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Sample records for reported feeling unprepared

  1. Analytical comparison between unprepared and calcined magnetitum(Cishi)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gang; JIN Tongshun; YOU Juan; WANG Lu; WU Qinan

    2007-01-01

    The phases, chemical composition, surface appearance,crystal size,specific surface and thermal behavior of the unprepared and calcined forms of the mineral Magnetitum(Cishi),used as Chinese traditional medicine,were characterized by using X-ray powder diffraction,scan electron microscopy,inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectometry(ICP)and thermogravimetrie(TG).The results indicated that after calcination the main phase Fe304 of the calcined Magnetitum(Duan Cishi)remained,while the Fe203 phase disappeared.The contents of the harmful chemical elements Cd and Pb were obviously reduced,while the crystal size increased from 24.5 to 35.7 nm and surface loosened.There were different TG curves for unprepared and calcined Magnetitum(Cishi)samples on heating.The former showed two weight-losing steps(at 367.9-422.1℃ and 568.8-594.1℃),and the latter only one.These results might serve as a base for quality evaluation of Magnetitum (Cishi).

  2. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... you need it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions ... and information that can make you feel better. Anxiety Do you often feel restless and worried? This ...

  3. What students think they feel differs from what they really feel--academic self-concept moderates the discrepancy between students' trait and state emotional self-reports.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Bieg

    Full Text Available This study investigated whether there is a discrepancy pertaining to trait and state academic emotions and whether self-concept of ability moderates this discrepancy. A total of 225 secondary school students from two different countries enrolled in grades 8 and 11 (German sample; n = 94 and grade 9 (Swiss sample; n = 131 participated. Students' trait academic emotions of enjoyment, pride, anger, and anxiety in mathematics were assessed with a self-report questionnaire, whereas to assess their state academic emotions experience-sampling method was employed. The results revealed that students' scores on the trait assessment of emotions were generally higher than their scores on the state assessment. Further, as expected, students' academic self-concept in the domain of mathematics was shown to partly explain the discrepancy between scores on trait and state emotions. Our results indicate that there is a belief-driven discrepancy between what students think they feel (trait assessment and what they really feel (state assessment. Implications with regard to the assessment of self-reported emotions in future studies and practical implications for the school context are discussed.

  4. What students think they feel differs from what they really feel--academic self-concept moderates the discrepancy between students' trait and state emotional self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieg, Madeleine; Goetz, Thomas; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether there is a discrepancy pertaining to trait and state academic emotions and whether self-concept of ability moderates this discrepancy. A total of 225 secondary school students from two different countries enrolled in grades 8 and 11 (German sample; n = 94) and grade 9 (Swiss sample; n = 131) participated. Students' trait academic emotions of enjoyment, pride, anger, and anxiety in mathematics were assessed with a self-report questionnaire, whereas to assess their state academic emotions experience-sampling method was employed. The results revealed that students' scores on the trait assessment of emotions were generally higher than their scores on the state assessment. Further, as expected, students' academic self-concept in the domain of mathematics was shown to partly explain the discrepancy between scores on trait and state emotions. Our results indicate that there is a belief-driven discrepancy between what students think they feel (trait assessment) and what they really feel (state assessment). Implications with regard to the assessment of self-reported emotions in future studies and practical implications for the school context are discussed.

  5. Self-Reported Depressive Feelings and Cigarette Smoking among Mexican-American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesa, Jacqueline A.; Cowdery, Joan E.; Wang, Min Qi; Fu, Qiang

    1997-01-01

    Examined the relationship between depressive feelings and cigarette smoking in Mexican-American adolescents who participated in the 1993 Teenage Attitudes and Practices Survey II. Results suggest a relationship between certain feelings of depression and smoking, beyond that experienced by nonsmokers, which may be more evident in females.…

  6. Are Children with Asperger Syndrome Creative in Divergent Thinking and Feeling? A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Jung; Shih, Wei-Lin; Ma, Le-Yin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates whether children with Asperger syndrome (AS) show superior competence in creativity, and it examines the relationship between nonverbal creativity and nonverbal IQ and vocabulary size. Sixteen (16) children with AS and forty-two (42) typically developing peers completed the exercises in divergent thinking and feeling from a…

  7. Music feels like moods feel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kris eGoffin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available While it is widely accepted that music evokes moods, there is disagreement over whether music-induced moods are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music as such. The arguments against the aesthetic relevance of music-induced moods are: (1 moods cannot be intentionally directed at the music and (2 music-induced moods are highly subjective experiences and are therefore a kind of mind-wandering. This paper presents a novel account of musical moods that avoids these objections. It is correct to say that a listener's entire mood is not relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music. However, the experience of mood consists of having different feelings. Music induces feelings that are intentionally directed at the music and clusters of these feelings can be recognized as typical of a specific mood. Therefore, mood-feelings are relevant to the aesthetic appreciation of music.

  8. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... and manage it, but sometimes feelings such as depression may stay with you and require you to ... it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions John Hammarley ...

  9. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... and manage it, but sometimes feelings such as depression may stay with you and require you to ... it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A patient advises coping with emotions John Hammarley ...

  10. Your Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ways to feel happy Ways to boost self-esteem and self-confidence How to know if you might have a mental health problem Symptoms of depression Dealing with loss and grief Why some teens cut themselves How to handle body image issues Healthy ways to handle stress Teens and ...

  11. Feeling Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thelle, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    The article relates the study of mobility history to the fields of history of emotion and affect theory in the promotion of a cross-disciplinary research agenda. Taking as its point of departure a workshop in Copenhagen on feeling and space, the text draws lines and points of potential interface...

  12. The Cost Burden to Minnesota K-12 when Children Are Unprepared for Kindergarten. [Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Richard; Coffee-Borden, Brandon; Anton, Paul; Moore, Christopher; Valorose, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    This summary presents highlights of "The Cost Burden to Minnesota K-12 when Children Are Unprepared for Kindergarten" [ED511612]. A number of studies document the long-term public and societal benefits of early childhood education, including the reduced costs associated with child welfare, public assistance, crime and incarceration, and…

  13. The Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate to Prepared and Unprepared Anterior Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Asghar Alavi; Zeinab Behroozi; Farid Nik Eghbal

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Porcelain laminate veneer is an esthetic restoration used as an alternative to full veneer crowns and requires minimal tooth preparation. In restoration with porcelain laminate veneers, both the longevity of the laminate and conservation of the sound tooth structure are imperative. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the shear bond strength of porcelain laminates to prepared- and unprepared- anterior teeth in order to compare their longevity and succes...

  14. Shear bond strength of a novel silorane adhesive to orthodontic brackets and unprepared bovine enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchli, Lorenz; Steineck, Markus; Ball, Judith

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the suitability of a novel epoxy-based resin, Filtek Silorane, for orthodontic bracket bonding on unprepared enamel. Shear forces to bovine enamel were measured for Filtek Silorane and Transbond XT in combination with steel, ceramic, and polymer brackets. For Filtek Silorane, etching was performed with the Silorane self-etching primer alone or an additional previous application of phosphoric acid. Transbond XT (conventional methacrylate) was used for the control group and the enamel was previously etched with 35% phosphoric acid. All samples were thermocycled (1000X, 5°to 55° C). Shear bond testing was done with an Instron 3344 at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. In addition, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were evaluated. The shear forces showed a weak adhesion of Filtek Silorane to unprepared enamel both with the selfetching primer and conventional etching (0.87 to 4.28 MPa). The shear forces of the control group were significantly higher (7.6 to 16.5 MPa). The ARI scores showed a clear failure at the enamel/adhesive interface for all Filtek Silorane samples. For the combination of Transbond XT and different brackets, the failure was found at the adhesive/bracket interface. The novel epoxy-based resin Filtek Silorane is not appropriate for bonding of brackets to unprepared enamel.

  15. What Students Think They Feel Differs from What They Really Feel – Academic Self-Concept Moderates the Discrepancy between Students’ Trait and State Emotional Self-Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Madeleine Bieg; Thomas Goetz; Lipnevich, Anastasiya A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether there is a discrepancy pertaining to trait and state academic emotions and whether self-concept of ability moderates this discrepancy. A total of 225 secondary school students from two different countries enrolled in grades 8 and 11 (German sample; n = 94) and grade 9 (Swiss sample; n = 131) participated. Students' trait academic emotions of enjoyment, pride, anger, and anxiety in mathematics were assessed with a self-report questionnaire, whereas to assess the...

  16. Academic delay of gratification, self-efficacy, and time management among academically unprepared college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Héfer

    2009-04-01

    This study examined the associations between academic delay of gratification, self-efficacy beliefs, and time management among academically unprepared college students participating in a summer-immersion program. This study also examined whether the relation of self-efficacy with time management is mediated by academic delay of gratification. Analysis indicated that self-efficacy was directly associated with time management, as delay of gratification served to mediate this effect partially. Self-efficacy emerged as the strongest positive predictor of academic achievement.

  17. The Oceanic Feeling in Painterly Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jussi Antti Saarinen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic feeling is a frequent topic of discussion in both creativity research and aesthetics. Characterized by a sensation of self-boundary dissolution, the feeling has been reported to involve experiences of fusion with various objects, including works of art. In this article, I discuss the oceanic feeling in the specific context of painterly creativity. I begin by arguing that the oceanic feeling cannot be classified as an emotion, mood, or bodily feeling, in the established definitions of these terms. I then introduce philosopher Matthew Ratcliffe’s theory of existential feelings to help formulate a more accurate view of the oceanic feeling. Specifically, I suggest that oceanic feelings should be classified as shifts in existential feeling. In conclusion, I briefly discuss the implications of my account of the oceanic feeling for the more general pursuits of painterly creativity and artistic self-transformation.

  18. Fiscal 1998 R and D report on human feeling measurement application technology. Pt. 1. Outline; 1998 nendo ningen kankaku keisoku oyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu itaku kenkyu seika hokokusho. 1. Gaiyohen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report outlines the fiscal 1998 R and D result on human feeling measurement application technology. For development of assessment technology of the impact of work fatigue on human feeling (human feeling index), and assessment technology of the adaptability and affinity between human being and environment or product (environment and product adaptability index), data storage and evaluation by measuring experiment of human feeling, and modification of every index toward the final index based on the above data were carried out. Further case studies were carried out to reflect the above both indices to design of living products or residence and office environments, and new data were also collected. The database model for using previously collected human feeling data effectively, and the sweating manikin for estimating human thermal feeling reasonably were developed. In addition, the human feeling measurement manual was prepared to diffuse these technologies. The R and D system is also described. (NEDO)

  19. The Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate to Prepared and Unprepared Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Alavi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Porcelain laminate veneer is an esthetic restoration used as an alternative to full veneer crowns and requires minimal tooth preparation. In restoration with porcelain laminate veneers, both the longevity of the laminate and conservation of the sound tooth structure are imperative. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the shear bond strength of porcelain laminates to prepared- and unprepared- anterior teeth in order to compare their longevity and success rate. Materials and Method: Thirty extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 3 groups regarding their preparation methods. The preparation methods were full-preparation in group A, full-preparation and finishing with fine diamond bur in group B, and no-preparation, only grinding with diamond bur in group C. After conditioning the teeth, ceramic veneers (IP S e.max were silanated and then cemented with DuoLink luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured for each group and failure mode was determined by stereomicroscopic examination. Results: Group C exhibited the highest shear bond strength. The shear bond strength was significantly different between groups C and B (p 0.05. Adhesion failure mode was found to be more common than the cohesive mode. Conclusion: Regarding the shear bond strength of unprepared anterior teeth to porcelain laminate veneers yielded by this study, no-preparation veneers might be used when the enamel is affected by wearing, trauma, or abrasion. It can also be used in patients who refuse the treatments which involve tooth reduction and preparation.

  20. The Shear Bond Strength of Porcelain Laminate to Prepared and Unprepared Anterior Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Ali Asghar; Behroozi, Zeinab; Nik Eghbal, Farid

    2017-01-01

    Statement of the Problem: Porcelain laminate veneer is an esthetic restoration used as an alternative to full veneer crowns and requires minimal tooth preparation. In restoration with porcelain laminate veneers, both the longevity of the laminate and conservation of the sound tooth structure are imperative. Purpose: The present study aimed to investigate the shear bond strength of porcelain laminates to prepared- and unprepared- anterior teeth in order to compare their longevity and success rate. Materials and Method: Thirty extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into 3 groups regarding their preparation methods. The preparation methods were full-preparation in group A, full-preparation and finishing with fine diamond bur in group B, and no-preparation, only grinding with diamond bur in group C. After conditioning the teeth, ceramic veneers (IP S e.max) were silanated and then cemented with DuoLink luting cement. The shear bond strength was measured for each group and failure mode was determined by stereomicroscopic examination. Results: Group C exhibited the highest shear bond strength. The shear bond strength was significantly different between groups C and B (p 0.05). Adhesion failure mode was found to be more common than the cohesive mode. Conclusion: Regarding the shear bond strength of unprepared anterior teeth to porcelain laminate veneers yielded by this study, no-preparation veneers might be used when the enamel is affected by wearing, trauma, or abrasion. It can also be used in patients who refuse the treatments which involve tooth reduction and preparation. PMID:28280760

  1. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... what lies ahead, or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some ... what lies ahead, or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some ...

  2. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... what lies ahead, or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some ... what lies ahead, or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... learn to understand your heart condition and manage it, but sometimes feelings such as depression may stay ... and your risk of future cardiac events, so it's important to understand your feelings, recognize problems and ...

  4. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... about coping with emotions Learn more about these emotions: Fear After any illness, it's normal to feel ... off, then take action. Hope Many of the emotions you may feel after a heart disease diagnosis ...

  5. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... learn to understand your heart condition and manage it, but sometimes feelings such as depression may stay ... and your risk of future cardiac events, so it's important to understand your feelings, recognize problems and ...

  6. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... the emotions you may feel after a heart disease diagnosis are difficult, even unpleasant. But another common feeling is hope. Even people who are very ill say they feel a sense of hope, if only for a moment, an hour or a day. Learning as much as you can about your condition ...

  7. The effects of message framing and feelings of susceptibility to breast cancer on reported frequency of breast self-examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalor, K M; Hailey, B J

    1989-01-01

    One of two types of pamphlets on breast self-examination (BSE) attitudes and behavior was administered to subjects who were classified as high or low in feelings of susceptibility to breast cancer. Half of the subjects received pamphlets stressing the positive consequences of doing BSE and the other half received pamphlets stressing the negative consequences of not doing BSE. A previous study found negatively framed pamphlets to be superior in BSE promotion and these results were explained in terms of Tversky and Kahneman's framing postulate. The original framing postulate includes characteristics of the decision-maker as well as the type of frame presented, thus, we hypothesized an interaction between pamphlet type and level of susceptibility with the largest effect on the group with low perceived susceptibility who received negatively framed pamphlets. The hypothesized interaction did not occur, nor was there a significant effect for pamphlet type. However, there were significant differences between the BSE performance at follow-up of women who were high or low in perceived susceptibility prior to the intervention. These results are discussed in terms of implications for BSE training in the future, more specifically-the need to consider perceived level of susceptibility as an important subject characteristic that could have a large impact on the effectiveness of training programs.

  8. Exteriorized colon anastomosis for unprepared bowel: An alternative to routine colostomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sami K Asfar; Hilal M Al-Sayer; Talib H Juma

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To see the possibility of avoiding routine colostomy in patients presenting with unprepared bowel.METHODS: The cohort is composed of 103 patients,of these, 86 patients presented as emergencies (selfinflected and iatrogenic colon injuries, stab wounds and blast injury of the colon, volvulus sigmoid, obstructing left colon cancer, and strangulated ventral hernia).Another 17 patients were managed electively for other colon pathologies. During laparotomy, the involved segment was resected and the two ends of the colon were brought out via a separate colostomy wound.One layer of interrupted 3/0 silk was used for colon anastomosis. The exteriorized segment was immediately covered with a colostomy bag. Between the 5th and 7th postoperative day, the colon was easily dropped into the peritoneal cavity. The defect in the abdominal wall was closed with interrupted nonabsorbable suture. The skin was left open for secondary closure.RESULTS: The mean hospital stay (± SD) was 11.5 ±2.6 d (8-20 d). The exteriorized colon was successfully dropped back into the peritoneal cavity in all patients except two. One developed a leak from oesophagojejunostomy and from the exteriorized colon. She subsequently died of sepsis and multiple organ failure(MOF). In a second patient the colon proximal to the exteriorized anastomosis prolapsed and developed severe serositis, an elective ileo-colic anastomosis (to the left colon) was successfully performed.CONCLUSION: Exteriorized colon anastomosis is simple, avoids the inconvenience of colostomy and can be an alternative to routine colostomy. It is suitable where colostomy is socially unacceptable or the facilities and care is not available.

  9. Fiscal 1998 R and D report on human feeling measurement application technology. Part 2. Main report (2); 1998 nendo ningen kankaku keisoku oyo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu itaku kenkyu seika hokokusho. 2. Honronhen (2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report reports case studies on human feeling measurement (physiological index (A), environmental adaptability index (B)) application technology, and product adaptability evaluation technology. In fiscal 1998, a real living simulation experiment was conducted in addition to an integration and verification experiment of indices. As for (A) such as stress, fatigue and stimulus, the composition for every integrated index, verification of its effectiveness under real environment, and the effect of environmental factors on it were studied to improve prediction accuracies, and compose index groups corresponding to various work environments. As for (B), adaptive feeling and fatigue feeling under visual, noisy and thermal environments, its effect on work results, and rest comfortability were studied, and an index formula for predicting subjective evaluation quantities from physical properties was prepared. In the simulation, an operability of monitoring works, the relation between a product index and (A), a lighting effect on night works, bathing and ununiform thermal environment were evaluated. The effect of (A) in real living, and an application guidance were also clarified. The result was adopted for a human feeling manual and database model. (NEDO)

  10. Coping with Feelings

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  11. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... heart disease . And your emotions may be both negative and positive. These feelings are very common — most ... can help you with home care, transportation and social needs. Think about why you feel ... take time to develop. Anger Many heart patients ...

  12. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... afraid to talk about your feelings. Ask about treatment for depression. Treatment options include counseling, anti-depressant medicine or a ... more thing wrong with you. Consider recovering from depression to be part of your overall treatment plan. Loneliness It's easy to feel alone when ...

  13. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... talk about your feelings. Ask about treatment for depression. Treatment options include counseling, anti-depressant medicine or a ... more thing wrong with you. Consider recovering from depression to be part of your overall treatment plan. Loneliness It's easy to feel alone when ...

  14. Do You Know How I Feel? Parents Underestimate Worry and Overestimate Optimism Compared to Child Self-Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagattuta, Kristin Hansen; Sayfan, Liat; Bamford, Christi

    2012-01-01

    Three studies assessed parent-child agreement in perceptions of children's everyday emotions in typically developing 4- to 11-year-old children. Study 1 (N = 228) and Study 2 (N = 195) focused on children's worry and anxiety. Study 3 (N = 90) examined children's optimism. Despite child and parent reporters providing internally consistent…

  15. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... HBP Tools & Resources Stroke Vascular Health Peripheral Artery ... Your healthcare professionals may not have talked to you about the emotional aspects of your illness. And you're probably feeling many emotions. You ...

  16. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... negative and positive. These feelings are very common — most heart patients have them. They may go away ... overcome your fears. For example, say to yourself, "Most people recover and I will, too," Or, "Most ...

  17. Coping with Feelings

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  18. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... your risk of future cardiac events, so it's important to understand your feelings, recognize problems and get ... heart rate to rise, and make your heart work harder. Sometimes anger also causes angina (chest pain) ...

  19. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... a panic attack, you may feel fearful or short of breath or have irregular heartbeats, chest pain ... going and share your own encouragement. Read personal stories from other heart survivors . This content was last ...

  20. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... future. You may be scared because you don't know what lies ahead, or because you feel ... lot of questions without answers or you aren't sure about what lies ahead. That could be ...

  1. Coping with Feelings

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  2. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... person you were before you learned you had heart disease . And your emotions may be both negative and ... medications. Depression When you first learn you have heart disease, it's normal to feel sad or low. These ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... can affect your recovery and your risk of future cardiac events, so it's important to understand your ... normal to feel afraid and unsure of the future. You may be scared because you don't ...

  4. Coping with Feelings

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  5. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... person you were before you learned you had heart disease . And your emotions may be both negative and ... medications. Depression When you first learn you have heart disease, it's normal to feel sad or low. These ...

  6. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... short of breath or have irregular heartbeats, chest pain or feel sweaty. Tips To calm your anxiety, ... work harder. Sometimes anger also causes angina (chest pain) because vessels constrict (narrow), reducing blood and oxygen ...

  7. Coping with Feelings

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  8. Coping with Feelings

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  9. Coping with Feelings

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  10. Coping with Feelings

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  12. Coping with Feelings

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  13. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... may be less likely to follow your treatment plan if you're suffering depression. Over the past ... depression to be part of your overall treatment plan. Loneliness It's easy to feel alone when you' ...

  14. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... coping with emotions Learn more about these emotions: Fear After any illness, it's normal to feel afraid ... life. Every heart patient has some degree of fear, but if your fear is overwhelming, it can ...

  15. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... workers and healthcare professionals. Learn about community and social service resources that can help you with home care, transportation and social needs. Think about why you feel lonely or ...

  16. Coping with Feelings

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  17. Coping with Feelings

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  18. Coping with Feelings

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  19. Coping with Feelings

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  20. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... future. You may be scared because you don't know what lies ahead, or because you feel ... lot of questions without answers or you aren't sure about what lies ahead. That could be ...

  1. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... a Heart Attack Treatment of a Heart Attack Life After a Heart Attack Heart Failure About Heart ... or because you feel less control over your life. Every heart patient has some degree of fear, ...

  2. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... workers and healthcare professionals. Learn about community and social service resources that can help you with home care, transportation and social needs. Think about why you feel lonely or ...

  3. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... ask your healthcare professionals about anger or stress management programs in your community. Tips Keep an anger ... When you feel angry, use a three-step approach: stop, ask yourself questions, then react. The first ...

  4. Coping with Feelings

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  5. Coping with Feelings

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    Full Text Available ... or ask your healthcare professionals about anger or stress management programs in your community. Tips Keep an ... Care of Yourself - Introduction - Coping With Feelings - Reducing Stress - Quitting Smoking - Eating Well and Losing Weight • Tools & ...

  6. Feelings of powerlessness in relation to pain: ascribed causes and reported strategies. A qualitative study among Dutch community nurses caring for cancer patients with pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepper, A.M.E. de; Francke, A.L.; Huijer-Abu Saad, H.

    1997-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the causes for the feelings of powerlessness experienced by dutch community nurses in caring for cancer patients with pain. In addition, the study focused on the strategies community nurses employed to cope with feelings of powerlessness. Semistructured interviews r

  7. Canal Transportation, Unprepared Areas, and Dentin Removal after Preparation with BT-RaCe and ProTaper Next Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Sabrina C; Marceliano-Alves, Marília F; Marques, Márcia L; Grillo, João P; Lacerda, Mariane F L S; Alves, Flávio R F; Siqueira, José F; Provenzano, José C

    2017-07-13

    This study compared the shaping ability of ProTaper Next (Dentsply Sirona, Tulsa, OK) and BT-RaCe (FKG Dentaire, La Chaux-de-Fonds, Switzerland) instrument systems in the mesial canals of mandibular molars using micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging. A total of 17 type IV mesial roots of extracted first mandibular molars were scanned using micro-CT imaging before and after root canal preparation with the 2 instrument systems. Both systems were used in the same root but alternating the mesial canals from root to root. The following parameters were analyzed: root canal volume, surface area, unprepared surface areas, transportation, canal/root width ratio, and preparation time. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 systems for all evaluated parameters (P > .05). The unprepared surface areas for the full canal length and the apical 5-mm segment were 33% and 14% for BT-RaCe and 31% and 14% for ProTaper Next, respectively. After preparation, all root canals had a diameter that was not larger than 35% of the root diameter at the coronal and middle segments. The 2 systems showed no differences in any of the evaluated shaping parameters. None of the tested systems put the roots at risk of fracture because of excessive dentin removal. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  9. Overcoming feelings of envy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    How should professionals help clients deal with feelings of envy about their fellow service users? Psychotherapist David O'Driscoll, writing in Learning Disability Practice, uses the case of a young man in a day service who had met all the markers of normal grief after his mother's death. Yet nine months following her loss, he was prone to angry outbursts if other service users mentioned their mothers. His first aim was to help his client acknowledge his envy. Then the client was able to discuss his feelings of injustice and anger at losing his mother.

  10. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search By Zipcode Search by State SELECT YOUR LANGUAGE Español (Spanish) 简体中文 (Traditional Chinese) 繁体中文 (Simplified Chinese) ... And your emotions may be both negative and positive. These feelings are very common — most heart patients ...

  11. Principles, Feelings and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2006-01-01

    Two of Susan Moller Okin's articles are discussed: "Reason and feeling in thinking about justice", "Ethics" 99(2), 1989: 229-49 and "Mistresses of their own destiny: group rights, gender, and realistic rights of exit", "Ethics" 112(2), 2002: 205-30. Her argument on the foundation necessary for Rawls's…

  12. Feeling and tourism studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; d'Hauteserre, Anne-Marie; Johnston, Lynda

    Drawing on critical social and spatial theories of emotion and affect this article offers a contribution to the concepts of danger-zone and dark tourism through a focus on feelings. Research findings on tourism in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the West Bank (of the river Jordan) in Palestine

  13. Making People Feel Valued.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergueson, Susan; Aimone, Logan

    2002-01-01

    Suggests many quick, easy and inexpensive ways to help make staff members of student publications feel valued and keep staff motivation levels high. Includes additional articles that describe how an editor can support efforts to motivate, suggest that staff retreats lead to success, note how banquets serve as reward, and suggest some favorite…

  14. Feeling and tourism studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; d'Hauteserre, Anne-Marie; Johnston, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on critical social and spatial theories of emotion and affect this article offers a contribution to the concepts of danger-zone and dark tourism through a focus on feelings. Research findings on tourism in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the West Bank (of the river Jordan) in Palestine a

  15. Principles, Feelings and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noddings, Nel

    2006-01-01

    Two of Susan Moller Okin's articles are discussed: "Reason and feeling in thinking about justice", "Ethics" 99(2), 1989: 229-49 and "Mistresses of their own destiny: group rights, gender, and realistic rights of exit", "Ethics" 112(2), 2002: 205-30. Her argument on the foundation necessary for Rawls's original position is accepted and extended.…

  16. Feeling Anxious or Worried

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on for too long, you may need treatment. Treatment for anxiety disorders may include medicines or therapy . Treatment can work very well, and you can feel better. Anxiety disorders that aren't treated can get worse, though. You ... out about treatment by talking with your parents or another trusted ...

  17. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Arrhythmia Tools & Resources Cholesterol About Cholesterol HDL, LDL & Triglycerides Causes of High Cholesterol How To Get Your ... the emotions you may feel after a heart disease diagnosis are difficult, even ... conditions . Monitor your progress toward your treatment goals ...

  18. How Do You Feel?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosfort, René; Stanghellini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    . These dialectics become particularly evident in the way our moods challenge our sense of personal identity by complicating our relation to norms and values. In fact, we argue that moods are the most conspicuous epiphany of otherness in human life, in that they, more than other experiences, complicate our sense...... are Janus-faced in the sense that they bring out the complex interplay of impersonal, biological and personal features of mental illness. We propose a framework for understanding emotional experience that is grounded in four key points: a general concept of “affectivity”, the definition of “emotion” as felt....... Emotional experience reveals an intimate alienation at the heart of our mental life. What we feel is our own experience, but in this experience we may feel that we are not ourselves. To be a person is to live with this affective experience of selfhood and otherness. Emotions disclose an inescapable...

  19. Feeling, Meaning, and Intentionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Peer

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the phenomenology of aesthetic experience. It first, critically, considers one of the most influential approaches to the psychophysics of aesthetic perception, viz. neuroaesthetics. Hereafter, it outlines constitutive tenets of aesthetic perception in terms of a particular...... relative to its object and the tools for meaning-making specific to that object, and not relative to the feeling (of beauty) it may elicit. Finally, I sketch the import this fact may have on a research program in empirical aesthetics....

  20. Acute onset of the sinking feeling in the elderly. A case report and addendum to an article published in this annual in 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, John

    2013-01-01

    During a recent review of S. Freud's "Elisabeth von R.," the author experienced a forme fruste of the sinking feeling he had described in this annual in 1984. He avers that his current reaction promoted a more-nuanced analysis, and advocates the rereading of classic psychoanalytic literature.

  1. Positive feelings among terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Lee, M L; Swarte, N B; Van der Bom, J G; Van den Bout, J; Heintz, A P M

    2006-03-01

    For a realistic perspective on what it is like to have cancer and be in the last months of life, it is necessary to also study the positive feelings people may still experience. We set out to describe positive feelings experienced by terminally ill patients. The Depression Adjective Checklist was completed by 96 cancer patients with an estimated life expectancy of less than 3 months. On average patients endorsed 30% (3.6/12) of the positive mood items, and 25% (5.4/22) of the negative mood items. The larger part of terminally ill cancer patients with an estimated life expectancy of less than 3 months reported one or more positive mood states. A positive mood state such as 'being interested' was endorsed by more than half (65%) of the patients, other positive feelings were endorsed by a substantial proportion of patients, for example: 38% of patients endorsed feeling 'jovial' and 35% reported being 'optimistic'. Although having incurable cancer often leads to feelings of depression, mood is variable and many patients experience at least some positive feelings.

  2. Association of usual self-reported dietary intake with ecological momentary measures of affective and physical feeling states in children ☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Reilly, Gillian A.; Huh, Jimi; Schembre, Susan M.; Tate, Eleanor B.; Pentz, Mary Ann; Dunton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relationship between dietary intake and affective and physical feeling states in children. Purpose The current study used Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to examine how usual dietary intake is cross-sectionally associated with both average affective and physical feeling state ratings and rating variability in children. Methods Children (N = 110, mean age = 11.0 ± 1.2 years, 52.5% male, 30.1% Hispanic/Latino) completed EMA measures of affective and physical feeling states 3–7 times per day for a full or partial day (weekday evenings and weekend days and evenings) over a 4-day period. Usual intake of pre-selected dietary components was measured prior to the EMA measurement period using the Block Kids Food Screener. Statistical analyses included mixed models and mixed-effects location scale models. Results Greater usual fiber intake was cross-sectionally associated with higher average positive affect (PA) ratings, lower variability of NA ratings, and higher variability of physical fatigue ratings. Lower usual glycemic load of diet was cross-sectionally associated with lower variability of NA ratings. Lower usual added sugar intake was cross-sectionally associated with higher average physical energy ratings and lower variability of NA ratings. Conclusions Although temporal precedence was not established by these findings, they indicate that characteristics of children’s usual dietary intake are cross-sectionally associated with both the average and variability of affective and physical feeling states. EMA offers a promising avenue through which to explore the associations between affective states and diet and has the potential to provide insight into nuances of this relationship. PMID:26032196

  3. Gut feeling is electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Jide

    2011-06-01

    Although "gut feeling" is a cliché in English parlance, there are neuro-physiological basis for registration of emotions in the gut. Control of the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is by an integration of neuro-hormonal factors from the local myogenic to the central nervous system. Gastric contractile activity, which is responsible for the motor properties of the stomach, is regulated by this integrated complex. Signatures of the activity include gastric electrical activity (GEA) and bowel sounds. GEA has two distinct components: a high-frequency spike activity or post depolarization potential termed the electrical response activity superimposed on a lower frequency, rhythmic depolarization termed the control activity. These signatures are measured in the clinic with contact sensors and well understood for diagnosis of gut dysmotility. Can these signatures be measured at standoff and employed for purposes of biometrics, malintent and wellness assessment?

  4. Transient feelings of compulsion caused by hemispheric lesions: three cases.

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    There was strong evidence of a neurological explanation for transient feelings of compulsion reported by three patients. In at least two cases the mechanism was epileptic. The frontal lobe was implicated in all three. A feeling of compulsion, divorced from action, has rarely if ever been reported in epilepsy or other neurological disorders.

  5. Leading by feel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Like it or not, leaders need to manage the mood of their organizations. The most gifted leaders accomplish that by using a mysterious blend of psychological abilities known as emotional intelligence. They are self-aware and empathetic. They can read and regulate their own emotions while intuitively grasping how others feel and gauging their organization's emotional state. But where does emotional intelligence come from, and how do leaders learn to use it? In this article, 18 leaders and scholars (including business executives, leadership researchers, psychologists, an autism expert, and a symphony conductor) explore the nature and management of emotional intelligence--its sources, uses, and abuses. Their responses varied, but some common themes emerged: the importance of consciously--and conscientiously--honing one's skills, the double-edged nature of self-awareness, and the danger of letting any one emotional intelligence skill dominate. Among their observations: Psychology professor John Mayer, who co-developed the concept of emotional intelligence, warns managers not to be confused by popular definitions of the term, which suggest that if you have a certain set of personality traits then you automatically possess emotional intelligence. Neuropsychologist Elkhonon Goldberg agrees with professors Daniel Goleman and Robert Goffee that emotional intelligence can be learned--but only by people who already show an aptitude for it. Cult expert Janja Lalich points out that leaders can use their emotional intelligence skills for ill in the same way they can for good. "Sometimes the only difference is [the leader's] intent," she says. And business leaders Carol Bartz, William George, Sidney Harman, and Andrea jung (of Autodesk, Medtronic, Harman International, and Avon respectively) describe situations in which emotional intelligence traits such as self-awareness and empathy have helped them and their companies perform at a higher level.

  6. The Feeling Dimension in Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, Marlow

    The feeling dimension of students cannot be ignored in teaching and learning situations. Feelings are there and must not be ignored. Reading stresses word recognition, comprehension of subject matter at diverse levels of complexity, and application of what has been learned. A major ingredient so frequently left out is student appreciation of the…

  7. Students feeling unsafe in school: fifth graders' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gloria; Riesch, Susan K; Temkin, Barbara Myers; Kedrowski, Karen M; Kluba, Nina

    2011-04-01

    Children of late elementary school age (fifth grade) provide evidence that many do not feel safe in their schools. The purpose of this study was to examine how children express their experiences of feeling unsafe in school. Questions guiding the study were What percentage of children in this sample report feeling unsafe at school? What are the aftereffects of feeling unsafe? and How do children describe what makes them feel unsafe? Participants included 243 fifth-grade students who, as part of their participation in a larger study, were asked, "Have you felt unsafe at school?" Children responding affirmatively described what made them feel unsafe. Fifty-seven (23.8%) participants indicated they sometimes or always felt unsafe at school, citing teasing, bullying, or other threats that typically occurred when adults were not present. Of these, nearly a third reported being stressed and almost half felt at slight or great risk because of feeling unsafe. When children feel unsafe in school, there are implications for schools, neighborhoods, and larger communities. The related potential for children's increased involvement in health risk behaviors because they feel unsafe merits immediate and thoughtfully planned action.

  8. Coping with Feelings

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... problems and get help if you need it. Medical reporter John Hammarley discusses anxiety and depression A ... to your healthcare professional. Depression is a common medical condition, not a character flaw, and you shouldn' ...

  9. Did You Feel It?

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The DYFI system collects observations from people who felt an earthquake and then maps out the extent of shaking and damage they reported. The ComCat online Search...

  10. Emotion in Schizophrenia: Where Feeling Meets Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Ann M Kring; Caponigro, Janelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of the nature of emotional difficulties in schizophrenia has been greatly enhanced by translational research over the past two decades. By incorporating methods and theories from affective science, researchers have been able to discover that people with schizophrenia exhibit very few outward displays of emotion but report experiencing strong feelings in the presence of emotionally evocative stimuli or events. Recent behavioral, psychophysiological, and brain imaging research...

  11. [A deceptive gut feeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müggler, Simon A; von Babo, Michelle; Iseli, Sarah M; Reho, Ivano; Giambarba, Christian

    2013-07-24

    We report the case of a 58 year old man with unspecific lower abdominal pain, respiratory failure and shock. An acute aortic syndrome and a massive pulmonary embolism were excluded, and a coronary angiography for suspected acute myocardial infarction was performed, with detection of a high-grade stenosis of the left main coronary artery. A percutaneous coronary intervention was needed. We discuss the difficulty to distinguish an acute aortic syndrome, an acute coronary syndrome, and a massive pulmonary embolism in the emergency situation. In addition we discuss the difficulty of detecting a left main coronary artery stenosis in the ECG.

  12. Can We Feel Physics Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yucheng

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to improve students' understanding of physics concepts. This article focused on drawing students' attention with picture-embedded questions. Pictures give students a direct impression or feeling about the corresponding concepts, which really makes a difference. However, the effects are limited. Some physics concepts are…

  13. Factors in Adolescent Rebellious Feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Patricia W.; Rust, James O.

    1979-01-01

    This study examined 15- and 16-year-old youths' (Midteens') feelings of anomie and rebellion in relation to family and situational factors. Only parents' formal education level and midteens' approval of the way they were being reared correlated significantly with midteens' scores on the Anomia and Rebellion Scales. (Author/SJL)

  14. Factors in Adolescent Rebellious Feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Patricia W.; Rust, James O.

    1979-01-01

    This study examined 15- and 16-year-old youths' (Midteens') feelings of anomie and rebellion in relation to family and situational factors. Only parents' formal education level and midteens' approval of the way they were being reared correlated significantly with midteens' scores on the Anomia and Rebellion Scales. (Author/SJL)

  15. Patients with a congenital heart defect and type D personality feel functionally more impaired, report a poorer health status and quality of life, but use less healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoormans, Dounya; Mulder, Barbara Jm; van Melle, Joost P; Pieper, Els G; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Sieswerda, Gert-Jan Tj; Hulsbergen-Zwarts, Mariët S; Plokker, Thijs Hwm; Brunninkhuis, Leo Gh; Vliegen, Hubert W; Sprangers, Mirjam Ag

    2012-09-01

    Type D personality, characterized by high levels of negative affectivity and social inhibition, is related to mortality, morbidity, poor health status, quality of life (QoL) and less healthcare utilization in various cardiovascular patient groups. To date, studies in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are lacking. (1) To examine the prevalence of type D personality in CHD patients; (2) to compare type D to non-type D patients with regard to disease severity, functional status, health status and QoL; and (3) to examine the extent to which type D personality is independently related to healthcare utilization. A total of 1109 adult CHD patients were included in a questionnaire survey. Due to missing data, 302 patients were excluded. The prevalence of Type D personality was 20.4%. Type D patients reported a poorer functional status, health status and QoL than non-type D patients (p<0.05). Type D patients reported less healthcare use than non-type D patients (primary and cardiac outpatient healthcare: adjusted OR=0.56, 95% CI=0.35-0.90; inpatient healthcare: adjusted OR=0.38, 95% CI=0.17-0.83). Results of a post-hoc analysis showed a high prevalence of type D personality in patients with a poor functional status who did not consult their cardiologist. type D patients report a poorer functional status, health status and QoL, but less healthcare utilization. In clinical practice, patients should be screened for type D personality, since social inhibition may prevent them from contacting a healthcare provider in the event of symptom aggravation.

  16. Regulation of Romantic Love Feelings: Preconceptions, Strategies, and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langeslag, Sandra J E; van Strien, Jan W

    2016-01-01

    Love feelings can be more intense than desired (e.g., after a break-up) or less intense than desired (e.g., in long-term relationships). If only we could control our love feelings! We present the concept of explicit love regulation, which we define as the use of behavioral and cognitive strategies to change the intensity of current feelings of romantic love. We present the first two studies on preconceptions about, strategies for, and the feasibility of love regulation. Questionnaire responses showed that people perceive love feelings as somewhat uncontrollable. Still, in four open questions people reported to use strategies such as cognitive reappraisal, distraction, avoidance, and undertaking (new) activities to cope with break-ups, to maintain long-term relationships, and to regulate love feelings. Instructed up-regulation of love using reappraisal increased subjective feelings of attachment, while love down-regulation decreased subjective feelings of infatuation and attachment. We used the late positive potential (LPP) amplitude as an objective index of regulation success. Instructed love up-regulation enhanced the LPP between 300-400 ms in participants who were involved in a relationship and in participants who had recently experienced a romantic break-up, while love down-regulation reduced the LPP between 700-3000 ms in participants who were involved in a relationship. These findings corroborate the self-reported feasibility of love regulation, although they are complicated by the finding that love up-regulation also reduced the LPP between 700-3000 ms in participants who were involved in a relationship. To conclude, although people have the preconception that love feelings are uncontrollable, we show for the first time that intentional regulation of love feelings using reappraisal, and perhaps other strategies, is feasible. Love regulation will benefit individuals and society because it could enhance positive effects and reduce negative effects of romantic

  17. The secret to happiness: Feeling good or feeling right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Maya; Schwartz, Shalom H; Oishi, Shige; Kim, Min Y

    2017-10-01

    Which emotional experiences should people pursue to optimize happiness? According to traditional subjective well-being research, the more pleasant emotions we experience, the happier we are. According to Aristotle, the more we experience the emotions we want to experience, the happier we are. We tested both predictions in a cross-cultural sample of 2,324 participants from 8 countries around the world. We assessed experienced emotions, desired emotions, and indices of well-being and depressive symptoms. Across cultures, happier people were those who more often experienced emotions they wanted to experience, whether these were pleasant (e.g., love) or unpleasant (e.g., hatred). This pattern applied even to people who wanted to feel less pleasant or more unpleasant emotions than they actually felt. Controlling for differences in experienced and desired emotions left the pattern unchanged. These findings suggest that happiness involves experiencing emotions that feel right, whether they feel good or not. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Exploring the Subjective Feeling of Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Michael; Leder, Helmut; Ansorge, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    According to the processing fluency theory, higher ease of processing a stimulus leads to higher feelings of fluency and more positive evaluations. However, it is unclear whether feelings of fluency are positive or an unspecific activation and whether feelings of fluency are directly attributed to the stimulus even without much positive feelings. In two experiments, we tested how variations in the ease of processing influenced feelings of fluency and affect, in terms of evaluations (Exp. 1) and physiological responses (Exp. 2). Higher feelings of fluency were associated with more positive stimulus ratings and did not affect stimulus arousal ratings, but perceivers' feelings showed higher felt arousal ratings and left felt valence ratings unaffected. Physiological indices only showed small effects of a subtle positive reaction. These findings show that feelings of fluency can be sources of positive object evaluations, but do not affect one's own positive feelings.

  19. The feeling state of nursing

    OpenAIRE

    McKinnon, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies in neuroscience show that effective judgement and decision making require tempered emotion to provide a guiding ‘rudder’ revealing knowing to be a ‘feeling state’(Immordino and Damassio, 2007). Emotional labour as a central feature of nursing practice is well documented (Gray, 2009). Theorists have identified emotions as tools for reflection but this area of knowledge remains underdeveloped (Bradbury- Jones, Hughes, Murphy, Parry and Sutton, 2009). Aims This pap...

  20. Towards the feeling of emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambray, Joe

    2006-02-01

    Emergence is a multi-dimensional notion; the meanings it has acquired span the mythopoetic to the scientific, especially as found in complex systems. Examples of emergence in Navaho and Egyptian imagery underscore its diverse cultural origins and applications as well as suggesting an underlying archetypal quality to the core concept. A brief overview of the use of this term in science starting in the 17th century helps to locate the roots of modern emergent views in the philosophy of Leibniz. Jung's own use of early systems approaches was a part of his formulations of a 'third' position associated with the transcendent function. As this paper was delivered at the 50th anniversary conference of the Journal of Analytical Psychology, aspects of the emergence of the Journal within the contents of the first issue are explored. Attention is drawn to several articles, especially a case of brief child therapy done by Robert Moody. His approach to working his case is strikingly modern and vividly demonstrates principles of emergence within the clinical setting. Following this there is a discussion of some neuroscientific research on neural body maps, pointing to the experience of feelings as an emergent process. It is suggested that feelings derive from phase transitions in the brain's body mapping states. A reconsideration of a seeming impasse in the case described by Moody leads instead to a view of the initial phase of treatment as a pre-critical period. Research findings on mirror neurons are presented in terms of the feeling of empathy. Subjective feelings are then shown to be associated with moments of emergence, especially surprise and curiosity, exemplified by a case from the author's practice.

  1. How feeling betrayed affects cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouria Ramazi

    Full Text Available For a population of interacting self-interested agents, we study how the average cooperation level is affected by some individuals' feelings of being betrayed and guilt. We quantify these feelings as adjusted payoffs in asymmetric games, where for different emotions, the payoff matrix takes the structure of that of either a prisoner's dilemma or a snowdrift game. Then we analyze the evolution of cooperation in a well-mixed population of agents, each of whom is associated with such a payoff matrix. At each time-step, an agent is randomly chosen from the population to update her strategy based on the myopic best-response update rule. According to the simulations, decreasing the feeling of being betrayed in a portion of agents does not necessarily increase the level of cooperation in the population. However, this resistance of the population against low-betrayal-level agents is effective only up to some extend that is explicitly determined by the payoff matrices and the number of agents associated with these matrices. Two other models are also considered where the betrayal factor of an agent fluctuates as a function of the number of cooperators and defectors that she encounters. Unstable behaviors are observed for the level of cooperation in these cases; however, we show that one can tune the parameters in the function to make the whole population become cooperative or defective.

  2. I feel like I know you: sharing negative attitudes of others promotes feelings of familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jonathan R; Bosson, Jennifer K

    2011-04-01

    Holding similar negative-versus positive-attitudes toward a third party has been shown to predict increased closeness to a stranger. Here, the authors examined whether this effect is mediated by the heightened feelings of familiarity engendered by shared negative attitudes. In Study 1, participants who shared with a (bogus) stranger a negative attitude of a professor subsequently reported knowing more about the stranger than those who shared a positive attitude, but only when they did not feel strongly about the attitude. In Study 2, a familiarity manipulation produced high levels of closeness among participants who believed they had a lot of information about a stranger. Among those who believed they knew little about the stranger, closeness was facilitated by sharing a weakly held, negative attitude of a professor. Discussion considers the relevance of these findings to the interpersonal attraction literature.

  3. "Think" versus "feel" framing effects in persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Nicole D; Tormala, Zakary L

    2010-04-01

    Three studies explored think ("I think . . . ") versus feel ("I feel . . . ") message framing effects on persuasion.The authors propose a matching hypothesis, suggesting that think framing will be more persuasive when the target attitude or message recipient is cognitively oriented, whereas feel framing will be more persuasive when the target attitude or message recipient is affectively oriented. Study 1 presented cognitively and affectively oriented individuals with a think- or feel-framed message. Study 2 primed cognitive or affective orientation and then presented a think- or feel-framed message. Study 3 presented male and female participants with an advertisement containing think- or feel-framed arguments. Results indicated that think (feel) framing was more persuasive when the target attitude or recipient was cognitively (affectively) oriented. Moreover, Study 2 demonstrated that this matching effect was mediated by processing fluency. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  4. Feelings and Intersubjectivity in Qualitative Suicide Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Zoë V R; Gibson, Susanne; Owen, Gareth J; Benson, Outi

    2016-07-01

    In this article, we explore how feelings permeated our qualitative research on suicide. Drawing on phenomenological theory, we argue for the epistemic and ethical importance of the feelings that emerge through research encounters, considering them to be embodied, intersubjective, and multilayered, and requiring careful interpretation through a "reflexivity of feelings." We sketch a tentative framework of the ways that we experienced feelings in our research and give three in-depth examples to illustrate some of the different layers and types of feelings we identified. We reflexively interpret these feelings and their role in our analysis and then discuss some of the ethical and methodological issues related to examining feelings in suicide research, and research more generally.

  5. Chinese Feelings Cherished By Canadians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On March 30, "The Chinese Feelings Across the Pacific-The Century Exhibition of the Old Photos Treasured by the Canadians" was open in the Lu Xun Museum in Beijing. The exhibition lasted for one week. At the exhibition some old photos taken in the early 20th century were on display, showing James G. Endicott, envoy of world peace, together with Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai; the family of O. L. Kilborn, one of the founders of West China Union University, together with Chinese women with bound feet: O. L. Kilborn treating the wounded soldiers during the Revolution of 1911; Leslie Earl Willmott in Chinese tunic suit and his wife reluctant to bid farewell to China, as well as photos of Ashley Woodward Lindesay, founder of China’s modern

  6. How do you feel? Students’ emotions after practicing bullying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luiz da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to identify and analyze emotions generated in students involved in bullying situations as aggressors. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, conducted with 232 students from the sixth to ninth year of middle school, who answered a self-reported questionnaire. We analyzed the data with the Statistical Analysis Software, through descriptive statistics and Fisher’s exact test. Of all students, 17.4% were identified as aggressors. Not feeling any emotion after practicing aggression against friends was prevalent for boys (36.7% and girls (25.0%. Boys demonstrated to feel anger (26.7% and sadness (23.3% in smaller proportions, while girls also demonstrated to feel guilt (25.0%, sadness (16.7% and shame (8.3%. The study indicates investigated aggressors presenting emotions that do not compete to comprehend negative effects of the practiced violence, as well as it does not collaborate to interrupt aggressions.

  7. Ambulatory Care Skills: Do Residents Feel Prepared?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Bonds

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine resident comfort and skill in performing ambulatory care skills. Methods: Descriptive survey of common ambulatory care skills administered to internal medicine faculty and residents at one academic medical center. Respondents were asked to rate their ability to perform 12 physical exam skills and 6 procedures, and their comfort in performing 7 types of counseling, and obtaining 6 types of patient history (4 point Likert scale for each. Self-rated ability or comfort was compared by gender, status (year of residency, faculty, and future predicted frequency of use of the skill. Results: Residents reported high ability levels for physical exam skills common to both the ambulatory and hospital setting. Fewer felt able to perform musculoskeletal, neurologic or eye exams easily alone. Procedures generally received low ability ratings. Similarly, residents’ comfort in performing common outpatient counseling was also low. More residents reported feeling very comfortable in obtaining history from patients. We found little variation by gender, year of training, or predicted frequency of use. Conclusion: Self-reported ability and comfort for many common ambulatory care skills is low. Further evaluation of this finding in other training programs is warranted.

  8. Feeling Ashamed of Myself Because of You

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montes Sanchez, Alba; Salice, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Within the literature, shame is generally described as a self-conscious emotion, meaning that shame is about the self that feels that emotion. But how can this account accommodate cases in which I feel ashamed of someone else? This paper pursues two goals. The first is to vindicate the phenomenol...... this is by supplementing the standard account by a theory of group identification....

  9. Feeling at home in nursing homes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Kerkstra, A.

    2001-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to examine determinants of feeling at home and in particular the privacy in nursing homes in The Netherlands. The first question was to what extent nursing homes differed in the degree residents feel at home and experience privacy. The second question was whether f

  10. Thinking and Feeling Poetry: Exploring Meanings Aloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva-Wood, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    What role can emotions play in informing readers' interpretations of poems? This think-aloud study, with an experimental design, featured 10 college freshmen randomly assigned to 2 groups. The think-aloud (TA) group verbalized thoughts while reading 2 poems, and the think-and-feel-aloud (TFA) group voiced both thoughts and feelings. Participants…

  11. Akratic Feelings, Empathy and Self-Consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Mendonça

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is an analysis of the role of akratic feelings on empathy and self-consciousness. It argues that akratic feelings create a meta-emotional platform that allows the installation of a type of empathic process, which simultaneously contributes for self-consciousness. The article shows in what way akratic feelings are crucial to further understand both ourselves and others.The article begins by describing the nature of akratic feelings and the way in which we can find them at various emotional levels. The second part points out how akratic feelings contribute to empathetic processes and their role in the formation of a meta-emotional platform in which people recognize their opacity. Finally, the article points out how this also contributes for self-awareness, and ultimately for a better understanding of emotional processes.

  12. ‘Should I feel a moment with you?’: Queering Dickensian Feeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Winyard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This piece considers some of the negative feelings about Dickens and his work circulating in this bicentennial year. It goes on to consider negative reactions to Dickens’s uses of feeling, particularly sentimentality, and suggests queer ways of reading Dickensian feeling and the reactions to it.

  13. [Patient's pain feeling and surgeon's comfort--ECCE versus phacoemulsification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kałuzny, Jakub J; Eliks, Iwona; Mierzejewski, Andrzej; Kałuzny, Bartłomiej

    2004-01-01

    To compare patient's pain and surgeon's comfort during ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia and phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. 120 patients scheduled for planned routine cataract extraction were divided in 2 groups: group 1-60 eyes, ECCE under retrobulbar anesthesia and group II-60 eyes, phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Immediately after operation patients were asked, to answer questions about their feeling during surgery. Simultaneously, the surgeon filled up the questionnaire, concerning patients behavior during the entire procedure. Statistically significant higher level of pain was reported in group I (ECCE). The most painful moment of the procedure was retrobulbar injection. During surgery pain feeling in both groups was similar. Both types of anesthesia provided very good level of surgeon's comfort. The longer operation, the higher level of pain and lower surgeon's comfort were reported in both groups. Patients having ECCE performed under retrobulbar anesthesia reported more pain comparing to phacoemulsification under topical anesthesia. Both anesthesia methods provided high level of surgeon's comfort.

  14. Feeling without Thinking? Reply to Zajonc

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Michael

    1981-01-01

    Criticizes Zajonc's thesis that in the course of forming impressions, preferences, and attitudes, feelings can sometimes precede associated cognitions. Zajonc's claim that sometimes affect is precognitive is said to be inadequate on both logical and empirical grounds. (Author/CM)

  15. Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163702.html Heart Disease Linked to Anxiety, Negative Feelings And that's especially ... Feb. 21, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with mild heart disease are more likely to say they have poorer ...

  16. When you feel like changing your medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000616.htm When you feel like changing your medicine To use the sharing features on this page, ... well with your medicines. Common Reasons for Changing Medicine You may think about stopping or changing your ...

  17. Background Music and Background Feelings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Iben

    2008-01-01

    With a focus on underscore music in film and television this report discusses the relations between music and emotions. The report will present and discuss an interdisciplinary theoretical framework connecting the experience of musical structures with emotional structures. Subsequently it discuss...... how music in the attachment to the audiovisual context contributes to the generation of different kinds of emotional experiences. The Danish television documentary Ballets droning (“The Queen of the Ball”) portraying the leader of the Danish right wing party The Danish Peoples’ Party...

  18. Does how the patient feels matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Opio, Martin Otyek; Mutiibwa, George; Kellett, John

    2017-01-01

    Background: although asking how a patient feels is the first enquiry most clinicians make the value of the answer has never been examined in acutely ill patients. Methods: prospective observational study that compared the predictive value of how well acutely ill medical patients felt after admiss...... stability and female gender. Conclusion: in this patient cohort a subjective feeling of improvement at the first re-assessment after admission to hospital is a powerful independent predictor of reduced in-hospital mortality....

  19. When feeling bad leads to feeling good: guilt-proneness and affective organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Francis J; Schaumberg, Rebecca L

    2012-01-01

    The authors posit that higher levels of guilt-proneness are associated with higher levels of affective organizational commitment. To explain this counterintuitive link, the authors suggest that a dispositional tendency to feel guilt motivates individuals to exert greater effort on their work-related tasks that, in turn, strengthens their affinity for the organization. The authors tested this idea using a laboratory study and field data from 2 samples of working adults. Individuals who are more guilt-prone reported higher levels of organizational attachment compared with less guilt-prone individuals. Furthermore, mediation analyses indicate that the link between guilt-proneness and affective commitment is driven by greater task effort. The authors discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the affective drivers of commitment in organizations.

  20. Suicidal feelings interfere with help-seeking in bullied adolescents [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Kitagawa

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Being bullied is associated with the manifestation of suicidal feelings, which sharply increase in middle(-late adolescence. Whether or not bullied middle(-late adolescents with suicidal feelings seek help is therefore a critical issue, given that help-seeking plays a key role in the prevention of suicide. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of bullying, suicidal feelings and the interaction between these two factors on help-seeking behavior in adolescents. METHODS: Japanese middle(-late adolescents (aged 15-18 years; n = 9484 were studied using self-report questionnaires. The rate of adolescents who actually sought help was examined for bullying status and suicidal feelings. RESULTS: The rate of adolescents who sought help was significantly higher when they were bullied (p<0.001 and also when they had mild suicidal feelings (p<0.001, but not when they displayed serious suicidal feelings. In the case of adolescents who were bullied, however, having suicidal feelings significantly decreased the rate of help-seeking (OR = 0.47, p<0.05 and OR = 0.32, p = 0.002 for having mild and serious suicidal feelings, respectively. The decrease was remarkable when suicidal feelings were serious. Specifically, the decrease was significant in seeking help from peers and family members, who are the most frequent source of the help for adolescents, when they had serious suicidal feelings (OR = 0.21, p<0.01 and OR = 0.13, p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Suicidal feelings may interfere with help-seeking behavior, which could be critical in suicide prevention in bullied middle(-late adolescents.

  1. Parents’ Feelings Towards Their Adoptive and Non-Adoptive Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Marshaun B.; Mullineaux, Paula Y.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we examined parent gender differences in feelings (negativity and positivity) and perceptions of child behavioural and emotional problems in adoptive and biological parent–child dyads. In a sample of 85 families, we used a novel within-family adoption design in which one child was adopted and one child was a biological child of the couple, and tested whether the links between parent feelings and child maladjustment included effects of passive gene–environment correlation. Parents reported more negativity and less positivity as well as higher levels of externalizing behaviour for the adopted child compared to the non-adopted child, although effect sizes were small and no longer statistically significant after correcting for multiple comparisons. Fathers and mothers did not differ significantly in their reports of positive and negative feelings towards their children or in regard to child externalizing and internalizing behaviours. The correlations between parental negativity and positivity and child externalizing and internalizing were similar for fathers and mothers, and for adopted and non-adopted children. The findings suggest similar parent–child relationship processes for fathers and mothers, and that genetic transmission of behaviour from parent to child does not account for the association between parental warmth and hostility and child-adjustment problems. PMID:21088705

  2. Feels Right … Go Ahead? When to Trust Your Feelings in Judgments and Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan Pham Michel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Not only are subjective feelings an integral part of many judgments and decisions, they can even lead to improved decisions and better predictions. Individuals who have learned to trust their feelings performed better in economic-negotiation games than their rational-thinking opponents. But emotions are not just relevant in negotiations and decisions. They also play a decisive role in forecasting future events. Candidates who trusted their feelings made better predictions than people with less emotional confidence. Emotions contain valuable information about the world around us. This information is not as readily available in our mind as hard facts but rather lies in the background of our conscious attention. In negotiation situations like the ultimatum game, feelings provide an intuitive sense of what offer is about right and what offer is too high or too low. But feelings also summarize statistical relationships among things that, on the surface, may seem disconnected. These statistical relationships make more probable futures feel more right than less probable futures. However, researchers warn that you should not always trust your feelings. Feelings that tend to help are those based on general knowledge, not those based on easy-to-verbalize local knowledge.

  3. Do You Ever Feel That Way? A Story and Activities about Families and Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanewischer, Erica J. W.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an intervention to be used with young children in the foster care or adoption system. "Do You Ever Feel That Way? A Story and Activities About Families and Feelings" is a bibliotherapy-based intervention to be used with young children who have experienced removal from their homes due to abuse or neglect. The narrative tells…

  4. A feeling of being (in)visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    contact with the healthcare system and healthcare professionals are often dismissed as irrelevant. It is also evident that spine fusion patients are denied the opportunity to verbalise what it feels like to, for example, be ”a person in constant pain” or someone who ”holds back” to avoid being......Abstract PhD Day 2015 The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long...

  5. [Is fetus able to feel pain?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosińska-Kaczyńska, Katarzyna; Wielgoś, Mirosław

    2011-02-01

    On the basis of fetal hormonal and hemodynamic responses to pain related stimuli, neuroanatomy and observations of preterm babies, it was concluded that human fetus is able to feel pain after 24 weeks gestation. However it is possible that the fetus may feel pain even before that time. With the development of intrauterine diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, it is crucial to provide fetuses undergoing painful procedures not only with anesthesia but also analgesia. The article presents fetal pain research history and its implications for medicine.

  6. A feeling of being (in)visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise

    Abstract PhD Day 2015 The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoor......Abstract PhD Day 2015 The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long...

  7. Masking the Feeling of Being Stupid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sally L.

    1988-01-01

    Teaching experience at The Lab School of Washington has shown that learning-disabled children and adults cope with their lack of self-esteem and feelings of stupidity by developing masks to hide their hurt. These include masks of super-competence, helplessness, invisibility, clowning, injustice collecting, indifference, boredom, outrageousness,…

  8. ACT UP as a Structure of Feeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingrich-Philbrook, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Revisiting AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP) restarts the "panic of loss" characterizing the author's youth. The author argues that the 25th anniversary of ACT UP marks the failure to consider Raymond Williams's "structure of feeling". Williams counterposes this structure against falsely viewing the past as formalized into something…

  9. Depressive feelings in children with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inocente, Clara Odilia; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Lavault, Sophie; Guignard-Perret, Anne; Raoux, Aude; Christol, Noemie; Gerard, Daniel; Dauvilliers, Yves; Reimão, Rubens; Bat-Pitault, Flora; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Franco, Patricia

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to evaluate depressive feelings and their correlations in children and adolescents with narcolepsy collected in national reference centers for narcolepsy. We compared clinical and sleep characteristics of patients with and without depressive symptoms evaluated on the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI). Our study sample included 88 children (44 boys; 44 de novo patients) with a mean age of 11.9 ± 3.1 years at diagnosis (37.5% were aged ⩽ 10 years). Obesity was found in 59% of the sample and cataplexy was present in 80.7%. The DQB1*0602 allele was positive in 93.5% of our sample. There were 25% of children who had clinically depressive feelings (CDI>16), especially girls older than the age of 10 years. Bivariate associations indicated that depressive feelings were associated with fatigue (48%), hyperactivity (31%), insomnia (16%), and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (14-24%). In the multivariate model adjusted for gender and age, only fatigue explained the variability of the depression score. In our large cohort, high levels of depressive symptoms essentially expressed by fatigue affected 25% of children with narcolepsy. The girls older than 10 years of age were especially vulnerable. The similar prevalence of depressive feelings in treated vs never-treated patients suggests a specific need for diagnosing and managing this symptom in young patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Feeling Jumpy: Teaching about HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesko, Nancy; Brotman, Jennie S.; Agarwal, Ruchi; Quackenbush, Jaime Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Sexuality education and HIV/AIDS education are arenas of strong feelings. Emotions make sexuality and health lessons peculiar, "thrown together" lessons, and emotions stick to "childhood innocence", "growing up too fast" and even "jump" in response to visuals, say a used condom on an elementary school playground or a pregnant sophomore in a…

  11. Joystick With Cable Springs Offers Better Feel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerley, James; Ecklund, Wayne

    1992-01-01

    Improved joystick allows motion in 6 degrees of freedom, biased toward central position and orientation by 16 segments of cable serving as springs. Improvement in feel and control results from nonlinear compliance of cable-spring assembly. Nonlinear variations accommodate natural reactions of hand and brain. Operator functions as part of feedback control loop. More comfortable, increases ability to exert control and reduces fatigue.

  12. Teaching Emotionally Disturbed Students to Count Feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Cynthia S.; Calkin, Abigail B.

    The paper describes a program to teach high school students with emotional and behavior problems to count their feelings, thereby improving their self concept. To aid in instruction, a hierarchy was developed which involved four phases: counting tasks completed and tasks not completed, counting independent actions in class, counting perceptions of…

  13. Feel Fine with Chinese Folk Music

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaoZi

    2005-01-01

    The Chinese folk music band “Feel Fine” is composed of three accomplished young female instrumentalists. These young musicians, since their debut, have brought to audiences fresh music experiences with their splendid costumes, extraordinary skills and pop-style music.

  14. My Galaxy of Memories, Feelings, and Dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomek, George; Tomek, Marilee

    Young people are encouraged to use this writing journal for kids as a means to think, write, and be creative. The journal helps children to explore their worlds, learn about their families, and record their memories, feelings, and dreams. Following explanatory sections for parents, teachers, and the writer, the journal contains these sections:…

  15. Feelings of women in return of sexual life after childbirth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Macedo de Oliveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the experience of the mothers in relation to the feeling experienced in return of sexual life after childbirth. This is a descriptive and qualitative research. The instrument used was the technical work of the Collective Subject Discourse. Were addressed fifteen mothers of normal birth residents in the municipality of Sorocaba. The interviews were recorded in the Basic Health - UBS of Neighborhoods Sabia, Vila Haro and Barcelona. In the analysis, the reports were grouped into core ideas, totaling nine: body awareness, influence pain, feeling the mother to the child, her husband's involvement in resuming sexual activity, involvement of women in return of sexual life, the woman's felling about her sexual life, the woman feeling regarding pain, reasons for waiting until the return of sexual life. The results show that during this period the woman is more concerned about the changes that occur in your body, not only associated with weight gain, but also linked self image and low self esteem, fear of pain and division of roles as wife and mother.

  16. Gender differences in feelings and knowledge about stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhaki, Michal; Melnikov, Semyon; Koton, Silvia

    2016-10-01

    To examine gender differences in knowledge and feelings about stroke among ≥40 years old population. Knowledge of stroke is consistently found to be poor among both genders in general populations, however, it has been reported to be better among women than men. Gender differences in feelings about stroke in the general population have not been examined. Data were collected from a convenience sample using semi-structured personal interviews. Participants were representative of Israeli sub-populations aged ≥40 with no history of stroke. Knowledge of stroke was studied with quantitative methods while constant comparative analysis was used for the qualitative data analysis of feelings evoked by stroke. One hundred and seventy-seven participants were interviewed, 79/177 (44·6%) men and 98/177 (55·4%) women. Rates of self-reported hypertension [33/79 (41·8%) men, 25/98 (25·5%) women] and current smoking [29/79 (36·7%) men, 18/98 (18·4%) women] were significantly higher in men than women. Over 50% men and women mentioned one-side sudden weakness or paralysis as a stroke symptom, however, other stroke symptoms were not recognised by most participants. Education was associated with the number of identified stroke signs. Knowledge of stroke-warning signs was better in women. The main feelings expressed by both genders were fear of dying and disability, self-concern about survival, blaming fate and self-accusation. Stroke knowledge is poor among men and women. Higher level of education is a predictor of stroke knowledge among both genders. Gender-specific differences in stroke risk factors and feelings about stroke in different sub-populations should be taken into account to improve prevention of stroke through education programmes. Health education on stroke prevention should be tailored to population groups differing in level of education. Health promotion recommendations should be provided by nurses with regard to beliefs of both men and women regarding

  17. Exploring the human emotion of feeling cared for in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggett, Margarita; Giambattista, Laura; Lobbestael, Linda; Pfeiffer, Judith; Madani, Catherina; Modir, Royya; Zamora-Flyr, Maria Magdalena; Davidson, Judy E

    2016-09-01

    To explore the emotion of feeling cared for in the workplace. The emotion of feeling cared for drives health-promoting behaviours. Feeling cared for is the end-product of caring, affecting practice, environment and outcomes. Identifying behaviours that lead to feeling cared for is the first step in promoting caring practices in leadership. A survey with open-ended questions was designed, validated and electronically distributed. Data from 35 responses were thematically analysed. Unit culture and leadership style affect caring capacity in the workplace. First level coding revealed two caring behaviour categories: recognition and support. Themes emerged aligned to Chapman's model of workplace appreciation: words of affirmation, receiving gifts, quality time and acts of service. The importance of being treated as a whole person was reported: being appreciated personally and professionally. Feeling cared for drives outcomes such as feeling valued, important, teamwork and organisational loyalty. This study generalises the applicability of Chapman's model developed for workplace appreciation in the health-care setting. Concrete examples of how leaders stimulate feeling cared for are provided. Caring leadership behaviours have the potential to improve retention, engagement, the healing environment and the capacity for caring for others. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension–Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  19. The influence of narrative risk communication on feelings of cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Eva; van Osch, Liesbeth; de Vries, Hein; Lechner, Lilian

    2013-05-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the importance of feelings of risk in explaining cancer preventive behaviours, but best practices for influencing these feelings are limited. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effects of narrative and non-narrative risk communication about sunbed use on ease of imagination and feelings of cancer risk. A total of 233 female sunbed users in the general Dutch population were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a narrative message (i.e., personal testimonial), a non-narrative cognitive message (i.e., factual risk information using cognitive-laden words), or a non-narrative affective message (i.e., factual risk information using affective-laden words). Ease of imagination and feelings of risk were assessed directly after the risk information was given (T1). Three weeks after the baseline session, feelings of risk were measured again (T2). The results revealed that sunbed users who were exposed to narrative risk information could better imagine themselves developing skin cancer and reported higher feelings of skin cancer risk at T1. Moreover, ease of imagination mediated the effects of message type on feelings of risk at T1 and T2. The findings provide support for the effects of narrative risk communication in influencing feelings of cancer risk through ease of imagination. Cancer prevention programmes may therefore benefit from including narrative risk information. Future research is important to investigate other mechanisms of narrative information and their most effective content and format. What is already known on this subject? Evidence is growing for the importance of feelings of risk in explaining cancer preventive behaviours. Narratives have increasingly been considered as an effective format for persuasive risk messages and studies have shown narrative risk communication to be effective in influencing cognitive risk beliefs. What does this study add? Increasing understanding of how feelings of cancer

  20. Music Improves Subjective Feelings Leading to Cardiac Autonomic Nervous Modulation: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Satoshi; Nishimura, Yukako; Mizuno, Kei; Sakimoto, Nae; Hori, Hiroshi; Tamura, Yasuhisa; Yamato, Masanori; Mitsuhashi, Rika; Akiba, Keigo; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kataoka, Yosky

    2017-01-01

    It is widely accepted that listening to music improves subjective feelings and reduces fatigue sensations, and different kinds of music lead to different activations of these feelings. Recently, cardiac autonomic nervous modulation has been proposed as a useful objective indicator of fatigue. However, scientific considerations of the relation between feelings of fatigue and cardiac autonomic nervous modulation while listening to music are still lacking. In this study, we examined which subjective feelings of fatigue are related to participants' cardiac autonomic nervous function while they listen to music. We used an album of comfortable and relaxing environmental music, with blended sounds from a piano and violin as well as natural sound sources. We performed a crossover trial of environmental music and silent sessions for 20 healthy subjects, 12 females, and 8 males, after their daily work shift. We measured changes in eight types of subjective feelings, including healing, fatigue, sleepiness, relaxation, and refreshment, using the KOKORO scale, a subjective mood measurement system for self-reported feelings. Further, we obtained measures of cardiac autonomic nervous function on the basis of heart rate variability before and after the sessions. During the music session, subjective feelings significantly shifted toward healing and a secure/relaxed feeling and these changes were greater than those in the silent session. Heart rates (ΔHR) in the music session significantly decreased compared with those in the silent session. Other cardiac autonomic parameters such as high-frequency (HF) component and the ratio of low-frequency (LF) and HF components (LF/HF) were similar in the two sessions. In the linear regression analysis of the feelings with ΔHR and changes in LF/HF (ΔLF/HF), increases and decreases in ΔHR were correlated to the feeling axes of Fatigue-Healing and Anxiety/Tension-Security/Relaxation, whereas those in ΔLF/HF were related to the feeling axes

  1. Positive feelings reward and promote prosocial behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aknin, Lara B; Van de Vondervoort, Julia W; Hamlin, J Kiley

    2017-08-12

    Humans are extraordinarily prosocial. What inspires and reinforces a willingness to help others? Here we focus on the role of positive feelings. Drawing on functional accounts of positive emotion, which suggest that positive emotional states serve to alert actors to positive experiences and encourage similar action in the future, we summarize evidence demonstrating that positive feelings promote and reward prosocial behavior throughout development. Specifically, we highlight new and classic evidence from both child and adult research showing first, that various positive states prompt prosocial behavior, and second, prosocial action leads to positive states. We also consider the possibility of a positive feedback loop, wherein the emotional rewards of giving promote future prosociality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Neuromodulation, Emotional Feelings and Affective Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fushun Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Affective disorders such as anxiety, phobia and depression are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide. Monoamine neuromodulators are used to treat most of them, with variable degrees of efficacy. Here, we review and interpret experimental findings about the relation of neuromodulation and emotional feelings, in pursuit of two goals: (a to improve the conceptualisation of affective/emotional states, and (b to develop a descriptive model of basic emotional feelings related to the actions of neuromodulators. In this model, we hypothesize that specific neuromodulators are effective for basic emotions. The model can be helpful for mental health professionals to better understand the affective dynamics of persons and the actions of neuromodulators - and respective psychoactive drugs - on this dynamics.

  3. Farmers’ Markets: Positive Feelings of Instagram Posts

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Pilař; Tereza Balcarová; Stanislav Rojík

    2016-01-01

    With increasing consumer requirements, farmers and vendors see the importance of social media as a marketing tool to engage with consumers. In particular, on a more personal level for reasons of brand management. Instagram is becoming increasingly popular as a marketing communication tool. The aim of this paper is to identify areas that users evaluate in terms of positive feelings in connection with farmers’ markets. The results are based on the analysis of the worldwide, and Czech, instagram...

  4. Values and Feelings in Young Brazilians’ Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Potenza Guimarães Pinheiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purposes are projections about the future based on past and present actions, including the integration and regulation of values and feelings. In this study, we aimed to analyze these processes in the purposes of young Brazilians. A total of 200 young people between 15 and 19 years of age who were public school students from the five geographical regions of Brazil participated in the survey. We applied a written, individual, and open-ended questionnaire that was constructed by the Stanford Center on Adolescence and adapted for this study. We identified seven different ways by which the future was designed, observing different dynamics of thought and great complexity in the integration of values and feelings. For the vast majority of respondents, family and work constituted central values and appeared in an integrated manner in the feelings they expressed: happiness, welfare, and satisfaction. These results cultivate a greater understanding of psychic organization in purposes, opening up new possibilities for studies in moral psychology.

  5. Farmers’ Markets: Positive Feelings of Instagram Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Pilař

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing consumer requirements, farmers and vendors see the importance of social media as a marketing tool to engage with consumers. In particular, on a more personal level for reasons of brand management. Instagram is becoming increasingly popular as a marketing communication tool. The aim of this paper is to identify areas that users evaluate in terms of positive feelings in connection with farmers’ markets. The results are based on the analysis of the worldwide, and Czech, instagram social network. Instagram posts were identified on the basis of keywords, such as #farmarsketrhy and #farmersmarkets. The results of the study are based on 100,000 contributions on Instagram made by 55,632 users. The analysis contains 1,357,812 ‘unique’ words. The results identified six major areas (1 Healthy (2 Good (3 Great (4 Happy (5 Nice (6 Perfect. An appropriately posted hashtag indicated the positive feelings that were evoked and then assigned to a matching category. The research results are used to identify group characteristics that exert these positive feelings while visiting farmers’ markets. These results can be used to build communications campaigns for farmers’ markets. They can also be used as a basis for further research in defining the behaviour of farmers’ markets visitors, based on cultural differences arising from geographic location.

  6. Correlations between social-emotional feelings and anterior insula activity are independent from visceral states but influenced by culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Helen eImmordino-Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The anterior insula (AI maps visceral states and is active during emotional experiences, a functional confluence that is central to neurobiological accounts of feelings. Yet, it is unclear how AI activity correlates with feelings during social emotions, and whether this correlation may be influenced by culture, as studies correlating real-time AI activity with visceral states and feelings have focused on Western subjects feeling physical pain or basic disgust. Given psychological evidence that social-emotional feelings are cognitively constructed within cultural frames, we asked Chinese and American participants to report their feeling strength to admiration and compassion-inducing narratives during fMRI with simultaneous electrocardiogram recording. Trial-by-trial, cardiac arousal and feeling strength correlated with ventral and dorsal AI activity bilaterally but predicted different variance, suggesting that interoception and social-emotional feeling construction are concurrent but dissociable AI functions. Further, although the variance that correlated with cardiac arousal did not show cultural effects, the variance that correlated with feelings did. Feeling strength was especially associated with ventral AI activity (the autonomic modulatory sector in the Chinese group but with dorsal AI activity (the visceral-somatosensory/cognitive sector in an American group not of Asian descent. This cultural group difference held after controlling for posterior insula activity and was replicated. A bi-cultural East-Asian American group showed intermediate results. The findings help elucidate how the AI supports feelings and suggest that previous reports that dorsal AI activation reflects feeling strength are culture related. More broadly, the results suggest that the brain’s ability to construct conscious experiences of social emotion is less closely tied to visceral processes than neurobiological models predict and at least partly open to cultural

  7. Spatial Distance Regulates Sex-Specific Feelings to Suspected Sexual and Emotional Infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Schützwohl

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the hitherto neglected influence of the spatial distance between the jealous person, the partner, and a potential rival as a proximate contextual factor regulating emotion intensity. The study tested four predictions. (1 The jealousy mechanism responds with mild negative feelings at most as long as the partner is close to the jealous person. (2 The negative feelings increase when the partner is far from the jealous person but the rival is close. (3 The most uncomfortable feelings result when the partner and the rival are close together and both far from the jealous person. (4 Based on the evolutionary psychological considerations, men report stronger negative feelings than women when suspecting sexual infidelity. Conversely, women report stronger negative feelings than men when suspecting emotional infidelity. The results confirmed predictions 1 and 4. Reversing predictions 2 and 3, the close rival consistently elicited the most uncomfortable feelings. Implications and limitations of the present study are discussed and suggestions for future research are provided.

  8. Medical Mysteries: "We Feel Deep Compassion for Patients..."

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Javascript on. Feature: Medical Mysteries “We feel deep compassion for patients...” Past Issues / Spring 2011 Table of ... maybe even relief. As doctors, we feel deep compassion for patients who have been without hope because ...

  9. The Relationship between Media Consumption and Feeling of Social Security

    OpenAIRE

    Bijan khajeNoori; Mehdi Kaveh

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe concept of social security and a Feeling of security and the citizens, as a key element in achieving the projected, is important Sociologists and criminologist shave always paid special attention has been sought. Study of the factors influencing the feeling of security, can increase the feeling of security is work. Also enhance citizens' feeling of security and welfare of the citizens and to accept responsibility and commitment will do. The widespread use of social media in re...

  10. 'Feeling for' and 'feeling with': developmental and neuroscientific perspectives on intersubjectivity and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Jean

    2013-09-01

    This paper discusses research by Beatrice Beebe, Bessel van der Kolk and others, exploring the interpersonal processes that underpin early relational trauma and how this contributes to adult psychopathology. An essential feature of early relational trauma, the infant's experience of being unable to evoke an empathic response from the caregiver and the feelings of shame this gives rise to, is discussed and its implications for psychotherapy are considered. The neuroscience that underpins two forms of empathy in the therapeutic relationship, of 'feeling for' and 'feeling with' the patient is discussed and explored in relation to the concordant and complementary countertransference. I argue that when therapists respond to the projection on to them of the abuser by an increasingly determined adherence to analytic technique, this may become a complementary countertransference identification with the abuser and an enactment of the abusive relationship.

  11. Formations of Feeling, Constellation of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Highmore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay revisits Raymond Williams’s notion of ‘structures of feeling’ with the intention of clarifying what Williams meant by ‘feelings’, and of exploring the concept’s possible range and reach within the study of culture. It recovers the initial anthropological context for the phrase by reconnecting it to the work of Ruth Benedict and Gregory Bateson. It goes on to suggest that while the analysis of ‘structures of feeling’ has been deployed primarily in studies of literary and filmic culture it might be usefully extended towards the study of more ubiquitous forms of material culture such as clothing, housing, food, furnishings and other material practices of daily living. Indeed it might be one way of explaining how formations of feeling are disseminated, how they suture us to the social world and how feelings are embedded in the accoutrements of domestic, habitual life. The essay argues that by joining together a socially phenomenological interest in the world of things, accompanied by an attention to historically specific moods and atmospheres, ‘structures of feelings’ can direct analyses towards important mundane cultural phenomena.

  12. Perceiving and expressing feelings through actions in relation to individual differences in empathic traits: the Action and Feelings Questionnaire (AFQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Justin H G; Cameron, Isobel M; Ross, Emma; Braadbaart, Lieke; Waiter, Gordon D

    2016-04-01

    Empathy is usually conceived of as independent of the non-verbal behaviors which mediate its experience, though embodied cognition theory predicts that individual differences in action representation will affect empathic traits. The "Actions and Feelings Questionnaire" (AFQ) was designed to capture individual differences in self-awareness of own and others' actions, particularly those associated with feelings, which we predicted would correlate with levels of empathic traits. A pilot 30-item questionnaire included items on perceptual sensitivity to action, imitation, action imagery, and gestural and facial expression. It was completed by a sample of 278 adults (mean age 21.2 years; 189 females, 89 males) along with the 15-item Empathic Quotient (EQ) Questionnaire. Total scores on the final 18-item questionnaire showed strong internal coherence (Cronbach's alpha of 0.81) and test-retest reliability (ICC=0.88), marked effect of sex and highly significant correlation with EQ. The questionnaire was administered to participants in an fMRI study investigating the neural correlates of facial imitation. Total AFQ score correlated with activity in somatosensory cortex, insula, anterior cingulate, and visual cortex. The AFQ shows promise as a brief and simple self-report measure sensitive to variability in the self-awareness of actions associated with feelings. It suggests that much of the variability of empathic traits in typical populations is accounted for by variance in this capacity. We suggest that being more empathic really is about being "touchy-feely," and this questionnaire provides a novel measure of action-based empathy.

  13. Night or darkness, which intensifies the feeling of fear?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yadan; Ma, Wenjuan; Kang, Qin; Qiao, Lei; Tang, Dandan; Qiu, Jiang; Zhang, Qinglin; Li, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Nighttime fear is a phenomenon in which people feel more afraid of threats at night. Despite the vast amount of psychological research on nighttime fear, previous researchers have not accurately distinguished between "night" and "darkness", both of which play important roles in nighttime fear. We collected physiological (skin conductance response and heart rate) and psychological (self-report) data simultaneously to investigate the effects of "night" and "darkness" on fearful feelings and whether these effects were moderated by the mode of stimulus delivery (i.e., visual or auditory). Specifically, two tasks were employed in which time (day vs. night), illumination (light vs. darkness) and stimulus type (fearful vs. neutral) were manipulated. Participants (n=128) were exposed to visual and auditory oddball tasks consisting of fearful and neutral stimuli. The results indicated that there were significant increases in fear responses at night, and the difference between day and night was significant for fear stimuli but not for neutral events. Furthermore, these effects were consistent over different sensory modalities (visual and auditory). The results of this study underscore the importance of the day-night cycle in fear-related information processing and suggest that further attention needs to be paid to the influence of the biological circadian rhythm on these processes. The current findings could inform a deeper understanding of anxiety and fear-related disorders, and thus, we invite future studies to illuminate the underlying neurobiological mechanisms therein. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Strengthening the Feeling of Identity and Self-esteem Through Group Music and Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    than 4 in the years 2008-2010. I will present two case studies concerning two of the participants taking part in these group experiences. Focus will be on developments in the self-reported problem area of `strengthening the feeling of identity and self-esteem", which both clients shose among different...... understanding). I will present selected excerpts of the client´s processes such as the music they listen to, mandalas, narratives and their closing self reported outcome of the treatment. I will relate this to the theory model and show how strengthening of the feeling of identity and self-esteem through Group...

  15. The Association of Current Violence from Adult Family Members with Adolescent Bullying Involvement and Suicidal Feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Shinya; Ando, Shuntaro; Shimodera, Shinji; Koike, Shinsuke; Usami, Satoshi; Toriyama, Rie; Kanata, Sho; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Okazaki, Yuji; Nishida, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although several studies have reported that child physical abuse increased the risk for bullying involvement, the effect of current violence from adult family members (CVA) on bullying involvement and suicidal feelings among adolescents has not been sufficiently examined. This study investigated the association of CVA with adolescent bullying involvement and the interaction effect of CVA and bullying involvement on suicidal feelings. This cross-sectional study used data from a school-based survey with a general population of adolescents (grades 7 to 12). Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire completed by 17,530 students. Logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the association of CVA with adolescent bullying involvement and suicidal feelings. The overall response rate was 90.2%. The odds of students being characterized as bullies, victims, and bully-victims were higher among adolescents with CVA than without CVA (odds ratios (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI), [2.3-3.7], 4.6 [3.6-5.8], and 5.8 [4.4-7.6], respectively). Both CVA (OR = 3.4 [95% CI 2.7-4.3]) and bullying (bullies, victims, and bully-victims; OR = 2.0 [95% CI 1.6-2.6], 4.0 [3.1-5.1], 4.1 [3.0-5.6], respectively), were associated with increased odds of current suicidal feelings after adjusting for confounding factors. Furthermore, positive additive effects of CVA and all three types of bullying involvement on suicidal feelings were found. For example, bully-victims with CVA had about 19-fold higher odds of suicidal feelings compared with uninvolved adolescents without CVA. This study, although correlational, suggested that CVA avoidance might prevent bullying involvement and suicidal feelings in adolescents.

  16. The Association of Current Violence from Adult Family Members with Adolescent Bullying Involvement and Suicidal Feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimodera, Shinji; Koike, Shinsuke; Usami, Satoshi; Toriyama, Rie; Kanata, Sho; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Okazaki, Yuji; Nishida, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Although several studies have reported that child physical abuse increased the risk for bullying involvement, the effect of current violence from adult family members (CVA) on bullying involvement and suicidal feelings among adolescents has not been sufficiently examined. This study investigated the association of CVA with adolescent bullying involvement and the interaction effect of CVA and bullying involvement on suicidal feelings. This cross-sectional study used data from a school-based survey with a general population of adolescents (grades 7 to 12). Data were collected using a self-report questionnaire completed by 17,530 students. Logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the association of CVA with adolescent bullying involvement and suicidal feelings. The overall response rate was 90.2%. The odds of students being characterized as bullies, victims, and bully-victims were higher among adolescents with CVA than without CVA (odds ratios (OR) = 2.9, 95% confidence interval (CI), [2.3–3.7], 4.6 [3.6–5.8], and 5.8 [4.4–7.6], respectively). Both CVA (OR = 3.4 [95% CI 2.7–4.3]) and bullying (bullies, victims, and bully-victims; OR = 2.0 [95% CI 1.6–2.6], 4.0 [3.1–5.1], 4.1 [3.0–5.6], respectively), were associated with increased odds of current suicidal feelings after adjusting for confounding factors. Furthermore, positive additive effects of CVA and all three types of bullying involvement on suicidal feelings were found. For example, bully-victims with CVA had about 19-fold higher odds of suicidal feelings compared with uninvolved adolescents without CVA. This study, although correlational, suggested that CVA avoidance might prevent bullying involvement and suicidal feelings in adolescents. PMID:27711150

  17. The feeling of agency hypothesis: a critique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grünbaum, Thor

    2015-01-01

    -conscious and not associated with any particular type of distinctive phenomenology (the simple hypothesis). In this paper, I critically evaluate the nature of the empirical evidence researchers commonly take to support FoA-hypothesis. The aim of this paper is not only to scrutinize the FoA-hypothesis and data supposed......A dominant view in contemporary cognitive neuroscience is that low-level, comparator-based mechanisms of motor control produce a distinctive experience often called the feeling of agency (the FoA-hypothesis). An opposing view is that comparator-based motor control is largely non...... to support it; it is equally to argue that experimentalists supporting the FoA-hypothesis fail to establish that the experimental outcomes are more probable given the FoA-hypothesis than given the simpler hypothesis....

  18. Cognitive Naturalism and the Phenomenal Feel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Michael Hoerzer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to Sandro Nannini’s Time and Consciousness in Cognitive Naturalism, we can draw an analogy between the shift in the conception of time that occurred in physics with the introduction of relativity theory and a shift towards a scientifically more graspable functional concept of phenomenal consciousness. This analogy is meant to persuade us of the eliminative materialist view that we should abandon our folk psychological concept of consciousness. In my commentary, I examine the naturalization procedure underlying Nannini’s cognitive naturalism, argue for its inability to account for the phenomenal feel of conscious states, and point to some important differences between the conceptual change in the case of time and the intended change in the case of consciousness.

  19. So Whom To Feel Sorry For?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Cecil Marie

    2015-01-01

    citizenship strategies), as well as the maintenance of isolated communities. My field is characterized by contradicting perceptions of who are the exploiters and who are the victims, and the narratives of suffering challenge my understanding of the roles of Indians in past, present, and future situation...... they ’developed’, as many Indians say). The African Tanzanians have a very different perception of the role of the Indians in the Tanzanian society; they see them as exploitative and arrogant and not in any way as suffering subjects. In my fieldwork I explore the Indians’ role as stigmatized yet powerful. Despite...... the fact that many African Tanzanians would never feel sorry for an Indian, I see suffering as a personal experience, which we need to take seriously. At the same time I see suffering being used strategically by my informants in order to justify corruption, disloyal national affiliation (through different...

  20. Interpersonal closeness and morality predict feelings of being moved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibt, Beate; Schubert, Thomas W; Zickfeld, Janis H; Fiske, Alan Page

    2017-04-01

    The emotion commonly labeled in English as being moved or touched is widely experienced but only tacitly defined, and has received little systematic attention. Based on a review of conceptualizations from various disciplines, we hypothesize that events appraised as an increase in interpersonal closeness, or as moral acts, when sufficiently intense, elicit a positive emotion typically labeled "being moved," and characterized by tears, goosebumps, and a feeling of warmth in the chest. We predicted this to be true for events a person participates in, as well as for events they observe. In Study 1, we elicited reports of recent episodes of weeping evoked by something positive, and also weeping because of something negative; we measured emotion terms, bodily sensations, and appraisals in a U.S.

  1. An Examination of the Impact of Minority Status Stress and Impostor Feelings on the Mental Health of Diverse Ethnic Minority College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin; McClain, Shannon; Enciso, Alicia; Martinez, Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    This study examined differences in minority status stress, impostor feelings, and mental health in a sample of 240 ethnic minority college students. African Americans reported higher minority status stress than Asian Americans and Latino/a Americans, whereas Asian Americans reported higher impostor feelings. Minority status stress and impostor…

  2. The feeling of hope in cancer patients: an existential analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Aparecida Sales

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at unveiling the feeling of hope in people who experience cancer in their existence. Qualitative study based on Heidegger’s phenomenology, performed with eight cancer patients assisted in a philanthropic organization, between December 2013 and February 2014, in a northwestern city in Paraná, Brazil, using the following guiding question: “How do you perceive the feeling of hope at this time in your life?” The analysis resulted in the ontological themes: searching for hope in dealing with cancer, and experiencing feelings of hope and despair in being with others. Patients revealed mixed feelings, going from the lack of hope at the time of diagnosis to a rekindling of hope, as well as those who never lost the will to live. We conclude that living with cancer causes extreme feelings; and hope emerges as a feeling capable of influencing and causes an expressive impact in coping with that.

  3. Feeling the Science, Thinking about Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristou, E. T.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Giannakis, O.

    2015-10-01

    MAARBLE (Monitoring, Analyzing and Assessing Radiation Belt Loss and Energization) was an FP7- funded project, involving monitoring of the geospace environment through space and ground-based observations, in order to understand various aspects of the radiation belts (torus-shaped regions encircling the Earth, in which high-energy charged particles are trapped by the geomagnetic field), which have direct impact on human endeavors in space (spacecraft and astronauts exposure). Besides interesting science, the MAARBLE outreach team employed a variety of outreach techniques to provide the general public with simplified information concerning the scientific objectives of the project, its focus and its expected outcomes. An outstanding moment of the MAARBLE outreach experience was the organization of an international contest of musical compositions inspired by impressive sounds of space related to very low and ultra-low frequency (VLF/ULF) electromagnetic waves. The MAARBLE international contest of musical composition aspired to combine scientific and artistic ways of thinking, through the science of Astronomy and Space and the art of Music. It was an original idea to provide scientific information to the public, inviting people to "feel" the science and to think about art. The leading concept was to use the natural sounds of the Earth's magnetosphere in order to compose electroacoustic music. Composers from all European countries were invited to take part at the contest, using some (or all) of the sounds included in a database of magnetospheric sounds compiled by the MAARBLE outreach team. The results were astonishing: the contest was oversubscribed by a factor of 19 (in total 55 applications from 17 countries) and the musical pieces were of overall excellent quality, making the selection of winners a very difficult task. Ultimately, the selection committee concluded on the ten highest ranked compositions, which were uploaded on the MAARBLE website. Furthermore, the

  4. Meanings of feeling well for women with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juuso, Päivi; Skär, Lisa; Olsson, Malin; Söderberg, Siv

    2013-01-01

    The researchers' focus in this study was to elucidate meanings of feeling well for women with fibromyalgia (FM). We obtained narrative interviews with 13 women with FM and used a phenomenological-hermeneutic interpretation to analyze the interview texts. Our interpretation of the findings shows that for women with FM meanings of feeling well can be understood as having strength to be involved. The women's experiences of feeling well meant being in control, having power, finding one's own pace, and experiencing feelings of belonging.

  5. Doing Good and Feeling Bad: The Work of Women University Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acker, Sandra; Feuerverger, Grace

    1996-01-01

    Explores consequences of the gendered division of labor in Canadian university faculties of education. Interviewees reported working hard but feeling disappointed by the results. Argues that this is related to the academic reward system and to expectations of harder work from women. Explores individual and structural explanations of the findings.…

  6. Early Feelings about School and Later Academic Outcomes of Children with Special Needs Living in Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser-Cram, Penny; Durand, Tina M.; Warfield, Marji Erickson

    2007-01-01

    In this investigation we examined the relation of children's reported feelings about school during kindergarten or first grade to their academic achievement at the end of fifth grade. Participants were children (N=103) who lived in poverty during early childhood and who were placed on individualized education programs (IEPs) during their…

  7. [Family in the waiting room of an intensive care unit revealed feelings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizon, Gloriana; do Nascimento, Eliane Regina Pereira; Bertoncello, Kátia Cilene Godinho; Martinse, Josiane de Jesus

    2011-03-01

    This is a qualitative study that aims to understand the feelings of relatives of patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). The study was conducted in the ICU of a large general hospital in the western region of Santa Catarina. The data collection occurred in 2009 with a semi structured interview to eighteen families. For data treatment the collective subject discourse was used. Reports emerged of two items related to feelings: hospitalization in the ICU and while waiting to enter the unit. The analysis revealed feelings as pain, anguish, sadness, helplessness,fear, despair, anxiety and expectation infinite. It is hoped that these results may assist in the training of professionals, to host the family and its insertion in the ICU environment as an element to be integrated into nursing care, through actions welcoming, helping them to cope with hospitalization of a relative in a critical unit.

  8. [Workers' subjective feeling of fatigue and attitudes towards work--effects of age and job difference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumashiro, M; Nagae, S

    1984-09-01

    The present study is an attempt to assess attitudes towards work and subjective feelings of fatigue. To discover the relationships between these factors, a field study was conducted in a large-sized electric company. The subjects were 1376 male workers. The results of the 30 questions concerning subjective feelings of fatigue published by the Japan Association of Industrial Health showed that the complaint rate of fatigue in younger workers (18-29 yrs.) was higher than that of older workers (30-66 yrs.). In the middle aged (44-49 yrs.), feelings of fatigue in the administrative group were lower than that of the non-administrative group. Finally, workers who had a high complaint rate of fatigue were less favourably disposed towards their work and felt an increase in boredom, loneliness and monotony. Overall, the results indicated that the difference of labor mode exerts an influence on the onset of self-reported stress.

  9. Neuronal processes involved in subjective feeling emergence: oscillatory activity during an emotional monitoring task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Glauser, Elise S; Scherer, Klaus R

    2008-06-01

    Subjective feeling, defined as the conscious experience of emotion and measured by self-report, is generally used as a manipulation check in studying emotional processes, rather than being the primary focus of research. In this paper, we report a first investigation into the processes involved in the emergence of a subjective feeling. We hypothesized that the oscillatory brain activity presumed to underlie the emergence of a subjective feeling can be measured by electroencephalographic (EEG) frequency band activity, similar to what has been shown in the literature for the conscious representation of objects. Emotional reactions were induced in participants using static visual stimuli. Episodes for which participants reported a subjective feeling were compared to those that did not lead to a conscious emotional experience, in order to identify potential differences between these two kinds of reactions at the oscillatory level. Discrete wavelet transforms of the EEG signal in gamma (31-63 Hz) and beta (15-31 Hz) bands showed significant differences between these two types of reactions. In addition, whereas beta band activities were widely distributed, differences in gamma band activity were predominantly observed in the frontal and prefrontal regions. The results are interpreted and discussed in terms of the complexity of the processes required to perform the affective monitoring task. It is suggested that future work on coherent mental representation of multimodal reaction patterns leading to the emergence of conscious emotional experience should include modifications in the time window examined and an extension of the frequency range to be considered.

  10. Regulation of romantic love feelings: Preconceptions, strategies, and feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.E. Langeslag (Sandra); J.W. van Strien (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractLove feelings can be more intense than desired (e.g., after a break-up) or less intense than desired (e.g., in long-Term relationships). If only we could control our love feelings! We present the concept of explicit love regulation, which we define as the use of behavioral and cognitive

  11. Feelings of Well-Being Before and After an Abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hittner, Amy

    1987-01-01

    Examined feelings of well-being in 217 women who had abortions. Results suggest that, compared to women who have not had abortions, those who choose abortion feel more negatively. Of women choosing abortion, those who are already mothers are most likely to be depressed and lonely, followed by those from lower educational and socioeconomic…

  12. Justice and Feelings: Toward a New Era in Justice Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremer, D. de; Bos, K. van den

    2007-01-01

    In this special issue, the relationship between feelings and justice and its consequences are highlighted. Five articles discuss the role that affect, feelings, and emotions play in justice processes across a variety of social settings. In the present introductory article, the position of past and p

  13. Photos That Increase Feelings of Learning Promote Positive Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardwell, Brittany A.; Newman, Eryn J.; Garry, Maryanne; Mantonakis, Antonia; Beckett, Randi

    2017-01-01

    Research shows that when semantic context makes it feel easier for people to bring related thoughts and images to mind, people can misinterpret that feeling of ease as evidence that information is positive. But research also shows that semantic context does more than help people bring known concepts to mind--it also teaches people new concepts. In…

  14. Regulation of romantic love feelings: Preconceptions, strategies, and feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J.E. Langeslag (Sandra); J.W. van Strien (Jan)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractLove feelings can be more intense than desired (e.g., after a break-up) or less intense than desired (e.g., in long-Term relationships). If only we could control our love feelings! We present the concept of explicit love regulation, which we define as the use of behavioral and cognitive

  15. Response to Mary J. Reichling, "Intersections: Form, Feeling, and Isomorphism"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Anne

    2004-01-01

    In her response to Mary Reichling's article "Intersections: Form, Feeling, and Isomorphism, Anne Sinclair believes that the exploration of form, feeling, and isomorphism in the writings of Susanne Langer accomplishes its goal to examine and elucidate aspects of these concepts. Sinclair finds several of the ideas presented very engaging. Musical…

  16. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  17. Music Therapy with Bereaved Youth: Expressing Grief and Feeling Better

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFerran, Katrina

    2011-01-01

    Music therapy is a promising intervention with bereaved youth. In comparison to other programs, it appears particularly effective for promoting the resolution of grief-related feelings; providing opportunities to express and release feelings through musical participation. Descriptions from music therapy participants are supported by research…

  18. Erotic feelings toward the therapist: a relational perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotterman, Jenny H

    2014-02-01

    This article focuses on the relational treatment of a male patient presenting with sexual and erotic feelings toward the therapist. The use of relational psychotherapy allowed us to collaborate in viewing our therapeutic relationship as a microcosm of other relationships throughout the patient's life. In this way, the patient came to understand his fears of being close to women, his discomfort with his sexuality, and how these feelings impacted his ongoing romantic and sexual experiences. Use of the therapist's reactions to the patient, including conscious and unconscious feelings and behaviors, aided in the conceptualization of this case. Working under a relational model was especially helpful when ruptures occurred, allowing the patient and therapist to address these moments and move toward repair. The patient was successful in making use of his sexual feelings to understand his feelings and behaviors across contexts. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Unprepared Discipline: Selection of Alternative Futures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, John D.

    1988-01-01

    Physical education teachers need to create alternative futures, select the one of their choice, and then take the necessary steps to make this future come true. Background information on futurism, futures research, and ways to consider alternative futures is provided for those who wish to incorporate these concepts into the curriculum. (Author/CB)

  20. Evaluation of the "Feeling Good" Television Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Keith W.; Swinehart, James W.

    This report provides an overview of the development and evaluation of an experimental television series for adult viewers on health care. The series was produced by the Children's Television Workshop and aired in prime time during 1974-1975 by the Public Broadcasting Service. The report synthesizes results of complementary impact studies conducted…

  1. A reflection on feelings and the history of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Otniel E

    2009-12-01

    This reflection attends to Paul White's call in his introduction to this Focus section for a history of science that is informed by the history of emotions. It offers a succinct historical exemplification of the possibilities of studying the history of science in terms of the history of emotions. It draws on Raymond Williams's concept of "structure of feeling" in arguing for the emergence of an adrenaline structure of feeling during the early twentieth century. It provides a mosaic of different views of the immanence of the adrenaline structure of feeling in diverse scientific realms by broaching some of the major themes that appear in the individual essays in this Focus section.

  2. Patients with Spina Bifida and their Caregivers Feelings about Intermittent Bladder Catheterization in Brazil and Germany: A Correlational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faleiros, Fabiana; Cordeiro, Adriana; Favoretto, Naira; Käppler, Christoph; Murray, Christine; Tate, Denise

    2015-10-29

    A major complication for individuals with spina bifida (SB) is managing their neurogenic bladder. For many, this process evokes negative feelings associated with guilt, dependence, and lack of self-worth. To compare feelings that hinder the performing of intermittent bladder catheterization reported by individuals with SB and their families in two countries of different sociocultural characteristics: Brazil and Germany. Quantitative and comparative study with convenience sampling. The sample comprised of 200 SB patients and their caregivers, 100 from Brazil and 100 from Germany. When asked about the existence of negative feelings or ideas that may hinder the performance of key person responsible for IC, 155 (77.5%) participants did not report such feelings. On the other hand, 45 (22.5%) reported emotional difficulties; among these participants, 31 (69%) were Brazilians and 14 (31%) Germans. Although emotional factors are important to the adjustment of using IC methods for bladder management, the majority of people with SB and their caregivers seem to report no major emotional difficulties with this process. Yet a considerable group of participants did report such emotional difficulties associated with fear and shame. Knowing more about the factors associated with such negative feelings can facilitate interactions, provide mutual aid, and assist with resolution of practical concerns related to intermittent bladder catheterization. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  3. Can a Web-Based Course Improve Communicative Competence of Foreign-Born Nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Schaik, Eileen; Lynch, Emily M.; Stoner, Susan A.; Sikorski, Lorna D.

    2014-01-01

    In the years since World War II, the United States has grown increasingly dependent on foreign-born healthcare personnel at all levels of the healthcare system. Foreign-born nurses report that while they may feel clinically competent, they often feel unprepared for the use of English in the healthcare setting (Davis & Nichols, 2002; Guttman,…

  4. Tragedy or tragicomedy: Mixed feelings induced by positive and negative emotional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mu; Chen, Jie; Li, Hong

    2016-08-01

    Based on the theory of appraisal, we predicted that positive and negative events happening to the same people or things in a specific chronological order (i.e., a negative event following a positive event) would induce different mixed feelings than the same events happening to different people or things. Pairs of emotional pictures with different captions were used to create two event groups. In the "tragic event" group, the positive and negative events happened to the same person or things, and in the "tragicomic event" group, the positive and negative events happened to different people or things. We designed two experiments to explore and compare the generation of mixed feelings in those two groups. In Experiment 1, the negative event was shown first, and in Experiment 2, the negative event was shown second (although the chronological order of the depicted events was the same). The participants were 381 undergraduates: 195 in Experiment 1 and 186 in Experiment 2. In both experiments, we found that tragic events introduced less intense mixed feelings than did tragicomic events due to fewer pleasurable feelings induced by the tragic events. There was no significant difference in the report of negative emotions between the groups. Appraisal theory and negative bias effects may explain these results.

  5. Feelings and opinions of women who underwent humanized labor at Santa Lucinda Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Dias de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Objectives: the aim of this study was to identify the feelings and opinions of the women about the experience lived in the pre-partum and humanized childbirth at Santa Lucinda's Hospital, based on the humanization of preconized assistance by the Ministry of Health. Methods: it treats of a descriptive and qualitative research. Fifteen puerperas who participated of the humanized childbirth at Santa Lucinda's Hospital, reported of the Basic Health Unit Sorocaba I of Sorocaba county, had participated in the study. It was used the Coletive Subject Discourse technique and the theory referential of Minayo, where the instrument of work was a recorded interview with two orientation questions. Results and Discussion: in the analysis, the talks were combined in eleven central ideas. The importance of the humanized assistance was emphasized and related to feelings of calmness and strength, as well as the pain was directly related to negative feelings and expressions such as fear, preoccupation and hate but followed by the feeling of compensation where the first contact with the baby becomes exciting and can be summarized in relief and joy. About the no pharmacological methods of pain relief and the accompanying's right, which are importance points to the childbirth humanization, it predominates the positive opinions. Conclusion: it can be concluded that it is necessary to reflect about the experience of humanized childbirth considering the individuality of each woman, for the applicability of it by the team be effective, providing an integral assistance to the women, respecting the middle which she is inserted.

  6. Feeling (Mis)Understood and Intergroup Friendships in Interracial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Nicole; Douglass, Sara; Garcia, Randi L; Yip, Tiffany; Trail, Thomas E

    2014-09-01

    The present research investigated whether having out-group friends serves as a buffer for feeling misunderstood in interracial interactions. Across three experience sampling studies, we found that among ethnic minorities who have few White friends or are not interacting with White friends, daily interracial interactions are associated with feeling less understood. By contrast, we found that among ethnic minorities who have more White friends or are interacting with White friends, the relationship between daily interracial interactions and feeling understood is not significant. We did not find similar results for Whites; that is, having ethnic minority friends did not play a role in the relationship between daily interracial interactions and feeling understood. Together, these studies demonstrate the beneficial effects of intergroup friendships for ethnic minorities.

  7. Would You Feel Safe in A Driverless Ambulance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... configuration, while they had mixed feelings about the autopilot configuration," said Rice, an associate professor of human ... people's emotional responses to it because ambulances on autopilot aren't a part of our everyday lives ...

  8. Feeling blue? Blue phosphors for OLEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hungshin Fu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs has been revitalized, partly due to the debut of the OLED TV by SONY in 2008. While there is still plenty of room for improvement in efficiency, cost-effectiveness and longevity, it is timely to report on the advances of light emitting materials, the core of OLEDs, and their future perspectives. The focus of this account is primarily to chronicle the blue phosphors developed in our laboratory. Special attention is paid to the design strategy, synthetic novelty, and their OLED performance. The report also underscores the importance of the interplay between chemistry and photophysics en route to true-blue phosphors.

  9. Money in the Bank: Feeling Powerful Increases Saving

    OpenAIRE

    Emily N. Garbinsky; Anne-Kathrin Klesse; Jennifer Aaker

    2014-01-01

    Across five studies, this research reveals that feeling powerful increases saving. This effect is driven by the desire to maintain one's current state. When the purpose of saving is no longer to accumulate money but to spend it on a status-related product, the basic effect is reversed, and those who feel powerless save more. Further, if money can no longer aid in maintaining one's current state because power is already secure or because power is maintained by accumulating an alternative resou...

  10. Association between maternal feeling about pregnancy and child's lifestyle

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Tomoko; Goto, Aya; Yokokawa, Hirohide; Sato, Yoshiaki; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    The number of children with undesirable lifestyles has recently increased. We tested the hypothesis that maternal feelings about pregnancy might be associated with their attitude towards promoting healthy lifestyles in their children. We used a city database collected from guardians of 204 randomly selected children aged 1 to 3 years in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima. Maternal feeling about pregnancy was measured using a 10-point scale, and a child lifestyle score was calculated as the sum of des...

  11. Symbolic objects as sediments of the intersubjective stream of feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Danilo Silva

    2010-09-01

    Taking into account that feeling is "the critical mediating process of the person-world relationships" (Josephs, Theory & Psychology 10(6):815, 2000), this article focuses on the artistic symbolic object as constraints that direct someone's feelings. Johansen (2010) states that the literary discourse "is designed to arousing and forming the feelings of listeners and readers" (p. 185). Distancing from strict literary production, I've used the testimony of the Brazilian songwriter, composer and performer, Tom Zé (2003), in order to discuss the intersubjective aspect of feelings articulation in his artistic work. Is proposed that the creative process of a symbolic object, which can be considered art, is a circumstance of a most general intersubjective-cultural process in which novel objects are built. If the specificity of art is to give a symbolic shape to human feeling (cf. Langer 1953), I argue that it is a sort of mediation which allows otherness to elaborate their affections through its objective guidance. In contrast with the scientific method of objective creation that is an effort for silencing contradictions (cf. Stengers 2002), the object of art remains open to multiple interpretations, stimulating the other to recursively speak and feel through it.

  12. Commitment to personal values and guilt feelings in dementia caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Alberto, Laura; Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Vara, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Caregivers' commitment to personal values is linked to caregivers' well-being, although the effects of personal values on caregivers' guilt have not been explored to date. The goal of this study is to analyze the relationship between caregivers´ commitment to personal values and guilt feelings. Participants were 179 dementia family caregivers. Face-to-face interviews were carried out to describe sociodemographic variables and assess stressors, caregivers' commitment to personal values and guilt feelings. Commitment to values was conceptualized as two factors (commitment to own values and commitment to family values) and 12 specific individual values (e.g. education, family or caregiving role). Hierarchical regressions were performed controlling for sociodemographic variables and stressors, and introducing the two commitment factors (in a first regression) or the commitment to individual/specific values (in a second regression) as predictors of guilt. In terms of the commitment to values factors, the analyzed regression model explained 21% of the variance of guilt feelings. Only the factor commitment to family values contributed significantly to the model, explaining 7% of variance. With regard to the regression analyzing the contribution of specific values to caregivers' guilt, commitment to the caregiving role and with leisure contributed negatively and significantly to the explanation of caregivers' guilt. Commitment to work contributed positively to guilt feelings. The full model explained 30% of guilt feelings variance. The specific values explained 16% of the variance. Our findings suggest that commitment to personal values is a relevant variable to understand guilt feelings in caregivers.

  13. What else do you feel when you feel sad? Emotional overproduction, neuroticism and rumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervas, Gonzalo; Vazquez, Carmelo

    2011-08-01

    Numerous experimental and naturalistic studies have shown the relevant role of ruminative styles in the onset, duration and severity of depressive episodes. Recent research has increasingly focused on the precursors of these ruminative responses. Neuroticism has been found to be closely related to ruminative styles, but the nature of this relationship is unknown. Across three studies, we explored the role of emotional overproduction, conceptualized as the tendency to simultaneously experience an elevated number of negative emotions and feelings during sad episodes. Study 1 showed that emotional overproduction is independently and strongly associated with ruminative styles. Furthermore, emotional overproduction was found to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and ruminative styles. Study 2 replicated these findings in a large community sample even after controlling for mood, personality, and other emotion-related variables. In Study 3, we conducted a laboratory study to increase the internal and external validity of our findings. Implications for personality, for coping and stress literature, and for clinical research and treatment are suggested.

  14. Meanings of feeling well for women with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Malin; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2010-09-01

    In research concerning multiple sclerosis (MS), the factors that impact on people's well-being and quality of life have been studied, but little has been written about what it means to feel well for women with MS. Therefore, in this study our aim was to describe meanings of feeling well for women with MS. We interviewed 15 women with MS, and a phenomenological hermeneutic interpretation was utilized to analyze the interviews. Through this study it can be understood that finding a pace where daily life goes on means that women with MS feel well when the illness is kept in check and is not the dominant experience. The findings of this study can be used to confirm women's experiences of feeling well, despite living with the consequences of MS. Health care professionals will find the results of this study useful when they reflect on and formulate the care of women with MS when attempting to support the latter's desire to feel well in their daily lives.

  15. Association between maternal feeling about pregnancy and child's lifestyle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tomoko; Goto, Aya; Yokokawa, Hirohide; Sato, Yoshiaki; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    The number of children with undesirable lifestyles has recently increased. We tested the hypothesis that maternal feelings about pregnancy might be associated with their attitude towards promoting healthy lifestyles in their children. We used a city database collected from guardians of 204 randomly selected children aged 1 to 3 years in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima. Maternal feeling about pregnancy was measured using a 10-point scale, and a child lifestyle score was calculated as the sum of desirable lifestyle habits (sleeping, eating, watching TV/videos, and tooth brushing). Associations between maternal feeling and her child's lifestyles were examined with multiple logistic regression analysis. For all lifestyle items, proportion of children with undesirable lifestyle habits was higher in the "unhappy group" (those who scored 1 to 9) than in the "happy group" (those who scored 10). In particular, a child's short sleeping hours (odds ratio [OR]=3.01) and lifestyle score of less than 3 ([OR] =3.60) were significantly associated with unhappy feelings. This was apparent among mothers aged 29 (median age) or younger. Our results indicate an association between a mother's unhappy feelings about pregnancy and her child's undesirable lifestyle, especially among relatively younger mothers. These findings provide public health implications important for early familial intervention to improve children's lifestyles.

  16. Microbiota and Neurological Disorders: A Gut Feeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Walter H; Faller, Douglas V; Harpp, David N; Kanara, Iphigenia; Pernokas, Julie; Powers, Whitney R; Steliou, Kosta

    2016-01-01

    In the past century, noncommunicable diseases have surpassed infectious diseases as the principal cause of sickness and death, worldwide. Trillions of commensal microbes live in and on our body, and constitute the human microbiome. The vast majority of these microorganisms are maternally derived and live in the gut, where they perform functions essential to our health and survival, including: digesting food, activating certain drugs, producing short-chain fatty acids (which help to modulate gene expression by inhibiting the deacetylation of histone proteins), generating anti-inflammatory substances, and playing a fundamental role in the induction, training, and function of our immune system. Among the many roles the microbiome ultimately plays, it mitigates against untoward effects from our exposure to the environment by forming a biotic shield between us and the outside world. The importance of physical activity coupled with a balanced and healthy diet in the maintenance of our well-being has been recognized since antiquity. However, it is only recently that characterization of the host-microbiome intermetabolic and crosstalk pathways has come to the forefront in studying therapeutic design. As reviewed in this report, synthetic biology shows potential in developing microorganisms for correcting pathogenic dysbiosis (gut microbiota-host maladaptation), although this has yet to be proven. However, the development and use of small molecule drugs have a long and successful history in the clinic, with small molecule histone deacetylase inhibitors representing one relevant example already approved to treat cancer and other disorders. Moreover, preclinical research suggests that epigenetic treatment of neurological conditions holds significant promise. With the mouth being an extension of the digestive tract, it presents a readily accessible diagnostic site for the early detection of potential unhealthy pathogens resident in the gut. Taken together, the data outlined

  17. [Holism only in theory: the struggle of nursing students feelings about their education process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperidião, Elizabeth; Munari, Denize Bouttelet

    2004-09-01

    Despite the speech of the human being's integration, we have observed that the nurse professional formation emphasizes the technical dimension, leaving out the professional's internal growth. Searching for understanding that process, our goal is to identify and to analyze the perception and feelings of nursing teaching staff, related to their formation as a person and as a professional in the of Nursing scope. The reports that were submitted to the content analysis pointed out two categories: Holism only in theory and Scheme of the feelings, revealing a stage of many discoveries and little space for the student person. The results of the research offered important elements to think about it by the Schools, visualizing the student's formation as an integral and integrated person.

  18. The Rubber Hand Illusion: feeling of ownership and proprioceptive drift do not go hand in hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Marieke; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2011-01-01

    In the Rubber Hand Illusion, the feeling of ownership of a rubber hand displaced from a participant's real occluded hand is evoked by synchronously stroking both hands with paintbrushes. A change of perceived finger location towards the rubber hand (proprioceptive drift) has been reported to correlate with this illusion. To measure the time course of proprioceptive drift during the Rubber Hand Illusion, we regularly interrupted stroking (performed by robot arms) to measure perceived finger location. Measurements were made by projecting a probe dot into the field of view (using a semi-transparent mirror) and asking participants if the dot is to the left or to the right of their invisible hand (Experiment 1) or to adjust the position of the dot to that of their invisible hand (Experiment 2). We varied both the measurement frequency (every 10 s, 40 s, 120 s) and the mode of stroking (synchronous, asynchronous, just vision). Surprisingly, with frequent measurements, proprioceptive drift occurs not only in the synchronous stroking condition but also in the two control conditions (asynchronous stroking, just vision). Proprioceptive drift in the synchronous stroking condition is never higher than in the just vision condition. Only continuous exposure to asynchronous stroking prevents proprioceptive drift and thus replicates the differences in drift reported in the literature. By contrast, complementary subjective ratings (questionnaire) show that the feeling of ownership requires synchronous stroking and is not present in the asynchronous stroking condition. Thus, subjective ratings and drift are dissociated. We conclude that different mechanisms of multisensory integration are responsible for proprioceptive drift and the feeling of ownership. Proprioceptive drift relies on visuoproprioceptive integration alone, a process that is inhibited by asynchronous stroking, the most common control condition in Rubber Hand Illusion experiments. This dissociation implies that

  19. The Rubber Hand Illusion: feeling of ownership and proprioceptive drift do not go hand in hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Rohde

    Full Text Available In the Rubber Hand Illusion, the feeling of ownership of a rubber hand displaced from a participant's real occluded hand is evoked by synchronously stroking both hands with paintbrushes. A change of perceived finger location towards the rubber hand (proprioceptive drift has been reported to correlate with this illusion. To measure the time course of proprioceptive drift during the Rubber Hand Illusion, we regularly interrupted stroking (performed by robot arms to measure perceived finger location. Measurements were made by projecting a probe dot into the field of view (using a semi-transparent mirror and asking participants if the dot is to the left or to the right of their invisible hand (Experiment 1 or to adjust the position of the dot to that of their invisible hand (Experiment 2. We varied both the measurement frequency (every 10 s, 40 s, 120 s and the mode of stroking (synchronous, asynchronous, just vision. Surprisingly, with frequent measurements, proprioceptive drift occurs not only in the synchronous stroking condition but also in the two control conditions (asynchronous stroking, just vision. Proprioceptive drift in the synchronous stroking condition is never higher than in the just vision condition. Only continuous exposure to asynchronous stroking prevents proprioceptive drift and thus replicates the differences in drift reported in the literature. By contrast, complementary subjective ratings (questionnaire show that the feeling of ownership requires synchronous stroking and is not present in the asynchronous stroking condition. Thus, subjective ratings and drift are dissociated. We conclude that different mechanisms of multisensory integration are responsible for proprioceptive drift and the feeling of ownership. Proprioceptive drift relies on visuoproprioceptive integration alone, a process that is inhibited by asynchronous stroking, the most common control condition in Rubber Hand Illusion experiments. This dissociation implies

  20. Feeling entitled to more: ostracism increases dishonest behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kai-Tak; Chen, Zhansheng; Dewall, C Nathan

    2013-09-01

    Five experiments tested whether ostracism increases dishonesty through increased feelings of entitlement. Compared with included and control participants, ostracized participants indicated higher levels of dishonest intentions (Experiments 1-3) and cheated more to take undeserved money in a behavioral task (Experiments 4 and 5). In addition, increased feelings of entitlement mediated the effect of ostracism on dishonesty (Experiments 3-5). Framing ostracism as beneficial weakened the connection between ostracism, entitlement, and dishonest behavior (Experiment 5). Together, these findings highlight the significance of entitlement in explaining when and why ostracism increases dishonest behavior and how to weaken this relationship.

  1. Meanings of feeling well among women with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Malin; Nilsson, Carina

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative inquiry to describe the meanings of feeling well as experienced by women with Parkinson's disease. Nine women were interviewed and we analysed the interviews using a reflective lifeworld approach based on phenomenological epistemology. We present the analysis as five constituents: the body as unnoticed; being able to move on; feeling joy by being connected; finding peace and harmony; and being the director of one's own life. Our findings can be used to understand and promote well-being among women with Parkinson's disease. In care meetings, knowledge about the lived and experienced health processes supports the women's striving to not let illness dominate their experience of daily life.

  2. [Electrostimulation for the treatment of a dry mouth feeling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, M J E J; Bots, C P; Brand, H S

    2015-10-01

    A 67-year-old woman suffered from a burning mouth feeling for 1.5 years and was referred by her dentist to a saliva clinic. At the clinic persistent xerostomia was diagnosed, and Sjögren's syndrome was suspected. After 1 year, a new measurement of the saliva secretion was carried out, which revealed a further decline in saliva secretion rate. The patient was consequently treated with an intra-oral electrostimulating device in order to stimulate the saliva secretion rate and reduce the feeling of a dry mouth. After 2 weeks, the patient experienced a considerable improvement of the subjective oral dryness.

  3. Impostor feelings as a moderator and mediator of the relationship between perceived discrimination and mental health among racial/ethnic minority college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, Kevin; Smith, Leann; Bernard, Donte; Hurst, Ashley; Jackson, Stacey; Stone, Steven; Awosogba, Olufunke; Saucer, Chastity; Bailey, Marlon; Roberts, Davia

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated whether impostor feelings would both moderate and mediate the relationship between perceived discrimination and mental health in a sample of diverse ethnic minority college students (106 African Americans, 102 Asian Americans, 108 Latino/a Americans) at an urban public university. African American students reported higher perceived discrimination than Asian American and Latino/a American students, while no racial/ethnic group differences were reported for impostor feelings. Analyses revealed that among African American students, high levels of impostor feelings moderated the perceived discrimination and depression relationship and mediated the perceived discrimination and anxiety relationship. Among Asian American students, impostor feelings mediated the relationship between perceived discrimination and both depression and anxiety. Among Latino/a American students low levels of impostor feelings moderated the relationship between perceived discrimination and both depression and anxiety, and partially mediated the relationship between perceived discrimination and anxiety. Multigroup path analyses revealed a significantly stronger impact of impostor feelings on depression among African American students and a stronger impact of perceived discrimination on impostor feelings among African American and Latino/a American students. Clinical implications and future research directions are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Feedback environment and well-being at work: The mediating role of personal control and feelings of helplessness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparr, J.L.; Sonnentag, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines employees' personal control and feelings of helplessness at work as partial mediators of the relationship between the supervisor-employee feedback environment and well-being (job satisfaction, job depression, job anxiety, turnover intentions) at work. Findings are reported from a

  5. Evaluation of the "Feeling Good" Television Series. Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Keith W.; Swinehart, James W.

    "Feeling Good" is the first television series for adults produced by the Children's Television Workshop, aired in prime time during 1974-1975 by the Public Broadcasting Service. The series attempted to reach the general public and motivate them to practice health maintenance behaviors. Various presentation formats were used. It was…

  6. Hospitalized child and teenager with chronic diseases: feelings about death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Moura de Moura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.Analyze the feelings of hospitalized children and adolescents with chronic diseases towards death. Methodology. Qualitative research, with four children and one teenager with chronic diseases, aged between 11 and 13 years old, who were admitted at a teaching hospital in Brazil, in the period from January to March 2009. In-depth interviews were carried out using a ludic material for therapeutic purposes, named ''As a guest in the hospital". The empirical material was submitted to thematic analysis. Results. Two mains meanings were obtained: Feelings of hospitalized children and adolescents with chronic diseases dealing with the death of the other; and children and adolescents with chronic diseases and the fear of their own deaths. Hospitalization makes children and adolescents come across the death of other sick people, arousing feelings of sadness, consternation, anxiety, making the fear of their own death become a threat. Conclusion. The health team needs to be attentive to the feelings of hospitalized children and adolescents facing death so that they can get the demands, minimizing fears and anguish.

  7. Money in the bank : Feeling powerful increases saving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbinsky, E.; Klesse, A.K.; Aaker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Across five studies, this research reveals that feeling powerful increases saving. This effect is driven by the desire to maintain one’s current state. When the purpose of saving is no longer to accumulate money but to spend it on a status-related product, the basic effect is reversed, and those who

  8. Money in the bank : Feeling powerful increases saving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbinsky, E.; Klesse, A.K.; Aaker, J.

    2014-01-01

    Across five studies, this research reveals that feeling powerful increases saving. This effect is driven by the desire to maintain one’s current state. When the purpose of saving is no longer to accumulate money but to spend it on a status-related product, the basic effect is reversed, and those who

  9. Emotions and feelings as the body's comment to personal relationships:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Søren

    describing - as the title does - emotions and feelings as the body's (subjectively experienced) comments to personal relationships. A model of human self- or second order consciousness, consistent with the described theoretical framework, will be presented. Implications of the model for the understanding...

  10. Art appreciation and aesthetic feeling as objects of explanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick Colm

    2013-04-01

    The target article presents a thought-provoking approach to the relation of neuroscience and art. However, at least two issues pose potential difficulties. The first concerns whether "art appreciation" is a coherent topic for scientific study. The second concerns the degree to which processing fluency can explain aesthetic feeling or may simply be one component of a more complex account.

  11. Feeling Good: Helping Children Grow Emotionally and Socially.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mimi, Ed.; And Others

    Designed to be presented in a workshop format, by trainers, to an audience of caregivers of young children, these materials provide six modules for workshops in the areas of helping children grow emotionally and socially. Contents of the workshop modules focus on adult behavior and children's self-esteem, feelings and sexuality, activities for…

  12. SPATIAL ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTS' FEAR AND FEELING OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    This study examined spatial pattern of crime and residents' fear and feeling of insecurity in Ile-Ife,. Nigeria. To obtain the ... underground subway alone or have reservations ..... the roles of these vigilante groups and that of the police in the ...

  13. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  14. Imagining and Feeling: Experiential Learning in Mass Communication Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parcells, Frank E.

    Defining the media experience as the media and social interaction involved in any person's viewing of television and the consequences of that viewing for oneself and others, this paper examines how phenomenology and psychodrama--methods of experiential learning focusing on the feeling and imagining functions of communication--can be used to teach…

  15. PEACE: A Feeling You Have in Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kim

    2006-01-01

    The author believes that very young children are able to understand the abstract concept of peace. In her primary classroom she introduces the concept of peace to the children in a low energy environment with low lights, and soft music. When children feel at peace in their hearts, they relate peacefully to those around them. She begins with the…

  16. Children's Perceptions of and Feelings about Their Musical Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cose-Giallella, Carla D.

    2010-01-01

    This action research study investigates children's perceptions of and feelings about musical performance. The participants were 41 children from two intact third-grade classes at one private school in the southwest region of the United States. The study occurred over nine weeks, including preparation for performance, the performance, and the…

  17. How Think-and-Feel-Aloud Instruction Influences Poetry Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva-Wood, Amy L.

    2004-01-01

    Assuming readers' emotional responses can inform literary analysis, this study of poetry readers featured an instructional intervention that involved modeling both cognitive and affective reading processes through a think-and-feel-aloud pedagogy. Eleventh-grade students in 2 conditions participated in a 4-week unit on reading poetry. Control group…

  18. Parental Divorce, Adolescents' Feelings toward Parents and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; van Dijk, Jitse P.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between parental divorce and adolescent drunkenness and the contribution of adolescents' feelings toward their parents to this association. Cross-sectional data on 3,694 elementary school students from several cities in Slovakia (mean age 14.3, 49

  19. Validation of the FEEL-KJ: An Instrument to Measure Emotion Regulation Strategies in Children and Adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiel Cracco

    Full Text Available Although the field of emotion regulation in children and adolescents is growing, there is need for age-adjusted measures that assess a large variety of strategies. An interesting instrument in this respect is the FEEL-KJ because it measures 7 adaptive and 5 maladaptive emotion regulation strategies in response to three different emotions. However, the FEEL-KJ has not yet been validated extensively. Therefore, the current study aims to test the internal structure and validity of the FEEL-KJ in a large sample of Dutch-speaking Belgian children and adolescents (N = 1102, 8-18 years old. The investigation of the internal structure confirms earlier reports of a two-factor structure with Adaptive and Maladaptive Emotion Regulation as overarching categories. However, it also suggests that the two-factor model is more complex than what was previously assumed. The evaluation of the FEEL-KJ validity furthermore provides evidence for its construct and external validity. In sum, the current study confirms that the FEEL-KJ is a valuable and reliable measure of emotion regulation strategies in children and adolescents.

  20. The Moral Virtue of Authenticity: How Inauthenticity Produces Feelings of Immorality and Impurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gino, Francesca; Kouchaki, Maryam; Galinsky, Adam D

    2015-07-01

    The five experiments reported here demonstrate that authenticity is directly linked to morality. We found that experiencing inauthenticity, compared with authenticity, consistently led participants to feel more immoral and impure. This link from inauthenticity to feeling immoral produced an increased desire among participants to cleanse themselves and to engage in moral compensation by behaving prosocially. We established the role that impurity played in these effects through mediation and moderation. We found that inauthenticity-induced cleansing and compensatory helping were driven by heightened feelings of impurity rather than by the psychological discomfort of dissonance. Similarly, physically cleansing oneself eliminated the relationship between inauthenticity and prosocial compensation. Finally, we obtained additional evidence for discriminant validity: The observed effects on desire for cleansing were not driven by general negative experiences (i.e., failing a test) but were unique to experiences of inauthenticity. Our results establish that authenticity is a moral state--that being true to thine own self is experienced as a form of virtue.

  1. Multisensory aversive stimuli differentially modulate negative feelings in near and far space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffou, Marine; Ondřej, Jan; O'Sullivan, Carol; Warusfel, Olivier; Dubal, Stéphanie; Viaud-Delmon, Isabelle

    2016-05-05

    Affect, space, and multisensory integration are processes that are closely linked. However, it is unclear whether the spatial location of emotional stimuli interacts with multisensory presentation to influence the emotional experience they induce in the perceiver. In this study, we used the unique advantages of virtual reality techniques to present potentially aversive crowd stimuli embedded in a natural context and to control their display in terms of sensory and spatial presentation. Individuals high in crowdphobic fear navigated in an auditory-visual virtual environment, in which they encountered virtual crowds presented through the visual channel, the auditory channel, or both. They reported the intensity of their negative emotional experience at a far distance and at a close distance from the crowd stimuli. Whereas auditory-visual presentation of close feared stimuli amplified negative feelings, auditory-visual presentation of distant feared stimuli did not amplify negative feelings. This suggests that spatial closeness allows multisensory processes to modulate the intensity of the emotional experience induced by aversive stimuli. Nevertheless, the specific role of auditory stimulation must be investigated to better understand this interaction between multisensory, affective, and spatial representation processes. This phenomenon may serve the implementation of defensive behaviors in response to aversive stimuli that are in position to threaten an individual's feeling of security.

  2. Effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on socioemotional feelings, authenticity, and autobiographical disclosure in healthy volunteers in a controlled setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggott, Matthew J; Coyle, Jeremy R; Siegrist, Jennifer D; Garrison, Kathleen J; Galloway, Gantt P; Mendelson, John E

    2016-04-01

    The drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy", "molly") is a widely used illicit drug and experimental adjunct to psychotherapy. MDMA has unusual, poorly understood socioemotional effects, including feelings of interpersonal closeness and sociability. To better understand these effects, we conducted a small (n=12) within-subjects double-blind placebo controlled study of the effects of 1.5 mg/kg oral MDMA on social emotions and autobiographical disclosure in a controlled setting. MDMA displayed both sedative- and stimulant-like effects, including increased self-report anxiety. At the same time, MDMA positively altered evaluation of the self (i.e. increasing feelings of authenticity) while decreasing concerns about negative evaluation by others (i.e. decreasing social anxiety). Consistent with these feelings, MDMA increased how comfortable participants felt describing emotional memories. Overall, MDMA produced a prosocial syndrome that seemed to facilitate emotional disclosure and that appears consistent with the suggestion that it represents a novel pharmacological class.

  3. Parental Depressive Feelings, Parental Support, and the Serotonin Transporter Gene as Predictors of Adolescent Depressive Feelings: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2011-01-01

    Parental support and parental depressive feelings are found to be associated with depressive feelings in adolescent boys and girls, but results are inconsistent. In addition, the "5-HTTLPR" genotype has been found to interact with environmental stressors in predicting adolescents' depressive feelings, but this has not been examined longitudinally.…

  4. Young women selling sex online - narratives on regulating feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Linda S; Svedin, Carl Göran; Hydén, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    The current study concerns young women's life stories of their experiences selling sex online before the age of 18. The aim was to gain an understanding of young women's perceptions of the reasons they started, continued, and stopped selling sex. The study included interviews with 15 young women between the ages of 15 and 25 (M=18.9). Thematic analysis was used to identify similarities and differences in the narratives. Three themes and eight sub-themes were identified in relation to different stages in their lives in the sex trade. The themes were organized into three parts, each with its own storyline: "Entering - adverse life experiences"; traumatic events: feeling different and being excluded. "Immersion - using the body as a tool for regulating feelings"; being seen: being touched: being in control: affect regulation and self-harming. "Exiting - change or die"; living close to death: the process of quitting. The informants all had stable social lives in the sense that they had roofs over their heads, food to eat, and no substance-abuse issues. None had a third party who arranged the sexual contacts and none were currently trafficked. They described how their experiences of traumatic events and of feeling different and excluded had led them into the sex trade. Selling sex functioned as a way to be seen, to handle traumatic events, and to regulate feelings. Professionals working with young people who sell sex online need to understand the complex web of mixed feelings and emotional needs that can play a role in selling sex. Young people selling sex might need guidance in relationship building as well as help processing traumatic experiences and ending self-harming behavior. Further studies are needed on the functions of online sex selling and on the exit process for young people, in order to prevent entrance and facilitate exiting.

  5. Emotions and feelings as the body's comment to personal relationships:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willert, Søren

    Modern neurobiological research on emotions (Damasio, LeDoux, Panksepp etc.) is changing our conceptions of emotional life. Rather than viewing emotions as belonging to an irrational realm, separated from cognition proper, (as in Freud's original hydraulic metaphor), emotions are understood...... us in our relational exchanges with our external surroundings (or Umwelt). Felt emotions, or feelings, also show up in our perceptual fields as distinguishable objects of attention constituting an important subset of phenomena belonging to our bodily-inside-as-Umwelt. This is the rationale behind...... describing - as the title does - emotions and feelings as the body's (subjectively experienced) comments to personal relationships. A model of human self- or second order consciousness, consistent with the described theoretical framework, will be presented. Implications of the model for the understanding...

  6. Digital TV: structures of feeling in the television of becoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Marquioni

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this text is to present some reflections on theinsertion of a new model of television in Brazil (interactive digital TV,adopting the concept of culture as the center to think of the television system.The notion for structure of feeling, by Raymond Williams, opens up atype of new window that helps to understand this new television whichis being implanted.

  7. Young women selling sex online – narratives on regulating feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Linda S; Svedin, Carl Göran; Hydén, Margareta

    2015-01-01

    The current study concerns young women’s life stories of their experiences selling sex online before the age of 18. The aim was to gain an understanding of young women’s perceptions of the reasons they started, continued, and stopped selling sex. The study included interviews with 15 young women between the ages of 15 and 25 (M=18.9). Thematic analysis was used to identify similarities and differences in the narratives. Three themes and eight sub-themes were identified in relation to different stages in their lives in the sex trade. The themes were organized into three parts, each with its own storyline: “Entering – adverse life experiences”; traumatic events: feeling different and being excluded. “Immersion – using the body as a tool for regulating feelings”; being seen: being touched: being in control: affect regulation and self-harming. “Exiting – change or die”; living close to death: the process of quitting. The informants all had stable social lives in the sense that they had roofs over their heads, food to eat, and no substance-abuse issues. None had a third party who arranged the sexual contacts and none were currently trafficked. They described how their experiences of traumatic events and of feeling different and excluded had led them into the sex trade. Selling sex functioned as a way to be seen, to handle traumatic events, and to regulate feelings. Professionals working with young people who sell sex online need to understand the complex web of mixed feelings and emotional needs that can play a role in selling sex. Young people selling sex might need guidance in relationship building as well as help processing traumatic experiences and ending self-harming behavior. Further studies are needed on the functions of online sex selling and on the exit process for young people, in order to prevent entrance and facilitate exiting. PMID:25733944

  8. Improving Customer Home-like Feeling Through Service Design

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Thu

    2015-01-01

    This thesis project was commissioned by Original Sokos Hotel Albert to investigate the hotel’s needs and customer demands. The aim of the project is to understand the connection between customer expectations and business strategy to generate higher service value. Sokos Hotel Albert offers hotel and restaurant services and the purpose of the thesis project is to improve the hotel customers’ home-like feelings. The project focuses on increasing the variety of the hotel services and solving the ...

  9. National well-being policy and a weighted approach to human feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Gus; Oswald, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Governments are becoming interested in the concept of human well-being and how truly to assess it. As an alternative to traditional economic measures, some nations have begun to collect information on citizens' happiness, life satisfaction, and other psychological scores. Yet how could such data actually be used? This paper is a cautious attempt to contribute to thinking on that question. It suggests a possible weighting method to calculate first-order changes in society's well-being, discusses some of the potential principles of democratic 'well-being policy', and (as an illustrative example) reports data on how sub-samples of citizens believe feelings might be weighted.

  10. A motion capture study to measure the feeling of synchrony in romantic couples and in professional musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Preissmann

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The feeling of synchrony is fundamental for most social activities and prosocial behaviors. However, little is known about the behavioral correlates of this feeling and its modulation by intergroup differences. We previously showed that the subjective feeling of synchrony in subjects involved in a mirror imitation task was modulated by objective behavioral measures, as well as contextual factors such as task difficulty and duration of the task performance. In the present study, we extended our methodology to investigate possible interindividual differences. We hypothesized that being in a romantic relationship or being a professional musician can modulate both implicit and explicit synchronisation and the feeling of synchrony as well as the ability to detect synchrony from a third person perspective. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find significant differences between people in a romantic relationship and control subjects. However, we observed differences between musicians and control subjects. For the implicit synchrony (spontaneous synchronization during walking, the results revealed that musicians that had never met before spontaneously synchronized their movements earlier among themselves than control subjects, but not better than people sharing a romantic relationship. Moreover, in explicit behavioral synchronisation tasks (mirror game, musicians reported earlier feeling of synchrony and had less speed errors than control subjects. This was in interaction with tasks difficulty as these differences appeared only in tasks with intermediate difficulty. Finally, when subjects had to judge synchrony from a third person perspective, musicians had a better performance to identify if they were present or not in the videos. Taken together, our results suggest that being a professional musician can play a role in the feeling of synchrony and its underlying mechanisms.

  11. A Motion Capture Study to Measure the Feeling of Synchrony in Romantic Couples and in Professional Musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissmann, Delphine; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Chagué, Sylvain; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Llobera, Joan; Ansermet, Francois; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2016-01-01

    The feeling of synchrony is fundamental for most social activities and prosocial behaviors. However, little is known about the behavioral correlates of this feeling and its modulation by intergroup differences. We previously showed that the subjective feeling of synchrony in subjects involved in a mirror imitation task was modulated by objective behavioral measures, as well as contextual factors such as task difficulty and duration of the task performance. In the present study, we extended our methodology to investigate possible interindividual differences. We hypothesized that being in a romantic relationship or being a professional musician can modulate both implicit and explicit synchronization and the feeling of synchrony as well as the ability to detect synchrony from a third person perspective. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find significant differences between people in a romantic relationship and control subjects. However, we observed differences between musicians and control subjects. For the implicit synchrony (spontaneous synchronization during walking), the results revealed that musicians that had never met before spontaneously synchronized their movements earlier among themselves than control subjects, but not better than people sharing a romantic relationship. Moreover, in explicit behavioral synchronization tasks (mirror game), musicians reported earlier feeling of synchrony and had less speed errors than control subjects. This was in interaction with tasks difficulty as these differences appeared only in tasks with intermediate difficulty. Finally, when subjects had to judge synchrony from a third person perspective, musicians had a better performance to identify if they were present or not in the videos. Taken together, our results suggest that being a professional musician can play a role in the feeling of synchrony and its underlying mechanisms.

  12. A Motion Capture Study to Measure the Feeling of Synchrony in Romantic Couples and in Professional Musicians

    KAUST Repository

    Preissmann, Delphine

    2016-10-27

    The feeling of synchrony is fundamental for most social activities and prosocial behaviors. However, little is known about the behavioral correlates of this feeling and its modulation by intergroup differences. We previously showed that the subjective feeling of synchrony in subjects involved in a mirror imitation task was modulated by objective behavioral measures, as well as contextual factors such as task difficulty and duration of the task performance. In the present study, we extended our methodology to investigate possible interindividual differences. We hypothesized that being in a romantic relationship or being a professional musician can modulate both implicit and explicit synchronization and the feeling of synchrony as well as the ability to detect synchrony from a third person perspective. Contrary to our hypothesis, we did not find significant differences between people in a romantic relationship and control subjects. However, we observed differences between musicians and control subjects. For the implicit synchrony (spontaneous synchronization during walking), the results revealed that musicians that had never met before spontaneously synchronized their movements earlier among themselves than control subjects, but not better than people sharing a romantic relationship. Moreover, in explicit behavioral synchronization tasks (mirror game), musicians reported earlier feeling of synchrony and had less speed errors than control subjects. This was in interaction with tasks difficulty as these differences appeared only in tasks with intermediate difficulty. Finally, when subjects had to judge synchrony from a third person perspective, musicians had a better performance to identify if they were present or not in the videos. Taken together, our results suggest that being a professional musician can play a role in the feeling of synchrony and its underlying mechanisms. © 2016 Preissmann, Charbonnier, Chagué, Antonietti, Llobera, Ansermet and Magistretti.

  13. Parental divorce, adolescents' feelings toward parents and drunkenness in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; van Dijk, Jitse P

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the association between parental divorce and adolescent drunkenness and the contribution of adolescents' feelings toward their parents to this association. Cross-sectional data on 3,694 elementary school students from several cities in Slovakia (mean age 14.3, 49.0% males; response rate 93%) were obtained. Respondents completed questionnaires on how often they had been drunk in the previous 4 weeks, whether their parents were divorced and a measure of their feelings toward their parents. Parental divorce was found to have an effect on adolescent drunkenness in the previous month, as were the high rates of negative and low rates of positive feelings toward both parents. The effect of divorce on drunkenness strongly decreased if adjusted for the affect of the adolescent toward the father, but not the mother. Our findings indicate that to keep the father positively involved after divorce might be a protective factor with regard to a higher probability of adolescent drunkenness in divorced families.

  14. Feelings about culture scales: development, factor structure, reliability, and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffini, Cara S; Wong, Y Joel

    2015-04-01

    Although measures of cultural identity, values, and behavior exist in the multicultural psychological literature, there is currently no measure that explicitly assesses ethnic minority individuals' positive and negative affect toward culture. Therefore, we developed 2 new measures called the Feelings About Culture Scale--Ethnic Culture and Feelings About Culture Scale--Mainstream American Culture and tested their psychometric properties. In 6 studies, we piloted the measures, conducted factor analyses to clarify their factor structure, and examined reliability and validity. The factor structure revealed 2 dimensions reflecting positive and negative affect for each measure. Results provided evidence for convergent, discriminant, criterion-related, and incremental validity as well as the reliability of the scales. The Feelings About Culture Scales are the first known measures to examine both positive and negative affect toward an individual's ethnic culture and mainstream American culture. The focus on affect captures dimensions of psychological experiences that differ from cognitive and behavioral constructs often used to measure cultural orientation. These measures can serve as a valuable contribution to both research and counseling by providing insight into the nuanced affective experiences ethnic minority individuals have toward culture.

  15. Alteration of adults' subjective feeling of familiarity toward infants' sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Y; Itakura, S

    2008-08-01

    Many adults may have lower subjective feelings of familiarity toward infants' vocalizations since infants' sounds are different from those of adults. However, mothers frequently exposed to infants' vocalizations may be more familiar and less averse. To test this hypothesis, 21 mothers (M age = 31.1 yr., SD = 4.3) of infants (M age = 8.2 mo., SD = 3.5), 18 mothers (M age = 34.4 yr., SD = 4.8) of children between two and five years of age (M age = 2.8 yr., SD = 1.0), and 17 women (M age = 29.2 yr., SD = ll.1) with no children were exposed to 20 types of sounds. Of these sounds, 14 were produced by infants. Although the mothers of infants did not recognize sounds as those of an infant's vocalization, they showed higher subjective feelings of familiarity toward the timbres of the vowel-like stimuli than did the other groups. By contrast, the subjective feelings of familiarity for nonspeech sounds did not differ among groups. Maternal experiences may change women's recognition of perceived sounds.

  16. Shame and Anxiety Feelings of a Roma Population in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouva, M; Mentis, M; Kotrotsiou, S; Paralikas, Th; Kotrotsiou, E

    2015-12-01

    Shame is a crucial issue for Roma. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the severity of shame and anxiety feelings in a Roma population living in Greece and assess the differentiation of these feelings between Roma men and women. A quota sample of 194 Roma adult men and women living in Southern Greece was retrieved. The Experiences of Shame Scale (ESS), the Other As Shamer Scale (OAS) and the Spielberg's State/Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) questionnaires were used. Women scored statistically significantly higher than men on ESS, whereas men scored higher on OAS scale (52.27 ± 16.91 vs 45.42 ± 9.98 and 35.93 ± 16.94 vs 30.87 ± 13.72 respectively). Women scored higher than men in both STAI subscales, however significant differences were observed only in State Anxiety scale (48.83 ± 9.26 vs 43.20 ± 9.81). OAS total score was inversely related to state anxiety, whereas ESS total score was positive related to trait anxiety, all correlations being significant at p Roma men and women exhibit high levels of shame and anxiety. Cultural, social and minority issues contribute to feelings of inferiority and anxiety experience.

  17. Viewing experience of 3DTV: An exploration of the feeling of sickness and presence in a shopping mall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrist, Marianna; Wurhofer, Daniela; Meneweger, Thomas; Grill, Thomas; Tscheligi, Manfred

    2013-02-01

    The adoption and deployment of 3DTV can be seen as a major step in the history of television, comparable to the transition from analogue to digital and standard to high definition TV. Although 3D is expected to emerge from the cinema to peoples' home, there is still a lack of knowledge on how people (future end users) perceive 3DTV and how this influences their viewing experience as well as their acceptance of 3DTV. Within this paper, findings from a three-day field evaluation study on people's 3DTV experiences, focusing on the feeling of sickness and presence, are presented. Contrary to the traditional controlled laboratory setting, the study was conducted in the public setting of a shopping center and involved 700 participants. The study revealed initial insights on users' feeling of presence and sickness when watching 3DTV content. Results from this explorative study show that most of the participants reported symptoms of sickness after watching 3DTV with an effect of gender and age on the reported feeling of sickness. Our results further suggest that the users' previous experience with 3D content has an influence on how realistic people rate the viewing experience and how involved they feel. The particularities of the study environment, a shopping mall, are reflected in our findings and future research directions and action points for investigating people's viewing experiences of 3DTV are summarized.

  18. Confessions of a baseball mom: the impact of youth sports on parents' feelings and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Nancy E

    2011-01-01

    To explore parents' emotional investment in and behaviors in response to youth sports, the author conducted a mixed-methods investigation to answer four research questions: (1)How do parents feel about their children's participation in organized youth team sports? (2) Which situations trigger which feelings? (3) How do parents' feelings influence their behaviors? (4) What parental characteristics (such as personal histories or demographics) are linked to different feelings and behaviors? The research indicated that many parents' feelings are triggered by their children's sports experiences and that adults must learn how to translate these feelings into productive behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  19. Affective consciousness: Core emotional feelings in animals and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panksepp, Jaak

    2005-03-01

    The position advanced in this paper is that the bedrock of emotional feelings is contained within the evolved emotional action apparatus of mammalian brains. This dual-aspect monism approach to brain-mind functions, which asserts that emotional feelings may reflect the neurodynamics of brain systems that generate instinctual emotional behaviors, saves us from various conceptual conundrums. In coarse form, primary process affective consciousness seems to be fundamentally an unconditional "gift of nature" rather than an acquired skill, even though those systems facilitate skill acquisition via various felt reinforcements. Affective consciousness, being a comparatively intrinsic function of the brain, shared homologously by all mammalian species, should be the easiest variant of consciousness to study in animals. This is not to deny that some secondary processes (e.g., awareness of feelings in the generation of behavioral choices) cannot be evaluated in animals with sufficiently clever behavioral learning procedures, as with place-preference procedures and the analysis of changes in learned behaviors after one has induced re-valuation of incentives. Rather, the claim is that a direct neuroscientific study of primary process emotional/affective states is best achieved through the study of the intrinsic ("instinctual"), albeit experientially refined, emotional action tendencies of other animals. In this view, core emotional feelings may reflect the neurodynamic attractor landscapes of a variety of extended trans-diencephalic, limbic emotional action systems-including SEEKING, FEAR, RAGE, LUST, CARE, PANIC, and PLAY. Through a study of these brain systems, the neural infrastructure of human and animal affective consciousness may be revealed. Emotional feelings are instantiated in large-scale neurodynamics that can be most effectively monitored via the ethological analysis of emotional action tendencies and the accompanying brain neurochemical/electrical changes. The

  20. Doctoral Students’ Experiences of Feeling (or not Like an Academic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Emmioglu Sarikaya

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: This paper examined the balance and meaning of two types of experiences in the day-to-day activity of doctoral students that draw them into academia and that move them away from academia: ‘feeling like an academic and belonging to an academic community;’ and ‘not feeling like an academic and feeling excluded from an academic community.’ Background: As students navigate doctoral work, they are learning what is entailed in being an academic by engaging with their peers and more experienced academics within their community. They are also personally and directly experiencing the rewards as well as the challenges related to doing academic work. Methodology\t: This study used a qualitative methodology; and daily activity logs as a data collection method. The data was collected from 57 PhD students in the social sciences and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields at two universities in the UK and two in Canada. Contribution: The current study moves beyond the earlier studies by elaborating on how academic activities contribute/hinder doctoral students’ sense of being an academic. Findings: The participants of the study generally focused on disciplinary/scholarly rather than institutional/service aspects of academic work, aside from teaching, and regarded a wide range of activities as having more positive than negative meanings. The findings related to both extrinsic and intrinsic factors that play important roles in students’ experiences of feeling (or not like academics are elaborated in the study. Recommendations for Practitioners: Supervisors should encourage their students to develop their own support networks and to participate in a wide range of academic activities as much as possible. Supervisors should encourage students to self-assess and to state the activities they feel they need to develop proficiency in. Future Research: More research is needed to examine the role of teaching in doctoral

  1. [Development of the Feelings toward Nature Scale and relationship between feelings toward nature and proximity to nature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Seiji

    2016-04-01

    In the field of environmental psychology, there is rapidly growing interest in the concept of connectivity with nature, describing an individual's sense of being connected with nature. The author developed a new scale for assessing feelings toward nature, including connectedness. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated a five-factor model consisting of restorativeness, oneness, mystery, care, and aversion. Then, the relationships among availability of nature in respondents' neighborhood, age, and each subscale score of the Feelings toward Nature Scale, were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The availability of nature in neighborhoods was assessed using a geographic information system and respondents' subjective evaluations. Results indicate that overall connectedness to nature is weaker as availability of nature decreases, as assessed by subjective evaluation. Results also suggest that aversion toward nature in younger people is relatively stronger than in older generations.

  2. Expectations and positive emotional feelings accompany reductions in ongoing and evoked neuropathic pain following placebo interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gitte L; Finnerup, Nanna B; Grosen, Kasper; Pilegaard, Hans K; Tracey, Irene; Benedetti, Fabrizio; Price, Donald D; Jensen, Troels S; Vase, Lene

    2014-12-01

    Research on placebo analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia has primarily included healthy subjects or acute pain patients, and it is unknown whether these effects can be obtained in ongoing pain in patients with chronic pain caused by an identifiable nerve injury. Eighteen patients with postthoracotomy neuropathic pain were exposed to placebo and nocebo manipulations, in which they received open and hidden administrations of pain-relieving (lidocaine) or pain-inducing (capsaicin) treatment controlled for the natural history of pain. Immediately after the open administration, patients rated their expected pain levels on a mechanical visual analogue scale (M-VAS). They also reported their emotional feelings via a quantitative/qualitative experiential method. Subsequently, patients rated their ongoing pain levels on the M-VAS and underwent quantitative sensory testing of evoked pain (brush, pinprick, area of hyperalgesia, wind-up-like pain). There was a significant placebo effect on both ongoing (P=.009 to .019) and evoked neuropathic pain (P=.0005 to .053). Expected pain levels accounted for significant amounts of the variance in ongoing (53.4%) and evoked pain (up to 34.5%) after the open lidocaine administration. Furthermore, patients reported high levels of positive and low levels of negative emotional feelings in the placebo condition compared with the nocebo condition (P⩽.001). Pain increases during nocebo were nonsignificant (P=.394 to 1.000). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate placebo effects in ongoing neuropathic pain. It provides further evidence for placebo-induced reduction in hyperalgesia and suggests that patients' expectations coexist with emotional feelings about treatments. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Measuring how game feel is influenced by the player avatar's acceleration and deceleration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Gustav; Kraus, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The feel of videogames is important, but not very well understood. Game feel is an integral part of game design and can be defined as the moment-to-moment sensation of control in games. It is important for game designers to understand when a game feels a certain way, since it is something...... that the player is constantly experiencing. There is a need of a better understanding of why certain games feel like they do, such as which parameters can be used to make a game feeling a particular way. This paper sets out to investigate what words players use to describe the feel of games, as well as what kind...... of parameters yield these descriptive words. This is attempted by using a 2D platforming game in which the response of the player avatar's motion is modulated. Between each round, players were asked to describe their perceived feel of controlling the avatar. The majority used basic words to describe the feel...

  4. Are GPs’ feelings of burnout and discontent reflected in the psychological content of their consultations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, E.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bakker, D.H. de; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if consultations from general practitioners (GPs) with feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction contain less psychological elements compared to consultations from GPs without these negative feelings. It is known that GPs’ available time and specific communication tools are

  5. Determinants of general practitioner’s cancer related gut feelings – a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Donker, G.; Wiersma, E.; Heins, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background General practitioners (GPs) use gut feelings to diagnose cancer in an early stage, but little is known about the predictive value of gut feelings and how this is influenced by patient and GP characteristics. Methods Prospective cohort study of patients in 44 general practices throughout the Netherlands, from January 2010 till December 2013. GPs completed a questionnaire regarding gut feelings, patient and GP characteristics, if they noticed a cancer-related gut feeling during patie...

  6. Mood Assessment via Animated Characters: A Novel Instrument to Evaluate Feelings in Young Children with Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manassis, Katharina; Mendlowitz, Sandra; Kreindler, David; Lumsden, Charles; Sharpe, Jason; Simon, Mark D.; Woolridge, Nicholas; Monga, Suneeta; Adler-Nevo, Gili

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated a novel, computerized feelings assessment instrument (MAAC) in 54 children with anxiety disorders and 35 nonanxious children ages 5 to 11. They rated their feelings relative to 16 feeling animations. Ratings of feelings, order of feeling selection, and correlations with standardized anxiety measures were examined. Positive emotions…

  7. Young women selling sex online – narratives on regulating feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonsson LS

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Linda S Jonsson,1 Carl Göran Svedin,1 Margareta Hydén2 1Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden Abstract: The current study concerns young women’s life stories of their experiences selling sex online before the age of 18. The aim was to gain an understanding of young women’s perceptions of the reasons they started, continued, and stopped selling sex. The study included interviews with 15 young women between the ages of 15 and 25 (M=18.9. Thematic analysis was used to identify similarities and differences in the narratives. Three themes and eight sub-themes were identified in relation to different stages in their lives in the sex trade. The themes were organized into three parts, each with its own storyline: “Entering – adverse life experiences”; traumatic events: feeling different and being excluded. “Immersion – using the body as a tool for regulating feelings”; being seen: being touched: being in control: affect regulation and self-harming. “Exiting – change or die”; living close to death: the process of quitting. The informants all had stable social lives in the sense that they had roofs over their heads, food to eat, and no substance-abuse issues. None had a third party who arranged the sexual contacts and none were currently trafficked. They described how their experiences of traumatic events and of feeling different and excluded had led them into the sex trade. Selling sex functioned as a way to be seen, to handle traumatic events, and to regulate feelings. Professionals working with young people who sell sex online need to understand the complex web of mixed feelings and emotional needs that can play a role in selling sex. Young people selling sex might need guidance in relationship building as well as help

  8. Evoked Feelings, Assigned Meanings and Constructed Knowledge Based on Mistakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Guimarães Batistella Bianchini

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available By means of Piaget's critical clinical method, the study investigated the meanings assigned to mistakes by four students in different activities and interactive situations. The research also analyzed the results of using self-regulatory situations in understanding mistakes initially committed by the students. Data collection instruments consisted of games, video recordings, diaries and interviews. Following intervention, the students were able to recognize their competence, establish positive interactions within the group, and avoid viewing mistakes as obstacles to learning. We concluded that the meanings assigned to mistakes depend on certain variables, among them feelings nurtured by the individuals about themselves, the other, and the object of knowledge.

  9. [Subjective feeling of patient on his illness and his treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, P-M

    2013-09-01

    Subjective feeling of schizophrenic patients has been underestimated in the study of this illness. Subjective experience associated with the onset of the disease is of interest in a clinical point of view but also in the study of the underlying mechanisms. The fields of cognitive psychology, but also neuroscientific inputs, provide new paradigms to understand schizophrenia. In a more global perspective, subjective experience has an important impact on quality of life and is highly related to symptomatology and treatments. Identification of these subjective dimensions is needed to develop more efficacious strategies. Copyright © 2013 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  10. Feelings and Ethics Education: The Film 'Dear Scientists'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Semendeferi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available There is an increasing body of evidence that not only cognition but also emotions shape moral judgment. The conventional teaching of responsible conduct of research, however, does not target emotions; its emphasis is on rational analysis. Here I present a new approach, ‘the feelings method,’ for incorporating emotions into science ethics education. This method is embodied in Dear Scientists, an innovative film that combines humanities with arts and works at the subconscious level, delivering an intense mix of music and images, contrasted by calm narration. Dear Scientists has struck a chord across the science, humanities, and arts communities—a promising sign.

  11. The Relationship between Media Consumption and Feeling of Social Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan khajeNoori

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe concept of social security and a Feeling of security and the citizens, as a key element in achieving the projected, is important Sociologists and criminologist shave always paid special attention has been sought. Study of the factors influencing the feeling of security, can increase the feeling of security is work. Also enhance citizens' feeling of security and welfare of the citizens and to accept responsibility and commitment will do. The widespread use of social media in recent years and the impact of media on society's mind have led to many domestic and foreign scholars. So, check the contacts affected by the mass media, education and the media in order to prevent the audience from passive acceptance of messages highlights. The aim of this research was to study the effects of mass media on the population of Sanandaj is a feeling of social security, which includes theoretical and experimental studies, will be secure. In the security field can be separated into three terms: instability, insecurity and lack of imagination. When one of the variables constituting the security is not there, the country is unsafe, but a time for people who live in that country, the feeling there is no safe live in the country, but the full security is established. When the population is thought to suffer from some kind of insecurity, that is, assume that there is no security. The country is in crisis, it is a sign of political legitimacy, which can even lead to the overthrow of the crisis. In general we can say that the definition of the concept of social security is a feeling of mental peace of mind about the women in your life how much they are protected against the risks, and harassing other people. To test it out feel safe in public areas, family and work are examined. The main variables investigated in relation to the impact of the media on the audience's sense of security, the theoretical foundations were explored. Becker (1998, two approaches

  12. Effects of Chronic Exercise on Feelings of Energy and Fatigue: A Quantitative Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Patrick; Dishman, Rod K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of chronic exercise on feelings of energy and fatigue using meta-analytic techniques. Chronic exercise increased feelings of energy and lessened feelings of fatigue compared with control conditions by a mean effect delta of 0.37. The effect varied according to the presence or absence of a placebo control or…

  13. Intensity of ADHD Symptoms and Subjective Feelings of Competence in School Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanc, Tomasz; Brzezinska, Anna Izabela

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to assess how different levels of intensity of ADHD symptoms influence the development of the subjective feeling of competence in school age children. The sample was comprised of 62 children age 11 to 13. For the purpose of estimation of the subjective feeling of competence, The Feeling of Competence Questionnaire…

  14. Feeling the pain of others is associated with self-other confusion and prior pain experience

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    Stuart W G Derbyshire

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some chronic pain patients and healthy individuals experience pain when observing injury or others in pain. To further understand shared pain, we investigated perspective taking, bodily ownership and tooth pain sensitivity. First, participants who reported shared pain (responders and those who did not (non-responders viewed an avatar on a screen. Intermittently, 0-3 circles appeared. Sometimes the participant's and avatar's perspective were consistent, both directly viewed the same circles, and sometimes inconsistent, both directly viewed different circles. Responders were faster than non-responders to identify the number of circles when adopting a consistent perspective. Second, participants sat with their left hand hidden while viewing a rubber hand. All participants reported an illusory sensation of feeling stroking in the rubber hand and a sense of ownership of the rubber hand during synchronous stroking of the rubber and hidden hand. The responders also reported feeling the stroking and a sense of ownership of the rubber hand during asynchronous stroking. For experiment three, participants with either low, moderate or high tooth sensitivity observed a series of images depicting someone eating an ice-popsicle. Low sensitivity participants never reported pain. In contrast, moderate and high sensitivity participants reported pain in response to an image depicting someone eating an ice popsicle (4% and 19% of the time, respectively and depicting someone eating an ice-popsicle and expressing pain (23% and 40%, respectively. In summary, responders have reduced ability to distinguish their own and others' visual perspective and enhanced ability to integrate a foreign arm into their bodily representation. The tendency to share pain is also enhanced when an observed pain is commonly experienced by the observer. Shared pain may therefore involve reactivation of pain memories or pain schema that are readily integrated into a self perspective and

  15. Awareness and recall during general anesthesia. Facts and feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerman, N; Bonke, B; Oosting, J

    1993-09-01

    Experiences of awareness and recall during general anesthesia can be most distressing for patients. To obtain relevant information, the authors systematically interviewed patients in whom awareness during surgery had occurred, and questioned them about their experiences. Twenty-six patients, referred by colleagues, described the facts and feelings they had experienced during the period of awareness, and whether these had had any consequences. Available anesthetic records were independently judged by three experienced anesthesiologists for relevant parameters. Auditory perception and the sensation of paralysis were most frequently mentioned, followed by the sensation of pain. Patients' feelings were mostly related to anxiety, panic, powerlessness, and helplessness. Eighteen patients (70%) experienced unpleasant aftereffects, including sleep disturbances, dreams and nightmares, and flashbacks and anxiety during the day. Only nine patients (35%) had informed their anesthesiologists about what had taken place. Twelve anesthetic records were assessed. In three, the occurrence of awareness had been indicated, while, in a fourth, it was noted that an amnesic drug had been given at a moment of increased blood pressure. Experienced anesthesiologists were unable to reliably distinguish awareness cases from matched controls when judging the records. Details recalled from the period of awareness correspond with data from the literature. The anesthesiologist's role in discussing, and dealing with, traumatic experiences related to anesthesia may be of great importance. The hand-written anesthetic record is of limited value in retrospectively explaining why awareness and recall have occurred.

  16. Choreographing lived experience: dance, feelings and the storytelling body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eli, Karin; Kay, Rosie

    2015-06-01

    Although narrative-based research has been central to studies of illness experience, the inarticulate, sensory experiences of illness often remain obscured by exclusively verbal or textual inquiry. To foreground the body in our investigation of subjective and intersubjective aspects of eating disorders, we-a medical anthropologist and a contemporary dance choreographer-designed a collaborative project, in which we studied the experiences of women who had eating disorders, through eight weeks of integrating dance practice-based, discussion-based and interview-based research. Grounded in the participants' own reflections on choreographing, dancing and watching others perform solos about their eating disordered experiences, our analysis examines the types of knowledge the participants used in choreographing their dance works, and the knowledge that they felt the dance enabled them to convey. We find that the participants consistently spoke of feeling as guiding their choreographic processes; they also said the experiences they conveyed through their dance works were centred in feelings, rather than in practices or events. Through dance, the participants said they could communicate experiences that would have remained unspoken otherwise. Yet, notably, dance practice also enabled participants to begin defining and describing their experiences verbally. We suggest, therefore, that through engaging participants in contemporary dance practice, we can begin to identify and address embodied experiences of illness and recovery that may be silenced in speech or writing alone.

  17. Friendly touch increases gratitude by inducing communal feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simão, Cláudia; Seibt, Beate

    2015-01-01

    Communion among people is easily identifiable. Close friends or relatives frequently touch each other and this physical contact helps identifying the type of relationship they have. We tested whether a friendly touch and benefits elicit the emotion of gratitude given the close link between gratitude and communal relations. In Study 1, we induced a communal mindset and manipulated friendly touch (vs. non-touch) and benefit to female participants by a female confederate. We measured pre- and post-benefit gratitude, communal feelings, and liking toward the toucher, as well as general affect. In Study 2, we manipulated mindset, friendly touch and benefit, and measured the same variables in female pairs (confederate and participants). In both studies the results showed a main effect of touch on pre-benefit gratitude: participants who were touched by the confederate indicated more gratitude than those not touched. Moreover, benefit increased gratitude toward a confederate in the absence of touch, but not in the presence of touch. Additionally, perceiving the relationship as communal, and not merely liking the confederate, or a positive mood mediated the link between touch and gratitude. The results further support a causal model where touch increases communal feelings, which in turn increase gratitude at the end of the interaction, after having received a benefit from the interaction partner. These results support a broader definition of gratitude as an emotion embodied in communal relationship cues.

  18. Friendly touch increases gratitude by inducing communal feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia eSimão

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Communion among people is easily identifiable. Close friends or relatives frequently touch each other and this physical contact helps identifying the type of relationship they have. We tested whether a friendly touch and benefits elicit the emotion of gratitude given the close link between gratitude and communal relations. In Study 1 we induced a communal mindset and manipulated friendly touch (vs. non-touch and benefit to female participants by a female confederate. We measured pre- and post-benefit gratitude, communal feelings, and liking towards the toucher, as well as general affect. In Study 2 we manipulated mindset, friendly touch and benefit, and measured the same variables in female pairs (confederate and participants. In both studies the results showed a main effect of touch on pre-benefit gratitude: participants who were touched by the confederate indicated more gratitude than those not touched. Moreover, benefit increased gratitude towards a confederate in the absence of touch, but not in the presence of touch. Additionally, perceiving the relationship as communal, and not merely liking the confederate, or a positive mood mediated the link between touch and gratitude. The results further support a causal model where touch increases communal feelings, which in turn increase gratitude at the end of the interaction, after having received a benefit from the interaction partner. These results support a broader definition of gratitude as an emotion embodied in communal relationship cues.

  19. Armor and anesthesia: exposure, feeling, and the soldier's body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, Kenneth T

    2012-03-01

    For many civilians, the high-tech weapons, armor, and military medicine with which U.S. soldiers are equipped present an image of lethal capacity and physical invulnerability. But, as this article explores, soldiers themselves just as often associate the life-sustaining technology of modern warfare with feelings that range from a pragmatic ambivalence about exposure to harm all the way to profoundly unsettling vulnerability. This article, based on fieldwork among soldiers and military families at the U.S. Army's Ft. Hood, examines sensory and affective dimensions of soldiers' intimate bodily relationships with the technologies that alternately or even simultaneously keep them alive and expose them to harm. I argue that modern military discipline and technology conspire to cultivate soldiers as highly durable, capable, unfeeling, interchangeable bodies, or what might be called, after Susan Buck-Morss (1992), anesthetic subjects. But for soldiers themselves, their training, combat environment, protective gear, and weapons are a rich font of both emotional and bodily feeling that exists in complex tension with the also deeply felt military imperative to carry on in the face of extreme discomfort and danger.

  20. Conciliatory gestures facilitate forgiveness and feelings of friendship by making transgressors appear more agreeable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Benjamin A; McCullough, Michael E; Luna, Lindsey R; Bono, Giacomo; Berry, Jack W

    2012-04-01

    The authors examined how conciliatory gestures exhibited in response to interpersonal transgressions influence forgiveness and feelings of friendship with the transgressor. In Study 1, 163 undergraduates who had recently been harmed were examined longitudinally. Conciliatory gestures exhibited by transgressors predicted higher rates of forgiveness over 21 days, and this relationship was mediated by victims' perceptions of their transgressors' Agreeableness. Study 2 was an experiment including 145 undergraduates who experienced a breach in trust from an anonymous partner during an iterated prisoner's dilemma. When transgressors apologized and offered financial compensation, participants reported higher levels of forgiveness and feelings of friendship when compared to a control condition and an aggravating condition. The effects of apology/compensation on forgiveness and perceived friendship were mediated by victims' perceptions of their transgressors' Agreeableness. Results suggest that conciliatory gestures promote forgiveness in part by depicting transgressors as more sympathetic, considerate, fair, and just (i.e., agreeable). © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Personality © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Intuitive Feelings of Warmth and Confidence in Insight and Noninsight Problem Solving of Magic Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedne, Mikael R; Norman, Elisabeth; Metcalfe, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the current study is on intuitive feelings of insight during problem solving and the extent to which such feelings are predictive of successful problem solving. We report the results from an experiment (N = 51) that applied a procedure where the to-be-solved problems were 32 short (15 s) video recordings of magic tricks. The procedure included metacognitive ratings similar to the "warmth ratings" previously used by Metcalfe and colleagues, as well as confidence ratings. At regular intervals during problem solving, participants indicated the perceived closeness to the correct solution. Participants also indicated directly whether each problem was solved by insight or not. Problems that people claimed were solved by insight were characterized by higher accuracy and higher confidence than noninsight solutions. There was no difference between the two types of solution in warmth ratings, however. Confidence ratings were more strongly associated with solution accuracy for noninsight than insight trials. Moreover, for insight trials the participants were more likely to repeat their incorrect solutions on a subsequent recognition test. The results have implications for understanding people's metacognitive awareness of the cognitive processes involved in problem solving. They also have general implications for our understanding of how intuition and insight are related.

  2. Comparison between subjective feelings to alcohol and nitrogen narcosis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, M G; Hernandez, W; Figlie, N B; Takahashi, E; Korukian, M

    1996-01-01

    Nitrogen narcosis is often compared to alcohol intoxication, but no actual studies have been carried out in humans to test the comparability of these effects. If a common mechanism of action is responsible for the behavioral effects of these substances, biological variability of response to alcohol should correlate to that of nitrogen in the same individual. To test this hypothesis, subjective feelings were assessed in two separate occasions in 14 adult male, healthy volunteers, nonprofessional divers. In one occasion, each subject received 0.75 ml/kg (0.60 g/kg) alcohol 50% (v/v PO) and in another day underwent a simulated dive at 50 m for 30 min in a hyperbaric chamber. There was a significant correlation between reported feelings in the two sessions; subjects who felt less intoxicated after drinking also felt less nitrogen narcosis during the simulated dive. The results, although preliminary, raise the hypothesis that ethanol and nitrogen may share the same mechanisms of action in the brain and that biological differences might account for interindividual variability of responses to both ethanol and nitrogen.

  3. Feelings of well being in elderly people: relationship to physical activity and physical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garatachea, Nuria; Molinero, Olga; Martínez-García, Raquel; Jiménez-Jiménez, Rodrigo; González-Gallego, Javier; Márquez, Sara

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate in a sample of Spanish elderly whether measures of physical activity and physical function are related to feelings of well being, and whether level of dependence is a moderator in the relation of well being, physical activity and physical function. The sample was a cohort of 151 elderly people (89 women and 62 men, aged 60-98 years) from the North of Spain. Participants completed surveys including demographic characteristics, and measures of physical activity (Yale Physical Activity Survey, YPAS), instrumental activities of daily living (Barthel Index, BI) and well being (Psychological Well Being Scale, from Spanish: Escala de Bienestar Psicológico=EBP). Components of the physical function were measured by the Senior Fitness Test (SFT). Upper and lower body strength, dynamic balance, aerobic endurance, self-reported weekly energy expenditure and physical activity total time were significantly correlated with both Material and Subjective well being. All components of physical function were significantly impaired in dependent subjects when compared to independent individuals of the same sex and physical activity category. Significant differences were also observed in Subjective well being among less active dependent or independent individuals. In conclusion, physical function and physical activity are related to feelings of well being, and results emphasize the positive functional and psychological effects of physical activity in dependent subjects.

  4. What does cognitive control feel like? Effective and ineffective cognitive control is associated with divergent phenomenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Blair; Milyavskaya, Marina; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive control is accompanied by observable negative affect. But how is this negative affect experienced subjectively, and are these feelings related to variation in cognitive control? To address these questions, 42 participants performed a punished inhibitory control task while periodically reporting their subjective experience. We found that within-subject variation in subjective experience predicted control implementation, but not neural monitoring (i.e., the error-related negativity, ERN). Specifically, anxiety and frustration predicted increased and decreased response caution, respectively, while hopelessness accompanied reduced inhibitory control, and subjective effort coincided with the increased ability to inhibit prepotent responses. Clarifying the nature of these phenomenological results, the effects of frustration, effort, and hopelessness-but not anxiety-were statistically independent from the punishment manipulation. Conversely, while the ERN was increased by punishment, the lack of association between this component and phenomenology suggests that early monitoring signals might precede the development of control-related subjective experience. Our results indicate that the types of feelings experienced during cognitively demanding tasks are related to different aspects of controlled performance, critically suggesting that the relationship between emotion and cognitive control extends beyond the dimension of valence.

  5. Association between feeling upon awakening and use of information technology devices in Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko; Amano, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Kamura, Masanori; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between feeling upon awakening (FA) and time spent using information technology (IT) devices by children in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Shimane, Japan. In October 2008, a self-report survey was distributed to 2075 children in kindergartens (n = 261), elementary schools (n = 1162), and junior high schools (n = 652) in Shimane, Japan. The questionnaire gathered data on sex, school year, feeling upon awakening, and time spent using IT devices after school (television, videos on television, video games, personal computers, and cellular phones). After adjusting for sex and school year, data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 2030 children completed this survey (response rate, 97.8%). Negative FA was associated with watching television more than 2 hours/day (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.23-1.85), playing video games more than 30 minutes/day (1.50, 1.20-1.87), and using personal computers more than 30 minutes/day (1.35, 1.04-1.75). Time spent using IT devices affected the FA of children in kindergarten through junior high school. We propose the development of guidelines regarding the appropriate amount of time this population should spend using IT devices.

  6. Does seeing ice really feel cold? Visual-thermal interaction under an illusory body-ownership.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Kanaya

    Full Text Available Although visual information seems to affect thermal perception (e.g. red color is associated with heat, previous studies have failed to demonstrate the interaction between visual and thermal senses. However, it has been reported that humans feel an illusory thermal sensation in conjunction with an apparently-thermal visual stimulus placed on a prosthetic hand in the rubber hand illusion (RHI wherein an individual feels that a prosthetic (rubber hand belongs to him/her. This study tests the possibility that the ownership of the body surface on which a visual stimulus is placed enhances the likelihood of a visual-thermal interaction. We orthogonally manipulated three variables: induced hand-ownership, visually-presented thermal information, and tactically-presented physical thermal information. Results indicated that the sight of an apparently-thermal object on a rubber hand that is illusorily perceived as one's own hand affects thermal judgments about the object physically touching this hand. This effect was not observed without the RHI. The importance of ownership of a body part that is touched by the visual object on the visual-thermal interaction is discussed.

  7. Making It through the First Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2009-01-01

    As much as it is eagerly anticipated, freshman year is often a time of confusion, disorientation, and even alienation for many students. One in four college freshmen will drop out before completing sophomore year. The reasons for this high level of withdrawal vary, but a report suggests that new students often feel overwhelmed and unprepared for…

  8. Translating Knowledge of Social-Emotional Learning and Evidence-Based Practice into Responsive School Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Karen Callan

    2011-01-01

    As the number of children engaging in problem behaviors grows, teachers increasingly report feeling unprepared to effectively meet students' mental health needs. Social-emotional learning (SEL) should be a prominent goal of school programs because social competence prevents school failure. This commentary reviews the challenges associated with…

  9. Feeling alone among friends: Adolescence, social networks and loneliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Biolcati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents are particularly susceptible to feelings of loneliness and social relationships are therefore an important part of their development. The aim of the present study is to explore the patterns of adolescents' use of Social Network Sites, e.g. Facebook, in relation to friendships, focusing on the differences between teenagers with a high and low level of loneliness. Participants (N=988 were aged 14-22 (M age = 16.32, SD = 1.59 and attended secondary schools in the north of Italy. The “loneliness group” includes more girls, older adolescents and subjects dissatisfied with their online and offline relationships; lonely adolescents consider their online contacts less as “true friends” and meet friends less frequently in person than the “no loneliness” group; the “loneliness” group believe it is easier to relate with peers online. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  10. Ornamented Worlds and Textures of Feeling: The Power of Abundance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaan Valsiner

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Human development takes place in an ornamented –redundantly patterned and highly repetitive – world.The emergence of knowledge takes the form of episodicunpredictable synthetic events at the intersectionof the fields of internal and external cultural meaningsystems – through the mutually linked processes ofconstructive internalization and externalization. Patterns ofdecorations – ornaments – are relevant as redundant “inputs”into the internalization/externalization processes.Ornaments can be viewed not merely as "aestheticaccessories" to human activity contexts but as holisticdevices of cultural guidance of human conduct thatacts through the subjectivity of personal feelings. Thisguidance is peripheral in its nature – surrounding theordinary life activities with affectively oriented texturesof cultural meanings.

  11. When being wasteful appears better than feeling wasteful

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ro'i Zultan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available ``Waste not want not'' expresses our culture's aversion to waste. ``I could have gotten the same thing for less'' is a sentiment that can diminish pleasure in a transaction. We study people's willingness to ``pay'' to avoid this spoiler. In one scenario, participants imagined they were looking for a rental apartment, and had bought a subscription to an apartment listing. If a cheaper subscription had been declined, respondents preferred not to discover post hoc that it would have sufficed. Specifically, they preferred ending their quest for the ideal apartment after seeing more, rather than fewer, apartments, so that the length of the search exceeds that available within the cheaper subscription. Other scenarios produced similar results. We conclude that people may sometimes prefer to BE wasteful in order to avoid FEELING wasteful.

  12. Positive feelings in learning and interest development in biology education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten Rask; Dohn, Niels Bonderup

    2015-01-01

    support our initial hypothesis that learning can be a facilitator for interest development. This is an argument for focusing more on didactical approaches and learning environments if the goal is to have interested students. As stated by Dewey: “If we can discover a child’s urgent needs and powers...... as an optimal state that combines positive affective qualities (e.g., feelings of immediate enjoyment, good moods etc.) and positive cognitive qualities (e.g. striving for meaningful goals, relevance etc., cf. Rathunde & Csikszentmihalyi, 1993). In the literature interest is typically described as a facilitator...... for learning (e.g. Krapp, 2002). Here we turn the interplay and see learning as a facilitator for interest development. This interplay was studied in upper secondary biology education. Student’s conducted an exercise on modelling natural selection with LEGO® bricks (Christensen-Dalsgaard & Kanneworf, 2009...

  13. Aging, episodic memory feeling-of-knowing, and frontal functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchay, C; Isingrini, M; Espagnet, L

    2000-04-01

    Groups of normal old and young adults made episodic memory feeling-of-knowing (FOK) judgments and took 2 types of episodic memory tests (cued recall and recognition). Neuropsychological tests of executive and memory functions thought to respectively involve the frontal and medial temporal structures were also administered. Age differences were observed on the episodic memory measures and on all neuropsychological tests. Compared with young adults, older adults performed at chance level on FOK accuracy judgments. Partial correlations indicated that a composite measure of frontal functioning and FOK accuracy were closely related. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that the composite frontal functioning score accounted for a large proportion of the age-related variance in FOK accuracy. This finding supports the idea that the age-related decline in episodic memory FOK accuracy is mainly the result of executive or frontal limitations associated with aging.

  14. Do trainees feel that they belong to a team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sophie; Lusznat, Rosie

    2017-05-18

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone significant reorganisation in recent years, with changes to the traditional apprenticeship model and an increasing reliance on shift working. The importance of teamwork in clinical care is well established; however, there is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team in the context of current working patterns. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of medical and surgical trainees. Data were analysed thematically using an inductive qualitative approach. Fifteen trainees who had worked in a range of hospitals across the UK participated. Emerging themes fell into several categories: what constitutes the team; the effect of shift patterns on the team; the role of the team in education, support and well-being; and influences on team rapport. Whilst in general interviewees felt part of a team, this was not true for all posts. The nature of the team was also highly variable, and had evolved from the traditional 'Firm' structure to a more nebulous concept. Shift-working patterns could result in the fragmentation of the team, which had implications for patient care as well as for training. The team played an important role in both education and well-being for trainees, and several factors were identified that could engender a more supportive team. With an ageing population and with increasing demands on limited resources, the requirement for shift work is likely to increase, and there is a fundamental need to maintain support for the next generation of doctors. There is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  15. The community feeling versus anxiety, self-esteem and well-being – introductory research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kałużna-Wielobób Alina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the concept of A. Adler (1933/1986 - the community feeling is an individual characteristic which is relatively stable throughout life. It refers to an inner relationship of one person with other people: a feeling of unity with others or separation from others. People with high community feeling are motivated in their actions by striving towards the common good, whereas people with low community feeling intend to exhibit their superiority over others in their actions, which would allow them to compensate for their inner feeling of inferiority. On the basis of the Adler concept the following hypotheses were formulated: There is a negative connection between the community feeling and anxiety. The community feeling is positively connected with self-esteem and psychological well-being. A slight increase in the community feeling can be observed with age. The community feeling increases in the age of middle adulthood. 585 people between 20 to 65 years of age were examined. Methods: Community Feeling Questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Ryff Scales of Psychological Well-Being. The hypotheses assumed were verified.

  16. Optimism and positive and negative feelings in parents of young children with developmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz-Nelson, E; McIntyre, L L

    2017-07-01

    Parents' positive and negative feelings about their young children influence both parenting behaviour and child problem behaviour. Research has not previously examined factors that contribute to positive and negative feelings in parents of young children with developmental delay (DD). The present study sought to examine whether optimism, a known protective factor for parents of children with DD, was predictive of positive and negative feelings for these parents. Data were collected from 119 parents of preschool-aged children with developmental delay. Two separate hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted to determine if optimism significantly predicted positive feelings and negative feelings and whether optimism moderated relations between parenting stress and parent feelings. Increased optimism was found to predict increased positive feelings and decreased negative feelings after controlling for child problem behaviour and parenting stress. In addition, optimism was found to moderate the relation between parenting stress and positive feelings. Results suggest that optimism may impact how parents perceive their children with DD. Future research should examine how positive and negative feelings impact positive parenting behaviour and the trajectory of problem behaviour specifically for children with DD. © 2017 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Social comparisons with media images are cognitively inefficient even for women who say they feel pressure from the media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Want, Stephen C; Saiphoo, Alyssa

    2017-03-01

    The present study investigated whether social comparisons with media images are cognitively efficient (demanding minimal mental effort) or cognitively effortful processes, in a sample of female undergraduate students (N=151) who reported feeling pressure from the media regarding their appearance. Two groups were shown 12 images of thin and attractive female models. One group was asked to memorize a complex 8-digit number during exposure to the images (Cognitively Busy condition), while the other memorized a much simpler number (Free View condition). A third group (Control condition) viewed images without people. Participants in the Free View condition demonstrated significantly increased negative mood and lowered appearance satisfaction from before to after exposure, while participants in the Cognitively Busy and Control conditions did not. We argue that these results suggest social comparisons with media images are at least somewhat cognitively effortful even among women who say they feel pressure from the media.

  18. How does self-injury feel? Examining automatic positive reinforcement in adolescent self-injurers with experience sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Edward A; Nock, Matthew K; Kranzler, Amy

    2014-02-28

    One of the most frequently reported, yet understudied, motivations for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) involves automatic positive reinforcement (APR), wherein sensations arising from NSSI reinforce and promote the behavior. The current study used experience sampling methodology with a clinical sample of self-injuring adolescents (N=30) over a 2-week period during which the adolescents reported NSSI behaviors, and rated if an APR motivation was present, and if so whether that motivation pertained to feeling "pain," "stimulation," or "satisfaction." Over 50% of the sample reported at least one instance of NSSI for APR reasons. No significant differences were found on demographic factors or psychiatric comorbidity for those with and without an APR motivation. However, those with an APR motivation reported elevated NSSI thoughts, longer duration of those thoughts, and more NSSI behaviors. They also reported more alcohol use thoughts, alcohol use, impulsive spending, and binge eating. The most commonly reported sensation following NSSI for APR was "satisfaction." However those endorsing feeling pain reported the most NSSI behaviors. These findings provide new information about the APR motivations for NSSI and shed light on the different sensations felt.

  19. Illusory Visual Completion of an Object's Invisible Backside Can Make Your Finger Feel Shorter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Sayim, Bilge; Van der Hallen, Ruth; Wagemans, Johan

    2016-04-25

    In a well-known magic trick known as multiplying balls, conjurers fool their audience with the use of a semi-spherical shell, which the audience perceives as a complete ball [1]. Here, we report that this illusion persists even when observers touch the inside of the shell with their own finger. Even more intriguingly, this also produces an illusion of bodily self-awareness in which the finger feels shorter, as if to make space for the purely illusory volume of the visually completed ball. This observation provides strong evidence for the controversial and counterintuitive idea that our experience of the hidden backsides of objects is shaped by genuine perceptual representations rather than mere cognitive guesswork or imagery [2].

  20. Religious feelings in pre-school children in their own and their mothers’ perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatala Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare the expression of religious feelings in pre-school children and the perception of these feelings by the children’s’ mothers. Ninety Polish children from Catholic families aged 4, 5 and 6 participated in the study. A picture method along with interviews with children’s mothers were employed to gather the data. Data from the two sources was compared, taking into consideration the content and ways of expression of the described feelings. Relations between positive and negative feelings were investigated and further statistical analyses were focused mainly on negative feelings. It was found that structure of negative religious feelings obtained directly from the children bears significant similarity to the mothers’ perception.

  1. How Does It Feel Like? An Exploratory Study of a Prototype System to Convey Emotion through Haptic Wearable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Mazzoni

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the design and implementation of a portable, hands-free, wearable haptic device that maps the emotions evoked by the music in a movie into vibrations, with the aim that hearing-impaired audience can get a sense of the emotional content carried by the music in specific movie scenes, and therefore feel (hear the music through the sense of touch. A study of the use of the technology is reported which found that high arousal and high valence were reliably conveyed through haptic patterns with high intensity and high frequency, whereas haptic patterns with low intensity and low frequency conveyed low arousal and low valence.

  2. The Concept of the Oceanic Feeling in Artistic Creativity and in the Analysis of Visual Artworks

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    For several decades now, psychoanalytically oriented writers on art have used the concept of the oceanic feeling to designate feelings of oneness, limitlessness, and mania in artistic creativity and aesthetic experiencing. In this article, I examine critically the most influential account of the oceanic feeling in aesthetics, provided by art pedagogue and art critic Anton Ehrenzweig. Following his points of emphasis, I elaborate on the structural, perceptual, and affective aspects of oceanic ...

  3. Relationship of Terror Feelings and Physiological Response During Watching Horror Movie

    OpenAIRE

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Tsukino, Yuuki

    2015-01-01

    Part 8: ICBAKE 2015 Workshop; International audience; Movie is one of the most popular media types. Horror movie is a kind of attractive movie contents which part of people want to watch very much. Although the users feel terror of the contents, the users want to watch the horror movies to have extraordinary feelings such as excitements. Therefore, terror feelings of the horror movies are considered as an important factor to establish more attractive movie contents, and the effect of horror m...

  4. [Guilt and subjective feelings of guilt in the context of separation and divorce].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the vicissitudes of guilt and responsibility and development and function of guilt feelings are discussed in the context of the typical family dynamics in cases of divorce (delegation, claiming of loyalty, parentification). The "guilt" of the parents is often transformed to the feeling of guilt of the children in the sense of a traumatic feeling of guilt. This happens especially when sufficient mourning is not possible. Feelings of guilt by reason of the mere existence of the child (basic feelings of guilt) and the oedipal and other feelings of guilt out of rivalry can be reinforced (feelings of guilt out of vitality). Strivings for separation may be connected with guilt by the children (feelings of guilt regarding separation). The recognition of the adults' responsibility (especially choice of partners, functionalization of the child to facilitate the separation from the own parents, to maintain the image of an intact family or the struggle for power at the cost of the children) diminishes the feelings of guilt of the children.

  5. Persistence of Feelings and Sentience after Bilateral Damage of the Insula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasio, Hanna; Tranel, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    It has been convincingly established, over the past decade, that the human insular cortices are involved in processing both body feelings (such as pain) and feelings of emotion. Recently, however, an interpretation of this finding has emerged suggesting that the insular cortices are the necessary and sufficient platform for human feelings, in effect, the sole neural source of feeling experiences. In this study, we investigate this proposal in a patient whose insular cortices were destroyed bilaterally as a result of Herpes simplex encephalitis. The fact that all aspects of feeling were intact indicates that the proposal is problematic. The signals used to assemble the neural substrates of feelings hail from different sectors of the body and are conveyed by neural and humoral pathways to complex and topographically organized nuclei of the brain stem, prior to being conveyed again to cerebral cortices in the somatosensory, insular, and cingulate regions. We suggest that the neural substrate of feeling states is to be found first subcortically and then secondarily repeated at cortical level. The subcortical level would ensure basic feeling states while the cortical level would largely relate feeling states to cognitive processes such as decision-making and imagination. PMID:22473895

  6. Poor, Unsafe, and Overweight: The Role of Feeling Unsafe at School in Mediating the Association Among Poverty Exposure, Youth Screen Time, Physical Activity, and Weight Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté-Lussier, Carolyn; Fitzpatrick, Caroline; Séguin, Louise; Barnett, Tracie A

    2015-07-01

    This study applied socioecological and cumulative risk exposure frameworks to test the hypotheses that 1) the experience of poverty is associated with feeling less safe at school, and 2) feeling less safe is associated with engaging in poorer weight-related behaviors, as well as an increased probability of being overweight or obese. Data were from the ongoing Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, initiated in 1998 with a population-based cohort of 2,120 Québec (Canada) infants 5 months of age and their parent or primary caregiver. Measures of youths' (age, 13 years) self-reported feelings of safety, screen time, physical activity, and objectively assessed not overweight/obese (70%), overweight (22%), and obese (8%) weight status were collected in 2011. Family poverty trajectory from birth was assessed by using latent growth modeling. As hypothesized, exposure to poverty was associated with feeling less safe at school and, in turn, with an increased probability of being overweight or obese. The association was most pronounced for youths who experienced chronic poverty. Compared with youths who experienced no poverty and felt unsafe, those who experienced chronic poverty and felt unsafe were nearly 18% more likely to be obese (9.2% vs. 11.2%). Although feeling unsafe was associated with screen time, screen time did not predict weight status.

  7. Feeling Older and the Development of Cognitive Impairment and Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Yannick; Sutin, Angelina R; Luchetti, Martina; Terracciano, Antonio

    2016-07-19

    Subjective age is a biopsychosocial marker of aging associated with a range of outcomes in old age. In the domain of cognition, feeling older than one's chronological age is related to lower cognitive performance and steeper cognitive decline among older adults. The present study examines whether an older subjective age is associated with the risk of incident cognitive impairment and dementia. Participants were 5,748 individuals aged 65 years and older drawn from the Health and Retirement Study. Measures of subjective age, cognition, and covariates were obtained at baseline, and follow-up cognition was assessed over a 2- to 4-year period. Only participants without cognitive impairment were included at baseline. At follow-up, participants were classified into one of the three categories: normal functioning, cognitive impairment without dementia (CIND), and dementia. An older subjective age at baseline was associated with higher likelihood of CIND (odds ratio [OR] = 1.18; 1.09-1.28) and dementia (OR = 1.29; 1.02-1.63) at follow-up, controlling for chronological age, other demographic factors, and baseline cognition. Physical inactivity and depressive symptoms partly accounted for these associations. An older subjective age is a marker of individuals' risk of subsequent cognitive impairment and dementia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Feel your stride and find your preferred running speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibault Lussiana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable inter-individual variability in self-selected intensity or running speed. Metabolic cost per distance has been recognized as a determinant of this personal choice. As biomechanical parameters have been connected to metabolic cost, and as different running patterns exist, we can question their possible determinant roles in self-selected speed. We examined the self-selected speed of 15 terrestrial and 16 aerial runners, with comparable characteristics, on a 400 m track and assessed biomechanical parameters and ratings of pleasure/displeasure. The results revealed that aerial runners choose greater speeds associated with shorter contact time, longer flight time, and higher leg stiffness than terrestrial runners. Pleasure was negatively correlated with contact time and positively with leg stiffness in aerial runners and was negatively correlated with flight time in terrestrial runners. We propose the existence of an optimization system allowing the connection of running patterns at running speeds, and feelings of pleasure or displeasure.

  9. Probing when Japanese junior high school students begin to feel difficulty in learning mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tomoko; Izuta, Giido

    2017-05-01

    It is thought that the increasing number of Japanese students avoiding mathematics has become a serious problem in the last decades. Japanese junior high school students are learning the basic understanding and skills of mathematics during the years of mandatory education. To our knowledge, there are few reports about the time when Japanese junior high school students begin to feel difficulty in mathematics learning. The aim of this work is to examine this case. To accomplish this purpose, a typical public junior high school in a country city with 616 students (182 first-year, 212 second-year, 222 third-year) in all was chosen to be the field of investigation. Likert scale type questionnaires to assess their feelings were conducted, and the respondents who answered `difficulty' and `a little difficulty' were extracted. The number of respondents were 89 first-year (26 males, 63 females), 76 second-year (27 males, 49 females), and 112 third-year (45 males, 67 females) students. The beginning time was divided into school years when it was in elementary school, and semesters when it was in junior high school. Ordinary statistical processings for each grade and gender were performed to analyze them. It was found that the time when they began to have difficulty learning mathematics was different in gender. Male students tended to start from higher-grade of elementary school whereas female students from middle-grade of elementary school. In other words, these results showed differences in gender and time. Finally, these examinations suggest that teachers need to provide appropriate support for students at a suitable time in the elementary school. Also these results are useful in mathematics education of elementary school.

  10. Occupational exposure to contaminated biological material: perceptions and feelings experienced among dental students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila PINELLI

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental students may be a particularly vulnerable group exposed to the risk of acquiring infections through occupational injuries.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the perceptions with regard to their occupational exposure to potentially infectious biologic materials.MATERIAL AND METHOD: Interviews were conducted by means of a script with open questions. The speeches were recorded, transcribed and qualitative analysis was performed with the aid of QUALIQUANTISOFT® software. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD was obtained.RESULT: The feeling most frequently experienced was related to the fear of contagion. Most accidents occurred during the handling of sharp dental instruments. Respondents attributed the occurrence of accidents especially the lack of attention, carelessness while handling sharp instruments, and lack of use of Personal Protective Equipment. As regards the measures taken right after the exposure, they "washed the local area". Other respondents reported they "continued the dental treatment". They complained mostly about the fear of having been infected, and because they had to leave the faculty to take blood exams for HIV screening. As part of the learning experience the injured reported they paid more attention when handling sharp instruments. The students informed that any type of injury due to contact with contaminated material must be notified. However, they were neglectful about reporting their own injury.CONCLUSION: Education strategies for preventive measures related to occupational exposure must be restructured, because the knowledge and the fear of contagion among dental students were not always sufficient for a complete adherence to treatment protocols and notification.

  11. Faculty Feelings as Writers: Relationship with Writing Genres, Perceived Competences, and Values Associated to Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pilar Gallego Castaño, Liliana; Castelló Badia, Montserrat; Badia Garganté, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    This study attempts to relate faculty feelings towards writing with writing genres, perceived competences and values associated to writing. 67 foreign languages faculty in Colombia and Spain voluntarily filled in a four-section on-line questionnaire entitled "The Writing Feelings Questionnaire." All the sections were Likert Scale type.…

  12. Are GPs’ feelings of burnout and discontent reflected in the psychological content of their consultations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zantinge, E.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Bakker, D.H. de; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To investigate if consultations from general practitioners (GPs) with feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction contain less psychological elements compared to consultations from GPs without these negative feelings. It is known that GPs’ available time and specific communication tools are importa

  13. Survey of School Psychologists' Attitudes, Feelings, and Exposure to Gay and Lesbian Parents and Their Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee-sook; Thul, Candrice A.; Berenhaut, Kenneth S.; Suerken, Cynthia K.; Norris, James L.

    2006-01-01

    School psychologists' attitudes and feelings toward gay and lesbian parents were surveyed in relation to their training and exposure, and professional services offered to gay and lesbian parents and their children. The relationship between attitudes, feelings, training, exposure, and demographic characteristics was explored as well. A stratified…

  14. Multi-Level Aspects of Social Cohesion of Secondary Schools and Pupils' Feelings of Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed; de Wit, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    Background: School safety and corresponding feelings of both pupils and school staff are beginning to receive more and more attention. The social cohesion characteristics of a school may be useful in promoting feelings of safety, particularly in pupils. Aims: To conceptualize theoretically, and check empirically a two-level model of social…

  15. Feeling Caught between Parents: Adult Children's Relations with Parents and Subjective Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Paul R.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2006-01-01

    Research on divorce has found that adolescents' feelings of being caught between parents are linked to internalizing problems and weak parent-child relationships. The present study estimates the effects of marital discord, as well as divorce, on young adult offspring's feelings of being caught in the middle (N=632). Children with parents in…

  16. Followers feel valued : When leaders' regulatory focus makes leaders exhibit behavior that fits followers' regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamstra, Melvyn; Sassenberg, K.; Van Yperen, Nico W.; Wisse, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    When do followers feel valued by their leader? We propose that leaders' regulatory focus can make followers feel valued when leaders' regulatory focus is the same as followers' regulatory focus, that is, when there is regulatory fit between leaders and followers. We further propose that the reason w

  17. Family physicians' diagnostic gut feelings are measurable: construct validation of a questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolper, C.F.; Wiel, M.W.J. van de; Vet, H.C. de; Rutten, A.L.; Royen, P. Van; Bokhoven, M.A. van; Weijden, T.T. van der; Dinant, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Family physicians perceive that gut feelings, i.e. a 'sense of reassurance' or a 'sense of alarm', play a substantial role in diagnostic reasoning. A measuring instrument is desirable for further research. Our objective is to validate a questionnaire measuring the presence of gut feeling

  18. [Does less seclusion create a safer environment? An attempt to map the concept of 'feeling safe'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Severs, C.J.; Hondius, A.J.; Schene, A.H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The degree of restraint imposed by a psychiatrist seems to be influenced by the safety of the team. So far, there have been few attempts to map the concept of 'feeling safe'.
    AIM: To analyse, define and quantify the concept of 'feeling safe'.
    METHOD: Concept mapping involves

  19. "Adoption Wisdom: A Guide to the Issues and Feelings of Adoption" by Marlou Russell. Book Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonson, Tracy

    1998-01-01

    Reviews "Adoption Wisdom: A Guide to the Issues and Feelings of Adoption" by Marlou Russell. Maintains that its narrative/comment format and accounts of those involved in adoption validate the feelings of the adoption-triad members. Suggests that the book lacks information on individuals who contributed comments and contains few narratives from…

  20. A Comparative Study of the Impact of Students' Feelings regarding the Use of Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj-Sharma, Rawatee

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of a comparative study of two groups of learners--group 1 (25 non-science students) and group 2 (25 A-level physics students). It explores the extent to which their feelings and emotions in conjunction with their knowledge about nuclear energy impacts and influences their views and feelings about the use of…

  1. Gut feelings, deliberative thought, and paranoid ideation: a study of experiential and rational reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Evans, Nicole; Lister, Rachel

    2012-05-15

    Rapid intuitive hunches or gut feelings may be a compelling source of evidence for paranoid ideas. Conversely, a failure to apply effortful analytic thinking may contribute to the persistence of such thoughts. Our main aim was to examine for the first time the associations of persecutory thinking with experiential and rational thinking styles. Five hundred individuals recruited from the general population completed self-report assessments of current persecutory ideation, general reasoning styles and personality traits. Persecutory ideation was independently associated with greater use of experiential reasoning and less use of rational reasoning. The correlations were small. Persecutory ideation was also positively associated with neuroticism and negatively correlated with extraversion, agreeableness and conscientiousness. There was no evidence of an interaction between neuroticism and experiential reasoning in the prediction of paranoia, but high experiential reasoning in the context of low rational reasoning was particularly associated with persecutory ideation. Overall, the study provides rare evidence of self-reported general reasoning styles being associated with delusional ideation. Perceived reliance on intuition is associated with paranoid thinking, while perceived reliance on deliberation is associated with fewer such thoughts. The dual process theory of reasoning may provide a framework to contribute to the understanding of paranoid thinking.

  2. When right feels left: referral of touch and ownership between the hands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria I Petkova

    Full Text Available Feeling touch on a body part is paradigmatically considered to require stimulation of tactile afferents from the body part in question, at least in healthy non-synaesthetic individuals. In contrast to this view, we report a perceptual illusion where people experience "phantom touches" on a right rubber hand when they see it brushed simultaneously with brushes applied to their left hand. Such illusory duplication and transfer of touch from the left to the right hand was only elicited when a homologous (i.e., left and right pair of hands was brushed in synchrony for an extended period of time. This stimulation caused the majority of our participants to perceive the right rubber hand as their own and to sense two distinct touches--one located on the right rubber hand and the other on their left (stimulated hand. This effect was supported by quantitative subjective reports in the form of questionnaires, behavioral data from a task in which participants pointed to the felt location of their right hand, and physiological evidence obtained by skin conductance responses when threatening the model hand. Our findings suggest that visual information augments subthreshold somatosensory responses in the ipsilateral hemisphere, thus producing a tactile experience from the non-stimulated body part. This finding is important because it reveals a new bilateral multisensory mechanism for tactile perception and limb ownership.

  3. Welfare in relation to feelings, stress and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Broom.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available SummaryAnimal welfare is the subject of rapidly increasing concern in most countries in the world and this concern is resulting in changes in the ways in which farmers and other animal users keep and treat animals. Welfare can be defined in a way which incorporates ideas about needs, feelings, stress and health. The scientific assessment of animal welfare has developed substantially and very many studies of different kinds of animals have been carried out. Information from such studies is used by legislators, food companies and the public with the consequence that the various kinds of regulation lead to real improvements in animal welfare. Health is defined as an animal's state as regards its attempts to cope with pathology, wherepathology is a detrimental derangement of molecules, cells, tissues and functions that occur in living organisms in response to injurious agents or deprivations. Pathology can be classified into: genetic abnormalities; physical, thermal and chemical injury; infections andinfestations; metabolic abnormalities; and nutritional disorders.Health is a part of welfare. When an animal's health is poor, so is its welfare, but poor welfare does not always imply poor health. There are some measures of poor welfare which are classified as pathology and will therefore also be indicators of poor health, including body damage and symptoms of infectious, metabolic and nutritional disease. Other measures of poor welfare, whilst not being signs of poor health at that time, indicate a risk of poor healthin the future. They include immunosuppression and the occurrence of injurious abnormal behaviours. These are causal links between poor welfare and poor health. Two pathways can be identified:A. chronic activation of physiological coping mechanisms ---> immuno-suppression ---> infectious disease; B. behavioural coping mechanisms ---> injurious abnormal behaviour ---> physical injury.The connection between physiological coping mechanisms

  4. Pengaruh Self-Acceptance Importance, Affiliation Importance, dan Community Feeling Importance terhadap Compulsive Buying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euis Soliha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on phenomenon behavior of compulsive buying. The study examined how Self-Acceptance Importance, Affiliation Importance, and Community Feeling Importance influenced on Compulsive Buying. Population in this research was students in Kota Semarang, and 104 students become samples. To answer problem that is accurate, researcher applies econometrics Logit model. Result of research indicates that there were negativity influence Self-Acceptance Importance, Affiliation Importance and Community Feeling to Compulsive Buying. Result of this supports all hypothesis and consistent with theory.Keywords:    compulsive buying, self-acceptance Importance, affiliation Importance, community feeling Importance, Logit Model

  5. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  6. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  7. They Were Unprepared! 他们毫无防备!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荷马; 彭荣华

    2002-01-01

    Long ago, the Greeks and the Trojans were at war. For ten years, the Greeks attaeked the city of Troy but they could not get into the.city. The Greeks not Climb over the high walls of Troy nor eould they break open the city gates.

  8. We Were Caught Unprepared: The 2006 Hezbollah-Israeli War

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Rajar was stopped cold by the IDF. The attack served only to intensify the already stringent Israeli security measures. Hezbollah, however, remained...fighter wakes up in the morning, drinks his coffee , takes a rocket out of his closet, goes to his neighbor’s yard, sticks a clock timer on it, goes back...described as “a witches brew of high tech fantasies and basic unpreparedness.”18 On the night of 12 July, Israeli jets and artillery began limited

  9. Links between community violence and the family system: evidence from children's feelings of relatedness and perceptions of parent behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Michael; Cicchetti, Dante

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we examined some of the ways in which broader ecological systems may influence the organization of behavior within the family system. Specifically, links between exposure to community violence and children's relationships with maternal caregivers were investigated in a sample of 127 urban children between the ages of 7 and 13 years. Children were asked to indicate whether they had been exposed to a wide variety of violent events. In addition, their feelings of relatedness and separation anxiety, and their perceptions of maternal behavior were assessed. It was expected that exposure to community violence would be associated with feeling less secure with caregivers. Consistent with predictions from ecological-transactional theory, data supported this hypothesis. Children who reported that they had been exposed to high levels of community violence also indicated that they felt less positive affect when with their caregiver, were dissatisfied with how close they felt to her, felt more separation anxiety, and reported more negative maternal behavior than children exposed to less violence. Findings are discussed in terms of how violence may affect the family system and the protective function of human attachment.

  10. Natural Environments and Childhood Experiences Promoting Physical Activity, Examining the Mediational Effects of Feelings about Nature and Social Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogiuri, Giovanna

    2016-04-21

    The importance of natural environments (NEs) for physical activity (PA) has been studied extensively. However, there is scant evidence to explain the motivational processes underlying the NE-PA relation. The aim of this study was to investigate the NE-PA relation using an ecological framework, focusing on perception of NEs, childhood experiences and possible intra- and inter-individual mediators. Data were retrieved from a cross-sectional survey among 2168 adults from all over Norway. In addition, the coverage of NEs by municipalities was retrieved from national registers. Logistic regression showed that, unlike the self-reported proximity to NEs, higher ratings of perceived supportiveness of NEs for PA predicted participation in NE-based PA for at least 60 min/week or 150 min/week, before and after controlling for socio-demographic characteristics. Reporting frequent experiences in nature during childhood was also an important predictor of higher levels of NE-based PA. Furthermore, a mediational analysis showed that the effect of both predictors was mediated by "feelings about nature" and "social networks". These findings indicate that to encourage the use of local NE for PA, not only should environmental perceptions be taken into account, positive feelings towards nature alongside opportunities to share activity in nature with others should also be promoted.

  11. General self-efficacy, pre-competitive anxiety and flow feeling in handball team players from Costa Rica’s nactional team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Gutiérrez Vargas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the relationship between self-efficacy, pre-competitive anxiety and flow feeling in male and female handball team players from the  Costa Rica national teams. Participants were 28 players (14 male and 14 female from both teams. The scales of general self-efficacy, flow feeling and competitive anxiety were used to collect data. The average score in relation to self-efficacy was high (> 8.40. Regarding flow sensation, the average scores were range from 3.41 (autotelic experience  to 5,78 (control sense. Somatic anxiety was the lowest in men = 1.59 and women female = 1.98, and self-confidence was the highest score in men = 2.99 and women = 2.70 respectively.  No significant changes were observed throughout the game in relation to the flow feeling. The anxiety reported by men was significantly lower than women, and the self-confidence levels were higher in men than in women. No significant correlation was found between self efficacy and sense of flow.  Somatic anxiety showed significant correlations with some dimensions of the flow feeling. In conclusion, these data showed that there is a need to incorporate psychological interventions to ensure that athletes can reach optimal psychophysical states in order to perform better.

  12. The importance of trait emotional intelligence and feelings in the prediction of perceived and biological stress in adolescents: hierarchical regressions and fsQCA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Lidón; Montoya-Castilla, Inmaculada; Prado-Gascó, Vicente

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the combined effects of trait emotional intelligence (EI) and feelings on healthy adolescents' stress. Identifying the extent to which adolescent stress varies with trait emotional differences and the feelings of adolescents is of considerable interest in the development of intervention programs for fostering youth well-being. To attain this goal, self-reported questionnaires (perceived stress, trait EI, and positive/negative feelings) and biological measures of stress (hair cortisol concentrations, HCC) were collected from 170 adolescents (12-14 years old). Two different methodologies were conducted, which included hierarchical regression models and a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA). The results support trait EI as a protective factor against stress in healthy adolescents and suggest that feelings reinforce this relation. However, the debate continues regarding the possibility of optimal levels of trait EI for effective and adaptive emotional management, particularly in the emotional attention and clarity dimensions and for female adolescents.

  13. How do you feel? Sampling of experiences within a mobile field trip support system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Börner, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., & Börner, D. (2013, 30 May). How do you feel? Sampling of experiences within a mobile field trip support system. Workshop presentation at the 9th Joint European Summer School on Technology Enhanced Learning, Limassol, Cyprus.

  14. Resistance to consumption and Veganism: A Study about Motivations, Values, and Feelings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isabela Perez Campos Moreira; Claudia Rosa Acevedo

    2015-01-01

    .... Specifically the objective of this paper is to comprehend the way in which anti-consumption behavior relates to Veganism, analyze factors that motivate its practice, and record values and feelings...

  15. Childhood cancer: feelings expressed by children in chemotherapy during therapeutic toy sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Paulo Souza e Souza

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at understanding the feelings experienced by the child with cancer manifested during Therapeutic Toy sessions. This qualitative research was performed with five children aged between three and twelve years, of both sexes. Data collection was carried out through a participatory and systematic observation, coupled with interviews intermediated by Therapeutic Toy Sessions. The data was worked using discourse analysis. The child with cancer was shown as a being full of feelings. The fear of death, pain, sadness on the limitations imposed by the disease, the withdrawal and rebellion with the procedures, the anguish in the face of uncertainties were negative feelings expressed by the children in the dramatizations. However, the development of treatment, the manifestation of a good prognosis and outcome of cure were emerging feelings of hope and happiness before the treatment, optimism in return to usual activities and overcoming amidst the difficulties experienced.

  16. Increased oxytocin concentrations and prosocial feelings in humans after ecstasy (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, G J H; Sweep, F C G J; van der Steen, R; Hermsen, R; Donders, A R T; Touw, D J; van Gerven, J M A; Buitelaar, J K; Verkes, R J

    2009-01-01

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or "ecstasy") is a recreationally used drug with remarkable and characteristic prosocial effects. In spite of abundant attention in the scientific literature, the mechanism of its prosocial effects has not been elucidated in humans. Recently, research in animals has suggested that the neuropeptide oxytocin may induce these effects. In a double blind, randomized, crossover, and placebo-controlled study in 15 healthy volunteers we assessed blood oxytocin and MDMA concentrations and subjective prosocial effects after oral administration of 100 mg MDMA or placebo. MDMA induced a robust increase of blood oxytocin concentrations and an increase of subjective prosocial feelings. Within subjects, the variations in these feelings were significantly and positively correlated with variation in oxytocin levels, and the correlations between these feelings and oxytocin were significantly stronger than those between these feelings and blood MDMA levels. MDMA induces oxytocin release in humans, which may be involved in the characteristic prosocial effects of ecstasy.

  17. Prediction of feeling of subject on odor stimulation from physiological information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsujimoto, H.; Nishida, S. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan)] Tsutsumi, M. [Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd., Kadoma, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-20

    Some research groups studied how to evaluate the human olfaction objectively. But there was no attempt to evaluate objectively a subjectivity evoked by an odor stimulation. We tried to evaluate the feeling of subject, namely subjectivity evoked by the odor stimulation. In this study, we have measured an EEG activity of a subject who was stimulated by the odor and we have evaluated objectively the influence of the odor stimulation by a chaotic analysis and a frequency analysis. We could get the affection of odor stimulation even if the subject did not consciously feel the odor. The results showed that in the favorite odor stimulation the chaotic value of EEG data decreased slowly but it of the unfavorite odor stimulation dispersed. We could measure the change of the feeling of subject by the odor stimulation and we could predict the feeling of subject by several explanatory variates selected from physiological information. 11 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. When You're Feeling Blue%走出忧郁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强

    2003-01-01

    @@ Depression can make you feel exhausted( 疲惫的 ), worthless,helpless, and hopeless. But it's important to realize that these negative teelings are part of the depression and typically do not accurately reflect actual circumstances.

  19. On feeling humiliated : The experience of humiliation in interpersonal, intragroup, and intergroup contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, L.

    2017-01-01

    Humiliation is an intensely negative and complex emotion. This dissertation focused on the determinants, strength, emotion relations, and consequences of feelings of humiliation in different contexts. In an interpersonal context (Chapter 2), we found that negative audience behaviour (laughter) durin

  20. USGS "Did You Feel It?" internet-based macroseismic intensity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Worden, B.; Hopper, M.; Dewey, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) system is an automated approach for rapidly collecting macroseismic intensity data from Internet users' shaking and damage reports and generating intensity maps immediately following earthquakes; it has been operating for over a decade (1999-2011). DYFI-based intensity maps made rapidly available through the DYFI system fundamentally depart from more traditional maps made available in the past. The maps are made more quickly, provide more complete coverage and higher resolution, provide for citizen input and interaction, and allow data collection at rates and quantities never before considered. These aspects of Internet data collection, in turn, allow for data analyses, graphics, and ways to communicate with the public, opportunities not possible with traditional data-collection approaches. Yet web-based contributions also pose considerable challenges, as discussed herein. After a decade of operational experience with the DYFI system and users, we document refinements to the processing and algorithmic procedures since DYFI was first conceived. We also describe a number of automatic post-processing tools, operations, applications, and research directions, all of which utilize the extensive DYFI intensity datasets now gathered in near-real time. DYFI can be found online at the website http://earthquake.usgs.gov/dyfi/. ?? 2011 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia.

  1. Competence-impeding electronic games and players' aggressive feelings, thoughts, and behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylski, Andrew K; Deci, Edward L; Deci, Edward; Rigby, C Scott; Ryan, Richard M

    2014-03-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 106(3) of Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (see record 2014-07574-006). In the article, the name of author Edward Deci was missing his middle name initial and should have read as Edward L. Deci. In addition, an incorrect version of figure 1 was published.] Recent studies have examined whether electronic games foster aggression. At present, the extent to which games contribute to aggression and the mechanisms through which such links may exist are hotly debated points. In current research we tested a motivational hypothesis derived from self-determination theory-that gaming would be associated with indicators of human aggression to the degree that the interactive elements of games serve to impede players' fundamental psychological need for competence. Seven studies, using multiple methods to manipulate player competence and a range of approaches for evaluating aggression, indicated that competence-impeding play led to higher levels of aggressive feelings, easier access to aggressive thoughts, and a greater likelihood of enacting aggressive behavior. Results indicated that player perceived competence was positively related to gaming motivation, a factor that was, in turn, negatively associated with player aggression. Overall, this pattern of effects was found to be independent of the presence or absence of violent game contents. We discuss the results in respect to research focused on psychological need frustration and satisfaction and as they regard gaming-related aggression literature.

  2. Effects of the feeling of invulnerability and the feeling of control on motivation to participate in experience-based analysis, by type of risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, Safiétou; Kouabenan, Dongo Rémi

    2013-03-01

    Experience-based analysis (EBA) refers to a set of safety-management practices consisting of detecting, analyzing, and correcting the individual, material, and organizational causal factors of accidents in order to prevent their reoccurrence. Unfortunately, these practices do not always garner the adherence of employees. This article presents a study that examines the impact of risk perceptions on agents' motivation to participate in EBA in various production sectors. The study was conducted at two sites, a chemical factory and a nuclear power plant, by means of a questionnaire administered to 302 employees. The results indicated that the feeling of control was not only positively linked to the feeling of invulnerability, but that these two factors were negatively linked to risk perception. In addition, the actors in both production sectors were more motivated to participate in EBA of accidents linked to the core processes of their industry (which were more accurately perceived) than in EBA of ordinary accidents (accidents not specific to chemical or nuclear processes). Moreover, the agents' feeling of invulnerability and feeling of control both reduced EBA motivation for ordinary accidents to a greater extent than for chemical and radiation-related accidents. Recommendations are made in view of encouraging agents to get more involved in EBA.

  3. Feeling Safe in the Dark : Examining the Effect of Entrapment, Lighting Levels, and Gender on Feelings of Safety and Lighting Policy Acceptability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Christine; Steg, LInda

    2014-01-01

    This research examined to what extent physical factors, notably lighting and entrapment (blocked escape), and individual factors, notably gender, affect feelings of safety and the acceptability of reduced lighting levels. The authors reasoned that acceptability of reduced street lighting depends on

  4. Feeling the other : Emotion interpretation in intercultural settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommattam, P.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals are worse at reading facial expressions of emotions in outgroup members than in ingroup members. The goal of the current research was to study misinterpretations of emotional expressions across groups further. First, we report findings of 16 studies in which we tested whether people

  5. Feeling the other : Emotion interpretation in intercultural settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kommattam, P.

    2017-01-01

    Individuals are worse at reading facial expressions of emotions in outgroup members than in ingroup members. The goal of the current research was to study misinterpretations of emotional expressions across groups further. First, we report findings of 16 studies in which we tested whether people perc

  6. FEELINGS REPORTED BY HEALTH WORKERS WHEN FACING THE AIDS EPIDEMIC (1986–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira Villarinho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudio objetivó describir y comprender los sentimientos relatados por los trabajadores de salud frente al surgimiento del SIDA, en un hospital de referencia en enfermedades infectocontagiosas, en el periodo de 1986 a 2006. Para la recolección de los datos, utiliamos la historia oral con entrevistas a 23 trabajadores de salud y para el tratamiento de los datos, el análisis de contenido, del cual emergieron tres categorías: Actitudes y/o sentimientos de los trabajadores de la salud sobre el SIDA; -percepción de los trabajadores de salud en cuanto a los sentimientos y actitudes de los pacientes frente al diagnóstico seropositivo del SIDA y de sus familiares, Actitudes y/o sentimientos de la población frente al surgimiento del SIDA. Sentimientos como discriminación, estigma, rechazo, vergüenza, muerte marcaron la historia de la epidemia del SIDA; pues más que la muerte física, el SIDA trajo consigo sentimientos de muerte social.

  7. Women's Sexual Harassment at Workplace:Application of GT in examining Women's feeling of Insecurity at Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Maktoobian

    2014-11-01

    of insecurity and harassment and the cultural environment in society. Intervening conditions also include moral guidelines, security guard office, the office of the supreme leader, the nobility of the family, adherence to ethical standards. Strategies are methods of encounter and mental and job degradation are the relevant consequences. In this research, we arrived at this conclusion that despite of being undeniably available, such problems are social taboo in our country and bring labeling, stigma and dishonor for engaged people. Therefore, because of stigmatizing nature of these issues, women who are subject to sexual harassment prefer to stay silent and not report such problems. As a result, these problems tend to, when started, continue and develop. Also we found that single and younger women are more exposed to sexual harassment and feeling of insecurity compared with older women. The most frequent forms of harassment are oral and speaking interactions. Unfortunately, one of our interviewees had the experience of being raped, which is the worst form of sexual harassment. Finally, by considering the links between the mentioned axial categories, a center core of ethic work was discovered. Therefore observing ethical principles of work at a suitable place, which is free from gender discrimination, is a manifestation of equality and protection of citizens' rights. In addition, ethics is an important principle in our religion that contains a wide range and its observance, at all times and in all situations, is for the benefit of the people themselves. In our view, an ethical human is the one who is capacious and honorable, respects others' rights is selfish. An unethical person, on the other hand, is the one who is unpredictable and by his dangerous behavior, dire social consequences may come about.

  8. Science Resulting from U.S. Geological Survey's "Did You Feel It?" Citizen Science Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D. J.; Dewey, J. W.; Atkinson, G. M.; Worden, C. B.; Quitoriano, V. P. R.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) system, in operation since 1999, is an automated approach for rapidly collecting macroseismic intensity data from internet users' shaking and damage reports and generating intensity maps immediately following earthquakes felt around the globe. As with any citizen science project, a significant component of the DYFI system is public awareness and participation in the immediate aftermath of any widely felt earthquake, allowing the public and the USGS to exchange valuable post-earthquake information. The data collected are remarkably robust and useful, as indicated by the range of peer-reviewed literature that rely on these citizen-science intensity reports. A Google Scholar search results in 14,700 articles citing DYFI, a number of which rely exclusively on these data. Though focused on topics of earthquake seismology (including shaking attenuation and relationships with damage), other studies cover social media use in disasters, human risk perception, earthquake-induced landslides, rapid impact assessment, emergency response, and science education. DYFI data have also been analyzed for non-earthquake events, including explosions, aircraft sonic booms, and even bolides and DYFI is now one of the best data sources from which to study induced earthquakes. Yet, DYFI was designed primarily as an operational system to rapidly assess the effects of earthquakes for situational awareness. Oftentimes, DYFI data are the only data available pertaining to shaking levels for much of the United States. As such, DYFI provides site-specific constraints of the shaking levels that feed directly into ShakeMap; thus, these data are readily available to emergency managers and responders, the media, and the general public. As an early adopter of web-based citizen science and having worked out many kinks in the process, DYFI developers have provided guidance on many other citizen-science endeavors across a wide range of

  9. The Development of a Community Feeling Scale toward Online Distance Education Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Ilgaz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop a community feeling scale in order to analyze the community feeling of learners, enrolled in a distance education program which is designed with blended learning model, in online environments. Providing interaction with information communication technologies come into prominence as a result of increasing importance of these technologies in distance education. Although this situation has positive contributions, it may have negative effects on decrement of the motivation, achievement, satisfaction or learning of student such as social isolation, aprosexia, and feeling of alienation. The role of community feeling is major on drop out rates, which is one of the quality indicators of distance education. Rovai (2001b defined classroom community components, including McMillan and Chavis‟s four components of community dimensions. These components are spirit, trust, influence and learning. Spirit shows the acceptance of the membership in the community and develops the feelings of friendship, commitment and satisfaction between the students. Trust is the second one of the class community components. It will be friendly and constructive if the community can be trusted and be given feedback by individuals. When individuals have been accepted by a growing and developing community, they feel more in safe and start to trust to community. The third component, influence is the feeling of closeness and mutual benefit between the individuals. The last component learning is the feeling that community enhances the acquisition of knowledge and understanding, and also the feeling of active information and meaning conformation which supplies the educational needs of the individuals that it consists of. According to the research results, the community feeling of students has so many positive effects. Strong community feeling have positive outcomes as increasing the flow of information, access to support, collaboration between the

  10. "I Feel Like More of a Man": A Mixed Methods Study of Masculinity, Sexual Performance, and Circumcision for HIV Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Barrington, Clare; Pearce, Lisa D; Lerebours, Leonel; Donastorg, Yeycy; Brito, Maximo O

    2017-01-01

    Ethnographic studies from numerous societies have documented the central role of male circumcision in conferring masculinity and preparing boys for adult male sexuality. Despite this link between masculinity, sexuality, and circumcision, there has been little research on these dynamics among men who have been circumcised for HIV prevention. We employed a mixed methods approach with data collected from recently circumcised men in the Dominican Republic (DR) to explore this link. We analyzed survey data collected six to 12 months post-circumcision (N = 293) as well as in-depth interviews conducted with a subsample of those men (n = 30). We found that 42% of men felt more masculine post-circumcision. In multivariate analysis, feeling more masculine was associated with greater concern about being perceived as masculine (OR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.25-2.32), feeling more potent erections post-circumcision (OR = 2.25, 95% CI: 1.26-4.03), and reporting increased ability to satisfy their partners post-circumcision (OR = 2.30, 95% CI: 1.11-4.77). In qualitative interviews, these factors were all related to masculine norms of sexually satisfying one's partner, and men's experiences of circumcision were shaped by social norms of masculinity. This study highlights that circumcision is not simply a biomedical intervention and that circumcision programs need to incorporate considerations of masculine norms and male sexuality into their programming.

  11. The Dark Side of Authenticity: Feeling "Real" While Gambling Interacts with Enhancement Motives to Predict Problematic Gambling Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, Jamey J; Wohl, Michael J A; Davis, Christopher G

    2015-09-01

    Engaging in activities that make people feel authentic or real is typically associated with a host of positive psychological and physiological outcomes (i.e., being authentic serves to increase well-being). In the current study, we tested the idea that authenticity might have a dark side among people engaged in an addictive or risky behavior (gambling). To test this possibility, we assessed gamblers (N = 61) who were betting on the National Hockey League playoff games at a sports bar. As predicted, people who felt authentic when gambling reported behavior associated with problem gambling (high frequency of betting) as well as problematic play (a big monetary loss and a big monetary win). Moreover, such behavior and gambling outcomes were particularly high among people who were motivated to gamble for the purpose of enhancement. The interaction of feeling authentic when betting and gambling for purposes of enhancing positive emotions proved especially troublesome for problematic forms of play. Implications of authenticity as a potential vulnerability factor for sports betting and other types of gambling are discussed.

  12. It felt fluent, and I liked it: subjective feeling of fluency rather than objective fluency determines liking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, Michael; Leder, Helmut; Ansorge, Ulrich

    2013-04-01

    According to the processing-fluency explanation of aesthetics, more fluently processed stimuli are preferred (R. Reber, N. Schwarz, & P. Winkielman, 2004, Processing fluency and aesthetic pleasure: Is beauty in the perceiver's processing experience? Personality and Social Psychology Review, Vol. 8, pp. 364-382.). In this view, the subjective feeling of ease of processing is considered important, but this has not been directly tested in perceptual processing. In two experiments, we therefore objectively manipulated fluency (ease of processing) with subliminal perceptual priming (Study 1) and variations in presentation durations (Study 2). We assessed the impact of objective fluency on feelings of fluency and liking, as well as their interdependence. In line with the processing-fluency account, we found that objectively more fluent images were indeed judged as more fluent and were also liked more. Moreover, differences in liking were even stronger when data were analyzed according to felt fluency. These findings demonstrate that perceptual fluency is not only explicitly felt, it can also be reported and is an important determinant of liking. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  13. Emotional dysregulation in borderline personality disorder and its influence on communication behavior and feelings in romantic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Annemarie; Grosselli, Luna; Roepke, Stefan; Dziobek, Isabel

    2017-08-01

    Dysfunction in romantic relationships constitutes one of the most burdensome symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The aim of this study was to ascertain how emotional dysregulation affects behavior and relationship related feelings of women with BPD in threatening conversations with their own romantic partner. Thirty couples in which the women were diagnosed with BPD and 34 healthy control (HC) couples were videotaped while discussing personally threatening (i.e., personal failure) and relationship-threatening (i.e., separation) themes. Third party raters evaluated stress and communication behaviors during the conversations. Relationship related feelings, i.e., closeness and relationship insecurity, were assessed by self-report. Overall, women with BPD were rated as more stressed in threatening situations than HC women and their partners, but not more stressed in relationship-threatening than personally threatening situations. A heightened stress response of women with BPD predicted more negative and less positive communication behaviors and a stronger decline in self-rated closeness to the partner compared to HC. Stress-induced increases in relationship insecurity were specific to women with BPD. Our results highlight the central role of emotional dysregulation in interpersonal dysfunctions of persons with BPD and the need to address individual emotion regulation strategies more explicitly in dyadic contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Can you see what you feel? Color and folding properties affect visual-tactile material discrimination of fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bei; Bi, Wenyan; Jia, Xiaodan; Wei, Hanhan; Adelson, Edward H

    2016-01-01

    Humans can often estimate tactile properties of objects from vision alone. For example, during online shopping, we can often infer material properties of clothing from images and judge how the material would feel against our skin. What visual information is important for tactile perception? Previous studies in material perception have focused on measuring surface appearance, such as gloss and roughness, and using verbal reports of material attributes and categories. However, in real life, predicting tactile properties of an object might not require accurate verbal descriptions of its surface attributes or categories. In this paper, we use tactile perception as ground truth to measure visual material perception. Using fabrics as our stimuli, we measure how observers match what they see (photographs of fabric samples) with what they feel (physical fabric samples). The data shows that color has a significant main effect in that removing color significantly reduces accuracy, especially when the images contain 3-D folds. We also find that images of draped fabrics, which revealed 3-D shape information, achieved better matching accuracy than images with flattened fabrics. The data shows a strong interaction between color and folding conditions on matching accuracy, suggesting that, in 3-D folding conditions, the visual system takes advantage of chromatic gradients to infer tactile properties but not in flattened conditions. Together, using a visual-tactile matching task, we show that humans use folding and color information in matching the visual and tactile properties of fabrics.

  15. Hurt feelings and personality socialization in the family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano L'Abate

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to summarize a developmental, relational theory of personality socialization in the family and other settings. This theory consists of two assumptions about space and time, from which are derived two respective processes about the ability to love and the ability to negotiate. The contents of the theory consist of three modalities: Being, Doing, and Having. From these processes and contents other models about a continuum of likeness, selfhood and personality propensities, priorities, and intimacy are developed. This theory can be evaluated in the laboratory through self-report, paper-and-pencil tests, and in applied or clinical settings through enrichment programs, workbooks, and therapeutic tasks.

  16. Religious Feeling in Schleiermacher’s Standpoint and Otto’s Criticism on that

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaghool, Y

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Friedrich Daniel Ernest Schleiermacher (1768-1834 was one of the most notable theologian and philosophers, who is known for his impressive attempts in modern theology after the age of enlightenment. One of the most important aspects of theological standpoints of Schleiermacher is that he raised the question of the religious nature in the enlightenment for the first time. He tried to develop a systematic theory and He based the religion on the firm foundations which were free from the criticism of rationalism. Therefore, he defines religion as an “absolute dependence feeling”. Schleiermacher’s definition of religion as feeling posses a considerable impact on the thinker’s ideas that live after him such as Otto’s theory. He emphasized a feelings too, but also criticized the absolute dependence of feelings of Schleiermacher. He instead considered the feeling of being creature as the most important criteria of the religion. In this paper, the author’s analyses Schleiermacher’s view about religious feelings and Otto’s criticism on them.

  17. Religious Feeling in Schleiermacher’s Standpoint and Otto’s Criticism on that

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Shaghool

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available   Friedrich Daniel Ernest Schleiermacher (1768-1834 was one of the most notable theologian and philosopher s, who is known for his impressive attempts in modern theology after the age of enlightenment. One of the most important aspects of theological standpoints of Schleiermacher is that he raised the question of the religious nature in the enlightenment for the first time. He tried to develop a systematic theory and He based the religion on the firm foundations which were free from the criticism of rationalism. Therefore, he defines religion as an “absolute dependence feeling”. Schleiermacher’s definition of religion as feeling posses a considerable impact on the thinker’s ideas that live after him such as Otto’s theory. He emphasized a feelings too, but also criticized the absolute dependence of feelings of Schleiermacher. He instead considered the feeling of being creature as the most important criteria of the religion. In this paper, the author’s analyses Schleiermacher’s view about religious feelings and Otto’s criticism on them.

  18. Dissociable roles of internal feelings and face recognition ability in facial expression decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Song, Yiying; Liu, Ling; Liu, Jia

    2016-05-15

    The problem of emotion recognition has been tackled by researchers in both affective computing and cognitive neuroscience. While affective computing relies on analyzing visual features from facial expressions, it has been proposed that humans recognize emotions by internally simulating the emotional states conveyed by others' expressions, in addition to perceptual analysis of facial features. Here we investigated whether and how our internal feelings contributed to the ability to decode facial expressions. In two independent large samples of participants, we observed that individuals who generally experienced richer internal feelings exhibited a higher ability to decode facial expressions, and the contribution of internal feelings was independent of face recognition ability. Further, using voxel-based morphometry, we found that the gray matter volume (GMV) of bilateral superior temporal sulcus (STS) and the right inferior parietal lobule was associated with facial expression decoding through the mediating effect of internal feelings, while the GMV of bilateral STS, precuneus, and the right central opercular cortex contributed to facial expression decoding through the mediating effect of face recognition ability. In addition, the clusters in bilateral STS involved in the two components were neighboring yet separate. Our results may provide clues about the mechanism by which internal feelings, in addition to face recognition ability, serve as an important instrument for humans in facial expression decoding.

  19. Emotion-Focused Coping Worsens Depressive Feelings and Health Complaints in Cyberbullied Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Völlink

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Coping may explain why being cyberbullied affects children’s well-being differently, though previous studies are inconclusive. This survey among 325 children focused on the role coping strategies may play in the relationship between cyberbullying and depressive feelings and health complaints. Being cyberbullied was measured with the Cyberbullying Questionnaire, general coping with the Utrecht Coping List, and cyberbullying-specific coping with a questionnaire developed for this study. Health complaints were measured with the Short Questionnaire for Experienced Health and depressive feelings with the shortened Children’s Depression Inventory. The results showed that 18.8% of the children were bullied by mobile phone and 24.1% through the internet. Correlation analyses showed strong relationships between victimization, coping, depressive feelings, and health complaints. In the regression analyses conducted in all children, victimization, general emotion-focused, and problem-focused copings had main effects on depressive feelings and health complaints; emotion-focused coping interacted with victimization in health complaints. Simple slope analyses of children with high scores on emotion-focused general coping showed a stronger positive relationship between victimization and health complaints. Regression analyses of only cyberbullied children showed that only emotion-focused cyber-specific coping was associated with more health complaints and depressive feelings.

  20. Moral and political feelings in civic education in Colombia: attributes and stigmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieta Quintero Mejía

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.39folios137.147 The processes of civic education have been focused on the strengthening of the cognitive path of morals, which has led to locating moral and political feelings in a restricted place. This allows us to understand, to a considerable extent, the reasons for which we have valued these feelings as vital for our political and moral life. Because of this, feelings such as empathy, solidarity, indignation, among others, have been stripped of their intersubjective nature and been pushed back into the field of irrationality. In order to account for this, this article presents some attributes and stigmas of feelings in the process of civic education. To this aim, scholarly texts are analysed (1800, to be exact, and the results of interviews with members of educational institutions in four Colombian departments affected by the Colombian armed conflict are given. We consider that the meaning of the public, the processes of socialisation, subjectivity, as well as our forms of collective action, are motivated, in some way, by feelings which trigger rejection/indifference; resistance/apathy when faced with situations where our rights are violated.

  1. The paradox of vaginal examination practice during normal childbirth: Palestinian women’s feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sahar J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal examination (VE, is a frequent procedure during childbirth. It is the most accepted ways to assess progress during childbirth, but its repetition at short intervals has no value. Over years, VE continued to be plagued by a nature that implies negative feelings and experiences of women. The aim of this exploratory qualitative study was to explore women’s feelings, opinions, knowledge and experiences of vaginal examinations (VE during normal childbirth. Methods We interviewed 176 postpartum women using semi-structured questionnaire in a Palestinian public hospital in the oPt. Descriptive statistics were conducted; frequency counts and percentages for the quantitative questions. The association between the frequency of VE and age, parity, years of education, locale and the time of delivery was tested by Chi-squared and Fisher’s Exact test. The open-ended qualitative questions were read line-by-line for the content and coded. The assigned codes for all responses were entered to the SPSS statistical software version 18. Results As compared with WHO recommendations, VE was conducted too frequently, and by too many providers during childbirth. The proportion of women who received a ‘too high’ frequency of VEs during childbirth was significantly larger in primipara as compared to multipara women (P = .037. 82% of women reported pain or severe pain and 68% reported discomfort during VE. Some women reported insensitive approaches of providers, insufficient means of privacy and no respect of dignity or humanity during the exam. Conclusions Palestinian women are undergoing unnecessary and frequent VEs during childbirth, conducted by several different providers and suffer pain and discomfort un-necessarily. Practice implications Adhering to best evidence, VE during childbirth should be conducted only when necessary, and if possible, by the same provider. This will decrease the laboring women’s unnecessary suffering

  2. Feeling Touched: Emotional Modulation of Somatosensory Potentials to Interpersonal Touch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravaja, N.; Harjunen, V.; Ahmed, I.; Jacucci, G.; Spapé, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Although the previous studies have shown that an emotional context may alter touch processing, it is not clear how visual contextual information modulates the sensory signals, and at what levels does this modulation take place. Therefore, we investigated how a toucher’s emotional expressions (anger, happiness, fear, and sadness) modulate touchee’s somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs) in different temporal ranges. Participants were presented with tactile stimulation appearing to originate from expressive characters in virtual reality. Touch processing was indexed using SEPs, and self-reports of touch experience were collected. Early potentials were found to be amplified after angry, happy and sad facial expressions, while late potentials were amplified after anger but attenuated after happiness. These effects were related to two stages of emotional modulation of tactile perception: anticipation and interpretation. The findings show that not only does touch affect emotion, but also emotional expressions affect touch perception. The affective modulation of touch was initially obtained as early as 25 ms after the touch onset suggesting that emotional context is integrated to the tactile sensation at a very early stage. PMID:28079157

  3. Patient safety in nursing education: contexts, tensions and feeling safe to learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, Alison; Magnusson, Carin; Smith, Pam; Pearson, Pauline H

    2014-02-01

    Education is crucial to how nurses practice, talk and write about keeping patients safe. The aim of this multisite study was to explore the formal and informal ways the pre-registration medical, nursing, pharmacy and physiotherapy students learn about patient safety. This paper focuses on findings from nursing. A multi-method design underpinned by the concept of knowledge contexts and illuminative evaluation was employed. Scoping of nursing curricula from four UK university programmes was followed by in-depth case studies of two programmes. Scoping involved analysing curriculum documents and interviews with 8 programme leaders. Case-study data collection included focus groups (24 students, 12 qualified nurses, 6 service users); practice placement observation (4 episodes=19 hrs) and interviews (4 Health Service managers). Within academic contexts patient safety was not visible as a curricular theme: programme leaders struggled to define it and some felt labelling to be problematic. Litigation and the risk of losing authorisation to practise were drivers to update safety in the programmes. Students reported being taught idealised skills in university with an emphasis on 'what not to do'. In organisational contexts patient safety was conceptualised as a complicated problem, addressed via strategies, systems and procedures. A tension emerged between creating a 'no blame' culture and performance management. Few formal mechanisms appeared to exist for students to learn about organisational systems and procedures. In practice, students learnt by observing staff who acted as variable role models; challenging practice was problematic, since they needed to 'fit in' and mentors were viewed as deciding whether they passed or failed their placements. The study highlights tensions both between and across contexts, which link to formal and informal patient safety education and impact negatively on students' feelings of emotional safety in their learning. Copyright © 2014

  4. Feelings of disgust and disgust-induced avoidance weaken following induced sexual arousal in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Borg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sex and disgust are basic, evolutionary relevant functions that are often construed as paradoxical. In general the stimuli involved in sexual encounters are, at least out of context strongly perceived to hold high disgust qualities. Saliva, sweat, semen and body odours are among the strongest disgust elicitors. This results in the intriguing question of how people succeed in having pleasurable sex at all. One possible explanation could be that sexual engagement temporarily reduces the disgust eliciting properties of particular stimuli or that sexual engagement might weaken the hesitation to actually approach these stimuli. METHODOLOGY: Participants were healthy women (n = 90 randomly allocated to one of three groups: the sexual arousal, the non-sexual positive arousal, or the neutral control group. Film clips were used to elicit the relevant mood state. Participants engaged in 16 behavioural tasks, involving sex related (e.g., lubricate the vibrator and non-sex related (e.g., take a sip of juice with a large insect in the cup stimuli, to measure the impact of sexual arousal on feelings of disgust and actual avoidance behaviour. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The sexual arousal group rated the sex related stimuli as less disgusting compared to the other groups. A similar tendency was evident for the non-sex disgusting stimuli. For both the sex and non-sex related behavioural tasks the sexual arousal group showed less avoidance behaviour (i.e., they conducted the highest percentage of tasks compared to the other groups. SIGNIFICANCE: This study has investigated how sexual arousal interplays with disgust and disgust eliciting properties in women, and has demonstrated that this relationship goes beyond subjective report by affecting the actual approach to disgusting stimuli. Hence, this could explain how we still manage to engage in pleasurable sexual activity. Moreover, these findings suggest that low sexual arousal might be a key feature in the

  5. Relationships, love and sexuality: what the Filipino teens think and feel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Irala Jokin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to achieve a change among teens' sexual behavior, an important step is to improve our knowledge about their opinions concerning relationships, love and sexuality. Methods A questionnaire including topics on relationships, love and sexuality was distributed to a target population of 4,000 Filipino students from third year high school to third year college. Participants were obtained through multi-stage sampling of clusters of universities and schools. This paper concentrates on teens aged 13 to 18. Results Students reported that they obtained information about love and sexuality mainly from friends. However, they valued parents' opinion more than friends'. They revealed few conversations with their parents on these topics. A majority of them would like to have more information, mainly about emotion-related topics. Almost half of respondents were not aware that condoms are not 100% effective in preventing STIs or pregnancies. More girls, compared to boys, were sensitive and opposed to several types of sexism. After adjusting for sex, age and institution, the belief of 100% condom effectiveness and the approval of pornography and sexism were associated with being sexually experienced. Conclusion There is room for further encouraging parents to talk more with their children about sexuality, specially aspects related to feelings and emotions in order to help them make better sexual choices. Indeed, teens wish to better communicate with their parents on these issues. Condoms are regarded as safer than what they really are by almost half of the participants of this study, and such incorrect knowledge seems to be associated with sexual initiation.

  6. Neural correlates of "feeling-of-not-knowing":Evidence from functional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The neural correlates of "feeling-of-not- knowing" ("FOnK", i.e. the feeling-of-knowing judgments that accurately predicted "not knowing" or "misses" in the criterion test) were investigated by the event-related fMRI method through an RJR (recall-judgment-recognition) procedure that adopted unrelated word pairs as materials. Results revealed that, relative to the inaccurate "FOnK" predictions, the accurate ones were associated with activities in right ventral prefrontal cortex (PFC) and insula, the areas that were known to subserve "cue specification" in which the retrieval cues were converted into "descriptors" that could be used for direct memory search. This result implied that the accurate "FOnK" predictions relayed more on "cue specification" process than the inaccurate ones and was in consistent with the cue familiarity heuristic hypothesis of feeling-of-knowing.

  7. Mothers' feelings about breastfeeding their premature babies in a rooming-in facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davim, Rejane Marie Barbosa; Enders, Bertha Cruz; da Silva, Richardson Augusto Rosendo

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed at learning about the feelings experienced by mothers while breastfeeding their premature babies in a rooming-in facility, by means of individual interviews with 33 mothers during the period of February to April 2006, at a maternity hospital in Natal/RN/Brazil. The main feelings referred by the mothers regarding their inability to breastfeed their premature babies immediately after delivery were: sorrow, guilt, disappointment, frustration, insecurity, and fear of touching, holding or harming the delicate babies while breastfeeding. However, the mother-child bond that was formed when the baby was discharged from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and taken to the rooming-in facility was reflected by feelings of fulfillment, pride, and satisfaction at experiencing the first breastfeeding.

  8. From a breath to another true feeling---Talk about contingency in water color painting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Pan

    2015-01-01

    The artists extract the essence of the art from the universe of 1,000,000,000 universes in , and the idea became highly ab-stract art language , into art of breathing for their creation . Their artistic feeling of beauty in the creation main body emotion , have the feeling there will be the potential, from a breath to another true feeling . Water impermanence shape is the property of water-color painting , that is the property leads to the contingency in watercolor art . The Spirits of creation and flashes of insight and the unconscious and subconscious ideas of artists in the art creation are all worthy of study in the contingency of watercolor art .

  9. Feelings of Gratitude Toward God Among Older Whites, Older African Americans, and Older Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal

    2012-03-01

    The first goal of this study is to see if social relationships in the church influence feelings of gratitude toward God. The second goal is to assess the impact of race and ethnicity on this relationship. The data support the following hypotheses: (1) older people who go to church more often tend to receive more spiritual support from fellow church members; (2) older adults who receive more spiritual support at church will derive a deeper understanding of themselves and others; (3) older people who develop greater insight into themselves and others will derive a greater sense of religious meaning in life; and (4) older adults who develop a deeper sense of religious meaning in life will feel more grateful to God. The results also indicate that the study model explains how feelings of gratitude toward God arise among older blacks and whites, but not older Mexican Americans.

  10. [Feelings of relatives regarding the patient who is admitted in intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Andreza Santos; Aragão, Neylor Rodrigo Oliveira; Moura, Elaine; Lima, Gabriela de Carvalho; Hora, Edilene Curvelo; Silva, Lausimary Araújo São Mateus

    2009-01-01

    This is a study with qualitative approach focusing on the relatives' feelings related to the patient who is admitted in intensive care unity. Twenty-four relatives were interviewed in a public hospital in Aracaju, SE, Brazil between July and August, 2007. The information was collected through an interview and evaluated according to content analysis. The results showed the following feelings: anxiety; worry; anguish and sadness; powerless; pain and sorrow; lost; fear and panic; stress; trust and security; insecurity; faith and hope and unexplainable feelings. Anxiety was the most common one and was related to the strange environment, the diversified procedures, fear of what will happen tomorrow and expectations of their relatives to get better.

  11. VOICES AND FEELINGS: MIGRANT EVENTS OF PURÉPERO, MICHOACÁN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigoberto Sandoval-Contreras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the feelings and emotions that some migrants living community Purépero Michoacán when they go to the United States. From an ethnographic perspective and social construction of reality, we approach approach the origin and importance of the subject. Although failure to inquire, we now know that each of migrants experience similar feelings and emotions. This may seem obvious, but not, as each migrant construct their own reality according to the role it plays in the family (father and husband, before leaving and once established. So each forging their feelings and emotions in the experience. In this process the migrant uses his own theory say Berger and Luckman (2001 is driven by common sense.

  12. Adults' Descriptions of a Situation Can Influence Children's Appraisal, Feelings, and Subsequent Psychological Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Li; Lim, Zhao M T

    2016-09-01

    This study examined how an adult's descriptions of a situation could influence children's appraisal, feelings, and subsequent psychological functions. After baseline measures, 81 middle-class Singaporean kindergarten children (Mage  = 5.6 years, SD = 0.6) were exposed to an ambiguous accident and provided with positive, negative, or no descriptions of the accident. Children's appraisal of the experience, feelings of pleasantness, motivation to play a new game, confidence in playing the new game well, and performance on the new game were measured. The results revealed that the descriptions of the accident influenced children's appraisal, feelings of pleasantness, motivation to play a new game, confidence in playing the new game well, and performance on the new game.

  13. The study of subjective feelings of loneliness older women in terms of suicide risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudryashov E.L.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of the study of subjective feeling lonely older women and their actual social status in terms of the propensity to suicidal behavior. Hypothesized that the level of suicide risk in older women reveals a closer connection with the severity of subjective feelings of loneliness than with the degree of objective social isolation. The study involved 52 women aged 55 to 75 years old who do not have mental disorders and debilitating physical illness. The main methods of study was the analysis of medical records, interview and psychological testing formalized. Data used for U-Mann-Whitney test, H-Kruskal-Wallis test, and Pearson criterion 2 Spearman rank correlation method. It is shown that the severity of suicidal risk in the studied sample is really linked to the level of subjective feelings of loneliness (p≤0,05, in respect of the same objective social isolation test found no such relationship.

  14. Does smoke-free legislation and smoking outside bars increase feelings of stigmatization among smokers? Findings from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelhout, Gera E; Willemsen, Marc C; Gebhardt, Winifred A; van den Putte, Bas; Hitchman, Sara C; Crone, Matty R; Fong, Geoffrey T; van der Heiden, Sander; de Vries, Hein

    2012-11-01

    This study examined whether smokers' perceived level of stigmatization changed after the implementation of smoke-free hospitality industry legislation and whether smokers who smoked outside bars reported more perceived stigmatization. Longitudinal data from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Netherlands Survey was used, involving a nationally representative sample of 1447 smokers aged 15 years and older. Whether smoke-free legislation increases smokers' perceived stigmatization depends on how smokers feel about smoking outside. The level of perceived stigmatization did not change after the implementation of smoke-free hospitality industry legislation in the Netherlands, possibly because most Dutch smokers do not feel negatively judged when smoking outside. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [The decision to abort: the process and feelings involved].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, R G; Hardy, E; Osis, M J; Faúndes, A

    1995-01-01

    In Brazil, induced abortion is considered a crime in the majority of cases, the result being that there is little official data on the subject. Little is known about the conditions under which abortions are induced This research was designed to shed light on the characteristics of the women who had had an abortion and to study the reasons why and conditions under which it occurred. The sample consisted of all employees (7,359) and students (2,231) in a university program in S o Paulo who were mailed a self-administered survey. Accompanying the questionnaire was a letter and self-addressed stamped envelope. 27% of the employees and 42% of the students returned the questionnaires. Of these, 1,314 employees and 138 students had had at least one pregnancy. The results presented in this study show that 465 of the employees and students ar some point had thought of having an abortion. They were divided into two groups: those who had had an abortion and those who had nos. The objective was to analyze the association of some characteristics of the women with their decision to have/not have an abortion and how they felt when faced with this decision. The proportion of women who had had an abortion was significantly lower among married women than singles. A larger percentage of women who had talked with a friend and/or husband/partner/boyfriend had decided to have an abortion than those who had talked to a parent or had not talked to anyone. More women who said they were not prepared to raise/educate a child had had an abortion as compared to those giving other reasons. Almost half of the women undergoing an abortion said that they felt bad emotionally and physically afterwards. Among those who had not had an abortion, almost two-fifths reported that they felt good, were happy, relieved, and did not regret their decision. The conclusion drawn from the population studied was that emotional and social factors played a significant role in the decision-making process for women

  16. Method and application of grade division for road traffic congestion based on driver’s feeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Qi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although road traffic congestion is an objective state of traffic flow, drivers have different feelings about road traffic congestion. First of all, in order to reveal the law that driver’s mental state changes along with congested degree of road traffic, the targeted questionnaire was designed to analyze the driver’s psychological feeling under different state of traffic flow. Then, from the perspectives of the driver’s subjective feeling, the new definition of road traffic congestion was put forward, so the pressure coefficient of traffic congestion, which is written as χ press t 0 − t n , is defined to measure traffic congestion pressure. Furthermore, by adopting statistical methods to associate the driver’s subjective feeling toward traffic congestion with objective parameters of traffic flow, the grading thresholds of the unblocked state, mild congested state, moderate congested state, and severe congested state were calculated, which are χ press t 0 − t n = 0 . 37 , χ press t 0 − t n = 0 . 51 , and χ press t 0 − t n = 0 . 65 , respectively. And in the field of application for the grading thresholds, Fourier Transform theory was introduced to calculate domain frequency indexes of the driver’s heart rate variability in the four states of traffic flow, respectively. The results show that the domain frequency indexes of the driver’s heart rate variability present obvious differences in the four states, which illustrates the solving rationality and applied value of the new grading thresholds for traffic congestion based on driver’s feeling. On one hand, the new grading method for traffic congestion, which combines the subjectivity with objectivity, can reflect the driver’s actual feeling; on the other hand, it lays the foundation for the study about the influence of traffic congestion on the driver’s physiological and psychological characteristics.

  17. VOICES AND FEELINGS: MIGRANT EVENTS OF PURÉPERO, MICHOACÁN

    OpenAIRE

    Rigoberto Sandoval-Contreras; Paola Leonora Aburto-Benitez

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the feelings and emotions that some migrants living community Purépero Michoacán when they go to the United States. From an ethnographic perspective and social construction of reality, we approach approach the origin and importance of the subject. Although failure to inquire, we now know that each of migrants experience similar feelings and emotions. This may seem obvious, but not, as each migrant construct their own reality according to the role it plays i...

  18. Feeling lonely in the lab: A literature review and partial examination of recent loneliness induction procedures for experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pels Fabian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Few laboratory experiments have been conducted in loneliness research in the past. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to review, partially investigate and discuss loneliness induction procedures in order to facilitate future laboratory experiments in loneliness research (e.g. to examine the link between loneliness and social cognition. Previous studies have found both unconscious (i.e. professional hypnosis and conscious (i.e. recalling and calling out lonely experiences procedures to be successful in inducing loneliness. Another conscious procedure (i.e. recalling and writing down lonely experiences that has been described in recent literature has not yet been examined. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine this procedure using a one-group before-after design. However, this procedure, in which the participants had to recall and write down two lonely situations, was not found to significantly induce loneliness. Of 16 participants, only three reported at least some higher feelings of loneliness following this procedure.

  19. Physical activity across the life-span: Does feeling physically younger help you to plan physical activities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, Julian; Gellert, Paul; Lippke, Sonia

    2017-03-01

    We tested whether the relationship between subjective physical age and physical activity is mediated by planning. Participants came from a broad age range (25-78 years, M = 39.57, standard deviation = 10.75) and reported relatively good health ( M = 3.36, standard deviation = 0.90). The model supported the suggested mediation ( β = -.01, standard error = .01, p = .042). Feeling physically younger is associated with higher planning to adopt higher levels of physical activity and more planning is associated with more subsequent physical activity. Results open avenues for interventions that help people to become more active by focusing on subjective age. One way to do so might be tailoring approaches for interventions.

  20. The Effects of Chewing Cinnamon Flavored Gum on Mood, Feeling and Spelling Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew; Kim, Wonsun; Raudenbush, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate if the effects of chewing cinnamon flavored gum can increase mood, feeling and spelling acquisition. 5th grade students (n = 22) at Ilshin elementary school in South Korea served as participants. The same students were required to take 4 spelling tests with 1 given every day over the course of 4 days. For…

  1. "Feeling Lore": The "Problem" of Emotion in the Practice of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Christy I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the current dismissal of feeling from teaching and learning in the college composition classroom. Drawing on the teaching experiences and the concept of lore, it argues that the practices and pedagogies of composition studies continue to produce a division between reason and emotion, denying the body's epistemic potential.…

  2. The feeling of "face" in Confucian society: From a perspective of psychosocial Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei-Hsiang Han

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research on the feeling of face has long described face as a complicated phenomenon in Confucian societies. Indeed, the feeling of face is highly context dependent. One may have very different (having or losing face perception if the same face event occurs in a different context. To better capture the features of how face is felt, effects on possible responses need to be considered. Therefore, this article adopts a perspective of psychosocial equilibrium to elaborate people’s feeling of face in Taiwan, a Confucian society. The first section illustrates the concept of psychosocial equilibrium and its psychodynamic effects on people’s feeling of face. Then, the second section of this article takes positive social situations (having face events as backdrop to exhibit how people balance their psychosocial equilibrium with different relationships. Following the positive social situations, the third section of this article then focuses on the negative situations (losing face events to explain how losing face is felt due to unbalance of psychosocial equilibrium with one’s relation in that specific context.

  3. Negative Feelings as Emotional Enhancement in Cinema: The Case of Ulrich Seidl's Paradise Trilogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, T.; Hauskeller, M.; Philbeck, T.D.; Carbonell, C.D.; Carbonell, CD

    2015-01-01

    In everyday life, negative feelings such as shame, horror and disgust, are emotions one rather wants to discard than to cherish. Just think of the way in which people aspire at ‘improving’ their emotional makeup by means of Prozac and other mood enhancers in order to get rid of their undesirable emo

  4. Parental Autonomy Support, Community Feeling and Student Expectations as Contributors to Later Achievement among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Worrell, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the relationships among parental autonomy support, student intrinsic life goals (i.e. community feeling), student expectations for long-term educational attainment and later academic performance (measured by GPA) in 227 students in an ethnically and racially diverse high school. Hypotheses were tested with…

  5. "I Can Feel It Making My Brain Bigger": Thinking Science Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullard, Heath; Oliver, Mary

    2012-01-01

    "I can feel it making my brain bigger": from a Year 8 student at Pinjarra Senior High School (SHS) halfway through the two-year Thinking Science Program. Pinjarra was a pilot school for the program in 2009/10 and a growing number of schools in Western Australia (WA) are implementing this program in Years Seven to Nine as part of the…

  6. Changing tactics in the abortion argument: does a fetus feel pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, N W

    1997-12-10

    The 30th anniversary of the passing of the abortion law in England sparked off yet another skirmish in the continuing struggle. Not only the Catholic Church but also anti-lobby groups have protested against the abortion law. Anti-lobby groups consider abortion as an evil that must be fought. To further explain their point, the anti-lobby groups used the conclusions on pediatric anesthetic practice to change their tactics in combating the abortion issue from the emotional point of view to the apparently rational. A group of pediatricians, anesthetists, bioethicists and neuroanatomists has considered the problem of when the fetus may first be able to feel pain. They have decided that the fetus cannot feel pain before the 26th week and recommended that the fetus be given an anesthetic for any abortion later than the 24th week. The anti-lobby groups say that this view limits the perception of pain to the cerebral cortex and that the thalamus is well enough developed by the 10th week for the growing embryo to feel the pain. However, as to the question of fetal pain, one can never know whether fetuses feel pain, because they can never tell.

  7. Enhancing Academic Performance and Social and Emotional Competence with the RULER Feeling Words Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.; Reyes, Maria R.; Salovey, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A pre- and post-test quasi-experimental design was used to test the impact of a 30-week, theoretically-based social and emotional learning (SEL) curriculum, The RULER Feeling Words Curriculum ("RULER"), on the academic performance and social and emotional competence of 5th and 6th grade students (N = 273) in fifteen classrooms in three schools.…

  8. Emotions in the History of Latin American Popular Education: Constructions for a Thinking-Feeling Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Danilo R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the presence of emotions in the constitution of popular education in Latin America, thus contributing to understand popular education as a thinking-feeling practice. It starts from the assumption that emotions are also historical and cultural expressions that mark societies and their understanding of…

  9. New Brain Research on Emotion and Feeling: Dramatic Implications for Music Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Bennett

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the author concludes that the lesson for music educators is that every musical experience that is offered to students affects their brains, bodies, and feelings. In short, it changes their minds permanently, and, if educators are conscientious, it does so progressively. Such a process is called "learning." That capacity to learn, to…

  10. Feeling like a nurse: re-calling the spirit of nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Deborah; Smythe, Elizabeth

    2008-12-01

    To explore the essential meaning of being a nurse. Nine registered nurses were each asked to write a story of a time when they felt like a nurse. Analysis was informed by Heideggerian hermeneutic philosophy, seeking to reveal the phenomenon of "feeling like a nurse." As part of a workshop on phenomenological methodology, participants were invited to reflect on a personal experience of feeling like a nurse. These documents were analyzed according to the method of van Manen. Participants were kept informed throughout each phase. Feelings announce primordial meaning of feeling like a nurse. Nurses experience the call as mood attuned by an anxiety that creates possibilities for authentic caring. It is a way of being that encompasses watching and acting, doing to and caring for, and taking over and giving back. Moreover, it is after the encounter that the essential meaning is more clearly revealed. We argue that there is value in continuing to question the meaning of "being a nurse." Amid a complex and increasingly technological world, this calls the profession to remember the human encounter at the heart of all nursing.

  11. [Death versus feelings: a reality in the world of medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpena, L A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to unveil the feelings of medical students while facing the phenomena of death, and also the meaning of these experiences on their lived-world and its implications to their academic training. The investigation was carried out with 10 students who are regularly registered in the Medical School of the Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, Brazil, attending between the 3rd and the 6th year. The qualitative approach, with phenomenological basis, along with theoretical assumptions of Merleau-Ponty and the information analysis method proposed by Giorgi (1988) and Comiotto (1992), disclosed five phenomenological essences: The meanings of death; Conflict between life and death; Feelings experienced on the interfaces of death; Medical training; Personal transformation as a path to professional transformation. The findings of this study evidence the feelings and their implications to the process of personal and professional development of the students as primordial and undeniable phenomenon. Considering this relevance, a psycho-pedagogical proposal is presented to educate feelings.

  12. Calvin Brainerd Cady: Thought and Feeling in the Study of Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Fumiko

    1999-01-01

    Presents the life and work of Calvin Brainerd Cady, an influential U.S. music educator who developed a theory of music education that emphasized the unification of children's thoughts and feelings. Discusses Cady's educational practices in depth and how his work remains relevant to current music-education practices. (DSK)

  13. Difficulty Identifying Feelings, Distress Tolerance and Compulsive Buying: Analyzing the Associations to Inform Therapeutic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Paul; Segrist, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Difficulty identifying feelings (a component of alexithymia) and distress tolerance both appear to play a role in impulse-control problems. The goal of the present study was to build upon past research by developing a model of the relations between these constructs and compulsive buying. Participants from the United States and Canada completed a…

  14. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, van M.; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, de S.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people’s living environment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in the

  15. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people's living environ- ment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in

  16. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a

  17. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a pol

  18. Implementation and Evaluation of the Modified Feeling Great Program for Oncology Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, C. Nadeane

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Designed to reduce anxiety and boost self-concept, The Modified Feeling Great Program (MFGP) consisted of a series of mental training exercises used to improve the quality of life for 6-17 year old children (N=20) with cancer. More specifically, the children were taught how to relax, look for highlights (good things that happen to them),…

  19. Do Moral Choices Make Us Feel Good? The Development of Adolescents' Emotions Following Moral Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malti, Tina; Keller, Monika; Buchmann, Marlis

    2013-01-01

    Some people believe that making the morally right decision makes people feel good. However, until now, there has been no empirical evidence in support of this belief. In a representative two-wave longitudinal study of 995 15-year-old adolescents followed for 3 years (until the age of 18) in Switzerland, adolescents were asked about their decisions…

  20. Blocking opioids attenuates physical warmth-induced feelings of social connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K.; Irwin, Michael R.; Eisenberger, Naomi I.

    2015-01-01

    “Heartwarming” social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), “social warmth” and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms, however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in order to examine the role of opioids, previously shown to alter temperature and social bonding behavior, on perceived thermal intensity, general positive affect, and feelings of social connection from physical warmth. Thirty-one participants took both naltrexone and placebo and completed a temperature manipulation task (held a warm pack, cold pack, and neutral object) while on each drug. Replicating previous research, holding a warm (vs. a cold or neutral) object increased feelings of social connection. Moreover, blocking opioids reduced this effect. Hence, naltrexone specifically reduced feelings of social connection to holding a warm (vs. neutral) object but not to holding a cold (vs. neutral) object. These results lend further support to the theory that social and physical warmth share neurobiological, opioid receptor dependent mechanisms. PMID:26098729

  1. Hearing feelings : Affective categorization of music and speech in alexithymia, an ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerlich, Katharina Sophia; Witteman, Jurriaan; Aleman, André; Martens, Sander

    2011-01-01

    Background: Alexithymia, a condition characterized by deficits in interpreting and regulating feelings, is a risk factor for a variety of psychiatric conditions. Little is known about how alexithymia influences the processing of emotions in music and speech. Appreciation of such emotional qualities

  2. Perceiving social pressure not to feel negative predicts depressive symptoms in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejonckheere, Egon; Bastian, Brock; Fried, Eiko I; Murphy, Sean C; Kuppens, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Western societies often overemphasize the pursuit of happiness, and regard negative feelings such as sadness or anxiety as maladaptive and unwanted. Despite this emphasis on happiness, the amount of people suffering from depressive complaints is remarkably high. To explain this apparent paradox, we examined whether experiencing social pressure not to feel sad or anxious could in fact contribute to depressive symptoms. A sample of individuals (n = 112) with elevated depression scores (Patient Health Questionnaire [PHQ-9] ≥ 10) took part in an online daily diary study in which they rated their depressive symptoms and perceived social pressure not to feel depressed or anxious for 30 consecutive days. Using multilevel VAR models, we investigated the temporal relation between this perceived social pressure and depressive symptoms to determine directionality. Primary analyses consistently indicated that experiencing social pressure predicts increases in both overall severity scores and most individual symptoms of depression, but not vice versa. A set of secondary analyses, in which we adopted a network perspective on depression, confirmed these findings. Using this approach, centrality analysis revealed that perceived social pressure not to feel negative plays an instigating role in depression, reflected by the high out- and low instrength centrality of this pressure in the various depression networks. Together, these findings indicate how perceived societal norms may contribute to depression, hinting at a possible malignant consequence of society's denouncement of negative emotions. Clinical implications are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. On Feeling in Literature%论文学中的感受

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王洁群

    2001-01-01

    Feeling, which is not emotion and also different from sensation, originally is just a kind of psychological excitement of the subject. Feeling in literature originates from and formalizes the general feeling in life. It is expressed through the psychological processes of intuition, association and imagination to become the compound of thought, emotion, image and language. The desire of formalization from feeling makes it not only the cause and motivation of literary activity, but also its purpose and objective.%感受最初只是主体的一种心理兴奋,它不是情感,也不同于感觉;文学中的感受源于一般的生活感受,它是生活感受的形式化;表现感受就是通过直觉、联想、想象等心理过程使感受成为思想、情感、形象、语言的复合体。感受具有的赋形需求使得它既是文学活动产生的原因、动力,又是文学活动的目的、对象。

  4. How Do Gut Feelings Feature in Tutorial Dialogues on Diagnostic Reasoning in GP Traineeship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, C. F.; Van de Wiel, M. W. J.; Hendriks, R. H. M.; Van Royen, P.; Van Bokhoven, M. A.; Van der Weijden, T.; Dinant, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic reasoning is considered to be based on the interaction between analytical and non-analytical cognitive processes. Gut feelings, a specific form of non-analytical reasoning, play a substantial role in diagnostic reasoning by general practitioners (GPs) and may activate analytical reasoning. In GP traineeships in the Netherlands, trainees…

  5. Metamemory in a Familiar Place: The Effects of Environmental Context on Feeling of Knowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczakowski, Maciej; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Collie, Harriet; Macken, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Feeling-of-knowing (FOK) judgments are judgments of future recognizability of currently inaccessible information. They are known to depend both on the access to partial information about a target of retrieval and on the familiarity of the cue that is used as a memory probe. In the present study we assessed whether FOK judgments could also be…

  6. Blocking opioids attenuates physical warmth-induced feelings of social connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Tristen K; Irwin, Michael R; Eisenberger, Naomi I

    2015-08-01

    "Heartwarming" social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), "social warmth" and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms; however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in order to examine the role of opioids, previously shown to alter temperature and social bonding behavior, on perceived thermal intensity, general positive affect, and feelings of social connection from physical warmth. Thirty-one participants took both naltrexone and a placebo and completed a temperature manipulation task (held a warm pack, cold pack, and neutral object) while on each drug. Replicating previous research, holding a warm (vs. a cold or neutral) object increased feelings of social connection. Moreover, blocking opioids reduced this effect. Hence, naltrexone specifically reduced feelings of social connection to holding a warm (vs. neutral) object but not to holding a cold (vs. neutral) object. These results lend further support to the theory that social and physical warmth share neurobiological, opioid receptor dependent mechanisms.

  7. Social motives and emotional feelings as determinants of facial displays: The case of smiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Jakobs; A.S.R. Manstead; A.H. Fischer

    1999-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the relationship between social motives, emotional feelings, and smiling, with a view to demonstrating that smiling is determined by both factors but in different ways. To vary social motives, the authors manipulated two aspects of social context. Pairs o

  8. The Pleasure Evoked by Sad Music Is Mediated by Feelings of Being Moved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuoskoski, Jonna K.; Eerola, Tuomas

    2017-01-01

    Why do we enjoy listening to music that makes us sad? This question has puzzled music psychologists for decades, but the paradox of “pleasurable sadness” remains to be solved. Recent findings from a study investigating the enjoyment of sad films suggest that the positive relationship between felt sadness and enjoyment might be explained by feelings of being moved (Hanich et al., 2014). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether feelings of being moved also mediated the enjoyment of sad music. In Experiment 1, 308 participants listened to five sad music excerpts and rated their liking and felt emotions. A multilevel mediation analysis revealed that the initial positive relationship between liking and felt sadness (r = 0.22) was fully mediated by feelings of being moved. Experiment 2 explored the interconnections of perceived sadness, beauty, and movingness in 27 short music excerpts that represented independently varying levels of sadness and beauty. Two multilevel mediation analyses were carried out to test competing hypotheses: (A) that movingness mediates the effect of perceived sadness on liking, or (B) that perceived beauty mediates the effect of sadness on liking. Stronger support was obtained for Hypothesis A. Our findings suggest that – similarly to the enjoyment of sad films – the aesthetic appreciation of sad music is mediated by being moved. We argue that felt sadness may contribute to the enjoyment of sad music by intensifying feelings of being moved. PMID:28377740

  9. Co-creating & Co-performing Tourism of Affects, Emotions, Feelings and Senses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buda, Dorina; van Hoven, Bettina; Hoskins, Gareth

    2014-01-01

    “What do emotions do?” asks Sara Ahmed. Emotions, feelings, senses and affects are complex, slippery concepts. They shape, circulate between and connect bodies, they belong to individuals and to collectivities alike, they reside inside, within us and outwith when they are released outwards towards o

  10. Gut feelings as a third track in general practitioners' diagnostic reasoning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolper, E.; Wiel, M. van de; Royen, P. Van; Bokhoven, M. Van; Weijden, G.D.E.M. van der; Dinant, G.J.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) are often faced with complicated, vague problems in situations of uncertainty that they have to solve at short notice. In such situations, gut feelings seem to play a substantial role in their diagnostic process. Qualitative research distinguished a sense of a

  11. What Has Personality and Emotional Intelligence to Do with "Feeling Different" while Using a Foreign Language?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozanska-Ponikwia, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigates the link between personality traits (OCEAN Personality test), emotional intelligence (EI) (Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire) and the notion of "feeling different" while using a foreign language among 102 Polish-English bilinguals and Polish L2 users of English who were immersed in a foreign language and…

  12. Relation of Neuroticism and Negative Career Thoughts and Feelings to Lack of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kevin R.; Shin, Yun-Jeong

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore correlates of chronic career indecision with multivariate modeling. We examined the effects of neuroticism and negative career thoughts and feelings on lack of information, which is one of the core elements of chronic career indecision. The sample included 310 first-semester students who had entered…

  13. Why Doesn't This Feel Empowering? The Challenges of Web-Based Intercultural Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali, Maha

    2014-01-01

    Ellsworth's article entitled "Why doesn't this feel empowering? Working through the repressive myths of critical pedagogy" raises issues about the complex dynamics of implementing critical pedagogy in real classrooms, and the difficulties and paradoxes of putting the empowerment rhetoric into practice. This article analyses the…

  14. Multilevel aspects of social cohesion of secondary schools and pupils’ feelings of safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Smeets, Ed; De Wit, Wouter

    2010-01-01

    Mooij, T., Smeets, E., & De Wit, W. (2011). Multi-level aspects of social cohesion of secondary schools and pupils’ feelings of safety. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 81(3), 369-390. doi:10.1348/000709910X526614

  15. Why Acting Environmentally-Friendly Feels Good : Exploring the Role of Self-Image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venhoeven, Leonie A.; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that engagement in environmentally-friendly behavior can feel good. Current explanations for such a link do not focus on the nature of environmentally-friendly behavior itself, but rather propose well-being is more or less a side-benefit; behaviors that benefit environmental

  16. Tell Me How You Feel...Creating an Awareness of Emotions in a Day Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Cathy; Harvey, Helen M.

    This paper describes 4 experiences designed to increase adult awareness of the child's perspective in adult/child dyadic interaction and outlines 12 children's activities to encourage concentration on feelings in a positive group situation. Also provided are instructions for making a board game, lists of suggested recordings and songs, and…

  17. Experiencing polar bears in the zoo: feelings and cognitions in relation to a visitor's conservation attitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marseille, M.M.; Elands, B.H.M.; Brink, van den M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores which feelings and cognitions are involved in visitor experiences of zoo polar bears and how this experience relates to a visitor's conservation attitude. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with 30 visitors in two Dutch zoos. Most respondents believed that a pol

  18. An Investigation of Students' Academic Development, Views, and Feelings through Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran Avci, Dilek; Karaca, Dilek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate upper primary school students' academic development in science courses and to evaluate their views and feelings about self-learning processes through journals. Students in 6th and 7th grade wrote journals twice a week for nine weeks. We evaluated the journals weekly according to the Science Journal…

  19. "I Secretly Relished that Delicious Feeling of Excitement": A Rhizoanalysis of Teacher-Student Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Tara Star

    2004-01-01

    In the author's pilot study of teacher-student sexual dynamics in five preservice teachers high school classrooms, one piece of data stood out from among the rest of the interview transcripts, field notes, and email correspondence--not as an aberrant outlier; the content, feeling attracted to a student, echoed across the data set. Rather, this one…

  20. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people's living environ- ment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in

  1. Is green space in the living environment associated with people's feelings of social safety?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, J.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Winsum-Westra, M. van; Verheij, R.A.; Vries, S. de; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigate whether the percentage of green space in people’s living environment affects their feelings of social safety positively or negatively. More specifically they investigate the extent to which this relationship varies between urban and rural areas, between groups in the communit

  2. Variation in Adjustment to Divorce: The Feeling of Being Caught between Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Christy; Maccoby, Eleanor

    The variability of children's adjustment to parental conflict and divorce has been well-documented. The family systems literature stresses the importance of a strong parental subsystem that stands apart from the child. This subsystem is clearly at risk in situations of divorce. The study described in this paper examined children's feelings of…

  3. 'A good person does not feel envy': envy in a nursing community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, E; Nikkonen, M; Aavarinne, H

    1998-05-01

    The definition of envy is commonly based on psychoanalytical views of organizational culture. The purpose of this paper is to describe envy in a nursing community. The population study consisted of random sample of 120 subjects drawn from among the employees of one central hospital in Finland. The study material consisted of data collected by questionnaires (response rate 65%). The data were processed by various statistical methods. Open-ended questions were analysed by inductive content analysis. The results of this study indicated that the employee's view of his/her official position in the nursing community, his/her relationships with his/her fellow workers and the management as well as relationships with other nursing communities are all related to envy. The employee's view of his/her official position intensified his/her feelings of envy, if he/she had other negative feelings, anxiety, dissatisfaction with him/herself, and negative feelings towards fellow workers. The major object of envy was fellow workers' salaries. Envy towards other nursing communities was generated by alleged differences in the amount of labour, or by the charge nurse's greater interest in other sections. Employees coped with envy by hiding these feelings and being modest. Women coped with envy by being silent, while men denied the value of the object of envy.

  4. Landscape architecture graduate student researches public spaces that help women feel comfortable and safe

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2008-01-01

    Sruthi Atmakur, a landscape architecture student in Virginia Tech's School of Architecture + Design, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, is researching what about a public space's environment can make women feel comfortable and safe, and what can do just the opposite.

  5. Emotional Intelligence and Negative Feelings: A Gender Specific Moderated Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to clarify the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) on negative feelings (stress, anxiety, burnout and depression) in a gender specific model. Four hundred and twenty-five primary school teachers (326 males, 99 females) completed the measures of EI, stress, anxiety, burnout and depression. The multi-group analysis was performed…

  6. Hearing feelings : Affective categorization of music and speech in alexithymia, an ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goerlich, Katharina Sophia; Witteman, Jurriaan; Aleman, André; Martens, Sander

    2011-01-01

    Background: Alexithymia, a condition characterized by deficits in interpreting and regulating feelings, is a risk factor for a variety of psychiatric conditions. Little is known about how alexithymia influences the processing of emotions in music and speech. Appreciation of such emotional qualities

  7. A Mediating Model of Relational Aggression, Narcissistic Orientations, Guilt Feelings, and Perceived Classroom Norms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Ayako; Kawabata, Yoshito; Kurokawa, Masayuki; Yoshida, Toshikazu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relation between narcissistic orientations (grandiose sense of self-importance, interpersonal exploitation, and narcissistic rage) and relational aggression (self-satisfactory and punishment type) and the mediating effects of guilt feelings toward and perceived classroom norms against relational…

  8. "Yo Pertenezco Aquí": Academic Identities, Formal Spanish, and Feelings of Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minor, Denise

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the impact that membership in a Spanish language theater and poetry troupe had upon a group of Mexican and Chicano university students in terms of the development of academic identities, feelings of belonging, connections with friends and family, and other factors that correlate with academic perseverance. Also examined was the…

  9. Feeling successful as an entrepreneur : A job demands — Resources approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuizen, J.; Gorgievski, M.; van Veldhoven, M.J.P.M.; Schalk, R.

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study among 277 Dutch entrepreneurs investigates how entrepreneurs’ job demands relate to their work-related strain and work engagement, as well as their feelings of subjective success. As such it contributes to the literature firstly by focusing on psychological rather than bus

  10. Investigaton of Social and Cultural Factors Influenced on Feeling of Societal Security in Yasouj

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mokhtari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The porpuse of this study was to determine effective social and cultural factors on the feeling of societal security in Yasouj. Resent statistics have representative of increasing crime and collective conflicts in Yasouj. Loss or impairment in security has outcomes and dangerous reflections for people and the government. Undoubtedly the feeling of security and safety is effected by various factors that some of these factors pay attentioned in this study. Research method was survey and data was collected by using a researcher-made questionnaire. Population of this study were all people over 18 years in Yasouj that 380 of them was selected as a sample. The results showed that there was significant different between young people and older people, between single and married people, the Lurs and other relatives, about sense of social security. Also there was significant correlation between independent variables as: social-economic status, social trust, religious degree, attitudes toward the police performance and the dependent variable. In the study, social trust, with 32 percent, had greater share in the explination of feeling of societal security. Using a linear combination Variance of independent variables was explained 41/7% of the variance of feeling of societal security

  11. Does Involuntary Mental Time Travel Make Sense in Prospective Teachers' Feelings and Behaviors during Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Altay; Yesilbursa, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of involuntary mental time travel into the past and into the future on prospective teachers' feelings and behaviors during the period of a class hour. A total of 110 prospective teachers participated voluntarily in the study. The results of the present study showed that (a) the involuntary mental time travel into…

  12. Negotiating Critical Geographies through a "Feel-Trip": Experiential, Affective and Critical Learning in Engaged Fieldwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubchikov, Oleg

    2015-01-01

    The paper proposes the notion of a "critical feel-trip" as a pedagogical narrative to entertain the relationships of experiential, affective and critical learning in field-based studies. It is argued that explicit mobilization of the triadic relations of these three modes of learning is a powerful way to strengthen students' appreciation…

  13. An Investigation of Students' Academic Development, Views, and Feelings through Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran Avci, Dilek; Karaca, Dilek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate upper primary school students' academic development in science courses and to evaluate their views and feelings about self-learning processes through journals. Students in 6th and 7th grade wrote journals twice a week for nine weeks. We evaluated the journals weekly according to the Science Journal…

  14. A Model for Teaching Large Classes: Facilitating a "Small Class Feel"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Rosealie P.; Pappas, Eric

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a model for teaching large classes that facilitates a "small class feel" to counteract the distance, anonymity, and formality that often characterize large lecture-style courses in higher education. One author (E. P.) has been teaching a 300-student general education critical thinking course for ten years, and the…

  15. Difficulty Identifying Feelings, Distress Tolerance and Compulsive Buying: Analyzing the Associations to Inform Therapeutic Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Paul; Segrist, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Difficulty identifying feelings (a component of alexithymia) and distress tolerance both appear to play a role in impulse-control problems. The goal of the present study was to build upon past research by developing a model of the relations between these constructs and compulsive buying. Participants from the United States and Canada completed a…

  16. First Grade Teacher's Feelings about Discussing Death in the Classroom and Suggestions To Support Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Cordero, Minerva

    Drawing on the literature and a survey of first-grade teachers, this paper provides a summary of the ways children grieve, children's ideas on death, ways to help children contend with the difficulties surrounding death, and teachers' feelings about discussing death in the classroom. Twelve teachers completed a questionnaire about how to…

  17. Feelings towards Older vs. Younger Adults: Results from the European Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalon, Liat

    2013-01-01

    The study evaluated the association of modernization (at the macro/societal-level) and modernity (at the micro/individual-level) with feelings towards older vs. younger adults. Analysis was based on the fourth wave of the European Social Survey, which includes a rotated module on ageism. The sample consisted of 28 countries and a total of 54,988…

  18. Feelings of indebtedness and guilt toward donor and immunosuppressive medication adherence among heart transplant (HTx) patients, as assessed in a cross-sectional study with the Basel Assessment of Adherence to Immunosuppressive Medications Scale (BAASIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Yedida; Peles-Bortz, Anat; Peled, Yael; HarZahav, Yedael; Lavee, Jacob; Freimark, Dov; Melnikov, Semyon

    2017-07-11

    Nonadherence (NA) to immunosuppressive (IS) medications after organ transplant is a major risk factor for transplant failure, morbidity, and treatment costs. This study examined the association between feelings of indebtedness and guilt toward the donor, and IS medication adherence among HTx patients. In this cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study, a convenience sample of 102 HTx patients, from the outpatient facility of a tertiary medical center in Israel, completed the BAASIS, a validated instrument for assessing adherence, and reported their feelings of indebtedness and guilt toward the donor. Missing a dose or skipping two or more doses, taking medication >2 hours before or after the recommended dosing time, altering the prescribed amount, or completely stopping the IS treatment in the last 4 weeks, characterized 64 patients (64%). The highest score received the item "timing nonadherence," characterizing 58 patients (56.9%). Age, waiting time, and time since transplant, guilt feelings, and indebtedness to donor explained 17% (R(2) =.17) of the variance in adherence (χ(2)(5) =13.22, P=.021), with age, time since transplant, and guilt feelings significantly explaining adherence. Physicians and nurses should inquire about the presence of guilt feelings, as they might be associated with NA to medications after HTx. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Feeling Fresh

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lots of girls worry about them. Do I Smell — and Can People Tell? Many girls wonder if they smell "down there" or if people notice they have ... truth is that when everything's normal, no one smells any odors from a girl's vagina. If a ...

  20. Feeling voices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ammirante

    Full Text Available Two experiments investigated deaf individuals' ability to discriminate between same-sex talkers based on vibrotactile stimulation alone. Nineteen participants made same/different judgments on pairs of utterances presented to the lower back through voice coils embedded in a conforming chair. Discrimination of stimuli matched for F0, duration, and perceived magnitude was successful for pairs of spoken sentences in Experiment 1 (median percent correct = 83% and pairs of vowel utterances in Experiment 2 (median percent correct = 75%. Greater difference in spectral tilt between "different" pairs strongly predicted their discriminability in both experiments. The current findings support the hypothesis that discrimination of complex vibrotactile stimuli involves the cortical integration of spectral information filtered through frequency-tuned skin receptors.

  1. A Study of Gender Differences in Feeling of Insecurity (The Case of Yasouj City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siroos Ahmadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In recent decades, explaining gender differences has become a major issue in social studies, because gender is an important factor in making a variety of opportunities, and life chances and strongly influences gender roles that men and women play in social institutions. One area that has provoked many discussions and research projects, is security and insecurity. Security, defined as being safe from threat or fear of risk, is one of the most important human needs. In contrast, insecurity is an illness that has many personal and social consequences. Insecurity is manifested into two forms, including actual and emotional. Usually, feeling of insecurity is considered more important. Insecurity especially with focusing on fear of crime or victimization has been widely considered since 1960s and has promoted numerous investigations. But a significant segment of these studies have been devoted to the study of gender differences in feelings of insecurity. The most important research question of these studies is the role that gender differences play in feeling of insecurity. On the basis of many theories, including evolutionary, vulnerability, different socialization, sexual harassment, power, and biological differences, a generalized assumption is that women experience more fear and insecurity in comparison with men. But the results of the various studies have been quite different. As a result, it is difficult to reach to a clear conclusion about gender differences in feeling of insecurity. Although the actual insecurity in Iran is not high, but the feeling of insecurity is rather high and it seems that it is a social problem in the country. Therefore, the main goal of the present research is to investigate gender differences in feeling of insecurity in one of Iran's cities. Materials and Methods The research is a survey study. The population is all of citizens more than 18 years old in Yasouj. Sample size is 482 individuals who were

  2. Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akin Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gossypiboma (GP is a term used to express the mass resulting from forgotten cotton sponge in operations. Rarely, a transmural migration may occur into the gastrointestinal lumen without creating any defect by GP. Laparotomy or endoscopic removal may be required, by the way it can be taken out of the body itself by intestinal ways. In this study, we reported a case of mechanical intestinal obstruction causing GP. Case. The fifty-one-year-old female patient admitted to the emergency department with the complaints of mechanical intestinal obstruction and had a history of open cholecystectomy 20 years ago. There were the findings of intestinal obstruction in abdominal plain radiography and computerized tomography. The sponge that obstructed the lumen completely 40 cm proximal to the ileocecal valve was identified in the laparotomy with the diagnosis of brid ileus. The small intestine was closed over double-fold after removal of sponge. Transmural migration of abdominal-remained sponge was thought to be occurred without creating a defect after cholecystectomy. Postoperatively, the patient was discharged without having any problems at 4th day of hospitalization. Conclusion. Although it is a rare situation in routine clinical practice, GP should be considered as a differential diagnosis in the patients who had a diagnosis of mechanical intestinal obstruction, and laparotomy was applied before. As GP may lead to situations which cause mortality, all precautions should be taken to prevent it.

  3. Thinking and feeling in the People's Republic of China: testing the generality of the "laws of emotion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jonathon D; Cai, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Cognitive theories of emotion assert that emotional reactions to events depend on the manner in which events are interpreted and appraised. From this perspective, the same outcome can produce different emotions. For example, a score of 85% on a test can evoke positive feelings if it is considered a success or negative feelings if it is considered a failure. Among the various appraisal dimensions that have been identified, causal attributions are thought to play a particularly influential role in shaping emotional reactions to various events. For example, success can evoke pride if it is attributed to high ability, gratitude if it is attributed to help from others, relief if it is attributed to a stroke of good fortune, or guilt if it is attained fraudulently or at the expense of others. These cognitive-affective linkages are thought to be universal. In this paper, we report two studies that tested the cross-cultural generality of some of these assumptions. In Study 1, participants from the People's Republic of China were led to succeed or fail on an (alleged) test of their intelligence and creativity. Consistent with previous findings with Western samples, attributions to ability predicted participants' emotional reactions to their test performance, with high ability attributions linked to greater pride following success. In Study 2, we extended these findings with American and Chinese participants, using a different experimental manipulation of success and failure, and a measure of attributions to effort. For both cultural groups, attributions to ability (but not attributions to effort) predicted greater emotional reactions to success. We conclude that attribution-emotion linkages have cross-cultural validity, and that pride is maximized when success is attributed to high ability.

  4. Leadership Behavior and Job Performance of Teachers in Public and Private Kindergartens: The Perspectives of Institutionalization, Reason, and Feeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yigean; Cheng, Jaonan

    2012-01-01

    Chinese society is accustomed to using feelings, reasons, and institutionalizations to determine how to deal with events, which raises a number of questions. How can the directors of early education institutions incorporate feelings, reasons, and institutionalizations into their management? How can they enhance the job performance of teachers?…

  5. Prepare, Do, Review: A Model Used to Reduce the Negative Feelings towards Laboratory Classes in an Introductory Chemistry Undergraduate Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, Dino; Wong, Lawrence; Maisey, Shannan; Clemons, Tristan D.

    2017-01-01

    Student feelings towards the laboratory component of an introductory chemistry unit were evaluated in an action research study, over a three-year period at the University of Western Australia. In 2013 we found that the percentage of students with negative feelings towards the laboratory increased over the duration of a semester. In 2014 we…

  6. Empathy, awareness of others, and action: How feeling empathy for one-among-others motivates helping the others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oceja, L.V.; Heerdink, M.W.; Stocks, E.L.; Ambrona, T.; López-Pérez, B.; Salgado, S.

    2014-01-01

    Feeling empathy for a member of the group may result in either favoring this individual at the expense of the group or helping the entire group. We explain these intriguing findings by proposing that the combined influence of feeling empathy for one individual and awareness of others enhances

  7. Empathy, awareness of others, and action: How feeling empathy for one-among-others motivates helping the others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oceja, L.V.; Heerdink, M.W.; Stocks, E.L.; Ambrona, T.; López-Pérez, B.; Salgado, S.

    2014-01-01

    Feeling empathy for a member of the group may result in either favoring this individual at the expense of the group or helping the entire group. We explain these intriguing findings by proposing that the combined influence of feeling empathy for one individual and awareness of others enhances willin

  8. Empathy, awareness of others, and action: How feeling empathy for one-among-others motivates helping the others

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.V. Oceja; M.W. Heerdink; E.L. Stocks; T. Ambrona; B. López-Pérez; S. Salgado

    2014-01-01

    Feeling empathy for a member of the group may result in either favoring this individual at the expense of the group or helping the entire group. We explain these intriguing findings by proposing that the combined influence of feeling empathy for one individual and awareness of others enhances willin

  9. 凉爽型聚酯纤维的开发%The Development of Cool Feeling Polyester Fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨卫忠; 孔彩珍

    2012-01-01

    The composite powder of mica, aluminium oxide and zinc oxide is used to make cool feeling master batch using PET as carrier. The blend of cool feeling master batch and PET chip is spun to inorganic nano-powder-containing cool feeling fiber by melt spinning machine, The cppl feeling master batch preparing, cooling feeling PET chip drying and spinning and drawing process are discussed.%将云母、氧化铝、氧化锌制成纳米复合粉体,以聚酯(PET)为载体制成凉感母粒,将凉感母粒与PET切片共混熔纺,开发含有无机纳米粉体的凉感纤维.对凉感母粒的制备、凉爽型聚酯切片的干燥、纺丝、后拉伸工艺进行了讨论.

  10. An Interpretation of Jane Eyre’s Feeling of Inferiority at Gateshead in Jane Eyre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵艳梅

    2015-01-01

    Jane Eyre has been the focus of numerous critics and scholars since its publication in 1847 and they have made a great contribution to the study of Jane Eyre, exploring it from different perspectives. Most of critics and readers regard Jane Eyre as an independent and brave feminism fighter to challenge the tradition in Victorian period while they tend to pay less attention to the invisible side of Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre is not always so brave and strong and confident to face her life, which can be discovered from her language and behavior when she confronts conflicts. This is Jane Eyre ’s feeling of inferiority. From the perspective of Alfred Adler’s individual psychology, this thesis studies Jane Eyre’s feeling of inferiority at Gateshead.

  11. Why still marry? The role of feelings in the persistence of marriage as an institution(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billari, Francesco C; Liefbroer, Aart C

    2016-09-01

    Despite cohabitation becoming increasingly equivalent to marriage in some of the most 'advanced' Western European societies, the vast majority of people still marry. Why so? Existing theories, mostly based on various approaches tied to cognitive decision-making, do not provide a sufficient explanation of the persistence of marriage. In this article, we argue that feelings attached to marriage, i.e. the affective evaluation of those involved in a partner relationship concerning marriage as opposed to cohabitation, explain the persistent importance of marriage as an institution. We argue that socialization, biological and social-structural factors affect these affective evaluations. We provide a test of our hypotheses using a longitudinal study of young adults in the Netherlands. The results of our analyses are consistent with a central role of feelings in the decision to marry, as well as with a role for key moderating factors such as gender.

  12. Maternal feelings facing the hospitalisation of a newborn in neonatal ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcione Correia de Lima

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to understand the feelings experienced by mothers of newborns admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU. This is a descriptive and exploratory qualitative study, conducted at a public / private midsize located in the western region of Paraná state. After project approval by the Ethics Committee, taped interviews were undertaken with eight mothers of infants admitted to the NICU. Data collection occurred in July 2011 and these were interpreted as content analysis, which emerged five categories. The results revealed that the news of the hospitalization of the child caused diverse feelings in their mothers, mostly related to the loss. It is necessary to sensitize all the staff who works in the area of Neonatology and train nurses so that they can provide emotional support to families during the rehabilitation process of the newborn.

  13. More than a feeling: integrating empathy into the study of lawmaking, lawbreaking, and reactions to lawbreaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posick, Chad; Rocque, Michael; Rafter, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is related, directly or indirectly, to important elements in criminology such as the enactment of harsh penalties for repeat offenders, antisocial behavior, feelings of legitimacy toward the law, and attitudes toward the death penalty. Although empathy is beginning to find its way into criminological discourse, it is still not well understood nor often incorporated into quantitative research. This is likely due to issues regarding the conceptualization and measurement of empathy as well as the lack of measures of empathy incorporated into contemporary data sets. This study discusses the importance of empathy for criminology and uses a set of research examples to exemplify the relationships between empathy and outcomes important to criminology. Empathy emerges as an important predictor of criminal behavior, support for harsh laws, and perceptions of police effectiveness. Future research should incorporate measures of empathy when seeking to understand individual feelings and behaviors as they relate to important facets of criminology and criminal justice.

  14. When feeling bad is expected to be good: emotion regulation and outcome expectancies in social conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamir, Maya; Ford, Brett Q

    2012-08-01

    According to the instrumental approach to emotion regulation, people may want to experience even unpleasant emotions to attain instrumental benefits. Building on value-expectancy models of self-regulation, we tested whether people want to feel bad in certain contexts specifically because they expect such feelings to be useful to them. In two studies, participants were more likely to try to increase their anger before a negotiation when motivated to confront (vs. collaborate with) a negotiation partner. Participants motivated to confront (vs. collaborate with) their partner expected anger to be more useful to them, and this expectation in turn, led them to try to increase their anger before negotiating. The subsequent experience of anger, following random assignment to emotion inductions (Study 1) or engagement in self-selected emotion regulation activities (Study 2), led participants to be more successful at getting others to concede to their demands, demonstrating that emotional preferences have important pragmatic implications.

  15. What It Feels Like To Hear Voices: Fond Memories of Julian Jaynes

    CERN Document Server

    Harnad, Stevan

    2008-01-01

    Julian Jaynes's profound humanitarian convictions not only prevented him from going to war, but would have prevented him from ever kicking a dog. Yet according to his theory, not only are language-less dogs unconscious, but so too were the speaking/hearing Greeks in the Bicameral Era, when they heard gods' voices telling them what to do rather than thinking for themselves. I argue that to be conscious is to be able to feel, and that all mammals (and probably lower vertebrates and invertebrates too) feel, hence are conscious. Julian Jaynes's brilliant analysis of our concepts of consciousness nevertheless keeps inspiring ever more inquiry and insights into the age-old mind/body problem and its relation to cognition and language.

  16. [Care of mothers of newborns in intensive care units: experiences, feelings and expectations of the mothers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, M A

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the experiences, feelings and expectation of mothers of high risk newborns. The population was a group of 20 mothers of high risk newborns of three hospitals in the City of São Paulo. Interview with the mothers was the method of data collection containing opened and structured questions. It was verified that most of the mothers had none or only a little interaction with the newborn after delivery; the eye contact was the most referred during the staying of the newborn in the Intensive Care Unity; all of them demonstrated interest in participating in the care of the newborn and expressed the need of information concerning to the health status of the newborn, the Intensive Care Unity environment and the hospital team. Several were the feelings expressed and the motives that indicated the needs of the mothers.

  17. [Feelings and conflicts of women living with HIV/AIDS: a literature research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Maria Luciana; Waidman, Maria Angélica Pagliarini; Marcon, Sonia Silva; Scochi, Maria José

    2009-03-01

    This is a literature review with the purpose to identify how the conflicts and feelings of women living with HIV/AIDS are addressed in the national literature, and the proposed pathways for an integral care approach. Data were collected in November, 2006, in the LILACS database, using the following keywords: women, feelings, HIV, AIDS, suffering, depression and fear. The inclusion criterion was that these studies should have been published in the past five years. The sample was made up of 14 studies (four dissertations, two theses and eight articles). The content analysis method allowed for the identification of three thematic categories: the researcher's perspective, what their perspective identifies and their perspective beyond the physical body--which reveal the necessity of addressing women considering their whole context as human beings, including issues of vulnerability, social gender ideology and the promotion of self-esteem and citizenship.

  18. The Impact of Exploring Feelings Training on TheLoneliness of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel ÖKSÜZ

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of exploring feelings training on the loneliness levels of university students. The research was carried out with students of the Elementary Class Teacher Division of the Educational Faculty, Ondokuz Mayıs University for the 2002-2003 academic year. The research was designedpre-test, post-test control group design and both, the experimental group and the control group contained 22 students.The students’ loneliness level was measured by using the UCLA Loneliness Scale that was adapted by Demir (1989. In order to analyze the obtained data the t-test was used.Generally, it was concluded that “exploring feelings training” has lowered loneliness levels of students who have received the training and has positively contributed to the students development.

  19. Feeling for the Future: The Crisis of Anticipation in Great Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tyler

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the sense of shock, anxiety, and confusion that arises when the future-directed narrative that Pip internalizes about his own life story is thrown into disarray. It will examine Dickens’s deft handling of that crisis of narrative and of feeling. Although 'Great Expectations' (1860–61 is quite rightly usually seen as a novel in which the past is found to be inescapable, this paper reminds us that Pip’s crisis is equally a crisis of the future. It considers recent work on the narrative representation of human cognition, as well as psychoanalytic readings of the novel, and it investigates the implications of these issues for Dickens’s account of Pip’s devastated feelings about the future, and for his stylized treatment of them. (Image scanned by Philip V. Allingham

  20. Feelings experienced by parents when their premature children are hospitalized. A contribution to the humanized care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Acosta Romo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To understand the meaning of the experiences felt by parents of premature children who are hospitalized in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a hospital in the city of Pasto, Nariño, taking into account the phenomenological theory of Edmund Husserl. Materials and methods: In order to understand these experiences, a qualitative phenomenological study was carried out with eight parents in a range of age between 17 and 35. Results: The investigative process identified five categories, which emerged from the process of codification or nomothetic analysis of the speeches convergences. Two of these categories were considered for this article: Feelings and affective bond as an expression of parental love and process of interaction with the health staff. Conclusion: The parents of children in hospital were not prepared for the birth of a premature baby, so they experienced feelings of sadness, anxiety, self-criticism and fear, altering the affective bond between parents and children.

  1. Making Me Feel Comfortable: Developing Trust in the Nurse for Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon M

    2015-11-01

    Trust (confianza) is an important component of patient-centered care and culturally competent care and a major element in the Hispanic culture. The aim of this study was to conceptualize the process of the development of interpersonal trust by hospitalized patients in their nurses. Using the grounded theory method, English-speaking Mexican American patients (N = 22) were interviewed. The core category was Making Me Feel Comfortable. The cyclical process included a beginning stage (Having Needs, Relying on the Nurse), middle stage (Coming Across to Me, Taking Care of Me, Connecting), and end point (Feeling Confianza) with two outcomes (Confiding in the Nurse, Taking Away the Negative). Anytime there was a negative element during the middle stage, this element halted any further development of trust with the nurse. Unique findings were related to Hispanic cultural values of familism and personalismo. The findings have implications which impact patient safety and quality care.

  2. Decision Strategies in Continuous Ratings of Jealousy Feelings Elicited by Sexual and Emotional Infidelity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achim Schützwohl

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Two studies (total N = 689 tested the assumption of DeSteno, Bartlett, Braverman, and Salovey (2002 that sex differences in jealousy predicted by the evolutionary view are an artifact of measurement because they are restricted to a forced-choice response format and do not emerge when using continuous jealousy ratings. In Study 1, men and women rated how much a mate's emotional and sexual infidelity contributed to their jealousy feeling. In Study 2, men and women rated the intensity of their jealousy feeling elicited by a mate's emotional and sexual infidelity. In one condition they were asked to make their ratings spontaneously whereas in the other condition they were instructed to make their ratings only after careful consideration. The results of both studies lend no support for the artifact-of-measurement assumption. The implications of the present finding for the assumption of DeSteno et al. (2002 are discussed.

  3. Experiences, feelings and thoughts of women undergoing second trimester medical termination of pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga-Maj Andersson

    Full Text Available MAIN OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore women's expectations and experiences of undergoing second trimester abortion. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study using a screening questionnaire and semi-structured interviews for data collection. Thirty-one women filled out the questionnaire and 23 of them were later interviewed. The questionnaires were analyzed by descriptive statistics. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. MOST IMPORTANT FINDINGS: Indications for the abortion were fetal malformation or unintended pregnancy. The women expressed similar feelings and these were irrespective for the reason for having an abortion. Both physical and mental pain was experienced during the abortion process and described by the women. Taking the mifepristone-pill was experienced as especially emotionally difficult for many participants. Professional support from the staff together with support from the partner, a friend or relative helped in transforming the worries related to something unknown to feelings of coping with a new and hard experience. Prior to the abortion most women stated that they did not want to view the fetus but women who chose to view the fetus described this as a way of confronting the reality and an opportunity to say farewell to the pregnancy/fetus. The analysis of the interview transcripts revealed five themes mirroring the women's experiences, thoughts and feelings related to the abortion. CONCLUSIONS: The decision to undergo second trimester abortion sometimes exposes women to strong and conflicting emotions which are irrespective for the reason for having an abortion. Despite this women do not regret their decision to terminate the pregnancy. This analysis shows that their rational thinking outweighs their emotionally difficult feelings. It is important for the attending staff to be responsive to the needs of each individual woman whatever the

  4. Affect-regulated exercise intensity: does training at an intensity that feels 'good' improve physical health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Gaynor; Alrumh, Amnah; Rowlands, Alex V

    2012-11-01

    Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used to control exercise intensity amongst both active and sedentary individuals and should support exercise adherence. It is not known, however, whether affect-regulated exercise training can lead to physical health gains. The aim of this study was to examine if affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' leads to improved fitness over the course of an 8-week training programme. A repeated measures design (pretest-posttest) with independent groups (training and control). 20 sedentary females completed a submaximal graded exercise test and were then allocated to either a training group or control group. The training group completed two supervised sessions and one unsupervised session per week for 8 weeks. Exercise intensity was affect-regulated to feel 'good'. Following the 8 weeks of training, both groups completed a second submaximal graded exercise test. Repeated measures analyses of variance indicated a significant increase in the time to reach ventilatory threshold in the training group (318 ± 23.7s) compared to control (248 ± 16.9s). Overall compliance to training was high (>92%). Participants in the training group exercised at intensities that would be classified as being in the lower range of the recommended guidelines (≈ 50% V˙O(2) max) for cardiovascular health. Affect-regulated exercise to feel 'good' can be used in a training programme to regulate exercise intensity. This approach led to a 19% increase in time to reach ventilatory threshold, which is indicative of improved fitness. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Connections between children's feelings of social inclusion and their musical backgrounds

    OpenAIRE

    Tiija Rinta; Ross Purves; Graham Welch; Stephanie Stadler Elmer; Raffaela Bissig

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social inclusion is considered to be a key element in maintaining a balanced society (such as in preventing high rates of unemployment). Music and arts programmes in communities have been found to facilitate feelings of social inclusion in citizens, in particular amongst the youth. The exact influence of such activities on social inclusion is not known, however, nor are there any formal, empirically-tested comprehensive assessment instruments for the concept. The current study (se...

  6. Joint recognition-expression impairment of facial emotions in Huntington's disease despite intact understanding of feelings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkler, Iris; Cleret de Langavant, Laurent; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder that causes major motor impairments, also show cognitive and emotional deficits. While their deficit in recognising emotions has been explored in depth, little is known about their ability to express emotions and understand their feelings. If these faculties were impaired, patients might not only mis-read emotion expressions in others but their own emotions might be mis-interpreted by others as well, or thirdly, they might have difficulties understanding and describing their feelings. We compared the performance of recognition and expression of facial emotions in 13 HD patients with mild motor impairments but without significant bucco-facial abnormalities, and 13 controls matched for age and education. Emotion recognition was investigated in a forced-choice recognition test (FCR), and emotion expression by filming participants while they mimed the six basic emotional facial expressions (anger, disgust, fear, surprise, sadness and joy) to the experimenter. The films were then segmented into 60 stimuli per participant and four external raters performed a FCR on this material. Further, we tested understanding of feelings in self (alexithymia) and others (empathy) using questionnaires. Both recognition and expression were impaired across different emotions in HD compared to controls and recognition and expression scores were correlated. By contrast, alexithymia and empathy scores were very similar in HD and controls. This might suggest that emotion deficits in HD might be tied to the expression itself. Because similar emotion recognition-expression deficits are also found in Parkinson's Disease and vascular lesions of the striatum, our results further confirm the importance of the striatum for emotion recognition and expression, while access to the meaning of feelings relies on a different brain network, and is spared in HD.

  7. Experiences, Feelings and Thoughts of Women Undergoing Second Trimester Medical Termination of Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Inga-Maj; Christensson, Kyllike; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Main Objective The objective of this study was to explore women's expectations and experiences of undergoing second trimester abortion. Methods This is a cross-sectional study using a screening questionnaire and semi-structured interviews for data collection. Thirty-one women filled out the questionnaire and 23 of them were later interviewed. The questionnaires were analyzed by descriptive statistics. The interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Most Important Findings Indications for the abortion were fetal malformation or unintended pregnancy. The women expressed similar feelings and these were irrespective for the reason for having an abortion. Both physical and mental pain was experienced during the abortion process and described by the women. Taking the mifepristone-pill was experienced as especially emotionally difficult for many participants. Professional support from the staff together with support from the partner, a friend or relative helped in transforming the worries related to something unknown to feelings of coping with a new and hard experience. Prior to the abortion most women stated that they did not want to view the fetus but women who chose to view the fetus described this as a way of confronting the reality and an opportunity to say farewell to the pregnancy/fetus. The analysis of the interview transcripts revealed five themes mirroring the women's experiences, thoughts and feelings related to the abortion. Conclusions The decision to undergo second trimester abortion sometimes exposes women to strong and conflicting emotions which are irrespective for the reason for having an abortion. Despite this women do not regret their decision to terminate the pregnancy. This analysis shows that their rational thinking outweighs their emotionally difficult feelings. It is important for the attending staff to be responsive to the needs of each individual woman whatever the indication is for the abortion

  8. Blocking Opioids Attenuates Physical Warmth-Induced Feelings of Social Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Inagaki, TK; Irwin, MR; Eisenberger, NI

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 APA, all rights reserved). "Heartwarming" social experiences, when one feels interpersonally connected to others, have recently been linked with physical warmth. According to one theory (Panksepp, 1998), "social warmth" and physical warmth may be closely linked because both experiences are supported by similar neurobiological mechanisms; however, the neurochemical substrates underlying this overlap have not been explored. Here, an opioid antagonist, naltrexone, was administered in orde...

  9. I FEEL CONNECTED: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF STUDENT ENGAGEMENT AND LECTURERS’ CREDIBILITY

    OpenAIRE

    Padma Pillai; Vikaneswari Shanmugam

    2016-01-01

    Communication is essential. Having the ability to communicate thoughts, ideas, and feelings is crucial in all environments. The education industry regards communication as a core business to transfer knowledge. This paper focuses on how two different groups of students at Sunway University, Malaysia, perceived Lecturers’ Credibility (LC) in a class that enhances the Students’ Engagement (SE). A group of 50 to 60 students from the Faculty of Arts (FoA) and School of Business (SoB) completed me...

  10. Resistance to consumption and Veganism: A Study about Motivations, Values, and Feelings

    OpenAIRE

    Isabela Perez Campos Moreira; Claudia Rosa Acevedo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study resistance to consumption as a recent phenomenon designed to bring about changes in societal values and consumptio habits. Specifically the objective of this paper is to comprehend the way in which anti-consumption behavior relates to Veganism, analyze factors that motivate its practice, and record values and feelings associated with the acceptance of the movement.This study utilized the ethnographic method of collection and analysis of data through pa...

  11. ["A good person does not feel envy"--envy in nursing communities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, E; Nikkonen, M; Aavarinne, H

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the nature, manifestation, and amount of envy among the staff of a nursing community. The definition of envy is commonly based on views of essence of envy and organisational culture. The population study consisted of random sample of 120 subjects drawn from among the employees in the Kainuu Central Hospital. Frequency and percentage distributions were used to present the data. The correlations between the variables were examined using cross-tabulation. Summarized variables were formed for nature of envy, and the Cronbach alpha coefficient was used to test the internal consistency of those. Factor analysis and cross-tabulation were also used. Open-ended questions were analysed by qualitative contact analysis. These results were used to complement quantitative data. The results of this study indicated that the employee's view of his/her official position in the nursing society, his/her relations with his/her fellow workers and the management as well as the relations to other nursing societies are all related to enviousness. The employees's view of his/her official position intensified his/her feelings of envy, if he/she had other negative feelings (anxiety, dissatisfaction with him/herself, and feeling if looks could kill). If the employee was ambitious and hard-working, his/her envy manifested in a comparison of his/her own work and the work of other employees. The major object of envy was fellow workers' salary. Envy was also caused by new, proficient, and senior co-workers and possible favourites or proteges of management. Envy towards other nursing community was generated by alleged differences in the amount of labour, or by the charge nurse's greater interest in other section. Employees coped with envy by hiding these feelings and being modest. Women coped with envy by being silent.

  12. STS-86 Pilot Bloomfield feels heat from a tire after landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    STS-86 Pilot Michael J. Bloomfield, the only space rookie on the crew, feels the heat from a tire on the orbiter Atlantis more than an hour after the landing on KSCs Runway 15. The nearly 11- day mission ended with main gear touchdown at 5:55:09 p.m. EDT, Oct. 6, 1997. STS-86 was the seventh docking of the Space Shuttle with the Russian Space Station Mir.

  13. Why Acting Environmentally-Friendly Feels Good: Exploring the Role of Self-Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venhoeven, Leonie A; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggests that engagement in environmentally-friendly behavior can feel good. Current explanations for such a link do not focus on the nature of environmentally-friendly behavior itself, but rather propose well-being is more or less a side-benefit; behaviors that benefit environmental quality (e.g., spending one's money on people rather than products) also tend to make us feel good. We propose that the moral nature of environmentally-friendly behavior itself may elicit positive emotions as well, because engaging in this behavior can signal one is an environmentally-friendly and thus a good person. Our results show that engagement in environmentally-friendly behavior can indeed affect how people see themselves: participants saw themselves as being more environmentally-friendly when they engaged in more environmentally-friendly behavior (Study 1). Furthermore, environmentally-friendly behavior resulted in a more positive self-image, more strongly when it was voluntarily engaged in, compared to when it was driven by situational constraints (Study 2). In turn, the more environmentally-friendly (Study 1) and positive (Study 2) people saw themselves, the better they felt about acting environmentally-friendly. Together, these results suggest that the specific self-signal that ensues from engaging in environmentally-friendly behavior can explain why environmentally-friendly actions may elicit a good feeling.

  14. ‘Wot larx!’: William Morris, Charles Dickens, and Fatherly Feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Parkins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores the significance of William Morris’s reading of Dickens for Morris’s articulation of fatherly feelings. Recent scholarship on Victorian fatherhood has begun to overturn the stereotype of the dour, emotionally distant paterfamilias as providing only a partial understanding of forms of middle-class fatherhood and William Morris may serve as an example of a Victorian father whose parenting style eschewed detached authoritarianism, and instead combined nurture, play, and creativity. While Morris referred to Dickens’s works and characters in letters to a range of correspondents, his repeated usage of Joe Gargery’s catchphrase ‘Wot larx!’ (variously spelled occurs exclusively in letters to his wife and daughters, especially the latter. I will consider how the character of Joe Gargery, who combines nurturing tenderness with manly labour, was deployed by Morris to perform a playful and affectionate paternal persona. While Morris’s use of Joe’s catchphrase seems to express a spontaneous overflow of powerful feeling its status as a quotation also works to mark (and mask a disavowal of powerfully ambivalent feelings concerning his own emotional agency as husband and father.

  15. Values, antivalues and feelings transmitted by the media and its reflexive perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaciano BARTOLOMÉ CRESPO

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This research deals with the perception of values, antivalues and feelings incarnated and manifested in images, words and sounds self introduced or mediated. If in the past media and their messages have been studied, the current concern of the majority would be to investigate what happens inside the individual, how he or she reacts, what are his /her feelings. There is no doubt that the reflection about values an own feelings that listening, looking or reading news create, is a very attractive and prommising field. But as the ethical principles which media should serve can vary and even contradict each other, the modern teacher schould be aware of it in order not to assing roles and functions that do not fit whit the media. However it is always his/her concern from his/her educative function to anlyze and penetrate into the messages that circulate in society through the omnipresent mass media. Tis study stands out with level and scientific rigueur what is generally and commonly known. All the calls made by Government, authorities, institutions, and people for a better quality'vs media where it would not be be propagation or apology of antivalues such as paradigms of behavior, should make the responsible of media think over to study and deeply change according to the new funktions in a new society where philosophy and medias programming.

  16. Using Persuasive Design Principles in Motivational Feeling towards Children Dental Anxiety (CDA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salam, Sobihatun Nur-Abdul; Yahaya, Wan Ahmad Jaafar-Wan; Ali, Azillah-Mohd

    This paper is focusing the potential use of persuasive design principles in motivating children's dental anxiety. The main intention of the paper is to emphasize an attempt of how persuasive design principle can be designed into educational material using CD ROM based multimedia learning environment to overcome the CDA. Firstly, we describe a problem domain which discuss about the universal feeling of CDA and secondly the current practices in handling those negative feelings. Thirdly, the conceptual background of PMLE and how the principle has been applied in designing the information interfaces and presentation of a persuasive multimedia learning environment (PMLE) are described. Fourthly, an experimental design was used to validate the effects of prototype which assessed children dental anxiety level before and after the demonstration and utilization of a PMLE. Primary school children age between seven and nine years old are selected as respondents. Fifthly, the result of the study has revealed the feedback from children regarding baseline test and children dental anxiety test. It shows how by using persuasive design principles as an overall strategy in designing PMLE was able to motivate children feelings towards dental anxiety and could let the children behave in a good manner for dental visit in the future.

  17. Young children's understanding of other people's feelings and beliefs: individual differences and their antecedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, J; Brown, J; Slomkowski, C; Tesla, C; Youngblade, L

    1991-12-01

    Individual differences in young children's understanding of others' feelings and in their ability to explain human action in terms of beliefs, and the earlier correlates of these differences, were studied with 50 children observed at home with mother and sibling at 33 months, then tested at 40 months on affective-labeling, perspective-taking, and false-belief tasks. Individual differences in social understanding were marked; a third of the children offered explanations of actions in terms of false belief, though few predicted actions on the basis of beliefs. These differences were associated with participation in family discourse about feelings and causality 7 months earlier, verbal fluency of mother and child, and cooperative interaction with the sibling. Differences in understanding feelings were also associated with the discourse measures, the quality of mother-sibling interaction, SES, and gender, with girls more successful than boys. The results support the view that discourse about the social world may in part mediate the key conceptual advances reflected in the social cognition tasks; interaction between child and sibling and the relationships between other family members are also implicated in the growth of social understanding.

  18. Professor YU Yun's Experience in Treating Tumor by Pulse-feeling and Acupuncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong-jian; DI Ruo-hong; LI Yong; LI Yan-li; CHENG Xiao-mi

    2006-01-01

    @@ Professor YU Yun was born in Suzhou city, Jiangsu province in 1940. After graduation from Xuzhou Medical College in 1964, professor YU has been engaged himself in integrative Chinese & western medicine practice in Shanghai Tumor Hospital. In the middle 1980s, he was invited to Spain for traditional Chinese medicine research. He participated in world acupuncture conferences many times and delivered speeches. He wrote the book Pulse-feeling and Acupuncture for Tumor Treatment and published articles at home and abroad. He is an honorary professor of American Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine, permanent member of World Society of Integrative Chinese & Western Medicine, research fellow of Shanghai Center of Acupuncture and Meridian, and the director of Spain Institute of Pulsefeeling and Acupuncture. Greatly interested in Chinese medicine and acupuncture, professor YU has been engaged in Pulse-feeling and acupuncture to treat late tumor and various kinds of difficult disorders for nearly forty years, and achieved wonderful results. I am honored to follow professor YU and learnt a lot. Now I present professor's experience in treating tumor by Pulse-feeling and acupuncture.

  19. The Risk-as-feelings hypothesis in a Theory-of-planned-behaviour perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Kobbeltvedt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Theory of Planned Behaviour (TpB: Ajzen, 1985; 1991 is based on a utility framework, and the Risk-as-Feelings hypothesis (RaF: Loewenstein, Weber, Hsee, and Welch, 2001 is a feelings-based behavioural model. The TpB and RaF are first compared and contrasted. Two empirical studies investigated the predictive power of consequence-based vs. affect-based evaluative judgements for behavioural intentions: Study 1 (extit{n} = 94 applied a regression model to examine the predictive value of a subset of shared variables, unique TpB variables, and unique RaF variables for intentions to have unsafe sex. Study 2 (extit{n} = 357 experimentally examined whether intentions are driven by consequences or feelings, in two decision vignettes with opposite qualities: A positive hedonic experience with potential negative consequences (unsafe sex vs. a negative hedonic experience with potential positive consequences (back surgery. The results supported the TpB by emphasising the role of outcome-expectations in the construction of intentions, and the RaF by showing the importance of affective subcomponents in attitudes. % Behavioural % decision models need to capture the general, the individual, and the % dynamic. The inclusion of contextual and individual trends may % facilitate behavioural predictions. % unclear

  20. Can instruction in engineering ethics change students' feelings about professional responsibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Golnaz; Loui, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    How can a course on engineering ethics affect an undergraduate student's feelings of responsibility about moral problems? In this study, three groups of students were interviewed: six students who had completed a specific course on engineering ethics, six who had registered for the course but had not yet started it, and six who had not taken or registered for the course. Students were asked what they would do as the central character, an engineer, in each of two short cases that posed moral problems. For each case, the role of the engineer was successively changed and the student was asked how each change altered his or her decisions about the case. Students who had completed the ethics course considered more options before making a decision, and they responded consistently despite changes in the cases. For both cases, even when they were not directly involved, they were more likely to feel responsible and take corrective action. Students who were less successful in the ethics course gave answers similar to students who had not taken the course. This latter group of students seemed to have weaker feelings of responsibility: they would say that a problem was "not my business." It appears that instruction in ethics can increase awareness of responsibility, knowledge about how to handle a difficult situation, and confidence in taking action.

  1. Social safety, self-rated general health and physical activity: changes in area crime, area safety feelings and the role of social cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated whether social cohesion protects the residents against the negative impact of unsafe areas on health and PA. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed on Dutch survey data, including 47,926 respondents living in 2974 areas. An increase in area level unsafety feelings between 2009 and 2011 was associated with more people reporting poor general health in 2012 in that area, but was not related to PA. Changes in reported area crime were not related to either poor general health or PA. The social cohesion in the area did not modify the effect of changes in social safety on health and PA. The results suggest that tackling feelings of unsafety in an area might contribute to the better general health of the residents. Because changes in area social safety were not associated with PA, we found no leads that such health benefits were achieved through an increase in physical activity.

  2. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J M; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-11-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on negative emotions of staff. However, a distinction between emotions and feelings has never been made in the research field of intellectual disabilities. Negative emotions and feelings may be regulated by emotional intelligence, a psychological construct that takes into account personal style and individual differences. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence on the one hand and emotions and feelings on the other. Participants were 207 support staff serving clients with moderate to borderline intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings were measured with questionnaires. The results show that emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings are related. However, found relationships were weak. Most significant relations were found between feelings and stress management and adaptation elements of emotional intelligence. Because the explored variables can change over time they call for a longitudinal research approach.

  3. Analysis of Handling Qualities Design Criteria for Active Inceptor Force-Feel Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malpica, Carlos A.; Lusardi, Jeff A.

    2013-01-01

    The force-feel system characteristics of the cyclic inceptors of most helicopters are set based on the characteristics of the mechanical components in the control system (mass, springs, friction dampers, etc.). For these helicopters, the force-feel characteristics typically remain constant over the entire flight envelope, with perhaps a trim release to minimize control forces while maneuvering. With the advent of fly-by-wire control systems and active inceptors in helicopters, the force-feel characteristics are now determined by the closed-loop response of the active inceptor itself as defined by the inertia, force/displacement gradient, damping, breakout force and detent shape configuration parameters in the inceptor control laws. These systems give the flexibility to dynamically prescribe different feel characteristics for different control modes or flight conditions, and the ability to provide tactile cueing to the pilot through the actively controlled side-stick or center-stick cyclic inceptor. For rotorcraft, a few studies have been conducted to assess the effects of cyclic force-feel characteristics on handling qualities in flight. An early study provided valuable insight into the static force-deflection characteristics (force gradient) and the number of axes controlled by the side-stick controller for the U.S. Army's Advanced Digital/Optical Control System (ADOCS) demonstrator aircraft [1]. The first of a series of studies providing insight on the inceptor dynamic force-feel characteristics was conducted on the NASA/Army CH-47B variable-stability helicopter [2]. This work led to a proposed requirement that set boundaries based on the cyclic natural frequency and inertia, with the stipulation of a lower damping ratio limit of 0.3 [3]. A second study was conducted by the Canadian Institute for Aerospace Research using their variable-stability Bell 205A helicopter [4]. This research suggested boundaries for stick dynamics based on natural frequency and damping

  4. Empathy and feelings of guilt experienced by nurses: A cross-sectional study of their role in burnout and compassion fatigue symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Joana; Pinto-Gouveia, José

    2017-06-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the relationships between empathy, empathy-based pathogenic guilt and professional quality of life (burnout and compassion fatigue). We aim to test a model in which we hypothesize that when empathic feelings are related to pathogenic guilt, burnout and compassion fatigue symptoms may be increased. Empathy is at the core of nursing practice, and has been associated with positive outcomes not only for the healthcare provider but also for the patient. However, empathy is also at the core of guilt feelings that, when excessive and misdirected, can lead to pathogenic guilt beliefs. We focused on two types of empathy-based guilt characterized by excessive responsibility over others' well-being and how these can be related to professional quality of life. This study is a cross-sectional self-report survey. Data were collected during 2014 and 2015. Two hundred ninety-eight nurses from public hospitals in Portugal's north and center region were surveyed. Professional quality of life (burnout and compassion fatigue), empathy, and empathy-based guilt were measured using validated self-report measures. Correlation analyses showed that empathy-based guilt was positively associated with empathy, and with burnout and compassion fatigue. Results from multiple mediation models further indicated when empathy is associated with empathy-based guilt, this leads to greater levels of burnout and compassion fatigue. Given the nature of their work, nurses who experience pathogenic guilt feelings may have compromised well-being, and this should be addressed in training programs aiming at preventing or treating burnout and compassion fatigue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Expressing one's feelings and listening to others increases emotional intelligence: a pilot study of Asian medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Keiko; Evans, Phillip; Austin, Elizabeth J; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Fujisaki, Kazuhiko; Niwa, Masayuki; Aomatsu, Muneyoshi

    2013-06-07

    There has been considerable interest in Emotional Intelligence (EI) in undergraduate medical education, with respect to student selection and admissions, health and well-being and academic performance. EI is a significant component of the physician-patient relationship. The emotional well-being of the physician is, therefore, a significant component in patient care. The aim is to examine the measurement of TEIQue-SF in Asian medical students and to explore how the practice of listening to the feelings of others and expressing one's own feelings influences an individual's EI, set in the context of the emotional well-being of a medical practitioner. A group of 183 international undergraduate medical students attended a half-day workshop (WS) about mental-health and well-being. They completed a self-reported measure of EI on three occasions, pre- and post-workshop, and a 1-year follow-up. The reliability of TEIQue-SF was high and the reliabilities of its four factors were acceptable. There were strong correlations between the TEIQue-SF and personality traits. A paired t-test indicated significant positive changes after the WS for all students (n=181, p=.014), male students (n=78, p=.015) and non-Japanese students (n=112, p=.007), but a repeated measures analysis showed that one year post-workshop there were significant positive changes for all students (n=55, p=.034), female students (n=31, p=.007), especially Japanese female students (n=13, p=.023). Moreover, 80% of the students reported that they were more attentive listeners, and 60% agreed that they were more confident in dealing with emotional issues, both within themselves and in others, as a result of the workshop. This study found the measurement of TEIQue-SF is appropriate and reliable to use for Asian medical students. The mental health workshop was helpful to develop medical students' EI but showed different results for gender and nationality. The immediate impact on the emotional awareness of individuals

  6. Potentially traumatic events and mental health problems among children of Iraqi refugees: The roles of relationships with parents and feelings about school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trentacosta, Christopher J; McLear, Caitlin M; Ziadni, Maisa S; Lumley, Mark A; Arfken, Cynthia L

    2016-01-01

    This study examined mental health problems among children of Iraqi refugees, most of whom were Christian. Exposure to potentially traumatic events was hypothesized to predict more symptoms of depression and traumatic stress. Moreover, youth reports of supportive relationships with parents and positive feelings about school were examined in relation to mental health problems. These promotive factors were expected to mitigate the hypothesized association between traumatic event exposure and mental health problems. Participants were 211 youth recruited from agencies and programs serving Iraqi refugees in a large metropolitan area in the United States. The hypotheses were partially supported. Youth who reported experiencing more potentially traumatic events endorsed more traumatic stress and depression symptoms. After accounting for exposure to potentially traumatic events and other covariates, youth who reported more positive feelings about school endorsed fewer symptoms of traumatic stress, and youth who reported more supportive relationships with parents endorsed fewer symptoms of depression. In addition, there was an interaction between potentially traumatic events and relationships with parents when predicting depression symptoms. Youth endorsed higher levels of depression symptoms when they reported less supportive relationships, regardless of the amount of traumatic event exposure, whereas youth endorsed lower levels of depression symptoms when they reported more supportive relationships with parents, but only at low levels of traumatic event exposure. Otherwise, the main effects were not qualified by interactions between potentially traumatic event exposure and the promotive factors. The findings from this study have implications for future research, policy, and practice with children of refugees. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Leisure-time physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and feelings of hopelessness in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viinamäki Heimo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness contribute to mental health. Hopelessness has been linked to impaired mental health, cardiovascular events and mortality. Previous studies have focused on physical exercise and depression. We examined the associations of LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness with feelings of hopelessness. Methods In this cross-sectional study leisure-time physical activity, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, hopelessness and cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in a population-based cohort of 2428 men aged 42 – 60 years old at baseline. Results Men feeling more hopeless about their future and reaching goals were less physically active, less fit and had a higher prevalence of many cardiovascular risk factors than men with lower levels of hopelessness. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, smoking, alcohol consumption, cardiovascular disease and socioeconomic status, men engaging in less than 60 min/week of moderate-to-vigorous LTPA were 37% (95% CI 11 – 67% more likely to feel hopeless than those engaging in at least 2.5 h/wk of LTPA. After further adjusting for elevated depressive symptoms the association of LTPA and hopelessness remained significant. VO2max was also associated with hopelessness, but not after adjustment for depressive symptoms. Conclusion Moderate and vigorous LTPA and cardiorespiratory fitness were inversely associated with hopelessness in these middle-aged men. These findings suggest that physical inactivity and poor cardiorespiratory fitness is an important associate of hopelessness, a distinct element of low subjective well-being.

  8. Salivary Oxytocin Concentration Associates with the Subjective Feeling of Body Ownership during the Rubber Hand Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Masakazu; Wada, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Oxytocin is a hormone of the posterior pituitary that promotes lactation, maternal bonding, and birth. Recent studies have shown that oxytocin may modulate social recognition in both sexes, and thus it may be related to empathy. Brain regions that are associated with social recognition and empathy (e.g., the insular cortex) are activated in the rubber hand illusion (RHI), which involves illusory ownership of a rubber hand caused by brush strokes applied synchronously to both a rubber hand and one of the participant's hand, which is hidden from view. It is intriguing to examine whether oxytocin modulates plastic changes in body representation, such as the changes occurring in the RHI. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between salivary oxytocin concentration and the feeling of rubber hand ownership. Brush strokes were applied synchronously or asynchronously to the participant's hand and a rubber hand on different days. Salivary oxytocin was measured before and after the behavioral tasks. We found that participants who had high concentrations of salivary oxytocin tended to feel strong ownership of the rubber hand. We also found that the participants with a high autism spectrum quotient (AQ) score who particularly felt difficulties in social skills and communications tended to feel weak rubber hand ownership. We observed that illusory body ownership was closely linked to social communications and a related neuroendocrine basis. The results of the present study suggest that an individual's salivary oxytocin concentration can predict the extent to which the individual experiences the RHI; furthermore, oxytocin might modulate the sensation of body ownership.

  9. Managing and caring for distressed and disturbed service users: the thoughts and feelings experienced by a sample of English mental health nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, M; Kantaris, X; Guise, V; Välimäki, M

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the thoughts and feelings experienced by registered mental health nurses caring for distressed and/or disturbed service users in acute inpatient psychiatric settings in England. The prevailing thoughts of nurses were of cognitive dissonance and the conflict between benevolence and malevolence if coercive measures were seen as negative rather than positive; prevailing feelings experienced by nurses were fear, anxiety and vulnerability. To enhance care quality, nurses expressed the need for better communication with service users, and preventing the use of coercive measures and promotion of alternative methods of care and management. The nurses considered that debriefing dialogues following untoward incidents, practice development initiatives, education and training together with clinical supervision could be the way forward. The paper builds on the existing literature in offering clear explanations of nurses' thoughts and feelings when caring for distressed and/or disturbed service users in an English acute, inpatient psychiatric setting. Despite the small sample size and the limitations that it generates, the study findings will be of interest to the wider mental health nursing community. The findings will link to other national and international studies and therefore be valuable for future research studies of this kind. Collectively, they are building up a general picture of the distress, cognitive and emotional dissonance experienced by mental health nurses when using coercive interventions. The findings will help to develop mental health nurse education and enhance practice. High levels of distress and disturbance among service users experiencing acute mental illness is a major problem for mental health nurses (MHNs). The thoughts and feelings experienced by these nurses when caring for service users are of paramount importance as they influence clinical practice and caregiving. Similarly to research by other countries, this paper reports

  10. When Membership Gives Strength to Act: Inclusion of the Group Into the Self and Feeling of Personal Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besta, Tomasz; Mattingly, Brent; Błażek, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Identity fusion theory suggests that merging groups into one's personal identity should result in heightened levels of group agency. Research on the self-expansion model complementarily indicates that including others into the self is linked to a greater feeling of self-efficacy. Across three correlational studies, we examined whether personal and group identity fusion is associated with stronger feelings of personal agency, and we propose that relatively stable feelings of clarity of self-concept would mediate this association. Individuals strongly fused with a country (Studies 1-3) and family (Study 2) exhibited greater feelings of agency and goal-adherence, and self-concept clarity emerged as a significant mediator of this association when controlling for group identification measures.

  11. Feelings of loneliness, but not social isolation, predict dementia onset : results from the Amsterdam Study of the Elderly (AMSTEL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, Tjalling Jan; Deeg, Dorly J. H.; Beekman, Aartjan T. F.; van Tilburg, Theo G.; Stek, Max L.; Jonker, Cees; Schoevers, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Known risk factors for Alzheimer's disease and other dementias include medical conditions, genetic vulnerability, depression, demographic factors and mild cognitive impairment. The role of feelings of loneliness and social isolation in dementia is less well understood, and prospective stu

  12. School and pupil effects on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety in school, around school, and at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Ton; Fettelaar, Daan

    2012-01-01

    Mooij, T., & Fettelaar, D. (2013). School and pupil effects on secondary pupils’ feelings of safety in school, around school, and at home. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 28(6), 1240-1265. doi:10.1177/0886260512468242

  13. China’s Nickel Pig Iron (NPI) Companies Feel Pinch on Profit Due To Rising Cost

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>China’s nickel pig iron (NPI) companies feel pinch on profit due to rising cost.The inter- views with three NPI companies in Xuzhou have shown that this region,blessed with con- venient transportation advantages and enjoying low freight cost,is still able to maintain a steady output,despite the recent price jump in electricity which has caused the region to suffer from a rising cost.For those inland NPI com- panies which are far away from ports,however, the freight cost is already higher than those

  14. A feeling for Systems Development Work - Design of the ROSA project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Greenbaum, Joan

    1988-01-01

    This article is based on the design of a research project that will look at intuition, learning processes, language and roles in the development of computer systems. The research project, called ROSA (a Danish acronym for Roles and Cooperation in Systems Development) grew out of our interest...... of a gender perspective means that we do not intend to look for, or prove, the existence of differences between men and women, but rather to use gender awareness to 'listen to' and get a 'feeling for' how systems developers work together. Our research methods are interdisciplinary and based on action...

  15. Emotional distress regulation takes precedence over impulse control: if you feel bad, do it!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, D M; Bratslavsky, E; Baumeister, R F

    2001-01-01

    Why do people's impulse controls break down during emotional distress? Some theories propose that distress impairs one's motivation or one's ability to exert self-control, and some postulate self-destructive intentions arising from the moods. Contrary to those theories, Three experiments found that believing that one's bad mood was frozen (unchangeable) eliminated the tendency to eat fattening snacks (Experiment 1), seek immediate gratification (Experiment 2), and engage in frivolous procrastination (Experiment 3). The implication is that when people are upset, they indulge immediate impulses to make themselves feel better, which amounts to giving short-term affect regulation priority over other self-regulatory goals.

  16. Brand I Feel Slovenia: Inclusion of the Key Areas’ Representatives in the Branding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Konecnik Ruzzier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the part of the process of I feel Slovenia brand developmentin which we investigated 707 respondents from key stakeholdergroups. Respondents were representatives of all key stakeholdergroups in the country who, along with the other two target groups (opinionleaders and local inhabitants, represented the most importantstakeholders in the process of country brand development. A strongagreement regarding brand identity elements is evident from researchresults, which imply that identity elements shared by representativesfrom different internal stakeholder groups should form the basis of astrong country brand. Such brand foundation represents a strong preconditionfor a country brand, which could through hard and systematicwork become a strong and successful brand.

  17. Control Algorithm of Electric Vehicle in Coasting Mode Based on Driving Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Daxu; LAN Fengchong; ZHOU Yunjiao; CHEN Jiqing

    2015-01-01

    Coasting in gear is a common driving mode for the conventional vehicle equipped with the internal combustion engine (ICE), and the assistant braking function of ICE is utilized to decelerate the vehicle in this mode. However, the electric vehicle (EV) does not have this feature in the coasting mode due to the relatively small inertia of the driving motor, so it will cause the driver cannot obtaln the similar driving feeling to that of the conventional vehicle, and even a traffic accident may occur if the driver cannot immediately adapt to the changes. In this paper, the coasting control for EV is researched based on the driving feeling. A conventional vehicle equipped with continuously variable transmission (CVT) is taken as the reference vehicle, and the combined simulation model of EV is established based on AVL CRUISE and MATLAB/Simulink. The torque characteristic of the CVT output shaft is measured in coasting mode, and the data are smoothed and fitted to a polynomial curve. For the EV in coasting mode, if the state of charge (SOC) of the battery is below 95%, the polynomial curve is used as the control target for the torque characteristic of the driving motor, otherwise, the required torque is replaced by hydraulic braking torque to keep the same deceleration. The co-simulation of Matlab/Simulink/Stateflow and AVL CRUISE, as well as the hardware-in-loop experiment combined with dSPACE are carried out to verify the effectiveness and the real-time performance of the control algorithm. The results show that the EV with coasting braking control system has similar driving feeling to that of the reference vehicle, meanwhile, the battery SOC can be increased by 0.036%and 0.021%in the initial speed of 100 km/h and 50 km/h, respectively. The proposed control algorithm for EV is beneficial to improve the driving feeling in coasting mode, and it also makes the EV has the assistant braking function.

  18. Replacing and representing patients: Professional feelings and plastic body replicas in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soffer, Ann Katrine Bønnelykke

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the intimate profession of nursing and the affective practices that bind bodies together into engagements that appear stable. However, once the bodies of patients are replaced with ‘plastic replicas’ for the purpose of clinical training within an educational setting, new...... attending to the difference between feeling patients and plastic. Sensuous ethnography is the method used for exploring these professional engagements. By engaging through bodily senses, I actively use bodies as tools of inquiry and sources of knowledge within nursing. I argue that the notion...

  19. Textual Form and Cultural Affect: William Empson's Double-Plot and Raymond Williams's Structure of Feeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pamela McCallum

    2005-01-01

    By insisting on the primacy of double-plot, Empson brackets the sometimes deceptive appearances of a text's content to uncover and disengage the more fundamental double-plot system at work within the defining structure of the text. Empson's thinking about the reception of double-plot structures enables Raymond Williams's early formulations of structure of feeling, in particular the gesturing this perplexing, underdeveloped, but persistent concept makes towards understanding collective response to cultural forms. This article explores the implications of the reception of double-plot structures, drawing out the assumptions inscribed in Empson's claims about processes at work as an audience engages with these dramatic structures.

  20. Talking it Further: From Feelings and Memories to Civic Discussions In and About Places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias; Back, Jon

    2012-01-01

    ) memories, feelings, and attitudes to be prime means of expression for youth, (2) the expression of such personal emotions leading to civic discussions, and (3) such discussions expanding over geographic areas in the neighborhood. Consequently, we argue for an approach to locative civic engagement systems......Civic engagement systems to date frequently focus on purely rational aspects of deliberation void of emotions. In order to empower youth in a largely immigrant and lower-income neighborhood, we designed a location-based storytelling and story experiencing system for web-enabled mobile phones...... that takes a vantage point in youth’s emotions rather than a very rational and dry approach to deliberation....

  1. Martian Feeling: An Analogue Study to Simulate a Round-Trip to Mars using the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, C. V.; Gini, A.

    When talking about human space exploration, Mars missions are always present. It is clear that sooner or later, humanity will take this adventure. Arguably the most important aspect to consider for the success of such an endeavour is the human element. The safety of the crew throughout a Martian mission is a top priority for all space agencies. Therefore, such a mission should not take place until all the risks have been fully understood and mitigated. A mission to Mars presents unique human and technological challenges in terms of isolation, confinement, autonomy, reliance on mission control, communication delays and adaptation to different gravity levels. Analogue environments provide the safest way to simulate these conditions, mitigate the risks and evaluate the effects of long-term space travel on the crew. Martian Feeling is one of nine analogue studies, from the Mars Analogue Path (MAP) report [1], proposed by the TP Analogue group of ISU Masters class 2010. It is an integrated analogue study which simulates the psychological, physiological and operational conditions that an international, six-person, mixed gender crew would experience on a mission to Mars. Set both onboard the International Space Station (ISS) and on Earth, the Martian Feeling study will perform a ``dress rehearsal'' of a mission to Mars. The study proposes to test both human performance and operational procedures in a cost-effective manner. Since Low Earth Orbit (LEO) is more accessible than other space-based locations, an analogue studies in LEO would provide the required level of realism to a simulated transit mission to Mars. The sustained presence of microgravity and other elements of true spaceflight are features of LEO that are neither currently feasible nor possible to study in terrestrial analogue sites. International collaboration, economics, legal and ethical issues were considered when the study was proposed. As an example of international collaboration, the ISS would

  2. Musical emotions: predicting second-by-second subjective feelings of emotion from low-level psychoacoustic features and physiological measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Eduardo; Cangelosi, Angelo

    2011-08-01

    We sustain that the structure of affect elicited by music is largely dependent on dynamic temporal patterns in low-level music structural parameters. In support of this claim, we have previously provided evidence that spatiotemporal dynamics in psychoacoustic features resonate with two psychological dimensions of affect underlying judgments of subjective feelings: arousal and valence. In this article we extend our previous investigations in two aspects. First, we focus on the emotions experienced rather than perceived while listening to music. Second, we evaluate the extent to which peripheral feedback in music can account for the predicted emotional responses, that is, the role of physiological arousal in determining the intensity and valence of musical emotions. Akin to our previous findings, we will show that a significant part of the listeners' reported emotions can be predicted from a set of six psychoacoustic features--loudness, pitch level, pitch contour, tempo, texture, and sharpness. Furthermore, the accuracy of those predictions is improved with the inclusion of physiological cues--skin conductance and heart rate. The interdisciplinary work presented here provides a new methodology to the field of music and emotion research based on the combination of computational and experimental work, which aid the analysis of the emotional responses to music, while offering a platform for the abstract representation of those complex relationships. Future developments may aid specific areas, such as, psychology and music therapy, by providing coherent descriptions of the emotional effects of specific music stimuli.

  3. Changing how I feel about the food: experimentally manipulated affective associations with fruits change fruit choice behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Erin M; Kiviniemi, Marc T

    2014-04-01

    Fewer than half of Americans meet current recommendations for fruit and vegetable intake. The behavioral affective associations model posits that feelings and emotions associated with a behavior are a proximal influence on decision making. Cross-sectional evidence supports the model and suggests that affective associations predict fruit and vegetable consumption. The purpose of this study was to test whether a causal relation exists between affective associations about fruits and future fruit consumption behavior, as measured by a snack selection task. Following a baseline assessment of cognitive and affective variables, participants' (N = 161) affective associations about fruits were experimentally manipulated with an implicit priming paradigm. Images of fruits were repeatedly paired with positive, negative, or neutral affective stimuli. The key outcome measure was a behavioral choice task in which participants chose between fruit and a granola bar. Participants in the positive prime condition were three times more likely than those in the negative condition to select a piece of fruit over the granola bar alternative in the snack selection task. They were also twice as likely as those in the neutral condition to select fruit. There were no changes in self-reported affective associations or cognitive beliefs. These findings provide further evidence of the implicit and direct influence of affective associations on behavior, suggesting the need to both incorporate the role of affect in health decision making models, as well as the potential utility of intervention strategies targeting affective associations with health-related behaviors.

  4. Inter-religious feelings of Sunni and Alevi Muslim minorities : The role of religious commitment and host national identification

    OpenAIRE

    Martinovic, Borja; Verkuyten, Maykel

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines inter-religious attitudes from the perspective of Muslim minorities living in Western Europe. We examine both Sunni and Alevi Muslims of Turkish origin living in Germany and the Netherlands, and focus on their global feelings towards multiple religious out-groups (Christians, Jews, Muslim out-group, and non-believers). We hypothesize that Sunnis would dislike religious out-groups more than Alevis, and that these group differences in religious out-group feelings can be expl...

  5. How do you feel when you can't feel your body? Interoception, functional connectivity and emotional processing in depersonalization-derealization disorder.

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    Lucas Sedeño

    Full Text Available Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DD typically manifests as a disruption of body self-awareness. Interoception -defined as the cognitive processing of body signals- has been extensively considered as a key processing for body self-awareness. In consequence, the purpose of this study was to investigate whether there are systematic differences in interoception between a patient with DD and controls that might explain the disembodiment symptoms suffered in this disease. To assess interoception, we utilized a heartbeat detection task and measures of functional connectivity derived from fMRI networks in interoceptive/exteroceptivo/mind-wandering states. Additionally, we evaluated empathic abilities to test the association between interoception and emotional experience. The results showed patient's impaired performance in the heartbeat detection task when compared to controls. Furthermore, regarding functional connectivity, we found a lower global brain connectivity of the patient relative to controls only in the interoceptive state. He also presented a particular pattern of impairments in affective empathy. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental research that assesses the relationship between interoception and DD combining behavioral and neurobiological measures. Our results suggest that altered neural mechanisms and cognitive processes regarding body signaling might be engaged in DD phenomenology. Moreover, our study contributes experimental data to the comprehension of brain-body interactions and the emergence of self-awareness and emotional feelings.

  6. On the relationship between feelings and action tendencies in the emotional regulation of goal-directed behaviour

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    Robert eLowe

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the nature of the functional and causal relationship between neurophysiologically/psychologically generated states of emotional feeling and action tendencies and extrapolate a novel perspective. Emotion research, over the past century and beyond, has tended to view feeling and action tendency as independent phenomena: Attempts to outline the functional and causal relationship that exists between them have been framed therein. Classically, such relationships have been viewed as unidirectional, but an argument for bidirectionality rooted in a dynamic systems perspective has gained strength in recent years whereby the feeling-action tendency relationship is viewed as a composite whole. On the basis of our review of somatic-visceral theories of feelings, we argue that feelings are grounded upon neural-dynamic representations (elevated and stable activation patterns of action tendency. Such representations amount to predictions, updated by cognitive and bodily feedback. Specifically, we view emotional feelings as minimalist predictions of the action tendency (what the agent is likely to do in a given situation. The essence of this point is captured by our exposition of action tendency prediction-feedback loops (ATPFL which we consider, above all, in the context of emotion regulation, and in particular, of emotion regulation of goal-directed behaviour. The perspective outlined may be of use to emotion theorists, computational modellers and roboticists.

  7. Developmental changes in consistency of preferential feeling for peers and objects around age four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Izumi

    2004-02-01

    When do young children come to have an individual mental image of each peer? Forming a stable impression of each person requires maturation of at least two cognitive abilities, inferring the other's mind and episodic memory. According to past studies, the critical period for both these abilities is around age four. Thus, it was hypothesized that the child begins to form a consistent mental image of each peer at or after age four. To test this hypothesis, the temporal consistency of preference for peers was examined in 3-, 4-, and 5-yr.-olds. Each subject was asked "Who do you like better than others in this class?" once a week for three times (Study 1). The results indicated that most of the 3-yr.-olds answered different names as their favorite friends or nonsense things inconsistently week by week, whereas older children tended to answer the same names across weeks. However, changing the question to "Which object do you like best of these alternatives?" dramatically changed the response pattern (Study 2): preferences among nonhuman objects (playthings) were temporally consistent even for 3-yr.-olds. These results indicate that children before age four do have a temporally consistent feeling toward general objects but do not have a consistent firm feeling about personal relationships among peers. The results are discussed in relation to the critical developmental changes about age 4 in other cognitive abilities.

  8. A Survey of the Effective Factors on Foreign Tourists’ Feeling of Security in Isfahan

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    Fatemeh Sadat Moini Taba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tourism as the most peaceful human being movement has been recognized as the most effective factor playing a role in creating understanding among nations and world peace to the extent that economists have called it an "invisible export". In this article, the extent to which tourists feel secure has been investigated by considering two key variables, namely police presence and performance, and propaganda provided about security issues. The research method includes a survey of a sample of 381 foreign tourists visiting Isfahan in the year 1389. Data collection was done by giving questionnaires and since there was no precise information available about the number of tourists entering or exiting the country at the time of the study, tourists were accidentally interviewed and given the questionnaires in tourist spots of the city. Results show that there is a positively significant statistical relationship between police presence and performance and also providing propaganda in mass media about the security issues and foreign tourists’ feeling of security

  9. [The knowledge, involvement and feelings of students graduating in medicine, nursing and psychology about orthothanasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Luís Roberto Gonçalves; Menezes, Mariana Pires; Gradvohl, Silvia Mayumi Obana

    2013-09-01

    Orthothanasia involves the suspension of medical procedures for terminal phase patients, which leads to a natural death, relieving the symptoms that cause suffering. In this process, professionals such as physicians, nurses and psychologists, interact with patients and their families. Therefore, it is desirable that during undergraduate studies these professionals should take subjects geared to handle this aspect. The scope of this qualitative study was to evaluate the awareness with respect to orthothanasia of undergraduates in medicine, nursing and psychology courses in a university. Trigger questions in semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 students. The interviews were recorded and transcribed for content analysis and core identification themes. Three categories were identified: knowledge about orthothanasia; who should be involved in this process; and feelings experienced when facing death. The data revealed that students have scant knowledge about the subject, consider the family involvement in the orthothanasia decision to be important and they do not feel prepared to deal with death situations. The conclusion points to the need to change the focus on the end-of-life issue in the undergraduate courses in the area of health care in order to prepare the future professional adequately.

  10. Online optimized hysteresis-based steering feel model for steer-by-wire systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Kirli

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In rubber-wheeled road vehicles, the mechanical connection between steering wheel and front wheels provides steering-related feedback to the driver. The torque fed back to the driver through the steering linkages and steering wheel, which is called steering feel, helps the driver in controlling the vehicle. The torque feedback is reproduced via artificial methods in steer-by-wire systems due to the lack of mechanical connection. In this work, in order to minimize the physical workload and the lateral acceleration under the consideration of handling performance, optimization of a hysteresis-based steering feel has been studied. A 2-degree-of-freedom bicycle model based on the magic formula tire model has been used for simulations and hardware-in-the-loop experiments. A mathematical model is proposed in order to create an adaptive model-based optimization of the hysteresis parameters simultaneously while driving. A hardware-in-the-loop experimental setup has been used for the driving tests. The weave and the double-lane change tests have been performed with different drivers in order to demonstrate and quantify the optimization methods that are presented in this work.

  11. Feeling music: integration of auditory and tactile inputs in musical meter perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Juan; Gamble, Darik; Sarnlertsophon, Kristine; Wang, Xiaoqin; Hsiao, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Musicians often say that they not only hear, but also "feel" music. To explore the contribution of tactile information in "feeling" musical rhythm, we investigated the degree that auditory and tactile inputs are integrated in humans performing a musical meter recognition task. Subjects discriminated between two types of sequences, 'duple' (march-like rhythms) and 'triple' (waltz-like rhythms) presented in three conditions: 1) Unimodal inputs (auditory or tactile alone), 2) Various combinations of bimodal inputs, where sequences were distributed between the auditory and tactile channels such that a single channel did not produce coherent meter percepts, and 3) Simultaneously presented bimodal inputs where the two channels contained congruent or incongruent meter cues. We first show that meter is perceived similarly well (70%-85%) when tactile or auditory cues are presented alone. We next show in the bimodal experiments that auditory and tactile cues are integrated to produce coherent meter percepts. Performance is high (70%-90%) when all of the metrically important notes are assigned to one channel and is reduced to 60% when half of these notes are assigned to one channel. When the important notes are presented simultaneously to both channels, congruent cues enhance meter recognition (90%). Performance drops dramatically when subjects were presented with incongruent auditory cues (10%), as opposed to incongruent tactile cues (60%), demonstrating that auditory input dominates meter perception. We believe that these results are the first demonstration of cross-modal sensory grouping between any two senses.

  12. Feeling music: integration of auditory and tactile inputs in musical meter perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Huang

    Full Text Available Musicians often say that they not only hear, but also "feel" music. To explore the contribution of tactile information in "feeling" musical rhythm, we investigated the degree that auditory and tactile inputs are integrated in humans performing a musical meter recognition task. Subjects discriminated between two types of sequences, 'duple' (march-like rhythms and 'triple' (waltz-like rhythms presented in three conditions: 1 Unimodal inputs (auditory or tactile alone, 2 Various combinations of bimodal inputs, where sequences were distributed between the auditory and tactile channels such that a single channel did not produce coherent meter percepts, and 3 Simultaneously presented bimodal inputs where the two channels contained congruent or incongruent meter cues. We first show that meter is perceived similarly well (70%-85% when tactile or auditory cues are presented alone. We next show in the bimodal experiments that auditory and tactile cues are integrated to produce coherent meter percepts. Performance is high (70%-90% when all of the metrically important notes are assigned to one channel and is reduced to 60% when half of these notes are assigned to one channel. When the important notes are presented simultaneously to both channels, congruent cues enhance meter recognition (90%. Performance drops dramatically when subjects were presented with incongruent auditory cues (10%, as opposed to incongruent tactile cues (60%, demonstrating that auditory input dominates meter perception. We believe that these results are the first demonstration of cross-modal sensory grouping between any two senses.

  13. Original article Coffee consumption and propensity to experience aggressive feelings in provoking and frustrating situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zajenkowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on examining whether coffee intake is related to the intensity of aggressive feelings in reaction to various provoking or frustrating situations, along with consideration of sex and culture. Previous studies focused mainly on the dose of caffeine (not the habit of coffee drinking and aggressive behavior. Many of these studies showed a positive relation between the amount of caffeine consumed and aggression, so it was expected that also habitual coffee consumption would be positively related to propensity for aggressive feelings in situ ations of provocation and frustration. Participants from Greece (n = 299 and Poland (n = 300 declared whether they were coffee drinkers (at least 1 mug of coffee per day and completed the Situational Triggers of Aggressive Responses questionnaire. The results showed that in females, coffee drinkers had higher scores in Sensitivity to Provocation (SP and Frustration (SF than nondrinkers, while no differences between drinkers and nondrinkers appeared in males. Moreover, amongst coffee drinkers, females had higher scores in SP and SF than males, while no sex differences were found in nondrinkers. Furthermore, in Poland coffee drinkers had higher SP scores than nondrinkers. Poles also had higher SP scores than Greeks, but only when coffee drinkers were compared.

  14. Digitalization and the Production of Feeling and Emotion: The Case of Words Cut into the Skin

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    Sternudd Hans T.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates one example of how affect is articulated in the self-cutting of words into the skin and how the meaning of this multimodal [statement is modified through remediation. According to Tomkins, affects are understood as intensities that are impossible to frame as feelings or emotions. A theoretical framework based on Laclau’s and Mouffe’s discourse theory and the multimodal categories developed by Kress and van Leeuwen is used. Photographs of self-cutting and statements from people who cut themselves are examined through content analyses. The results show that words that had been cut into the skin often referred to painful experiences, disgust directed against themselves, or social isolation. Further, the study shows that when the cut-in words are remediated through a photograph, digitalized and published online, other meanings appear. Inside internet communities for people who self-injure, the photographs were associated with a communal experience, identification and prescribed activity. The original self-oriented feelings about one’s shortcomings and isolation attached to self-cutting could be altered so that those connoted, instead, experiences of solidarity, identity and intimacy.

  15. Neonatal nurses' attitudes, beliefs, and feelings toward the care and management of fetal-infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, D A

    1988-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care nurses must handle on a regular basis the complex dilemmas that accompany the rapid advances in knowledge and technology that have enabled the survival of fetal-infants. Little literature addresses the attitudes and feelings of neonatal nurses regarding the moral, ethical, legal, economic, and social issues surrounding fetal-infants. The purpose of this investigation, therefore, was to examine the attitudes, beliefs, and feelings held by neonatal nurses towards these issues as they relate to the care and management of fetal-infants. The research design of this study was a nonexperimental approach. The sample was drawn from a roster of subscribers to a neonatal nursing journal. The tool that was used in this study is an attitudinal assessment questionnaire developed by the investigator. Data obtained were described and synthesized by use of measures of central tendency, variability, frequency, and the chi square statistic. Comments to the questionnaire almost overwhelmingly referred to the participants' difficulty in responding as the issues were felt to be dependent on the particular fetal-infant, family, and circumstances involved. Respondents strongly supported the need for situational ethics in cases involving fetal-infants.

  16. [Alcohol consumption, alcohol abuse, and subjective feeling: a representative inquiry in the Federal Republic of Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerlein, W; Küfner, H

    1977-10-11

    The investigation was carried out in a representative sample of subjects of the Federal Republic of Germany, including West Berlin (n = 1952). The subjects were 20--64 years old. The following were investigated: 1. Social and abusive drinking patterns 2. Relations between drinking behavior and sociodemographic data 3. Relations between drinking behavior and subjective feeling. Of the subjects, 47% consumed alcohol daily or several times a week, 6% called themselves teetotallers. Beer was the preferred beverage. The drinking behavior varied among income classes and vocational groups. Of the whole sample, 8% drank regularly whilst working; 25% of the skilled workers did so. Comparing alcohol consumption and subjective feeling, there was a slight association between elevated mood and frequent alcohol consumption. Of the subjects, 4% were identified as alcohol misusers (7% of the males, 1% of the females). Persons at high risk were men living alone (especially widowed and divorced subjects) and persons of medium income. Regular consumers of hard liquor were at higher risk than consumers of beer or wine. The highest percentage of misuse was found among unskilled and skilled workers and among inhabitants of large cities. There was a slight association between high alcohol misuse index and depressive states, subjective complaints, and paranoid attitudes.

  17. The Redemption of the Feeling in Kierkegaard’s and Tillich’s Thought

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    Lehel BALOGH

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the modern era, with the development of the “objective”, scientific method, subjective, personal feelings and emotions have gradually become somewhat dubious sources of knowledge. A few religious thinkers, however, particularly those emerging from the existential tradition, have come to revitalize the belief in subjectivity, along with the trust in the authority of faith and inwardness in finding out important truths about our personal existence and about the human condition in general. In my paper I wish to investigate and compare the thoughts of two highly influential Christian philosophers of the 19th and the 20th century, respectively; those of Søren Kierkegaard and of Paul Tillich. These two unique thinkers, although living under considerably different historical circumstances, carried out strikingly similar analyses about the role of emotions and faith in human life, and through the emphasis of such phenomena as anxiety and despair they both attempted to “redeem” and reaffirm the significance of feelings and the subjective side of reality.

  18. THE ADOLESCENT FEELINGS RELATED TO THE BULLYING PHENOMENA: POSSIBILITIES TO THE NURSING ASSISTANCE IN THIS CONTEXT

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    Agnes Schutz de Oliveira

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Bullying is a devastating phenomenon that can affect the adolescent’s self-esteem and mental health. Generally occurs in school environment when the adolescent is more susceptible or vulnerable to verbal or moral aggressions that cause to them anguish and pain, meaning as a status of social exclusion. Most of time, health problems as anorexia, bulimia, depression, anxiety and also the suicide, appears. By the way, nurses are able to prevent injuries to various problems, and also concerns about this traumatic incident in adolescence. The aim of this study was to identify feelings that can be related to” bullying “in adolescent students in 5th to 8th classes. It is a descriptive research by qualitative approach, developed in a religious setting state school. Data was collected by taped interviews and, after transcribed, submitted to thematic analysis. The results showed that feelings related to this phenomena are multiple and varied, being categorized as positive aspects character, negative aspects character and necessary aspects character. KEY WORDS: School Health; Pediatric Nursing; Teen Health; Violence.

  19. AR Feels "Softer" than VR: Haptic Perception of Stiffness in Augmented versus Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffary, Yoren; Le Gouis, Benoit; Marchal, Maud; Argelaguet, Ferran; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lecuyer, Anatole

    2017-11-01

    Does it feel the same when you touch an object in Augmented Reality (AR) or in Virtual Reality (VR)? In this paper we study and compare the haptic perception of stiffness of a virtual object in two situations: (1) a purely virtual environment versus (2) a real and augmented environment. We have designed an experimental setup based on a Microsoft HoloLens and a haptic force-feedback device, enabling to press a virtual piston, and compare its stiffness successively in either Augmented Reality (the virtual piston is surrounded by several real objects all located inside a cardboard box) or in Virtual Reality (the same virtual piston is displayed in a fully virtual scene composed of the same other objects). We have conducted a psychophysical experiment with 12 participants. Our results show a surprising bias in perception between the two conditions. The virtual piston is on average perceived stiffer in the VR condition compared to the AR condition. For instance, when the piston had the same stiffness in AR and VR, participants would select the VR piston as the stiffer one in 60% of cases. This suggests a psychological effect as if objects in AR would feel "softer" than in pure VR. Taken together, our results open new perspectives on perception in AR versus VR, and pave the way to future studies aiming at characterizing potential perceptual biases.

  20. No experimental evidence for visual prior entry of angry faces, even when feeling afraid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Timothy P; Youssef, Hanan; Denson, Thomas F

    2017-02-01

    Threatening stimuli prevent attentional disengagement. Less clear is whether threat captures attention in addition to holding it. One way to measure attentional capture is to examine visual prior entry. Visual prior entry occurs when one stimulus is consciously recognized as appearing prior to other stimuli. Using a temporal order judgments paradigm, we examined whether threatening, angry faces would experience visual prior entry. Such a finding would provide evidence for attentional capture by threat. We further examined whether such attentional capture by threat was contingent on feeling afraid. Using Bayesian analyses, we found moderate support for the null hypothesis in 2 experiments (Ns = 44, 63). Angry faces did not capture attention, and there was no effect of feeling afraid because of watching a horror movie (Experiment 1) or anticipatory fear about giving a speech in front of an expert panel (Experiment 2). These studies were supplemented with a meta-analysis that suggests the visual prior entry effect is very small, if indeed it exists. Thus, the visual prior entry effect for threatening faces is likely a much smaller effect than the extant literature suggests. (PsycINFO Database Record