this field requires a proper understanding of how healthcare expenditures evolve throughout an individual's lifetime, and of how they vary

  1. Lifetime Prolonging Algorithms for Underwater Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhong-wen; LI Zhi-wei; YU Lei

    2006-01-01

    Underwater acoustic modem technology has attained a level of maturity to support underwater acoustic sensor networks (UASNs) which are generally formed by acoustically connected sensor nodes and a surface station providing a link to an on-shore control center. While many applications require long-term monitoring of the deployment area, the battery-powered network nodes limit the lifetime of UASNs. Therefore, designing a UASN that minimizes the power consumption while maximizing lifetime becomes a very difficult task. In this paper, a method is proposed to determine the optimum number of clusters through combining an application-specific protocol architecture and underwater acoustic communication model so as to reduce the energy dissipation of UASNs. Deploying more sensor nodes which work alternately is another way to prolong the lifetime of UASNs. An algorithm is presented for selecting sensor nodes and putting them into operation in each round, ensuring the monitoring to the whole given area. The present results show that the algorithm can help prolong system lifetime remarkably when it is applied to other conventional approaches for sensor networks under the condition that the sensor node density is high.

  2. Updated measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    A new measurement of the mean lifetime of the tau lepton is presented. Three different analysis methods are applied to a sample of 90000 tau pairs, collected in 1993 and 1994 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. The average of this measurement and those previously published by ALEPH is tau_tau = 290.1 +- 1.5 +- 1.1 fs.

  3. Lifetime oriented maintenance planning in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straub, A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we set up a framework for lifetime oriented maintenance planning as an outcome and input for strategic housing stock management. The maintenance planning holds maintenance activities and costs in the longer term. We consider the maintenance planning as a tool to calculate and implement

  4. Overview of Field Experience - Degradation Rates & Lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk; Kurtz, Sarah

    2015-09-14

    The way a PV module fails may depend not only on its design and the materials used in its construction, but also on the weather it experiences, the way it is mounted, and the quality control during its manufacture. This presentation gives an overview of Field Experience - what degradation rates and what lifetimes are being observed in various regions.

  5. Determination of the Free Neutron Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, J David; Clayton, S M; Dewey, M S; Fomin, N; Grammer, K B; Greene, G L; Huffman, P R; Holley, A T; Jones, G L; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Mendenhall, M P; Morris, C L; Mulholland, J; Nollett, K M; Pattie,, R W; Penttila, S; Ramsey-Musolf, M; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Snow, W M; Steyerl, A; Wietfeldt, F E; Young, A R; Yue, A T

    2014-01-01

    We present the status of current US experimental efforts to measure the lifetime of the free neutron by the "beam" and "bottle" methods. BBN nucleosynthesis models require accurate measurements with 1 second uncertainties, which are currently feasible. For tests of physics beyond the standard model, future efforts will need to achieve uncertainties well below 1 second. We outline paths achieve both.

  6. LIFETIMES OF SUPERDEFORMED STATES IN 194PB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILLSAU, P; HUBEL, H; AZAIEZ, F; DELEPLANQUE, MA; DIAMOND, RM; KORTEN, W; MACCHIAVELLI, AO; STEPHENS, FS; KLUGE, H; HANNACHI, F; BACELAR, JC; BECKER, JA; BRINKMAN, MJ; HENRY, EA; KUHNERT, A; WANG, TF; DRAPER, JA; RUBEL, E

    1992-01-01

    Lifetimes of members of the superdeformed band in 194Pb were measured by the Doppler-shift attenuation method. Quadrupole moments around 20 eb that are constant over the whole frequency range were derived. The results rule out large centrifugal stretching effects.

  7. Lifetime Modeling of Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hille, T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are applied in gas turbines to enhance their thermal efficiency by isolating the metallic components from the aggressive hot gas. TBC lifetime is limited by damage processes originating at internal interfaces, which may ultimately lead to delamination and spallation.

  8. Charmed particle lifetimes. [Review, six quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Conventional estimates are reviewed for charmed particle lifetimes. Free-quark models give values of (a few) x 10/sup -13/ sec to (a few) x 10/sup -12/ sec. The shorter of these values also follows from an extrapolation based on D ..-->.. Ke/sup nu/. Possible differences among the lifetimes and production rates of D/sup 0/, D/sup +/, F/sup +/, C/sub 0//sup +/, the heavy lepton tau, and the fifth quark b are discussed. Extreme values of mixing angles in a six-quark model could extend charmed particle lifetimes by a factor of at most three from the above estimates, while shorter lifetimes than those predicted could occur for some species like D/sup 0/ or F/sup +/ if their nonleptonic decays were enhanced. The predictions are discussed in the light of some current experimental results, and it is estimated that sigma(pp ..-->.. charm) approx. = 10 ..mu..b at 400 GeV/c. 95 references.

  9. The association between lifetime cigarette smoking and dysphonia in the Korean general population: findings from a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haewon Byeon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the relationship between current smoking and lifetime amount smoked and the incidence of dysphonia using data from a national cross-sectional survey that represents the Korean population. Subjects were 3,600 non-institutionalised civilian adults over the age of 19 (1,501 males and 2,099 females who completed the laryngeal examination of the 2008 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES. For lifetime amount smoked, subjects were classified as light smokers (≤26.7 pack years, medium smokers (26.7–40.5 pack years, heavy smokers (40.5–55.5 pack years, and very heavy smokers (55.5–156 pack years based on pack years (packs smoked per day × years as a smoker. The odds ratio (OR for the statistical test was presented using hierarchical logistic regression. When adjusted for covariates (age, gender, level of education, income, occupation, alcohol consumption and pain/discomfort during the last two weeks, current smokers had a 1.8 times (OR = 1.77, 95% CI [1.17–2.68] higher risk for self-reported voice problems than non-smokers. Moreover, current smokers had a 1.6 times (OR = 1.56, 95% CI [1.02–2.38] higher risk of laryngeal disorder (p < 0.05. In terms of pack years, very heavy smokers were significantly more likely to have laryngeal disorder, while self-reported voice problems were significantly more likely for heavy smokers but not very heavy smokers. The results of this study imply that chronic smoking has a significant relationship with dysphonia. Longitudinal studies are required in future work to verify the causality between lifetime smoking amount and dysphonia.

  10. Time-correlated single-photon counting study of multiple photoluminescence lifetime components of silicon nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamare, D., E-mail: d.diamare@ee.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Wojdak, M. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Lettieri, S. [Institute for Superconductors and Innovative Materials, National Council of Research (CNR-SPIN), Via Cintia 80126, Naples (Italy); Department of Physical Sciences, University of Naples “Federico II”, Via Cintia 80126, Naples (Italy); Kenyon, A.J. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-15

    We report time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of thin films of silica containing silicon nanoclusters (Si NCs), produced by PECVD and annealed at temperatures between 700 °C and 1150 °C. While the near infrared emission of Si NCs has long been studied, visible light emission has only recently attracted interest due to its very short decay times and its recently-reported redshift with decreasing NCs size. We analyse the PL decay dynamics in the range 450–700 nm with picosecond time resolution using Time Correlated Single Photon Counting. In the resultant multi-exponential decays two dominant components can clearly be distinguished: a very short component, in the range of hundreds of picoseconds, and a nanosecond component. In this wavelength range we do not detect the microsecond component generally associated with excitonic recombination. We associate the nanosecond component to defect relaxation: it decreases in intensity in the sample annealed at higher temperature, suggesting that the contribution from defects decreases with increasing temperature. The origin of the very fast PL component (ps time region) is also discussed. We show that it is consistent with the Auger recombination times of multiple excitons. Further work needs to be done in order to assess the contribution of the Auger-controlled recombinations to the defect-assisted mechanism of photoluminescence. -- Highlights: ► We report time-resolved PL measurements of Si-Ncs embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix. ► Net decrease of PL with increasing the annealing temperature has been observed. ► Lifetime distribution analysis revealed a multiexponential decay with ns and ps components. ► Ps components are consistent with the lifetime range of the Auger recombination times. ► No evidence for a fast direct transition at the Brillouin zone centre.

  11. Lifetime earnings patterns, the distribution of future Social Security benefits, and the impact of pension reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, B; Burtless, G; Steuerle, E

    2000-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of Social Security reform on current and future workers, it is essential to accurately characterize the initial situations of representative workers affected by reform. For the purpose of analyzing typical reforms, the most important characteristic of a worker is the level and pattern of his or her preretirement earnings. Under the current system, pensions are determined largely by the level of the workers' earnings averaged over their work life. However, several reform proposals would create individual retirement accounts for which the pension would depend on the investment accumulation within the account. Thus, the pension would also depend on the timing of the contributions into the account and hence on the exact shape of the worker's lifetime earnings profile. Most analysis of the distributional impact of reform has focused, however, on calculating benefit changes among a handful of hypothetical workers whose relative earnings are constant over their work life. The earnings levels are not necessarily chosen to represent the situations of workers who have typical or truly representative earnings patterns. Consequently, the results of such analysis can be misleading, especially if reform involves introducing a fundamentally new kind of pension formula. This article presents two broad approaches to creating representative earnings profiles for policy evaluation. First, we use standard econometric methods to predict future earnings for a representative sample of workers drawn from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Our statistical estimates are based on a simple representation of typical career earnings paths and a fixed-effect statistical specification. Because our estimation file contains information on each worker's annual earnings from 1951 through 1996 as reported in the Social Security Administration's earnings files, we have a record (though an incomplete one) of the actual earnings that will be used to

  12. The Relationship between Reports of Psychological Capital and Reports of Job Satisfaction among Administrative Personnel at a Private Institution of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, James A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this single-site case study was to investigate the relationship between administrative personnel's reports of psychological capital (Luthans, Youssef, & Avolio, 2007) and their reports of job satisfaction (Hackman & Oldham, 1980). Specifically, two surveys, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire (Luthans, Youssef, &…

  13. Electron Beam Lifetime in SPEAR3: Measurement and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbett, J.; Huang, X.; Lee, M.; Lui, P.; /SLAC; Sayyar-Rodsari, B.; /Pavilon Tech., Austin

    2007-12-19

    In this paper we report on electron beam lifetime measurements as a function of scraper position, RF voltage and bunch fill pattern in SPEAR3. We then outline development of an empirical, macroscopic model using the beam-loss rate equation. By identifying the dependence of loss coefficients on accelerator and beam parameters, a numerically-integrating simulator can be constructed to compute beam decay with time. In a companion paper, the simulator is used to train a parametric, non-linear dynamics model for the system [1].

  14. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  15. Oceanic eddy detection and lifetime forecast using machine learning methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkezari, Mohammad D.; Hill, Christopher N.; Follett, Christopher N.; Forget, Gaël.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel altimetry-based machine learning approach for eddy identification and characterization. The machine learning models use daily maps of geostrophic velocity anomalies and are trained according to the phase angle between the zonal and meridional components at each grid point. The trained models are then used to identify the corresponding eddy phase patterns and to predict the lifetime of a detected eddy structure. The performance of the proposed method is examined at two dynamically different regions to demonstrate its robust behavior and region independency.

  16. Malaysia and the Knowledge Economy: Building a World-Class Higher Education System. Human Development Sector Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, Omporn; Salmi, Jamil; Watkins, Alfred; Tan, Hong; Dawkins, John; Saroyan, Alenoush; Vestergaard, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    This report was prepared at the request of the Government of Malaysia (GOM) as a contribution to the long term development objectives for the university sector under the Ninth Malaysia Plan. The GOM is considering new policy directions to make the country a more competitive player in the world economy. Such a strategy will require bold innovations…

  17. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. METHODS: We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolesce

  18. Young adolescents who combine alcohol and energy drinks have a higher risk of reporting negative behavioural outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holubcikova, Jana; Kolarcik, Peter; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Joppova, Eva; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    To explore whether young adolescents consuming alcohol and energy drinks combined were more likely to report negative behavioural outcomes than their peers who drink only one type of these beverages or are abstinent. We analysed data on a representative sample of Slovak adolescents 8502 adolescents

  19. Piecing Together the Student Success Puzzle: Research, Propositions, and Recommendations. ASHE Higher Education Report, Volume 32, Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuh, George D., Ed.; Kinzie, Jillian, Ed.; Buckley, Jennifer A., Ed.; Bridges, Brian K., Ed.; Hayek, John C., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This report is an abridged version of work performed for the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative to synthesize the relevant literature and emerging findings related to student success, broadly defined (Kuh and others, 2006). The author's purpose is to provide an informed perspective on policies, programs, and practices that can make a…

  20. Exploring the Validity and Robustness of a Competency Self-Report Instrument for Vocational and Higher Competence-Based Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaled, A.E.; Gulikers, J.T.M.; Tobi, H.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Oonk, C.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the effectiveness of competence-based education (CB-education) across educational contexts and levels requires a new evaluation measurement. This study explores the face validity, construct validity, and robustness of a competency self-report instrument that is aligned with contemporary

  1. Brief Report: Parent-Adolescent Informant Discrepancies of Social Skill Importance and Social Skill Engagement for Higher-Functioning Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Camilla M.; Solomon, Marjorie

    2015-01-01

    Parent- and adolescent-report of social skill importance and social skill engagement on the Social Skills Rating System (Gresham and Elliott in The social skills rating system, American Guidance Service, Circle Pines, 1990) were assessed in higher-functioning adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Compared to parents, adolescents…

  2. Examples of fatigue lifetime and reliability evaluation of larger wind turbine components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp-Johansen, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    This report is one out of several that constitute the final report on the ELSAM funded PSO project “Vindmøllekomponenters udmattelsesstyrke og levetid”, project no. 2079, which regards the lifetime distribution of larger wind turbine components in ageneric turbine that has real life dimensions....... Though it was the initial intention of the project to consider only the distribution of lifetimes the work reported in this document provides also calculations of reliabilities and partial load safetyfactors under specific assumptions about uncertainty sources, as reliabilities are considered...

  3. Time-domain microfluidic fluorescence lifetime flow cytometry for high-throughput Förster resonance energy transfer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-02-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5-5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving fluorescence

  4. Estimating the volcanic emission rate and atmospheric lifetime of SO2 from space: a case study for Kīlauea volcano, Hawai`i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Beirle

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of SO2 column densities derived from GOME-2 satellite measurements for the Kīlauea volcano (Hawai`i for 2007–2012. During a period of enhanced degassing activity in March–November 2008, monthly mean SO2 emission rates and effective SO2 lifetimes are determined simultaneously from the observed downwind plume evolution and meteorological wind fields, without further model input. Kīlauea is particularly suited for quantitative investigations from satellite observations owing to the absence of interfering sources, the clearly defined downwind plumes caused by steady trade winds, and generally low cloud fractions. For March–November 2008, the effective SO2 lifetime is 1–2 days, and Kīlauea SO2 emission rates are 9–21 kt day−1, which is about 3 times higher than initially reported from ground-based monitoring systems.

  5. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes part 1. Fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan free in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan free in polar, hydrophobic and mixture of polar-hydrophobic solvents were recorded along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). Analysis of the data show that emission of tryptophan occurs with two lifetimes in 100% polar and hydrophobic environments. The values of the two lifetimes are not the same in both environments while their populations (pre-exponentials values) are identical. Fluorescence lifetimes and pre-exponentials values do not change with the excitation wavelength and thus are independent of excitation energy. Our results indicate that tryptophan emission occurs from two specific sub-structures existing in the excited state. These sub-structures differ from those present in the ground states and characterize an internal property and/or organization of the tryptophan structure in the excited state. By sub-substructure, we mean here tryptophan backbone and its electronic cloud. In ethanol, three fluorescence lifetimes were measured; two lifetimes are very close to those observed in water (0.4-0.5 ns and 2-4 ns). Presence of a third lifetime for tryptophan in ethanol results from the interaction of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic dipoles or chemical functions of ethanol with the fluorophore.

  6. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  7. Photoluminescence lifetime measurements in InP wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Jenkins, Phillip; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    A simple apparatus to measure the minority carrier lifetime in InP has been developed. The technique stimulates the sample with a short pulse of light from a diode laser and measures the photoluminescence decay to extract the minority carrier lifetime. The photoluminescence lifetime in InP as a function of doping on both n- and p-type material is examined. The results also show a marked difference in the lifetime of n-type InP and p-type InP of similar doping levels. N-type InP shows a lifetime considerably longer than the expected radiative limited lifetime.

  8. Self-reported leadership styles of deans of baccalaureate and higher degree nursing programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Marion E

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a lack of attention in the discipline paid to developing strong academic leaders. It is widely acknowledged that the role of the dean has shifted dramatically over the past two decades, with an increasing emphasis on interaction with and accountability to external constituencies at the university, community, and national levels. The overall purpose of this study was to investigate the self-reported leadership styles, behaviors, and experiences of deans of schools of nursing in the United States. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) was sent to 655 deans who were members of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing; 344 returned completed surveys for a return rate of 52.5%. Scores on the transformational scale (n = 321; 20 items) ranged from 2.75 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.79; transactional scores ranged from 1.3 to 4.0, with a mean of 3.3 and mode of 3.5. The passive leadership component was lowest, with a range of 0 to 3.75, mean of 1.1, and mode of 1.0. The highest scores for each dean were then examined and compared across the three components. Seventy-seven percent of the deans' highest scores fell on the transformational, 21% on the transactional, and 2% on the passive-avoidant scale. There were no significant differences in the most commonly reported leadership behaviors by gender, ethnicity, or terminal degree. Deans of nursing, compared with over 3,000 other leaders who have completed the MLQ, ranked in the 80th percentile for self-reported transformative behaviors and outcomes effectiveness. The findings from this sample, who were predominantly female, are congruent with previous research on women leaders. Recommendations for future research leadership development programs are presented.

  9. New Detectors to Explore the Lifetime Frontier

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, John Paul; Lubatti, H J

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived particles (LLPs) are a common feature in many beyond the Standard Model theories, including supersymmetry, and are generically produced in exotic Higgs decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to probe neutral LLPs with lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN), $c \\tau \\lesssim 10^7 - 10^8$ m. We propose the MATHUSLA surface detector concept (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles), which can be implemented cost-effectively and in time for the high luminosity LHC upgrade to find such ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs), whether produced in exotic Higgs decays or more general production modes. We also advocate for a dedicated LLP detector at a future 100 TeV collider, where a modestly sized underground design can discover ULLPs with lifetimes at the BBN limit produced in sub-percent level exotic Higgs decays

  10. Measurement of the B hadron lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ash, W.W.; Band, H.R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G.B.; Delfino, M.C.; De Sangro, R.; Ford, W.T.; Gettner, M.W.

    1986-09-01

    Data from e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions collected by the MAC detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP with a new vertex chamber having position resolution of 50 ..mu..m have been analyzed with a new method to make a determination of the lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks. In addition, data collected with MAC before the vertex chamber was installed have been re-analyzed using the new method. The combined result for the B lifetime is tau/sub b/ = (1.16 +- 0.16(stat.) +- 0.07(syst.)ps) x (1 +- 0.15), where the last factor is the scale. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Lifetime measurement of trapped staus using ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sibley, Logan

    I study the creation of long-lived staus at a 14 TeV centre of mass energy in proton-proton collisions at the LHC using both the ATLAS and ACME detectors. The ATLAS overburden or underburden, or even ATLAS itself, may trap the semi-stable staus at that place where they will remain until the time at which they decay, where the stau lifetime ranges between seven days and one year. Using a novel method, one may count the number of muons and pions originating from the stau decay using the standard ATLAS cosmic ray trigger. Using an idealized detector model, I find that this method can lead to measurements of the stau lifetime and SUSY cross-section to within statistical uncertainties of 6% and 1% of their actual values, respectively.

  12. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, M.; Thibault, D.; Bouffard, D. A.; Lévesque, M.

    2010-08-01

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Québec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  13. Neutrinos and cosmology: A lifetime relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpico, Pasquale D.

    2009-06-01

    We consider the example of neutrino decays to illustrate the profound relation between laboratory neutrino physics and cosmology. Two case studies are presented: In the first one, we show how the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE, when combined with Lab data, have greatly changed bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime. In the second case, we speculate on the consequence for neutrino physics of the cosmological detection of neutrino masses even as small as ~0.06 eV, the lower limit guaranteed by neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that a detection at that level would improve by many orders of magnitude the existing limits on neutrino lifetime, and as a consequence on some models of neutrino secret interactions.

  14. A Precise Measurement of the Tau Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e+e- -> tau+tau- events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave tau_tau (1 prong) = 291.8 +/- 2.3 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded tau_tau (3 prong) = 288.6 +/- 2.4 (stat) +/- 1.3 (sys) fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be tau_tau = 290.9 +/- 1.4 (stat) +/- 1.0 (sys) fs.

  15. Lifetime socio-economic position and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osler, Merete; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the influence of lifetime socio-economic position (SEP) on adult depression. We examined the association of SEP during the life course with depressive mood in late midlife and explored whether cognitive function at age 20, health-related behaviour and inflammatory...... biomarkers explained any associations. Methods: A cohort of 2482 Danish men born in 1953 with information from birth, and conscript board examinations was followed-up with assessment of depressive mood and blood sampling in 2010. Simple and multiple linear regression were used to investigate associations...... among variables. Results: Social circumstances during the life course were associated with depressive mood. Further, low lifetime SEP was associated with lower cognitive score, smoking, alcohol use, high body mass index (BMI) and increased level of high sensitive ProReactive Protein and Interleukin-6...

  16. Device Architecture and Lifetime Requirements for High Efficiency Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, H.; Hofstetter, J.; Mitchell, B.; Altermatt, P.; Buonassisi, T.

    2015-03-23

    We present a numerical simulation study of different multicrystalline silicon materials and solar cell architectures to understand today's efficiency limitations and future efficiency possibilities. We compare conventional full-area BSF and PERC solar cells to future cell designs with a gallium phosphide heteroemitter. For all designs, mc-Si materials with different excess carrier lifetime distributions are used as simulation input parameters to capture a broad range of materials. The results show that conventional solar cell designs are sufficient for generalized mean lifetimes between 40 – 90 μs, but do not give a clear advantage in terms of efficiency for higher mean lifetime mc-Si material because they are often limited by recombination in the phosphorus diffused emitter region. Heteroemitter designs instead increase in cell efficiency considerable up to generalized mean lifetimes of 380 μs because they are significantly less limited by recombination in the emitter and the bulk lifetime becomes more important. In conclusion, to benefit from increasing mc-Si lifetime, new cell designs, especially heteroemitter, are desirable.

  17. Hybrid Evolutionary Approaches to Maximum Lifetime Routing and Energy Efficiency in Sensor Mesh Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahat, Alma A M; Everson, Richard M; Fieldsend, Jonathan E

    2015-01-01

    Mesh network topologies are becoming increasingly popular in battery-powered wireless sensor networks, primarily because of the extension of network range. However, multihop mesh networks suffer from higher energy costs, and the routing strategy employed directly affects the lifetime of nodes with limited energy resources. Hence when planning routes there are trade-offs to be considered between individual and system-wide battery lifetimes. We present a multiobjective routing optimisation approach using hybrid evolutionary algorithms to approximate the optimal trade-off between the minimum lifetime and the average lifetime of nodes in the network. In order to accomplish this combinatorial optimisation rapidly, our approach prunes the search space using k-shortest path pruning and a graph reduction method that finds candidate routes promoting long minimum lifetimes. When arbitrarily many routes from a node to the base station are permitted, optimal routes may be found as the solution to a well-known linear program. We present an evolutionary algorithm that finds good routes when each node is allowed only a small number of paths to the base station. On a real network deployed in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, these solutions, using only three paths per node, are able to achieve minimum lifetimes of over 99% of the optimum linear program solution's time to first sensor battery failure.

  18. Lifetime Physical Activity and Breast Cancer: a Case-Control Study in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Siew Hwa; Knight, A; Krishna, Mbv; Muda, Wmw; Rufai, Aa

    2016-01-01

    Physical inactivity has been identified as the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality and is associated with increased breast cancer diagnosis and recurrence. To examine the association between adult lifetime physical activity and breast cancer risk in a case-control analysis. This study involved 122 cases of breast cancer and 121 controls in the state of Kelantan in Malaysia. A comprehensive measure of lifetime physical activity was used to assess occupational, household, and recreational/sports activity. For every type of activity, a metabolic equivalent (MET) score was assigned using the compendium of physical activities. MET-hours/week per year for all types of activities at different levels of intensities for different age groups were calculated. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios between various measures of physical activity and breast cancer risk. The mean MET-hours/week per year for all activities were 120.0 and 132.9 of MET-hours/week per year for cases and controls respectively. Household activities accounted for about 70% of the total lifetime physical activities. Only about 2.5% of the total lifetime physical activities were in the form of recreational/sports. This study found no association between lifetime occupational and recreational/sports physical activities with breast cancer risk among Kelantanese women. However, higher intensity lifetime household activities seemed to significantly reduce risk of breast cancer.

  19. Sensitivity for Diagnosing Group A Streptococcal Pharyngitis from Manufacturers is 10% Higher than Reported in Peer-Reviewed Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachhani, Raj; Patel, Toral; Centor, Robert M; Estrada, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Meta-analyses based on peer-reviewed publications report a sensitivity of approximately 85% for rapid antigen streptococcus tests to diagnose group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis. Because these meta-analyses excluded package inserts, we examined the test characteristics of rapid antigen streptococcal tests and molecular methods that manufacturers report in their package inserts. We included tests available in the US market (Food and Drug Administration, period searched 1993-2015) and used package insert data to calculate pooled sensitivity and specificity. To examine quality, we used the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies-2. We excluded 26 tests having different trade names but identical methods and data. The study design was prospective in 41.7% (10 of 24). The pooled sensitivity of the most commonly used method, lateral flow/immunochromatographic, was 95% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94-96) and the pooled specificity was 98% (96-98); 7108 patients. The pooled sensitivity of the polymerase chain reaction or molecular methods was 98% (95% CI 96-98) and the pooled specificity was 96% (95% CI 95-97); 5685 patients. Package inserts include sponsored studies that overestimate the sensitivity of rapid tests to diagnose GAS pharyngitis by approximately 10%. Physicians should understand that package inserts overestimate diagnostic test utility; a negative test cannot be used to exclude GAS pharyngitis.

  20. Gated Detection Measurements of Phosphorescence Lifetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kostov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost, gated system for measurements of phosphorescence lifetimes is presented. An extensive description of the system operating principles and metrological characteristics is given. Remarkably, the system operates without optical filtering of the LED excitation source. A description of a practical system is also given and its performance is discussed. Because the device effectively suppresses high-level background fluorescence and scattered light, it is expected to find wide-spread application in bioprocess, environmental and biomedical fields.

  1. PLATE: Product Lifetimes And The Environment Exhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The PLATE (Product Lifetimes And The Environment) Exhibition explored critical themes related to how long products last in contemporary society. The topic of product longevity is examined in innovative ways through prototypes, objects, artefacts, posters, photographs and films produced by designers, social businesses, artists, researchers, lecturers and students.\\ud \\ud Featuring household products, furniture, lighting, fashion, jewellery and artworks, this collection of visual work embraced ...

  2. Spectral hole lifetimes and spin population relaxation dynamics in neodymium-doped yttrium orthosilicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruzeiro, E. Zambrini; Tiranov, A.; Usmani, I.; Laplane, C.; Lavoie, J.; Ferrier, A.; Goldner, P.; Gisin, N.; Afzelius, M.

    2017-05-01

    We present a detailed study of the lifetime of optical spectral holes due to population storage in Zeeman sublevels of Nd3 +:Y2SiO5 . The lifetime is measured as a function of magnetic field strength and orientation, temperature, and Nd3 + doping concentration. At the lowest temperature of 3 K we find a general trend where the lifetime is short at low field strengths, then increases to a maximum lifetime at a few hundred mT, and then finally decays rapidly for high field strengths. This behavior can be modeled with a relaxation rate dominated by Nd3 +-Nd3 + cross relaxation at low fields and spin lattice relaxation at high magnetic fields. The maximum lifetime depends strongly on both the field strength and orientation, due to the competition between these processes and their different angular dependencies. The cross relaxation limits the maximum lifetime for concentrations as low as 30 ppm of Nd3 + ions. By decreasing the concentration to less than 1 ppm we could completely eliminate the cross relaxation, reaching a lifetime of 3.8 s at 3 K. At higher temperatures the spectral hole lifetime is limited by the magnetic-field-independent Raman and Orbach processes. In addition we show that the cross relaxation rate can be strongly reduced by creating spectrally large holes of the order of the optical inhomogeneous broadening. Our results are important for the development and design of new rare-earth-ion doped crystals for quantum information processing and narrow-band spectral filtering for biological tissue imaging.

  3. The lifetime cost of a magnetic refrigerator

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R; Nielsen, K K

    2016-01-01

    The total cost of a 25 W average load magnetic refrigerator using commercial grade Gd is calculated using a numerical model. The price of magnetocaloric material, magnet material and cost of operation are considered, and all influence the total cost. The lowest combined total cost with a device lifetime of 15 years is found to be in the range \\$150-\\$400 depending on the price of the magnetocaloric and magnet material. The cost of the magnet is largest, followed closely by the cost of operation, while the cost of the magnetocaloric material is almost negligible. For the lowest cost device, the optimal magnetic field is about 1.4 T, the particle size is 0.23 mm, the length of the regenerator is 40-50 mm and the utilization is about 0.2, for all device lifetimes and material and magnet prices, while the operating frequency vary as function of device lifetime. The considered performance characteristics are based on the performance of a conventional A$^{+++}$ refrigeration unit. In a rough life time cost comparis...

  4. Lifetimes of atmospheric species: Integrating environmental impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.

    2002-11-01

    The environmental damage caused by atmospheric pollutants is proportional to the duration of their effects. The global impacts of greenhouse gases (as measured by global warming potential) and ozone depleting substances (as measured by ozone depletion potential) have traditionally been calculated using the atmospheric lifetime of the source gas as a quantitative measure of the impact's duration, assuming that the gas quickly reaches a steady-state pattern which decays exponentially according to the lifetime. This assumed behavior obviously does not match the true rise and fall of impacts, particularly secondary ones like ozone depletion, that can be seen in numerical integrations or chemical mode decomposition. Here, the modes decomposition is used to prove that: (a) the steady-state pattern of impacts caused by specified emissions, multiplied by (b) the steady-state lifetime of the source gas for that emission pattern, is exactly equal to (c) the integral of all impacts - independent of the number and atmospheric residence times of secondary impacts.

  5. An EIAV field isolate reveals much higher levels of subtype variability than currently reported for the equine lentivirus family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Baoshan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV, a lentivirus that infects horses, has been utilized as an animal model for the study of HIV. Furthermore, the disease associated with the equine lentivirus poses a significant challenge to veterinary medicine around the world. As with all lentiviruses, EIAV has been shown to have a high propensity for genomic sequence and antigenic variation, especially in its envelope (Env proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated Env variation to be a major determinant of vaccine efficacy, emphasizing the importance of defining natural variation among field isolates of EIAV. To date, however, published EIAV sequences have been reported only for cell-adapted strains of virus, predominantly derived from a single primary virus isolate, EIAVWyoming (EIAVWY. Results We present here the first characterization of the Env protein of a natural primary isolate from Pennsylvania (EIAVPA since the widely utilized and referenced EIAVWY strain. The data demonstrated that the level of EIAVPA Env amino acid sequence variation, approximately 40% as compared to EIAVWY, is much greater than current perceptions or published reports of natural EIAV variation between field isolates. This variation did not appear to give rise to changes in the predicted secondary structure of the proteins. While the EIAVPA Env was serologically cross reactive with the Env proteins of the cell-adapted reference strain, EIAVPV (derivative of EIAVWY, the two variant Envs were shown to lack any cross neutralization by immune serum from horses infected with the respective virus strains. Conclusion Taking into account the significance of serum neutralization to universal vaccine efficacy, these findings are crucial considerations towards successful EIAV vaccine development and the potential inclusion of field isolate Envs in vaccine candidates.

  6. Dust Destruction Rates and Lifetimes in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Boyer, Martha L.; Meixner, Margaret; Gall, Christa; Roman-Duval, Julia

    2015-01-01

    The nature, composition, abundance, and size distribution of dust in galaxies is determined by the rate at which it is created in the different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetime and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust in these galaxies. We find dust lifetimes of 22+/-13 Myr (30+/-17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 +/- 32 Myr (72 +/- 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass, and the fact that the dust-destroying isolated SNe in the MCs seem to be preferentially occurring in regions with higher than average dust-to-gas (D2G) mass ratios. We also calculate the supernova rate and the current star formation rate in the MCs, and use them to derive maximum dust injection rates by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). We find that the injection rates are an order of magnitude lower than the dust destruction rates by the SNRs. This supports the conclusion that, unless the dust destruction rates have been considerably overestimated, most of the dust must be reconstituted from surviving grains in dense molecular clouds. More generally, we also discuss the dependence of the dust destruction rate on the local D2G mass ratio and the ambient gas density and metallicity, as well as the application of our results to other galaxies and dust evolution models.

  7. DUST DESTRUCTION RATES AND LIFETIMES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temim, Tea; Dwek, Eli; Boyer, Martha L. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Tchernyshyov, Kirill; Meixner, Margaret [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 366 Bloomberg Center, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gall, Christa [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Roman-Duval, Julia, E-mail: tea.temim@nasa.gov [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The dust budget in galaxies depends on the rate at which dust grains are created in different stellar sources and destroyed by interstellar shocks. Because of their extensive wavelength coverage, proximity, and nearly face-on geometry, the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) provide a unique opportunity to study these processes in great detail. In this paper, we use the complete sample of supernova remnants (SNRs) in the MCs to calculate the lifetimes and destruction efficiencies of silicate and carbon dust. We find dust lifetimes of 22 ± 13 Myr (30 ± 17 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC, and 54 ± 32 Myr (72 ± 43 Myr) for silicate (carbon) grains in the SMC. The corresponding dust destruction rates are 2.3 × 10{sup –2} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (5.9 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) and 3.0 × 10{sup –3} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (5.6 × 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) for silicate (carbon) grains in the LMC and SMC, respectively. The significantly shorter lifetimes in the MCs, as compared to the Milky Way, are explained as the combined effect of their lower total dust mass and preferentially higher dust-to-gas (D2G) mass ratios in the vicinity of the SNRs. We find that the maximum dust injection rates by asymptotic giant branch stars and core collapse supernovae are an order of magnitude lower than the dust destruction rates by the SNRs, suggesting that most of the dust may be reconstituted in dense molecular clouds. We also discuss the dependence of the dust destruction rate on the local D2G mass ratio, ambient gas density, and metallicity, as well as the application of our results to other galaxies and dust evolution models.

  8. Moving multiple sinks through wireless sensor networks for lifetime maximization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrioli, Chiara (Universita di Roma); Carosi, Alessio (Universita di Roma); Basagni, Stefano (Northeastern University); Phillips, Cynthia Ann

    2008-01-01

    Unattended sensor networks typically watch for some phenomena such as volcanic events, forest fires, pollution, or movements in animal populations. Sensors report to a collection point periodically or when they observe reportable events. When sensors are too far from the collection point to communicate directly, other sensors relay messages for them. If the collection point location is static, sensor nodes that are closer to the collection point relay far more messages than those on the periphery. Assuming all sensor nodes have roughly the same capabilities, those with high relay burden experience battery failure much faster than the rest of the network. However, since their death disconnects the live nodes from the collection point, the whole network is then dead. We consider the problem of moving a set of collectors (sinks) through a wireless sensor network to balance the energy used for relaying messages, maximizing the lifetime of the network. We show how to compute an upper bound on the lifetime for any instance using linear and integer programming. We present a centralized heuristic that produces sink movement schedules that produce network lifetimes within 1.4% of the upper bound for realistic settings. We also present a distributed heuristic that produces lifetimes at most 25:3% below the upper bound. More specifically, we formulate a linear program (LP) that is a relaxation of the scheduling problem. The variables are naturally continuous, but the LP relaxes some constraints. The LP has an exponential number of constraints, but we can satisfy them all by enforcing only a polynomial number using a separation algorithm. This separation algorithm is a p-median facility location problem, which we can solve efficiently in practice for huge instances using integer programming technology. This LP selects a set of good sensor configurations. Given the solution to the LP, we can find a feasible schedule by selecting a subset of these configurations, ordering them

  9. EPOXY INSULATORS’LIFETIME PREDICTION IMPLEMENTING NEURAL NETWORK TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Nasrat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to wide implementation of Epoxy insulators in industrial applications and its economic implications; development of various Epoxy insulator materials has to be evaluated along with a reliable prediction methodology of their lifetimes. In this study, a new methodology based on Artificial-Neural-Networks (ANN is developed to predict Epoxy insulators lifetime using laboratory measurements of their surface leakage current under accelerated aging. The effect of adding fillers with various concentration rates to the Epoxy insulators such as; Calcium Silicate (CaSiO2, Mica and Magnesium Oxide (Mg(OH2 on their lifetimes is compared with the base case (no filler and dry condition. Furthermore, the lifetime of each specimen under study is examined under various weather conditions such as dry, wet, salt wet (NaCl and hydro carbon solvent Naphtha. The obtained results are weighing against the experimental measured data based on two ANN techniques; i.e., Feed-Forward-Neural-Network (FNN and Recurrent-Neural-Network (RNN. The results obtained from the FNN and RNN are compared to validate the proposed methodology to predict the lifetime of epoxy insulators in terms of the type and percentage concentration of filler. The obtained Epoxy insulators predicted lifetime under various filler concentrations and weather conditions are compared and conclusions are reported.

  10. Doppler-shift attenuation lifetime measurement of the 36Ar21+ level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, P.; Drake, T. E.; Starosta, K.; Andreoiu, C.; Ashley, R.; Ball, G. C.; Bender, P. C.; Chester, A.; Churchman, R.; Cross, D. S.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Hadinia, B.; Henderson, R.; Jigmeddorj, B.; Ketelhut, S.; Krücken, R.; Laffoley, A. T.; Leach, K. G.; Miller, D.; Orlandi, R.; Pearson, C. J.; Pore, J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rand, E. T.; Svensson, C. E.; Tardiff, E.; Unsworth, C.; Wang, Z.-M.; Signoracci, A.

    2017-08-01

    At TRIUMF, the TIGRESS Integrated Plunger device and its suite of ancillary detector systems have been implemented for charged-particle tagging and light-ion identification in coincidence with γ -ray spectroscopy for Doppler-shift lifetime studies and low-energy Coulomb excitation measurements. As a test of the device, the lifetime of the first 2+ excited state in 36Ar was measured from the γ -ray line shape of the 21+→0g.s . + transition using the Doppler-shift attenuation technique following Coulomb excitation. The line-shape signatures, vital for precision lifetime measurements, were significantly improved by enhanced reaction-channel selectivity using a complementary approach of kinematic gating and digital rise-time discrimination of recoiling charged particles in a silicon PIN diode array. The lifetime was determined by comparisons between the data and simulated line shapes generated using our TIGRESS Coulomb excitation code as an input to the Lindhard method, which was then extended and included as a class in geant4. The model-independent lifetime result of 490 ±50 fs corresponds to a reduced quadrupole transition strength of B (E 2 ;21+→0g.s . +) =56 ±6 e2fm4 and agrees well with previous intermediate energy Coulomb excitation measurements, thereby resolving reported discrepancies in the 21+ level lifetime in this self-conjugate nucleus.

  11. Enhancement of Photoluminescence Lifetime of ZnO Nanorods Making Use of Thiourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Sönmez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated correlation of photoluminescence lifetime between zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods and thiourea-doped ZnO nanorods (tu: CH4N2S. Aqueous solutions of ZnO nanorods were deposited on glass substrate by using pneumatic spray pyrolysis technique. The as-prepared specimens were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL. The photoluminescence lifetime of ZnO nanorods and ZnO nanorods containing thiourea was determined as =1.56±0.05 ns (2=0.9 and =2.12±0.03 ns (2=1.0, respectively. The calculated lifetime values of ZnO nanorods revealed that the presence of thiourea in ZnO nanorods resulted in increasing the exciton lifetime. In addition to the optical quality of ZnO nanorods, their exciton lifetime is comparable to the longest lifetimes reported for ZnO nanorods. The structural improvement of ZnO nanorods, containing thiourea, was also elucidated by taking their SEM images which show the thinner and longer ZnO nanorods compared to those without thiourea.

  12. Solid-State Camera System for Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a well-established platform for biology and biomedical research (Chapter 2). Based on this platform, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been developed to measure fluorescence lifetimes, which are independent of fluorophore concentration and excitation inte

  13. Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of effective dose and excess lifetime cancer risk from indoor and outdoor gamma dose rate of university of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, ... In addition, the excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) calculated for indoor exposure ranges ...

  14. Lifetimes of Machinery and Equipment. Evidence from Dutch Manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erumban, Abdul Azeez

    2006-01-01

    This paper estimates service lifetimes for capital assets in Dutch manufacturing industries, using information on asset retirement patterns. A Weibull distribution function is estimated using a nonlinear regression technique to derive service lifetimes for three selected asset types: transport equip

  15. Evaluation of excessive lifetime cancer risk due to natural radioactivity in the rivers sediments of Northern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Ahmed Qureshi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring radionuclides 226Ra, 232Th and 40K present in the rivers sediments of Northern Pakistan were measured using HPGe γ-ray spectrometer to evaluate the radiation health hazard indices and excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR. Average concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K in the sediments were found to be 50.66 ± 1.29, 70.15 ± 1.45 and 531.70 ± 5.45 Bq kg−1 respectively. Radium equivalent activity (190.89 Bq kg−1, outdoor external dose (87.47 nGy h−1, indoor external dose (165.39 nGy h−1, and total average annual effective dose (0.92 mSv were calculated. The hazard indices are higher than the world's average values. Total excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR was found to be 3.21 × 10−3 which is relatively higher. Numerous cancer deaths are annually reported from the Northern areas of Pakistan, which may be related to high radioactivity in the area.

  16. Factors associated with illicit drugs' lifetime and frequent/heavy use among students results from a population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitancourt, Tânia; Tissot, Maria Cristina Ribeiro Grilli; Fidalgo, Thiago Marques; Galduróz, José Carlos Fernandes; da Silveira Filho, Dartiu Xavier

    2016-03-30

    Substance use among teenage students and factors associated were investigated through a survey using a questionnaire adapted from the WHO's Program on Research and Reporting on the Epidemiology of Drug Dependence, additional questions on family factors and personal risks, and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, adapted to Brazil. The target population consisted of 3891 10-22-year-old students from the city of Embu das Artes, São Paulo, Brazil. The prevalence of lifetime substance use was 26.7%. Most commonly used substances were energy drinks combined with alcohol (19%), solvents (11.2%) and marijuana (4.8%). Almost 60% of the students had already tried alcohol and 18.2% had tried tobacco. Factors associated to lifetime substance use were: lower self-esteem, going to nightclubs at least twice a week, use of alcohol, trying tobacco, bad relationship with the mother, permissive mothers, practicing sports as an obligation, working, and higher socioeconomic level. Concerning frequent/heavy substance use, chances were found to be higher among students who had use tobacco and alcohol, going to nightclubs at least twice a week, and those with lower self-esteem. Preventive actions concerning drug use should focus on avoiding the first experimentation, approaching family relationships, and improving students' self-esteem.

  17. Optimizing design of converters using power cycling lifetime models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Ørndrup; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    Converter power cycling lifetime depends heavily on converter operation point. A lifetime model of a single power module switched mode power supply with wide input voltage range is shown. A lifetime model is created using a power loss model, a thermal model and a model for power cycling capability...... with a given mission profile. A method to improve the expected lifetime of the converter is presented, taking into account switching frequency, input voltage and transformer turns ratio....

  18. Measurement of the τ-lepton lifetime at Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belous, K.; Shapkin, M.; Sokolov, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, Anu; Bhuyan, Bipul; Bobrov, A.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dutta, Deepanwita; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hara, Takanori; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kato, E.; Kichimi, H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, Jean; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S. H.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, Stephen L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlova, Galina; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, Todd; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ritter, M.; Rohrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, Himansu B.; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santel, Daniel; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Young-Soo; Stanic, S.; Stanic, M.; Steder, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Tatishvili, Gocha; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Vahsen, Sven E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, Gary; Varvell, K. E.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-01-23

    The lifetime of the Tau-lepton is measured using the process , where both leptons decay to . The result for the mean lifetime, based on of data collected with the Belle detector at the resonance and below, is . The first measurement of the lifetime difference between and is performed. The upper limit on the relative lifetime difference between positive and negative leptons is at 90% C.L. (That would make sense if ERICA could take RTF....)

  19. Final Report Project Activity Task ORD-FY04-002 Nevada System of Higher Education Quality Assurance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smiecinski, Amy; Keeler, Raymond; Bertoia, Julie; Mueller, Terry; Roosa, Morris; Roosa, Barbara

    2008-03-07

    The principal purpose of DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232 is to develop and continue providing the public and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with an independently derived, unbiased body of scientific and engineering data concerning the study of Yucca Mountain as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Under this agreement, the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), formerly the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN), performs scientific or engineering research, and maintains and fosters collaborative working relationships between government and academic researchers. In performing these activities, the NSHE has already developed and implemented a Quality Assurance (QA) program, which was accepted by the DOE Office of Quality Assurance, under the previous Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC28-98NV12081. The following describes the objectives of Project Activity 002 “Quality Assurance Program” under cooperative agreement DE-FC28-04RW12232. The objective of this QA program was to assure that data produced under the cooperative agreement met the OCRWM QA Requirements and Description (QARD) requirements for quality-affecting (Q) data. The QA Program was written to address specific QARD requirements historically identified and incorporated in Q activities to the degree appropriate for the nature, scope, and complexity of the activity. Additional QARD requirements were integrated into the program when required to complete a specific activity. NSHE QA staff developed a detailed matrix to address each QARD element, identifying the applicable requirements and specifying where each requirement is addressed in the QA program procedures, or identify requirements as “not applicable” to the QA program. Controlled documents were prepared in the form of QA procedures (QAPs) and implementing procedures (IPs). NSHE identified new QAPs and IPs when needed. NSHE PIs

  20. Higher Childhood Peer Reports of Social Preference Mediates the Impact of the Good Behavior Game on Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Alison R; Roth, Kimberly B; Kellam, Sheppard G; Wang, Wei; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Hart, Shelley R; Wagner, Barry M; Wilcox, Holly C

    2016-02-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a universal classroom-based preventive intervention directed at reducing early aggressive, disruptive behavior and improving children's social adaptation into the classroom. The GBG is one of the few universal preventive interventions delivered in early elementary school that has been shown to reduce the risk for future suicide attempts. This paper addresses one potential mechanism by which the GBG lowers the risk of later suicide attempt. In this study, we tested whether the GBG, by facilitating social adaptation into the classroom early on, including the level of social preference by classmates, thereby lowers future risk of suicide attempts. The measure of social adaptation is based on first and second grade peer reports of social preference ("which children do you like best?"; "which children don't you like?"). As part of the hypothesized meditational model, we examined the longitudinal association between childhood peer social preference and the risk of future suicide attempt, which has not previously been examined. Data were from an epidemiologically based randomized prevention trial, which tested the GBG among two consecutive cohorts of first grade children in 19 public schools and 41 classrooms. Results indicated that peer social preference partially mediated the relationship between the GBG and the associated reduction of risk for later suicide attempts by adulthood, specifically among children characterized by their first grade teacher as highly aggressive, disruptive. These results suggest that positive childhood peer relations may partially explain the GBG-associated reduction of risk for suicide attempts and may be an important and malleable protective factor for future suicide attempt.

  1. Risk factors for men's lifetime perpetration of physical violence against intimate partners: results from the international men and gender equality survey (IMAGES in eight countries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fleming

    Full Text Available This paper examines men's lifetime physical intimate partner violence (IPV perpetration across eight low- and middle-income countries to better understand key risk factors that interventions can target in order to promote gender equality and reduce IPV. We use data from men (n = 7806 that were collected as part of the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, Croatia, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, India, Mexico, and Rwanda. Results show that there is wide variation across countries for lifetime self-reported physical violence perpetration (range: 17% in Mexico to 45% in DRC, men's support for equal roles for men and women, and acceptability of violence against women. Across the sample, 31% of men report having perpetrated physical violence against a partner in their lifetime. In multivariate analyses examining risk factors for men ever perpetrating physical violence against a partner, witnessing parental violence was the strongest risk factor, reinforcing previous research suggesting the inter-generational transmission of violence. Additionally, having been involved in fights not specifically with an intimate partner, permissive attitudes towards violence against women, having inequitable gender attitudes, and older age were associated with a higher likelihood of ever perpetrating physical IPV. In separate analyses for each country, we found different patterns of risk factors in countries with high perpetration compared to countries with low perpetration. Findings are interpreted to identify key knowledge gaps and directions for future research, public policies, evaluation, and programming.

  2. Risk Factors for Men’s Lifetime Perpetration of Physical Violence against Intimate Partners: Results from the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) in Eight Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J.; McCleary-Sills, Jennifer; Morton, Matthew; Levtov, Ruti; Heilman, Brian; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines men’s lifetime physical intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration across eight low- and middle-income countries to better understand key risk factors that interventions can target in order to promote gender equality and reduce IPV. We use data from men (n = 7806) that were collected as part of the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, Croatia, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), India, Mexico, and Rwanda. Results show that there is wide variation across countries for lifetime self-reported physical violence perpetration (range: 17% in Mexico to 45% in DRC), men’s support for equal roles for men and women, and acceptability of violence against women. Across the sample, 31% of men report having perpetrated physical violence against a partner in their lifetime. In multivariate analyses examining risk factors for men ever perpetrating physical violence against a partner, witnessing parental violence was the strongest risk factor, reinforcing previous research suggesting the inter-generational transmission of violence. Additionally, having been involved in fights not specifically with an intimate partner, permissive attitudes towards violence against women, having inequitable gender attitudes, and older age were associated with a higher likelihood of ever perpetrating physical IPV. In separate analyses for each country, we found different patterns of risk factors in countries with high perpetration compared to countries with low perpetration. Findings are interpreted to identify key knowledge gaps and directions for future research, public policies, evaluation, and programming. PMID:25734544

  3. Risk factors for men's lifetime perpetration of physical violence against intimate partners: results from the international men and gender equality survey (IMAGES) in eight countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; McCleary-Sills, Jennifer; Morton, Matthew; Levtov, Ruti; Heilman, Brian; Barker, Gary

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines men's lifetime physical intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetration across eight low- and middle-income countries to better understand key risk factors that interventions can target in order to promote gender equality and reduce IPV. We use data from men (n = 7806) that were collected as part of the International Men and Gender Equality Survey (IMAGES) in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, Croatia, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), India, Mexico, and Rwanda. Results show that there is wide variation across countries for lifetime self-reported physical violence perpetration (range: 17% in Mexico to 45% in DRC), men's support for equal roles for men and women, and acceptability of violence against women. Across the sample, 31% of men report having perpetrated physical violence against a partner in their lifetime. In multivariate analyses examining risk factors for men ever perpetrating physical violence against a partner, witnessing parental violence was the strongest risk factor, reinforcing previous research suggesting the inter-generational transmission of violence. Additionally, having been involved in fights not specifically with an intimate partner, permissive attitudes towards violence against women, having inequitable gender attitudes, and older age were associated with a higher likelihood of ever perpetrating physical IPV. In separate analyses for each country, we found different patterns of risk factors in countries with high perpetration compared to countries with low perpetration. Findings are interpreted to identify key knowledge gaps and directions for future research, public policies, evaluation, and programming.

  4. Relative Lifetimes of MAPLUB Greases for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Mario; Sicre, Jacques; Jones, William R., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A Spiral Orbit Tribometer was employed to evaluate the tribological behavior and relative lifetimes of several commercially available greases under ultrahigh vacuum. These greases are either based on a multiply alkylated cyclopentane oil, or a perfluoropolyalkylether oil, and a thickener made of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) telomer. The multiply alkylated cyclopentane (MAC) greases yielded long lifetimes, while perfluoropolyalkylether (PFPE) greases yielded short lifetimes.

  5. Lifetime sedentary living accelerates some aspects of secondary aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booth, Frank W; Laye, Matthew J; Roberts, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Lifetime physical inactivity interacts with secondary aging (i.e., aging caused by diseases and environmental factors) in three patterns of response. First, lifetime physical inactivity confers no apparent effects on a given set of physiological functions. Second, lifetime physical inactivity acc...

  6. The fiscal consequences of ADHD in Germany: a quantitative analysis based on differences in educational attainment and lifetime earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Nikolaos; Connolly, Mark P; Sobanski, Esther; Postma, Maarten J

    2013-03-01

    To estimate the long-term fiscal consequences of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on the German government and social insurance system based on differences in educational attainment and the resulting differences in lifetime earnings compared with non-ADHD cohorts. Differences in educational attainment between ADHD and non-ADHD cohorts were linked to education-specific earnings data. Direct and indirect tax rates and social insurance contributions were linked to differences in lifetime, education-specific earnings to derive lost tax revenue in Germany associated with ADHD. For ADHD and non-ADHD cohorts we derived the age-specific discounted net taxes paid by deducting lifetime transfers from lifetime gross taxes paid. The lifetime net tax revenue for a non-ADHD individual was approximately EUR 80,000 higher compared to an untreated ADHD individual. The fiscal burden of untreated ADHD, based on a cohort of n=31,844 born in 2010, was estimated at EUR 2.5 billion in net tax revenue losses compared with an equally-sized non-ADHD cohort. ADHD interventions providing a small improvement in educational attainment resulted in fiscal benefits from increases in lifetime tax gains. ADHD results in long-term financial loss due to lower education attainment and lifetime reduced earnings and resulting lifetime taxes and social contributions paid. Investments in ADHD interventions allowing more children to achieve their educational potential may offer fiscal benefits generating a positive rate of return.

  7. Photoacoustic lifetime imaging of dissolved oxygen using methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Shai

    2010-07-01

    Measuring distribution of dissolved oxygen in biological tissue is of prime interest for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy optimization. Tumor hypoxia indicates poor prognosis and resistance to radiotherapy. Despite its major clinical significance, no current imaging modality provides direct imaging of tissue oxygen. We present preliminary results demonstrating the potential of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) for noninvasive, 3-D imaging of tissue oxygen. The technique is based on photoacoustic probing of the excited state lifetime of methylene blue (MB) dye. MB is an FDA-approved water soluble dye with a peak absorption at 660 nm. A double pulse laser system (pump probe) is used to excite the dye and probe its transient absorption by detecting photoacoustic emission. The relaxation rate of MB depends linearly on oxygen concentration. Our measurements show high photoacoustic signal contrast at a probe wavelength of 810 nm, where the excited state absorption is more than four times higher than the ground state absorption. Imaging of a simple phantom is demonstrated. We conclude by discussing possible implementations of the technique in clinical settings and combining it with photodynamic therapy (PDT) for real-time therapy monitoring.

  8. Evaluation of Fibre Lifetime in Optical Ground Wire Transmission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunvalds, R.; Ciekurs, A.; Porins, J.; Supe, A.

    2017-06-01

    In the research, measurements of polarisation mode dispersion of two OPGWs (optical ground wire transmission lines), in total four fibres, have been carried out, and the expected lifetime of the infrastructure has been assessed on the basis of these measurements. The cables under consideration were installed in 1995 and 2011, respectively. Measurements have shown that polarisation mode dispersion values for cable installed in 1995 are four times higher than that for cable installed in 2011, which could mainly be explained by technological differences in fibre production and lower fibre polarisation mode dispersion requirements in 1995 due to lack of high-speed (over 10 Gbit/s) optical transmission systems. The calculation methodology of non-refusal work and refusal probabilities, using the measured polarisation mode dispersion parameters, is proposed in the paper. Based on reliability calculations, the expected lifetime is then predicted, showing that all measured fibres most likely will be operational within minimum theoretical service life of 25 years accepted by the industry.

  9. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor...

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  10. Lifetime measurement in {sup 136}Pm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, D.; Zhong, Q.; De Angelis, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy)] (and others)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to investigate the electromagnetic transition probabilities in the doublet bands of {sup 136}Pm. These two bands have been observed up to I{pi} = (21{sup +}). Contrary to the case of {sup 134}Pr, the B(M1)/B(E2) ratios take similar values within the error bars in {sup 136}Pm. This is a strong indication that there is considerable difference between the two nuclei. However, a lifetime measurement in {sup 136}Pm is needed to shed light on the scale and the origin of the difference.

  11. Measurement of the τ lifetime from Belle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolov, A.A., E-mail: sokolov_a@ihep.ru

    2014-08-15

    The lifetime of the τ-lepton is measured using the process e{sup +}e{sup −}→τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, where both τ-leptons decay to 3πν. The preliminary result based on 711 fb{sup −1} of data collected on the ϒ(4S) resonance and in the nearby continuum is τ{sub τ}=(290.18±0.54(stat.)±0.33(syst.))×10{sup −15} s.

  12. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  13. Evidence Supporting an Independent Association between Childhood Physical Abuse and Lifetime Suicidal Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller-Thomson; Esme; Baker, Tobi M.; Brennenstuhl, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A regionally representative Canadian sample was used to investigate the gender-specific relationship between childhood physical abuse and lifetime suicidal ideation. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was about five times higher in abused men and women compared with their nonabused counterparts. After controlling for five clusters of potentially…

  14. Lifetime psychopathology among the offspring of Bipolar I parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo C. Zappitelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated high rates of psychopathology in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to identify psychiatric diagnoses in a sample of children of bipolar parents. METHOD: This case series comprised 35 children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years, with a mean age of 12.5 + 2.9 years (20 males and 15 females, who had at least one parent with bipolar disorder type I. The subjects were assessed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL. Family psychiatric history and demographics were also evaluated. RESULTS: Of the offspring studied, 71.4% had a lifetime diagnosis of at least one psychiatric disorder (28.6% with a mood disorder, 40% with a disruptive behavior disorder and 20% with an anxiety disorder. Pure mood disorders (11.4% occurred less frequently than mood disorders comorbid with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (17.1%. Psychopathology was commonly reported in second-degree relatives of the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder (71.4%. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support previous findings of an increased risk for developing psychopathology, predominantly mood and disruptive disorders, in the offspring of bipolar individuals. Prospective studies with larger samples are needed to confirm and expand these results.

  15. GaN-based superluminescent diodes with long lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, A.; Rossetti, M.; Matuschek, N.; Rezzonico, R.; Duelk, M.; Vélez, C.; Carlin, J.-F.; Grandjean, N.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the reliability of GaN-based super-luminescent light emitting diodes (SLEDs) emitting at a wavelength of 405 nm. We show that the Mg doping level in the p-type layers has an impact on both the device electro-optical characteristics and their reliability. Optimized doping levels allow decreasing the operating voltage on single-mode devices from more than 6 V to less than 5 V for an injection current of 100 mA. Furthermore, maximum output powers as high as 350 mW (for an injection current of 500 mA) have been achieved in continuous-wave operation (CW) at room temperature. Modules with standard and optimized p-type layers were finally tested in terms of lifetime, at a constant output power of 10 mW, in CW operation and at a case temperature of 25 °C. The modules with non-optimized p-type doping showed a fast and remarkable increase in the drive current during the first hundreds of hours together with an increase of the device series resistance. No degradation of the electrical characteristics was observed over 2000 h on devices with optimized p-type layers. The estimated lifetime for those devices was longer than 5000 h.

  16. Use phase signals to promote lifetime extension for Windows PCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Stewart; Fitzpatrick, Colin; O'Connell, Maurice; Johnson, Michael

    2009-04-01

    This paper proposes a signaling methodology for personal computers. Signaling may be viewed as an ecodesign strategy that can positively influence the consumer to consumer (C2C) market process. A number of parameters are identified that can provide the basis for signal implementation. These include operating time, operating temperature, operating voltage, power cycle counts, hard disk drive (HDD) self-monitoring, and reporting technology (SMART) attributes and operating system (OS) event information. All these parameters are currently attainable or derivable via embedded technologies in modern desktop systems. A case study detailing a technical implementation of how the development of signals can be achieved in personal computers that incorporate Microsoft Windows operating systems is presented. Collation of lifetime temperature data from a system processor is demonstrated as a possible means of characterizing a usage profile for a desktop system. In addition, event log data is utilized for devising signals indicative of OS quality. The provision of lifetime usage data in the form of intuitive signals indicative of both hardware and software quality can in conjunction with consumer education facilitate an optimal remarketing strategy for used systems. This implementation requires no additional hardware.

  17. Hydroxyl radical in/on illuminated polar snow: formation rates, lifetimes, and steady-state concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zeyuan; Chu, Liang; Galbavy, Edward S.; Ram, Keren; Anastasio, Cort

    2016-08-01

    While the hydroxyl radical (•OH) in the snowpack is likely a dominant oxidant for organic species and bromide, little is known about the kinetics or steady-state concentrations of •OH on/in snow and ice. Here we measure the formation rate, lifetime, and concentration of •OH for illuminated polar snow samples studied in the laboratory and in the field. Laboratory studies show that •OH kinetics and steady-state concentrations are essentially the same for a given sample studied as ice and liquid; this is in contrast to other photooxidants, which show a concentration enhancement in ice relative to solution as a result of kinetic differences in the two phases. The average production rate of •OH in samples studied at Summit, Greenland, is 5 times lower than the average measured in the laboratory, while the average •OH lifetime determined in the field is 5 times higher than in the laboratory. These differences indicate that the polar snows we studied in the laboratory are affected by contamination, despite significant efforts to prevent this; our results suggest similar contamination may be a widespread problem in laboratory studies of ice chemistry. Steady-state concentrations of •OH in clean snow studied in the field at Summit, Greenland, range from (0.8 to 3) × 10-15 M, comparable to values reported for midlatitude cloud and fog drops, rain, and deliquesced marine particles, even though impurity concentrations in the snow samples are much lower. Partitioning of firn air •OH to the snow grains will approximately double the steady-state concentration of snow-grain hydroxyl radical, leading to an average [•OH] in near-surface, summer Summit snow of approximately 4 × 10-15 M. At this concentration, the •OH-mediated lifetimes of organics and bromide in Summit snow grains are approximately 3 days and 7 h, respectively, suggesting that hydroxyl radical is a major oxidant for both species.

  18. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, L.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The ‘break-even’ point of QEC—at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system—has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0>f and |1>f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  19. Extending the lifetime of a quantum bit with error correction in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, Nissim; Petrenko, Andrei; Heeres, Reinier; Reinhold, Philip; Leghtas, Zaki; Vlastakis, Brian; Liu, Yehan; Frunzio, Luigi; Girvin, S M; Jiang, L; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2016-08-25

    Quantum error correction (QEC) can overcome the errors experienced by qubits and is therefore an essential component of a future quantum computer. To implement QEC, a qubit is redundantly encoded in a higher-dimensional space using quantum states with carefully tailored symmetry properties. Projective measurements of these parity-type observables provide error syndrome information, with which errors can be corrected via simple operations. The 'break-even' point of QEC--at which the lifetime of a qubit exceeds the lifetime of the constituents of the system--has so far remained out of reach. Although previous works have demonstrated elements of QEC, they primarily illustrate the signatures or scaling properties of QEC codes rather than test the capacity of the system to preserve a qubit over time. Here we demonstrate a QEC system that reaches the break-even point by suppressing the natural errors due to energy loss for a qubit logically encoded in superpositions of Schrödinger-cat states of a superconducting resonator. We implement a full QEC protocol by using real-time feedback to encode, monitor naturally occurring errors, decode and correct. As measured by full process tomography, without any post-selection, the corrected qubit lifetime is 320 microseconds, which is longer than the lifetime of any of the parts of the system: 20 times longer than the lifetime of the transmon, about 2.2 times longer than the lifetime of an uncorrected logical encoding and about 1.1 longer than the lifetime of the best physical qubit (the |0〉f and |1〉f Fock states of the resonator). Our results illustrate the benefit of using hardware-efficient qubit encodings rather than traditional QEC schemes. Furthermore, they advance the field of experimental error correction from confirming basic concepts to exploring the metrics that drive system performance and the challenges in realizing a fault-tolerant system.

  20. Long Lifetime Hole Traps at Grain Boundaries in CdTe Thin-Film Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, B. G.; Gachet, D.; Major, J. D.; Durose, K.

    2015-11-01

    A novel time-resolved cathodoluminescence method, where a pulsed electron beam is generated via the photoelectric effect, is used to probe individual CdTe grain boundaries. Excitons have a short lifetime (≤100 ps ) within the grains and are rapidly quenched at the grain boundary. However, a ˜47 meV shallow acceptor, believed to be due to oxygen, can act as a long lifetime hole trap, even at the grain boundaries where their concentration is higher. This provides direct evidence supporting recent observations of hopping conduction across grain boundaries in highly doped CdTe at low temperature.

  1. Atmospheric Lifetime of Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David; Eby, Michael; Brovkin, Victor; Ridgwell, Andy; Cao, Long; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Caldeira, Ken; Matsumoto, Katsumi; Munhoven, Guy; Montenegro, Alvaro; Tokos, Kathy

    2009-05-01

    CO2 released from combustion of fossil fuels equilibrates among the various carbon reservoirs of the atmosphere, the ocean, and the terrestrial biosphere on timescales of a few centuries. However, a sizeable fraction of the CO2 remains in the atmosphere, awaiting a return to the solid earth by much slower weathering processes and deposition of CaCO3. Common measures of the atmospheric lifetime of CO2, including the e-folding time scale, disregard the long tail. Its neglect in the calculation of global warming potentials leads many to underestimate the longevity of anthropogenic global warming. Here, we review the past literature on the atmospheric lifetime of fossil fuel CO2 and its impact on climate, and we present initial results from a model intercomparison project on this topic. The models agree that 20-35% of the CO2 remains in the atmosphere after equilibration with the ocean (2-20 centuries). Neutralization by CaCO3 draws the airborne fraction down further on timescales of 3 to 7 kyr.

  2. Remaining Useful Lifetime (RUL - Probabilistic Predictive Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ephraim Suhir

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliability evaluations and assurances cannot be delayed until the device (system is fabricated and put into operation. Reliability of an electronic product should be conceived at the early stages of its design; implemented during manufacturing; evaluated (considering customer requirements and the existing specifications, by electrical, optical and mechanical measurements and testing; checked (screened during manufacturing (fabrication; and, if necessary and appropriate, maintained in the field during the product’s operation Simple and physically meaningful probabilistic predictive model is suggested for the evaluation of the remaining useful lifetime (RUL of an electronic device (system after an appreciable deviation from its normal operation conditions has been detected, and the increase in the failure rate and the change in the configuration of the wear-out portion of the bathtub has been assessed. The general concepts are illustrated by numerical examples. The model can be employed, along with other PHM forecasting and interfering tools and means, to evaluate and to maintain the high level of the reliability (probability of non-failure of a device (system at the operation stage of its lifetime.

  3. Chemical Nonlinearities and Radical Pair Lifetime Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    Much attention has recently developed around chemical reactions that depend on applied static magnetic fields as weak as earth's. This interest is largely motivated by experiments that implicate the role of spin-selective radical pair recombination in biological magnetic sensing. Existing literature uses a straightforward calculation to approximate the expected lifetime of coherent radical pairs as a function of the minimum RF amplitude that is observed to disrupt magnetic navigation, apparently by decohering the radical pair via electronic Zeeman excitations. But we show that chemical nonlinearities can preclude direct computation of coherent pair lifetime without considering the cellular signalling mechanisms involved, and discuss whether it can explain the surprising fragility of some animals' compass sense. In particular, we demonstrate that an autocatalytic cycle can introduce threshold effects on the disruption sensitivity to applied oscillatory magnetic fields. We will show examples in the mean-field limit and consider the consequences of noise and fluctuations in the Freidlin-Wentzell picture of perturbed dynamical systems.

  4. Prolonging sensor networks lifetime using convex clusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Salehi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the energy consumption of nodes in sensor networks and prolonging the network life time has been proposed as one of the most important challenges facing researchers in the field of sensor networks. Therefore, designing an energy-aware protocol to gather data from network level and transmitting it to sink is placed on the agenda at this paper. After presenting an analysis of the processes of clustering in sensory networks and investigating the effect of sending interval on the amount of energy consumption, We have shown that if the use of convex static casters be done such as all the communications within the cluster with the sending distance less than the optimal threshold, it Will help to increase the lifetime of nodes. also have shown that if we create a virtual backbone between cluster heads to transfer far cluster heads data from sink to sink , will has a significant impact on increasing the network lifetime. For this reason, a detailed discussion on how to determine the size of clusters and partitioning of the network environment to them is presented in Chapter 4.Simulation results show considerable improvement of the proposed algorithm.

  5. Tuning nonradiative lifetimes via molecular aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Celestino, A

    2016-01-01

    We show that molecular aggregation can strongly influence the nonradiative decay (NRD) lifetime of an electronic excitation. As a demonstrative example, we consider a transition-dipole-dipole-interacting dimer whose monomers have harmonic potential energy surfaces (PESs). Depending on the position of the NRD channel ($q_{\\rm nr}$), we find that the NRD lifetime ($\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$) can exhibit a completely different dependence on the intermolecular-interaction strength. We observe that (i) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the Franck-Condon region, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ increases with the interaction strength; (ii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the minimum of the monomer excited PES, the intermolecular interaction has little influence on $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$; (iii) for $q_{\\rm nr}$ near the classical turning point of the monomer nuclear dynamics, on the other side of the minimum, $\\tau_{\\rm nr}^{\\rm dim}$ decreases with the interaction strength. Our findings suggest design principles for molecular systems where a...

  6. Cosmological constraints on the neutron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Salvati, Laura; Consiglio, Rossella; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We derive new constraints on the neutron lifetime based on the recent Planck 2015 observations of temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB. Under the assumption of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, we show that Planck data constrains the neutron lifetime to $\\tau_n=(907 \\pm 69) \\, [\\text{s}]$ at $68 \\%$ c.l.. Moreover, by including the direct measurements of primordial Helium abundance of Izotov et al. 2014 and Mucciarelli et al. 2014, we show that cosmological data provide the stringent constraint $\\tau_n=(905.7 \\pm 7.8) \\, [\\text{s}]$. This value is in tension with the most recent experimental value of $\\tau_n^{\\text{bottle}}=(879.6 \\pm 0.8) \\, [\\text{s}]$ provided by the "bottle method" based on Ultra Cold Neutrons, but in agreement with the experimental value of $\\tau_n^{\\text{beam}}=(888.0 \\pm 2.1) \\, [\\text{s}]$ based on the "beam method". Future CMB surveys as COrE+, in combination with a weak lensing survey as EUCLID, could constrain the neutron life time up to a $\\sim 6$ s precision.

  7. A cosmological bound on radiative neutrino lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirizzi, A.; Montanino, D.; Serpico, P. D.

    2008-07-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE. The lower bound on neutrino lifetime is between a few ×1019 s and ~ 5 × 1020 s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute neutrino mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound on the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than ~10-8 μB. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data.

  8. Revisiting cosmological bounds on radiative neutrino lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Mirizzi, A; Serpico, Pasquale Dario

    2007-01-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments and direct bounds on absolute masses constrain neutrino mass differences to fall into the microwave energy range, for most of the allowed parameter space. As a consequence of these recent phenomenological advances, older constraints on radiative neutrino decays based on diffuse background radiations and assuming strongly hierarchical masses in the eV range are now outdated. We thus derive new bounds on the radiative neutrino lifetime using the high precision cosmic microwave background spectral data collected by the FIRAS instrument on board of COBE. The lower bound on the lifetime is between a few x 10^19 s and 5 x 10^20 s, depending on the neutrino mass ordering and on the absolute mass scale. However, due to phase space limitations, the upper bound in terms of the effective magnetic moment mediating the decay is not better than ~ 10^-8 Bohr magnetons. We also comment about possible improvements of these limits, by means of recent diffuse infrared photon background data. We ...

  9. New detectors to explore the lifetime frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul Chou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Long-lived particles (LLPs are a common feature in many beyond the Standard Model theories, including supersymmetry, and are generically produced in exotic Higgs decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ∼ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN, cτ≲107–108 m. We propose the MATHUSLA surface detector concept (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles, which can be implemented with existing technology and in time for the high luminosity LHC upgrade to find such ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs, whether produced in exotic Higgs decays or more general production modes. We also advocate a dedicated LLP detector at a future 100 TeV collider, where a modestly sized underground design can discover ULLPs with lifetimes at the BBN limit produced in sub-percent level exotic Higgs decays.

  10. Radiative lifetimes of Rydberg 6pnd J=2 states of Pb Ⅰ by multichannel quantum defect theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dai Zhen-Wen; Jiang Hong-Mei; Sun Gui-Juan; Jiang Zhan-Kui

    2004-01-01

    Energy levels of the odd-parity 6pnd J=2 Rydberg states of Pb Ⅰ are analysed by the multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) in the frame of a five-channel three-limit calculation model. With optimal MQDT parameters, channel admixture coefficients are obtained and used to calculate the theoretical lifetimes of the levels by comparing to the previously measured lifetimes. The predicted lifetimes for higher-lying Rydberg states are given and discussed. These predicted lifetimes are very different from those obtained by the four-channel two-limit model previously used, which means that introduction of the additional interacting channel is important for studying the 6pnd J=2 Rydberg statesof Pb Ⅰ.

  11. Disability and principal lifetime occupation in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroldi, C; Frisoni, G B; Rozzini, R; Trabucchi, M

    1996-01-01

    This study addresses the relationship of disability with principal lifetime occupation in the elderly. Daily function, cognitive, and physical health variables were assessed in an Italian population of 524 community-dwelling elders aged seventy and over. Farmers had 1.4 (95% C.I.: 0.6 to 2.2) instrumental daily functions lost higher than white-collar workers. Adjustment for age, education, and financial dissatisfaction with multiple linear regression analysis decreased the difference to a still significant figure of 0.9 (95% C.I.: 0.1 to 1.7). On the contrary, adjustment only for cognitive status resulted in complete disappearance of the association [0.2 functions lost (95% C.I.: -0.5 to 0.9)]. The data indicate that greater disability in the most disadvantaged occupational groups may be due to poorer cognition.

  12. A new method for measuring the neutron lifetime using an in situ neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, C L; Broussard, L J; Callahan, N B; Clayton, S M; Cude-Woods, C; Currie, S A; Ding, X; Fox, W; Hickerson, K P; Holley, A T; Komives, A; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Pattie, R W; Ramsey, J; Salvat, D J; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Sharapov, E I; Sjue, S K; Tang, Z; Vanderwerp, J; Vogelaar, B; Walstrom, P L; Wang, Z; Wei, Wanchun; Wexler, J W; Womack, T L; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2016-01-01

    The neutron lifetime is important in understanding the production of light nuclei in the first minutes after the big bang and it provides basic information on the charged weak current of the standard model of particle physics. Two different methods have been used to measure the neutron lifetime: disappearance measurements using bottled ultracold neutrons and decay rate measurements using neutron beams. The best measurements using these two techniques give results that differ by nearly 4 standard deviations. In this paper we describe a new method for measuring surviving neutrons in neutron lifetime measurements using bottled ultracold neutrons that provides better characterization of systematic uncertainties and enables higher precision than previous measurement techniques. We present results obtained using our method.

  13. Lifetime experimental study of graphite cathode for relativistic backward wave oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Sun, Jun; Chen, Changhua

    2016-07-01

    Graphite cathodes are widely used due to their good emission properties, especially their long lifetime. Some previous papers have researched their lifetime under certain conditions and uncovered some important phenomena. This paper is dedicated to research the lifetime of the graphite cathode under higher power. In the lifetime test, the voltage and current amplitudes are about 970 kV and 9.7 kA, respectively. The repetition rate is 20 Hz. An X-band relativistic backward wave oscillator is used to generate high power microwave by utilizing the electron beam energy. The experimental results demonstrate that the emission property of the graphite cathode remains quite stable during 105 pulses, despite some slight deteriorations regarding the beam and microwave parameters. The macroscopic morphology change of the cathode blade due to material evaporation is observed by a laser microscope. The mass loss of the graphite cathode is about 60 μg/C. Meanwhile, the observation by a scanning electron microscope uncovers that the original numerous flaky micro-structures are totally replaced by a relatively smooth surface at the mid region of the cathode blade and a large number of new micro-protrusions at the blade edges during the lifetime test.

  14. Long carrier lifetimes in large-grain polycrystalline CdTe without CdCl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, S. A.; Burst, J. M.; Duenow, J. N.; Guthrey, H. L.; Moseley, J.; Moutinho, H. R.; Johnston, S. W.; Kanevce, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Metzger, W. K.

    2016-06-01

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  15. Long Carrier Lifetimes in Large-Grain Polycrystalline CdTe Without CdCl2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Soren A.; Burst, James M.; Duenow, Joel N.; Guthrey, Harvey L.; Moseley, John; Moutinho, Helio R.; Johnston, Steve W.; Kanevce, Ana; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Metzger, Wyatt K.

    2016-06-27

    For decades, polycrystalline CdTe thin films for solar applications have been restricted to grain sizes of microns or less whereas other semiconductors such as silicon and perovskites have produced devices with grains ranging from less than a micron to more than 1 mm. Because the lifetimes in as-deposited polycrystalline CdTe films are typically limited to less than a few hundred picoseconds, a CdCl2 treatment is generally used to improve the lifetime; but this treatment may limit the achievable hole density by compensation. Here, we establish methods to produce CdTe films with grain sizes ranging from hundreds of nanometers to several hundred microns by close-spaced sublimation at industrial manufacturing growth rates. Two-photon excitation photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a positive correlation of lifetime with grain size. Large-grain, as-deposited CdTe exhibits lifetimes exceeding 10 ns without Cl, S, O, or Cu. This uncompensated material allows dopants such as P to achieve a hole density of 1016 cm-3, which is an order of magnitude higher than standard CdCl2-treated devices, without compromising the lifetime.

  16. Accelerated lifetime testing methodology for lifetime estimation of Lithium-ion batteries used in augmented wind power plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroe, Daniel Ioan; Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stan, Ana-Irina

    2013-01-01

    The development of lifetime estimation models for Lithium-ion battery cells, which are working under highly variable mission profiles characteristic for wind power plant applications, requires a lot of expenditures and time resources. Therefore, batteries have to be tested under accelerated...... lifetime ageing conditions. This paper presents a three-stage methodology used for accelerated lifetime testing of Lithium-ion batteries. The results obtained at the end of the accelerated ageing process can be used for the parametrization of a performance-degradation lifetime model. In the proposed...... methodology both calendar and cycling lifetime tests are considered since both components are influencing the lifetime of Lithium-ion batteries. The methodology proposes also a lifetime model verification stage, where Lithium-ion battery cells are tested at normal operating conditions using an application...

  17. Increasing minority carrier lifetime in as-grown multicrystalline silicon by low temperature internal gettering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amin, M.; Murphy, J. D.

    2016-06-01

    We report a systematic study into the effects of long low temperature (≤500 °C) annealing on the lifetime and interstitial iron distributions in as-grown multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) from different ingot height positions. Samples are characterised in terms of dislocation density, and lifetime and interstitial iron concentration measurements are made at every stage using a temporary room temperature iodine-ethanol surface passivation scheme. Our measurement procedure allows these properties to be monitored during processing in a pseudo in situ way. Sufficient annealing at 300 °C and 400 °C increases lifetime in all cases studied, and annealing at 500 °C was only found to improve relatively poor wafers from the top and bottom of the block. We demonstrate that lifetime in poor as-grown wafers can be improved substantially by a low cost process in the absence of any bulk passivation which might result from a dielectric surface film. Substantial improvements are found in bottom wafers, for which annealing at 400 °C for 35 h increases lifetime from 5.5 μs to 38.7 μs. The lifetime of top wafers is improved from 12.1 μs to 23.8 μs under the same conditions. A correlation between interstitial iron concentration reduction and lifetime improvement is found in these cases. Surprisingly, although the interstitial iron concentration exceeds the expected solubility values, low temperature annealing seems to result in an initial increase in interstitial iron concentration, and any subsequent decay is a complex process driven not only by diffusion of interstitial iron.

  18. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  19. A chloride ion nanosensor for time-resolved fluorimetry and fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2012-03-21

    In this work, the first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence lifetime based chloride ion nanosensor is reported. The acridinium dication lucigenin was self-assembled on the surface of negatively charged mercaptopropionic acid capped QDs to achieve QD-lucigenin conjugates. Upon attachment, a drastic decrease of the photoluminescence lifetime of both QD nanoparticles and lucigenin is observed by virtue of a charge transfer mechanism. Since lucigenin is a chloride-sensitive indicator dye, the photoluminescence decay of QD-lucigenin conjugates changes by adding chloride ion. The photoluminescence lifetime of the QDs in the conjugate increases after reacting with Cl(-), but also shows a concomitant decrease in the lucigenin lifetime immobilized on the surface. The photoluminescence lifetime of QD-lucigenin nanosensors shows a linear response in the Cl(-) concentration range between 0.5 and 50 mM. Moreover, the ratio τ(ave)(QD)/τ(ave)(luc) can be used as an analytical signal since the lifetime ratio presents a linear response in the same Cl(-) concentration range. The system also shows good selectivity towards most of the main anions and molecules that can be found in biological fluids. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for Cl(-) determination in simulated intracellular media with high sensitivity and high selectivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential application of the proposed nanosensor in confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These results show the promising application of the QD-lucigenin nanosensors in FLIM, particularly for intracellular sensing, with the invaluable advantages of the time-resolved fluorescence techniques.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Mass and Lifetime of the Xi(-)(b) Baryon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; Mcnab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2014-01-01

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Xi(-)(b) baryon using about 1800 Xi(-)(b) decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Xi(-)(b) -> Xi(

  1. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  2. Paraffin Alkylation Using Zeolite Catalysts in a slurry reactor: Chemical Engineering Principles to Extend Catalyst Lifetime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Mesters, C.M.A.M.; Peferoen, D.G.R.; Brugge, P.T.M. van; Groot, C. de

    1996-01-01

    The alkylation of isobutane with 2-butene is carried out using a zeolitic catalyst in a well stirred slurry reactor. Whereas application of fixed bed technology using a solid acid alkylation catalyst has in the led to catalysts lifetimes in the range of minutes, in this work we report catalyst

  3. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  4. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  5. Interaction Effects between Maternal Lifetime Depressive/Anxiety Disorders and Correlates of Children's Externalizing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piche, Genevieve; Bergeron, Lise; Cyr, Mireille; Berthiaume, Claude

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the interaction effects between mother's lifetime depressive/anxiety disorders and psychosocial correlates of 6 to 11 year-old children's self-reported externalizing symptoms in the Quebec Child Mental Health Survey. A representative subsample of 1,490 Quebec children aged 6 to 11 years was selected from the original sample. We…

  6. Quantitative review of degradation and lifetime of solid oxide cells and stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skafte, Theis Løye; Hjelm, Johan; Blennow, Peter;

    2016-01-01

    and lifetime in the field. The data is used to visualizespecific trends regarding choice of materials, operating conditions and degradation rates.The average degradation rate reported is decreasing and is quickly approaching officialtargets. The database is published online for open-access and a continued...

  7. A Lifetime Measurement of the Exclusive Charged and Neutral B Meson States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammerata, Jeffrey Donald [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This thesis reports a measurement of the charged and neutral B lifetimes using the decay modes B → ΨK where B symbolizes Bu or Bd, Ψ denotes J/Ψ or Ψ(2S), and K denotes K K$0\\atop{s}$, or K* (892).

  8. Fluorescence lifetime biosensing with DNA microarrays and a CMOS-SPAD imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraud, G.; Schulze, H.; Li, D.U.; Bachmann, T.T.; Crain, J.; Tyndall, D.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.; Arlt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of dye molecules is a sensitive reporter on local microenvironment which is generally independent of fluorophores concentration and can be used as a means of discrimination between molecules with spectrally overlapping emission. It is therefore a potentially powerful multiplexe

  9. Childhood Risk Factors for Lifetime Anorexia Nervosa by Age 30 Years in a National Birth Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Dasha E.; Viner, Russell M.

    2009-01-01

    Whether previously identified childhood risk factors for anorexia nervosa (AN) predict self-reported lifetime AN by age 30 is examined. The cohort confirmed four risk and two protective factors out of the 22 suggested risk factors. The study used data from the 1970 British Cohort Study.

  10. Lifetime-Enhanced Transport in Silicon due to Spin and Valley Blockade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansbergen, G.P.; Rahman, R.; Verduijn, J.; Tettamanzi, G.C.; Collaert, N.; Biesemans, S.; Klimeck, G.; Hollenberg, L.C.L.; Rogge, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report the observation of lifetime-enhanced transport (LET) based on perpendicular valleys in silicon by transport spectroscopy measurements of a two-electron system in a silicon transistor. The LET is manifested as a peculiar current step in the stability diagram due to a forbidden transition be

  11. Measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime in {ital Z}{sup 0} decays using reconstructed vertices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Falciai, D.; Fan, C.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; Russell, J.J.; (SLD Collabora...

    1995-11-13

    We report a measurement of the average {ital B} hadron lifetime using data collected with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider in 1993. An inclusive analysis selected three-dimensional vertices with {ital B} hadron lifetime information in a sample of 50{times}10{sup 3} {ital Z}{sup 0} decays. A lifetime of 1.564{plus_minus}0.030(stat){plus_minus}0.036(syst) ps was extracted from the decay length distribution of these vertices using a binned maximum likelihood method. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  12. BMI and lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, Niloofar; Boezen, H Marike; Schouten, Jan P; Schröder, Carolien P; Elisabeth de Vries, E G; Vonk, Judith M

    2015-01-01

    Body Mass Index (BMI) is known to be associated with cancer mortality, but little is known about the link between lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality in both males and females. We studied the association of BMI measurements (at baseline, highest and lowest BMI during the study-period) and lifetime changes in BMI (calculated over different time periods (i.e. short time period: annual change in BMI between successive surveys, long time period: annual change in BMI over the entire study period) with mortality from any cancer, and lung, colorectal, prostate and breast cancer in a large cohort study (n=8,645. Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen, 1965-1990) with a follow-up on mortality status on December 31st 2008. We used multivariate Cox regression models with adjustments for age, smoking, sex, and place of residence. Being overweight at baseline was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer mortality (hazard ratio (HR) =2.22; 95% CI 1.19-4.17). Obesity at baseline was associated with a higher risk of any cancer mortality [all subjects (1.23 (1.01-1.50)), and females (1.40 (1.07-1.84))]. Chronically obese females (females who were obese during the entire study-period) had a higher risk of mortality from any cancer (2.16 (1.47-3.18), lung (3.22 (1.06-9.76)), colorectal (4.32 (1.53-12.20)), and breast cancer (2.52 (1.15-5.54)). We found no significant association between long-term annual change in BMI and cancer mortality risk. Both short-term annual increase and decrease in BMI were associated with a lower mortality risk from any cancer [all subjects: (0.67 (0.47-0.94)) and (0.73 (0.55-0.97)), respectively]. In conclusion, a higher BMI is associated with a higher cancer mortality risk. This study is the first to show that short-term annual changes in BMI were associated with lower mortality from any type of cancer.

  13. BMI and lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Taghizadeh

    Full Text Available Body Mass Index (BMI is known to be associated with cancer mortality, but little is known about the link between lifetime changes in BMI and cancer mortality in both males and females. We studied the association of BMI measurements (at baseline, highest and lowest BMI during the study-period and lifetime changes in BMI (calculated over different time periods (i.e. short time period: annual change in BMI between successive surveys, long time period: annual change in BMI over the entire study period with mortality from any cancer, and lung, colorectal, prostate and breast cancer in a large cohort study (n=8,645. Vlagtwedde-Vlaardingen, 1965-1990 with a follow-up on mortality status on December 31st 2008. We used multivariate Cox regression models with adjustments for age, smoking, sex, and place of residence. Being overweight at baseline was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer mortality (hazard ratio (HR =2.22; 95% CI 1.19-4.17. Obesity at baseline was associated with a higher risk of any cancer mortality [all subjects (1.23 (1.01-1.50, and females (1.40 (1.07-1.84]. Chronically obese females (females who were obese during the entire study-period had a higher risk of mortality from any cancer (2.16 (1.47-3.18, lung (3.22 (1.06-9.76, colorectal (4.32 (1.53-12.20, and breast cancer (2.52 (1.15-5.54. We found no significant association between long-term annual change in BMI and cancer mortality risk. Both short-term annual increase and decrease in BMI were associated with a lower mortality risk from any cancer [all subjects: (0.67 (0.47-0.94 and (0.73 (0.55-0.97, respectively]. In conclusion, a higher BMI is associated with a higher cancer mortality risk. This study is the first to show that short-term annual changes in BMI were associated with lower mortality from any type of cancer.

  14. Nondestructive Testing of Advanced Concrete Structure during Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubos Pazdera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on measurements and analysis of the measurements during hardening and drying of specimens using selected acoustic nondestructive testing techniques. An integrated approach was created for better understanding of the relations between the lifetime cycle and the development of the mechanical properties of concrete. Acoustic emission, impact echo, and ultrasonic techniques were applied simultaneously to the same mixtures. These techniques and results are presented on alkali-activated slag mortars. The acoustic emission method detects transient elastic waves within the material, caused by the release of cumulated stress energy, which can be mechanical, thermal, or chemical. Hence, the cause is a phenomenon which releases elastic energy into the material, which then spreads in the form of an elastic wave. The impact echo method is based on physical laws of elastic stress wave propagation in solids generated by mechanical impulse. Ultrasonic testing is commonly used to find flaws in materials or to assess wave velocity spreading.

  15. A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe for skin cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, P. A. A.; Dunsby, C.; Galletly, N. P.; Stamp, G. W.; Chu, A. C.; Anand, U.; Anand, P.; Benham, C. D.; Naylor, A.; French, P. M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The autofluorescence of biological tissue can be exploited for the detection and diagnosis of disease but, to date, its complex nature and relatively weak signal levels have impeded its widespread application in biology and medicine. We present here a portable instrument designed for the in situ simultaneous measurement of autofluorescence emission spectra and temporal decay profiles, permitting the analysis of complex fluorescence signals. This hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe utilizes two ultrafast lasers operating at 355 and 440nm that can excite autofluorescence from many different biomolecules present in skin tissue including keratin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and flavins. The instrument incorporates an optical fiber probe to provide sample illumination and fluorescence collection over a millimeter-sized area. We present a description of the system, including spectral and temporal characterizations, and report the preliminary application of this instrument to a study of recently resected (skin lesions, illustrating its potential for skin cancer detection and diagnosis.

  16. Nondestructive indication of fatigue damage and residual lifetime in ferromagnetic construction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomáš, Ivan; Kovářík, Ondřej; Vértesy, Gábor; Kadlecová, Jana

    2014-06-01

    A new revolutionary attitude toward investigation of fatigue damage in cyclically loaded steel samples is reported. The measurement is based on the method of magnetic adaptive testing, which--in contrast to traditional magnetic hysteresis investigations--picks up the relevant information from systematic measurement and evaluation of whole minor magnetic hysteresis loops and their derivatives. Satisfactory correlations between nondestructively measured magnetic descriptors and actual lifetime of the fatigued material were found. The presented method is able to serve as a powerful tool for indication of changes, which occur in the structure of the inspected objects during their industrial service lifetime, as long as they are manufactured from ferromagnetic materials.

  17. Realistic calculations of nuclear disappearance lifetimes induced by n nmacr oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2008-07-01

    Realistic calculations of nuclear disappearance lifetimes induced by n nmacr oscillations are reported for oxygen and iron, using nmacr nuclear potentials derived from a recent comprehensive analysis of pmacr atomic X-ray and radiochemical data. A lower limit τn nmacr >3.3×108s on the n nmacr oscillation time is derived from the Super-Kamiokande I new lower limit Td(O)>1.77×1032yr on the neutron lifetime in oxygen. Antineutron scattering lengths in carbon and nickel, needed in trap experiments using ultracold neutrons, are calculated from updated Nmacr optical potentials at threshold, with results shown to be largely model independent.

  18. [Concordance between self-reported weight and height for nutritional assessment in adults aged between 25 and 50 years without higher education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matínez-Torres, Javier; Lee Osorno, Belinda Inés; Mendoza, Leylis; Mariotta, Sharom; López Epiayu, Yandra; Martínez, Yelitza; Jiménez, Nelly

    2014-11-01

    Overweight and obesity are metabolic disorders that have become a public health problem due to the current high prevalence; therefore, it is important to create simple monitoring systems to assess their trends. To determine the correlation between weight, height and body mass index reported by patients and the values measured directly in adults between 25 and 50 years old without higher education. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with participation of 207 adults between 25 and 50 years old. Each participant was asked weight and height; and body mass index was calculated with these data. Moreover, a qualified person determined the real value of these variables. The coefficient of intra-class correlation between self-reported and measurements was obtained. The body mass index measured for men was 25.8±3.7 kg/m2 and for women 26.0±4.1 kg/m2. Intraclass correlation coefficients were for weight 0.962 (IC95%: 0.950-0.971), height 0.909 (IC95%: 0.882-0.930), and body mass index 0.929 (IC95% 0.907-0.945); the real prevalence of people with a body mass index greater than 25 kg/m2 was 52.1%, whereas the value obtained by self-reported data was 44%. Self-reported weight and height data are useful for obesity assessment in adults aged between 25 and 50 years without higher education at the population level. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Surface plasmon lifetime in metal nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirakosyan, Arman S.; Stockman, Mark I.; Shahbazyan, Tigran V.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime of localized surface plasmon plays an important role in many aspects of plasmonics and its applications. In small metal nanostructures, the dominant mechanism of plasmon decay is size-dependent Landau damping. We performed quantum-mechanical calculations of Landau damping for the bright surface plasmon mode in a metal nanoshell with dielectric core. In contrast to the conventional model based on the electron surface scattering, we found that the damping rate decreases as the nanoshell thickness is reduced. The origin of this behavior is traced to the spatial distribution of plasmon local field in the metal shell. We also found that, due to the interference of electron scattering amplitudes from the two nanoshell metal surfaces, the damping rate exhibits pronounced quantum beats with changing shell thickness.

  20. The lifetime cost of a magnetic refrigerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian R.H.; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2016-01-01

    The total cost of a 25 W average load magnetic refrigerator using commercial grade Gd is calculated using a numerical model. The price of magnetocaloric material, magnet material and cost of operation are considered, and all influence the total cost. The lowest combined total cost with a device...... lifetime of 15 years is found to be in the range $150-$400 depending on the price of the magnetocaloric and magnet material. The cost of the magnet is largest, followed closely by the cost of operation, while the cost of the magnetocaloric material is almost negligible. For the lowest cost device...... characteristics are based on the performance of a conventional A+++ refrigeration unit. In a rough life time cost comparison between the AMR device and such a unit we find similar costs, the AMR being slightly cheaper, assuming the cost of the magnet can be recuperated at end of life....

  1. Lifetime of quasiparticles in hot QED plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Blaizot, J P; Blaizot, Jean Paul; Iancu, Edmond

    1996-01-01

    The calculation of the lifetime of quasiparticles in a QED plasma at high temperature remains plagued with infrared divergences, even after one has taken into account the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of very soft, unscreened, magnetic photons, whose contribution is enhanced by the thermal Bose-Einstein occupation factor. The self energy diagrams which diverge in perturbation theory contain no internal fermion loops, but an arbitrary number of internal magnetostatic photon lines. By generalizing the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature, we can resum all the singular contributions of such diagrams, and obtain the correct long time behaviour of the retarded fermion propagator in the hot QED plasma: S_R(t)\\sim \\exp\\{-\\alpha T \\, t\\, \\ln\\omega_pt\\}, where \\omega_p=eT/3 is the plasma frequency and \\alpha=e^2/4\\pi.

  2. Predicting the Lifetimes of Nuclear Waste Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Fraser

    2014-03-01

    As for many aspects of the disposal of nuclear waste, the greatest challenge we have in the study of container materials is the prediction of the long-term performance over periods of tens to hundreds of thousands of years. Various methods have been used for predicting the lifetime of containers for the disposal of high-level waste or spent fuel in deep geological repositories. Both mechanical and corrosion-related failure mechanisms need to be considered, although until recently the interactions of mechanical and corrosion degradation modes have not been considered in detail. Failure from mechanical degradation modes has tended to be treated through suitable container design. In comparison, the inevitable loss of container integrity due to corrosion has been treated by developing specific corrosion models. The most important aspect, however, is to be able to justify the long-term predictions by demonstrating a mechanistic understanding of the various degradation modes.

  3. LCP- LIFETIME COST AND PERFORMANCE MODEL FOR DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    -specific and follows a three-step procedure. First the hourly power produced by the PV system is computed using a selected year's insolation and temperature profile. For this step it is assumed that there are no module failures or degradation. Next, the monthly simulation is performed involving a month to month progression through the lifetime of the system. In this step, the effects of degradation, failure, dirt accumulation and operations/maintenance efforts on PV system performance over time are used to compute the monthly power capability fraction. The resulting monthly power capability fractions are applied to the hourly power matrix from the first step, giving the anticipated hourly energy output over the lifetime of the system. PV system energy output is compared with the PV system owner's electricity demand for each hour. The amount of energy to be purchased from or sold to the utility grid is then determined. Monthly expenditures on the PV system and the purchase of electricity from the utility grid are also calculated. LCP generates output reports pertaining to the performance of the PV system, and system costs and revenues. The LCP model, written in SIMSCRIPT 2.5 for batch execution on an IBM 370 series computer, was developed in 1981.

  4. Thermal dependence of luminescence lifetimes and radioluminescence in quartz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagonis, V., E-mail: vpagonis@mcdaniel.edu [McDaniel College, Physics Department, Westminster, MD 21157 (United States); Chithambo, M.L. [Department of Physics and Electronics, Rhodes University, PO BOX 94, Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); Chen, R. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978 (Israel); Chruścińska, A. [Institute of Physics, Nicholas Copernicus University, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Fasoli, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Li, S.H. [Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Martini, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Ramseyer, K. [Institut für Geologie, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-01-15

    During time-resolved optical stimulation experiments (TR-OSL), one uses short light pulses to separate the stimulation and emission of luminescence in time. Experimental TR-OSL results show that the luminescence lifetime in quartz of sedimentary origin is independent of annealing temperature below 500 °C, but decreases monotonically thereafter. These results have been interpreted previously empirically on the basis of the existence of two separate luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L} in quartz, each with its own distinct luminescence lifetime. Additional experimental evidence also supports the presence of a non-luminescent hole reservoir R, which plays a critical role in the predose effect in this material. This paper extends a recently published analytical model for thermal quenching in quartz, to include the two luminescence centers L{sub H} and L{sub L}, as well as the hole reservoir R. The new extended model involves localized electronic transitions between energy states within the two luminescence centers, and is described by a system of differential equations based on the Mott–Seitz mechanism of thermal quenching. It is shown that by using simplifying physical assumptions, one can obtain analytical solutions for the intensity of the light during a TR-OSL experiment carried out with previously annealed samples. These analytical expressions are found to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions of the equations. The results from the model are shown to be in quantitative agreement with published experimental data for commercially available quartz samples. Specifically the model describes the variation of the luminescence lifetimes with (a) annealing temperatures between room temperature and 900 °C, and (b) with stimulation temperatures between 20 and 200 °C. This paper also reports new radioluminescence (RL) measurements carried out using the same commercially available quartz samples. Gaussian deconvolution of the RL emission spectra was

  5. Prolonged cannabis withdrawal in young adults with lifetime psychiatric illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Randi Melissa; Fontaine, Madeleine; Nip, Emily; Zhang, Haiyue; Hanly, Ailish; Eden Evins, A

    2017-02-27

    Young adults with psychiatric illnesses are more likely to use cannabis and experience problems from use. It is not known whether those with a lifetime psychiatric illness experience a prolonged cannabis withdrawal syndrome with abstinence. Participants were fifty young adults, aged 18-25, recruited from the Boston-area in 2015-2016, who used cannabis at least weekly, completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV to identify Axis I psychiatric diagnoses (PD+ vs PD-), and attained cannabis abstinence with a four-week contingency management protocol. Withdrawal symptom severity was assessed at baseline and at four weekly abstinent visits using the Cannabis Withdrawal Scale. Cannabis dependence, age of initiation, and rate of abstinence were similar in PD+ and PD- groups. There was a diagnostic group by abstinent week interaction, suggesting a difference in time course for resolution of withdrawal symptoms by group, F(4,46)=3.8, p=0.009, controlling for sex, baseline depressive and anxiety symptoms, and frequency of cannabis use in the prior 90days. In post hoc analyses, there was a difference in time-course of cannabis withdrawal. PD- had significantly reduced withdrawal symptom severity in abstinent week one [t(46)=-2.2, p=0.03], while PD+ did not report improved withdrawal symptoms until the second abstinent week [t(46)=-4.1, p=0.0002]. Cannabis withdrawal symptoms improved over four weeks in young people with and without a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis. However, those with a psychiatric illness reported one week delayed improvement in withdrawal symptom severity. Longer duration of cannabis withdrawal may be a risk factor for cannabis dependence and difficulty quitting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (≈100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins.

  7. Effect of refractive index on the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Carolyn; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The average fluorescence lifetime of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in solution is a function of the refractive index of its environment. We report that this is also the case for GFP-tagged proteins in cells. Using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a confocal scanning microscope, images of GFP-tagged proteins in cells suspended in different refractive index media are obtained. It is found that the average fluorescence lifetime of GFP decreases on addition of glycerol or sucrose to the media in which the fixed cells are suspended. The inverse GFP lifetime is proportional to the refractive index squared. This is the case for GFP-tagged major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with the GFP located inside the cytoplasm, and also for GPI-anchored GFP that is located outside the cell membrane. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques where the change in refractive index is crucial in producing an evanescent wave to excite fluorophores near a glass interface. Our findings show that the GFP fluorescence lifetime is shortened in TIRF microscopy in comparison to confocal microscopy.

  8. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  9. Faster self-reported speed of eating is related to higher body mass index in a nationwide survey of middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sook Ling; Madden, Clara; Gray, Andrew; Waters, Debra; Horwath, Caroline

    2011-08-01

    This study is the first nationwide population survey to explore the association between speed of eating and degree of obesity. The objective was to cross-sectionally examine the relationship between self-reported speed of eating and body mass index (BMI; calculated as kg/m(2)) in a nationally representative sample of New Zealand women. In May 2009, a sample of 2,500 New Zealand women aged 40 to 50 years was randomly selected from the nationwide electoral rolls. A 66% participation rate was achieved. Potential participants were mailed a self-administered questionnaire containing questions on self-reported speed of eating, demographics, health conditions, menopause status, physical activity, height, and weight. Univariate models were used to examine the associations between demographic, health and behavioral variables, and BMI, while a multivariate model was developed to investigate the relationship between self-reported speed of eating and BMI. After adjusting for age, smoking status, menopause status, thyroid condition, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and physical activity, BMI statistically significantly increased by 2.8% (95% confidence interval: 1.5% to 4.1%; P<0.001) for each category increase in self-reported speed of eating. Although the direction of causality requires confirmation in longitudinal and randomized intervention studies, the results suggest that faster eating is associated with higher BMI in middle-aged women.

  10. The activation of the Sox2 RR2 pluripotency transcriptional reporter in human breast cancer cell lines is dynamic and labels cells with higher tumorigenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel eIglesias

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The striking similarity displayed at the mechanistic level between tumorigenesis and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and the fact that genes and pathways relevant for embryonic development are reactivated during tumor progression highlights the link between pluripotency and cancer. Based on these observations we tested whether it is possible to use a pluripotency-associated transcriptional reporter, whose activation is driven by the SRR2 enhancer from the Sox2 gene promoter (named S4+ reporter, to isolate cancer stem cells from breast cancer cell lines. The S4+ pluripotency transcriptional reporter allows the isolation of cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and its activation was switched on and off in the cell lines studied, reflecting a plastic cellular process. Microarray analysis comparing the populations in which the reporter construct is active vs. inactive showed that positive cells expressed higher mRNA levels of cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, TNF and genes (such as ATF3, SNAI2, KLF6 previously related with the cancer stem cell phenotype in breast cancer.

  11. Demonstration of long minority carrier lifetimes in very narrow bandgap ternary InAs/GaInSb superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, H. J.; Brown, G. J.; Olson, B. V.; Kadlec, E. A.; Kim, J. K.; Shaner, E. A.

    2015-09-01

    Minority carrier lifetimes in very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) InAs/GaInSb superlattices (SLs) are reported using time-resolved microwave reflectance measurements. A strain-balanced ternary SL absorber layer of 47.0 Å InAs/21.5 Å Ga0.75In0.25Sb, corresponding to a bandgap of ˜50 meV, is found to have a minority carrier lifetime of 140 ± 20 ns at ˜18 K. This lifetime is extraordinarily long, when compared to lifetime values previously reported for other VLWIR SL detector materials. This enhancement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary design, which offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to a reduction of defect-mediated recombination centers.

  12. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; de Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C.; García, J.; Cabruja, E.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain the mobility for each charge carrier. The Hecht equation has been employed to evaluate the lifetime. The measured values for μτe/h (mobility-lifetime product) are in agreement with earlier published data.

  13. Lifetime measurement of 2+1 state in 74Zn by differential plunger method

    CERN Document Server

    Niikura, M; Azaiez, F; Franchoo, S; Matea, I; Stefan, I; Verney, D; Assie, M; Bednarczyk, P; Borcea, C; Burger, A; Burgunder, G; Buta, A; Càceres, L; Clément, 2 E; Coquard, L; de Angelis, G; de France, G; Santos, F de Oliveira; Dewald, A; Dijon, A; Dombradi, Z; Fiori, E; Fransen, C; Friessner, G; Gaudefroy, L; Georgiev, G; Grévy, S; Hackstein, M; Harakeh, M N; Ibrahim, F; Kamalou, O; Kmiecik, M; Lozeva, R; Maj, A; Mihai, C; Möller, O; Myalski, S; Negoita, F; Pantelica, D; Perrot, L; Pissulla, Th; Rotaru, F; Rother, W; Scarpaci, J A; Stodel, C; Thomas, J C; Ujic, P

    2011-01-01

    We report here the first direct lifetime measurement of the 2+1 state in 74Zn. The neutron-rich 74Zn beam was produced by in-flight fragmentation of 76Ge at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds and separated with the LISE spectrometer. The 2+1 state was excited by inelastic scattering on a CD2 target and the lifetime was measured by the recoil distance Doppler-shift method with the K\\"oln plunger device combined with the EXOGAM detectors. The lifetime of the 2+1 state in 74Zn was determined to be 27.0(24) ps, which corresponds to a reduced transition probability B(E2; 2+1 \\to 0+) = 370(33) e2fm4.

  14. The lifetime of a long cylindrical shell under external pressure at elevated temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Bargmann, H W

    1972-01-01

    This paper is concerned with creep collapse of a long, thin walled, circular, cylindrical shell subjected to external pressure. The problem has been studied by Hoff et al. (1959), where elasticity has been neglected in the material equations. In the present paper it is pointed out that elasticity must not be neglected in stability problems as it may reduce the lifetime considerably. The improved equation for the lifetime of the shell is presented. Moreover, a procedure is indicated to derive the necessary creep parameters easily from usually available creep data. Numerical values of the lifetime of thin-walled, circular, cylindrical shells under external atmospheric pressure are presented for a wide range of shells of different geometrical characteristics for a number of high-temperature alloys and the temperature range up to 1000 degrees C. Experimental results are reported which are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. (11 refs).

  15. Vibrational Infrared Lifetime of the Anesthetic nitrous oxide gas in solution

    CERN Document Server

    Chieffo, Logan; Shattuck, Jeffrey; Hong, Mi K; Ziegler, Lawrence; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-01-01

    The lifetime of the asymmetric fundamental stretching 2218 cm$^{-1}$ vibration of the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide (N$_2$O) dissolved in octanol and olive oil is reported. These solvents are model systems commonly used to assess anesthetic potency. Picosecond time-scale molecular dynamics simulations have suggested that protein dynamics or membrane dynamics play a role in the molecular mechanism of anesthetic action. Ultrafast infrared spectroscopy with 100 fs time resolution is an ideal tool to probe dynamics of anesthetic molecules on such timescales. Pump-probe studies at the peak of the vibrational band yield a lifetime of $55 \\pm 1$ ps in olive oil and $52 \\pm 1 ps$ in octanol. The similarity of lifetimes suggests that energy relaxation of the anesthetic is determined primarily by the hydrophobic nature of the environment, consistent with models of anesthetic action. The results show that nitrous oxide is a good model system for probing anesthetic-solvent interactions using nonlinear infrared spectroscop...

  16. Improved charge carrier lifetime in planar perovskite solar cells by bromine doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiermasch, David; Rieder, Philipp; Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Baumann, Andreas; Dyakonov, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    The charge carrier lifetime is an important parameter in solar cells as it defines, together with the mobility, the diffusion length of the charge carriers, thus directly determining the optimal active layer thickness of a device. Herein, we report on charge carrier lifetime values in bromine doped planar methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells determined by transient photovoltage. The corresponding charge carrier density has been derived from charge carrier extraction. We found increased lifetime values in solar cells incorporating bromine compared to pure MAPbI3 by a factor of ~2.75 at an illumination intensity corresponding to 1 sun. In the bromine containing solar cells we additionally observe an anomalously high value of extracted charge, which we deduce to originate from mobile ions.

  17. Substrate thermal conductivity effect on heat dissipation and lifetime improvement of organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seungjun; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Jeong, Jaewook; Kim, Jang-Joo; Hong, Yongtaek

    2009-06-01

    We report substrate thermal conductivity effect on heat dissipation and lifetime improvement of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Heat dissipation behavior of top-emission OLEDs fabricated on silicon, glass, and planarized stainless steel substrates was measured by using an infrared camera. Peak temperature measured from the backside of each substrate was saturated to be 21.4, 64.5, and 40.5 °C, 180 s after the OLED was operated at luminance of 10 000 cd/m2 and 80% luminance lifetime was about 198, 31, and 96 h, respectively. Efficient heat dissipation through the highly thermally conductive substrates reduced temperature increase, resulting in much improved OLED lifetime.

  18. Traffic congestion and the lifetime of networks with moving nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianxia; Li, Jie; Pu, Cunlai; Yan, Meichen; Sharafat, Rajput Ramiz; Yang, Jian; Gakis, Konstantinos; Pardalos, Panos M.

    2017-01-01

    For many power-limited networks, such as wireless sensor networks and mobile ad hoc networks, maximizing the network lifetime is the first concern in the related designing and maintaining activities. We study the network lifetime from the perspective of network science. In our model, nodes are initially assigned a fixed amount of energy moving in a square area and consume the energy when delivering packets. We obtain four different traffic regimes: no, slow, fast, and absolute congestion regimes, which are basically dependent on the packet generation rate. We derive the network lifetime by considering the specific regime of the traffic flow. We find that traffic congestion inversely affects network lifetime in the sense that high traffic congestion results in short network lifetime. We also discuss the impacts of factors such as communication radius, node moving speed, routing strategy, etc., on network lifetime and traffic congestion.

  19. Study of Minority Carrier Lifetimes in Very Long Wave Infrared Strained Layer InAs/GaInSb Superlattices (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-19

    aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information...previously reported lifetime values for other VLWIR detector absorbers. This improvement is attributed to the strain-engineered ternary SL design, which...offers a variety of epitaxial advantages and ultimately leads to the improvements in the minority carrier lifetime b mitigating defect-mediated Shockley

  20. LHCb: Measurement of $b$-hadron lifetimes at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Amhis, Y

    2014-01-01

    Lifetimes are among the most fundamental properties of elementary particles. Precision Measurements of $b$-hadron lifetimes are an important tool to test theoretical models such as HQET. These models allow to predict various observables related to B-mixing. Using data collected during Run 1 at the LHC, LHCb measured the lifetime of B-decays including a $J/\\psi$ in the final state.

  1. Lifetime measurement of high spin states in {sup 75}Kr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, T. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211001 (India); Palit, R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Negi, D. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India); Naik, Z. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Yang, Y.-C. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Sun, Y. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Sheikh, J.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, PO Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Kashmir, Srinagar 190 006 (India); Dhal, A. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Raju, M.K. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam-530003 (India); Appannababu, S. [Department of Physics, MS University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Kumar, S. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007 (India); Choudhury, D. [Department of Physics, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee-247667 (India); Maurya, K. [Department of Physics, University of Allahabad, Allahabad-211001 (India); Mahanto, G.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India); Jain, A.K. [Department of Physics, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee-247667 (India); Jain, H.C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Pancholi, S.C. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2010-03-01

    The lifetimes of high spin states of {sup 75}Kr have been determined via {sup 50}Cr ({sup 28}Si, 2pn) {sup 75}Kr reaction in positive parity band using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. The transition quadrupole moments Q{sub t} deduced from lifetime measurements have been compared with {sup 75}Br. Experimental results obtained from lifetime measurement are interpreted in the framework of projected shell model.

  2. Lifetime unbiased beauty and charm triggers at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Kenzie, Matthew William

    2016-01-01

    This note describes the use of lifetime unbiased triggers in LHCb's High Level Trigger system, implemented during Run 2 of LHC data collection. This is the first time such a strategy has been employed to exclusively trigger on signal candidates in a lifetime unbiased way at a hadron collider. It provides samples of charm and beauty hadrons whose lifetime acceptance due to the trigger requirements is uniform. Consequently, these triggers are suitable for time-dependent measurements and calibration purposes.

  3. Minimizing Lifetime Poverty with a Penalty for Bankruptcy

    OpenAIRE

    Asaf Cohen; Young, Virginia R.

    2015-01-01

    We provide investment advice for an individual who wishes to minimize her lifetime poverty, with a penalty for bankruptcy or ruin. We measure poverty via a non-negative, non-increasing function of (running) wealth. Thus, the lower wealth falls and the longer wealth stays low, the greater the penalty. This paper generalizes the problems of minimizing the probability of lifetime ruin and minimizing expected lifetime occupation, with the poverty function serving as a bridge between the two. To i...

  4. The Effect of Physical Topology on Wireless Sensor Network Lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Debdhanit Yupho; Joseph Kabara

    2007-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks must measure environmental conditions, such as temperature, over extended periods and therefore require a long system lifetime. The design of long lifetime networks in turn requires efficient sensor node circuits, algorithms, and protocols. Protocols such as GSP (Gossip-based Sleep Protocol) have been shown to mitigate energy consumption in idle listening and receiving, by turning off the receiver circuit. However, previous studies of network lifetime have been based ...

  5. Left-handedness is statistically linked to lifetime experimentation with illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Antonio; Usai, Ileana; Pintus, Elisa; Sardu, Cinzia; Petretto, Donatella Rita; Masala, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    Handedness has been linked to an enhanced risk of alcohol abuse, while less is known about other drugs. A convenience sample of 1004 male and female Italian participants (females=58%) from the general community (18 to 65 years old: average age = 30; standard deviation = 10, median = 25) was asked about: handedness (preference in writing); lifetime use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs; levels of psychological distress, as measured by the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ); and levels of delusion proneness, as measured by the Peters et al. Delusions Inventory (PDI). Overall, 92 individuals (9.2%) were classified as left-handed, with no significant difference reported among genders. Lifetime use of illicit drugs, primarily cannabis, was reported by 20% of the sample. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, after taking into account sex, age, and caseness on GHQ and PDI, left-handed people in the sample were statistically more likely to report lifetime experimentation with heroin, ecstasy/amphetamine, and, marginally, hallucinogens, but not alcohol or tobacco. Different mechanisms might contribute to an explanation of greater lifetime experimentation with some illicit drugs among left-handed people as compared to right-handed people. However, replications with clinical samples are necessary before any definitive statements can be made.

  6. Measurement of picosecond lifetimes in neutron-rich Xe isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, S.; Kröll, Th.; Régis, J.-M.; Saed-Samii, N.; Blanc, A.; Bruce, A. M.; Fraile, L. M.; de France, G.; Hartig, A.-L.; Henrich, C.; Ignatov, A.; Jentschel, M.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Köster, U.; Lalkovski, S.; Lozeva, R.; Mach, H.; Mǎrginean, N.; Mutti, P.; Paziy, V.; Regan, P. H.; Simpson, G. S.; Soldner, T.; Thürauf, M.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Warr, N.

    2016-09-01

    Background: Lifetimes of nuclear excited states in fission fragments have been studied in the past following isotope separation, thus giving access mainly to the fragments' daughters and only to long-lived isomeric states in the primary fragments. For the first time now, short-lived excited states in the primary fragments, produced in neutron-induced prompt fission of 235U and 241Pu, were studied within the EXILL&FATIMA campaign at the intense neutron-beam facility of the Institute Laue-Langevin in Grenoble. Purpose: We aim to investigate the quadrupole collective properties of neutron-rich even-even 138,140,142Xe isotopes lying between the double shell closure N =82 and Z =50 and a deformed region with octupole collectivity. Method: The γ rays emitted from the excited fragments were detected with a mixed array consisting of 8 HPGe EXOGAM Clover detectors (EXILL) and 16 LaBr3(Ce) fast scintillators (FATIMA). The detector system has the unique ability to select the interesting fragment making use of the high resolution of the HPGe detectors and determine subnanosecond lifetimes using the fast scintillators. For the analysis the generalized centroid difference method was used. Results: We show that quadrupole collectivity increases smoothly with increasing neutron number above the closed N =82 neutron shell. Our measurements are complemented by state-of-the-art theory calculations based on shell-model descriptions. Conclusions: The observed smooth increase in quadrupole collectivity is similar to the evolution seen in the measured masses of the xenon isotopic chain and is well reproduced by theory. This behavior is in contrast to higher Z even-even nuclei where abrupt change in deformation occurs around N =90 .

  7. Temperature and phase dependence of positron lifetimes in solid cyclohexane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    1985-01-01

    The temperature dependence of position lifetimes in both the brittle and plastic phases of cyclohaxane has been examined. Long-lived components in both phases are associated with the formation of positronium (Ps). Two long lifetimes attributable to ortho-Ps are resolvable in the plastic phase....... The longer of these (≈ 2.5 ns), which is temperature dependent, is ascribed to ortho-Ps trapped at vacancies. The shorter lifetime (≈ 0.9 ns), shows little temperature dependence. In contrast to most other plastic crystals, no sigmoidal behaviour of the average ortho-Ps lifetime is observed. A possibility...

  8. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Quantum Dot Labeled DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Terry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (QD labeling combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is proposed as a powerful transduction technique for the detection of DNA hybridization events. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA microarray spots of hybridized QD labeled target indicated a characteristic lifetime value of 18.8 ns, compared to 13.3 ns obtained for spots of free QD solution, revealing that QD labels are sensitive to the spot microenvironment. Additionally, time gated detection was shown to improve the microarray image contrast ratio by 1.8, achieving femtomolar target sensitivity. Finally, lifetime multiplexing based on Qdot525 and Alexa430 was demonstrated using a single excitation-detection readout channel.

  9. A Universal Lifetime Distribution for Multi-Species Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Yohsuke; Ito, Nobuyasu; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2015-01-01

    Lifetime distributions of social entities, such as enterprises, products, and media contents, are one of the fundamental statistics characterizing the social dynamics. To investigate the lifetime distribution of mutually interacting systems, simple models having a rule for additions and deletions of entities are investigated. We found a quite universal lifetime distribution for various kinds of inter-entity interactions, and it is well fitted by a stretched-exponential function with an exponent close to 1/2. We propose a "modified Red-Queen" hypothesis to explain this distribution. We also review empirical studies on the lifetime distribution of social entities, and discussed the applicability of the model.

  10. Implementation of a Quality Improvement Process Aimed to Deliver Higher-Value Physical Therapy for Patients With Low Back Pain: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Emily; McCathie, Becky

    2015-12-01

    The current state of health care demands higher-value care. Due to many barriers, clinicians routinely do not implement evidence-based care even though it is known to improve quality and reduce cost of care. The purpose of this case report is to describe a theory-based, multitactic implementation of a quality improvement process aimed to deliver higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. Patients were treated from January 2010 through December 2014 in 1 of 32 outpatient physical therapy clinics within an academic health care system. Data were examined from 47,755 patients (mean age=50.3 years) entering outpatient physical therapy for management of nonspecific low back pain, with or without radicular pain. Development and implementation tactics were constructed from adult learning and change management theory to enhance adherence to best practice care among 130 physical therapists. A quality improvement team implemented 4 tactics: establish care delivery expectations, facilitate peer-led clinical and operational teams, foster a learning environment focused on meeting a population's needs, and continuously collect and analyze outcomes data. Physical therapy utilization and change in functional disability were measured to assess relative cost and quality of care. Secondarily, charge data assessed change in physical therapists' application of evidence-based care. Implementation of a quality improvement process was measured by year-over-year improved clinical outcomes, decreased utilization, and increased adherence to evidence-based physical therapy, which was associated with higher-value care. When adult learning and change management theory are combined in quality improvement efforts, common barriers to implementing evidence-based care can be overcome, creating an environment supportive of delivering higher-value physical therapy for patients with low back pain. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  11. Relativistic configuration interaction plus linearized-coupled-cluster calculations of U2 + energies, g factors, transition rates, and lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, I.; Safronova, U. I.; Safronova, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Excitation energies, term designations, g factors, transition rates, and lifetimes of U2 + are determined using a relativistic configuration interaction (CI) + linearized-coupled-cluster (LCC) approach. The CI-LCC energies are compared with CI + many-body-perturbation-theory (MBPT) and available experimental energies. Close agreement has been found with experiment, within hundreds of cm-1. In addition, lifetimes of higher levels have been calculated for comparison with three experimentally measured lifetimes, and close agreement has been found within the experimental error. CI-LCC calculations constitute a benchmark test of the CI + all-order method in complex relativistic systems such as actinides and their ions with many valence electrons. The theory yields many energy levels, g factors, transition rates, and lifetimes of U2 + that are not available from experiment. The theory can be applied to other multivalence atoms and ions, which would be of interest to many applications.

  12. Study of creep cavity growth for power plant lifetime assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Rui; Sandstroem, Rolf

    2001-01-01

    This report aims to the sub project lifetime assessment by creep (livslaengdspredikteringar vid kryp), which is involved in the project package strength in high temperature power plant, KME 708. The physical creep damage includes mainly cavities and their development. Wu and Sandstroem have observed that cavity size increases linearly with increasing creep strain in a 12%Cr steel. Sandstroem has showed that, based on the relations between the nucleation and growth of creep cavities with creep strain, the physical creep damage can be modelled as a function of creep strain. In the present paper the growth of creep cavity radius R in relation to time t and strain {epsilon} in low alloy and 12%Cr steels as well as a Type 347 steel has been studied. The results exhibit that the power law cavity radius with creep time (R-t) and with creep strain (R-{epsilon}) relations are found for these materials at various testing conditions. The power law R-t and R-{epsilon} relations are in most cases dependent and independent on testing conditions, respectively. The empirical power law R-{epsilon} relations give a description of cavity evolution, which can be used for lifetime assessment. Experimental data have also been compared to the estimations by the classical models for cavity growth, including the power law growth due to Hancock, the diffusion growth due to Speight and Harris, the constrained diffusion growths due to Dyson and due to Rice and the enhanced diffusion growth due to Beere. It appears that the constraint diffusion growth models give a reasonable estimation of R-{epsilon} relation in many cases. The diffusion growth model is only applicable for limited cases where the power over t in R-t relation takes about 1/3. The power law and the enhanced diffusion models are found in most cases to overestimate the cavity growth.

  13. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  14. Explore the Lifetime Frontiers with MATHUSLA Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ce; CERN. Geneva. EP Department

    2017-01-01

    Many extensions of the Standard Model (SM) include particles that are neutral, weakly coupled, and long-lived that can decay to final states containing several hadronic jets. Long-lived particles (LLPs) can be detected as displaced decays from the interaction point, or missing energy if they escape. ATLAS and CMS have performed searches at the LHC and significant exclusion limits have been set in recent years. However, the current searches performed at colliders have limitations. An LLP does not interact with the detector and it is only visible once it decays. Unfortunately, no existing or proposed search strategy will be able to observe the decay of non-hadronic electrically neutral LLPs with masses above ~ GeV and lifetimes near the limit set by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis ($c\\tau \\sim 10^7-10^8 m$). Therefore, ultra-long-lived particles (ULLPs) produced at the LHC will escape the main detector with extremely high probability. MATHUSLA (MAssive Timing Hodoscope for Ultra Stable neutraL pArticles) is a surface ...

  15. Differential mortality by lifetime earnings in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rembrandt D. Scholz

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available e estimate mortality rates by a measure of socio-economic status in a very large sample of male German pensioners aged~65 or older. Our analysis is entirely nonparametric. Furthermore, the data enable us to compare mortality experiences in eastern and western Germany conditional on socio-economic status. As a simple summary measure, we compute period life expectancies at age~65. Our findings show a lower bound of almost 50 percent (six years on the difference in life expectancy between the lowest and the highest socio-economic group considered. Within groups, we find similar values for the former GDR and western Germany. Our analysis contributes to the literature in three aspects. First, we provide the first population-based differential mortality study for Germany. Second, we use a novel measure of lifetime earnings as a proxy for socio-economic status that remains applicable to retired people. Third, the comparison between eastern and western Germany may provide some interesting insights for transformation countries.

  16. Lifetime obtained by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakaroun, M. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France); Antony, R. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)], E-mail: remi.antony@unilim.fr; Taillepierre, P.; Moliton, A. [XLIM-MINACOM-UMR 6172, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, 123 av. Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges cedex (France)

    2007-09-15

    We have fabricated green organic light-emitting diodes based on tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) thin films. In order to favor the charge carriers transport from the anode, we have deposited a N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis (3-methylphenyl)-1,1'-diphenyl-4,4'-diamine (TPD) layer (hole transport layer) on a ITO anode. Cathode is obtained with a calcium layer covered with a silver layer. This silver layer is used to protect the other layers against oxygen during the OLED use. All the depositions are performed under vacuum and the devices are not exposed to air during their realisation. In order to improve the silver layer characteristics, we have realized this layer with the ion beam assisted deposition process. The aim of this process is to densify the layer and then reduce the permeation of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. We have used argon ions to assist the silver deposition. All the OLEDs optoelectronic characterizations (I = f(V), L = f(V)) are performed in the ambient air. We compare the results obtained with the assisted layer with those obtained with a classical cathode realized by thermal unassisted evaporation. We have realized lifetime measurements in the ambient air and we discuss about the assisted layer influence on the OLEDs performances.

  17. Radiative lifetime measurements of rubidium Rydberg states

    CERN Document Server

    Branden, Drew B; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Vesa, Cristian; Wilson, Roy O; Zheng, Mao; Kortyna, Andrew; Tate, Duncan A

    2009-01-01

    We have measured the radiative lifetimes of ns, np and nd Rydberg states of rubidium in the range 28 < n < 45. To enable long-lived states to be measured, our experiment uses slow-moving Rb atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Two experimental techniques have been adopted to reduce random and systematic errors. First, a narrow-bandwidth pulsed laser is used to excite the target Rydberg state, resulting in minimal shot-to-shot variation in the initial state population. Second, we monitor the target state population as a function of time delay from the laser pulse using a short-duration, millimetre-wave pulse that is resonant with a one- or two-photon transition. We then selectively field ionize the monitor state, and detect the resulting electrons with a micro-channel plate. This signal is an accurate mirror of the target state population, and is uncontaminated by contributions from other states which are populated by black body radiation. Our results are generally consistent with other recent experime...

  18. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  19. Lifetime, Mixing and CPV in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00340295; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The latest results measured by the ATLAS experiment on lifetime, mixing and $CP$ violation in the $B^0$ and $B_s^0$ systems are presented. First, the measurement of the $B_s^0 \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decay parameters using 4.9 fb$^{-1}$ and 14.3$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC in $p p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV respectively is given. The measured values include the $CP$-violating phase $\\phi_s$ and the width difference of the mass eigenstates $\\Delta\\Gamma_s$. The measurements for the 7 and 8 TeV data samples are combined, giving values of $\\phi_s = -0.098 \\pm 0.084~\\mbox{(stat.)} \\pm 0.040~\\mbox{(syst.)}$ and $\\Delta\\Gamma_s = 0.083 \\pm 0.011~\\mbox{(stat.)} \\pm 0.007~\\mbox{(syst.)}$. The measured values agree with the Standard Model predictions. Second, the measurement of the relative width difference $\\Delta \\Gamma_d / \\Gamma_d$ of the $B^0$--$\\bar B^0$ system at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated lumino...

  20. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  1. Estimating service lifetimes of a polymer encapsulant for photovoltaic modules from accelerated testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czanderna, A.W.; Pern, F.J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In this paper, most of the emphasis is on A9918 ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) used commercially as the pottant for encapsulating photovoltaic (PV) modules, in which the efficiencies in field-deployed modules have been reduced by 10-70% in 4-12 years. Yet, projections were made by several different research groups in the 1980s that the EVA lifetime could range from 2-100 years. The authors (1) elucidate the complexity of the encapsulation problem, (2) indicate the performance losses reported for PV systems deployed since 1981, (3) critically assess the service lifetime predictions for EVA as a PV pottant based on studies by others for which they review the inherent errors in their assumptions about the Arrhenius relation, (4) show how degradation of minimodules in laboratory experiments that simulate reality can produce efficiency losses comparable to those in field-degraded PV modules reported in the literature, and (5) outline an acceptable methodology for making a service lifetime prediction of the polymer encapsulant, including the essential need for relating accelerated lifetime testing to real-time testing with a sufficient number of samples.

  2. Lifetimes of vibro-rotational levels for excited electronic states of the diatomic hydrogen isotopologues

    CERN Document Server

    Astashkevich, S A

    2014-01-01

    Current situation in studies of lifetimes of excited rovibronic levels for the H2, D2, T2, HD, HT, and DT molecules is analyzed. All measured values of the lifetimes (792 data for 618 different vibro-rotational levels of 33 electronic states), reported in 61 publications before November 2014, are compiled and listed in the tabular format together with annotated bibliography. Experimental data are now available for the H2, HD and D2 molecules only. The data collected in the present work show fragmentariness of experimental data. For vast majority of the levels the lifetime value was reported in one paper only, and has no independent experimental verification. Complete bibliography of publications concerning semi-empirical determination and non-empirical calculations of the lifetimes is presented. Numerical results obtained by these two approaches are listed in an explicit form only in the cases when experimental data are available. For more than half of the levels the differences between measured and calculate...

  3. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation presenting with steroid-responsive higher brain dysfunction: case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maeda Yasushi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 56-year-old man noticed discomfort in his left lower limb, followed by convulsion and numbness in the same area. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed white matter lesions in the right parietal lobe accompanied by leptomeningeal or leptomeningeal and cortical post-contrast enhancement along the parietal sulci. The patient also exhibited higher brain dysfunction corresponding with the lesions on MRI. Histological pathology disclosed β-amyloid in the blood vessels and perivascular inflammation, which highlights the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA-related inflammation. Pulse steroid therapy was so effective that clinical and radiological findings immediately improved. CAA-related inflammation is a rare disease, defined by the deposition of amyloid proteins within the leptomeningeal and cortical arteries associated with vasculitis or perivasculitis. Here we report a patient with CAA-related inflammation who showed higher brain dysfunction that improved with steroid therapy. In cases with atypical radiological lesions like our case, cerebral biopsy with histological confirmation remains necessary for an accurate diagnosis.

  4. Increased visceral adiposity and cortisol to cortisone ratio in adults with congenital lifetime isolated GH deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Santos, Elenilde; Salvatori, Roberto; Ferrão, Thiago O; Oliveira, Carla R P; Diniz, Rachel D C A; Santana, João A M; Pereira, Francisco A; Barbosa, Rita A A; Souza, Anita H O; Melo, Enaldo V; Epitácio-Pereira, Carlos C; Oliveira-Santos, Alécia A; Oliveira, Ingrid A S; Machado, Julianne A; Santana-Júnior, Francisco J; Barreto-Filho, José A S; Aguiar-Oliveira, Manuel H

    2014-09-01

    Adult-onset GH deficiency (GHD) increases visceral adiposity and the activity of the enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, which converts cortisone (E) to cortisol (F), both linked to insulin resistance and increased cardiovascular risk. Conversely, we reported that adults with congenital isolated GHD (IGHD) have increased insulin sensitivity. To assess the type of fat distribution and the amount of visceral and sc fat and to correlate them to the F/E ratio in adults with untreated IGHD due to a mutation in the GHRH receptor gene. Body composition was assessed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, thickness of sc and visceral fat was measured by sonography, and serum F and E were measured in 23 IGHD subjects and 21 age-matched controls. Waist/hip ratio (WHR), trunk fat, and trunk/extremity fat (TR/EXT) ratio were higher in IGHD subjects. Visceral fat index (VFI) (but not sc fat index [SFI]) was higher in IGHD. F and F/E ratio were also higher in IGHD. In all 44 individuals, WHR correlated with TR/EXT ratio, thickness of visceral fat, VFI/SFI ratio, F, and F/E ratio. TR/EXT ratio correlated with visceral fat thickness, VFI/SFI ratio, and F. Age had a significant effect on VFI and on F/E ratio. Body mass index SD score and WHR have a similar significant effect on TR/EXT ratio and on F/E ratio. Lifetime congenital untreated IGHD causes increased visceral adiposity with a high F/E ratio. However, the increased insulin sensitivity suggests that visceral adiposity needs a minimal GH secretion to translate into increased insulin resistance.

  5. CFCI3 (CFC-11): UV Absorption Spectrum Temperature Dependence Measurements and the Impact on Atmospheric Lifetime and Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgillen, Max R.; Fleming, Eric L.; Jackman, Charles H.; Burkholder, James B.

    2014-01-01

    CFCl3 (CFC-11) is both an atmospheric ozone-depleting and potent greenhouse gas that is removed primarily via stratospheric UV photolysis. Uncertainty in the temperature dependence of its UV absorption spectrum is a significant contributing factor to the overall uncertainty in its global lifetime and, thus, model calculations of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change. In this work, the CFC-11 UV absorption spectrum was measured over a range of wavelength (184.95 - 230 nm) and temperature (216 - 296 K). We report a spectrum temperature dependence that is less than currently recommended for use in atmospheric models. The impact on its atmospheric lifetime was quantified using a 2-D model and the spectrum parameterization developed in this work. The obtained global annually averaged lifetime was 58.1 +- 0.7 years (2 sigma uncertainty due solely to the spectrum uncertainty). The lifetime is slightly reduced and the uncertainty significantly reduced from that obtained using current spectrum recommendations

  6. Measurement of the Bs(0) → Ds-Ds+ and Bs(0) → D-Ds+ effective lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorosz, P; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morandin, M; Morawski, P

    2014-03-21

    The first measurement of the effective lifetime of the B(s)(0) meson in the decay B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ is reported using a proton-proton collision data set, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment. The measured value of the B(s)(0) → Ds-Ds+ effective lifetime is 1.379 ± 0.026 ± 0.017 ps, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This lifetime translates into a measurement of the decay width of the light B(s)(0) mass eigenstate of ΓL = 0.725 ± 0.014 ± 0.009 ps(-1). The B(s)(0) lifetime is also measured using the flavor-specific B(s)(0)→ D-Ds+ decay to be 1.52 ± 0.15 ± 0.01 ps.

  7. Radiative lifetime measurements of some Tm I and Tm II levels by time-resolved laser spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanshan; Wang, Xinghao; Yu, Qi; Li, Yongfan; Gao, Yang; Dai, Zhenwen

    2016-04-01

    Radiative lifetimes of 88 levels of Tm I in the energy range 22 791.176-48 547.98 cm-1 and 29 levels of Tm II in the range 27 294.79-65 612.85 cm-1 were measured by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in laser-ablation plasma. The lifetime values obtained are in the range from 15.4 to 7900 ns for Tm I and from 36.5 to 1000 ns for Tm II. To the best of our knowledge, 77 lifetimes of Tm I and 22 lifetimes of Tm II are reported for the first time. Good agreements between the present results and the previous experimental values were achieved for both Tm I and Tm II.

  8. Lifetime Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders among Parents of Children with Bipolar I Disorder: Parental Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh Amiri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Evaluation of family system is an important area in the context of child and adolescent mental health. This study aimed to estimate psychiatric disorders in parents of children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder (BID. Methods and Materials. In this cross-sectional study, during 2012-2013, all of the children and adolescents diagnosed with BID based on Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version were included. All of the parents (both mother and father were evaluated by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. Statistical Analysis. Prevalence rates are reported and independent-sample t-test and chi-square test were used when appropriate. Results. A total of 108 families were interviewed. 25% of mothers and 33% of fathers met the criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder, with major depressive disorder, BMD, and cluster B personality disorder being more prevalent. Fathers were more likely to receive a dual psychiatric diagnosis. Cluster B personality disorder and substance dependence were more prevalent among fathers while major depressive disorder was more prevalent among mothers. Conclusion. This study confirmed a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in parents of children with BID and emphasizes parental evolution.

  9. Lifetime prevalence of psychiatric disorders among parents of children with bipolar I disorder: parental difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Shahrokh; Ghoreishizadeh, Mohammad Ali; Alavizadeh, Yasaman; Saedi, Farnaz

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of family system is an important area in the context of child and adolescent mental health. This study aimed to estimate psychiatric disorders in parents of children and adolescents with bipolar I disorder (BID). In this cross-sectional study, during 2012-2013, all of the children and adolescents diagnosed with BID based on Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version were included. All of the parents (both mother and father) were evaluated by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR. Prevalence rates are reported and independent-sample t-test and chi-square test were used when appropriate. A total of 108 families were interviewed. 25% of mothers and 33% of fathers met the criteria for at least one psychiatric disorder, with major depressive disorder, BMD, and cluster B personality disorder being more prevalent. Fathers were more likely to receive a dual psychiatric diagnosis. Cluster B personality disorder and substance dependence were more prevalent among fathers while major depressive disorder was more prevalent among mothers. This study confirmed a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders in parents of children with BID and emphasizes parental evolution.

  10. Polyester-toner electrophoresis microchips with improved analytical performance and extended lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Ellen Flávia Moreira; Duarte Junior, Gerson F; Garcia, Paulo de Tarso; de Jesus, Dosil P; Coltro, Wendell K T

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of polyester-toner (PT) electrophoresis microchips with improved analytical performance and extended lifetime. This has been achieved with a better understanding about the EOF generation and the influence of some parameters including the channel dimensions (width and depth), the injection mode, and the addition of organic solvent to the running buffer. The analytical performance of the PT devices was investigated using a capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detector and inorganic cations as model analytes. The proposed devices have exhibited EOF values of (3.4 ± 0.2) × 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with good stability over 25 consecutive runs. It has been found that the EOF magnitude depends on the channel dimension, i.e. the wider the channel, the higher the EOF value. The separation efficiency for inorganic cations ranged from 13 000 to 50 000 plates/m. The LOD found for K(+) , Na(+) , and Li(+) were 4.2, 7.3, and 23 μM, respectively. In addition, the same PT device has been used by three consecutive days. Lately, due to improved analytical performance, it was carried out by the first time the detection of inorganic cations in real samples such as energetic drinks and pharmaceutical formulations.

  11. Evaluation of Battery Lifetimes using Inhomogeneous Markov Reward Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, L.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetimes depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  12. Developing an "atomic clock" for fission lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Kravchuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of measuring fission lifetimes of hot nuclei is briefly discussed. It is shown that K X-ray emission prior to fission can be used to measure fission lifetimes. The preparation of the K-shell hole, the simultaneous nuclear excitation, and the analysis of the X-ray spectra is described.

  13. Extending Lifetime of Wireless Sensor Networks using Forward Error Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donapudi, S U; Obel, C O; Madsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    reducing node and network lifetime. In this paper, a convolution code FEC with Viterbi decoding on Mica2 nodes was implemented and evaluated to explore the possibility of extending the lifetime of a degrading WSN. Results were presented which suggest that our approach could be used in a WSN when increasing...

  14. Optimal Taxation and Social Insurance in a Lifetime Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovenberg, A. Lans; Sørensen, Peter Birch

    Advances in information technology have improved the administrative feasibility of redistribution based on lifetime earnings recorded at the time of retirement. We study optimal lifetime income taxation and social insurance in an economy in which redistributive taxation and social insurance serve...

  15. Lifetime Measurement for 6snp Rydberg States of Barium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Li; WANG Lei; YANG Hai-Feng; LIU Xiao-Jun; LIU Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a simple and efficient method for measuring the atomic lifetimes in order of tens of microseconds and demonstrate it in the lifetime determination of barium Rydberg states.This method extracts the lifetime information from the time-of-flight spectrum directly, which is much more efficient than other methods such as the time-delayed field ionization and the traditional laser induced fluorescence.The lifetimes determined with our method for barium Rydberg 6snp(n=37-59)series are well coincident with the values deduced from the absolute oscillator strengths of barium which were given in the literature [J.Phys.B 14(1981)4489, 29(1996)655]on experiments.%We present a simple and efficient method for measuring the atomic lifetimes in order of tens of microseconds and demonstrate it in the lifetime determination of barium Rydberg states. This method extracts the lifetime information from the time-of-flight spectrum directly, which is much more efficient than other methods such as the time-delayed field ionization and the traditional laser induced fluorescence. The lifetimes determined with our method for barium Rydberg 6snp (n=37-59) series are well coincident with the values deduced from the absolute oscillator strengths of barium which were given in the literature [J. Phys. B 14 (1981) 4489, 29 (1996) 655] onexperiments.

  16. Evaluation of Battery Lifetimes using Inhomogeneous Markov Reward Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, Lucia; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.; Jongerden, Marijn

    2006-01-01

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetimes depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  17. Time-Varying Triplet State Lifetimes of Single Molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, J.A.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.; Kuipers, L.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1999-01-01

    It is found that triplet state lifetimes and intersystem crossing yields of individual molecules embedded in a polymer host at room temperature are not constant in time. The range over which the triplet lifetime of a single molecule varies during long observation times shows a strong similarity with

  18. Lifetimes of machinery and equipment : evidence from Dutch manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erumban, 27675

    2008-01-01

    This paper estimates service lifetimes for capital assets in Dutch manufacturing industries, using information on asset retirement patterns. A Weibull distribution function is estimated using a non-linear regression technique to derive service lifetimes for three selected asset types: transport equi

  19. Experimental Investigation of Excited-State Lifetimes in Atomic Ytterbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, C.J.; Budker, D.; Commins, E.D.; DeMille, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Shang, S.-Q.; /UC, Berkeley; Zolotorev, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-15

    Lifetimes of 21 excited states in atomic Yb were measured using time-resolved fluorescence detection following pulsed laser excitation. The lifetime of the 4f{sup 14}5d6s {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, which is of particular importance for a proposed study of parity nonconservation in atoms, was measured to be 380(30) ns.

  20. Developing an "atomic clock" for fission lifetime measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, H.W.E.M.; Kravchuk, V.

    2004-01-01

    The relevance of measuring fission lifetimes of hot nuclei is briefly discussed. It is shown that K X-ray emission prior to fission can be used to measure fission lifetimes. The preparation of the K-shell hole, the simultaneous nuclear excitation, and the analysis of the X-ray spectra is described.

  1. Lifetime measurements of beauty hadrons at the LHCb experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dordei, Francesca

    2015-05-19

    This thesis presents several lifetime measurements of b-flavoured hadrons at the LHCb experiment. They represent an important test of the theoretical approach to b-hadron observables known as Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE). This analysis uses data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √(s)=7 TeV. For the decays B{sup +}→J/ψK{sup +}, B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup *0}, B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup 0}{sub S}, Λ{sup 0}{sub b}→J/ψΛ and B{sup 0}{sub s}→J/ψφ the lifetimes are measured to be τ{sub B{sup +}→J/ψK{sup +}}=1.637±0.004±0.003 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}→J/ψK}{sup {sub *}{sub 0}}=1.524±0.006±0.004 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}→J/ψK{sup 0}{sub S}}=1.499±0.013±0.005 ps, τ{sub Λ{sup 0}{sub b}} {sub →} {sub J/ψΛ}=1.415±0.027±0.006 ps, τ{sub B{sup 0}{sub s}} {sub →} {sub J/ψφ}=1.480±0.011±0.005 ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. These are the most precise lifetime measurements in these decay modes to date. Ratios of these lifetimes also are reported in this thesis, as they are well-defined quantities where many theoretical or experimental uncertainties cancel. The ratio of the decay width difference, ΔΓ{sub d}, to the average width, Γ{sub d}, in the B{sup 0} system is found to be ΔΓ{sub d}/Γ{sub d}=-0.044±0.025±0.011. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb{sup -1} collected at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV, the measurements of the decay width difference, ΔΓ{sub s}, and the average width, Γ{sub s}, in the B{sup 0}{sub s} system are performed. Using the decay B{sup 0}{sub s}→J/ψφ, they are measured to be ΔΓ{sub s}=0.0805±0.0091±0.0033 ps{sup -1}, Γ{sub s}=0.6603±0.0027±0.0015 ps{sup -1}. These are the most precise determinations of these observables ot date. All measurements are consistent with HQE predictions.

  2. Spectral dependence of carrier lifetimes in silicon for photovoltaic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, John F.; Li, Yu-Tai; Dagenais, Mario; Hamadani, Behrang H.

    2016-12-01

    Charge carrier lifetimes in photovoltaic-grade silicon wafers were measured by a spectral-dependent, quasi-steady-state photoconductance technique. Narrow bandwidth light emitting diodes were used to excite excess charge carriers within the material, and the effective lifetimes of these carriers were measured as a function of wavelength and intensity. The dependence of the effective lifetime on the excitation wavelength was then analyzed within the context of an analytical model relating effective lifetime to the bulk lifetime and surface recombination velocity of the material. The agreement between the model and the experimental data provides validation for this technique to be used at various stages of the solar cell production line to investigate the quality of the passivation layers and the bulk properties of the material.

  3. Use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for latent fingerprints detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chao, Zhi Xia; Seah, Leong K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in frequency domain enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes of a specimen. FLIM can provide unique information about fluorophores and hence is widely used in biology and for medical diagnostics. In this paper, a theoretical analysis for the fluorescence lifetime determination of latent fingerprint samples is described, which is followed by the feasibility study of using FLIM in frequency domain for latent fingerprints detection. Experiments are carried out with fingerprint on green paper substrate and postcard substrate treated with certain fluorescent powder. The total phase lag and demodulation factor are calculated to determine the lifetimes pixel by pixel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime image of fingerprint revealed an improvement in the contrast, and was able to detect the latent fingerprint clearly.

  4. Moisture dependence of positron lifetime in Kevlar-49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jag J.; Holt, William H.; Mock, Willis, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Because of filamentary character of Kevlar-49 aramid fibers, there is some concern about the moisture uptake and its effect on plastic composites reinforced with Kevlar-49 fibers. As part of continuing studies of positron lifetime in polymers, we have measured positron lifetime spectra in Kevlar-49 fibers as a function of their moisture content. The long lifetime component intensities are rather low, being only of the order of 2-3 percent. The measured values of long component lifetimes at various moisture levels in the specimens are as follows: 2072 +/- 173 ps (dry); 2013 +/- 193 ps (20.7 percent saturation); 1665 +/- 85 ps (25.7 percent saturation); 1745 +/- 257 ps (32.1 percent saturation); and 1772 +/- 217 ps (100 percent saturation). It is apparent that the long component lifetime at first decreases and then increases as the specimen moisture content increases. These results have been compared with those inferred from Epon-815 and Epon-815/K-49 composite data.

  5. Positron lifetimes in Cu-based {beta}-phase alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plazaola, F. [Bilbo, Euskal Herrilo Unibertsitatea (Spain). Elektrika eta Elektronika Saila; Romero, R.; Somoza, A. [Tandil, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina). IFIMAT

    1997-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical characterization of the positron lifetimes for bulk and vacancy-type defects are considered in the ordered {beta}-phase Cu-Zn-Al alloys. The general trend exhibits the same behaviour in both cases, in which the bulk positron lifetimes vary very little with alloy`s composition. The ordered structure can be described as two interpenetrating sublattices: however, within the theoretical approach, there is no preferential positron trapping at the mono vacancies of one of the two sublattices. The calculated lifetimes of positrons trapped at mono vacancies depend mainly on the Al content in the next near-neighbourhood. The lifetimes of positrons trapped at divacancies are 10-25 ps larger than the ones at mono vacancies. The experimental vacancy-type defect lifetimes are in good agreement with the ones calculated for mono vacancies.

  6. Adult lifetime reproductive value in fish depends on size and fecundity type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsoukali, Stavroula; Olsson, Karin H.; Visser, André W.

    2016-01-01

    , the expected proportionality falls off if mortality increases to include fishing. Furthermore, we find that the fecundity type (determinate or indeterminate) affects the predicted adult reproductive value, which is significantly (10-fold) higher for an indeterminate spawner than for a determinate spawner......In a stable population, the adult lifetime reproductive value must be balanced against early life survival. Although delaying maturity may increase fecundity, it also reduces survival. Larger size at maturity therefore not only allows for higher fecundity, but requires it. Using simple arguments...... from life history, we derive a direct proportionality relationship between the adult lifetime reproductive value and weight at maturation and find that this relationship is consistent with empirical evidence from 28 stocks and species of bony fish from temperate–boreal environments. However...

  7. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  8. The PACE study: lifetime and past-year prevalence of headache in Parma's adult general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Arens; Russo, Marco; Manzoni, Gian Camillo; Torelli, Paola

    2017-05-01

    Headache is a widespread disorder and therefore it has a strong impact on quality of life. In the present work we focused on lifetime and past-year prevalence of headache in general and by gender, in a population-based sample in Parma. A total of 904 subjects representative of Parma's adult general population were interviewed face-to-face by a physician from the Parma Headache Centre, using a validated questionnaire. The lifetime prevalence of headache was 69.1%, i.e. 75.8% in women and 60.6% in men; the crude past-year prevalence of headache was 42.8%, i.e. 52.0% in women and 31.1% in men. Both lifetime and past-year prevalence rates were significantly higher in females than in males (odds ratio, respectively, 2.0 and 2.4). In our study, past-year prevalence decreased after age 50 in both genders. Most people suffer from one headache subtype. In over 80% of cases, headache starts before age 40 and therefore people were not very likely to develop headache after 50 years. The past-year and lifetime prevalence rate of headache in general that we found in our study falls within the lower range of values for headache prevalence in European countries. Further researches need to be set in the Italian epidemiological background.

  9. Enhance the lifetime and bias stress reliability in organic vertical transistor by UV/Ozone treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Ming-Yu; Zan, Hsiao-Wen; Meng, Hsin-Fei; Chao, Yu-Chiang

    In this paper, we use UV/Ozone treatment to improve the lifetime and bias stress reliability of organic transistor with vertical channel. Even if vertical organic transistor exhibits better bias stress reliability than organic field effect transistor (OFET) due to bulk conduction mechanism, poor lifetime performance is still a challenge. Adding octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) to treat the vertical channel can reduce the trapping state and hence improve the bias stress ability. However, off-current is much higher after 6 days and lifetime performance is degraded. On the other hand, after 4000-s on-state bias stress, stable output current and on/off current ratio are demonstrated by using UV/Ozone to treat vertical channels. Threshold voltage shift is only -0.02 V which is much smaller than OFET with the same organic semiconductor material. Furthermore, the output current is also an order enhanced. Nevertheless, unlike device with OTS treatment, no obvious degradation is observed for UV/Ozone treated devices even after 170 days. With UV/Ozone treatment, the output current, bias stress reliability and lifetime were all improved. It makes vertical transistor become a promising device for the further application in display technology and flexible electronics.

  10. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  11. Bilayer Suspension Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings with Enhanced Thermal Cyclic Lifetime: Experiments and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit; Kumara, Chamara; Nylén, Per

    2017-08-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) has been shown as a promising process to produce porous columnar strain tolerant coatings for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in gas turbine engines. However, the highly porous structure is vulnerable to crack propagation, especially near the topcoat-bondcoat interface where high stresses are generated due to thermal cycling. A topcoat layer with high toughness near the topcoat-bondcoat interface could be beneficial to enhance thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs. In this work, a bilayer coating system consisting of first a dense layer near the topcoat-bondcoat interface followed by a porous columnar layer was fabricated by SPS using Yttria-stabilised zirconia suspension. The objective of this work was to investigate if the bilayer topcoat architecture could enhance the thermal cyclic lifetime of SPS TBCs through experiments and to understand the effect of the column gaps/vertical cracks and the dense layer on the generated stresses in the TBC during thermal cyclic loading through finite element modeling. The experimental results show that the bilayer TBC had significantly higher lifetime than the single-layer TBC. The modeling results show that the dense layer and vertical cracks are beneficial as they reduce the thermally induced stresses which thus increase the lifetime.

  12. Customer Lifetime and After Lifetime Value - Calculations from an Iranian perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Wilson, Jonathan A.J.; Ebrahimi, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) is an established relationship marketing-centric approach to evaluating the significance of a customer, and what resources should be allocated towards maintaining relations – beyond short-term transactional views. The conceptual argument presented in this paper...... contributes one very simple, yet significant argument, which is both transactional and relational. Namely, a large portion of humanity believes in a life beyond current existence – the Afterlife. Therefore, death in the psyche of such a person does not terminate benefit seeking, and there is value...... in the afterlife. The aim here, is to refine value-based calculations, drawing from varying religious perspectives: reincarnation, heaven, and enlightenment, amongst others....

  13. Incorporating Satisfaction into Customer Value Analysis: Optimal Investment in Lifetime Value

    OpenAIRE

    Teck-Hua Ho; Young-Hoon Park; Yong-Pin Zhou

    2006-01-01

    We extend the Schmittlein et al. model (1987) of customer lifetime value to include satisfaction. Customer purchases are modeled as Poisson events, and their rates of occurrence depend on the satisfaction of the most recent purchase encounter. Customers purchase at a higher rate when they are satisfied than when they are dissatisfied. A closed-form formula is derived for predicting total expected dollar spending from a customer base over a time period (0, ]. This formula reveals that approxim...

  14. Measurement of the Average $B^{0}_{s}$ Lifetime in the Decay $B^{0}_{s} \\to J/\\Psi\\Phi$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauly, Thilo [Keble Collge, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    The lifetime difference between the long (CP odd) and short (CP even) lived components of the Bg meson is currently predicted to be of the order of 10 % in the Standard Model. It has been suggested that the decay Bg —>• J/\\|> 4) is predominantly CP even and thus the measured average lifetime could be shorter than the lifetime measured in the inclusive decay modes. We present a measurement of the average lifetime of the 6° meson in its decay Eg —>• J/4> cj), with J/\\|) —> M.+ M.~ and cj) —>• K+K-. During January 2002 and August 2003 the CDF experiment at the Tevatron has been exposed to about 135 pb" 1 of pp collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of A/S = 1.96 TeV. In the data sample collected with the J/\\Jj dimuon trigger we fully reconstruct about 125 Bg —> J/\\J) (J) candidates with precision silicon information. This is currently the largest exclusive Bg sample. We perform a fit to the proper decay time information to extract the average Bg lifetime and simultaneously use the mass information to disentangle signal from background. For cross-checks we measure the lifetime in the higher statistics modes Bj -» J/\\J> K* and B° —> J/4> K*°, which both have similar decay topologies and kinematics. We obtain r(B°s -> J/\\|> cf>) = (1.31±5:l3(stat.) ± 0.02(syst.)) ps , which is currently the best single measurement of the Bg lifetime and is consistent with other measurements. This result is not accurate enough to establish the existence of a possible significant lifetime difference between the CP odd and even states.

  15. Los Alamos National Laboratory W76 Pit Tube Lifetime Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeln, Terri G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-25

    A metallurgical study was requested as part of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) W76-1 life-extension program (LEP) involving a lifetime analysis of type 304 stainless steel pit tubes subject to repeat bending loads during assembly and disassembly operations at BWXT/Pantex. This initial test phase was completed during the calendar years of 2004-2006 and the report not issued until additional recommended tests could be performed. These tests have not been funded to this date and therefore this report is considered final. Tubes were reportedly fabricated according to Rocky Flats specification P14548 - Seamless Type 304 VIM/VAR Stainless Steel Tubing. Tube diameter was specified as 0.125 inches and wall thickness as 0.028 inches. A heat treat condition is not specified and the hardness range specification can be characteristic of both 1/8 and 1/4 hard conditions. Properties of all tubes tested were within specification. Metallographic analysis could not conclusively determine a specified limit to number of bends allowable. A statistical analysis suggests a range of 5-7 bends with a 99.95% confidence limit. See the 'Statistical Analysis' section of this report. The initial phase of this study involved two separate sets of test specimens. The first group was part of an investigation originating in the ESA-GTS [now Gas Transfer Systems (W-7) Group]. After the bend cycle test parameters were chosen (all three required bends subjected to the same amount of bend cycles) and the tubes bent, the investigation was transferred to Terri Abeln (Metallurgical Science and Engineering) for analysis. Subsequently, another limited quantity of tubes became available for testing and were cycled with the same bending fixture, but with different test parameters determined by T. Abeln.

  16. An overview of service lifetime prediction (SLP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, G. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report describes the need for service life prediction for photovoltaic cells and associated devices, coatings, and other related technologies. Information regarding outdoor exposure tests is given.

  17. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  18. Use of multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate skin pigmentation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Favre, Amandine; Loy, Chong Jin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature showing the usefulness of multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in situ characterization of skin constituents and the ensuing development of noninvasive diagnostic tools against skin diseases. Melanin and pigmentation-associated skin cancers constitute some of the major applications. We show that MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to measure changes in cutaneous melanin concentration and that these can be related to the visible skin color. Melanin in the skin of African, Indian, Caucasian, and Asian volunteers is detected on the basis of its emission wavelength and fluorescence lifetimes in solution and in a melanocyte-keratinocyte cell culture. Fluorescence intensity is used to characterize the melanin content and distribution as a function of skin type and depth into the skin (stratum granulosum and stratum basale). The measured fluorescence intensities in given skin types agree with melanin amounts reported by others using biopsies. Our results suggest that spatial distribution of melanin in skin can be studied using MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging, but further studies are needed to ascertain that the method can resolve melanin amount in smaller depth intervals.

  19. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  20. Development of a high average current polarized electron source with long cathode operational lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. K. Sinclair; P. A. Adderley; B. M. Dunham; J. C. Hansknecht; P. Hartmann; M. Poelker; J. S. Price; P. M. Rutt; W. J. Schneider; M. Steigerwald

    2007-02-01

    Substantially more than half of the electromagnetic nuclear physics experiments conducted at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory) require highly polarized electron beams, often at high average current. Spin-polarized electrons are produced by photoemission from various GaAs-based semiconductor photocathodes, using circularly polarized laser light with photon energy slightly larger than the semiconductor band gap. The photocathodes are prepared by activation of the clean semiconductor surface to negative electron affinity using cesium and oxidation. Historically, in many laboratories worldwide, these photocathodes have had short operational lifetimes at high average current, and have often deteriorated fairly quickly in ultrahigh vacuum even without electron beam delivery. At Jefferson Lab, we have developed a polarized electron source in which the photocathodes degrade exceptionally slowly without electron emission, and in which ion back bombardment is the predominant mechanism limiting the operational lifetime of the cathodes during electron emission. We have reproducibly obtained cathode 1/e dark lifetimes over two years, and 1/e charge density and charge lifetimes during electron beam delivery of over 2?105???C/cm2 and 200 C, respectively. This source is able to support uninterrupted high average current polarized beam delivery to three experimental halls simultaneously for many months at a time. Many of the techniques we report here are directly applicable to the development of GaAs photoemission electron guns to deliver high average current, high brightness unpolarized beams.

  1. Preliminary findings on lifetime trauma prevalence and PTSD symptoms among adolescents in Sarawak Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Siti Raudzah; Elklit, Ask; Balang, Rekaya Vincent; Sultan, M Ameenudeen; Kana, Kamarudin

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of lifetime exposure to traumatic events and its relation to PTSD symptoms. Participants were randomly selected from several schools located in the city of Kuching. There were 85 adolescents participating in this study, with ages ranging from 13 to 14 years old, of whom 31% (n=26) were males and 69% (n=59) females. The Child Posttraumatic Stress Index-Revised, The Harvard Trauma Questionnaire and a lifetime trauma checklist were used in this study. Results showed that 77.6% of participants were exposed to at least one lifetime trauma. The most frequently reported traumas were road accident (20.1%), death of a family member (19.7%), and almost drowning (10%). There was more indirect trauma than direct trauma exposure. Males were more likely to be involved in traumatic events than females. Results showed that 7.1% (6) exhibited PTSD symptoms. There was no significant difference in the mean score of CPTS-RI between genders and among ethnic groups. Total exposure to traumatic events was significantly correlated with PTSD symptoms. Findings suggest that number of lifetime traumatic events was quite high and multiple exposures to traumatic events were significantly related to PTSD symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  3. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  4. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  5. Lifetime of 19Ne*(4.03 MeV)

    CERN Document Server

    Kanungo, R; Andreyev, A N; Ball, G C; Chakravarthy, R S; Chicoine, M; Churchman, R; Davids, B; Forster, J S; Gujrathi, S; Hackman, G; Howell, D; Leslie, J R; Morton, A C; Mythili, S; Pearson, C J; Ressler, J J; Ruiz, C; Savajols, H; Schumaker, M A; Tanihata, I; Walden, P L; Yen, S

    2006-01-01

    The Doppler-shift attenuation method was applied to measure the lifetime of the 4.03 MeV state in 19Ne. Utilizing a 3He-implanted Au foil as a target, the state was populated using the 20Ne(3He,alpha)19Ne reaction in inverse kinematics at a 20Ne beam energy of 34 MeV. De-excitation gamma rays were detected in coincidence with alpha particles. At the 1 sigma level, the lifetime was determined to be 11 +4, -3 fs and at the 95.45% confidence level the lifetime is 11 +8, -7 fs.

  6. Interlaboratory comparison of positron and positronium lifetimes in polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastlund, C.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Maurer, F.H.J.

    1998-01-01

    A comparison of the results of a series of positron annihilation lifetime measurements performed in 12 laboratories is presented. The measurements were conducted on three different polymer samples, all prepared in one laboratory under standard conditions. The objective of the work was to gain...... insight into the variation in derived positron and positronium lifetimes and intensities measured in the different laboratories on identical specimens. Lifetime data were collected at room temperature by each laboratory following their own standard measurement and data evaluation procedures. The polymers...

  7. On random age and remaining lifetime for populations of items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finkelstein, M.; Vaupel, J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider items that are incepted into operation having already a random (initial) age and define the corresponding remaining lifetime. We show that these lifetimes are identically distributed when the age distribution is equal to the equilibrium distribution of the renewal theory. Then we...... develop the population studies approach to the problem and generalize the setting in terms of stationary and stable populations of items. We obtain new stochastic comparisons for the corresponding population ages and remaining lifetimes that can be useful in applications. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley...

  8. Hair cortisol and lifetime discrimination: Moderation by subjective social status

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Kymberlee M; Meyer, Jerrold; Tronick, Edward; Moore, Celia L

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination has been associated with elevated cortisol as measured in saliva, blood, and urine. This study investigated the association between lifetime discrimination and hair cortisol concentrations, considered a measure of chronic stress. We recruited 180 young adults from diverse backgrounds. Participant responses to lifetime discrimination, home stress, and subjective status measures were recorded. Lifetime discrimination significantly predicted hair cortisol concentrations, supporting past research that discrimination experiences impact neuroendocrine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first findings associating hair cortisol concentrations with discrimination and supports prior evidence positing discrimination as a chronic stressor that serves as a risk factor for chronic disease. PMID:28491342

  9. Hair cortisol and lifetime discrimination: Moderation by subjective social status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kymberlee M O’Brien

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Discrimination has been associated with elevated cortisol as measured in saliva, blood, and urine. This study investigated the association between lifetime discrimination and hair cortisol concentrations, considered a measure of chronic stress. We recruited 180 young adults from diverse backgrounds. Participant responses to lifetime discrimination, home stress, and subjective status measures were recorded. Lifetime discrimination significantly predicted hair cortisol concentrations, supporting past research that discrimination experiences impact neuroendocrine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first findings associating hair cortisol concentrations with discrimination and supports prior evidence positing discrimination as a chronic stressor that serves as a risk factor for chronic disease.

  10. Hair cortisol and lifetime discrimination: Moderation by subjective social status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kymberlee M; Meyer, Jerrold; Tronick, Edward; Moore, Celia L

    2017-01-01

    Discrimination has been associated with elevated cortisol as measured in saliva, blood, and urine. This study investigated the association between lifetime discrimination and hair cortisol concentrations, considered a measure of chronic stress. We recruited 180 young adults from diverse backgrounds. Participant responses to lifetime discrimination, home stress, and subjective status measures were recorded. Lifetime discrimination significantly predicted hair cortisol concentrations, supporting past research that discrimination experiences impact neuroendocrine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first findings associating hair cortisol concentrations with discrimination and supports prior evidence positing discrimination as a chronic stressor that serves as a risk factor for chronic disease.

  11. Radiative lifetimes of Rydberg states of BeⅠ and BeⅢ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Liang; WANG Yong-chang

    2003-01-01

    By using the multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT), we have evaluated the energy levels and lifetimes of 2sns 3S1,2snd 3D(n=3-25) of BeⅠ and 1sns 3S1,1snd 3D(n=3-25) of BeⅢ. These energies and lifetimes that we have calculated not only agree with the recent measurements and theoretical calculation of Ref.4 and Ref.3, but also predict the lifetimes of 66 other highly excited states.

  12. Fatigue reassessment for lifetime extension of offshore wind monopile substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Lisa; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue reassessment is required to decide about lifetime extension of aging offshore wind farms. This paper presents a methodology to identify important parameters to monitor during the operational phase of offshore wind turbines. An elementary effects method is applied to analyze the global sensitivity of residual fatigue lifetimes to environmental, structural and operational parameters. Therefore, renewed lifetime simulations are performed for a case study which consists of a 5 MW turbine with monopile substructure in 20 m water depth. Results show that corrosion, turbine availability, and turbulence intensity are the most influential parameters. This can vary strongly for other settings (water depth, turbine size, etc.) making case-specific assessments necessary.

  13. Modeling and optimization of membrane lifetime in dead-end ultra filtration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zondervan, Edwin; Roffel, Brian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, a membrane lifetime model is developed and experimentally validated. The lifetime model is based on the Weibull probability density function. The lifetime model can be used to determine an unambiguous characteristic membrane lifetime. Experimental results showed that membrane lifetime

  14. Assessing the impacts of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimlin, Michael G; Guo, Yuming

    2012-05-15

    Ultraviolet radiation exposure during an individuals' lifetime is a known risk factor for the development of skin cancer. However, less evidence is available on assessing the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. This study aims to assess the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging using a non-invasive measure of exposure. We recruited 180 participants (73 males, 107 females) aged 18-83 years. Digital imaging of skin hyperpigmentation (skin damage) and skin wrinkling (skin aging) on the facial region was measured. Lifetime sun exposure (presented as hours) was calculated from the participants' age multiplied by the estimated annual time outdoors for each year of life. We analyzed the effects of lifetime sun exposure on skin damage and skin aging. We adjust for the influence of age, sex, occupation, history of skin cancer, eye color, hair color, and skin color. There were non-linear relationships between lifetime sun exposure and skin damage and skin aging. Younger participant's skin is much more sensitive to sun exposure than those who were over 50 years of age. As such, there were negative interactions between lifetime sun exposure and age. Age had linear effects on skin damage and skin aging. The data presented showed that self reported lifetime sun exposure was positively associated with skin damage and skin aging, in particular, the younger people. Future health promotion for sun exposure needs to pay attention to this group for skin cancer prevention messaging. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Floristics of Higher Plants in China——Report from Catalogue of Life: Higher Plants in China Database%中国高等植物编目信息系统进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Song WANG; Yu-Cheng ZHANG; Na-Xin XUE; Hai-Ning QIN

    2011-01-01

    Biodiversity research increasingly relies on distribution networks for dealing with large-scale primary data.Up-to-date information on biodiversity is critical for the proper management and conservation of any area. The first step towards conservation should be to compile an authoritative species inventory or checklist. Catalogue of Life:Higher Plants in China (CNPC) is an ongoing biodiversity informatics project with the aim to integrate existing higher plants inventory data, and provide access via an internet based web service to public user and the scientific com-munity. The CNPC, for the first time, provides integrated and authoritative taxonomic information on higher plant species found in China, and this database will be permanent, free and continously updated. Presently, a total of 34377 species have been included in the database. Among of them, 16 620 species are only found in China. Taxa are classified into 432 families and 3 941 genera. The CNPC will be an important source for scientists working on Chinese flora, and will play an important role in helping to achieve the targets set under the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation in the future.

  16. Comparison of lifetime-based methods for 2D phosphor thermometry in high-temperature environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Di; Liu, Yingzheng; Zhao, Xiaofeng; Kim, Kyung Chun

    2016-09-01

    This paper discusses the currently available techniques for 2D phosphor thermometry, and compares the performance of two lifetime-based methods: high-speed imaging and the dual-gate. High-speed imaging resolves luminescent decay with a fast frame rate, and has become a popular method for phosphor thermometry in recent years. But it has disadvantages such as high equipment cost and long data processing time, and it would fail at sufficiently high temperature due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and short lifetime. The dual-gate method only requires two images on the decay curve and therefore greatly reduces cost in hardware and processing time. A dual-gate method for phosphor thermometry has been developed and compared with the high-speed imaging method through both calibration and a jet impingement experiment. Measurement uncertainty has been evaluated for a temperature range of 473-833 K. The effects of several key factors on uncertainty have been discussed, including the luminescent signal level, the decay lifetime and temperature sensitivity. The results show that both methods are valid for 2D temperature sensing within the given range. The high-speed imaging method shows less uncertainty at low temperatures where the signal level and the lifetime are both sufficient, but its performance is degraded at higher temperatures due to a rapidly reduced signal and lifetime. For T  >  750 K, the dual-gate method outperforms the high-speed imaging method thanks to its superiority in signal-to-noise ratio and temperature sensitivity. The dual-gate method has great potential for applications in high-temperature environments where the high-speed imaging method is not applicable.

  17. Women and Minority Faculty in the Academic Workplace: Recruitment, Retention, and Academic Culture. ASHE-ERIC Higher Education Report, Volume 27, Number 6. Jossey-Bass Higher and Adult Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Adalberto, Jr.

    In an attempt to address the need for substantive comparisons in the minority university faculty population, this monograph examines the relative differences in minority groups in the faculty population when the data permit comparisons. The report also examines research on the status of women faculty members. The discussion assembles a large…

  18. Silicone Molding and Lifetime Testing of Peripheral Nerve Interfaces for Neuroprostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupte, Kimaya [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Tolosa, Vanessa [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Center for Micro- and Nanotechnology

    2016-08-10

    Implantable peripheral nerve cuffs have a large application in neuroprostheses as they can be used to restore sensation to those with upper limb amputations. Modern day prosthetics, while lessening the pain associated with phantom limb syndrome, have limited fine motor control and do not provide sensory feedback to patients. Sensory feedback with prosthetics requires communication between the nervous system and limbs, and is still a challenge to accomplish with amputees. Establishing this communication between the peripheral nerves in the arm and artificial limbs is vital as prosthetics research aims to provide sensory feedback to amputees. Peripheral nerve cuffs restore sensation by electrically stimulating certain parts of the nerve in order to create feeling in the hand. Cuff electrodes have an advantage over standard electrodes as they have high selective stimulation by bringing the electrical interface close to the neural tissue in order to selectively activate targeted regions of a peripheral nerve. In order to further improve the selective stimulation of these nerve cuffs, there is need for finer spatial resolution among electrodes. One method to achieve a higher spatial resolution is to increase the electrode density on the cuff itself. Microfabrication techniques can be used to achieve this higher electrode density. Using L-Edit, a layout editor, microfabricated peripheral nerve cuffs were designed with a higher electrode density than the current model. This increase in electrode density translates to an increase in spatial resolution by at least one order of magnitude. Microfabricated devices also have two separate components that are necessary to understand before implantation: lifetime of the device and assembly to prevent nerve damage. Silicone molding procedures were optimized so that devices do not damage nerves in vivo, and lifetime testing was performed on test microfabricated devices to determine their lifetime in vivo. Future work of this project

  19. LIFETIME PREDICTION FOR MODEL 9975 O-RINGS IN KAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

    2009-11-24

    higher than the estimates due to the conservative assumptions used for the model. For lower heat loads at similar ambient temperatures, seal lifetime is further increased. The preliminary model is based on several assumptions that require validation with additional experiments and longer exposures at more realistic conditions. The assumption of constant exposure at peak temperature is believed to be conservative. Cumulative damage at more realistic conditions will likely be less severe but is more difficult to assess based on available data. Arrhenius aging behavior is expected, but non-Arrhenius behavior is possible. Validation of Arrhenius behavior is ideally determined from longer tests at temperatures closer to actual service conditions. CSR experiments will therefore continue at lower temperatures to validate the model. Ultrasensitive oxygen consumption analysis has been shown to be useful in identifying non-Arrhenius behavior within reasonable test periods. Therefore, additional experiments are recommended and planned to validate the model.

  20. Measurement of mobility and lifetime of electrons and holes in a Schottky CdTe diode

    OpenAIRE

    Ariño-Estrada, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Kolstein, M.; Puigdengoles, C; García, J; Cabruja, E.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the measurement of drift properties of electrons and holes in a CdTe diode grown by the travelling heating method (THM). Mobility and lifetime of both charge carriers has been measured independently at room temperature and fixed bias voltage using charge integration readout electronics. Both electrode sides of the detector have been exposed to a 241Am source in order to obtain events with full contributions of either electrons or holes. The drift time has been measured to obtain ...