WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported experimental observations

  1. Experimental observation of fractional echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karras, G.; Hertz, E.; Billard, F.; Lavorel, B.; Siour, G.; Hartmann, J.-M.; Faucher, O.; Gershnabel, Erez; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh.

    2016-09-01

    We report the observation of fractional echoes in a double-pulse excited nonlinear system. Unlike standard echoes, which appear periodically at delays which are integer multiples of the delay between the two exciting pulses, the fractional echoes appear at rational fractions of this delay. We discuss the mechanism leading to this phenomenon, and provide experimental demonstration of fractional echoes by measuring third harmonic generation in a thermal gas of CO2 molecules excited by a pair of femtosecond laser pulses.

  2. Understanding experimentally-observed fluctuations

    CERN Document Server

    Kitazawa, Masakiyo

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two topics on the experimental measurements of fluctuation observables in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. First, we discuss the effects of the thermal blurring, i.e. the blurring effect arising from the experimental measurement of fluctuations in momentum space as a proxy of the thermal fluctuations defined in coordinate space, on higher order cumulants. Second, we discuss the effect of imperfect efficiency of detectors on the measurement of higher order cumulants. We derive effective formulas which can carry out the correction of this effect for higher order cumulants based on the binomial model.

  3. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Nakanishi, Hiizu; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    We report experimental observations of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed...

  4. Experimental observation of shear thickening oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental observation of the shear thickening oscillation, i.e. the spontaneous macroscopic oscillation in the shear flow of severe shear thickening fluid. The shear thickening oscillation is caused by the interplay between the fluid dynamics and the shear thickening, and has been predicted theoretically by the present authors using a phenomenological fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid, but never been reported experimentally. Using a density-matched starch-water mixture, in the cylindrical shear flow of a few centimeters flow width, we observed strong vibrations of the frequency around 20 Hz, which is consistent with our theoretical prediction.

  5. Experimental observation of spectral Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersch, Christoph; Onishchukov, Georgy; Peschel, Ulf

    2009-08-01

    We report on the first, to our knowledge, experimental observation of spectral Bloch oscillations in an optical fiber employing the interaction between a probe signal and a traveling-wave periodic potential. The spectrum of weak probe pulses is shown to oscillate on account of their group-velocity mismatch to the periodic field. The behavior of a cw probe spectrum reveals the actual discrete nature of the effect. Recurrences of the spectrum after one and two Bloch periods are demonstrated.

  6. Experimental observation of optical Weyl points

    CERN Document Server

    Noh, Jiho; Leykam, Daniel; Chong, Y D; Chen, Kevin; Rechtsman, Mikael C

    2016-01-01

    Weyl fermions are hypothetical two-component massless relativistic particles in three-dimensional (3D) space, proposed by Hermann Weyl in 1929. Their band-crossing points, called 'Weyl points,' carry a topological charge and are therefore highly robust. There has been much excitement over recent observations of Weyl points in microwave photonic crystals and the semimetal TaAs. Here, we report on the first experimental observation of Weyl points of light at optical frequencies. These are also the first observations of 'type-II' Weyl points for photons, which have strictly positive group velocity along one spatial direction. We use a 3D structure consisting of laser-written waveguides, and show the presence of type-II Weyl points by (1) observing conical diffraction along one axis when the frequency is tuned to the Weyl point; and (2) observing the associated Fermi arc surface states. The realization of Weyl points at optical frequencies allow these novel electromagnetic modes to be further explored in the cont...

  7. Experimental Observations of Ion Phase-Space Vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Armstrong, R. J.; Trulsen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental observations of ion phase-space vortices are reported. The ion phase-space vortices form in the region of heated ions behind electrostatic ion acoustic shocks. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical and analytic studies....

  8. Experimental Synchronization by Means of Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Martínez-Guerra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with the experimental synchronization of the Colpitts oscillator in a real-time implementation. Our approach is based on observer design theory in a master-slave configuration thus, a chaos synchronization problem can be posed as an observer design procedure, where the coupling signal is viewed as a measurable output and a slave system is regarded as an observer. A polynomial observer is used for synchronizing the Colpitts oscillator employing linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a comparison with a reduced order observer and a high gain observer is given to assess the performance of the proposed observer.

  9. Experimental lithium system. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolowith, R.; Berg, J.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1985-04-01

    A full-scale mockup of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system was built at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). This isothermal mockup, called the Experimental Lithium System (ELS), was prototypic of FMIT, excluding the accelerator and dump heat exchanger. This 3.8 m/sup 3/ lithium test loop achieved over 16,000 hours of safe and reliable operation. An extensive test program demonstrated satisfactory performance of the system components, including the HEDL-supplied electromagnetic lithium pump, the lithium jet target, the purification and characterization hardware, as well as the auxiliary argon and vacuum systems. Experience with the test loop provided important information on system operation, performance, and reliability. This report presents a complete overview of the entire Experimental Lithium System test program and also includes a summary of such areas as instrumentation, coolant chemistry, vapor/aerosol transport, and corrosion.

  10. Instrumented tube burns: theoretical and experimental observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarrington, Cole Davis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foley, Timothy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Son, Steven F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The advent of widely available nanoscale energetic composites has resulted in a flurry of novel applications. One of these applications is the use of nanomaterials in energetic compositions. In compositions that exhibit high sensitivity to stimulus, these materials are often termed metastable intermolecular composites (MIC). More generally, these compositions are simply called nanoenergetics. Researchers have used many different experimental techniques to analyze the various properties of nanoenergetic systems. Among these various techniques, the confined tube burn is a simple experiment that is capable of obtaining much data related to the combustion of these materials. The purpose of this report is to review the current state of the confined tube burn experiment, including the drawbacks of the technique and possible remedies. As this report is intended to focus on the specific experimental technique, data from many different energetic materials, and experimental configurations will be presented. The qualitative and quantitative data that can be gathered using confined tube burn experiments include burning rates, total impulse, pressure rise rate, and burning rate differences between different detector types. All of these measurements lend insight into the combustion properties and mechanisms of specific nanoenergetics. Finally, certain data indicates a more complicated flow scenario which may need to be considered when developing burn tube models.

  11. Experimental observations of boric acid precipitation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaghetto, R., E-mail: r.vaghetto@tamu.edu; Childs, M., E-mail: masonchilds@tamu.edu; Jones, P., E-mail: pgjones87@tamu.edu; Lee, S., E-mail: sayalee@tamu.edu; Kee, E., E-mail: erniekee@gmail.com; Hassan, Y.A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu

    2017-02-15

    During a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) in Light Water Reactors (LWR), borated water is injected into the core through the safety injection system. The continuous vaporization of the water from the core may increase the concentration of boric acid in the core that, under certain conditions may reach the solubility limit and precipitate. This includes scenarios where the liquid water supply to the core is affected by possible blockages due to debris accumulation. Questions have been raised on the effects of the precipitate in the core on the flow behavior, including the possibility of additional blockages produced by precipitate accumulation. A simple experimental facility was constructed to perform experimental observations of the behavior of borated water under the combined effects of the boiling and the boric acid precipitation (BAP). The facility consists of a transparent polycarbonate vertical pipe where forty-five heated rods have been installed to supply the power to the water to reach the saturation temperature, and maintain a desired boil-off rate. The layout and geometry of the experimental apparatus were conceived to emulate a simplified core of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Experimental observations have been conducted under two different conditions. Preliminary tests were conducted to observe the behavior of the water and the boric acid precipitate during a boil-off scenario without borated water addition (decreasing water level). During the main test runs, borated water was constantly injected from the top of the test section to maintain a constant mixture level in the test section. Both tests assumed no flow from the bottom of the test section which may be the case of PWR LOCA scenarios in presence of debris-generated core blockage. The observations performed with a set of cameras installed around the test section showed interesting effects of the vapor bubbles on the boric acid precipitate migration and accumulation in the test section. The

  12. Experimental Observation of Kink in a Perfect Bidimensional Granular System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Peng; MIAO Guo-Qing; HUANG Kai; YUN Yi; WEI Rong-Jue

    2005-01-01

    @@ The kink formation in a vertical vibrated granular layer has been widely studied in three-dimensional systems, but there are few if any experimental reports on bidimensional granular layers. We report the kink formation newly found in a perfect bidimensional granular system. We measure the range of the driving frequencies and dimensionless accelerations for kinks. Furthermore, we observe a heaping process, which is caused by co-operative action of the kink-associated convection and the sidewall-associated convection.

  13. 47 CFR 5.73 - Experimental report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Experimental report. 5.73 Section 5.73 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications and Licenses § 5.73 Experimental report. (a) Unless specifically stated as a condition of...

  14. Experimental observation of polarization-dependent optical vortex beams

    CERN Document Server

    Srisuphaphon, S; Photia, T; Temnuch, W; Chiangga, S; Deachapunya, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of the induced polarization-dependent optical vortex beams. We use the Talbot configuration as a method to probe this effect. In particular, our simple experiment shows the direct measurement of this observation. Our experiment can exhibit clearly the combination between the polarization and orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light. This implementation might be useful for further studies in the quantum system or quantum information.

  15. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  16. Novel experimentally observed phenomena in soft matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranjini Bandyopadhyan

    2013-07-01

    Soft materials such as colloidal suspensions, polymer solutions and liquid crystals are constituted by mesoscopic entities held together by weak forces. Their mechanical moduli are several orders of magnitude lower than those of atomic solids. The application of small to moderate stresses to these materials results in the disruption of their microstructures. The resulting flow is non-Newtonian and is characterized by features such as shear rate-dependent viscosities and nonzero normal stresses. This article begins with an introduction to some unusual flow properties displayed by soft matter. Experiments that report a spectrum of novel phenomena exhibited by these materials, such as turbulent drag reduction, elastic turbulence, the formation of shear bands and the existence of rheological chaos, flow-induced birefringence and the unusual rheology of soft glassy materials, are reviewed. The focus then shifts to observations of the liquid-like response of granular media that have been subjected to external forces. The article concludes with examples of the patterns that emerge when certain soft materials are vibrated, or when they are displaced with Newtonian fluids of lower viscosities.

  17. Experimental Observation of Bohr’s Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η2 for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr’s hydrodynamic theory.

  18. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Songky; Shin, Younghoon; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2016-01-25

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of 0.416η(2) for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of η much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained a coefficient of 0.42 ± 0.08 consistently under various experimental conditions. We also measured the resonance mode spectrum of a two-dimensional cavity formed by the cross-sectional segment of the liquid jet. The observed spectra agree well with wave calculations assuming a coefficient of 0.414 ± 0.011. Our measurements establish the first experimental observation of Bohr's hydrodynamic theory.

  19. Experimental Observation of a Photon Bouncing Ball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, G.; Savoini, M.; Ornigotti, M.; Laporta, P.; Foglietti, V.; Finazzi, M.; Duò, L.; Longhi, S.

    2009-05-01

    An optical analogue of a quantum particle bouncing on a hard surface under the influence of gravity (a quantum bouncer) is experimentally demonstrated using a circularly curved optical waveguide. Spatially resolved tunneling optical microscopy measurements of multiple beam reflections at the waveguide edge clearly show the appearance of wave packet collapses and revivals (either integer and fractional), corresponding to the full quantum regime of the quantum bouncer.

  20. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  1. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Experimental observation of spatial antibunching of photons

    CERN Document Server

    Nogueira, W A T; Pádua, S; Monken, C H

    2001-01-01

    We report an interference experiment that shows transverse spatial antibunching of photons. Using collinear parametric down-conversion in a Young-type fourth-order interference setup we show interference patterns that violate the classical Schwarz inequality and should not exist at all in a classical description.

  3. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  4. Experimental observation of radiation heat waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DingYao-Nan; YaoZhen-Yu; 等

    1997-01-01

    Radiation heat waves play an important role in high-temperature hydrodrnamic phenomena which is very important for laser fusion.Therefore,the propagation of a radiation heat wave through a thin foil of solid aluminium is observed.The wave is driven by the intense solft-X-ray radiation in a cylindrical cavity heated by the intense laser pulse.Experiments are carried out with two beams of λ=1.05μm light form the Shenguang Nd-glass laser facility.The pulse energy is about 600 J and the pulse duration 0.8ns.Evidence of radiation heat wave is obtained by observing the delayes signal of intense thermal emission from the outside of the foil.The delay is 850ps for 1.5μm thick foil and the mass ablation rate is about 4.8×105g/(cm2.s) under the X-ray flux of about 1×1013W/cm2.Also.the radiation-driven shock waves of (2±1)TPa are observed from different shots in the experiments.

  5. Experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Surabhi; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-04-01

    The excitation of precursor solitons ahead of a rapidly moving object in a fluid, a spectacular phenomenon in hydrodynamics that has often been observed ahead of moving ships, has surprisingly not been investigated in plasmas where the fluid model holds good for low frequency excitations such as ion acoustic waves. In this Rapid Communication we report an experimental observation of precursor solitons in a flowing dusty plasma. The nonlinear solitary dust acoustic waves (DAWs) are excited by a supersonic mass flow of the dust particles over an electrostatic potential hill. In a frame where the fluid is stationary and the hill is moving the solitons propagate in the upstream direction as precursors while wake structures consisting of linear DAWs are seen to propagate in the downstream region. A theoretical explanation of these excitations based on the forced Korteweg-deVries model equation is provided and their practical implications in situations involving a charged object moving in a plasma are discussed.

  6. Experimental observation of N00N state Bloch oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebugle, Maxime; Gräfe, Markus; Heilmann, René; Perez-Leija, Armando; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander

    2015-09-22

    Bloch oscillations of quantum particles manifest themselves as periodic spreading and relocalization of the associated wave functions when traversing lattice potentials subject to external gradient forces. Albeit this phenomenon is deeply rooted into the very foundations of quantum mechanics, all experimental observations so far have only contemplated dynamics of one and two particles initially prepared in separable local states. Evidently, a more general description of genuinely quantum Bloch oscillations will be achieved on excitation of a Bloch oscillator by nonlocal states. Here we report the observation of Bloch oscillations of two-particle N00N states, and discuss the nonlocality on the ground of Bell-like inequalities. The time evolution of two-photon N00N states in Bloch oscillators, whether symmetric, antisymmetric or partially symmetric, reveals transitions from particle antibunching to bunching. Consequently, the initial states can be tailored to produce spatial correlations akin to those of bosons, fermions and anyons, presenting potential applications in photonic quantum simulation.

  7. Report on HOM experimental methods and code

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I R R; Flisgen, T

    2013-01-01

    Experimental methods and various codes used are reported on with the aim to understand the signals picked up from the higher order modes in the third harmonic cavities within the ACC39 module at FLASH. Both commercial computer codes have been used, and also codes written for the express purpose of understanding the sensitivity of the modal profiles to geometrical errors and other sources of experimental errors.

  8. Experimental observations of nonlinear effects of the Lamb waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Mingxi; D.C. Price; D.A.Scott

    2004-01-01

    The experimental observations of nonlinear effects of the primary Lamb waves have been reported. Firstly, the brief descriptions have been made for the nonlinear acoustic measurement system developed by Ritec. The detailed considerations for the acoustic experiment system established for observing of the nonlinear effects of the primary Lamb waves have been carried out. Especially, the analysis focuses on the time-domain responses of second harmonics of the primary Lame waves by employing a straightforward model. Based on the existence conditions of strong nonlinearity of the primary Lamb waves, the wedge transducers are designed to generate and detect the primary and secondary waves on the surface of an aluminum sheet. For the different distances between the transmitting and receiving wedge transducers,the amplitudes of the primary waves and the second harmonics on the sheet surface have been measured within a specified frequency range. In the immediate vicinity of the driving frequency,where the primary and the double frequency Lamb waves have the same phase velocities, the quantitative relations of second-harmonic amplitudes with the propagation distance have been analyzed. It is experimentally verified that the second harmonics of the primary Lamb waves do have a cumulative growth effect along with the propagation distance.

  9. Yakima Hatchery Experimental Design : Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Curtis; Marshall, Anne

    1991-08-01

    This progress report details the results and status of Washington Department of Fisheries' (WDF) pre-facility monitoring, research, and evaluation efforts, through May 1991, designed to support the development of an Experimental Design Plan (EDP) for the Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), previously termed the Yakima/Klickitat Production Project (YKPP or Y/KPP). This pre- facility work has been guided by planning efforts of various research and quality control teams of the project that are annually captured as revisions to the experimental design and pre-facility work plans. The current objective are as follows: to develop genetic monitoring and evaluation approach for the Y/KPP; to evaluate stock identification monitoring tools, approaches, and opportunities available to meet specific objectives of the experimental plan; and to evaluate adult and juvenile enumeration and sampling/collection capabilities in the Y/KPP necessary to measure experimental response variables.

  10. Experimental Course Report, Grade Nine, No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Robert B.

    Reported are the results of an experimental course taught at the ninth grade level. The course included both modern and traditional topics in algebra. Presented are a rationale for the course, a list of the topics included in the course, a description of instructional techniques and methods used in presenting and developing some of the main ideas…

  11. Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1990-04-13

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

  12. MOOSES: Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Jon; Wehby, Joseph

    The Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies (MOOSES) is a flexible data collection and analysis package for applied behavioral research that addresses the needs of researchers interested in live coding of observational data. MOOSES allows the researcher to design a coding system for a particular research question. General types…

  13. [The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology [STROBE] statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elm, E. von; Altman, D.G.; Egger, M.

    2008-01-01

    Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) initiative developed rec...

  14. Experimental Observation of Hardy-Like Quantum Contextuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Breno; Ahrens, Johan; Nawareg, Mohamed; Cabello, Adán; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2014-12-01

    Contextuality is a fundamental property of quantum theory and a critical resource for quantum computation. Here, we experimentally observe the arguably cleanest form of contextuality in quantum theory [A. Cabello et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 180404 (2013)] by implementing a novel method for performing two sequential measurements on heralded photons. This method opens the door to a variety of fundamental experiments and applications.

  15. GeNF - Experimental report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranzas, Philipp Klaus; Mueller, Martin; Willumeit, Regine; Schreyer, Andreas (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2009-12-11

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 182 experiments were performed in 2008 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests, by GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 76 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2008. The contributions may contain several combined experiments. During 2008 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 175 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4.10{sup 14} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2} s. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments in 2008 was the characterisation of nanostructures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at SANS-2, DCD, ARES-2 and TEX-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at NeRo, PNR, POLDI and ROeDI. The modern experiment control hardware (e.g. sample environments, like magnets, cryostats or furnaces) and software based on LabView was continuously improved on all instruments. In the appendices I and II the experimental reports of the GKSS outstation at the FRM II are attached as well as of the GKSS outstation at DESY. The massive activity at the FRM II outstation is documented by the increasing number of REFSANS reports, accumulated to nine. Three reports show the activities of GKSS in the field of texture measurement at the instrument STRESS-SPEC. The instrument HARWI II at the synchrotron storage ring DORIS III at DESY is accepted very well by the community and is heavily overbooked in all fields (tomography, diffraction, etc.). After an 8-month shutdown period for an upgrade in the frame

  16. GeNF - experimental report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreyer, A.; Vollbrandt, J.; Willumeit, R. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. for Materials Research

    2004-07-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 210 experiments were performed in 2003 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guest and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 76 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2003. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2003 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 252 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1,4 x 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons / cm{sup 2} s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of metal alloys, the analysis of stresses in welds and technical structures at ARES, FSS, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR and ROeDI. The reflectomer TOREMA was thoroughly upgraded to the instrument NeRo and now offers new measurement possibilities. In the appendices the progress of the project REFSANS at FRM-II is reported as well as the experimental activities of the newly installed GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. (orig.)

  17. GeNF - Experimental report 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranzas, P.K.; Schreyer, A.; Willumeit, R. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. of Materials Research

    2007-07-01

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 212 experiments were performed in 2006 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 71 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2006. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2006 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 197 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4 x 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2}s. The cold neutron source was available during the complete operation time. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments was the characterisation of nanostructures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at ARES-2, TEX-2, DCD and SANS-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at PNR, NeRo, POLDI and ROeDI. The thoroughly upgraded residual stress diffractomer ARES-2 went in full operation in spring 2006 as well as the new neutron tomography device at GENRA-3. The installation of modern experiment control hardware and software based on LabView was completed on all designated instruments. In the appendices I and II the experimental reports of REFSANS at FRM II are attached as well as of the GKSS outstation HARWI-II at DESY. Both instruments started full operation in 2006. (orig.)

  18. GeNF - Experimental report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pranzas, P.K.; Schreyer, A.; Willumeit, R. (eds.) [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2008-11-05

    At the Geesthacht Neutron Facility GeNF about 203 experiments were performed in 2007 by GKSS and by or for external users, partners or contractors. In most cases the measurements were performed and analysed in cooperation by the guests and by the GKSS staff or by the permanent external user group staff. The activities, which are based on a proposal procedure and on the in house R and D program, are reported in 70 contributions in the present annual experimental report for the year 2007. The contributions may contain one or also several combined experiments. During 2007 the GKSS research reactor FRG-1 achieved an operation time of 204 days at the full 5 MW reactor power providing a neutron flux of ca. 1.4 x 10{sup 14} thermal neutrons/cm{sup 2}s. In May/June 2007 the FRG-1 was upgraded with a new cold neutron source yielding a flux increase at the five instruments using cold neutrons of up to 40 %. The focus of the in house R and D work at GeNF instruments in 2007 was the characterisation of nano-structures in engineering materials, the analysis of stresses and textures in welds and technical structures at SANS-2, DCD, ARES-2 and TEX-2, the structural investigation of hydrogen containing substances such as polymers, colloids and biological macromolecules at SANS-1 as well as the characterisation of magnetic thin films at NeRo, PNR, POLDI and ROeDI. The modern experiment control hardware and software based on LabView was continuously improved on all instruments. In the appendices I and II the experimental reports of the GKSS outstation at the FRM II are attached as well as of the GKSS outstation at DESY. At the neutron reflectometer REFSANS at FRM II measurements are possible using a broad range of the scattering vector with reflectivities up to 10{sup -7}. Three reports show the activities of GKSS in the field of texture measurement at the instrument STRESS-SPEC. The instrument HARWI II at DESY is accepted very well by the community and is overbooked in all fields

  19. Experimental observation of guanine tautomers with VUV photoionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jia; Kostko, Oleg; Nicolas, Christophe; Tang, Xiaonan; Belau, Leonid; de Vries, Mattanjah S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-01

    Two methods of preparing guanine in the gas phase, thermal vaporization and laser desorption, have been investigated. The guanine generated by each method is entrained in a molecular beam, single photon ionized with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation, and analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. The recorded photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves show a dramatic difference for experiments performed via thermal vaporization compared to laser desorption. The calculated vertical and adiabatic ionization energies for the eight lowest lying tautomers of guanine suggest the experimental observations arise from different tautomers being populated in the two different experimental methods.

  20. Experimental observation of strong mixing due to internal wave focusing over sloping terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, A.; Manders, A.; Harlander, U.; Maas, L.R.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on experimental observation of internal waves that are focused due to a sloping topography. A remarkable mixing of the density field was observed. This result is of importance for the deep ocean, where internal waves are believed to play a role in mixing. The experiments were perf

  1. Experimental Observation of Bohr's Nonlinear Fluidic Surface Oscillation

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Songky; Kwak, Hojeong; Yang, Juhee; Lee, Sang-Bum; Kim, Soyun; An, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Niels Bohr in the early stage of his career developed a nonlinear theory of fluidic surface oscillation in order to study surface tension of liquids. His theory includes the nonlinear interaction between multipolar surface oscillation modes, surpassing the linear theory of Rayleigh and Lamb. It predicts a specific normalized magnitude of $0.41\\dot{6}\\eta^2$ for an octapolar component, nonlinearly induced by a quadrupolar one with a magnitude of $\\eta$ much less than unity. No experimental confirmation on this prediction has been reported. Nonetheless, accurate determination of multipolar components is important as in optical fiber spinning, film blowing and recently in optofluidic microcavities for ray and wave chaos studies and photonics applications. Here, we report experimental verification of his theory. By using optical forward diffraction, we measured the cross-sectional boundary profiles at extreme positions of a surface-oscillating liquid column ejected from a deformed microscopic orifice. We obtained...

  2. Experimental observation of partial amplitude death in coupled chaotic oscillators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Wei-Qing; Yang Jun-Zhong; Xiao Jing-Hua

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of coupled Lorenz circuits is investigated experimentally. The partial amplitude death reported in Phys. Rev. E 72, 057201 (2005) is verified by physical experiments with electronic circuits. With the increase of coupling constant, the coupled circuits undergo the transition from the breakdown of both the reflection symmetry and the translational symmetry to the partial amplitude death. Its stability is also confirmed by analysing the effects of noise.

  3. Experimental Observation of Dark Solitons on Water Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    vertical walls are made of transparent sections of glass supported by the metal frame. The water level of the free surface is measured with seven resistive...Experimental observation of dark solitons on water surface A. Chabchoub1,∗, O. Kimmoun2, H. Branger3, N. Hoffmann1, D. Proment4, M. Onorato4,5, and N...observation of dark solitons on the water surface. It takes the form of an amplitude drop of the carrier wave which does not change shape in propagation

  4. Observing photons in space a guide to experimental space astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Pauluhn, Anuschka; Culhane, J; Timothy, J; Wilhelm, Klaus; Zehnder, Alex

    2013-01-01

    An ideal resource for lecturers, this book provides a comprehensive review of experimental space astronomy. The number of astronomers whose knowledge and interest is concentrated on interpreting observations has grown substantially in the past decades; yet, the number of scientists who are familiar with and capable of dealing with instrumentation has dwindled.  All of the authors of this work are leading and experienced experts and practitioners who have designed, built, tested, calibrated, launched and operated advanced observing equipment for space astronomy. This book also contains concise information on the history of the field, supported by appropriate references. Moreover, scientists working in other fields will be able to get a quick overview of the salient issues of observing photons in any one of the various energy, wavelength and frequency ranges accessible in space. This book was written with the intention to make it accessible to advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

  5. Experimental evaluation of shark detection rates by aerial observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, William D; Peddemors, Victor M; Kennelly, Steven J; Ives, Matthew C

    2014-01-01

    Aerial surveys are a recognised technique to identify the presence and abundance of marine animals. However, the capability of aerial observers to reliably sight coastal sharks has not been previously assessed, nor have differences in sighting rates between aircraft types been examined. In this study we investigated the ability of observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft to sight 2.5 m artificial shark analogues placed at known depths and positions. Initial tests revealed that the shark analogues could only be detected at shallow depths, averaging only 2.5 m and 2.7 m below the water surface for observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, respectively. We then deployed analogues at shallower depths along a 5 km-long grid, and assessed their sightability to aircraft observers through a series of transects flown within 500 m. Analogues were seen infrequently from all distances, with overall sighting rates of only 12.5% and 17.1% for fixed-wing and helicopter observers, respectively. Although helicopter observers had consistently higher success rates of sighting analogues within 250 m of their flight path, neither aircraft observers sighted more than 9% of analogues deployed over 300 m from their flight paths. Modelling of sighting rates against environmental and experimental variables indicated that observations were affected by distance, aircraft type, sun glare and sea conditions, while the range of water turbidities observed had no effect. We conclude that aerial observers have limited ability to detect the presence of submerged animals such as sharks, particularly when the sharks are deeper than ∼ 2.6 m, or over 300 m distant from the aircraft's flight path, especially during sunny or windy days. The low rates of detections found in this study cast serious doubts on the use of aerial beach patrols as an effective early-warning system to prevent shark attacks.

  6. Experimental evaluation of shark detection rates by aerial observers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D Robbins

    Full Text Available Aerial surveys are a recognised technique to identify the presence and abundance of marine animals. However, the capability of aerial observers to reliably sight coastal sharks has not been previously assessed, nor have differences in sighting rates between aircraft types been examined. In this study we investigated the ability of observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft to sight 2.5 m artificial shark analogues placed at known depths and positions. Initial tests revealed that the shark analogues could only be detected at shallow depths, averaging only 2.5 m and 2.7 m below the water surface for observers in fixed-wing and helicopter aircraft, respectively. We then deployed analogues at shallower depths along a 5 km-long grid, and assessed their sightability to aircraft observers through a series of transects flown within 500 m. Analogues were seen infrequently from all distances, with overall sighting rates of only 12.5% and 17.1% for fixed-wing and helicopter observers, respectively. Although helicopter observers had consistently higher success rates of sighting analogues within 250 m of their flight path, neither aircraft observers sighted more than 9% of analogues deployed over 300 m from their flight paths. Modelling of sighting rates against environmental and experimental variables indicated that observations were affected by distance, aircraft type, sun glare and sea conditions, while the range of water turbidities observed had no effect. We conclude that aerial observers have limited ability to detect the presence of submerged animals such as sharks, particularly when the sharks are deeper than ∼ 2.6 m, or over 300 m distant from the aircraft's flight path, especially during sunny or windy days. The low rates of detections found in this study cast serious doubts on the use of aerial beach patrols as an effective early-warning system to prevent shark attacks.

  7. Observer Based Sliding Mode Attitude Control: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Jørgensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the design of a sliding mode controller for attitude control of spacecraft actuated by three orthogonal reaction wheels. The equilibrium of the closed loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Due to cases where spacecraft do not have angular velocity measurements, an estimator for the generalized velocity is derived and asymptotic stability is proven for the observer. The approach is tested on an experimental platform with a sphere shaped Autonomous Underwater Vehicle SATellite: AUVSAT, developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

  8. Experimental overview on flow observables in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mohapatra, Soumya

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the experimental results on flow phenomena that were presented at Quark matter 2015, with a focus on new flow observables and correlations in small systems. The results presented include event-shape selected pT spectra and vn measurements, correlations between flow harmonics of different orders, study of factorization breakdown in two-particle correlations, and principal component analysis of two-particle correlations. Recent developments in investigation of collective effects in small collisions systems, namely, p+A, d+A and 3He + A as well as in pp collisions are also presented.

  9. Experimental Observations of Cavitating Flows Around a Hydrofoil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Min-di; WANG Guo-yu; DONG Zi-qiao; LI Xiang-bin; GAO De-ming

    2008-01-01

    The cavitation around a hydrofoil is studied experimentally tO shed light on the multiphase fluid dynamies.Different cavitation regimes are studied by using high speed visualization and particle image velocimetry(PIV).As decreasing the cavitation number,four cavitating flow regimes are observed:incipient cavitation,sheet cavitation,cloud cavitation,and supercavitation.From the incipient cavitation to the cloud cavitation,bubbles become more and more.Phenomena with large-scale vortex structure and rear re-entrant jet associated with the cloud cavitation,and subsequent development in the supercavitation are described.The velocity in the cavitation regions in the different cavitation conditions is low compared to that of the free stream.The large velocity gradient is also observed in the cavitating flow region near the suHace of the hydrofoil.

  10. Multiscale Behavior of Viscous Fluids Dynamics: Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Spina, Laura; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of Newtonian fluids with viscosities of mafic to intermediate silicate melts (10-1000 Pa s) during slow decompression present multi-time scale processes. To observe these processes we have performed several experiments on silicon oil saturated with Argon gas for 72 hours, in a Plexiglas autoclave. The slow decompression, dropping from 10 MPa to ambient pressure, acting as the excitation mechanism, triggered several processes with their own distinct timescales. These processes generate complex non-stationary microseismic signals, which have been recorded with 7 high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors located along the conduit flanked by high-speed video recordings. The analysis in time and frequency of these time series and their correlation with the associated high-speed imaging enables the characterization of distinct phases and the extraction of the individual processes during the evolution of decompression of these viscous fluids. We have observed fluid-solid elastic interaction, degassing, fluid mass expansion and flow, bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, foam building and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are sequentially coupled in time, occur within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution along the conduit. Their coexistence and interactions constitute the stress field and driving forces that determine the dynamics of the conduit system. Our observations point to the great potential of this experimental approach in the understanding of volcanic conduit dynamics and volcanic seismicity.

  11. Criticality in conserved dynamical systems: Experimental observation vs. exact properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dimitrije; Gros, Claudius; Schuelein, André

    2013-03-01

    Conserved dynamical systems are generally considered to be critical. We study a class of critical routing models, equivalent to random maps, which can be solved rigorously in the thermodynamic limit. The information flow is conserved for these routing models and governed by cyclic attractors. We consider two classes of information flow, Markovian routing without memory and vertex routing involving a one-step routing memory. Investigating the respective cycle length distributions for complete graphs, we find log corrections to power-law scaling for the mean cycle length, as a function of the number of vertices, and a sub-polynomial growth for the overall number of cycles. When observing experimentally a real-world dynamical system one normally samples stochastically its phase space. The number and the length of the attractors are then weighted by the size of their respective basins of attraction. This situation is equivalent, for theory studies, to "on the fly" generation of the dynamical transition probabilities. For the case of vertex routing models, we find in this case power law scaling for the weighted average length of attractors, for both conserved routing models. These results show that the critical dynamical systems are generically not scale-invariant but may show power-law scaling when sampled stochastically. It is hence important to distinguish between intrinsic properties of a critical dynamical system and its behavior that one would observe when randomly probing its phase space.

  12. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  13. Criticality in conserved dynamical systems: experimental observation vs. exact properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dimitrije; Gros, Claudius; Schuelein, André

    2013-03-01

    Conserved dynamical systems are generally considered to be critical. We study a class of critical routing models, equivalent to random maps, which can be solved rigorously in the thermodynamic limit. The information flow is conserved for these routing models and governed by cyclic attractors. We consider two classes of information flow, Markovian routing without memory and vertex routing involving a one-step routing memory. Investigating the respective cycle length distributions for complete graphs, we find log corrections to power-law scaling for the mean cycle length, as a function of the number of vertices, and a sub-polynomial growth for the overall number of cycles. When observing experimentally a real-world dynamical system one normally samples stochastically its phase space. The number and the length of the attractors are then weighted by the size of their respective basins of attraction. This situation is equivalent, for theory studies, to "on the fly" generation of the dynamical transition probabilities. For the case of vertex routing models, we find in this case power law scaling for the weighted average length of attractors, for both conserved routing models. These results show that the critical dynamical systems are generically not scale-invariant but may show power-law scaling when sampled stochastically. It is hence important to distinguish between intrinsic properties of a critical dynamical system and its behavior that one would observe when randomly probing its phase space.

  14. Overview and Issues of Experimental Observation of Microbunching Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lumpkin, Alex H

    2014-01-01

    The generation of the ultra-bright beams required by modern accelerators and drivers of free-electron lasers (FELs) has generally relied on chicane-based bunch compressions that often result in the microbunching instability. Following compression, spectral enhancements extend even into the visible wavelengths through the longitudinal space charge (LSC) impedances. Optical transition radiation (OTR) screens have been extensively used for transverse electron beam size measurements for the bright beams, but the presence of such longitudinal microstructures (microbunching) in the electron beam or the leading edge spikes can result in strong, localized coherent enhancements (COTR) that mask the actual beam profile. Generally, we have observed effects in rf photocathode (PC) injected linacs with chicane compressions since an R56 term is needed. In the past COTR had been only reported in S-band and L-band photoinjected based linacs with single or double bunch compression. Drive laser modulations and charge shot nois...

  15. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-04-01

    Research at the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility was successfully concluded in September 1979. In 13,000 hours of operation over a three and one half year period, the nominal 10 megawatt electrical equivalent GLEF provided the opportunity to identify problems in working with highly saline geothermal fluids and to develop solutions that could be applied to a commercial geothermal power plant producing electricity. A seven and one half year period beginning in April 1972, with early well flow testing and ending in September 1979, with the completion of extensive facility and reservoir operations is covered. During this period, the facility was designed, constructed and operated in several configurations. A comprehensive reference document, addressing or referencing documentation of all the key areas investigated is presented.

  16. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement: guidelines for reporting observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik von Elm

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Much biomedical research is observational. The reporting of such research is often inadequate, which hampers the assessment of its strengths and weaknesses and of a study's generalisability. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE Initiative developed recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists, researchers, and journal editors to draft a checklist of items. This list was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group and in e-mail discussions with the larger group of STROBE contributors, taking into account empirical evidence and methodological considerations. The workshop and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case-control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting of observational studies.

  17. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-05-01

    This is the May 1988 annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington. It contains chapters on astrophysics, giant resonances, heavy ion induced reactions, fundamental symmetries, polarization in nuclear reactions, medium energy reactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), research by outside users, Van de Graaff and ion sources, the Laboratory`s booster linac project work, instrumentation, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, Ph.D. degrees granted in the 1987-88 academic year, and publications. Refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Experimental observation of very large magnetoconductance in microbial nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvankar, Nikhil; Vargas, Madeline; Lovley, Derek; Tuominen, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Microbial nanowires are 2-5 nm-wide conductive proteinous pili filaments secreted by some bacteria, which can grow tens of micrometers long and may serve as a conduit for long-distance electron transport. Our previous studies demonstrated that pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens exhibit properties akin to disordered metals, and indicated a temperature-driven crossover from the regime of weak localization (WL) to strong localization (SL). Here we report a very large positive magnetoconductance (MC), up to 10,000 %, at 300K. MC increased exponentially with magnetic field. A crossover from positive MC (WL regime) to negative MC (SL) was observed at ~ 280 K when the localization and the phase-breaking lengths are expected to become comparable. We attribute positive MC to destruction of the quantum interference of delocalized electron wavefunctions and negative MC to shrinkage of the localized electron wavefunctions due to applied magnetic field, which is consistent with the temperature dependence of conductivity. Funded by U.S. DOE Genomic Sciences and Office of Naval Research.

  19. Experimental observation of coherent cavity soliton frequency combs in silica microspheres

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Karen E; Coen, Stéphane; Murdoch, Stuart G

    2016-01-01

    We report on the experimental observation of coherent cavity soliton frequency combs in silica microspheres. Specifically, we demonstrate that careful alignment of the microsphere relative to the coupling fiber taper allows for the suppression of higher-order spatial modes, reducing mode interactions and enabling soliton formation. Our measurements show that the temporal cavity solitons have sub-100-fs durations, exhibit considerable Raman self-frequency shift, and generally come in groups of three or four, occasionally with equidistant spacing in the time domain. RF amplitude noise measurements and spectral interferometry confirm the high coherence of the observed soliton frequency combs, and numerical simulations show good agreement with experiments.

  20. Experimental observation of subharmonic gap structures in long Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahn, M.A.; Manscher, Martin; Mygind, Jesper

    1999-01-01

    The subharmonic gap structure (SGS) in long-overlap Nb-AlOx-Nb Josephson tunnel junctions has been investigated. The experimental results show peaks in the differential conductance at both odd and even integer fractions of the gap voltage, VG Furthermore, the conductance peaks at V-G/2 has been...

  1. Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigor, Ignatius [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Johnson, Jim [Applied Physics Lab, University of Washington; Motz, Emily [National Ice Center; Bisic, Aaron [National Ice Center

    2017-06-30

    Our ability to understand and predict weather and climate requires an accurate observing network. One of the pillars of this network is the observation of the fundamental meteorological parameters: temperature, air pressure, and wind. We plan to assess our ability to measure these parameters for the polar regions during the Arctic Observing Experiment (AOX, Figure 1) to support the International Arctic Buoy Programme (IABP), Arctic Observing Network (AON), International Program for Antarctic Buoys (IPAB), and Southern Ocean Observing System (SOOS). Accurate temperature measurements are also necessary to validate and improve satellite measurements of surface temperature across the Arctic. Support for research associated with the campaign is provided by the National Science Foundation, and by other US agencies contributing to the US Interagency Arctic Buoy Program. In addition to the support provided by the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow and the National Science Foundation (NSF), the U.S. IABP is supported by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Ice Center (NIC), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

  2. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase synchronization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haihong Li; Weiqing Liu; Qiongling Dai; Jinghua Xiao

    2006-09-01

    The dynamics of two uncoupled distinct Chua circuits driven by a common direct current voltage is explored experimentally. It was found that, with increasing current intensity, the dominant frequencies of these two Chua circuits will first vary at different speeds, approach an identical value for a certain current intensity and then separate. Techniques such as synchronization index and phase difference distribution were employed to analyze the phase coherence between these two Chua circuits.

  3. Science Experimenter: Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of simple optical aids that allow the amateur scientist to safely observe sunspots and solar eclipses and also to measure the sun's rotation. (five references) (JJK)

  4. Observations on algal populations in an experimental maturation pond system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shillinglaw, SN

    1977-01-01

    Full Text Available . Likewise the adults, which are carnivorous, could have had an effect on zooplankton and other animal populations in the ponds. Xrnopus laevis populations were unfortunately not monitored. Temperature There was a seasonal increase in water temperature... of efficient ammonia removal. However, this observation must be treated with extreme caution since plate count numbers depend largely upon the culture medium used. Obviously more observations using different media would seem to be in order. It is also...

  5. The effect of peer observation on consumption choices: experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Antonia; Sakha, Sahra

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of peer observation on the consumption decisions of rural households in Thailand using a lab-in-the-field experiment. We find that those groups that observe each other show lower within group standard deviation in their decisions. Thus, we find evidence for conformity. Further, we find that individual's consumption choice is influenced by the group choice controlling for large number of individual, household, and village characteristics. We find that unfamil...

  6. Experimental investigation of observation error in anuran call surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, B.T.; Bailey, L.L.; Pollock, K.H.; Simons, T.R.

    2010-01-01

    Occupancy models that account for imperfect detection are often used to monitor anuran and songbird species occurrence. However, presenceabsence data arising from auditory detections may be more prone to observation error (e.g., false-positive detections) than are sampling approaches utilizing physical captures or sightings of individuals. We conducted realistic, replicated field experiments using a remote broadcasting system to simulate simple anuran call surveys and to investigate potential factors affecting observation error in these studies. Distance, time, ambient noise, and observer abilities were the most important factors explaining false-negative detections. Distance and observer ability were the best overall predictors of false-positive errors, but ambient noise and competing species also affected error rates for some species. False-positive errors made up 5 of all positive detections, with individual observers exhibiting false-positive rates between 0.5 and 14. Previous research suggests false-positive errors of these magnitudes would induce substantial positive biases in standard estimators of species occurrence, and we recommend practices to mitigate for false positives when developing occupancy monitoring protocols that rely on auditory detections. These recommendations include additional observer training, limiting the number of target species, and establishing distance and ambient noise thresholds during surveys. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CHEMICAL CHOLECYSTECTOMY: OBSERVATION OF PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: TO verify through animal experiment the validity of chemical cholecystectomy . Methods: The experimental objects seven healthy juvenile pigs,hardener was infused into the gallbladder,after infusion the samples were collected by pathoiogical examination , according to the different duration under anesthestize. Reslts:The mucous destructive and digestive process remained with one week, the inflammatory reacton in two weeks,the chronic inflatoy reaction compained a a great deal of granu lation tissue and scar formation occurred in 4th-8th week,10 weeks latter,the inflmmatory reaction reduced ,and scar tissue formed. Conclusion: Chemical cholecystectomy is safe and reliable in clinical.

  8. Experimental observation of internal water curing of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2007-01-01

    Internal water curing has a significant effect on concrete. In addition to affecting hydration and moisture distribution, it influences most concrete properties, such as strength, shrinkage, cracking, and durability. The following paper is an overview of experimental methods to study internal water...... curing of concrete and its consequences. The special techniques needed to study internal water curing are dealt with along with the consequences of this process. Examples of applications are given and new measuring techniques that may potentially be applied to this field are addressed....

  9. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Jochen, E-mail: wilms@physik.uni-kiel.de; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Reichstein, Torben [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); DME, Kiel University of Applied Sciences, Grenzstr. 3, D-24147 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  10. Experimental observations of a complex, supersonic nozzle concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magstadt, Andrew; Berry, Matthew; Glauser, Mark; Ruscher, Christopher; Gogineni, Sivaram; Kiel, Barry; Skytop Turbulence Labs, Syracuse University Team; Spectral Energies, LLC. Team; Air Force Research Laboratory Team

    2015-11-01

    A complex nozzle concept, which fuses multiple canonical flows together, has been experimentally investigated via pressure, schlieren and PIV in the anechoic chamber at Syracuse University. Motivated by future engine designs of high-performance aircraft, the rectangular, supersonic jet under investigation has a single plane of symmetry, an additional shear layer (referred to as a wall jet) and an aft deck representative of airframe integration. Operating near a Reynolds number of 3 ×106 , the nozzle architecture creates an intricate flow field comprised of high turbulence levels, shocks, shear & boundary layers, and powerful corner vortices. Current data suggest that the wall jet, which is an order of magnitude less energetic than the core, has significant control authority over the acoustic power through some non-linear process. As sound is a direct product of turbulence, experimental and analytical efforts further explore this interesting phenomenon associated with the turbulent flow. The authors acknowledge the funding source, a SBIR Phase II project with Spectral Energies, LLC. and AFRL turbine engine branch under the direction of Dr. Barry Kiel.

  11. Experimental observation of Rabi oscillations in photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandarova, Ksenia; Rüter, Christian E; Kip, Detlef; Makris, Konstantinos G; Christodoulides, Demetrios N; Peleg, Or; Segev, Mordechai

    2009-03-27

    We demonstrate spatial Rabi oscillations in optical waveguide arrays. Adiabatic transitions between extended Floquet-Bloch modes associated with different bands are stimulated by periodic modulation of the photonic lattice in the propagation direction. When the stimulating modulation also carries transverse momentum, the transition becomes indirect, equivalent to phonon-assisted Rabi oscillations. In solid state physics such indirect Rabi oscillations necessitate coherent phonons and hence they have never been observed. Our experiments suggest that phonon-assisted Rabi oscillations are observable also with Bose-Einstein condensates, as well as with other wave systems-where coherence can be maintained for at least one period of the Rabi oscillation.

  12. Numerical simulation and experimental observations of initial friction transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, D.A.; Weingarten, L.I.; Dawson, D.B.

    1995-07-01

    Experiments were performed to better understand the sliding frictional behavior between metals under relatively high shear and normal forces. Microstructural analyses were done to estimate local near-surface stress and strain gradients. The numerical simulation of the observed frictional behavior was based on a constitutive model that uses a state variable approach.

  13. Experimental observables on nuclear liquid gas phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Y G

    2006-01-01

    Progress on nuclear liquid gas phase transition (LGPT) or critical behavior has been simply reviewed and some signals of LGPT in heavy ion collisions, especially in NIMROD data, are focused. These signals include the power-law charge distribution, the largest fluctuation of the fragment observables, the nuclear Zipf law, caloric curve and critical exponent analysis etc.

  14. Experimental observations on fungal diagenesis of carbonate substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolo, Kamal; Keppens, Eddy; PréAt, Alain; Claeys, Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Carbonate substrates (dolomites and limestones) are susceptible to fungal attack that results in significant microbial diagenesis of these substrates. In a 15-day experimental study, fungi growing in Petri dishes from airborne spores attacked petrographic thin sections and chips prepared from the dolomites of Terwagne Formation (Viséan, Bocahut quarry at Avesnes-sur-Helpe, northern France) and limestones of the Morrone di Pacentro Formation (Lower Cretaceous, Italy). The analyses of the fungal material (samples of mycelia), thin sections and chips under optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and stable isotopes (C and O) revealed an extensive fungally induced diagenesis. The results indicate strong diagenesis and biomineral neomorphism: neo-dolomite, glushinskite, weddellite, whewellite and possibly struvite, as well as intense substrate "de-micritization" and "micritization" with oxalates, grain bridging and cementation, open space filling, formation of intergranular and intragranular porosity, and permeability enhancement. Advanced stages of diagenesis were characterized by dissolution and replacement of original minerals by new substrates produced by fungal biomineralization. The formation of new substrates on the original attacked surfaces produced microscale stratification. Stable isotope analysis of fungal biomineralized material and of attacked and unattacked chip surfaces revealed marked differences in their isotopic signatures. The C and O isotopes of biomineralized material within the fungal mass were fractionated differently as compared to the signature measured in the original and unattacked surfaces. In sedimentary cycles, such microbially modified isotopic signature of carbonate substrates may be used to define microbial events, and consequently whether certain types of diagenesis were produced by microbial interaction. The finding of neo-dolomite formed

  15. Experimental observation of the linewidth narrowing of electromagnetically induced transparency resonance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Wang; Shujing Li; Jingqin Yao; Jie Ma; Feng Peng; Gang Jiang; Hai Wang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We report an experimental observation of the variation in linewidth of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) resonance in a three-level A-type system for several laser bandwidths in a Rb vapor cell, with and without a buffer gas. It is found, using narrow bandwidth (about 20 kHz) diode laser for both coupling and probe beams, that the linewidth of the EIT resonance can be significantly narrowed in the Rb vapor cell with the buffer gas. The results are in good qualitative agreement with a simple theoretical calculation.

  16. Animal tales: observations of the emotions in American experimental psychology, 1890-1940.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anne C

    2012-01-01

    In nineteenth-century science, the emotions played a crucial role in explaining the social behavior of animals and human beings. Beginning in the 1890s, however, the first American psychologists, resolutely parsimonious in method, dismissed affective experience as intellectually imprecise. Yet in practice, feelings continued to influence at least one research setting: animal experiments. Laboratory reports, although focused on learning, became a repository of informal observations about the animals' temperaments and moods. When American psychologists began to reexamine the emotions between the world wars, they drew on this empirical legacy in animal studies. They also devised a conceptual approach to emotion consistent with their expectation of experimental precision.

  17. Experimental observation of impossible-to-beat quantum advantage on a hybrid photonic system

    CERN Document Server

    Nagali, Eleonora; Sciarrino, Fabio; Cabello, Adan; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.090501

    2012-01-01

    Quantum resources outperform classical ones for certain communication and computational tasks. Remarkably, in some cases, the quantum advantage cannot be improved using hypothetical postquantum resources. A class of tasks with this property can be singled out using graph theory. Here we report the experimental observation of an impossible-to-beat quantum advantage on a four-dimensional quantum system defined by the polarization and orbital angular momentum of a single photon. The results show pristine evidence of the quantum advantage and are compatible with the maximum advantage allowed using postquantum resources.

  18. Experimental Observation of Travelling Hexagon Patterns in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽芳; 贺亚峰; 尹增谦; 柴志方

    2003-01-01

    Travelling hexagon patterns have been observed in dielectric barrier discharge in an air-argon mixture. The phase diagram of hexagon pattern appearance as functions of applied voltage and air concentration is given. The spatial frequency of hexagon pattern increases with increasing applied voltage and air concentration. The current waveforms of hexagon pattern also vary with the air concentration. The drift velocity of travelling hexagon pattern changes from 4mm/s to 18mm/s.

  19. Experimental observations and theoretical models for beam-beam phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kheifets, S.

    1981-03-01

    The beam-beam interaction in storage rings exhibits all the characteristics of nonintegrable dynamical systems. Here one finds all kinds of resonances, closed orbits, stable and unstable fixed points, stochastic layers, chaotic behavior, diffusion, etc. The storage ring itself being an expensive device nevertheless while constructed and put into operation presents a good opportunity of experimentally studying the long-time behavior of both conservative (proton machines) and nonconservative (electron machines) dynamical systems - the number of bunch-bunch interactions routinely reaches values of 10/sup 10/-10/sup 11/ and could be increased by decreasing the beam current. At the same time the beam-beam interaction puts practical limits for the yield of the storage ring. This phenomenon not only determines the design value of main storage ring parameters (luminosity, space charge parameters, beam current), but also in fact prevents many of the existing storage rings from achieving design parameters. Hence, the problem has great practical importance along with its enormous theoretical interest. A brief overview of the problem is presented.

  20. Nanoparticles in medicine: selected observations and experimental caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Sharon; Pearce, John A.; Giustini, Andrew; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Medically useful nanoparticles measure 1-100 nm in at least one dimension and are engineered and manufactured for specific diagnostic and treatment applications. Most nanoparticles used currently used in medicine are engineered and manufactured for specific purposes. Medically significant nanoparticles are composed of a 1) central core that is usually the medically active component, 2) one or more layers of organic or inorganic materials that forms a capsule (corona) covering the core and 3) an outer surface layer that interacts with the environment and/or targeted cells and tissues. Effective nanoparticle function in the living, intact animal or human requires electrochemical stability necessary to bypass the reticuloendothelial system (RES) and avoid filtration through the renal glomerulus into the urine. Nanoparticles are present in " natural" as well as the manufacturing and clinical environments thus could pose as significant toxins because of their small sizes, their chemical and drug content and potential effect of causing long term disease including allergies, chronic inflammation and cancer. Currently published studies have focused on the effects of nanoparticles on cells in the extremely artificial environments of cell cultures. More clinical and preclinical studies documenting the short term and long term effects nanoparticle in the intact experimental animal and human are needed.

  1. Experimental observation of anomalous trajectories of single photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zong-Quan; Liu, Xiao; Kedem, Yaron; Cui, Jin-Min; Li, Zong-Feng; Hua, Yi-Lin; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-04-01

    A century after its conception, quantum mechanics still hold surprises that contradict many "common sense" notions. The contradiction is especially sharp in case one consider trajectories of truly quantum objects such as single photons. From a classical point of view, trajectories are well defined for particles, but not for waves. The wave-particle duality forces a breakdown of this dichotomy and quantum mechanics resolves this in a remarkable way: Trajectories can be well defined, but they are utterly different from classical trajectories. Here, we give an operational definition to the trajectory of a single photon by introducing a technique to mark its path using its spectral composition. The method demonstrates that the frequency degree of freedom can be used as a bona fide quantum measurement device (meter). The analysis of a number of setups, using our operational definition, leads to anomalous trajectories which are noncontinuous and in some cases do not even connect the source of the photon to where it is detected. We carried out an experimental demonstration of these anomalous trajectories using a nested interferometer. We show that the two-state vector formalism provides a simple explanation for the results.

  2. Experimental observation of wiggler superradiance under group synchronism condition

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, N S; Zotova, I V; Sergeev, A S; Phelps, A D R; Cross, A W; He, W; Ronald, K; Shpak, V G; Yalandin, M I; Shunailov, S A; Ulmaskulov, M R

    1999-01-01

    The first results of the observation of superradiance from a single, subnanosecond, high current, electron bunch passing through a wiggler immersed in a guide magnetic field are presented. The 300-500 ps microwave pulses were generated in the high gain regime for both the conventional and reverse directions of the guide magnetic field. The dependence of the radiation power on the interaction length as well as the absolute value of the power, 100-200 kW, were related with the development of self-bunching and consequently with coherent emission.

  3. Oscillatory oxidation of benzaldehyde by air. 1. Experimental observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colussi, A.J.; Ghibaudi, E.; Yuan, Zhi; Noyes, R.M. (Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (USA))

    1990-11-21

    In 90% aqueous acetic acid at 70 C, the oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid by air is catalyzed by a mixture of cobalt(II) and bromide. Jensen has shown that the concentration of cobalt(III) undergoes major oscillations during the reaction. Consistent with these prior observations, the authors find that the rate of formation of cobalt(III) increases exponentially until at about 10{sup {minus}5} M s{sup {minus}1} it becomes comparable to the maximum rate at which O{sub 2} can be transported from atmosphere to solution. A virtually discontinuous change of behavior then causes the concentration of cobalt(III) to decrease at about 10{sup {minus}4} M s{sup {minus}1}; the rate of this decrease is almost constant and independent of (Co{sup III}) until most of this species has been consumed. The authors have examined most of the subsystems that they could prepare and study independently. Among other observations, they find that increasing acidity increases the rate at which bromide catalyzes the oxidation of benzaldehyde by cobalt(III).

  4. Experimental Observation of Energetic Electrons during Magnetic Island Merging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Byungkeun; Yoo, Jongsoo; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Fox, Will; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao

    2015-11-01

    Non-thermal particles have been observed in space as a consequence of magnetic reconnection, but the exact acceleration mechanisms are not well understood. The energization of electrons during magnetic island merging is studied in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). A double-sided electron energy analyzer is developed to simultaneously measure the electron energy distribution in two directions, parallel and anti-parallel to the electron flow. The bias of the selector grid is swept from -30 to 0 V with respect to the floating potential within 1 μs , comparable to the Alfvén time of the typical MRX plasma. Energetic electrons are found inside the magnetic island after island merging is completed. The measured electron tail distribution is well modeled by a high temperature Maxwellian. In the parallel direction, the tail temperature (~ 28 eV) is found to be up to four times higher than the bulk temperature (~ 7 eV). In the anti-parallel direction, a negligible tail population is observed. The measured electron energy distribution is discussed in connection with possible electron acceleration mechanisms.

  5. Experimental observation on a small-scale thermoacoustic prime mover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Tao; ZHANG Bao-sen; TANG Ke; BAO Rui; CHEN Guo-bang

    2007-01-01

    A miniature thermoacoustic prime mover, consuming heat to radiate sound, may be considered as a potential way of heat management in microcircuits because of its simplicity and stability. A prototype with variable resonant tube length of 10 to 25 cm was built, and experiments were carried out to observe its performance, such as onset temperature, oscillation amplitude and operating frequency. The results with atmospheric air showed that proper structures and operating conditions can make the system start an oscillation at a temperature lower than 100 ℃, which proves the feasibility of potential usage in electronic units. The influences of stack position, heat input power or tube inclination on the oscillation amplitude, onset temperature and operating frequency are also presented.

  6. AeroValve Experimental Test Data Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noakes, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report documents the collection of experimental test data and presents performance characteristics for the AeroValve brand prototype pneumatic bidirectional solenoid valves tested at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July/August 2014 as part of a validation of AeroValve energy efficiency claims. The test stand and control programs were provided by AeroValve. All raw data and processing are included in the report attachments.

  7. Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors (VI report)

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiki, Hirota; Ichikawa, Koichi; Yamagiwa, Katsusaburo; Maruyama, Koshichiro; Lee, Kunsei; Fukuda,Tamotsu; Kinoshita, Riojun; Kashiwagi, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Juntaro

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cancer and inflammation has a long history. Virchow's irritation theory based on human cancer engendered the essential role of inflammation in carcinogenesis. Drs. Yamagiwa and Ichikawa first published a comprehensive paper entitled “Experimental study on the pathogenesis of epithelial tumors” (I report) in 1915 in German, and went on to publish five more reports (1915–1924) under the same title. They succeeded in demonstrating that inflammation is an important carcinogenic fac...

  8. Improving plant bioaccumulation science through consistent reporting of experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantke, Peter; Arnot, Jon A; Doucette, William J

    2016-10-01

    Experimental data and models for plant bioaccumulation of organic contaminants play a crucial role for assessing the potential human and ecological risks associated with chemical use. Plants are receptor organisms and direct or indirect vectors for chemical exposures to all other organisms. As new experimental data are generated they are used to improve our understanding of plant-chemical interactions that in turn allows for the development of better scientific knowledge and conceptual and predictive models. The interrelationship between experimental data and model development is an ongoing, never-ending process needed to advance our ability to provide reliable quality information that can be used in various contexts including regulatory risk assessment. However, relatively few standard experimental protocols for generating plant bioaccumulation data are currently available and because of inconsistent data collection and reporting requirements, the information generated is often less useful than it could be for direct applications in chemical assessments and for model development and refinement. We review existing testing guidelines, common data reporting practices, and provide recommendations for revising testing guidelines and reporting requirements to improve bioaccumulation knowledge and models. This analysis provides a list of experimental parameters that will help to develop high quality datasets and support modeling tools for assessing bioaccumulation of organic chemicals in plants and ultimately addressing uncertainty in ecological and human health risk assessments.

  9. Experimental observation of the collision of three vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, R. H.; Monsalve, E.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate for the first time the motion, interaction and simultaneous collision between three initially stable vortex rings arranged symmetrically, making an angle of 120 degrees between their straight path lines. We report results with laminar vortex rings in air and water obtained through measurements of the ring velocity field with a hot-wire anemometer, both in free flight and during the entire collision. In the air experiment, our flow visualizations allowed us to identify two main collision stages. A first ring-dominated stage where the rings slowdown progressively, increasing their diameter rapidly, followed by secondary vortex structures resulting after the rings make contact. Local portions of the vortex tubes of opposite circulation are coupled together thus creating local arm-like vortex structures moving radially in outward directions, rapidly dissipating kinetic energy. From a similar water experiment, we provide detailed shadowgraph visualizations of both the ring bubble and the full size collision, showing clearly the final expanding vortex structure. It is accurately resolved that the physical contact between vortex ring tubes gives rise to three symmetric expanding vortex arms but also the vortex reconnection of the top and lower vortex tubes. The central collision zone was found to have the lowest kinetic energy during the entire collision and therefore it can be identified as a safe zone. The preserved collision symmetries leading to the weak kinematic activity in the safe zone is the first step into the development of an intermittent hydrodynamic trap for small and lightweight particles.

  10. Experimental observation of fluid flow channels in a single fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen; Caprihan, Arvind; Hardy, Robert

    1998-03-01

    A method for obtaining precise replicas of real fracture surfaces using transparent epoxy resins was developed, allowing detailed study of fluid flow paths within a fracture plane. A natural rock fracture was collected from the field and prepared for study. Silicon rubber molds of the fracture surfaces were used to make a transparent epoxy replica of the original fracture. Clear and dyed water were injected into the fracture pore space allowing examination of the flow field. Digitized optical images were used to observe wetting, saturated flow, and drying of the specimen. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging was used for quantitative measurements of flow velocity. Both video imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques show distinct and strong channeling of the flow at the submillimeter to several-centimeter scale. Each phenomenon, including wetting, drying, dye transport, and velocity channeling, has its own distinct geometric structure and scale. We find that fluid velocities measured simultaneously at various locations in the fracture plane during steady state flow range over several orders of magnitude, with the maximum velocity a factor of 5 higher than the mean velocity. This suggests that flow channeling in fractured rock can cause the breakthrough velocity of contaminants to far exceed the mean flow.

  11. Predictions of experimentally observed stochastic ground vibrations induced by blasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostić, Srđan; Perc, Matjaž; Vasović, Nebojša; Trajković, Slobodan

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the blast induced ground motion recorded at the limestone quarry "Suva Vrela" near Kosjerić, which is located in the western part of Serbia. We examine the recorded signals by means of surrogate data methods and a determinism test, in order to determine whether the recorded ground velocity is stochastic or deterministic in nature. Longitudinal, transversal and the vertical ground motion component are analyzed at three monitoring points that are located at different distances from the blasting source. The analysis reveals that the recordings belong to a class of stationary linear stochastic processes with Gaussian inputs, which could be distorted by a monotonic, instantaneous, time-independent nonlinear function. Low determinism factors obtained with the determinism test further confirm the stochastic nature of the recordings. Guided by the outcome of time series analysis, we propose an improved prediction model for the peak particle velocity based on a neural network. We show that, while conventional predictors fail to provide acceptable prediction accuracy, the neural network model with four main blast parameters as input, namely total charge, maximum charge per delay, distance from the blasting source to the measuring point, and hole depth, delivers significantly more accurate predictions that may be applicable on site. We also perform a sensitivity analysis, which reveals that the distance from the blasting source has the strongest influence on the final value of the peak particle velocity. This is in full agreement with previous observations and theory, thus additionally validating our methodology and main conclusions.

  12. Using Experimental Methods to Investigate Discriminatory Tendencies: A Lesson Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Masch, Lena; Finze, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Using dictator games in experimental analysis, this lesson report demonstrates the process and results of a postgraduate class project in which university students were instructed to scientifically investigate and explore one of German society's most hotly-contested issues: the level of discriminatory tendencies of non-Muslims towards Muslims. The…

  13. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  14. Experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a brillouin cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yingchun; Feng, Qi; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhongxuan; Tang, Xin; Lin, Chengyou; Chen, Zhaoyang

    2017-06-01

    It has been an important research subject to find new nonlinear optical phenomena. In this paper, we report the experimental observation of stochastic, periodic, and localized light structures in a super long single-mode standard fiber with external optical feedback provided by the fiber end. The end facet reflection provides an analogous Fabry-Perot stimulated Brillouin resonator cavity. By increasing the pump power to exceed stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold, we observed light structures exhibiting extremely rich temporal-pulse characteristics that had never been reported in literature before, including supercontinuum background generation, the localization of periodic optical structure formation, fission, and compression. These optical structures are of period-doubling distribution and have different recurrence rates. What is more interesting is that we have observed sets of low frequency bipolar cycle-pulse trains that is often seen in the electrical field and hardly seen in pure optical system. Real-time specification of dynamical temporal regimes of laser operation may bring new insight into rich underlying nonlinear physics of practical fiber cavity systems. Therefore, some new nonlinear optical phenomena have been observed.

  15. Experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a minimal globally coupled network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, Joseph D. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Bansal, Kanika [Department of Mathematics, University at Buffalo, SUNY Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); US Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States); Murphy, Thomas E. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Roy, Rajarshi [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    A “chimera state” is a dynamical pattern that occurs in a network of coupled identical oscillators when the symmetry of the oscillator population is broken into synchronous and asynchronous parts. We report the experimental observation of chimera and cluster states in a network of four globally coupled chaotic opto-electronic oscillators. This is the minimal network that can support chimera states, and our study provides new insight into the fundamental mechanisms underlying their formation. We use a unified approach to determine the stability of all the observed partially synchronous patterns, highlighting the close relationship between chimera and cluster states as belonging to the broader phenomenon of partial synchronization. Our approach is general in terms of network size and connectivity. We also find that chimera states often appear in regions of multistability between global, cluster, and desynchronized states.

  16. A New Experimental Method Assessing Attitudes toward Adolescent Dating and Sibling Violence Using Observations of Violent Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese-Weber, Marla

    2008-01-01

    The present study provides experimental data comparing emerging adults' attitudes toward dating and sibling violence in adolescence using a new methodology in which participants observe a violent interaction between adolescents. The reported amount of violence experienced in dating and sibling relationships among emerging adults is also compared.…

  17. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part II: Thermal modeling and analysis of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Solanki, Prem K; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    This study aims at developing thermal analysis tools and explaining experimental observations made by means of polarized-light cryomacroscopy (Part I). Thermal modeling is based on finite elements analysis (FEA), where two model parameters are extracted from thermal measurements: (i) the overall heat transfer coefficient between the cuvette and the cooling chamber, and (ii) the effective thermal conductivity within the cryoprotective agent (CPA) at the upper part of the cryogenic temperature range. The effective thermal conductivity takes into account enhanced heat transfer due to convection currents within the CPA, creating the so-called Bénard cells. Comparison of experimental results with simulation data indicates that the uncertainty in simulations due to the propagation of uncertainty in measured physical properties exceeds the uncertainty in experimental measurements, which validates the modeling approach. It is shown in this study that while a cavity may form in the upper-center portion of the vitrified CPA, it has very little effect on estimating the temperature distribution within the domain. This cavity is driven by thermal contraction of the CPA, with the upper-center of the domain transitioning to glass last. Finally, it is demonstrated in this study that additional stresses may develop within the glass transition temperature range due to nonlinear behavior of the thermal expansion coefficient. This effect is reported here for the first time in the context of cryobiology, using the capabilities of polarized-light cryomacroscopy.

  18. The first experimental observation of the higher-energy trans conformer of trifluoroacetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apóstolo, R. F. G.; Bazsó, Gábor; Bento, R. R. F.; Tarczay, G.; Fausto, R.

    2016-12-01

    We report here the first experimental observation of the higher-energy conformer of trifluoroacetic acid (trans-TFA). The new conformer was generated by selective narrowband near-infrared vibrational excitation of the lower-energy cis-TFA conformer isolated in cryogenic matrices (Ar, Kr, N2) and shown to spontaneously decay to this latter form in the various matrix media, by tunneling. The decay rates in the different matrices were measured and compared with those of the trans conformers of other carboxylic acids in similar experimental conditions. The experimental studies received support from quantum chemistry calculations undertaken at various levels of approximation, which allowed a detailed characterization of the relevant regions of the potential energy surface of the molecule and the detailed assignment of the infrared spectra of the two conformers in the various matrices. Noteworthly, in contrast to cis-TFA that has its trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Cdbnd O bond of the carboxylic moiety, trans-TFA has the trifluoromethyl group eclipsed with the Csbnd O bond. This unusual structure of trans-TFA results from the fact that the relative orientation of the CF3 and COOH groups in this geometry facilitates the establishment of an intramolecular hydrogen-bond-like interaction between the OH group and the closely located in-plane fluorine atom of the CF3 moiety.

  19. Procedures for Classroom Observations: 1973-1974. Technical Report #19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, Alan

    This report describes classroom observation techniques used to record the behavior of educational specialists (teachers) and students in a kindergarten and a first grade classroom of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Classroom behavior was observed and recorded daily during the 1973-1974 school year. Each student was observed three…

  20. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, January-March, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.

    1979-04-01

    The general operations and accomplishments of the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility during the period from January 1, 1979 through March 31, 1979 are summarized. The construction and installation of a reactor clarifier/media filter system to treat the effluent brine continued. Startup is expected during the next reporting period. Operations of the facility evaluated the two stage flash cycle characteristics of brines from the second production well (Woolsey No. 1). The results were similar to the characteristics of the first production well (Magmamax No. 1) that were reported previously. The 1979 test program has been initiated and preliminary results documented.

  1. Experimental observation of transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in a neural pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaguang

    2013-06-01

    The transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking has been simulated and analyzed in theoretical neuronal models. In the present study, we report experimental observations in a neural pacemaker of a transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking within a bifurcation scenario from period-1 bursting to period-1 spiking. This was induced by adjusting extracellular calcium or potassium concentrations. The bifurcation scenario began from period-doubling bifurcations or period-adding sequences of bursting pattern. This chaotic bursting is characterized by alternations between multiple continuous spikes and a long duration of quiescence, whereas chaotic spiking is comprised of fast, continuous spikes without periods of quiescence. Chaotic bursting changed to chaotic spiking as long interspike intervals (ISIs) of quiescence disappeared within bursting patterns, drastically decreasing both ISIs and the magnitude of the chaotic attractors. Deterministic structures of the chaotic bursting and spiking patterns are also identified by a short-term prediction. The experimental observations, which agree with published findings in theoretical neuronal models, demonstrate the existence and reveal the dynamics of a neuronal transition from chaotic bursting to chaotic spiking in the nervous system.

  2. Experimental observation of cumulative second-harmonic generation of lamb waves propagating in long bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenggang; Liu, Dan; Deng, Mingxi; Ta, Dean; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-07-01

    The experimental observation of cumulative second-harmonic generation of fundamental Lamb waves in long bones is reported. Based on the modal expansion approach to waveguide excitation and the dispersion characteristics of Lamb waves in long bones, the mechanism underlying the generation and accumulation of second harmonics by propagation of the fundamental Lamb waves was investigated. An experimental setup was established to detect the second-harmonic signals of Lamb wave propagation in long bones in vitro. Through analysis of the group velocities of the received signals, the appropriate fundamental Lamb wave modes and the duration of the second-harmonic signals could be identified. The integrated amplitude of the time-domain second-harmonic signal was introduced and used to characterize the efficiency of second-harmonic generation by fundamental Lamb wave propagation. The results indicate that the second-harmonic signal generated by fundamental Lamb waves propagating in long bones can be observed clearly, and the effect was cumulative with propagation distance when the fundamental Lamb wave mode and the double-frequency Lamb wave mode had the same phase velocities. The present results may be important in the development of a new method to evaluate the status of long bones using the cumulative second harmonic of ultrasonic Lamb waves.

  3. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G

    2014-01-01

    Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical conside......, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/) should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research....... to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how...

  4. Experimental observation of 1/f noise in quasi-bidimensionnal turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Herault, Johann; Fauve, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We report the experimental observation of $1/f^{\\alpha}$ noise in quasi-bidimensionnal turbulence of an electromagnetically forced flow. The large scale velocity $U_L$ exhibits this power-law spectrum with $\\alpha \\simeq 0.7$ over a range of frequencies smaller than both the characteristic turn-over frequency and the damping rate of the flow. By studying the statistical properties of sojourn time in each polarity of $U_L$, we demonstrate that the $1/f^{\\alpha}$ noise is generated by a renewal process, defined by a two-state model given by the polarities of the large scale circulation. The statistical properties of this renewal process are shown to control the value of the exponent $\\alpha$.

  5. Guidelines for reporting evaluations based on observational methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portell, Mariona; Anguera, M Teresa; Chacón-Moscoso, Salvador; Sanduvete-Chaves, Susana

    2015-01-01

    Observational methodology is one of the most suitable research designs for evaluating fidelity of implementation, especially in complex interventions. However, the conduct and reporting of observational studies is hampered by the absence of specific guidelines, such as those that exist for other evaluation designs. This lack of specific guidance poses a threat to the quality and transparency of these studies and also constitutes a considerable publication hurdle. The aim of this study thus was to draw up a set of proposed guidelines for reporting evaluations based on observational methodology. The guidelines were developed by triangulating three sources of information: observational studies performed in different fields by experts in observational methodology, reporting guidelines for general studies and studies with similar designs to observational studies, and proposals from experts in observational methodology at scientific meetings. We produced a list of guidelines grouped into three domains: intervention and expected outcomes, methods, and results. The result is a useful, carefully crafted set of simple guidelines for conducting and reporting observational studies in the field of program evaluation.

  6. Experimental observation of topological Fermi arcs in type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ke; Wan, Guoliang; Deng, Peng; Zhang, Kenan; Ding, Shijie; Wang, Eryin; Yan, Mingzhe; Huang, Huaqing; Zhang, Hongyun; Xu, Zhilin; Denlinger, Jonathan; Fedorov, Alexei; Yang, Haitao; Duan, Wenhui; Yao, Hong; Wu, Yang; Fan, Shoushan; Zhang, Haijun; Chen, Xi; Zhou, Shuyun

    2016-12-01

    Weyl semimetal is a new quantum state of matter hosting the condensed matter physics counterpart of the relativistic Weyl fermions originally introduced in high-energy physics. The Weyl semimetal phase realized in the TaAs class of materials features multiple Fermi arcs arising from topological surface states and exhibits novel quantum phenomena, such as a chiral anomaly-induced negative magnetoresistance and possibly emergent supersymmetry. Recently it was proposed theoretically that a new type (type-II) of Weyl fermion that arises due to the breaking of Lorentz invariance, which does not have a counterpart in high-energy physics, can emerge as topologically protected touching between electron and hole pockets. Here, we report direct experimental evidence of topological Fermi arcs in the predicted type-II Weyl semimetal MoTe2 (refs ,,). The topological surface states are confirmed by directly observing the surface states using bulk- and surface-sensitive angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and the quasi-particle interference pattern between the putative topological Fermi arcs in scanning tunnelling microscopy. By establishing MoTe2 as an experimental realization of a type-II Weyl semimetal, our work opens up opportunities for probing the physical properties of this exciting new state.

  7. Experimental Facilities Division progress report 1996--97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the activities of the Experimental Facilities Division (XFD) in support of the users of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), primarily focusing on the past year of operations. In September 1996, the APS began operations as a national user facility serving the US community of x-ray researchers from private industry, academic institutions, and other research organizations. The start of operations was about three months ahead of the baseline date established in 1988. This report is divided into the following sections: (1) overview; (2) user operations; (3) user administration and technical support; (4) R and D in support of view operations; (5) collaborative research; and (6) long-term strategic plans for XFD.

  8. Issues of reporting in observational studies in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Jan M; O'Connor, Annette M

    2014-02-15

    Observational studies are common in veterinary medicine; the results may be used to inform decision-making, future research, or as inputs to systematic reviews or risk assessment. To be of use, the results must be published, all of the outcomes that were assessed must be included in the publication, and the research (methods and results) must be reported in sufficient detail that the reader can evaluate the internal and external validity. In human healthcare, concerns about the completeness of reporting - and evidence that poor reporting is associated with study results - have led to the creation of reporting guidelines; these include the STROBE statement for observational studies. There is evidence from a limited body of research that there also are reporting inadequacies in veterinary observational studies. There are differences between human and veterinary observational studies that might be relevant to recommendations for reporting. Such differences include: the use of observational studies in animal populations for simultaneously estimating disease frequency and risk-factor identification; the distinction between the animal owners who consent to participate and the animals that are the study subjects; and the complexity of organizational levels inherent in animal research (in particular, for studies in livestock species). In veterinary medicine, it is common to have clustering within outcomes (due to animal grouping) and clustering of predictor variables. We argue that there is a compelling need for the scientific community involved in veterinary observational studies to use the STROBE statement, use an amended version of STROBE, or to develop and use reporting guidelines that are specific to veterinary medicine to improve reporting of these studies.

  9. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Claire A; Flecknell, Paul A; Leach, Matthew C; Richardson, Claire A

    2011-02-21

    It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1) changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2) using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3) increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures.

  10. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leach Matthew C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become widely accepted that whenever animals are used in scientific procedures, the 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction and refinement described by William Russell and Rex Burch should be adhered to. Animals should be replaced with non-sentient alternatives if possible, the number of animals used should be reduced and experimental procedures should be refined to minimise pain, suffering and distress. Administration of analgesic agents to animals undergoing surgical procedures is a refinement used to alleviate pain. In this study, a structured literature review was carried out to examine current trends in analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing experimental surgical procedures. Results 128 papers from 51 peer-reviewed journals were selected for inclusion in this review. Reporting administration of systemic analgesia to rabbits in peer-reviewed scientific papers increased significantly from 16% to 50% between 1995-1997 and 2005-2007 (P P Conclusions Although this review provides evidence that systemic analgesic administration to rabbits undergoing surgical procedures is increasing, rabbits do not always receive analgesia when they undergo experimental surgery. Other practices in rabbit perioperative care that could be improved, highlighted by this survey include: 1 changing the timing of analgesic administration by giving systemic analgesics pre- or perioperatively rather than only postoperatively, 2 using multimodal analgesia when pain is likely to be moderate to severe and 3 increasing the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and use of other techniques such as epidural analgesia particularly for orthopaedic procedures.

  11. Assimilating Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Observations and the Relative Value of Other Observation Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) (301) 394-3072 Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 iii Contents List... code , surface observations reported as part of a sounding are treated as surface observations by the observation nudging rather than as part of the...presented at: 13th AMS Conference on Aviation, Range and Aerospace Meteorology; 2008 Jan 21–24; New Orleans (LA). Zhang Y, Liu Y, Childs P, Huffman

  12. Personal Reflections on Observational and Experimental Research Approaches to Childhood Psychopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen dramatic changes in childhood psychopathology research. The goal of this overview is to contrast observational and experimental research approaches; both have grown more complex such that the boundary between these approaches may be blurred. Both are essential. Landmark observational studies with long-term follow-up…

  13. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix A. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the course manual and materials.

  14. [Clinical and experimental parallels between immunological observations of irradiated animals and patients injured during Chernobyl accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tsev, V N

    2011-01-01

    Immunological parameters in different periods of acute radiation syndrome (ARS) of experimental animals and Chernobyl reactor accident-injured patients have been studied. 148 patients and experimental animals (123 dogs and 198 monkeys) were observed after radiation exposure of different levels (from a sub-lethal dose to the minimal absolute lethal dose). We have found the increase in the C-reactive protein, fluctuation of normal antibody titers and the complement in blood serum, as well as the growing number of skin microbes after exposures to lethal doses. Experimental results match clinical data in terms of ARS progress phases but differ from the latter in terms of the time of clinical manifestations. The highest rate of clinical manifestations is observed on the 7-14 days for experimental animals (rats, dogs and monkeys) and on the 20-30 days for patients after radiation exposure. Regenerative processes in animals run faster than those in humans.

  15. Porcelain Self Management : Report of observations in a Serbian factory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Kester (Gerard)

    1972-01-01

    textabstractThis report summarizes observations in the "Elektroporcelana" plant in Arandelovac, in the Socialist Republic of Serbia, Yugoslavia. A group of 5 foreigners, we were the guests of this factory for a period of three days. Even with the most competent help of an interpreter and with excell

  16. Determining Teachers’ TPACK through observations and self-report data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, Joke; Koehler, M.; Mishra, P.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports an arrangement directed at the development of 12 pre-service teachers’ TPACK, by guiding them in developing, practicing and teaching lessons that integrate technology for the first time. Interview, observation, and survey data were collected throughout the study. Results from the

  17. Using Experimental Methods to Investigate Discriminatory Tendencies: A Lesson Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wen Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Using dictator games in experimental analysis, this lesson report demonstrates the process and results of a postgraduate class project in which university students were instructed to scientifically investigate and explore one of German society’s most hotly-contested issues: the level of discriminatory tendencies of non-Muslims towards Muslims. The results of this class project show little or no discriminatory tendencies toward Muslims. Instead, the university students under our investigation tended to act favorably, or at the very least, fairly toward Muslims. We expect that this lesson report can demonstrate how a postgraduate course can be conducted in an innovative way, empowering students to collect primary data and finishing a small scientific project during the span of a semester. Dieser Bericht stellt die Prozesse und Ergebnisse einer experimentellen Studie eines Postgraduierten-Kurses der Universität Greifswald dar. Wir zeigen, wie Studierende das Thema Migration innovativ untersuchen können, indem sie neben theoretischen Lerninhalten an experimentelle Methoden sowie die Primärforschung herangeführt werden. Anhand eines Diktatorspiels wurden die teilnehmenden Studenten angeleitet, ein in der Öffentlichkeit kontrovers debattiertes Thema wissenschaftlich zu untersuchen: Diskriminierende Tendenzen von Nicht-Muslimen gegenüber Muslimen. Die Ergebnisse dieser Studie lassen jedoch nicht auf diskriminierende Tendenzen der Studenten schließen. Stattdessen deuten sie darauf hin, dass sich die Studierenden zumindest fair gegenüber Muslimen verhalten.

  18. Report on Physics of Channelization: Theory, Experiment, and Observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudrolli, Arshad [Clark University

    2014-05-19

    The project involved a study of physical processes that create eroded channel and drainage networks. A particular focus was on how the shape of the channels and the network depended on the nature of the fluid flow. Our approach was to combine theoretical, experimental, and observational studies in close collaboration with Professor Daniel Rothman of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Laboratory -scaled experiments were developed and quantitative data on the shape of the pattern and erosion dynamics are obtained with a laser-aided topography technique and fluorescent optical imaging techniques.

  19. Experimental and serologic observations on avian pneumovirus (APV/turkey/Colorado/97) infection in turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigrahy, B; Senne, D A; Pedersen, J C; Gidlewski, T; Edson, R K

    2000-01-01

    An avian pneumovirus (APV) was isolated from commercial turkeys in Colorado (APV/Colorado) showing clinical signs of a respiratory disease. The results of virus neutralization and indirect fluorescent antibody tests showed that the APV/Colorado was partially related to APV subgroup A but was unrelated to APV subgroup B. Turkeys experimentally inoculated with the APV/Colorado were observed for signs, lesions, seroconversion, and virus shedding. Thirty-six 7-wk-old turkeys were distributed into three groups. Eighteen turkeys were inoculated oculonasally with APV/Colorado, six were placed in contact at 1 day postinoculation (DPI), and 12 served as noninoculated controls. Tracheal swabs and blood samples were collected at 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, and 21 DPI. Tissues were collected from three inoculated and two control turkeys on aforementioned days for pathologic examination and APV isolation. Inoculated turkeys developed respiratory disease, yielded APV at 3, 5, and 7 DPI, and seroconverted at 10 DPI. Contact turkeys yielded APV at 7 and 10 DPI. No gross lesions were observed in the turbinates, infraorbital sinuses, and trachea. However, microscopic examination revealed acute rhinitis, sinusitis, and tracheitis manifested by congestion, edema, lymphocytic and heterophilic infiltration, and loss of ciliated epithelia. The inflammatory lesions were seen at 3 DPI and became extensive at 5 and 7 DPI. Active regenerative changes in the epithelia were seen at 10 and 14 DPI. Serologic survey for the presence of antibodies in commercial turkeys (24,504 sera from 18 states) and chickens (3,517 sera from 12 states) to APV/Colorado showed seropositive turkeys in Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota and no seropositive chickens. This report is the first on the isolation of an APV and APV infection in the United States.

  20. Basic visual observation skills training course: Appendix B. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.; Griggs, J.R.

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the basic visual observation skills course is to help safeguards inspectors evaluate and improve their skills in making observations during inspections and in evaluating and interpreting this information. The first 12 hours of the course provide training in five skill areas: perception and recognition; attention to detail; memory; mental imaging, mapping, and modeling skills; and judgment and decision making. Following this training is an integrating exercise involving a simulated safeguards inspection. This report contains the in-class exercises in the five skill areas; pre- and post-course exercises in closure, hidden figures, map memory, and mental rotations; the final examination; a training evaluation form; and the integrating exercise.

  1. The Effects of Music Genre on Young People's Alcohol Consumption: An Experimental Observational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engels, R.C.M.E.; Poelen, E.A.P.; Spijkerman, R.; Bogt, T.F.M. ter

    2012-01-01

    he aim of this study was to test whether exposure to specific music genres in a social drinking setting leads to differences in drinking levels. An observational experimental design was used in which we invited peer groups of young adults into a bar lab, a lab which is furnished like an ordinary, sm

  2. Intrinsic steady alternate bars in alluvial channels. Part 1: experimental observations and numerical tests.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crosato, A.; Desta, F.B.

    2009-01-01

    Alternate bars in straight alluvial channels are migrating or steady. The currently accepted view is that they are steady only if the width-to-depth ratio is at the value of resonance or if the bars are forced by a steady local perturbation. Experimental observations, however, seem to indicate that

  3. Oak Ridge Tokamak experimental power reactor study scoping report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.

    1977-03-01

    This report presents the scoping studies performed as the initial part of the program to produce a conceptual design for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor (EPR). The EPR as considered in this study is to employ all systems necessary for significant electric power production at continuous high duty cycle operation; it is presently scheduled to be the final technological step before a Demonstration Reactor Plant (Demo). The scoping study tasks begin with an exploration and identification of principal problem areas and then concentrate on consideration and evaluation of alternate design choices for each of the following major systems: Plasma Engineering and Physics, Nuclear, Electromagnetics, Neutral Beam Injection, and Tritium Handling. In addition, consideration has been given to the integration of these systems and requirements arising out of their incorporation into an EPR. One intent of this study is to document the paths explored in search of the appropriate EPR characteristics. To satisfy this intent, the explorations are presented in chart form outlining possible options in key areas with extensive supporting footnotes. An important result of the scoping study has been the development and definition of an EPR reference design to serve as (1) a common focus for the continuing design study and (2) a guide for associated development programs. In addition, the study has identified research and development requirements essential to facilitate the successful conceptual design, construction, and operation of an EPR.

  4. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively.

  5. Experimental observation of oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, J.; Mota, F. L.; Chen, L.; Billia, B.; Tourret, D.; Song, Y.; Debierre, J.-M.; Guérin, R.; Karma, A.; Trivedi, R.; Bergeon, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of oscillatory modes during three-dimensional cellular growth in a diffusive transport regime. We ground our analysis primarily on in situ observations of directional solidification experiments of a transparent succinonitrile 0.24 wt % camphor alloy performed in microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station. This study completes our previous reports [Bergeon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 226102 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.226102; Tourret et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 042401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042401] from an experimental perspective, and results are supported by additional phase-field simulations. We analyze the influence of growth parameters, crystal orientation, and sample history on promoting oscillations, and on their spatiotemporal characteristics. Cellular patterns display a remarkably uniform oscillation period throughout the entire array, despite a high array disorder and a wide distribution of primary spacing. Oscillation inhibition may be associated to crystalline disorientation, which stems from polygonization and is manifested as pattern drifting. We determine a drifting velocity threshold above which oscillations are inhibited, thereby demonstrating that inhibition is due to cell drifting and not directly to disorientation, and also explaining the suppression of oscillations when the pulling velocity history favors drifting. Furthermore, we show that the array disorder prevents long-range coherence of oscillations, but not short-range coherence in localized ordered regions. For regions of a few cells exhibiting hexagonal (square) ordering, three (two) subarrays oscillate with a phase shift of approximately ±120∘ (180∘), with square ordering occurring preferentially near subgrain boundaries.

  6. Improving plant bioaccumulation science through consistent reporting of experimental data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Arnot, Jon A.; Doucette, William J.

    2016-01-01

    experimental data are generated they are used to improve our understanding of plant-chemical interactions that in turn allows for the development of better scientific knowledge and conceptual and predictive models. The interrelationship between experimental data and model development is an ongoing, never...

  7. Water retention behaviour of compacted bentonites: experimental observations and constitutive model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieudonne Anne-Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bentonite-based materials are studied as potential barriers for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. In this context, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of the engineered barrier is first characterized by free swelling conditions followed by constant volume conditions. This paper presents an experimental study conducted in order to characterize the water retention behaviour of a compacted MX-80 bentonite/sand mixture. Then, based on observations of the material double structure and the water retention mechanisms in compacted bentonites, a new water retention model is proposed. The model considers adsorbed water in the microstructure and capillary water in the aggregate-porosity. The model is calibrated and validated against the experimental data. It is used for better understanding competing effects between volume change and water uptake observed during hydration under free swelling conditions.

  8. Experimental observation of the steady - oscillatory transition in a cubic lid-driven cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liberzon, A; Gelfgat, A Yu

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry is applied to the lid-driven flow in a cube to validate the numerical prediction of steady - oscillatory transition at lower than ever observed Reynolds number. Experimental results agree with the numerical simulation demonstrating large amplitude oscillatory motion overlaying the base quasi-two-dimensional flow in the mid-plane. A good agreement in the values of critical Reynolds number and frequency of the appearing oscillations, as well as similar spatial distributions of the oscillations amplitude are obtained.

  9. Experimental observation of parametric effects near period doubling in a loss-modulated CO2 laser

    OpenAIRE

    Chizhevsky, V. N.; Corbalán, R.

    1996-01-01

    A number of parametric effects, such as suppression of period doubling, shift of the bifurcation point, scaling law relating the shift and the perturbation amplitude, influence of the detuning on the suppression, reaching of the maximum gain between the original and shifted bifurcation points, and scaling law for idler power are experimentally observed near period doubling bifurcation in a loss-driven CO2 laser that is subjected to periodic loss perturbations at a frequency that is close to a...

  10. Experimental observation of robust surface states on photonic crystals possessing single and double Weyl points

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We designed and fabricated a time-reversal invariant Weyl photonic crystal that possesses single Weyl nodes with topological charge of 1 and double Weyl nodes with a higher topological charge of 2. Using numerical simulations and microwave experiment, nontrivial band gaps with nonzero Chern numbers for a fixed kz was demonstrated. The robustness of the surface state between the Weyl photonic crystal and PEC against kz-conserving scattering was experimentally observed.

  11. Experimental observation of parametric effects near period doubling in a loss-modulated CO2 laser

    OpenAIRE

    Chizhevsky, V. N.; Corbalán, R.

    1996-01-01

    A number of parametric effects, such as suppression of period doubling, shift of the bifurcation point, scaling law relating the shift and the perturbation amplitude, influence of the detuning on the suppression, reaching of the maximum gain between the original and shifted bifurcation points, and scaling law for idler power are experimentally observed near period doubling bifurcation in a loss-driven CO2 laser that is subjected to periodic loss perturbations at a frequency that is close to a...

  12. Experimental Observation of Differences in the Dynamic Response of Newtonian and Viscoelastic Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Castrejon-Pita, J R; Castrejon-Pita, A A; Huelsz, G

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental study of the dynamic responses of a Newtonian fluid and a Maxwellian fluid under an oscillating pressure gradient. We use laser Doppler anemometry in order to determine the velocity of each fluid inside a cylindrical tube. In the case of the Newtonian fluid, the dissipative nature is observed and the response obeys the Zhou and Sheng universality (PRB 39, 12027 (1989)). In the dynamic response of the Maxwellian fluid an enhancement at the frequencies predicted by the corresponding theory (PRE 39, 12027 (1989)) is observed.

  13. Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

  14. From experimental zoology to big data: Observation and integration in the study of animal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolker, Jessica; Brauckmann, Sabine

    2015-06-01

    The founding of the Journal of Experimental Zoology in 1904 was inspired by a widespread turn toward experimental biology in the 19th century. The founding editors sought to promote experimental, laboratory-based approaches, particularly in developmental biology. This agenda raised key practical and epistemological questions about how and where to study development: Does the environment matter? How do we know that a cell or embryo isolated to facilitate observation reveals normal developmental processes? How can we integrate descriptive and experimental data? R.G. Harrison, the journal's first editor, grappled with these questions in justifying his use of cell culture to study neural patterning. Others confronted them in different contexts: for example, F.B. Sumner insisted on the primacy of fieldwork in his studies on adaptation, but also performed breeding experiments using wild-collected animals. The work of Harrison, Sumner, and other early contributors exemplified both the power of new techniques, and the meticulous explanation of practice and epistemology that was marshaled to promote experimental approaches. A century later, experimentation is widely viewed as the standard way to study development; yet at the same time, cutting-edge "big data" projects are essentially descriptive, closer to natural history than to the approaches championed by Harrison et al. Thus, the original questions about how and where we can best learn about development are still with us. Examining their history can inform current efforts to incorporate data from experiment and description, lab and field, and a broad range of organisms and disciplines, into an integrated understanding of animal development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diagnosing peak-discharge power laws observed in rainfall runoff events in Goodwin Creek experimental watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furey, Peter R.; Gupta, Vijay K.

    2007-11-01

    Observations from the Goodwin Creek experimental watershed (GCEW), Mississippi show that peak-discharge Q( A) and drainage area A are related, on average, by a power law or scaling relationship, Q( A) = αAθ, during single rainfall-runoff events. Observations also show that α and θ change between events, and, based on a recent analysis of 148 events, observations indicate that α and θ change because of corresponding changes in the depth, duration, and spatial variability of excess-rainfall. To improve our physical understanding of these observations, a 5-step framework for diagnosing observed power laws, or other space-time patterns in a basin, is articulated and applied to GCEW using a combination of analysis and numerical simulations. Diagnostic results indicate how the power laws are connected to physical conditions and processes. Derived expressions for α and θ show that if excess-rainfall depth is fixed then there is a decreasing concave relationship between α and excess-rainfall duration, and an increasing and slightly convex relationship between θ and excess rainfall duration. These trends are consistent with observations only when hillslope velocity vh is given a physically realistic value near 0.1 m/s. If vh ≫ 0.1 m/s, then the predicted trends deviate from observed trends. Results also suggest that trends in α and θ can be impacted by the dependence of vh and link velocity vl on excess-rainfall rate.

  16. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time. PMID:27703140

  17. Photonic crystals possessing multiple Weyl points and the experimental observation of robust surface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jie; Xiao, Meng; Chan, C. T.

    2016-10-01

    Weyl points, as monopoles of Berry curvature in momentum space, have captured much attention recently in various branches of physics. Realizing topological materials that exhibit such nodal points is challenging and indeed, Weyl points have been found experimentally in transition metal arsenide and phosphide and gyroid photonic crystal whose structure is complex. If realizing even the simplest type of single Weyl nodes with a topological charge of 1 is difficult, then making a real crystal carrying higher topological charges may seem more challenging. Here we design, and fabricate using planar fabrication technology, a photonic crystal possessing single Weyl points (including type-II nodes) and multiple Weyl points with topological charges of 2 and 3. We characterize this photonic crystal and find nontrivial 2D bulk band gaps for a fixed kz and the associated surface modes. The robustness of these surface states against kz-preserving scattering is experimentally observed for the first time.

  18. Mechanism and Experimental Observability of Global Switching Between Reactive and Nonreactive Coordinates at High Total Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Hiroshi; Toda, Mikito; Takahashi, Masahiko; Kono, Hirohiko; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2015-08-01

    We present a mechanism of global reaction coordinate switching, namely, a phenomenon in which the reaction coordinate dynamically switches to another coordinate as the total energy of the system increases. The mechanism is based on global changes in the underlying phase space geometry caused by a switching of dominant unstable modes from the original reactive mode to another nonreactive mode in systems with more than 2 degrees of freedom. We demonstrate an experimental observability to detect a reaction coordinate switching in an ionization reaction of a hydrogen atom in crossed electric and magnetic fields. For this reaction, the reaction coordinate is a coordinate along which electrons escape and its switching changes the escaping direction from the direction of the electric field to that of the magnetic field and, thus, the switching can be detected experimentally by measuring the angle-resolved momentum distribution of escaping electrons.

  19. An experimental observation of geometric phases for mixed states using NMR interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Du, J; Shi, M; Kwek, L C; Pan, J W; Oh, C H; Ekert, A K; Oi, D K L; Ericsson, M; Du, Jiangfeng; Zou, Ping; Shi, Mingjun; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Pan, Jian-Wei; Oh, Choo Hiap; Ekert, Artur; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Ericsson, Marie

    2003-01-01

    Examples of geometric phases abound in many areas of physics. They offer both fundamental insights into many physical phenomena and lead to interesting practical implementations. One of them, as indicated recently, might be an inherently fault-tolerant quantum computation. This, however, requires to deal with geometric phases in the presence of noise and interactions between different physical subsystems. Despite the wealth of literature on the subject of geometric phases very little is known about this very important case. Here we report the first experimental study of geometric phases for mixed quantum states. We show how different they are from the well understood, noiseless, pure-state case.

  20. Effect of vorticity flip-over on the premixed flame structure: First experimental observation of type I inflection flames

    CERN Document Server

    El-Rabii, Hazem

    2015-01-01

    Premixed flames propagating in horizontal tubes are observed to take on shape convex towards the fresh mixture, which is commonly explained as a buoyancy effect. A recent rigorous analysis has shown, on the contrary, that this process is driven by the balance of vorticity generated by a curved flame front with the baroclinic vorticity, and predicted existence of a regime in which the leading edge of the flame front is concave. We report first experimental realization of this regime. Our experiments on ethane and n-butane mixtures with air show that flames with an inflection point on the front are regularly produced in lean mixtures, provided that a sufficiently weak ignition is used. The observed flame shape perfectly agrees with the theoretically predicted.

  1. Experimental Observation of Near-Field Deterioration Induced by Stimulated Rotational Raman Scattering in Long Air Paths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing; ZHANG Xiao-Min; HAN Wei; LI Fu-Quan; ZHOU Li-Dan; FENG Bin; XIANG Yong

    2011-01-01

    @@ We report the experimental investigation of a stimulated rotational Raman scattering effect in long air paths on SG-IQ TIL, with a 1053nm, 20-cm-diameter, linearly polarized, ins flat-topped laser pulse.An intense speckle pattern of near field with thickly dotted hot spots is observed at the end of propagation with an intensity-length product above 17TW/cm.The Stokes developing from the scattering of the laser beam by quantum fluctuations is characterized by a combination of high spatial frequency components.The observed speckle pattern with smalldiameter hot spots results from the combination of the nonlinear Raman amplification and the linear diffraction propagation effect of the Stokes with a noise pattern arising from the spontaneous Raman scattering.A new promising suppression concept based on the special characteristic of the Stokes, called active and selective filtering of Stokes, is proposed.

  2. Stimulating Interest in Natural Sciences and Training Observation Skills: The UAP Observations Reporting Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailleris, P.

    2012-04-01

    For a number of reasons the general public and many young people are fascinated by the ideas of UFOs and extra-terrestrial life. As mysteries motivate to gain interest and knowledge, an opportunity exists, throughout these topics, to stimulate the people's interests to natural sciences and technology. A major problem however exists, concerning the fact that the general public generally associates any strange aerial sighting to something exotic, unknown, and to the possibility of extraterrestrial visitations. Rumours, irrational thinking and conspiracy theories prevail around these topics. Launched under the framework of the 2009 International Year of Astronomy, the Unidentified Aerospace Phenomena (UAP) Observations Reporting Scheme seeks to tackle this situation through approaching the topic from a professional and rational perspective, providing an opportunity to teach the public how to think more critically, demystifying UFO events, and ultimately attempting to stimulate the interest in natural sciences and technological disciplines. This is tentatively attempted through the following resources: Firstly, the project's website (1) provides an extensive resource for inquiry-based learning regarding the various natural or man-made phenomena that often give rise to false UAP sightings. It serves as a general forum for educating the public about human, atmospheric and astrophysical phenomena that could be observed in the sky. Secondly, the basic educational information provided on the web site allows potential UAP witnesses to critically evaluate the potential cause of their sightings. Visual descriptions, photos, video clips, tools, and links to relevant websites are provided for each category of phenomena, in order to assist the observer in his self-analysis. Amateur astronomers and societies who receive questions about UFOs can redirect queries to the website. Thirdly, the website provides novice observers viewing tips (e.g. elevation, azimuth, angular size) about

  3. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  4. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  5. Experimental observation of the steady-oscillatory transition in a cubic lid-driven cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberzon, A.; Feldman, Yu.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.

    2011-08-01

    Particle image velocimetry is applied to the lid-driven flow in a cube to validate the numerical prediction of steady-oscillatory transition at lower than ever observed Reynolds number. Experimental results agree with the numerical simulation demonstrating large amplitude oscillatory motion overlaying the base quasi-two-dimensional flow in the mid-plane. A good agreement in the values of critical Reynolds number and frequency of the appearing oscillations as well as similar spatial distributions of the oscillations amplitude are obtained.

  6. Experimental observation and computational analysis of striations in electronegative capacitively coupled radio-frequency plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yong-Xin; Korolov, Ihor; Donko, Zoltan; Wang, You-Nian; Schulze, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Self-organized spatial structures in the light emission from the ion-ion capacitive RF plasma of a strongly electronegative gas (CF4) are observed experimentally for the first time. Their formation is analyzed and understood based on particle-based kinetic simulations. These "striations" are found to be generated by the resonance between the driving radio-frequency and the eigenfrequency of the ion-ion plasma (derived from an analytical model) that establishes a modulation of the electric field, the ion densities, as well as the energy gain and loss processes of electrons in the plasma. The growth of the instability is followed by the numerical simulations.

  7. Experimental demonstration and visual observation of dust trapping in an electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasunori Tanimoto

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Sudden decreases in the beam lifetime, which are attributed to the dust trappings, sometimes occur at the electron storage ring Photon Factory Advanced Ring (PF-AR. Since these dust events cause difficulties in user operations, we have been carefully observing this phenomenon for many years. Our observations indicated that the dust trappings could be caused by electric discharges in vacuum ducts. In order to demonstrate this hypothesis experimentally, we designed a new vacuum device that intentionally generates electric discharges and installed it in PF-AR. Using this device, we could repeatedly induce sudden decreases in the beam lifetime because of the generated electric discharge. We also detected decreases in the beam lifetime caused by mechanical movement of the electrodes in the device. Moreover, we could visually observe the dust trapping phenomenon; the trapped dust particle was observed by two video cameras and appeared as a luminous body that resembled a shooting star. This was the first direct observation of a luminous dust particle trapped by the electron beam.

  8. Brief report on primary mixture preparation for precise CO observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Lee, J. B.; Moon, D. M.; Kim, J. S.

    2012-04-01

    Greenhouse gases (GHG) have been known as causing materials of the greenhouse effect. Because it is very important to reduce their emission, they has been paid attention since Kyoto protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Accurate observation data of ambient GHG are vital for the study of the relationship between GHGs and global warming, but it is not easy to quantify their mixing ratios owing to their globally and temporally tiny variation. For example, mixing ratio of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, is reported to be growing by +1.7 ppm (parts per million)/year for recen 10 years according to GAW report. CO has contributed as an indicator in that an air mass is from source or background, although it lacks its traceability. CO is known to be emitted from industry, vehicle, and biomass burning. The atmospheric lifetime of CO varies from weeks to months depending on OH radical amount however ambient CO ranges from 50 nmol/mol to 300 nmol/mol at marine boundary, from 100 nmol/mol to 500 nmol/mol at city area. In order to monitor precisely CO at ambient, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) requires its measurement capability of 2 nmol/mol uncertainty. For these reasons, it's necessary for the measurement results to be accurate and consistent among the assigned standards. . In order to prepare CO/air standard mixtures with an absolute scale we have studied several factors on gravimetry; purity analysis of CO and an artificial air and stability including unexpected contamination during preparation and adsorption on inner wall of cylinders. Currently we are going to present the preliminary results on the development of standard mixtures with ~ 300 nmol/mol. The mixtures were verified by comparing their amount with a Gas Chromatography / Electron Capture Detector (GC/FID) and cavity ring down spectrometer (CRDS). Analytical capability during comparison is within ± 2 ppb, which satisfies WMO DQO.

  9. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, Laurianne; Adolf, Lise-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Fracture in ductile materials finds its origin in microscopic mechanisms: the nucleation of voids that grow and coalesce in order to form a crack. The most popular of these models, proposed by Gurson, aims at describing the damage development with respect to the plastic behavior of porous material. The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic porous materials. The Gurson-Perrin model (GPm) allows representing damage development with respect to the stress triaxiality and strain-rate conditions. We propose a new experimental design able to test and validate the GPm under various dynamic conditions and for different triaxiality levels. The experimental project will be detailed. A notch is drawn in the Cu cylindrical target where damage develops and the local failure occurs. A variation of the notch radius enables a variation in the triaxiality level. Three notch radii have been tested. Observations with numerical cameras allow following the shape of the notch, a characteristic of damage development. Several PDV measurements have been performed around the target. A first analysis of this experimental process will be shown and comparisons with numerical simulations will be presented.

  10. Bird colonies cause seagrass enrichment in a subtropical estuary: Observational and experimental evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, George V. N.; Fourqurean, James W.; Kenworthy, W. Judson; Zieman, Joseph C.

    1991-06-01

    Colonies/roosts of piscivorous birds in Florida Bay, a subtropical estuary, concentrate nutrients by feeding away from their colonies/roosts and returning with food for young and to defaecate. Seagrass beds surrounding the colony islands were markedly different from those around similar islands that did not contain colonies. Seagrass standing crop was enhanced up to 200 m from bird colony islands compared with islands without colonies. The species of seagrass were also different at colonies, where Halodule wrightii and Ruppia maritima predominated in zones close to the colony islands. Around islands without colonies, only Thalassia testudinum was present. Experimental bird perches placed to stimulate concentrated bird presence produced changes in adjacent seagrass meadows that were similar to differences between islands with colonies and those without. Over 5 years, seagrass standing crop increased around the experimental perches, and species dominance shifted from T. testudinum to H. wrightii. No similar changes occurred at control locations. These experimental results indicate that the bird concentrations are responsible for the observed differences in seagrass communities surrounding islands that contain colonies. These enriched areas are significant to the seagrass ecosystem because many seagrasses in Florida Bay appear to be nutrient-limited. Demersal fish and invertebrate density and species richness have been shown to be a function of the seagrass standing crop and species composition, so the changes in seagrasses stimulated by localized bird concentrations have the capacity to alter the entire community structure.

  11. Experimental observations on electrorefining spent nuclear fuel in molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T. A.; Laug, D. V.; Li, S. X.; Sofu, T.

    1999-07-14

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is currently performing a demonstration program for the Department of Energy (DOE) which processes spent nuclear fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). One of the key steps in this demonstration program is electrorefining of the spent fuel in a molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system using a pilot scale electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER). This article summarizes experimental observations and engineering aspects for electrorefining spent fuel in the molten LiCl-KCl/liquid cadmium system. It was found that the liquid cadmium pool acted as an intermediate electrode during the electrorefining process in the ER. The cadmium level was gradually decreased due to its high vapor pressure and vaporization rate at the ER operational temperature. The low cadmium level caused the anode assembly momentarily to touch the ER vessel hardware, which generated a periodic current change at the salt/cathode interface and improved uranium recovery efficiency for the process. The primary current distributions calculated by numerical simulations were used in interpreting the experimental results.

  12. Experimental observation and computer simulation on non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation kinetics of phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li; LI Qing-fen; LIU Er-bao

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study and computer simulation on non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation kinetics and the critical time for phosphorus in 12Cr1MoV steel(which is used in steam pipeline of ships)are put forward in this paper. The segregation level of phosphorus with solution temperature 1050℃ at the isothermal holding temperature of 540℃,have been measured at grain-boundaries. A non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation kinetics curve of phosphorus is given. The critical time for phosphorus non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation is about 500h at 540℃ for the experimental steel. When the holding time is longer than 1500h, non-equilibrium segregation disappears and the level of segregation reaches full equilibrium. The simulation using the kinetic equations of non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation is in good accordance with the experimental observation for phosphorus in steel 12Cr1MoV. The non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation kinetic model is therefore proved.

  13. Communication in the Classroom: Research and Observation. ERIC Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boileau, Don M.

    1981-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of ERIC resources on the following topics: teacher communication; research on classroom interaction; using systematic observations to improve teaching; different systems of classroom observations; and research on classroom observation techniques. (PD)

  14. Political science. Reverse-engineering censorship in China: randomized experimentation and participant observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary; Pan, Jennifer; Roberts, Margaret E

    2014-08-22

    Existing research on the extensive Chinese censorship organization uses observational methods with well-known limitations. We conducted the first large-scale experimental study of censorship by creating accounts on numerous social media sites, randomly submitting different texts, and observing from a worldwide network of computers which texts were censored and which were not. We also supplemented interviews with confidential sources by creating our own social media site, contracting with Chinese firms to install the same censoring technologies as existing sites, and--with their software, documentation, and even customer support--reverse-engineering how it all works. Our results offer rigorous support for the recent hypothesis that criticisms of the state, its leaders, and their policies are published, whereas posts about real-world events with collective action potential are censored.

  15. Experimental observation of anomalous topological edge modes in a slowly-driven photonic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Valiente, Manuel; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Goldman, Nathan; Thomson, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the quantised Hall effect, and its subsequent topological explanation, demonstrated the important role topology can play in determining the properties of quantum systems. This realisation led to the development of topological band theory, where, in addition to band index and quasimomentum, Bloch bands are also characterised by a set of topological invariants. This topological theory can be readily extended to periodically-driven systems. In the limit of fast driving, the topology of the system can still be captured by the topological invariants used to describe static systems. In the limit of slow driving, however, situations can arise where standard topological invariants are zero, but yet, topologically protected edge modes are still observed. These "anomalous" topological edge modes have no static analogue, and are associated with a distinct topological invariant, which takes into account the full time-evolution over a driving period. Here we demonstrate the first experimental observation ...

  16. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.; Bulmer, R.H.; Doggett, J.N.; Johnson, B.M.; Lee, J.D.; Hoard, R.W.; Miller, J.R.; Slack, D.S.

    1985-11-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs. (WRF)

  17. Experimental Observation of Strongly Bound Dimers of Sulfuric Acid: Application to Nucleation in the Atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petaja, Tuukka; Sipila, Mikko; Paasonen, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is a key compound in atmospheric nucleation. Here we report on the observation of a close-to-collision-limited sulfuric acid dimer formation in atmospherically relevant laboratory conditions in the absence of measurable quantities of ammonia or organics. The observed dimer formation...... compound(s) with (a) concentration(s) high enough to prevent the dimer evaporation. Such a stabilizing compound should be abundant enough in any natural environment and would therefore not limit the formation of sulfuric acid dimers in the atmosphere....

  18. Computational and experimental observations of welds in third-generation nickel-based superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naffakh-Moosavy, Homam

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce the weld quantitative solidification paths in the newly designed third-generation superalloys. The research has been conducted using both computational and experimental approaches. The model used the Scheil solidification relations to correlate the partitioning elements with their effects on the solidification paths. Accordingly, the k values were calculated for all the participating elements in the superalloy welds. The results of model demonstrated that these were very close to unity for austenite former elements, i.e. Ni, Co, Cr and Fe, while the other elements such as Ti, Nb and Mo displayed a significant tendency for segregation. The mathematical equations were calculated for weld solidification paths of superalloys. In all the welds, a remarkable segregation behaviour was observed, especially for Nb and Ti. The solidification path equations predicted type and amount of secondary phases. The solidification paths were compared with eutectic reactions ?, and ?, on the basis of the Ni-Ti-C and Ni-Nb-C ternary phase diagrams. Both the experimental measurements and microstructural observations of eutectics exhibited an appropriate accordance with the solidification paths obtained by model calculations.

  19. Vicarious pain experiences while observing another in pain: an experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie eVandenbroucke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed at developing an experimental paradigm to assess vicarious pain experiences. We further explored the putative moderating role of observer’s characteristics such as hypervigilance for pain and dispositional empathy. Methods: Two experiments are reported using a similar procedure. Undergraduate students were selected based upon whether they reported vicarious pain in daily life, and categorized into a pain responder group or a comparison group. Participants were presented a series of videos showing hands being pricked whilst receiving occasionally pricking (electrocutaneous stimuli themselves. In congruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were applied to the same spatial location. In incongruent trials, pricking and visual stimuli were in the opposite spatial location. Participants were required to report on which location they felt a pricking sensation. Of primary interest was the effect of viewing another in pain upon vicarious pain errors, i.e., the number of trials in which an illusionary sensation was reported. Furthermore, we explored the effect of individual differences in hypervigilance to pain, dispositional empathy and the rubber hand illusion (RHI upon vicarious pain errors. Results: Results of both experiments indicated that the number of vicarious pain errors was overall low. In line with expectations, the number of vicarious pain errors was higher in the pain responder group than in the comparison group. Self-reported hypervigilance for pain lowered the probability of reporting vicarious pain errors in the pain responder group, but dispositional empathy and the RHI did not. Conclusion: Our paradigm allows measuring vicarious pain experiences in students. However, the prevalence of vicarious experiences of pain is low, and only a small percentage of participants display the phenomenon. It remains however unknown which variables affect its occurrence.

  20. Observational Report of the Classical Nova KT Eridani

    CERN Document Server

    Imamura, Kazuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    A report on the spectroscopic and multi-color photometric observations of high galactic latitude classical nova KT Eridani (Nova Eridani 2009) is presented. After 12.2 days from maximum light, broad and prominent emission lines of Balmer series, He I, He II, N II, N III and O I can be seen on the spectra. The FWHM of H${\\alpha}$ line yields an expansion velocity of approximately 3400 km s$^{-1}$. After 279.4 days from maximum light, we can see prominent emission lines of He II and [O III] on the spectrum. Among them, [O III] (4959, 5007) lines show multiple peaks. From the obtained light curve, KT Eri is classified to be a very fast nova, with a decline rate by two magnitude of $6.2 \\pm 0.3$ days and three of $14.3 \\pm 0.7$ days. We tried to estimate the absolute magnitude ($M_V$) using the Maximum Magnitude versus Rate of Decline relationship and distance of KT Eri. The calculated $M_V$ is approximately -9. Accordingly, the distance and galactic height are approximately 7 kpc and 4 kpc, respectively. Hence, ...

  1. Experimental observations on the response of 1(st) and 2(nd) order fibre optic long period grating coupling bands to the deposition of nanostructured coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Stephen W; Cheung, C S; Tatam, Ralph P

    2007-10-01

    The sensitivity of attenuation bands corresponding to the 2(nd) order coupling to cladding modes by a fibre optic long period grating (LPG) to the deposition of nanostructured coatings is investigated and compared with that of the 1(st) order coupling. The experimental observations support previously reported theoretical descriptions of LPGs with nanoscale coatings.

  2. Forbidden Vibrational Transitions in Cold Molecular Ions: Experimental Observation and Potential Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germann, Matthias; Tonga, Xin; Willitsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A range of interesting fundamental scientific questions can be addressed by high-precision molecular spectroscopy. A promising way towards this goal is the measurement of dipole-forbidden vibrational transitions in molecular ions. We have recently reported the first such observation in a molecular ion. Here, we give an overview of our method and our results as well as an outlook on potential future applications.

  3. Report on projected future climate of the Goodwin Creek experimental watershed, MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is one of several reports that provide technical information on projected climate change at selected ARS experimental watersheds across the continental United States and for three greenhouse gas emission scenarios. The report is an attachment to the main report of the multi-location pro...

  4. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, October-December 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) was modified in April 1978 from a four stage flash/binary process to a two stage cycle for the extraction of energy from a high temperature, high salinity, liquid-dominated resource. The overhaul and cleaning during October and pigging problems which led to a limited shutdown in December are discussed. Reservoir assessment, including production and injection wells, are discussed. Results of tests that were accomplished are included. Laboratory data obtained for steam, brine, binary and cooling water, and scale are indicated. Any equipment that required repairs or modifications to equipment and the clarifier/media filter are discussed. The status of the feasibility and surge studies is covered. (MHR)

  5. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, April-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastas, G.; Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.

    1979-07-01

    Since the Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) start-up in May, 1976, a substantial amount of information has been obtained on the operation of the plant and its components, brine and steam composition, production and injection wells, and the potential of the Niland Reservoir. The GLEF was modified in April, 1978, from a four stage flash/binary process to a two stage flash cycle for the extraction of energy from a high temperature, high salinity, liquid-dominated resource. A Reactor Clarifier/Media Filter System was put in operation in May, 1979 to demonstrate that suspended solids in the brine could be removed prior to brine injection into the reservoir. The general operations and accomplishments of the GLEF during the period are summarized.

  6. Experimental studies of the Negative Ion of Hydrogen. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Howard C.

    1999-06-30

    This document presents an overview of the results of the DOE'S support of experimental research into the structure and interactions of the negative ion of hydrogen conducted by the Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of New Mexico at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The work involves many collaborations with scientists from both institutions, as well as others. Although official DOE support for this work began in 1977, the experiment that led to it was done in 1971, near the time the 800 MeV linear accelerator at Los Alamos (LAMPF) first came on line. Until the mid nineties, the work was performed using the relativistic beam at LAMFF. The most recent results were obtained using the 35 keV injector beam for the Ground Test Accelerator at Los Alamos. A list of all published results from this work is presented.

  7. Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility. Quarterly report, April--June 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, W.S.; Bishop, H.K.; Cooney, C.S.; Hanenburg, W.H.; Hoaglin, G.J.; Jacobson, W.O.; Mulliner, D.K.; Newell, D.G.; Swanson, C.R.

    1978-07-01

    The Geothermal Loop Experimental Facility (GLEF) was modified to use a two stage flash process with two parallel flash trains for the extraction of energy from a high temperature, high salinity, liquid-dominated resource. Since plant start-up in May 1976, a substantial amount of information has been obtained on the operation of the plant, components, brine and steam composition, production and injection wells, and the potential of the Niland Reservoir. The general operation and accomplishments of the GLEF during the period April 1978 through June 1978 are discussed. The GLEF underwent a major redesign. Modifications and inspections of various GLEF equipment and systems are also discussed. Information about the production and injection wells flow testing and instrumentation are discussed. Information regarding coatings and linings for valves and piping is included. In the Chemistry Section there is a wide range of data taken from Brine, Steam, Scale, Binary, Condensate, and Cooling Water Systems.

  8. Texas Experimental Tokamak. Technical progress report, April 1990--April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported.

  9. Mozambique Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the existing financial reporting infrastructure that underpins financial accounting and auditing practices in Mozambique. The assessment focuses on six pillars of financial reporting infrastructure: statutory framework, professional education and training, accountancy profession, accounting standards, auditing standards,...

  10. UVA experimental and high energy physics. Final grant report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.

    1999-10-07

    The period 1992--1997 was a mixture of frustrations and of accomplishments for the UVa HEP group. The experimental HEP group began this period with the completion of a truncated run of Experiment E771 at Fermilab in 1992. This experiment was designed to measure the cross section for beauty production in 800 GeV/c pN interactions. It succeeded in this goal as well as in obtaining one of the best limits on FCNC in charm decays by setting an upper limit on D{sup 0} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}. In addition, they were able to measure {Psi}, {Psi}, {chi}{sub 1},{chi}{sub 2} and upsilon production. Three UVa PhD theses have resulted from this experiment (as well as 12 other PhD's at other institutions). At the same time, the UVa experimental group was vigorously pursuing the goal of studying CP violation in B production. This took the form of a proposal to the SSC for a super fixed target facility, the SFT, which would focus on studies of B mesons. B. Cox was the spokesman of this experiment that had over thirty institutions. This proposal EOI-14 had a good reception by the SSC PAC. A R and D activity to prove the technique of crystal channeling was undertaken to prove the accelerator aspects of this proposal. This activity, known as E853 or CEX at Fermilab, resulted in proof of the crystal channeling technique as viable for the extraction of 20 TeV beam at the SSC. In addition to this activity, the UVa group investigated many other aspects of B physics at the SSC. They were among the leaders of the 1993 Snowmass meeting on B Physics at Hadronic Accelerators. The UVa HEP group worked vigorously on developing the ideas for B physics at the SSC, as evidenced by the many different studies listed in the publication list given, up to the very day the SSC was terminated by an act of Congress.

  11. Experimental High Energy Physics Brandeis University Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blocker, Craig A. [Brandeis University; Bensinger, James [Brandeis University; Sciolla, Gabriella [Brandeis University; Wellenstein, Hermann [Brandeis University

    2013-07-26

    During the past three years, the Brandeis experimental particle physics group was comprised of four faculty (Bensinger, Blocker, Sciolla, and Wellenstein), one research scientist, one post doc, and ten graduate students. The group focused on the ATLAS experiment at LHC. In 2011, the LHC delivered 5/fb of pp colliding beam data at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. In 2012, the center-of-mass energy was increased to 8 TeV, and 20/fb were delivered. The Brandeis group focused on two aspects of the ATLAS experiment -- the muon detection system and physics analysis. Since data taking began at the LHC in 2009, our group actively worked on ATLAS physics analysis, with an emphasis on exploiting the new energy regime of the LHC to search for indications of physics beyond the Standard Model. The topics investigated were Z' -> ll, Higgs -> ZZ* -. 4l, lepton flavor violation, muon compositeness, left-right symmetric theories, and a search for Higgs -> ee. The Brandeis group has for many years been a leader in the endcap muon system, making important contributions to every aspect of its design and production. During the past three years, the group continued to work on commissioning the muon detector and alignment system, development of alignment software, and installation of remaining chambers.

  12. Velocity changes at Volcán de Colima: Seismic and Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Oliver; Lavallée, Yan; De Angelis, Silvio; Varley, Nick; Reyes-Dávila, Gabriel; Arámbula-Mendoza, Raúl; Hornby, Adrian; Wall, Richard; Kendrick, Jackie

    2016-04-01

    Immediately prior to dome-building eruptions, volcano-seismic swarms are a direct consequence of strain localisation in the ascending magma. A deformation mechanism map of magma subjected to strain localisation will help develop accurate numerical models, which, coupled to an understanding of the mechanics driving monitored geophysical signals prior to lava eruption, will enhance forecasts. Here we present how seismic data from Volcán de Colima, Mexico, is combined with experimental work to give insights into fracturing in and around magma. Volcán de Colima is a dome-forming volcano that has been almost-continuously erupting since November 1998. We use coda-wave interferometry to quantify small changes in seismic velocity structure between pairs of similar earthquakes, employing waveforms from clusters of repeating earthquakes. The changes in all pairs of events were then used together to create a continuous function of velocity change at all stations within 7 km of the volcano from October to December 1998. We complement our seismic data with acoustic emission data from tensional experiments using samples collected at Volcán de Colima. Decreases in velocity and frequency reflect changes in the sample properties prior to failure. By comparing experimental and seismic observations, we may place constraints on the conditions of the natural seismogenic processes. Using a combination of field and experimental data promises a greater understanding of the processes affecting the rise of magma during an eruption. This will help with the challenge of forecasting and hazard mitigation during dome-forming eruptions worldwide.

  13. Theoretical and experimental studies of fixed-bed coal gasification reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, B.; Bhattacharya, A.; Salam, L.; Dudukovic, M.P.

    1983-09-01

    A laboratory fixed-bed gasification reactor was designed and built with the objective of collecting operational data for model validation and parameter estimation. The reactor consists of a 4 inch stainless steel tube filled with coal or char. Air and steam is fed at one end of the reactor and the dynamic progress of gasification in the coal or char bed is observed through thermocouples mounted at various radial and axial locations. Product gas compositions are also monitored as a function of time. Results of gasification runs using Wyoming coal are included in this report. In parallel with the experimental study, a two-dimensional model of moving bed gasifiers was developed, coded into a computer program and tested. This model was used to study the laboratory gasifier by setting the coal feed rate equal to zero. The model is based on prior work on steady state and dynamic modeling done at Washington University and published elsewhere in the literature. Comparisons are made between model predictions and experimental results. These are also included in this report. 23 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Early Childhood Student Teachers’ Observation and Experimentation of Creative Practices as a Design Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Minelli de Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we address the guidance of student teachers in initial training in schools as an invaluable opportunity to raise creative learning awareness. The objective of this present research is to develop guidance strategies for guiding the identification of creative practices and for analyzing that moment as a “way of knowing”. We analyze how to mentor future teachers so they feel willing to promote student engagement and creative thinking through their own practices. We adopted a case study approach guided by multimodal principles. We found that triangulation of individual interviews, focus group discussions and a diary of class observation was a useful strategy in the guidance of student teachers in initial training in schools. Results show these strategies allowed them to become more accepting of unpredicted or undesired results, as they approached their sessions’ designs as forms of experimentation. We argue it is essential to guide future educators in the critical analysis of the “standard classroom”, helping them design creative alternatives through collaborative experimentation.

  15. Assessment of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance using an adaptive observer--experimental and clinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, K; Manchester, I R; Andersson, N; Shiriaev, A; Malm, J; Eklund, A

    2007-11-01

    Idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (INPH) patients have a disturbance in the dynamics of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) system. The outflow conductance, C, of the CSF system has been suggested to be prognostic for positive outcome after treatment with a CSF shunt. All current methods for estimation of C have drawbacks; these include lack of information on the accuracy and relatively long investigation times. Thus, there is a need for improved methods. To accomplish this, the theoretical framework for a new adaptive observer (OBS) was developed which provides real-time estimation of C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the OBS method and to compare it with the constant pressure infusion (CPI) method. The OBS method was applied to data from infusion investigations performed with the CPI method. These consisted of repeated measurements on an experimental set-up and 30 patients with suspected INPH. There was no significant difference in C between the CPI and the OBS method for the experimental set-up. For the patients there was a significant difference, -0.84+/-1.25 microl (s kPa)(-1), mean +/- SD (paired sample t-test, poutflow conductance.

  16. Experimental Observation of Exact Coherent Structures in a Weakly Turbulent Quasi-Two-Dimensional Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Balachandra; Tithof, Jeffrey; Pallantla, Ravi Kumar; Grigoriev, Roman; Schatz, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The dynamical systems approach to fluid turbulence relies on understanding the role of unstable, non-chaotic solutions - such as equilibria, traveling waves, and periodic orbits - of the Navier-Stokes equations. These solutions, called Exact Coherent Structures, exist in the same parameter regime as turbulence, but being unstable, are observed in experiments only as short transients. In this talk, we present experimental evidence for the existence and dynamical relevance of unstable equilibria in a weakly turbulent quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) Kolmogorov flow. In the experiment, this Q2D flow is generated in an electromagnetically driven shallow layer of electrolyte. The numerical simulations, however, use a strictly 2D model which incorporates the effects of the finite thickness of the fluid layer in the experiment. During its evolution, there are instances when the dynamics of a weakly turbulent flow slow down, rather dramatically. Using experimental flow fields from such instances, and by means of a Newton-Solver, we numerically compute several unstable equilibria. Additionally, using numerical simulations, we show that the dynamics of a turbulent flow in the neighbourhood of an equilibrium are accurately described by the unstable manifold of the equilibrium. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grants CBET-0900018, and CMMI-1234436.

  17. Experimental Observation of Two Phase Flow of R123 Inside a Herringbone Microfin Tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akio Miyara; Mohammad Ariful Islam; Yoshihiko Mizuta; Atsushi Kibe

    2003-01-01

    Vapor-liquid two phase flow behavior of R123 inside herringbone microfin tubes has been studied. Herringbone microfin tube is a kind of internally finned tube in which microfins are installed inside the tube where the microfins form multi-V-shape in flow direction. For the present experiment three different types of herringbone microfin tubes with helix angle β = 8°, 14° and 28° are used. Experimental observations showed how flow diverges and converges inside herringbone microfin tube due to fin arrangement. The effect is more remarkable for larger helix angle. From the measurements of the cross-sectional liquid flow rate distribution, the liquid removal and collection and the entrained droplet are discussed. Quantity of liquid droplets is increased with increase of helix angle. The tube with helix angle β = 28° shows higher quantity of liquid droplets than others.

  18. Experimental Observation of the Skeletal Adaptive Repair Mechanism and Bionic Topology Optimization Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaysar Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone adaptive repair theory considers that the external load is the direct source of bone remodeling; bone achieves its maintenance by remodeling some microscopic damages due to external load during the process. This paper firstly observes CT data from the whole self-repairing process in bone defects in rabbit femur. Experimental result shows that during self-repairing process there exists an interaction relationship between spongy bone and enamel bone volume changes of bone defect, that is when volume of spongy bone increases, enamel bone decreases, and when volume of spongy bone decreases, enamel bone increases. Secondly according to this feature a bone remodeling model based on cross-type reaction-diffusion system influenced by mechanical stress is proposed. Finally, this model coupled with finite element method by using the element adding and removing process is used to simulate the self-repairing process and engineering optimization problems by considering the idea of bionic topology optimization.

  19. Why has reversal of the actin-myosin cross-bridge cycle not been observed experimentally?

    KAUST Repository

    Loiselle, D. S.

    2010-02-04

    We trace the history of attempts to determine whether the experimentally observed diminution of metabolic energy expenditure when muscles lengthen during active contraction is consistent with reversibility of biochemical reactions and, in particular, with the regeneration of ATP. We note that this scientific endeavor has something of a parallel flavor to it, with both early and more recent experiments exploiting both isolated muscle preparations and exercising human subjects. In tracing this history from the late 19th century to the present, it becomes clear that energy can be (at least transiently) stored in a muscle undergoing an eccentric contraction but that this is unlikely to be due to the regeneration of ATP. A recently developed, thermodynamically constrained model of the cross-bridge cycle provides additional insight into this conclusion. Copyright © 2010 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Experimental observation of quantum correlations in four-wave mixing with a conical pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Leiming; Du, Jinjian; Feng, Jingliang; Qin, Zhongzhong; Marino, Alberto M; Kolobov, Mikhail I; Jing, Jietai

    2017-04-01

    Generation of multimode quantum states has drawn much attention recently due to its importance for both fundamental science and the future development of quantum technologies. Here, by using a four-wave mixing process with a conical pump beam, we have experimentally observed about -3.8  dB of intensity-difference squeezing between a single-axial probe beam and a conical conjugate beam. The multi-spatial-mode nature of the generated quantum-correlated beams has been shown by comparing the variation tendencies of the intensity-difference noise of the probe and conjugate beams under global attenuation and local cutting attenuation. Due to its compactness, phase-insensitive nature, and easy scalability, our scheme may find potential applications in quantum imaging, quantum information processing, and quantum metrology.

  1. Experimental observation of multifrequency patterns in arrays of coupled nonlinear oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In, Visarath; Kho, Andy; Neff, Joseph D; Palacios, Antonio; Longhini, Patrick; Meadows, Brian K

    2003-12-12

    Frequency-related oscillations in coupled oscillator systems, in which one or more oscillators oscillate at different frequencies than the other oscillators, have been studied using group theoretical methods by Armbruster and Chossat [Phys. Lett. A 254, 269 (1999)] and more recently by Golubitsky and Stewart [in Geometry, Mechanics, and Dynamics, edited by P. Newton, P. Holmes, and A. Weinstein (Springer, New York, 2002), p. 243]. We demonstrate, experimentally, via electronic circuits, the existence of frequency-related oscillations in a network of two arrays of N oscillators, per array, coupled to one another. Under certain conditions, one of the arrays can be induced to oscillate at N times the frequency of the other array. This type of behavior is different from the one observed in a driven system because it is dictated mainly by the symmetry of the coupled system.

  2. The effects of music genre on young people's alcohol consumption: an experimental observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Rutger C M E; Poelen, Evelien A P; Spijkerman, Renske; Ter Bogt, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether exposure to specific music genres in a social drinking setting leads to differences in drinking levels. An observational experimental design was used in which we invited peer groups of young adults into a bar lab, a lab which is furnished like an ordinary, small pub. Between two tasks, people had a break of 50 minutes in which they could order nonalcoholic and alcoholic beverages. During the break, participants were exposed to a specific music genre: popular, hard rock, rap, or classical music. Those groups who were exposed to classical music drank significantly more alcohol than those who were exposed to other music genres. This pattern is quite robust and does not depend on participants' sex or age, drinking habits, own music preference, and relative importance of music in participant's lives. The study's limitations are mentioned.

  3. Experimental observation of pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line with a vapour cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Hua; Yang Hai-Jing; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2005-01-01

    Pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line are experimentally investigated in a Cs atomic vapour cell with copropagating orthogonal linearly-polarized pump and probe laser beams. Absorption-reduction dips duo to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in multi-A-type Zeeman sublevels of 6 S1/2 F=3-6 P3/2 F'=2 hyperfine transition and absorption-enhanced peaks due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in 6 S1/2 F=4-6 P3/2 F'=5 hyperfine transition are demonstrated. With detuned pump beam abnormal sign-reversed signals inside the EIT dip and the EIA peak are clearly observed.

  4. Experimental observation of anomalous topological edge modes in a slowly driven photonic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Spracklen, Alexander; Valiente, Manuel; Andersson, Erika; Öhberg, Patrik; Goldman, Nathan; Thomson, Robert R.

    2017-01-01

    Topological quantum matter can be realized by subjecting engineered systems to time-periodic modulations. In analogy with static systems, periodically driven quantum matter can be topologically classified by topological invariants, whose non-zero value guarantees the presence of robust edge modes. In the high-frequency limit of the drive, topology is described by standard topological invariants, such as Chern numbers. Away from this limit, these topological numbers become irrelevant, and novel topological invariants must be introduced to capture topological edge transport. The corresponding edge modes were coined anomalous topological edge modes, to highlight their intriguing origin. Here we demonstrate the experimental observation of these topological edge modes in a 2D photonic lattice, where these propagating edge states are shown to coexist with a quasi-localized bulk. Our work opens an exciting route for the exploration of topological physics in time-modulated systems operating away from the high-frequency regime.

  5. Experimental observations of flow instabilities and rapid mixing of two dissimilar viscoelastic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiong Yap Gan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Viscoelastically induced flow instabilities, via a simple planar microchannel, were previously used to produce rapid mixing of two dissimilar polymeric liquids (i.e. at least a hundredfold different in shear viscosity even at a small Reynolds number. The unique advantage of this mixing technology is that viscoelastic liquids are readily found in chemical and biological samples like organic and polymeric liquids, blood and crowded proteins samples; their viscoelastic properties could be exploited. As such, an understanding of the underlying interactions will be important especially in rapid microfluidic mixing involving multiple-stream flow of complex (viscoelastic fluids in biological assays. Here, we use the same planar device to experimentally show that the elasticity ratio (i.e. the ratio of stored elastic energy to be relaxed between two liquids indeed plays a crucial role in the entire flow kinematics and the enhanced mixing. We demonstrate here that the polymer stretching dynamics generated in the upstream converging flow and the polymer relaxation events occurring in the downstream channel are not exclusively responsible for the transverse flow mixing, but the elasticity ratio is also equally important. The role of elasticity ratio for transverse flow instability and the associated enhanced mixing were illustrated based on experimental observations. A new parameter Deratio = Deside / Demain (i.e. the ratio of the Deborah number (De of the sidestream to the mainstream liquids is introduced to correlate the magnitude of energy discontinuity between the two liquids. A new Deratio-Demain operating space diagram was constructed to present the observation of the effects of both elasticity and energy discontinuity in a compact manner, and for a general classification of the states of flow development.

  6. Experimental observations to the electrical field for electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel in the Mark-IV electrorefiner.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-05-13

    Experimental results from the pilot scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER) treating spent nuclear fuel are reported in this article. The electrorefining processes were carried out in a LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3} electrolyte. It has been noted that spool of molten cadmium below the electrolyte plays an important role in the electrorefining operations. In addition, formations of electrical shorting path between anode baskets and the electrorefiner vessel were observed, which lessened the uranium dissolution process from anode baskets, however appeared to improve the morphology of cathode deposit. The FIDAP simulation code was used to calculate the electrical potential field distributions and the potential gradient near the cathode. The effect of the electrical shorting between anode baskets and electrorefiner vessel on the morphology of cathode products is discussed.

  7. [Research in theoretical and experimental elementary particle physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    This report gives summaries of particle physics research conducted by different group members for Task A. A summary of work on the CLEO experiment and detector is included for Task B along with a list of CLEO publications. During the present grant period for Task C, the authors had responsibility for the design, assembly, and programming of the high-resolution spectrometer which looks for narrow peaks in the output of the cavity in the LLNL experiment. They successfully carried out this task. Velocity peaks are expected in the spectrum of dark matter axions on Earth. The computing proposal (Task S) is submitted in support of the High Energy Experiment (CLEO, Fermilab, CMS) and the Theory tasks.

  8. Experimental observation of electron-temperature-gradient turbulence in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoo, S K; Singh, S K; Awasthi, L M; Singh, R; Kaw, P K

    2012-06-22

    We report the observation of electron-temperature-gradient (ETG) driven turbulence in the laboratory plasma of a large volume plasma device. The removal of unutilized primary ionizing and nonthermal electrons from uniform density plasma and the imposition and control of the gradient in the electron temperature (T[Symbol: see text] T(e)) are all achieved by placing a large (2 m diameter) magnetic electron energy filter in the middle of the device. In the dressed plasma, the observed ETG turbulence in the lower hybrid range of frequencies ν = (1-80 kHz) is characterized by a broadband with a power law. The mean wave number k perpendicular ρ(e) = (0.1-0.2) satisfies the condition k perpendicular ρ(e) ≤ 1, where ρ(e) is the electron Larmor radius.

  9. Examining the Relationship between Psychosocial and Behavioral Proxies for Future Consumption Behavior: Self-Reported Impact and Bidding Behavior in an Experimental Auction Study on Cigarette Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousu, Matthew C.; Thrasher, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and observational research often involves asking consumers to self-report the impact of some proposed option. Because self-reported responses involve no consequence to the respondent for falsely revealing how he or she feels about an issue, self-reports may be subject to social desirability and other influences that bias responses in…

  10. Examining the Relationship between Psychosocial and Behavioral Proxies for Future Consumption Behavior: Self-Reported Impact and Bidding Behavior in an Experimental Auction Study on Cigarette Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousu, Matthew C.; Thrasher, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental and observational research often involves asking consumers to self-report the impact of some proposed option. Because self-reported responses involve no consequence to the respondent for falsely revealing how he or she feels about an issue, self-reports may be subject to social desirability and other influences that bias responses in…

  11. Experimental spectral analysis of SALMON/STERLING decoupling. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, R.R.; Woolson, J.R.

    1979-11-30

    Re-analysis of SALMON and STERLING initial short-period compressional and surface waves at station PLMS (Poplarville, Mississippi) at a distance of 27 km shows a SALMON/STERLING compressional phase spectral ratio tending to a ratio of only 17 at 25 Hz in agreement with the theoretical caculations of Patterson (1966) and of Healy, King, and 0'Neill (1971). The spectral ratio for the surface waves tends to a ratio of approximately 100 at 25 Hz, in agreement with spectral ratios previously reported by Springer, Denny, Healy, and Mickey (1968), whose data window at PLMS was large enough to consist predominantly of surface waves. The fact that the ratio varies as a function of phase suggests that decoupling varies as a function of takeoff angle, with the least decoupling occurring at high frequencies for the most steeply departing rays. Another topic discussed is the apparent variation in decoupling as defined by the ratio of STERLING/STERLING HE. The variation in this ratio is determined to be explainable by the variation in short point between these two explosions, and not necessarily by a variation in decoupling as a function of azimuth.

  12. Power-Stepped HF Cross-Modulation Experiments: Simulations and Experimental Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    High frequency (HF) cross modulation experiments are a well established means for probing the HF-modified characteristics of the D-region ionosphere. The interaction between the heating wave and the probing pulse depends on the ambient and modified conditions of the D-region ionosphere. Cross-modulation observations are employed as a measure of the HF-modified refractive index. We employ an optimized version of Fejer's method that we developed during previous experiments. Experiments were performed in March 2013 at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) observatory in Gakona, Alaska. During these experiments, the power of the HF heating signal incrementally increased in order to determine the dependence of cross-modulation on HF power. We found that a simple power law relationship does not hold at high power levels, similar to previous ELF/VLF wave generation experiments. In this paper, we critically compare these experimental observations with the predictions of a numerical ionospheric HF heating model and demonstrate close agreement.

  13. Experimental investigation of shaping disturbance observer design for motion control of precision mechatronic stages with resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Hu, Chuxiong; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Ze; Zhang, Ming

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, shaping disturbance observer (SDOB) is investigated for precision mechatronic stages with middle-frequency zero/pole type resonance to achieve good motion control performance in practical manufacturing situations. Compared with traditional standard disturbance observer (DOB), in SDOB a pole-zero cancellation based shaping filter is cascaded to the mechatronic stage plant to meet the challenge of motion control performance deterioration caused by actual resonance. Noting that pole-zero cancellation is inevitably imperfect and the controller may even consequently become unstable in practice, frequency domain stability analysis is conducted to find out how each parameter of the shaping filter affects the control stability. Moreover, the robust design criterion of the shaping filter, and the design procedure of SDOB, are both proposed to guide the actual design and facilitate practical implementation. The SDOB with the proposed design criterion is applied to a linear motor driven stage and a voice motor driven stage, respectively. Experimental results consistently validate the effectiveness nature of the proposed SDOB scheme in practical mechatronics motion applications. The proposed SDOB design actually could be an effective unit in the controller design for motion stages of mechanical manufacture equipments.

  14. Report on Research in Experimental High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusack, Roger W. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Cushman, Priscilla [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Poling, Ronald [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-01-06

    In the past three years the groups supported by the DOE have all made significant progress and posted major successes. The Minnesota CMS group has played leading roles in five data analyses and has had major roles in detector operations, the data management and the detector upgrades that are planned for for the LHC and those that are planned for the high-luminosity LHC. The CDMS-II experiment held the lead in WIMP sensitivity over the last decade, and is still the most sensitive detector in the world in the low WIMP mass region, with a recent 3σ hint of 8 GeV/c2 WIMP candidates in the silicon data. SuperCDMS, with three orders of magnitude better electron recoil background rejection, has been collecting data since October 2011. Since all dark matter experiments require a better understanding of neutron backgrounds to make further advances in sensitivity, Cushman has expanded the Minnesota effort on backgrounds to the national level, where she is leading a coordinated effort in neutron simulations for underground physics. The work of Mandic on 100 mm detectors both for Super-CDMS and beyond has advanced rapidly. Also at the Intensity Frontier, the BESIII experiment has had a successful year of operation largely focused on searches for and studies of new "charmonium-like" states above DD threshold. At least one new state has been observed so far, with hints of others. An intensive effort to understand their nature and gain new insight into the strong interaction continues. BESIII has also produced a large number of other results in charmonium decay and light-hadronic physics.

  15. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Radio-Turbulence Induced Diffusion -- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, H. B.; Usman, S.

    2005-07-07

    The outcome of this research project suggests that the transport of radon in water is significantly greater than that predicted solely by molecular diffusion. The original study was related to the long term storage of {sup 226}Ra-bearing sand at the DOE Fernald site and determining whether a barrier of water covering the sand would be effective in reducing the emanation of {sup 222}Rn from the sand. Initial observations before this study found the transport of radon in water to be greater than that predicted solely by molecular diffusion. Fick's law on diffusion was used to model the transport of radon in water including the impact associated with radioactive decay. Initial measurements suggested that the deposition of energy in water associated with the radioactive decay process influences diffusion and enhances transport of radon. A multi-region, one-dimensional, steady-state transport model was used to analyze the movement of radon through a sequential column of air, water and air. An effective diffusion coefficient was determined by varying the thickness of the water column and measuring the time for transport of {sup 222}Rn through of the water barrier. A one-region, one-dimensional transient diffusion equation was developed to investigate the build up of radon at the end of the water column to the time when a steady-state, equilibrium condition was achieved. This build up with time is characteristic of the transport rate of radon in water and established the basis for estimating the effective diffusion coefficient for {sup 222}Rn in water. Several experiments were conducted using different types and physical arrangements of water barriers to examine how radon transport is influenced by the water barrier. Results of our measurements confirm our theoretical analyses which suggest that convective forces other than pure molecular diffusion impact the transport of {sup 222}Rn through the water barrier. An effective diffusion coefficient is defined that

  17. BRIEF REPORT OF ACTIVE CONTROLLED AND OBSERVABLE PROTEIN CRYSTALLIZATION FACILITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ There are two tendency of development on space protein crystal growth facility.Increase the number of samples, for commercial purpose, or observe and control the crystallization process, for study of crystallization process.

  18. Experimental observations of pressure oscillations and flow regimes in an analogue volcanic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S.J.; Chouet, B.A.; Phillips, J.C.; Dawson, P.; Ryan, G.A.; Hurst, E.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-liquid flows, designed to be analogous to those in volcanic conduits, are generated in the laboratory using organic gas-gum rosin mixtures expanding in a vertically mounted tube. The expanding fluid shows a range of both flow and pressure oscillation behaviors. Weakly supersaturated source liquids produce a low Reynolds number flow with foam expanding from the top surface of a liquid that exhibits zero fluid velocity at the tube wall; i.e., the conventional "no-slip" boundary condition. Pressure oscillations, often with strong long-period characteristics and consistent with longitudinal and radial resonant oscillation modes, are detected in these fluids. Strongly supersaturated source liquids generate more energetic flows that display a number of flow regimes. These regimes include a static liquid source, viscous flow, detached flow (comprising gas-pockets-at-wall and foam-in-gas annular flow, therefore demonstrating strong radial heterogeneity), and a fully turbulent transonic fragmented or mist flow. Each of these flow regimes displays characteristic pressure oscillations that can be related to resonance of flow features or wall impact phenomena. The pressure oscillations are produced by the degassing processes without the need of elastic coupling to the confining medium or flow restrictors and valvelike features. The oscillatory behavior of the experimental flows is compared to seismoacoustic data from a range of volcanoes where resonant oscillation of the fluid within the conduit is also often invoked as controlling the observed oscillation frequencies. On the basis of the experimental data we postulate on the nature of seismic signals that may be measured during large-scale explosive activity. Copyright 2001 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Review on optical constants of Titan aerosols: Experimental results and modeling/observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassé, Coralie; Muñoz, Olga; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François

    2014-05-01

    During the last years many studies have been performed to improve the experimental database of optical constants of Titan aerosols. Indeed, the determination of the optical constants of these particles is essential to quantify their capacity to absorb and to scatter solar radiation, and thus to evaluate their role on Titan's radiative balance and climate. The study of optical properties is also crucial to analyze and to better interpret many of Titan's observational data, in particular those acquired during the Cassini-Huygens mission. One way to determine Titan aerosols optical constant is to measure the optical constants of analogues of Titan complex organic material synthesized in the laboratory, usually named Titan's tholins (Sagan and Khare, 1979). But the optical constants depend on the chemical composition, the size and the shape of particles (Raulin et al., 2012). Those three parameters result from the experimental conditions such as energy source, gas mixing ratio, gas pressure, flow rate and irradiation time (Cable et al., 2012). Besides the determination of the refractive index in the laboratory, there are others methods using theoretical models or observational data. Nevertheless, theoretical models are based on laboratory data or/and observational data. The visible - near infrared spectral region of optical constants has been widely studied with laboratory analogues. Comparison of the obtained results suggest that tholins synthesized by Tran et al. (2003) and Majhoub et al. (2012) are the best representative of Titan aerosols with regards to their refractive indexes in this spectral region. The mid-infrared spectral range has been studied only by Imanaka et al. (2012) and slightly by Tran et al. (2003). In that spectral range, Titan tholins do not exhibit the features displayed by Kim and Courtin (2013) from Titan's observations. For spectral region of wavelengths smaller than 0.20µm or higher than 25µm, only the data from Khare et al. (1984) are

  20. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits A to F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits A through F. Among the information included in the exhibits is the experimental model schedule, the schematic representation, the content display, and the course outlines for all courses in the program.…

  1. Observer Logistics (OBSLOG) - West Coast Groundfish Observer Program and At-Sea Hake Observer Program data collection, analysis and reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer programs are the most comprehensive fishery dependent data collection system for total mortality estimation, protected species monitoring and discard data...

  2. Cell mass and cell cycle dynamics of an asynchronous budding yeast population: experimental observations, flow cytometry data analysis, and multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Carlquist, Magnus; Lundin, Luisa; Heins, Anna-Lena; Dutta, Abhishek; Sørensen, Søren J; Jensen, Anker D; Nopens, Ingmar; Lantz, Anna Eliasson; Gernaey, Krist V

    2013-03-01

    Despite traditionally regarded as identical, cells in a microbial cultivation present a distribution of phenotypic traits, forming a heterogeneous cell population. Moreover, the degree of heterogeneity is notably enhanced by changes in micro-environmental conditions. A major development in experimental single-cell studies has taken place in the last decades. It has however not been fully accompanied by similar contributions within data analysis and mathematical modeling. Indeed, literature reporting, for example, quantitative analyses of experimental single-cell observations and validation of model predictions for cell property distributions against experimental data is scarce. This study focuses on the experimental and mathematical description of the dynamics of cell size and cell cycle position distributions, of a population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in response to the substrate consumption observed during batch cultivation. The good agreement between the proposed multi-scale model (a population balance model [PBM] coupled to an unstructured model) and experimental data (both the overall physiology and cell size and cell cycle distributions) indicates that a mechanistic model is a suitable tool for describing the microbial population dynamics in a bioreactor. This study therefore contributes towards the understanding of the development of heterogeneous populations during microbial cultivations. More generally, it consists of a step towards a paradigm change in the study and description of cell cultivations, where average cell behaviors observed experimentally now are interpreted as a potential joint result of various co-existing single-cell behaviors, rather than a unique response common to all cells in the cultivation.

  3. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Kirejczyk, M.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1997 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contain the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  4. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University Annual Report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeflinski, Z.; Popkiewicz, M. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Institute of Experimental Physics (Warsaw University) in year 1996 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure; Experimental methods and instrumentation and the third part contains the list of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` by NPD director prof. Ch. Droste.

  5. Nuclear Physics Division - Inst. of Experimental Physics - Warsaw University - Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirejczyk, M.; Szeflinski, Z. [eds.

    1999-08-01

    In the presented report the research activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of the Warsaw University Institute of Experimental Physics in year of 1998 are described. The report is divided into three parts: Reaction Mechanisms and Nuclear Structure, Experimental Methods and Instrumentation and the third one contains the lists of personnel, seminars held at the Nuclear Physics Division and list of published papers. A summary of the (NPD) activities are briefly presented in ``Preface`` written by NDP director prof. K. Siwek-Wilczynska

  6. Coherent evolution of parahydrogen induced polarisation using laser pump, NMR probe spectroscopy: Theoretical framework and experimental observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halse, Meghan E; Procacci, Barbara; Henshaw, Sarah-Louise; Perutz, Robin N; Duckett, Simon B

    2017-05-01

    We recently reported a pump-probe method that uses a single laser pulse to introduce parahydrogen (p-H2) into a metal dihydride complex and then follows the time-evolution of the p-H2-derived nuclear spin states by NMR. We present here a theoretical framework to describe the oscillatory behaviour of the resultant hyperpolarised NMR signals using a product operator formalism. We consider the cases where the p-H2-derived protons form part of an AX, AXY, AXYZ or AA'XX' spin system in the product molecule. We use this framework to predict the patterns for 2D pump-probe NMR spectra, where the indirect dimension represents the evolution during the pump-probe delay and the positions of the cross-peaks depend on the difference in chemical shift of the p-H2-derived protons and the difference in their couplings to other nuclei. The evolution of the NMR signals of the p-H2-derived protons, as well as the transfer of hyperpolarisation to other NMR-active nuclei in the product, is described. The theoretical framework is tested experimentally for a set of ruthenium dihydride complexes representing the different spin systems. Theoretical predictions and experimental results agree to within experimental error for all features of the hyperpolarised (1)H and (31)P pump-probe NMR spectra. Thus we establish the laser pump, NMR probe approach as a robust way to directly observe and quantitatively analyse the coherent evolution of p-H2-derived spin order over micro-to-millisecond timescales. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrating experimental and observational personality research--the contributions of Hans Eysenck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, William; Oehlberg, Katherine

    2008-12-01

    A fundamental aspect of Hans Eysenck's research was his emphasis upon using all the tools available to the researcher to study personality. This included correlational, experimental, physiological, and genetic approaches. Fifty years after Cronbach's call for the reunification of the two disciplines of psychology (Cronbach, 1957) and 40 years after Eysenck's plea for experimental approaches to personality research (H. J. Eysenck, 1966), what is the status of the unification? Should personality researchers use experimental techniques? Do experimental techniques allow us to tease out causality, and are we communicating the advantages of combining experimental with multivariate correlational techniques? We review the progress made since Cronbach's and Eysenck's original papers and suggest that although it is still uncommon to find experimental studies of personality, psychology would benefit from the joint use of correlational and experimental approaches.

  8. Management, Analysis, and Visualization of Experimental and Observational Data -- The Convergence of Data and Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Greenwald, Martin; Kleese van Dam, Kersten; Parashar, Manish; Wild, Stefan, M.; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-10-27

    Scientific user facilities---particle accelerators, telescopes, colliders, supercomputers, light sources, sequencing facilities, and more---operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) generate ever increasing volumes of data at unprecedented rates from experiments, observations, and simulations. At the same time there is a growing community of experimentalists that require real-time data analysis feedback, to enable them to steer their complex experimental instruments to optimized scientific outcomes and new discoveries. Recent efforts in DOE-SC have focused on articulating the data-centric challenges and opportunities facing these science communities. Key challenges include difficulties coping with data size, rate, and complexity in the context of both real-time and post-experiment data analysis and interpretation. Solutions will require algorithmic and mathematical advances, as well as hardware and software infrastructures that adequately support data-intensive scientific workloads. This paper presents the summary findings of a workshop held by DOE-SC in September 2015, convened to identify the major challenges and the research that is needed to meet those challenges.

  9. Experimental Observations of Multiscale Dynamics of Viscous Fluid Behavior: Implications in Volcanic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, A.; Spina, L.; Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of Newtonian fluids with viscosities (10-1000 Pa s; corresponding to mafic to intermediate silicate melts) during slow decompression, in a Plexiglas shock tube. As an analogue fluid we used silicon oil saturated with Argon gas for 72 hours. Slow decompression, dropping from 10 MPa to ambient pressure, acts as the excitation mechanism, initiating several processes with their own distinct timescales. The evolution of this multi-timescale phenomenon generates complex non-stationary microseismic signals, which have been recorded with 7 high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors located along the conduit. Correlation analysis of these time series with the associated high-speed imaging enables characterization of distinct phases of the dynamics of these viscous fluids and the extraction of the time and the frequency characteristics of the individual processes. We have identified fluid-solid elastic interaction, degassing, fluid mass expansion and flow, bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, foam building and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are sequentially coupled in time, occur within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution in space. Their coexistence and interactions constitute the stress field and driving forces that determine the dynamics of the system. Our observations point to the great potential of this experimental approach in the understanding of volcanic processes and volcanic seismicity.

  10. Multi-mode Alfv\\'enic Fast Particle Transport and Losses: Numerical vs. Experimental Observation

    CERN Document Server

    Schneller, Mirjam; Bilato, Roberto; García-Muñoz, Manuel; Brüdgam, Michael; Günter, Sibylle

    2013-01-01

    In many discharges at ASDEX Upgrade fast particle losses can be observed due to Alfv\\'enic gap modes, Reversed Shear Alfv\\'en Eigenmodes or core-localized Beta Alfv\\'en Eigenmodes. For the first time, simulations of experimental conditions in the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device are performed for different plasma equilibria (particularly for different, also non-monotonic q profiles). The numerical tool is the extended version of the HAGIS code [Pinches'98, Br\\"udgam PhD Thesis, 2010], which also computes the particle motion in the vacuum region between vessel wall in addition to the internal plasma volume. For this work, a consistent fast particle distribution function was implemented to represent the strongly anisotropic fast particle population as generated by ICRH minority heating. Furthermore, HAGIS was extended to use more realistic eigenfunctions, calculated by the gyrokinetic eigenvalue solver LIGKA [Lauber'07]. The main aim of these simulations is to allow fast ion loss measurements to be interpreted with ...

  11. SEALEX in-situ experiments-performance tests of repository seals: experimental observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes observations and numerical analysis of SEALEX performance tests installed in Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL. One of the objectives of the large scale in-situ tests is to investigate the impact of technological gaps on the long term performance of bentonite based seals. The swelling cores consist of pre-compacted blocks of a natural sodic Wyoming bentonite (MX80 type mixed with quartz sand in a ratio of 70/30 (in dry mass with different geometries (monolithic disks or four jointed disks. Several technological gaps exist within the in situ tests: Gaps between the blocks and annular gap with variable width between the bentonite-based core and the host rock. All the tests are extensively instrumented for monitoring the main Hydro-Mechanical (HM variables. Comparison of the experimental results showed that the presence of technological gaps constituted new hydration sources (annular gaps and flow paths (gaps between the blocks that changed the saturation kinetics. A coupled HM formulation that incorporates the relevant processes involved in the problem under consideration has been adopted to analyse the effect of the annular technological gap on dry density homogenization of the bentonite based core as hydration progresses. Technological gaps were demonstrated to have an impact on dry density distribution.

  12. Experimental observation of attosecond control over relativistic electron bunches with two-colour fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, M.; Rykovanov, S.; Bierbach, J.; Li, L.; Eckner, E.; Kuschel, S.; Woldegeorgis, A.; Rödel, C.; Sävert, A.; Paulus, G. G.; Coughlan, M.; Dromey, B.; Zepf, M.

    2017-01-01

    Energy coupling during relativistically intense laser-matter interactions is encoded in the attosecond motion of strongly driven electrons at the pre-formed plasma-vacuum boundary. Studying and controlling this motion can reveal details about the microscopic processes that govern a vast array of light-matter interaction phenomena, including those at the forefront of extreme laser-plasma science such as laser-driven ion acceleration, bright attosecond pulse generation and efficient energy coupling for the generation and study of warm dense matter. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by precisely adjusting the relative phase of an additional laser beam operating at the second harmonic of the driving laser it is possible to control the trajectories of relativistic electron bunches formed during the interaction with a solid target at the attosecond scale. We observe significant enhancements in the resulting high-harmonic yield, suggesting potential applications for sources of ultra-bright, extreme ultraviolet attosecond radiation to be used in atomic and molecular pump-probe experiments.

  13. Experimental and observational studies of seasonal interactions between overlapping life history stages in a migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonra, Christopher M; Marra, Peter P; Holberton, Rebecca L

    2013-11-01

    Prior to reproduction, migratory animals are at the juxtaposition of three life history stages in which they must finish the non-breeding stage, initiate and complete migration, and prepare for the onset of breeding. However, how these stages interact with one another is not fully understood. We provide evidence that, for migratory birds that begin breeding development prior to departure from non-breeding sites, the level of breeding preparation can drive migration phenology, a critical behavioral determinant of reproductive success. Specifically, male American redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) plasma androgen levels, which increase in males during the period leading into migration, were positively correlated with energetic condition. We empirically tested the hypothesis that elevated androgen simultaneously supports migratory and breeding preparation in a hormone manipulation field experiment. Males with testosterone implants showed advanced preparation for migration and breeding, and ultimately departed on migration earlier than controls. It is assumed that early departure leads to early arrival at breeding areas, which increases breeding success. Collectively, our observational and experimental results demonstrate how overlapping life history stages can interact to influence important components of an individual's fitness. This highlights the critical need for understanding population processes across the full life cycle of an organism to better understand the ecological and evolutionary origins of complex life history events.

  14. Experimental observations of thermal mixing characteristics in T-junction piping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mei-Shiue, E-mail: chenms@mx.nthu.edu.tw; Hsieh, Huai-En; Ferng, Yuh-Ming; Pei, Bau-Shi

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The effects of flow velocity ratio on thermal mixing phenomenon are the major parameters. • The flow velocity ratio (V{sub b}/V{sub m}) is greater than 13.6, reverse flow occurs. • The flow velocity ratio is greater than 13.7, a “good” mixing quality is achieved. - Abstract: The T-junction piping is frequently used in many industrial applications, including the nuclear plants. For a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) inject cold water into the primary loops if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) happens. Inappropriate mixing of the two streams with significant temperature different at a junction may cause strong thermal stresses to the downstream structures in the reactor vessel. The downstream structures may be damaged. This study is an experimental investigation into the thermal mixing effect occurring at a T-junction. A small-scale test facility was established to observe the mixing effect of flows with different temperature. Thermal mixing effect with different flow rates in the main and branch pipes are investigated by measuring the temperature distribution along the main pipe. In test condition I, we found that lower main pipe flow rate leads to better mixing effect with constant branch pipe flow rate. And in conditions II and III, higher injection flow velocity would enhance the turbulence effect which results in better thermal mixing. The results will be useful for applications with mixing fluids with different temperature.

  15. Computational studies of experimentally observed structures of sulfur on metal surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, Dominic

    2011-09-01

    First-principles electronic structure calculations were carried out to examine the experimentally observed structures of sulfur on close packed surfaces of a number of important metals - Ag(111), Cu(111), Ni(111), Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001). At low coverages ({le} 1/3 ML), the prediction is consistent with the typical pattern of preferred sulfur occupancy of threefold hollow sites, notably the fcc site on the (111) surfaces and the hcp site on the (0001) surfaces. Theoretical confirmation for the existence of pure sulfur overlayer phases on Pt(111), Rh(111), Re(0001) and Ru(0001) at higher coverages (> 1/3 ML) was provided. For the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase seen on Ag(111), the most preferred structure identified for adsorbed S trimer consists of an S atom on the top site bonded to two S atoms situated on the nearest neighbor off-bridge site positions. Among the different densely packed mixed sulfur-metal overlayer models suggested for the ({radical}7 x {radical}7) phase on Cu(111), the structure which consists of metal and S atoms in a hexagonal-like arrangement on the top substrate was found to be the most energetically favorable. For the (5{radical}3 x 2) phase on Ni(111), the calculations confirm the existence of clock-reconstructed top layer metal atoms onto which sulfur atoms are adsorbed.

  16. Experimental observations on the role of the cadmium pool in Mark-IV ER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S. X.; Vaden, D.; Mariani, R. D.; Johnson, T. A.

    2000-03-20

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed and demonstrated an electrometallurgical process for the Department of Energy (DOE) to treat sodium bonded spent nuclear fuel. One of the key steps in the demonstration was electrorefining the spent fuel in a molten LiCl-KCl-UCl{sub 3}/liquid cadmium system using a pilot scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER). This article summarizes experimental observations and engineering aspects for the roles of the liquid cadmium during electrorefining spent fuel in the Mark-IV ER. It was found that the liquid cadmium pool acted as an intermediate electrode during the electrorefining process. The cadmium level was gradually decreased due to its high vapor pressure and vaporization rate at the ER operational temperature. The low cadmium level caused the anode assembly to electrically short with the ER vessel hardware, which resulted in the difficulties to determine the endpoint of uranium dissolution from the anode baskets and reducing the current efficiency. A reflux cadmium vapor trap was installed and has successfully prevented the cadmium level from decreasing.

  17. Comparison of NOAA Experimental Forecasted Reference Evapotranspiration and Observed CIMIS Reference Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krone-Davis, P.; Melton, F. S.; Snell, H. D.; Palmer, C.; Rosevelt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Consumptive use of water through evapotranspiration from irrigated agricultural crops is one of the primary uses of water resources in California and other states in the western U.S. Information on reference evapotranspiration from agricultural weather networks is currently used by water managers and agricultural producers in water use planning and irrigation scheduling. The development of forecasts of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) offers promise for improving agricultural water management and scheduling of water deliveries, especially during the warmer summer months. The NOAA National Weather Service has developed an experimental daily Forecasted Reference Evapotranspiration (FRET) data product, which provides forecasts of ETo at lead times of up to 8-days. We present a comparison between the FRET data over the California Central Valley and observations of ETo from the California Irrigation Management Information System (CIMIS), a network of 139 agricultural weather stations in California. We also present results from a comparison between FRET and the 2 km daily interpolated ETo data products from the Spatial CIMIS model over the period from September 1, 2011 to August 31, 2012.

  18. Experimental observation of ultrasound fast and slow waves through three-dimensional printed trabecular bone phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mézière, F; Juskova, P; Woittequand, J; Muller, M; Bossy, E; Boistel, Renaud; Malaquin, L; Derode, A

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, ultrasound measurements of 1:1 scale three-dimensional (3D) printed trabecular bone phantoms are reported. The micro-structure of a trabecular horse bone sample was obtained via synchrotron x-ray microtomography, converted to a 3D binary data set, and successfully 3D-printed at scale 1:1. Ultrasound through-transmission experiments were also performed through a highly anisotropic version of this structure, obtained by elongating the digitized structure prior to 3D printing. As in real anisotropic trabecular bone, both the fast and slow waves were observed. This illustrates the potential of stereolithography and the relevance of such bone phantoms for the study of ultrasound propagation in bone.

  19. Malaysia; Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund.

    2013-01-01

    This report is an assessment of the state of compliance with the Basel Core Principles (BCPs) in Malaysia. Bank Negara Malaysia (BNM) employs a well-developed risk-focused regulatory and supervisory system, consisting of a hands-on and comprehensive program of onsite supervision and extensive offsite macroeconomic and microeconomic surveillance supervision. The assessment has revealed several opportunities for improvement of the regulatory and supervisory framework. The Executive Board recomm...

  20. Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Auxiliary Training Program. The Comprehensive Report, Exhibits G to L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico Univ., San Juan. School of Dentistry.

    This annex supplements the Puerto Rico Experimental Model Dental Training Program Comprehensive Report (CE 028 213) and is comprised of exhibits G through L. Among the information included in the exhibits is the evaluation reports of the commission on accreditation, the detailed curriculum, and the accredited program's scope, sequence, and course…

  1. Development of density plumes of dissolved CO2: Comparing experimental observations with numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Karen; Vosper, Hayley; Rochelle, Chris; Noy, Dave; Chadwick, Andy

    2014-05-01

    The long-term trapping of CO2 within deep geological storage reservoirs will be dependent upon CO2-water-rock geochemical reactions. The first, and most important, steps in this process will be dissolution of CO2 into the reservoir porewater and the transport of this dissolved CO2 through the reservoir. As part of the CO2CARE project we have investigated these via laboratory tests using a water-filled porous medium. Key experimental parameters were measured to determine system permeability, so that a high-resolution numerical model could be built in an attempt to reproduce the observed system behaviour. The Hele-Shaw cell comprised two glass sheets 65 cm wide and 36 cm high, separated by a spacing of 1.1 mm, and filled with closely-packed glass beads 0.4-0.6 mm in diameter. The surface of the glass was treated to prevent the formation of a higher permeability zone along this interface. A pH-sensitive dye was added to the pore-filling water to show where it had been acidified due to the presence of CO2. CO2 gas was introduced to a space at the top of the cell, which created a thin, diffusion-controlled boundary layer of CO2-rich water below the CO2-water interface. CO2 dissolution increased water density, resulting in gravitational instabilities and the formation of many small, downward-migrating plumes. Time-lapse photography was used to track the formation and progress of these plumes. As the plumes grew they increased in length relative to their width, and decreased in number over time. They also became more complex with time, splitting and forming several lobes, whose outer edges became more diffuse as they mixed with the CO2-poor water. The onset time of plume development and the horizontal wavelength (spacing) of the descending plumes are diagnostic measures of the system properties, notably permeability. They were analysed from the time-lapse images and expressed as probability density functions based on histograms of the observations. The derived

  2. Nuclear Physics Division Institute of Experimental Physics Warsaw University annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of the Nuclear Physics Division of the Institute of Experimental Physics of the Warsaw University in 1994 are described. The report consist of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (12 articles); (ii) Experimental Methods and Instrumentation (2 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers is also given. In the first, leading article of the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  3. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  4. Fluid dynamic design and experimental study of an aspirated temperature measurement platform used in climate observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jie, E-mail: yangjie396768@163.com [Key Laboratory for Aerosol-Cloud-Precipitation of China Meteorological Administration, Nanjing 210044 (China); School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Liu, Qingquan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Meteorological Observation and Information Processing, Nanjing 210044 (China); Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center on Atmospheric Environment and Equipment Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Dai, Wei [School of Atmospheric Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Ding, Renhui [Jiangsu Meteorological Observation Center, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Due to the solar radiation effect, current air temperature sensors inside a thermometer screen or radiation shield may produce measurement errors that are 0.8 °C or higher. To improve the observation accuracy, an aspirated temperature measurement platform is designed. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method is implemented to analyze and calculate the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform under various environmental conditions. Then, a radiation error correction equation is obtained by fitting the CFD results using a genetic algorithm (GA) method. In order to verify the performance of the temperature sensor, the aspirated temperature measurement platform, temperature sensors with a naturally ventilated radiation shield, and a thermometer screen are characterized in the same environment to conduct the intercomparison. The average radiation errors of the sensors in the naturally ventilated radiation shield and the thermometer screen are 0.44 °C and 0.25 °C, respectively. In contrast, the radiation error of the aspirated temperature measurement platform is as low as 0.05 °C. This aspirated temperature sensor allows the radiation error to be reduced by approximately 88.6% compared to the naturally ventilated radiation shield, and allows the error to be reduced by a percentage of approximately 80% compared to the thermometer screen. The mean absolute error and root mean square error between the correction equation and experimental results are 0.032 °C and 0.036 °C, respectively, which demonstrates the accuracy of the CFD and GA methods proposed in this research.

  5. 2nd International Workshop on Physics-Based Modelling of Material Properties and Experimental Observations with special focus on Fracture and Damage Mechanics: Book of Abstracts

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Karl-Fredrik; YALCINKAYA Tuncay; Oren, Ersin Emre; Tekoğlu, Cihan

    2013-01-01

    This report covers the book of abstracts of the 2nd International Workshop on Physics Based Modelling of Material Properties and Experimental Observations, with special focus on Fracture and Damage Mechanics. The workshop is organized in the context of European Commission’s Enlargement and Integration Action, by the Joint Research Centre in collaboration with the TOBB University of Economics and Technology (TOBB ETU) on 15th-17th May 2013 in Antalya, Turkey. The abstracts of the keynote le...

  6. Flow structures in submarine channels affected by Coriolis forces: Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu, R.; Wells, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    In this talk we will show how Coriolis forces can control the flow dynamics of turbidity currents flowing in sinuous channels at high latitudes. We describe how the internal velocity structure changes with latitude, based on observations from rotating laboratory experiments. When these results are combined with existing conceptual facies and depositional models we can now describe the changes in sedimentation patterns that are observed at different latitudes. The experiments were conducted in a sinuous channel model placed in a tank that was rotated at various rates (reflected by the Coriolis parameters f) ranging from f = 0 (at the equator) to ± 0.5 rad s-1 (at higher latitudes). The dependence of the density interface of gravity currents on rotation is shown in Figure 1a. At the equator the interface slopes up to the outer bend due to the centrifugal forces. In the Northern Hemisphere (NH) the tilt of the interface increases as now the Coriolis forces reinforce the centrifugal acceleration. In contrast, in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) the current ramps up to the inner bend and Coriolis forces dominate over centrifugal forces. Figure 1b shows the corresponding position of the downstream velocity core in the bend apex. At the equator the core is predominantly close to the centerline, whilst in the NH the core is deflected to the inner bend and in the SH the velocity core is shifted to the outer bank. Based upon our experimental results, we hypothesize that Coriolis forces can affect the velocity structure and sedimentation regime. Lateral accretion packages (LAPs) are built only on one side in the channel and finer sediments will be deposited mainly on the levee bank to which the high velocity core is deflected. The Rossby number RoW = U/fW (where U is the mean downstream velocity and W the channel width) can be used to determine the influence of Coriolis forces. In channel systems at high-latitudes (with RoW 1 implying that Coriolis forces are negligible. LAPs

  7. [The reporting of observational studies: analysis using the STROBE statement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galera Llorca, Jordi; Lahoz Grillo, Raquel; Roig Loscertales, Francesc

    2011-12-01

    Deficiencies detected in biomedical studies publication different Guidelines to improve. The objective of the study is to assess the communication of observational studies of Cardiovascular and Metabolism therapeutic area (CVM) published in 6 Spanish journals in 2009 using the STROBE statement. Cross-sectional analysis of articles related to CVM therapeutic area, published during 2009 in 6 Spanish journals applying the 34 items of the STROBE statement. Descriptive analysis of the results for qualitative variables was performed using a frequency analysis. Quantitative variables were analyzed by sample estimates and dispersion. A comparative analysis of journals was performed using ANOVA with a statistical significance of pGaceta Sanitaria and a minimum of 19 (DE±2.8) in Hipertensión. Evaluated papers comply with slightly more than a half items (58%) of the STROBE recommendations. The Methods and Results sections showed more deficiencies.

  8. Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections. Final report: Recommended observational skills training for IAEA safeguards inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toquam, J.L.; Morris, F.A.

    1994-09-01

    This is the second of two reports prepared to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA or Agency) in enhancing the effectiveness of its international safeguards inspections through inspector training in {open_quotes}Observational Skills{close_quotes}. The first (Phase 1) report was essentially exploratory. It defined Observational Skills broadly to include all appropriate cognitive, communications, and interpersonal techniques that have the potential to help IAEA safeguards inspectors function more effectively. It identified 10 specific Observational Skills components, analyzed their relevance to IAEA safeguards inspections, and reviewed a variety of inspection programs in the public and private sectors that provide training in one or more of these components. The report concluded that while it should be possible to draw upon these other programs in developing Observational Skills training for IAEA inspectors, the approaches utilized in these programs will likely require significant adaption to support the specific job requirements, policies, and practices that define the IAEA inspector`s job. The overall objective of this second (Phase 2) report is to provide a basis for the actual design and delivery of Observational Skills training to IAEA inspectors. The more specific purposes of this report are to convey a fuller understanding of the potential application of Observational Skills to the inspector`s job, describe inspector perspectives on the relevance and importance of particular Observational Skills, identify the specific Observational Skill components that are most important and relevant to enhancing safeguards inspections, and make recommendations as to Observational Skills training for the IAEA`s consideration in further developing its Safeguards training program.

  9. Experimental observations of rapid Maize streak virus evolution reveal a strand-specific nucleotide substitution bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsani Arvind

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent reports have indicated that single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses in the taxonomic families Geminiviridae, Parvoviridae and Anellovirus may be evolving at rates of ~10-4 substitutions per site per year (subs/site/year. These evolution rates are similar to those of RNA viruses and are surprisingly high given that ssDNA virus replication involves host DNA polymerases with fidelities approximately 10 000 times greater than those of error-prone viral RNA polymerases. Although high ssDNA virus evolution rates were first suggested in evolution experiments involving the geminivirus maize streak virus (MSV, the evolution rate of this virus has never been accurately measured. Also, questions regarding both the mechanistic basis and adaptive value of high geminivirus mutation rates remain unanswered. Results We determined the short-term evolution rate of MSV using full genome analysis of virus populations initiated from cloned genomes. Three wild type viruses and three defective artificial chimaeric viruses were maintained in planta for up to five years and displayed evolution rates of between 7.4 × 10-4 and 7.9 × 10-4 subs/site/year. Conclusion These MSV evolution rates are within the ranges observed for other ssDNA viruses and RNA viruses. Although no obvious evidence of positive selection was detected, the uneven distribution of mutations within the defective virus genomes suggests that some of the changes may have been adaptive. We also observed inter-strand nucleotide substitution imbalances that are consistent with a recent proposal that high mutation rates in geminiviruses (and possibly ssDNA viruses in general may be due to mutagenic processes acting specifically on ssDNA molecules.

  10. Experimental observations on the retreat of non-cohesive river banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solari, L.; Nardi, L.; Rinaldi, M.

    2009-12-01

    The topic of bank retreat is of particular relevance in the hydro-morphodynamic models devoted to study the planform evolution of rivers. This notwithstanding, in many models bank retreat is evaluated through over-simplified algorithms based, for instance, on the knowledge of the near bank flow velocity and some erodibility coefficient which does not have an explicit physical meaning. In the literature, the majority of studies on the modelling of bank processes are about cohesive banks composed by fine sediments; the retreat of these type of banks has been related to the stability and mass wasting processes through algorithms originally developed in the geotechnical field. In gravel-bed rivers, banks are often composite with a basal layer of gravel and an upper cohesive layer, or, sometime, completely composed by granular, relatively coarse sediments (gravel and cobbles). The mechanisms of bank retreat in relatively coarse riverbanks (mainly composed by gravel) represent an area that needs further investigation, as numerous physical mechanisms are still not understood. This research aims at gaining a better comprehension of the basic processes occurring in relatively coarse bank sediments; in particular, it focuses on the mass instability mechanisms due to the oscillations of free surface water level. The fluvial erosion of the streambank due to the boundary shear stresses is not taken into account. A physical model of a bank composed by granular relatively coarse sediments has been reproduced in a static tank. The main characteristics of the bank; such as geometry, sediment distribution and degree of packing, were set on the basis of the field observations of the riverbanks in the Cecina River (Tuscany). A first set of experiments simulating the behavior of the bank during a hydrograph has been carried out. Several sensors inserted into the bank allow monitoring the seepage flow and pore water pressures. Preliminary results are here reported, with a discussion of

  11. Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinman, LI [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sedlacek, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) was conducted to obtain a better understanding of how aerosols generated from biomass fires affect the atmosphere and climate. It is estimated that 40% of carbonaceous aerosol produced originates from biomass burning—enough to affect regional and global climate. Several biomass-burning studies have focused on tropical climates; however, few campaigns have been conducted within the United States, where millions of acres are burned each year, trending to higher values and greater climate impacts because of droughts in the West. Using the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility (AAF), the BBOP deployed the Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft over smoke plumes from active wildfire and agricultural burns to help identify the impact of these events and how impacts evolve with time. BBOP was one of very few studies that targeted the near-field time evolution of aerosols and aimed to obtain a process-level understanding of the large changes that occur within a few hours of atmospheric processing.

  12. Experimental observations on the decay of environmental DNA from bighead and silver carps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Richard F.; Klymus, Katy E.; Richter, Cathy; Guan, Xin; Farrington, Heather L.; Carr, Matthew R.; Thompson, Nathan; Chapman, Duane C.; Baerwaldt, Kelly L.

    2017-01-01

    Interest in the field of environmental DNA (eDNA) is growing rapidly and eDNA surveys are becoming an important consideration for aquatic resource managers dealing with invasive species. However, in order for eDNA monitoring to mature as a research and management tool, there are several critical knowledge gaps that must be filled. One such gap is the fate of eDNA materials in the aquatic environment. Understanding the environmental factors that influence the decay of eDNA and how these factors impact detection probabilities over time and space could have significant implications for eDNA survey design and data interpretation. Here we experimentally explore decay of eDNA associated with bighead carp (Hypophthalmichthys nobilis) biological waste collected from an aquaculture filtration system and with sperm collected from captive silver carp (H. molitrix), and how decay may be influenced by differing levels of water turbulence, temperature, microbial load, and pH. We found that the decay patterns of eDNA associated with both H. nobilis biological waste and H. molitrix milt significantly fit monophasic exponential decay curves. Secondly, we observed that the highest temperature we tested resulted in a decay half-life as much as 5.5× more rapid than the lowest temperature we tested. When we suppressed microbial loads in eDNA samples, we observed that overall losses of eDNA were reduced by about 2.5×. When we amended eDNA samples with pond water the half-life of eDNA was reduced by about 2.25×, despite relatively little apparent increase in the overall microbial load. This pattern indicated that species constituency of the microbial community, in addition to microbial load, might play a critical role in eDNA degradation. A shift in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 in the samples resulted in a 1.6× reduction in eDNA halflife. Water turbulence in our study had no apparent effect on eDNA decay. When we combined different temperature, pH, and microbial load treatments to create a

  13. Highly pressurized partially miscible liquid-liquid flow in a micro-T-junction. I. Experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ning; Wen, John Z.; Ren, Carolyn L.

    2017-04-01

    This is the first part of a two-part study on a partially miscible liquid-liquid flow (liquid carbon dioxide and deionized water) which is highly pressurized and confined in a microfluidic T-junction. Our main focuses are to understand the flow regimes as a result of varying flow conditions and investigate the characteristics of drop flow distinct from coflow, with a capillary number, C ac , that is calculated based on the continuous liquid, ranging from 10-3 to 10-2 (10-4 for coflow). Here in part I, we present our experimental observation of drop formation cycle by tracking drop length, spacing, frequency, and after-generation speed using high-speed video and image analysis. The drop flow is chronologically composed of a stagnating and filling stage, an elongating and squeezing stage, and a truncating stage. The common "necking" time during the elongating and squeezing stage (with C ac˜10-3 ) for the truncation of the dispersed liquid stream is extended, and the truncation point is subsequently shifted downstream from the T-junction corner. This temporal postponement effect modifies the scaling function reported in the literature for droplet formation with two immiscible fluids. Our experimental measurements also demonstrate the drop speed immediately following their generations can be approximated by the mean velocity from averaging the total flow rate over the channel cross section. Further justifications of the quantitative analysis by considering the mass transfer at the interface of the two partially miscible fluids are provided in part II.

  14. Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, P. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Gibson, J. P. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The campaign “Magnetic Field Observations at Purcell, Oklahoma” installed a ground-based magnetometer at Purcell’s U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility boundary installation at the Kessler Atmospheric and Ecological Field Station, University of Oklahoma, to measure local magnetic field variations. It is a part of the nine stations of the Mid-continent MAgnetoseismic Chain (McMAC) placed as close to the 330° magnetic longitude as possible. This is the meridian in the world where land covers the greatest continuous range in magnetic latitude. Figure 1 shows the map of the magnetometer stations along the 330th magnetic meridian, including the Purcell (PCEL) station. The main scientific objective of the campaign is to detect the field line resonance (FLR) frequencies of the magnetic field line connected to the Purcell station. This magnetic field line extends from Purcell to the outer space at distances as far as 2 Earth radii (RE). To accurately identify FLR frequencies, however, simultaneous measurements at slightly different latitudes along the same meridian are necessary to allow the use of the cross-phase technique. This consideration explains the arrangement to operate magnetometers at the Americus (AMER) and Richardson (RICH) stations nearby. The measured resonant frequency can infer the plasma mass density along the field line through the method of normal-mode magnetoseismology. The magnetometer at the Purcell station can detect many other types of magnetic field fluctuations associated with the changes in the electric currents in the ionosphere and the magnetosphere, which by large are affected by the solar activity. In other words, the magnetic field data collected by this campaign are also useful for understanding space weather phenomena. The magnetometer was installed at Purcell’s ARM boundary facility in March 27, 2006. The construction of the triaxial fluxgate magnetometer used by the

  15. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillon, L.

    2012-08-01

    The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  16. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pillon L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  17. Preliminary checklist of fungi of the Fernow Experimental Forest. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephenson, S.L.; Kumar, A.; Bhatt, R.; Dubey, T.; Landolt, J.C.

    1994-01-01

    The report provides a checklist of fungi found on the Fernow Experimental Forest in West Virginia during 4 years of research and collecting by the authors. More than 500 fungi in seven major taxonomic groups (Acrasiomycetes, Myxomycetes, Chytridiomycetes, Oomycetes, Ascomycetes, Deuteromycetes, and Basidiomycetes) are listed alphabetically by genus and species. Also provided is a general description of the forest vegetation of the Fernow Experimental Forest.

  18. Flora of the Fraser Experimental Forest, Colorado. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, S.J.; Shepperd, W.D.; Reichert, D.W.; Cone, M.A.

    1993-08-01

    The report lists 441 vascular plant taxa in 228 genera and 63 families encountered on the 9,300-ha Fraser Experimental Forest in central Colorado. Synonyms appearing in previous publications and other works pertaining to the Fraser Experimental Forest, as well as appropriate Colorado floras and less-technical field guides, are included. Plant communities and habitats are discussed, and a list of 54 lichens is also presented. A glossary of related terms is included.

  19. Experimenter Effects on Pain Reporting in Women Vary across the Menstrual Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob M. Vigil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Separate lines of research have shown that menstrual cycling and contextual factors such as the gender of research personnel influence experimental pain reporting. Objectives. This study examines how brief, procedural interactions with female and male experimenters can affect experimentally reported pain (cold pressor task, CPT across the menstrual cycle. Methods. Based on the menstrual calendars 94 naturally cycling women and 38 women using hormonal contraceptives (Mage=19.83,  SD=3.09 were assigned to low and high fertility groups. This assignment was based on estimates of their probability of conception given their current cycle day. Experimenters (12 males, 7 females engaged in minimal procedural interactions with participants before the CPT was performed in solitude. Results. Naturally cycling women in the high fertility group showed significantly higher pain tolerance (81 sec, d=.79 following interactions with a male but not a female experimenter. Differences were not found for women in the low fertility or contraceptive groups. Discussion. The findings illustrate that menstrual functioning moderates the effect that experimenter gender has on pain reporting in women. Conclusion. These findings have implications for standardizing pain measurement protocols and understanding how basic biopsychosocial mechanisms (e.g., person-perception systems can modulate pain experiences.

  20. Assessing the completeness of reporting of observational studies in Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology. Cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo-Peña, M. (Mary); Barona-Fong, L. (Luis); Campo-López, J. (Julio); Arroyave, Y. (Yeni); J.A. Calvache (Jose Andres)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction The STROBE statement (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology), consisting of 22 points, was published in 2007 with the aim of improving the reporting of observational research. Objective To determine the completeness of reporting of observationa

  1. Assessing the completeness of reporting of observational studies in Colombian Journal of Anesthesiology. Cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bravo-Peña, M. (Mary); Barona-Fong, L. (Luis); Campo-López, J. (Julio); Arroyave, Y. (Yeni); J.A. Calvache (Jose Andres)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction The STROBE statement (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology), consisting of 22 points, was published in 2007 with the aim of improving the reporting of observational research. Objective To determine the completeness of reporting of observationa

  2. Experimental observation and computational identification of Sc@Cu16+ , a stable dopant-encapsulated copper cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldeman, Nele; Höltzl, Tibor; Neukermans, Sven; Veszprémi, Tamás; Nguyen, Minh Tho; Lievens, Peter

    2007-07-01

    We report a combined experimental and computational study of scandium doped copper clusters. The clusters are studied with time-of-flight mass spectrometry after laser fragmentation. Enhanced stabilities for specific cluster sizes in the mass abundance spectra are discussed using both electronic (shell closing) and geometric (symmetry) arguments. The exceptional stability observed for Cu16Sc+ is investigated in detail computationally. Density functional geometry optimizations at the Becke-Perdew 1986 LANL 2-double-zeta (BP86/LANL2DZ) level result in a Frank-Kasper tetrahedron, encapsulating a scandium atom in a highly coordinated position. The high stability is therefore interpreted in terms of extremely stable dopant encapsulated structures featuring a closed electron shell. The thermodynamic stability, as indicated by the stable backbone and large binding energy per atom, the relatively small ionization energy, and the moderate electron affinity of the neutral Cu16Sc cluster show that it has a superatom character, chemically similar to the alkaline-metal atoms.

  3. Experimental observations of stray current effects on steel fibres embedded in mortar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solgaard, A.O.S.; Carsana, M.; Geiker, M.R.;

    2013-01-01

    It is known that stray direct current can cause corrosive damage over time to bar reinforced concrete, but knowledge on the consequences to steel fibre reinforced concrete is limited. This paper presents analyses and corresponding results from an experimental program (parametric study) investigat...

  4. Experimental observation of second-harmonic generation and diffusion inside random media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faez, Sanli; Johnson, P. M.; Mazurenko, D. A.; Lagendijk, Ad

    2009-01-01

    We have experimentally measured the distribution of the second-harmonic intensity that is generated inside a highly scattering slab of porous gallium phosphide. Two complementary techniques for determining the distribution are used. First, the spatial distribution of second-harmonic light intensity

  5. Effects of alcohol portrayals in movies on actual alcohol consumption: an observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; van Baaren, R.B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study uses an experimental design to assess the effects of movie alcohol portrayal on alcohol consumption of young adults while watching a movie. Gender, weekly alcohol use and identification with the movie actor/character were assessed as moderators. Design A two (sex) × two (movie:

  6. Effects of alcohol portrayals in movies on actual alcohol consumption: An observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; Baaren, R.B. van; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims - This study uses an experimental design to assess the effects of movie alcohol portrayal on alcohol consumption of young adults while watching a movie. Gender, weekly alcohol use and identification with the movie actor/character were assessed as moderators. Design - A two (sex) x two (movie:

  7. Effects of alcohol portrayals in movies on actual alcohol consumption: an observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; van Baaren, R.B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2011-01-01

    Aims This study uses an experimental design to assess the effects of movie alcohol portrayal on alcohol consumption of young adults while watching a movie. Gender, weekly alcohol use and identification with the movie actor/character were assessed as moderators. Design A two (sex) × two (movie: alcoh

  8. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of

  9. Poor quality of reporting confounding bias in observational intervention studies : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, Rolf H H; Van Deursen, Anna M M; Hoes, Arno W; Hak, Eelko

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To systematically review observational studies on medical interventions to determine the quality of reporting of confounding. METHODS: Articles on observational studies on medical interventions in five general medical journals and five epidemiological journals published between January 2004

  10. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBs

  11. Poor quality of reporting confounding bias in observational intervention studies : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, Rolf H H; Van Deursen, Anna M M; Hoes, Arno W; Hak, Eelko

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To systematically review observational studies on medical interventions to determine the quality of reporting of confounding. METHODS: Articles on observational studies on medical interventions in five general medical journals and five epidemiological journals published between January 2004

  12. Exposure to soda commercials affects sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young woman: an observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; van Baaren, R.B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the direct effects of television commercials advertising soda on actual sugar-sweetened soda consumption among young women. An experimental-observational study design was used, in which 51 female students (ages 18-29) were exposed to a 35-min movie clip, interrupted by two

  13. Exposure to soda commercials affects sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young women: An observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; Baaren, R.B. van; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the direct effects of television commercials advertising soda on actual sugar-sweetened soda consumption among young women. An experimental-observational study design was used, in which 51 female students (ages 18-29) were exposed to a 35-min movie clip, interrupted by two

  14. Exposure to soda commercials affects sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young women: An observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; Baaren, R.B. van; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the direct effects of television commercials advertising soda on actual sugar-sweetened soda consumption among young women. An experimental-observational study design was used, in which 51 female students (ages 18-29) were exposed to a 35-min movie clip, interrupted by two

  15. Exposure to soda commercials affects sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young woman: an observational experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koordeman, R.; Anschutz, D.J.; van Baaren, R.B.; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the direct effects of television commercials advertising soda on actual sugar-sweetened soda consumption among young women. An experimental-observational study design was used, in which 51 female students (ages 18-29) were exposed to a 35-min movie clip, interrupted by two

  16. Comment: Spurious Correlation and Other Observations on Experimental Design for Engineering Dimensional Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.

    2013-08-01

    This article discusses the paper "Experimental Design for Engineering Dimensional Analysis" by Albrecht et al. (2013, Technometrics). That paper provides and overview of engineering dimensional analysis (DA) for use in developing DA models. The paper proposes methods for generating model-robust experimental designs to supporting fitting DA models. The specific approach is to develop a design that maximizes the efficiency of a specified empirical model (EM) in the original independent variables, subject to a minimum efficiency for a DA model expressed in terms of dimensionless groups (DGs). This discussion article raises several issues and makes recommendations regarding the proposed approach. Also, the concept of spurious correlation is raised and discussed. Spurious correlation results from the response DG being calculated using several independent variables that are also used to calculate predictor DGs in the DA model.

  17. Hydromechanical behaviour of a heterogeneous compacted soil: experimental observations and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    George Stephenson Gold Medal, atorgada per la Institution of Civil Engineering (U.K.) The paper describes a theoretical and experimental study of the coupled hydromechanical behaviour of a compacted mixture of bentonite powder and bentonite pellets intended as sealing material in underground repositories for nuclear waste. One of the main advantages of the use of powder/pellets mixtures is the reduction of the compaction effort required to achieve the value of average dry density nec...

  18. Experimental observation of three-frequency quasiperiodic solution in a ring of unidirectionally coupled oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, L; Perlikowski, P; Kapitaniak, T; Stefanski, A

    2015-06-01

    The subject of the experimental research supported with numerical simulations presented in this paper is an analog electrical circuit representing the ring of unidirectionally coupled single-well Duffing oscillators. The research is concentrated on the existence of the stable three-frequency quasiperiodic attractor in this system. It is shown that such solution can be robustly stable in a wide range of parameters of the system under consideration in spite of a parameter mismatch which is unavoidable during experiment.

  19. Experimental observation of three-frequency quasiperiodic solution in a ring of unidirectionally coupled oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, L.; Perlikowski, P.; Kapitaniak, T.; Stefanski, A.

    2015-06-01

    The subject of the experimental research supported with numerical simulations presented in this paper is an analog electrical circuit representing the ring of unidirectionally coupled single-well Duffing oscillators. The research is concentrated on the existence of the stable three-frequency quasiperiodic attractor in this system. It is shown that such solution can be robustly stable in a wide range of parameters of the system under consideration in spite of a parameter mismatch which is unavoidable during experiment.

  20. Generalizability and decision studies to inform observational and experimental research in classroom settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottema-Beutel, Kristen; Lloyd, Blair; Carter, Erik W; Asmus, Jennifer M

    2014-11-01

    Attaining reliable estimates of observational measures can be challenging in school and classroom settings, as behavior can be influenced by multiple contextual factors. Generalizability (G) studies can enable researchers to estimate the reliability of observational data, and decision (D) studies can inform how many observation sessions are necessary to achieve a criterion level of reliability. We conducted G and D studies using observational data from a randomized control trial focusing on social and academic participation of students with severe disabilities in inclusive secondary classrooms. Results highlight the importance of anchoring observational decisions to reliability estimates from existing or pilot data sets. We outline steps for conducting G and D studies and address options when reliability estimates are lower than desired.

  1. A Novel Chemically Modified Curcumin Reduces Severity of Experimental Periodontal Disease in Rats: Initial Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna S. Elburki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetracycline-based matrix metalloproteinase- (MMP- inhibitors are currently approved for two inflammatory diseases, periodontitis and rosacea. The current study addresses the therapeutic potential of a novel pleiotropic MMP-inhibitor not based on an antibiotic. To induce experimental periodontitis, endotoxin (LPS was repeatedly injected into the gingiva of rats on one side of the maxilla; the contralateral (control side received saline injections. Two groups of rats were treated by daily oral intubation with a chemically modified curcumin, CMC 2.24, for two weeks; the control groups received vehicle alone. After sacrifice, gingiva, blood, and maxilla were collected, the jaws were defleshed, and periodontal (alveolar bone loss was quantified morphometrically and by μ-CT scan. The gingivae were pooled per experimental group, extracted, and analyzed for MMPs (gelatin zymography; western blot and for cytokines (e.g., IL-1β; ELISA; serum and plasma samples were analyzed for cytokines and MMP-8. The LPS-induced pathologically excessive bone loss was reduced to normal levels based on either morphometric (P=0.003 or μ-CT (P=0.008 analysis. A similar response was seen for MMPs and cytokines in the gingiva and blood. This initial study, on a novel triketonic zinc-binding CMC, indicates potential efficacy on inflammatory mediators and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis and warrants future therapeutic and pharmacokinetic investigations.

  2. Hepatocyte metaplasia in experimental chagasic pancreatitis: preliminary report Metaplasia hepatocítica em pancreatite chagásica experimental: nota prévia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitorino Modesto dos Santos

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Beginning the study of chronic pathologic changes in pancreas of hamsters experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi Vic strain, hepatocyte metaplasia was observed in one animal from infected group. This is the first report of oncocytes in Chagas' disease, which could be due to aberrant regenerative response to pancreas inflammatory process.Iniciando estudo de alterações patológicas crônicas no pâncreas de hamsters experimentalmente infectados com a cepa Vic de Trypanosoma cruzi, metaplasia oncocítica foi observada em um dos animais infectados. Este é o primeiro relato de oncocitos na doença de Chagas, que poderiam decorrer de resposta regenerativa aberrante ao processo inflamatório pancreático.

  3. Nuclear Physics Division, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osuch, S. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    In the presented Annual Report the activities of Nuclear Physics Division (NPD) of Warsaw University in 1995 are described. The report consists of three sections: (i) Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure (11 articles); (ii) Instrumentation and Experimental Methods (9 articles); (iii) Other Research (1 article). Additionally the list of seminars held at the NPD, personnel list and list of published papers are also given. The first, leading article in the report written by head of NPD prof. Ch. Droste the general description of the Department activity is presented.

  4. Experimental observation of the rule of flexible vegetation on erosion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termini, D.

    2012-04-01

    Vegetation altering hydrodynamic conditions of an open channel flow controls the exchanges of sediment, nutrients and contaminants. Thus, the knowledge of the hydraulic characteristics of flow over vegetation is very important to support the management of fluvial processes. But, the analysis of the hydrodynamic conditions is complex because vegetation is flexible in varying degrees and it oscillates in the flow changing position. Furthermore, because of temporal changing of roughness due to natural vegetative growth, the response of vegetation to the flow can change in time. Many theoretical and experimental investigations have been performed in order to analyze both the mean flow and turbulence structure of open-channel flow (Nezu and Rodi 1986; Lemmin and Rolland 1997; Shvidchenko and Pender 2001; Ghisalberti and Nepf, 2002). Recent experimental runs carried out in laboratory channels with flexible vegetation, realized by using artificial filaments (Kutija and Hong 1996; Ikeda and Kanazawa 1996), investigated some peculiar characteristics of flow turbulence structure and revealed the generation of periodic organized vortices whose center is located slightly above the top of the vegetation layer. On the other hand, recent experimental studies conducted by Termini and Sammartano (2012) in a mobile-bed laboratory channel, and in absence of vegetation, have demonstrated that the formation of coherent turbulence structures plays an important role in sediment transport and in scouring evolution. In particular, ejection and sweep events contribute significantly to erosion, deposition and sediment suspension. In this paper, in order to give a contribution to the understanding of the rule of vegetation on the analyzed erosion process, experimental results obtained in the same laboratory channel, but with bed covered by flexible vegetation, are presented. Attention is paid to interaction vegetation/erosion both along the vegetated-bed channel reach and downstream of it. In

  5. Speech-based recognition of self-reported and observed emotion in a dimensional space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, Khiet P.; Leeuwen, van David A.; Jong, de Franciska M.G.

    2012-01-01

    The differences between self-reported and observed emotion have only marginally been investigated in the context of speech-based automatic emotion recognition. We address this issue by comparing self-reported emotion ratings to observed emotion ratings and look at how differences between these two t

  6. Linking questionnaire reports and observer ratings of young couples’ hostility and support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Frederick O.; Melby, Janet N.; Conger, Rand D.; Surjadi, Florenzia F.

    2012-01-01

    Past studies have correlated observer ratings with questionnaire self- and partner-reports of behaviors in close relationships. However, few studies have actually proposed and tested longitudinal models that link observer ratings to past behaviors and to questionnaire self- and partner-reports of behaviors during an observational task. Using data from a panel of 324 young couples, we demonstrate that (1) observer ratings of hostility and support are significantly related to couple reports of the same behavior in the relationship two years earlier, and (2) respondent and partner questionnaire reports of hostility and support during the observational task converge with observer ratings of the same behavior even after controlling for earlier self- and partner-reports. These findings demonstrate that observer reports based on brief discussion tasks reflect the tenor of the relationship over a relatively long period of time. They also demonstrate that couple reports of hostile interactions reflect observable behaviors beyond that attributed to earlier self- and partner-reports. Consistent with previous research, effect sizes are larger for hostility than support but there are few differences between men and women. PMID:22662768

  7. Experimental observation of gravity-capillary solitary waves generated by a moving air-suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beomchan; Cho, Yeunwoo

    2016-11-01

    Gravity-capillary solitary waves are generated by a moving "air-suction" forcing instead of a moving "air-blowing" forcing. The air-suction forcing moves horizontally over the surface of deep water with speeds close to the minimum linear phase speed cmin = 23 cm/s. Three different states are observed according to forcing speed below cmin. At relatively low speeds below cmin, small-amplitude linear circular depressions are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. As the forcing speed increases close to cmin, however, nonlinear 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed, and they move steadily ahead of and along with the moving forcing. Finally, when the forcing speed is very close to cmin, oblique shedding phenomena of 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed ahead of the moving forcing. We found that all the linear and nonlinear wave patterns generated by the air-suction forcing correspond to those generated by the air-blowing forcing. The main difference is that 3-D gravity-capillary solitary waves are observed "ahead of" the air-suction forcing, whereas the same waves are observed "behind" the air-blowing forcing. This work was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2014R1A1A1002441).

  8. Experimental observation of strong coupling effects on the dispersion of dust acoustic waves in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, P; Sen, A; Kaw, P K

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion properties of low frequency dust acoustic waves in the strong coupling regime are investigated experimentally in an argon plasma embedded with a mixture of kaolin and $MnO_2$ dust particles. The neutral pressure is varied over a wide range to change the collisional properties of the dusty plasma. In the low collisional regime the turnover of the dispersion curve at higher wave numbers and the resultant region of $\\partial\\omega/\\partial k < 0$ are identified as signatures of dust-dust correlations. In the high collisional regime dust neutral collisions produce a similar effect and prevent an unambiguous identification of strong coupling effects.

  9. Experimental observation of electroluminescence enhancement on green LEDs mediated by surface plasmons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang-Geol; Choi, Ki-Young; Kim, Jin-Ha; Song, Seok Ho

    2014-08-25

    We experimentally demonstrate the 1.5-fold enhancement of the electroluminescence (EL) of surface-plasmon (SP)-mediated green LEDs. On the p-clad surface of InGaN/GaN multi-quantum well LEDs, a 2-dimensional, second-order grating structure is textured and coated with an Ag electrode. With this setup, a larger EL enhancement factor is obtained at a higher injected current, which suggests that SP-LEDs can be a possible solution to efficiency droop, which is one of the main problems in developing high-power LEDs. Details regarding the implementation of our device are discussed.

  10. Experimentally observe the effect of spherical aberration on diffractive intraocular lens using adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huanqing; DeLestrange, Elie

    2015-03-01

    We first investigated the similarity in optical quality of a batch of diffractive intraocular lenses (DIOLs), providing experimental evidence for one DIOL as representative of a batch. Using adaptive optics, we then evaluated one DIOL under different levels of Zernike spherical aberration (SA) by applying both a point spread function test and a psychophysical visual acuity test. We found that for small aperture size SA has the effect of shifting the through-focus curve of DIOL. Also, for a relatively large aperture size, it has different effects on the distant and near foci.

  11. Universal dimer in a collisionally opaque medium: experimental observables and Efimov resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machtey, Olga; Kessler, David A; Khaykovich, Lev

    2012-03-30

    A universal dimer is subject to secondary collisions with atoms when formed in a cloud of ultracold atoms via three-body recombination. We show that in a collisionally opaque medium, the value of the scattering length that results in the maximum number of secondary collisions may not correspond to the Efimov resonance at the atom-dimer threshold and thus cannot be automatically associated with it. This result explains a number of controversies in recent experimental results on universal three-body states and supports the emerging evidence for the significant finite range corrections to the first excited Efimov energy level.

  12. Experimental observation of optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation using a single SOI microdisk chip

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Li; Liao, Shasha; Tan, Sisi; Shi, Lei; Gao, Dingshan; Zhang, Xinliang

    2013-01-01

    Optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation play important roles in communications, computing, information processing and signal analysis in optical domain which offering huge bandwidth. Meanwhile, silicon-based photonic integrated circuits are preferable in all-optical signal processing due to their intrinsic advantages of low power consumption, compact footprint and ultra-high speed. In this study, we analyze the interrelation between first-order optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation and then experimentally demonstrate a feasible integrated scheme which can simultaneously function as first-order optical differentiation and optical Hilbert transformation based on a single microdisk resonator. This finding may motivate the development of integrated optical signal processors.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Cold-Drawn Low Carbon Steel for Nail Manufacture: Experimental Observation

    OpenAIRE

    N.A. Raji; Oluwole, O.O.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of service situation on the mechanical properties of plain nails manufactured from low carbon steel. The influence of the degree of cold drawing on the mechanical properties and strain hardening of the material is investigated by tensile test experimentation. The stress-strain relationships of the cold-drawn low carbon steel were investigated over the 20, 25, 40 and 55% degree of drawn deformation for the manufacture of 4, 3, 2½ and ...

  14. Correlation between calculated molecular descriptors of excipient amino acids and experimentally observed thermal stability of lysozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng-Lund, Helena; Friis, Natascha; van de Weert, Marco

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) between protein stability and the physicochemical properties of excipients was investigated to enable a more rational choice of stabilizing excipients than prior knowledge. The thermal transition temperature and aggregation time were determined...... analysis was applied to correlate the descriptors with the experimental results. It was possible to identify descriptors, i.e. amino acids properties, with a positive influence on either transition temperature or aggregation onset time, or both. A high number of hydrogen bond acceptor moieties was the most....... The QSPR shows good correlation between calculated molecular descriptors and the measured stabilizing effect of amino acids on lysozyme....

  15. Quantitative study on experimentally observed poroelastic behavior of Berea sandstone in two-phase fluid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiroki; Aichi, Masaatsu; Tokunaga, Tomochika; Yamamoto, Hajime; Ogawa, Toyokazu; Aoki, Tomoyuki

    2014-08-01

    Coupled two-phase fluid flow and poroelastic deformation of Berea sandstone is studied through laboratory experiment and numerical simulation. In the experiment, compressed air was infiltrated from the bottom of a water-saturated cylindrical Berea sandstone sample under hydrostatic external stress condition. Both axial and circumferential strains at half the height of the sample showed sudden extension and monotonic and gradual extension afterward. Numerical simulation based on thermodynamically consistent constitutive equations was conducted in order to quantitatively analyze the experimental results. In a simulation assuming isotropy of material properties, the volumetric discharge rate of water at the outlet and one of the axial, circumferential, and volumetric strains at half the height of the sample were reproduced well by each parameter set, while the other two strains were not. When introducing transverse isotropy, all the experimental data were reproduced well. In addition, the effect of saturation dependency of Bishop's effective stress coefficient on the deformation behavior of porous media was discussed, and it was found that strains, both axial and circumferential, are sensitive to the coefficient.

  16. Principles and standards for reporting animal experiments in The Journal of Physiology and Experimental Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, David

    2015-07-01

    The Journal of Physiology and Experimental Physiology have always used UK legislation as the basis of their policy on ethical standards in experiments on non-human animals. However, for international journals with authors, editors and referees from outside the UK the policy can lack transparency and is sometimes cumbersome, requiring the intervention of a Senior Ethics Reviewer or advice from external experts familiar with UK legislation. The journals have therefore decided to set out detailed guidelines for how authors should report experimental procedures that involve animals. As well as helping authors, this new clarity will facilitate the review process and decision making where there are questions regarding animal ethics.

  17. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  18. Design and Experimental Implementation of a Beam-Type Twin Dynamic Vibration Absorber for a Cantilevered Flexible Structure Carrying an Unbalanced Rotor: Numerical and Experimental Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Özer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental and numerical results about the effectiveness of a beam-type twin dynamic vibration absorber for a cantilevered flexible structure carrying an unbalanced rotor. An experimental laboratory prototype setup has been built and implemented in our laboratory and numerical investigations have been performed through finite element analysis. The proposed system design consists of a primary cantilevered flexible structure with an attached dual-mass cantilevered secondary dynamic vibration absorber arrangement. In addition, an unbalanced rotor system is attached to the tip of the flexible cantilevered structure to inspect the system response under harmonic excitations. Numerical findings and experimental observations have revealed that significant vibration reductions are possible with the proposed dual-mass, cantilevered dynamic vibration absorber on a flexible cantilevered platform carrying an unbalanced rotor system at its tip. The proposed system is efficient and it can be practically tuned for variety of design and operating conditions. The designed setup and the results in this paper can serve for practicing engineers, researchers and can be used for educational purposes.

  19. Evaluation of the Quality of Reporting of Observational Studies in Otorhinolaryngology - Based on the STROBE Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksma, Martine; Joosten, Michiel H M A; Peters, Jeroen P M; Grolman, Wilko; Stegeman, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies are the most frequently published studies in literature. When randomized controlled trials cannot be conducted because of ethical or practical considerations, an observational study design is the first choice. The STROBE Statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology) was developed to provide guidance on how to adequately report observational studies. The objectives were 1) to evaluate the quality of reporting of observational studies of otorhinolaryngologic literature using the STROBE Statement checklist, 2) to compare the quality of reporting of observational studies in the top 5 Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) journals versus the top 5 general medical journals and 3) to formulate recommendations to improve adequate reporting of observational research in otorhinolaryngologic literature. The top 5 general medical journals and top 5 otorhinolaryngologic journals were selected based on their ISI Web of Knowledge impact factors. On August 3rd, 2015, we performed a PubMed search using different filters to retrieve observational articles from these journals. Studies were selected from 2010 to 2014 for the general medical journals and from 2015 for the ENT journals. We assessed all STROBE items to examine how many items were reported adequately for each journal type. The articles in the top 5 general medical journals (n = 11) reported a mean of 69.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 65.8%-72.7%; median 70.6%), whereas the top 5 ENT journals (n = 29) reported a mean of 51.4% (95% CI: 47.7%-55.0%; median 50.0%). The two journal types reported STROBE items significantly different (p articles can considerably enhance. The quality of reporting was better in general medical journals compared to ENT journals. To improve the quality of reporting of observational studies, we recommend authors and editors to endorse and actively implement the STROBE Statement.

  20. Brazil : Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes--Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes: Accounting and Auditing (ROSC A&A) has been prepared under the Financial Sector Assessment Program in Brazil. The report assesses the status of implementation of 2005 ROSC A&A policy recommendations, highlights recent improvements in Brazil's corporate financial reporting framework, and sheds light on emerging issues regarding the insti...

  1. Does Civic Education Matter?: The Power of Long-Term Observation and the Experimental Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Ryan L.; Monson, J. Quin

    2015-01-01

    Despite consensus regarding the civic shortcomings of American citizens, no such scholarly consensus exists regarding the effectiveness of civic education addressing political apathy and ignorance. Accordingly, we report the results of a detailed study of students enrolled in introductory American politics courses on the campuses of two large…

  2. Comparison of 2008 national and state-level self-reported and observed seatbelt use estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahimova, Aybaniz; Shults, Ruth A; Beck, Laurie F

    2011-06-01

    The objective of the study was to compare national and state-level estimates of self-reported and observed seatbelt use for 2008. Self-reported seatbelt use from the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System was compared with 2008 observed seatbelt use published by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The ratio of self-reported belt use to observed use was calculated for each state, and the correlation between the two seatbelt measures was examined using the Pearson correlation coefficient. The median state ratio of self-reported to observed belt use was 0.97. Self-reported use was lower than observed use in 38 states. A moderate association was revealed between the self-reported and observed use (r=0.71, p<0.01). The findings suggest that, as seatbelt use has increased over time, measures of self-reported and observed use have converged, and any upward bias in self-reported use due to social desirability has substantially declined.

  3. Survey of the quality of experimental design, statistical analysis and reporting of research using animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Kilkenny

    Full Text Available For scientific, ethical and economic reasons, experiments involving animals should be appropriately designed, correctly analysed and transparently reported. This increases the scientific validity of the results, and maximises the knowledge gained from each experiment. A minimum amount of relevant information must be included in scientific publications to ensure that the methods and results of a study can be reviewed, analysed and repeated. Omitting essential information can raise scientific and ethical concerns. We report the findings of a systematic survey of reporting, experimental design and statistical analysis in published biomedical research using laboratory animals. Medline and EMBASE were searched for studies reporting research on live rats, mice and non-human primates carried out in UK and US publicly funded research establishments. Detailed information was collected from 271 publications, about the objective or hypothesis of the study, the number, sex, age and/or weight of animals used, and experimental and statistical methods. Only 59% of the studies stated the hypothesis or objective of the study and the number and characteristics of the animals used. Appropriate and efficient experimental design is a critical component of high-quality science. Most of the papers surveyed did not use randomisation (87% or blinding (86%, to reduce bias in animal selection and outcome assessment. Only 70% of the publications that used statistical methods described their methods and presented the results with a measure of error or variability. This survey has identified a number of issues that need to be addressed in order to improve experimental design and reporting in publications describing research using animals. Scientific publication is a powerful and important source of information; the authors of scientific publications therefore have a responsibility to describe their methods and results comprehensively, accurately and transparently, and peer

  4. Survey of the Quality of Experimental Design, Statistical Analysis and Reporting of Research Using Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Carol; Parsons, Nick; Kadyszewski, Ed; Festing, Michael F. W.; Cuthill, Innes C.; Fry, Derek; Hutton, Jane; Altman, Douglas G.

    2009-01-01

    For scientific, ethical and economic reasons, experiments involving animals should be appropriately designed, correctly analysed and transparently reported. This increases the scientific validity of the results, and maximises the knowledge gained from each experiment. A minimum amount of relevant information must be included in scientific publications to ensure that the methods and results of a study can be reviewed, analysed and repeated. Omitting essential information can raise scientific and ethical concerns. We report the findings of a systematic survey of reporting, experimental design and statistical analysis in published biomedical research using laboratory animals. Medline and EMBASE were searched for studies reporting research on live rats, mice and non-human primates carried out in UK and US publicly funded research establishments. Detailed information was collected from 271 publications, about the objective or hypothesis of the study, the number, sex, age and/or weight of animals used, and experimental and statistical methods. Only 59% of the studies stated the hypothesis or objective of the study and the number and characteristics of the animals used. Appropriate and efficient experimental design is a critical component of high-quality science. Most of the papers surveyed did not use randomisation (87%) or blinding (86%), to reduce bias in animal selection and outcome assessment. Only 70% of the publications that used statistical methods described their methods and presented the results with a measure of error or variability. This survey has identified a number of issues that need to be addressed in order to improve experimental design and reporting in publications describing research using animals. Scientific publication is a powerful and important source of information; the authors of scientific publications therefore have a responsibility to describe their methods and results comprehensively, accurately and transparently, and peer reviewers and

  5. Survey of the quality of experimental design, statistical analysis and reporting of research using animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilkenny, Carol; Parsons, Nick; Kadyszewski, Ed; Festing, Michael F W; Cuthill, Innes C; Fry, Derek; Hutton, Jane; Altman, Douglas G

    2009-11-30

    For scientific, ethical and economic reasons, experiments involving animals should be appropriately designed, correctly analysed and transparently reported. This increases the scientific validity of the results, and maximises the knowledge gained from each experiment. A minimum amount of relevant information must be included in scientific publications to ensure that the methods and results of a study can be reviewed, analysed and repeated. Omitting essential information can raise scientific and ethical concerns. We report the findings of a systematic survey of reporting, experimental design and statistical analysis in published biomedical research using laboratory animals. Medline and EMBASE were searched for studies reporting research on live rats, mice and non-human primates carried out in UK and US publicly funded research establishments. Detailed information was collected from 271 publications, about the objective or hypothesis of the study, the number, sex, age and/or weight of animals used, and experimental and statistical methods. Only 59% of the studies stated the hypothesis or objective of the study and the number and characteristics of the animals used. Appropriate and efficient experimental design is a critical component of high-quality science. Most of the papers surveyed did not use randomisation (87%) or blinding (86%), to reduce bias in animal selection and outcome assessment. Only 70% of the publications that used statistical methods described their methods and presented the results with a measure of error or variability. This survey has identified a number of issues that need to be addressed in order to improve experimental design and reporting in publications describing research using animals. Scientific publication is a powerful and important source of information; the authors of scientific publications therefore have a responsibility to describe their methods and results comprehensively, accurately and transparently, and peer reviewers and

  6. Experimental observation of silver and gold penetration into dental ceramic by means of a radiotracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moya, F.; Payan, J.; Bernardini, J.; Moya, E.G.

    1987-12-01

    A radiotracer technique was used to study silver and gold diffusion into dental porcelain under experimental conditions close to the real conditions in prosthetic laboratories for porcelain bakes. It was clearly shown that these non-oxidizable elements were able to diffuse into the ceramic as well as oxidizable ones. The penetration depth varied widely according to the element. The ratio DAg/DAu was about 10(3) around 850 degrees C. In contrast to gold, the silver diffusion rate was high enough to allow silver, from the metallic alloy, to be present at the external ceramic surface after diffusion into the ceramic. Hence, the greening of dental porcelains baked on silver-rich alloys could be explained mainly by a solid-state diffusion mechanism.

  7. Experimental observation of backscattered light based on different coherence between incident laser beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangfu; Meng; Chen; Wang; Honghai; An; Guo; Jia; Huazhen; Zhou; Sizu; Fu

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental results on NIF revealed a much higher stimulated Brillouin scattering(SBS)and stimulated Raman scattering(SRS)backscatter than expected;one possible reason was due to the coherence between incident laser beams.In our research,two laser beams(~1 ns,~250 J,527 nm in each one)with different coherent degrees between them from the SG-II facility were employed to irradiate an Au plate target;the backscatter of SBS and SRS in the range of the given solid angle had been measured.The results showed that it could change dramatically corresponding to the difference of the coherent degree between the two laser beams,and there was usually more intense backscatter the higher the coherent degree between the incident beams.

  8. Bottomonium states versus recent experimental observations in the QCD-inspired potential model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Wei-Zhao; CAO Lu; YANG You-Chang; CHEN Hong

    2013-01-01

    In the QCD-inspired potential model where the quark-antiquark interaction consists of the usual onegluon-exchange and the mixture of long-range scalar and vector linear confining potentials with the lowest order relativistic correction,we investigate the mass spectra and electromagnetic processes of a bottomonium system by using the Gaussian expansion method.It reveals that the vector component of the mixing confinement is anticonfining and takes around 18.51% of the confining potential.Combining the new experimental data released by Belle,BaBar and LHC,we systematically discuss the energy levels of the bottomonium states and make the predictions of the electromagnetic decays for further experiments.

  9. Methane Hydrate Dissociation by Depressurization in a Mount Elbert Sandstone Sample: Experimental Observations and Numerical Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-15

    A preserved sample of hydrate-bearing sandstone from the Mount Elbert Test Well was dissociated by depressurization while monitoring the internal temperature of the sample in two locations and the density changes at high spatial resolution using x-ray CT scanning. The sample contained two distinct regions having different porosity and grain size distributions. The hydrate dissociation occurred initially throughout the sample as a result of depressing the pressure below the stability pressure. This initial stage reduced the temperature to the equilibrium point, which was maintained above the ice point. After that, dissociation occurred from the outside in as a result of heat transfer from the controlled temperature bath surrounding the pressure vessel. Numerical modeling of the test using TOUGH+HYDRATE yielded a gas production curve that closely matches the experimentally measured curve.

  10. Comparing the invasibility of experimental "reefs" with field observations of natural reefs and artificial structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dafforn

    Full Text Available Natural systems are increasingly being modified by the addition of artificial habitats which may facilitate invasion. Where invaders are able to disperse from artificial habitats, their impact may spread to surrounding natural communities and therefore it is important to investigate potential factors that reduce or enhance invasibility. We surveyed the distribution of non-indigenous and native invertebrates and algae between artificial habitats and natural reefs in a marine subtidal system. We also deployed sandstone plates as experimental 'reefs' and manipulated the orientation, starting assemblage and degree of shading. Invertebrates (non-indigenous and native appeared to be responding to similar environmental factors (e.g. orientation and occupied most space on artificial structures and to a lesser extent reef walls. Non-indigenous invertebrates are less successful than native invertebrates on horizontal reefs despite functional similarities. Manipulative experiments revealed that even when non-indigenous invertebrates invade vertical "reefs", they are unlikely to gain a foothold and never exceed covers of native invertebrates (regardless of space availability. Community ecology suggests that invertebrates will dominate reef walls and algae horizontal reefs due to functional differences, however our surveys revealed that native algae dominate both vertical and horizontal reefs in shallow estuarine systems. Few non-indigenous algae were sampled in the study, however where invasive algal species are present in a system, they may present a threat to reef communities. Our findings suggest that non-indigenous species are less successful at occupying space on reef compared to artificial structures, and manipulations of biotic and abiotic conditions (primarily orientation and to a lesser extent biotic resistance on experimental "reefs" explained a large portion of this variation, however they could not fully explain the magnitude of differences.

  11. Numerical modeling of experimental observations on gas formation and multi-phase flow of carbon dioxide in subsurface formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, R.; Dash, Z.; Sakaki, T.; Plampin, M. R.; Lassen, R. N.; Illangasekare, T. H.; Zyvoloski, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the concerns related to geologic CO2 sequestration is potential leakage of CO2 and its subsequent migration to shallow groundwater resources leading to geochemical impacts. Developing approaches to monitor CO2 migration in shallow aquifer and mitigate leakage impacts will require improving our understanding of gas phase formation and multi-phase flow subsequent to CO2 leakage in shallow aquifers. We are utilizing an integrated approach combining laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to characterize the multi-phase flow of CO2 in shallow aquifers. The laboratory experiments involve a series of highly controlled experiments in which CO2 dissolved water is injected in homogeneous and heterogeneous soil columns and tanks. The experimental results are used to study the effects of soil properties, temperature, pressure gradients and heterogeneities on gas formation and migration. We utilize the Finite Element Heat and Mass (FEHM) simulator (Zyvoloski et al, 2010) to numerically model the experimental results. The numerical models capture the physics of CO2 exsolution, multi-phase fluid flow as well as sand heterogeneity. Experimental observations of pressure, temperature and gas saturations are used to develop and constrain conceptual models for CO2 gas-phase formation and multi-phase CO2 flow in porous media. This talk will provide details of development of conceptual models based on experimental observation, development of numerical models for laboratory experiments and modelling results.

  12. Direct experimental observation of the single reflection optical Goos-Hänchen shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwefel, H G L; Köhler, W; Lu, Z H; Fan, J; Wang, L J

    2008-04-15

    We report a precise direct measurement of the Goos-Hänchen shift after one reflection off a dielectric interface coated with periodic metal stripes. The spatial displacement of the shift is determined by image analysis. A maximal absolute shift of 5.18 and 23.39 mum for TE and TM polarized light, respectively, is determined. This technique is simple to implement and can be used for a large range of incident angles.

  13. Coupled transport, mixing and biogeochemical reactions in fractured media: experimental observations and modelling at the Ploemeur fractured rock observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Borgne, T.; Bochet, O.; Klepikova, M.; Kang, P. K.; Shakas, A.; Aquilina, L.; Dufresne, A.; Linde, N.; Dentz, M.; Bour, O.

    2016-12-01

    Transport processes in fractured media and associated reactions are governed by multiscale heterogeneity ranging from fracture wall roughness at small scale to broadly distributed fracture lengths at network scale. This strong disorder induces a variety of emerging phenomena, including flow channeling, anomalous transport and heat transfer, enhanced mixing and reactive hotspot development. These processes are generally difficult to isolate and monitor in the field because of the high degree of complexity and coupling between them. We report in situ experimental observations from the Ploemeur fractured rock observatory (http://hplus.ore.fr/en/ploemeur) that provide new insights on the dynamics of transport and reaction processes in fractured media. These include dipole and push pull tracer tests that allow understanding and modelling anomalous transport processes characterized by heavy-tailed residence time distributions (Kang et al. 2015), thermal push pull tests that show the existence of highly channeled flow with a strong control on fracture matrix exchanges (Klepikova et al. 2016) and time lapse hydrogeophysical monitoring of saline tracer tests that allow quantifying the distribution of transport length scales governing dispersion processes (Shakas et al. 2016). These transport processes are then shown to induce rapid oxygen delivery and mixing at depth leading to massive biofilm development (Bochet et al., in prep.). Hence, this presentation will attempt to link these observations made at different scales to quantify and model the coupling between flow channeling, non-Fickian transport, mixing and chemical reactions in fractured media. References: Bochet et al. Biofilm blooms driven by enhanced mixing in fractured rock, in prep. Klepikova et al. 2016, Heat as a tracer for understanding transport processes in fractured media: theory and field assessment from multi-scale thermal push-pull tracer tests, Water Resour. Res. 52Shakas et al. 2016, Hydrogeophysical

  14. Experimental Observation of the Inverse Spin Hall Effect at Room Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Baoli; Shi, Junren; Wang, Wenxin; Zhao, Hongming; Li, Dafang; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shoucheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Xue, Qikun; Chen, Dongmin; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.

    2010-03-16

    We observe the inverse spin Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas confined in Al-GaAs/InGaAs quantum wells. Specifically, they find that an inhomogeneous spin density induced by the optical injection gives rise to an electric current transverse to both the spin polarization and its gradient. The spin Hall conductivity can be inferred from such a measurement through the Einstein relation and the onsager relation, and is found to have the order of magnitude of 0.5(e{sup 2}/h). The observation is made at the room temperature and in samples with macroscopic sizes, suggesting that the inverse spin Hall effects is a robust macroscopic transport phenomenon.

  15. Experimental observation and investigation of the prewave zone effect in optical diffraction radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karataev

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition radiation (TR and diffraction radiation (DR has widely been used for both electron beam diagnostics and generation of intense radiation beams in the millimeter and the submillimeter wavelength range. Recently, it was theoretically predicted that TR and DR properties change either at extremely high energies of electrons or at long radiation wavelengths. This phenomenon was called a prewave zone effect. We have performed the first observation and detailed investigation of the prewave zone effect in optical diffraction radiation at 1.28 GeV electron beam at the KEK-Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-ATF. The beam energy at KEK-ATF is definitely not the highest one achieved in the world. Since we could easily observe the effect, at higher energies it might cause serious problems. We developed and applied a method for prewave zone suppression valid for optical wavelengths. Furthermore, a method for prewave zone suppression applicable for longer radiation wavelengths is discussed.

  16. Microwave Experimental Observation of Transmitted Enhanced Goos-Hanchen Displacement in Symmetry-Double-Prism Configuration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Tao; GE Guo-Ku; LI Chun-Fang; JIN Peng-Cheng

    2008-01-01

    is theoretically proven that the transmitted Goos-Hanchen (GH) displacement in the symmetry-double prism could be resonantly enhanced when the incident angle is less than but near the critical angle, and is modulated by the slab thickness between two prisms and the incident angle. This enhancement effect is directly observed in microwave experiments in which the incident angle is properly chosen. The measured data are in good agreement with the result of the numerical simulation.

  17. Experimental and Observational Studies of Molecular Hydrogen in Interstellar and Circumstellar Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Keri

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the evolution of gas over the lifetime of protoplanetary disks provides us with important clues about how planet formation mechanisms drive the diversity of exoplanetary systems observed to date. In the first part of my thesis, I discuss how I use fluorescent emission observations of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) with the Hubble Space Telescope to study the warm molecular regions (a distributions of H 2 help provide important constraints on the radiation properties of gas left in the inner disk of protoplanetary disks as they evolve. Additionally, I analyzed the absorption component of these fluorescence features, embedded within the hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission line produced by the accretion of material onto the host protostar. I present column density and temperature estimates for the H2 populations in each disk sightline, and discuss the behavior and possible spatial origins of these hot molecules. As part of my thesis, I address some observational requirements needed to gain further insights into the behavior of the warm, gaseous protoplanetary disk, focusing specifically on a spectrograph concept for the next-generation LUVOIR Surveyor. I discuss a testbed instrument, the Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS), built as a demonstration of one component of the LUVOIR spectrograph and new technological improvements to UV optical components for the next generation of near- to far-UV astrophysical observatories. CHESS is a far-UV sounding rocket experiment designed to probe the warm and cool atoms and molecules near sites of recent star formation in the local interstellar medium. I present the science goals, design, research and development components, and calibration of the CHESS instrument. I provide results on observations taken during both launches of CHESS, with detailed analysis of the epsilon Per sightline, as inferred from the flight data. I conclude by providing future works and simple

  18. Climate change and observed climate trends in the fort cobb experimental watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbrecht, J D; Zhang, X C; Steiner, J L

    2014-07-01

    Recurring droughts in the Southern Great Plains of the United States are stressing the landscape, increasing uncertainty and risk in agricultural production, and impeding optimal agronomic management of crop, pasture, and grazing systems. The distinct possibility that the severity of recent droughts may be related to a greenhouse-gas induced climate change introduces new challenges for water resources managers because the intensification of droughts could represent a permanent feature of the future climate. Climate records of the Fort Cobb watershed in central Oklahoma were analyzed to determine if recent decade-long trends in precipitation and air temperature were consistent with climate change projections for central Oklahoma. The historical precipitation record did not reveal any compelling evidence that the recent 20-yr-long decline in precipitation was related to climate change. Also, precipitation projections by global circulation models (GCMs) displayed a flat pattern through the end of the 21st century. Neither observed nor projected precipitation displayed a multidecadal monotonic rising or declining trend consistent with an ongoing warming climate. The recent trend in observed annual precipitation was probably a decade-scale variation not directly related to the warming climate. On the other hand, the observed monotonic warming trend of 0.34°C decade that started around 1978 is consistent with GCM projections of increasing temperature for central Oklahoma.

  19. Experimental observation of long-wavelength dispersive wave generation induced by self-defocusing nonlinearity in BBO crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally observe long-wavelength dispersive waves generation in a BBO crystal. A soliton was formed in normal GVD regime of the crystal by a self-defocusing and negative nonlinearity through phase-mismatched quatradic interaction. Strong temporal pulse compression confirmed the formation of soliton during the pulse propagation inside the crystal. Significant dispersive wave radiation was measured in the anomalous GVD regime of the BBO crystal. With the pump wavelengths from 1.24 to 1.4 $\\mu$m, tunable dispersive waves are generated around 1.9 to 2.2 $\\mu$m. The observed dispersive wave generation is well understood by simulations.

  20. Experimental Observations on a Low Strain Counter-Flow Diffusion Flame: Flow and Bouyancy Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutula, J. A.; Torero, J. L.; Ezekoye, O. A.

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion flames are of great interest in fire safety and many industrial processes. The counter-flow configuration provides a constant strain flow, and therefore is ideal to study the structure of diffusion flames. Most studies have concentrated on the high velocity, high strain limit, since buoyantly induced instabilities will disintegrate the planar flame as the velocity decreases. Only recently, experimental studies in microgravity conditions have begun to explore the low strain regimes. Numerical work has shown the coupling between gas phase reaction rates, soot reaction rates, and radiation. For these programs, size, geometry and experimental conditions have been chosen to keep the flame unaffected by the physical boundaries. When the physical boundaries can not be considered infinitely far from the reaction zone discrepancies arise. A computational study that includes boundary effects and accounts for the deviations occurring when the major potential flow assumptions are relaxed was presented by Borlik et al. This development properly incorporates all heat loss terms and shows the possibility of extinction in the low strain regime. A major constraint of studying the low strain regime is buoyancy. Buoyant instabilities have been shown to have a significant effect on the nature of reactants and heat transport, and can introduce instabilities on the flow that result in phenomena such as flickering or fingering. The counter-flow configuration has been shown to provide a flame with no symmetry disrupting instabilities for inlet velocities greater than 50 mm/s. As the velocity approaches this limit, the characteristic length of the experiment has to be reduced to a few millimetres so as to keep the Rayleigh number (Ra(sub L) = (Beta)(g(sub 0))(L(exp 3) del T)/(alpha(v))) below 2000. In this work, a rectangular counter-flow burner was used to study a two-dimensional counter-flow diffusion flame. Flow visualisation and Particle Image Velocimetry served to describe

  1. Experimental observations and modeling of ponding and overland flow in flat, permeable soil fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appels, Willemijn; Bogaart, Patrick; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    In flat well-drained agricultural terrain, overland flow is a relatively rare phenomenon, yet still a potentially important driver of sediment and nutrient transport. Under these conditions, periods of intense rainfall, shallow groundwater dynamics and local combinations of meso- and microtopography control whether water in ponds will become connected to streams and ditches. Combining overland flow measurements at agricultural fields with a new modeling approach, we explored: (i) what rainfall conditions relate to overland flow and (ii) how does flow route connectivity develop for various types of runoff generation and meso/microtopography? For this purpose, we assessed overland flow at two field sites in flat, lowland catchments in the sandy part of the Netherlands and developed a dynamic model (FAST-runoff) to simulate redistribution of water over a heterogeneous surface with infiltration and soil water storage. Experimentally, it appeared that most overland flow occurred as saturation excess runoff during long wet periods, though infiltration excess runoff generation may have played a role during snowmelt periods that generated small amounts of runoff. For both fields, the contributing area during the saturation excess events was large and flow paths long, irrespective of the profoundly different microtopographies. We explored this behaviour with our FAST-Runoff model and found that under saturation excess conditions, mesotopographic features, such as natural depressions or those caused by tillage, gain importance at the expense of the spatial organization of microtopography. The surface topographies of our experimental fields were equal in terms of standard topographic analytical measures such as Curvature, Convergence Index, and Topographic Wetness Index. However, the fields could be distinguished when analysed with a quantitative indicator of flow for hydrological connectivity. Also, the fields had different dynamics related to the runoff generating mechanism

  2. Reporting of unintended events in an intensive care unit: comparison between staff and observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verri Marco

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to identify relevant targets for change, it is essential to know the reliability of incident staff reporting. The aim of this study is to compare the incidence and type of unintended events (UE reported by facilitated Intensive Care Unit (ICU staff with those recorded concurrently by an observer. Methods The study is a prospective data collection performed in two 4-bed multidisciplinary ICUs of a teaching hospital. The format of the UE reporting system was voluntary, facilitated and not necessarily anonymous, and used a structured form with a predetermined list of items. UEs were reported by ICU staff over a period of 4 weeks. The reporting incidence during the first fourteen days was compared with that during the second fourteen. During morning shifts in the second fourteen days, one observer in each ICU recorded any UE seen. The staff was not aware of the observers' study. The incidence of UEs reported by staff was compared with that recorded by the observers. Results The staff reported 36 UEs in the first fourteen days and 31 in the second.. The incidence of UE detection during morning shifts was significantly higher than during afternoon or night shifts (p Conclusion UE incidence is strongly underreported by staff in comparison with observers. Also the types of UEs reported are different. Invaluable information about incidents in ICU can be obtained in a few days by observer monitoring.

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration. Progress report, June 1, 1991--February 1, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.; Danly, B.; Temkin, R.J.; Wurtele, J.S.

    1992-02-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-FG0291ER-40648. ``Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration.`` This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design and fabrication of a 17GHz of photocathode gun, Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration using a 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders. This report is organized as follows. The development of an rf gun design and research progress on the picosecond laser system is summarized in Sec. 2, the status of the studies of the LBL/Haimson high gradient structure, using a 50 MW free-electron laser is summarized in Sec. 3, and theoretical research progress is described in Sec. 4. Supporting material is contained in Appendices A-G.

  4. Experimental observation of second-harmonic generation and diffusion inside random media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faez, Sanli; Johnson, P. M.; Mazurenko, D. A.; Lagendijk, Ad

    2009-01-01

    We have experimentally measured the distribution of the second-harmonic intensity that is generated inside a highly-scattering slab of porous gallium phosphide. Two complementary techniques for determining the distribution are used. First, the spatial distribution of second-harmonic light intensity at the side of a cleaved slab has been recorded. Second, the total second-harmonic radiation at each side of the slab has been measured for several samples at various wavelengths. By combining these measurements with a diffusion model for second-harmonic generation that incorporates extrapolated boundary conditions, we present a consistent picture of the distribution of the second-harmonic intensity inside the slab. We find that the ratio $\\ell_{2\\omega}/L_c$ of the mean free path at the second-harmonic frequency to the coherence length, which was suggested by some earlier calculations, cannot describe the second-harmonic yield in our samples. For describing the total second-harmonic yield, our experiments show that the scattering parameter at the fundamental frequency $\\k_{1\\omega}\\ell_{1\\omega}$ is the most relevant parameter in our type of samples.

  5. Direct observation of magnetocaloric effect by differential thermal analysis: Influence of experimental parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotstein Habarnau, Yamila; Bergamasco, Pablo [Departamento Materia Condensada, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1429, San Martin 1650 (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Sacanell, Joaquin [Departamento Materia Condensada, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1429, San Martin 1650 (Argentina); Leyva, Gabriela [Departamento Materia Condensada, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1429, San Martin 1650 (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, San Martin, Buenos Aires 1650 (Argentina); Albornoz, Cecilia [Departamento Materia Condensada, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1429, San Martin 1650 (Argentina); Quintero, Mariano, E-mail: mquinter@cnea.gov.ar [Departamento Materia Condensada, CAC, CNEA, Av. Gral Paz 1429, San Martin 1650 (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, UNSAM, San Martin, Buenos Aires 1650 (Argentina)

    2012-08-15

    The magnetocaloric effect is the isothermal change of magnetic entropy and the adiabatic temperature change induced in a magnetic material when an external magnetic field is applied. In this work, we present an experimental setup to study this effect in metamagnetic transitions, using the differential thermal analysis technique, which consists in measuring simultaneously the temperatures of the sample of interest and a reference one while an external magnetic field ramp is applied. We have tested our system to measure the magnetocaloric effect in La{sub 0.305}Pr{sub 0.32}Ca{sub 0.375}MnO{sub 3}, which presents phase separation effects at low temperatures (T<200 K). We obtain {Delta}T vs H curves, and analyze how the effect varies by changing the rate of the magnetic field ramp. Our results show that the intensity of the effect increases with the magnetic field change rate. We also have obtained the effective heat capacity of the system without the sample by performing calorimetric measurements using a pulse heat method, fitting the temperature change with a two tau description. With this analysis, we are able to describe the influence of the environment and subtract it to calculate the adiabatic temperature change of the sample.

  6. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-10-10

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  7. Summary Report of the Workshop on The Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkova, V. [IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna (Austria); Pritychenko, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The Workshop on the Experimental Nuclear Reaction Data Database (EXFOR) was held at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna from 6 to 10 October 2014. The workshop was organized to discuss various aspects of the EXFOR compilation process including compilation rules, different techniques for nuclear reaction data measurements, software developments, etc. A summary of the presentations and discussions that took place during the workshop is reported here.

  8. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing: Review of VNIIEF efforts. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Y.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The report presents the basic results of some calculations, theoretical and experimental efforts in the study of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and the turbulent mixing which is caused by their evolution. Since the late forties the VNIIEF has been conducting these investigations. This report is based on the data which were published in different times in Russian and foreign journals. The first part of the report deals with calculations an theoretical techniques for the description of hydrodynamic instabilities applied currently, as well as with the results of several individual problems and their comparison with the experiment. These methods can be divided into two types: direct numerical simulation methods and phenomenological methods. The first type includes the regular 2D and 3D gasdynamical techniques as well as the techniques based on small perturbation approximation and on incompressible liquid approximation. The second type comprises the techniques based on various phenomenological turbulence models. The second part of the report describes the experimental methods and cites the experimental results of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meskov instability studies as well as of turbulent mixing. The applied methods were based on thin-film gaseous models, on jelly models and liquid layer models. The research was done for plane and cylindrical geometries. As drivers, the shock tubes of different designs were used as well as gaseous explosive mixtures, compressed air and electric wire explosions. The experimental results were applied in calculational-theoretical technique calibrations. The authors did not aim at covering all VNIIEF research done in this field of science. To a great extent the choice of the material depended on the personal contribution of the author in these studies.

  9. A brief report on MRI investigation of experimental traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy Q.Duong; Lora T.Watts

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a major cause of death and disability. This is a brief report based on a symposium presentation to the2014 Chinese Neurotrauma Association Meeting in San Francisco, USA. It covers the work from our laboratory in applying multimodal MRI to study experimental traumatic brain injury in rats with comparisons made to behavioral tests and histology. MRI protocols include structural, perfusion, manganese-enhanced, diffusion-tensor MRI, and MRI of blood-brain barrier integrity and cerebrovascular reactivity.

  10. Women With Addictions Report Reduced Anxiety After Group Music Therapy: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    OpenAIRE

    Diestelkamp, Wiebke S.; Susan C. Gardstrom

    2013-01-01

    Roughly six million females in the USA abuse or are addicted to alcohol. Women are more likely than men to report depression and anxiety as triggers for substance use and relapse, which emphasizes the importance of therapies designed to help women mitigate anxiety.Research supporting music therapy (MT) with women with addictions is scarce. In this quasi-experimental investigation, we hoped to learn: (1) What percentage of women with addictive disorders in a 45-minute group MT session will rep...

  11. Does Whipworm Increase the Pathogenicity of Campylobacter jejuni? A Clinical Correlate of an Experimental Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Shin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of acute diarrhea worldwide, usually mild and self-limiting. No adequate hypothesis has yet been formulated to explain why in an otherwise healthy host this infection is occasionally severe. In a pig model, C jejuni has been shown to be pathogenic only in the presence of swine whipworm. A human case of life-threatening C jejuni colitis leading to toxic megacolon and acute renal failure, associated with concomitant whipworm (Trichuris suis ova in the feces, is reported. The potential of T suis to potentiate C jejuni in humans deserves further study.

  12. Sea bird observations during an experimental oil spill on the Frigg field August 1995; Observasjoner av sjoefugl i forbindelse med eksperimentelt oljeutslipp - Friggfeltet august 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorentsen, S.H.

    1995-10-01

    During an experimental oil spill on the Frigg field in August 1995 the distribution and number of sea birds was mapped prior to the release of the first oil spill. As discussed in this report, behavioural studies were carried out to estimate the number of sea birds harmed in a real oil spill. There were three spills of 15 m{sup 3} each and two spills of 25 m{sup 3} each, of clean oil. Very few birds were observed to have oil damage. The usefulness of this type of exercise for vulnerability studies is discussed. It is concluded that experimental as well as real oil spill situations should be utilized to collect information on the behavioural reaction of sea birds to drifting oil spills. 14 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Experimental observation of the longitudinal plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irie, A; Oya, G [Department of Electrical and Electronic Systems Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan); Shukrinov, Yu M [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region, 141980 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: iriea@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp

    2008-10-15

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). Recently, it is predicted that the longitudinal plasma wave can be excited by the parametric resonance in IJJs. Such an excitation induces a singularity called as breakpoint region around switch back region in the IVC. We have succeeded in the observation of the breakpoint region in the IVC of the mesa with 5 IJJs at 4.2 K. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature dependence of the breakpoint current is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This suggests that the wave number of the excited plasma wave varies with temperature.

  14. Experimental observation of the longitudinal plasma excitation in intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irie, A.; Shukrinov, Yu M.; Oya, G.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs). Recently, it is predicted that the longitudinal plasma wave can be excited by the parametric resonance in IJJs. Such an excitation induces a singularity called as breakpoint region around switch back region in the IVC. We have succeeded in the observation of the breakpoint region in the IVC of the mesa with 5 IJJs at 4.2 K. Furthermore, it is found that the temperature dependence of the breakpoint current is in agreement with the theoretical prediction. This suggests that the wave number of the excited plasma wave varies with temperature.

  15. Experimental observation using particle image velocimetry of inertial waves in a rotating fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messio, Laura; Morize, Cyprien; Rabaud, Marc; Moisy, Frederic [Univ Paris-Sud; Univ Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS, Orsay (France); Fluides, Automatique et Systemes Thermiques (FAST), Orsay (France)

    2008-04-15

    Inertial waves generated by a small oscillating disk in a rotating water filled cylinder are observed by means of a corotating particle image velocimetry system. The wave takes place in a stationary conical wavepacket, whose angle aperture depends on the oscillation frequency. Direct visualisation of the velocity and vorticity fields in a plane normal to the rotation axis are presented. The characteristic wavelength is found to be approximately equal to the disk diameter. The classical dispersion relation for plane waves is verified from the radial location of the wavepacket, and from the ellipticity of the projected velocity diagram. (orig.)

  16. Experimental observation of disorder induced self-focusing in optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonetti, Marco, E-mail: marco.leonetti@roma1.infn.it [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Viale Regina Elena, 291 00161 Roma (Italy); Karbasi, Salman [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Mafi, Arash [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for High Technology Materials, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Conti, Claudio [ISC-CNR and Department of Physics, University Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro 5, I-00185, Roma (Italy)

    2014-10-27

    We observed disorder induced focusing nonlinearity activated by a monochromatic light beam in optical fibers composed by two kinds of plastics. The two materials, arranged in disordered fashion, support modes with a degree of localization which increases with the intensity of the optical beam. The temporal response of the optical fiber demonstrates the thermal origin of this nonlinearity. Measurements of the localization length as a function of the input power with broadband and monochromatic inputs show the effectiveness of focusing action with respect to the case of homogeneous fibers.

  17. The swimming behavior of Artemia (Anostraca): new experimental and observational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anufriieva, Elena V; Shadrin, Nickolai V

    2014-12-01

    Artemia (Anostraca) is among the most primitive and ancient groups of crustaceans. Artemia spp. play a dominant role in the ecosystems of hypersaline waters, and often they are the only animals in these extreme biotopes. Most ethological studies on Artemia have been conducted on nauplii and metanauplii. We made ethological observations on Artemia under laboratory conditions and in the natural waters of Crimea, where we studied growth and ontogenetic changes of swimming behavior. Growth occurred during the first 50 days up to a size of 9.5-10.5mm, after which time the size did not increase (some females lived up to 6.5 months). A strong positive relation was found between maximal speed and individual length, which varied between 0.4 and 10.5mm; it may be approximated by the power equation: Vmax=1.205·K(0.820), where Vmax is the maximal speed of Artemia (in mms(-1)) of the length K (in mm). There is no similar relation between average speed and length of Artemia. The average speed of adults was 40-60% lower in environments with microalgae compared to media without food. The duration of the "riding position" for mating pairs of Artemia urmiana in our experiments varied from 10 to 27 days. In lakes we observed different Artemia aggregations varying in size and form. We conclude that the swimming behavior of Artemia is quite complex and diverse, and develops during ontogeny.

  18. Low Earth orbit satellite-to-ground optical scintillation: comparison of experimental observations and theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Harold T; Kozlowski, David A

    2011-07-01

    Scintillation measurements of a 1064 nm laser at a 5 kHz sampling rate were made by an optical ground station at the European Space Agency observatory in Tenerife, Spain while tracking a low Earth orbit satellite during the spring and summer of 2010. The scintillation index (SI), the variance of irradiance normalized to the square of the mean, and power spectra measurements were compared to theoretical predictions based on the Kolmogorov spectrum, the Maui3 nighttime turbulence profile, weak scintillation finite-beam wave theory, included receiver, and source aperture averaging with no free-fitting parameters. Good agreement was obtained, not only for the magnitude of the observed fluctuations, but also for the corresponding elevation angle dependence and shape of the power spectra. Little variation was seen for the SI between daytime and nighttime links. For all elevation angles, ascending and descending, the observed scintillation over extensive regions of the atmosphere is consistent with log-normal statistics. Additionally, it appears from the results presented here that the nighttime turbulence profile for the atmosphere above the observatory in Tenerife is similar to that above Haleakala in Maui, Hawaii.

  19. Water quantity and quality response of a green roof to storm events: Experimental and monitoring observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Corey M G; Todorov, Dimitar; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Syracuse, New York is working under a court-ordered agreement to limit combined sewer overflows (CSO) to local surface waters. Green infrastructure technologies, including green roofs, are being implemented as part of a CSO abatement strategy and to develop co-benefits of diminished stormwater runoff, including decreased loading of contaminants to the wastewater system and surface waters. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of discharge associated with precipitation events over an annual cycle from a green roof in Syracuse, NY and to compare measurements from this monitoring program with results from a roof irrigation experiment. Wet deposition, roof drainage, and water quality were measured for 87 storm events during an approximately 12 month period over 2011-2012. Water and nutrient (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon) mass balances were conducted on an event basis to evaluate retention annually and during the growing and non-growing seasons. These results are compared with a hydrological manipulation experiment, which comprised of artificially watering of the roof. Loadings of nutrients were calculated for experimental and actual storms using the concentration of nutrients and the flow data of water discharging the roof. The green roof was effective in retaining precipitation quantity from storm events (mean percent retention 96.8%, SD = 2.7%, n = 87), although the relative fraction of water retained decreased with increases in the size of the event. There was no difference in water retention of the green roof for the growing and non-growing seasons. Drainage waters exhibited high concentration of nutrients during the warm temperature growing season, particularly total nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon. Overall, nutrient losses were low because of the strong retention of water. However, there was marked variation in the retention of nutrients by season due to variations in concentrations in roof

  20. Experimental investigation of collisionless electron-electron microinstabilities. Final technical report for the period August 1, 1997-October 31, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scime, Earl E. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2000-12-11

    This is the final report for the Office of Fusion Energy sponsored project entitled, "Experimental Investigation of Collisionless Electron-Electron Microinstabilities." The report summarizes the scientific and human resource development accomplishments supported through this project.

  1. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  2. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  3. Experimental observation of the antiferromagnetic resonance linewidth in KCuF3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Shi, Q.; Mino, M.; Yamazaki, H.; Yamada, I.

    2005-05-01

    We report the results of antiferromagnetic resonance (AFMR) measurements conducted on KCuF3 at various frequencies from 3.8 to 10.6 GHz at 4.2 K. The resonance linewidth is first found to depend on the frequency, i.e., the lower the frequency the greater the resonance linewidth, no matter whether the AFMR field is forced on the easy axis or uneasy axis. Moreover, a linewidth peak seems to exist for H\\parallel [100]_{p} at about 4 GHz. Based on the model of Yamada and Kato (1994 J. Phys. Soc. Japan 63 289) and considering the Laudau-Lifshitz damping term, the result of numerical calculation for the resonance linewidth is in good agreement with the data of AFMR experiments.

  4. Occupational therapy evaluation: use of self-report and/or observation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise the issue that time to perform evaluations is limited. It is, therefore, relevant to examine whether similar information concerning task performance can be obtained using self-report or observation. The aims were to investigate what information can be obtained regarding the quality of ADL task performance based on self-report and observation, respectively, and to examine the relationship between measures of self-reported and observed quality of ADL task performance. The quality of ADL task performance among 20 adults with depression was evaluated using the ADL Interview (ADL-I) and the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS). Results indicated that participants both reported and demonstrated increased effort and/or fatigue, increased use of time, need for assistance, and safety problems. However, little relationship was found between measures of self-reported and observed quality of ADL task performance, supporting the use of both self-report and observation as part of the evaluation phase outlined in the OTIPM.

  5. Development of Observation Techniques in Reactor Vessel of Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Misao; Imaizumi, Kazuyuki; Nagai, Akinori; Sekine, Takashi; Maeda, Yukimoto

    In-Vessel Observations (IVO) techniques for Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. And several IVO equipments for an SFR are developed. However, in order to secure the reliability of IVO techniques, it was necessary to demonstrate the performance under the actual reactor environment with high temperature, high radiation dose and remained sodium. During the investigation of an incident that occurred with Joyo, IVO using a standard Video Camera (VC) and a Radiation-Resistant Fiberscope (RRF) took place at (1) the top of the Sub-Assemblies (S/As) and the In-Vessel Storage rack (IVS), (2) the bottom face of the Upper Core Structure (UCS). A simple 6 m overhead view of each S/A, through the fuel handling or inspection holes etc, was photographed using a VC for making observations of the top of S/As and IVS. About 650 photographs were required to create a composite photograph of the top of the entire S/As and IVS, and a resolution was estimated to be approximately 1mm. In order to observe the bottom face of the UCS, a Remote Handling Device (RHD) equipped with RRFs (approximately 13 m long) was specifically developed for Joyo with a tip that could be inserted into the 70 mm gap between the top of the S/As and the bottom of the UCS. A total of about 35,000 photographs were needed for the full investigation. Regarding the resolution, the sodium flow regulating grid of 0.8mm in thickness could be discriminated. The performance of IVO equipments under the actual reactor environment was successfully confirmed. And the results provided useful information on incident investigations. In addition, fundamental findings and the experience gained during this study, which included the design of equipment, operating procedures, resolution, lighting adjustments, photograph composition and the durability of the RRF under radiation exposure, provided valuable insights into further improvements and verifications for IVO techniques to

  6. Experimental observation of a chaos-to-chaos transition in laser droplet generation

    CERN Document Server

    Krese, Blaz; Govekar, Edvard

    2010-01-01

    We examine the dynamics of laser droplet generation in dependence on the detachment pulse power. In the absence of the detachment pulse, undulating pendant droplets are formed at the end of a properly fed metal wire due to the impact of the primary laser pulse that induces melting. Eventually, these droplets detach, i.e. overcome the surface tension, because of their increasing mass. We show that this spontaneous dripping is deterministically chaotic by means of a positive largest Lyapunov exponent and a negative divergence. In the presence of the detachment pulse, however, the generation of droplets is fastened depending on the pulse power. At high powers, the spontaneity of dripping is completely overshadowed by the impact of the detachment pulse. Still, amplitude chaos can be detected, which similarly as the spontaneous dripping, is characterized by a positive largest Lyapunov exponent and a negative divergence, thus indicating that the observed dynamics is deterministically chaotic with an attractor as so...

  7. Experimental observation of Anderson localization in laser-kicked molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitter, Martin; Milner, Valery

    2016-05-01

    For the first time, the phenomenon of Anderson localization is observed and studied in a system of true quantum kicked rotors. Nitrogen molecules in a supersonic molecular jet are cooled down to 27 K and are rotationally excited by a periodic train of 24 high-intensity femtosecond pulses. Exponential distribution of the molecular angular momentum - the most unambiguous signature of Anderson localization - is measured directly by means of coherent Raman scattering. We demonstrate the suppressed growth of the molecular rotational energy with the number of laser kicks and study the dependence of the localization length on the kick strength. Both timing and amplitude noise in the pulse train is shown to destroy the localization and revive the diffusive growth of angular momentum.

  8. Microwave dielectric spectrum of vegetation. I - Experimental observations. II - Dual-dispersion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Rayes, Mohamed A.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1987-01-01

    The microwave dielectric behavior of vegetation materials is examined as a function of water content, microwave frequency, and temperature. Dielectric spectra for various types of vegetation, such as leaves, stalks, and trunks at various moisture conditions, were measured using a coaxial probe technique. The basic features and operation of the coaxial probe system are described. Examples of dielectric measurements for the vegetation materials are presented, and the relation between temperature and the dielectric constant is studied. The development of a dual-dispersion model that accounts for the dielectric properties of water in both free and bound conditions is described. The applicability of the model is evaluated by comparing it with the dielectric data; good correlation is observed between the model and the data over a wide range of moisture conditions and over the 0.2-20 GHz range.

  9. Experimental observations of root growth in a controlled photoelastic granular material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barés, Jonathan; Mora, Serge; Delenne, Jean-Yves; Fourcaud, Thierry

    2017-06-01

    We present a novel root observation apparatus capable of measuring the mechanical evolution of both the root network and the surrounding granular medium. The apparatus consists of 11 parallel growth frames, two of them being shearable, where the roots grow inside a photo-elastic or glass granular medium sandwiched between two pieces of glass. An automated system waters the plant and image each frame periodically in white light and between crossed polarisers. This makes it possible to follow (i) the root tips and (ii) the grain displacements as well as (iii) their inner pressure. We show how a root networks evolve in a granular medium and how it can mechanically stabilize it. This constitutes a model experiment to move forward in the understanding of the complex interaction between root growth and surrounding soil mechanical evolution.

  10. Experimental observation of structural crossover in binary mixtures of colloidal hard spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartl, Jörg; Dullens, Roel P A; Dijkstra, Marjolein; Roth, Roland; Bechinger, Clemens

    2007-05-11

    Using confocal microscopy, we investigate the structure of binary mixtures of colloidal hard spheres with size ratio q=0.61. As a function of the packing fraction of the two particle species, we observe a marked change of the dominant wavelength in the pair-correlation function. This behavior is in excellent agreement with a recently predicted structural crossover in such mixtures. In addition, the repercussions of structural crossover on the real-space structure of a binary fluid are analyzed. We suggest a relation between crossover and the lateral extension of networks containing only equally-sized particles that are connected by nearest-neighbor bonds. This is supported by Monte Carlo simulations which are performed at different packing fractions and size ratios.

  11. Experimental observation of Anderson localization in laser-kicked molecular rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Bitter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We observe and study the phenomenon of Anderson localization in a system of true quantum kicked rotors. Nitrogen molecules in a supersonic molecular jet are cooled down to 27~K and are rotationally excited by a periodic train of 24~high-intensity femtosecond pulses. Exponential distribution of the molecular angular momentum - the most unambiguous signature of Anderson localization - is measured directly by means of coherent Raman scattering. We demonstrate the suppressed growth of the molecular rotational energy with the number of laser kicks and study the dependence of the localization length on the kick strength. Both timing and amplitude noise in the pulse train is shown to destroy the localization and revive the diffusive growth of angular momentum.

  12. Impact of material thicknesses on fission observables obtained with the FALSTAFF experimental setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulliez L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, the fission studies have been mainly focused on thermal fission because most of the current nuclear reactors work in this energy domain. With the development of GEN-IV reactor concepts, mainly working in the fast energy domain, new nuclear data are needed. The FALSTAFF spectrometer under development at CEA-Saclay, France, is a two-arm spectrometer which will provide mass yields before (2V method and after (EV method neutron evaporation and consequently will have access to the neutron multiplicity as a function of mass. The axial ionization chamber, in addition to the kinetic energy value, will measure the energy loss profile of the fragment along its track. This energy loss profile will give information about the fragment nuclear charge. This paper will focus on recent developments on the FALSTAFF design. A special attention will be paid to the impact of the detector material thickness on the uncertainty of different observables.

  13. Macroscopic observables experimentally linked to microscopic processes in the explosive fracture and fragmentation of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, Lawrence M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-16

    The response of a metal element to explosive loading depends on a broad spectrum of explosive and metal properties, macroscopic geometry plays a crucial role in defining the localized loading history and the resulting gradients of interest, while microscopic effects and defects are generally believed responsible for damage nucleation. Certain experiments reduce the complexity by producing conditions that are uniform in some sense, allowing dynamic measurement of variables that can be correlated with corresponding microscopic effects observed in recovery experiments. Spherical expansion of thin shells, that eventually fragment, and steady wave loading of flat plates are two such experiments. Proton radiography, x-radiography, laser velocimetry, imaging IR, and visible light photography all have produced dynamic measurements in 4340 steel, copper, uranium alloys, tantalum, and titanium. Correlation of the macroscopic measurements with microscopy on recovered samples has been done with a statistical approach.

  14. Experimental observation of competing pathways in the relaxation of ICl* in a He supersonic expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darr, Joshua P; Loomis, Richard A

    2004-01-01

    Differing caging mechanisms of electronically excited ICl within He...ICl complexes are investigated using laser-induced fluorescence and two-laser, pump-probe spectroscopy. A continuum signal is observed in laser-induced fluorescence spectra recorded with excitation energies that access regions above the I 2P3/2 + Cl 2P3/2 dissociation limit. We show that this signal is associated with transitions of the He ...ICl(X,v" = 0) complex with a linear equilibrium geometry to the continuum of states correlating with the repulsive, inner wall of the ICl(A 3pi1) potential. The dissociating ICl(A) molecule within the complex undergoes kinematic one-atom caging, ejecting the weakly bound He atom, and re-stabilizing the molecule in high lying vibrational levels within the A electronic state with very little rotational excitation. At higher excitation energies, weak LIF features superimposed on the continuum fluorescence signals are observed in preliminary investigations. When fixing an excitation laser on one of these features, at 18,012 cm(-1), I35Cl(B,v' = 2,3) vibrational levels are formed with little rotational excitation. This feature is associated with transitions of the linear He...I35Cl(X,v" = 0) complex to intermolecular states associated with the ICl(B) diabat that are coupled with those in the ICl(B') adiabat formed by an avoided curve crossing. The I35Cl(B,v') products are formed via a non-adiabatic one-atom caging mechanism of ICl* molecules within linear He...I35Cl* complexes.

  15. Occupational therapy evaluation: use of self-report and/or observation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet Ejlersen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) serves to guide occupational therapists in their professional reasoning. The OTIPM prescribes evaluation of task performance based on both self-report and observation. Although this approach seems ideal, many clinicians raise...

  16. Field observations on Unimak Island, Alaska, 11-25 August 1975: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the observations of a two week reconnaissance of Unimak Island from 11 August-25 August, 1975. The primary objectives were to do a preliminary...

  17. Birds and mammals observed along the Hulahula River, Alaska, 5-10 June 1984: Trip report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Notes on 52 bird species and 9 mammal species observed during unsuccessful attempt to confirm reported sighting of Eskimo Curlew the prior summer.

  18. A computational study on the experimentally observed sensitivity of Ga-doped ZnO nanocluster toward CO gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshandeh, Maryam; Anaraki-Ardakani, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Metal doped ZnO nanostructures have attracted extensive attention as chemical sensors for toxic gases. An experimental study has previously shown that Ga-doped ZnO nanostructures significantly show a higher electronic response than the undoped sample toward CO gas. Here, the electronic sensitivity of pristine and Ga-doped ZnO nanoclusters to CO gas is explored using density functional theory computations (at B3LYP, PBE, M06-2X, and ωB97XD levels). Our results reproduce and clarify the electrical behavior which has been observed experimentally from the ZnO nanoparticles after the exposure to CO gas. We showed that the calculated change of HOMO-LUMO gap may be a proper index for the change of electrical conductance which is measurable experimentally. It was found that, in contrast to the pristine ZnO nanocluster, the electronic properties of Ga-doped cluster are sharply sensitive to the presence of CO gas which is in good accordance with the results of the experimental study.

  19. Experimental observation of spatially resolved photo-luminescence intensity distribution in dual mode upconverting nanorod bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Satbir; Singh, V. N.; Singh, Nidhi; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2017-02-01

    A novel method for demonstration of photoluminescence intensity distribution in upconverting nanorod bundles using confocal microscopy is reported. Herein, a strategy for the synthesis of highly luminescent dual mode upconverting/downshift Y1.94O3:Ho3+0.02/Yb3+0.04 nanorod bundles by a facile hydrothermal route has been introduced. These luminescent nanorod bundles exhibit strong green emission at 549 nm upon excitations at 449 nm and 980 nm with quantum efficiencies of ~6.3% and ~1.1%, respectively. The TEM/HRTEM results confirm that these bundles are composed of several individual nanorods with diameter of ~100 nm and length in the range of 1–3 μm. Furthermore, two dimensional spatially resolved photoluminescence intensity distribution study has been carried out using confocal photoluminescence microscope throughout the nanorod bundles. This study provides a new direction for the potential use of such emerging dual mode nanorod bundles as photon sources for next generation flat panel optical display devices, bio-medical applications, luminescent security ink and enhanced energy harvesting in photovoltaic applications.

  20. Experimental Observation on Antithrombotic Property of A New Bileaflet Mechanical Heart Valve in Sheep

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Hai-fang; XU Si-wei

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To observe the antithrombotic property of a new all-pyrolytic car-bon bileaflet mechanical heart valve so as to provide evidence for clinical practice. Meth-ods: 15 sheep underwent mitral valve replacement (MVR) with this new mechanical valve. Each animal was placed on cardiopulmonary bypass. All of the sheep were given in an anticoagulation protocol and followed for three months. Final studies were performed on all animals surviving for more than 12 weeks. Results: 10 sheep died within 48 h after op-eration, 5 sheep survived. The long-term survivors were killed for autopsies,2 sheep were killed after 1 week, 1 after 12 weeks and 2 after two and half years. Pathological examina-tion of 10 sheep which died early after operation revealed that there was neither evidence of thrombosis nor any failure of the mechanical valve. Autopsy studies in the 5 long-term survivors revealed that the sewing ring was covered by a thin layer of microthrombi consis-ted most of platelets and fibrin after 1 week. The sewing ring was covered by a tissue lay-er, with partial organized microthrombi and endothelialization after 12 weeks. Two and half years after operation, the complete endothelialization presented around the sewing ring without restriction of bileaflet motion. The tissue ingrowth tends to stop at the pyrolytic carbon-fabric interface on both surfaces of left atrium and ventricle. This study demonstra-ted that the new prosthetic heart valve had not promoted thrombosis and thrombembolism.

  1. Experimental study and clinical observation of minimum-contact plate in long bone fracture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xin-jian; FEI Jun; WANG Zheng-guo; YU Hong-jun; SUN Jun

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To sutdy the mechanical properties and the clinical results of minimum-contact plate in the treatment of fractures. Methods: Four-point bending and torsion tests were conducted to compare the new minimum contact plate (MCP) with dynamic compression plate (DCP) and limited contact dynamic compression plate (LC-DCP). The fracture healing time and growth of bony callus were observed in 29 cases of long bone fracture fixed with MCP to evaluate the advantages of this kind of plate. Results: The 29 patients who underwent MCP were followed up from 6 to 14 months. The average healing time for femoral, tibial and humeral fractures was 12, 13 and 10 weeks, respectively. All fractures were healed. No displacement of fracture, screw pullout, deformation or break of the plate were found. Conclusions: The bending stiffness of MCP is significantly greater than that of DCP and LC-DCP (P<0.05). MCP can protect the periosteal blood supply against avascular osseous necrosis and accelerate bone healing. It is a kind of reliable and effective plate in treatment of fractures.

  2. Nanoparticle kinetic effects experimentally observed in a magnetic fluid under a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelina, J., E-mail: julius.stelina@fel.uniza.sk [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia); Musil, C. [Department of Physics, University of Zilina, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Zilina (Slovakia)

    2012-05-15

    The effect of a quasi-homogeneous external magnetic field on a created and decaying space nanoparticle structure and its distribution in a sample of a magnetic fluid was studied. This space structure was created as a grating by applying an interference field of two crossed Ar laser beams. The magnetic field was formed using two electromagnets and was applied in three main directions of the created nanoparticle grating. The magnetic field oriented parallel to the strips of the grating or perpendicular to the grating plain does not significantly change the shape of it. The magnetic field oriented in the perpendicular direction to the grating plain causes redistribution of the nanoparticles and as a consequence a perpendicular nanoparticle 'quasi-grating' arises. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer External magnetic field creates a new nanoparticle quasi-grating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find that the new grating is perpendicular to the original one. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We observe a planar grating in the transitional phase of about 15 s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We speculate that the new grating is related to structuralization of particles.

  3. Myelin in the central nervous system as observed in experimentally induced edema in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, A; Zimmerman, H M; Levine, S

    1966-12-01

    The compact arrangement of cells in the normal white matter of the brain makes an analysis of cellular architecture difficult. To overcome this difficulty, cerebral edema was induced in rats by means of the unilateral intracerebral implantation of silver nitrate. Within 48 hr, the brains were fixed by perfusion with glutaraldehyde followed by immersion in Dalton's chrome-osmium. Sections of the callosal radiations were studied in the electron microscope. The untreated hemisphere appeared entirely unaltered, whereas in the edematous hemisphere the edema fluid separated individual cell processes and small groups of them. The myelin sheaths and their relationships to the axons appeared essentially unaltered. In this material, analysis of cellular architecture was relatively easy, and the widely held theory of spiral wrapping could be confirmed. In addition, several other aspects of the myelin and myelin-forming cell relationships became apparent in the edematous tissue. Most of these were later confirmed by extensive and careful study of the nonedematous tissue. These included the presence of occasional isolated cytoplasmic areas in myelin and the presence of two complete sheaths around a single axon. Other observations, such as the appearance of mitochondria and dense bodies within the outer loop and the separation of myelin lamellae, are apparently limited to the edematous tissue.

  4. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE: explanation and elaboration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P Vandenbroucke

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Much medical research is observational. The reporting of observational studies is often of insufficient quality. Poor reporting hampers the assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of a study and the generalisability of its results. Taking into account empirical evidence and theoretical considerations, a group of methodologists, researchers, and editors developed the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE recommendations to improve the quality of reporting of observational studies. The STROBE Statement consists of a checklist of 22 items, which relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results and discussion sections of articles. Eighteen items are common to cohort studies, case-control studies and cross-sectional studies and four are specific to each of the three study designs. The STROBE Statement provides guidance to authors about how to improve the reporting of observational studies and facilitates critical appraisal and interpretation of studies by reviewers, journal editors and readers. This explanatory and elaboration document is intended to enhance the use, understanding, and dissemination of the STROBE Statement. The meaning and rationale for each checklist item are presented. For each item, one or several published examples and, where possible, references to relevant empirical studies and methodological literature are provided. Examples of useful flow diagrams are also included. The STROBE Statement, this document, and the associated Web site (http://www.strobe-statement.org/ should be helpful resources to improve reporting of observational research.

  5. Polarized light scanning cryomacroscopy, part I: Experimental apparatus and observations of vitrification, crystallization, and photoelasticity effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feig, Justin S G; Eisenberg, David P; Rabin, Yoed

    2016-10-01

    Cryomacroscopy is an effective means to observe physical events affecting cryopreservation success in large-size specimens. The current study aims at integrating polarized-light in the study of large-size cryopreservation, using the scanning cryomacroscope as a development platform. Results of this study demonstrate polarized light as a visualization enhancement means, including the following effects: contaminants in the CPA solution, crystallization, fracture formation, thermal contraction, and solute precipitation. In addition, photoelasticity effects are used to demonstrate the development of residual stresses and the potential for stress relaxation above the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, this study suggests that the ability to periodically switch between non-polarized light and polarized light is an essential feature of investigation. When using polarized light for example, a dark region may represent a free-of-stress and free-of-crystals material, or fully crystallized material, which may potentially experience mechanical stress; switching to a non-polarized light would help to distinguish between the different cases. The analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in cryopreservation is essentially based on four key elements: identification of physical events, knowledge of physical properties, thermal analysis of the specimen, and description of the mechanical behavior of the cryopreserved material (also known as the constitutive law). With the above knowledge, one can investigate the conditions to preserve structural integrity. While the current study aims at identification of physical events, critical knowledge on physical properties and mechanical behavior has already been developed in previous studies. The companion manuscript (Part II) aims at providing means for thermal analysis in the specimen, which will serve as the basis for a multi-scale analysis of thermo-mechanical stress in large-size specimens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Experimental geothermal research facilities study (Phase O). Final report No. 26405-6001-RU-00

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-31

    This study focuses on identification of a representative liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of moderate temperature and salinity, preliminary design of an appropriate energy conversion system, identification of critical technology and planning for the implementation of experimental facilities. Results of Phase O of the project are reported in two volumes. Volume II presents detailed results of studies and analyses arranged in nine appendices including the final report by a subcontractor on the study. The specific appendices are: Appendix A: Geothermal Resources of the Western United States; Appendix B: Site Selection Process and the East Mesa Geothermal Field; Appendix C: East Mesa Geothermal Field Reservoir Characteristics; Appendix D: Advisor's Views and Comments; Appendix E: Thermodynamic Analyses; Appendix F: Material and Corrosion Factors; Appendix G: Preliminary Reliability/Maintainability Analyses; Appendix H: Environmental Impact Analysis Guidelines; and Appendix I: Report to the National Science Foundation/TRW Systems Group by Rogers Engineering Company, Inc., San Francisco, California.

  7. Brief clinical report: duplication of distal 17q: report of an observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccache, N F; Vianna-Morgante, A M; Richieri-Costa, A

    1984-03-01

    We describe a boy with the syndrome due to dup(17q) resulting from a paternal balanced t(12;17) (q24;q23). The comparison of the clinical findings in our patient with those previously reported shows that the dup(17q23----qter) is associated with a clinically recognizable syndrome. Anomalies present in greater than or equal to 75% of the patients were severe psychomotor retardation; short stature; microcephaly; frontal bossing and temporal retraction; widow's peak; narrow palpebral fissures; flat nasal bridge; thin upper lip overlapping thin lower lip; downturned corners of the mouth; apparently low-set, posteriorly angulated and malformed ears; low posterior hairline; widely spaced nipples; cryptorchidism; proximal limb shortness; and hyperlaxity of limb joints. The translocation carrier father of our patient had a Poland anomaly.

  8. Associations between Peer Nominations, Teacher Ratings, Self-Reports, and Observations of Malicious and Disruptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, David B.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the validity of two aggression scales for predicting observations of malicious or disruptive behavior at school. Subgroups of a sample of 1,560 children (age 8.6 plus or minus 1.5 years) were assessed using (a) peer nominations of aggression, (b) teacher reports on the Teacher Report Form (TRF) of the Child Behavior Checklist…

  9. Experimental simulation of the atmospheric ablation of cosmic dust particles: implications for HPLA radar and lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez Martin, Juan Carlos; Bones, David; Diego Carrillo Sanchez, Juan; James, Alexander; Janches, Diego; Plane, John

    2016-04-01

    The inner solar system is full of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating from cometary trails and collisions between asteroids. The entry and evaporation of IDPs in planetary atmospheres is related to a variety of phenomena including formation of mesospheric metal layers and clouds and stratospheric aerosol chemistry. The estimated mass flux into the Earth's Atmosphere from modelling of Zodiacal Cloud observations combined with results from our chemical ablation model (CABMOD) is consistent with the deposition rate of cosmic spherules on the ice caps. However, the fluxes derived from modelling HPLA radar observations, which also uses CABMOD, are significantly lower. In addition, all models underestimate the observed Na/Fe ratio in metal layers observed by LIDAR, and the radar-based model in particular does not predict differential ablation. In order to address these inconsistencies, we have built a laboratory meteor ablation simulator, which enables us to observe and characterise the ablation of metal atoms from meteoritic IDP analogues. CABMOD can be then benchmarked against the laboratory data. In this presentation, the implications of our experimental results for the interpretation of radar field observations, mass flux estimates and modelling of metal layers will be discussed.

  10. Seat belt use among rear passengers: validity of self-reported versus observational measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schievano Elena

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of seat belt laws and public education campaigns on seat belt use are assessed on the basis of observational or self-reported data on seat belt use. Previous studies focusing on front seat occupants have shown that self-reports indicate a greater seat belt usage than observational findings. Whether this over-reporting in self reports applies to rear seat belt usage, and to what extent, have yet to be investigated. We aimed to evaluate the over-reporting factor for rear seat passengers and whether this varies by gender and under different compulsory seat belt use conditions. Methods The study was conducted in the Veneto Region, an area in the North-East of Italy with a population of 4.7 million. The prevalence of seat belt use among rear seat passengers was determined by means of a cross-sectional self-report survey and an observational study. Both investigations were performed in two time periods: in 2003, when rear seat belt use was not enforced by primary legislation, and in 2005, after rear seat belt use had become compulsory (June 2003. Overall, 8138 observations and 7902 interviews were recorded. Gender differences in the prevalence of rear seat belt use were examined using the chi-square test. The over-reporting factor, defined as the ratio of the self-reported to the observed prevalence of rear seat belt use, was calculated by gender before and after the rear seat belt legislation came into effect. Results Among rear seat passengers, self-reported rates were always higher than the observational findings, with an overall over-reporting factor of 1.4. We registered no statistically significant changes over time in the over-reporting factor, nor any major differences between genders. Conclusion Self-reported seat belt usage by rear passengers represents an efficient alternative to observational studies for tracking changes in actual behavior, although the reported figures need to be adjusted using an

  11. Reporting of confounding bias in observational intervention studies: Are we making progress?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouwels, Koen B.; Hak, Eelko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previously, poor quality of reporting of confounding in articles on observational medical interventions has been observed in a systematic review. Included articles were published before the STROBE statement and it was suggested that this statement could have a considerable impact on the

  12. An assessment of recently published gene expression data analyses: reporting experimental design and statistical factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azuaje Francisco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of large-scale gene expression data is a fundamental approach to functional genomics and the identification of potential drug targets. Results derived from such studies cannot be trusted unless they are adequately designed and reported. The purpose of this study is to assess current practices on the reporting of experimental design and statistical analyses in gene expression-based studies. Methods We reviewed hundreds of MEDLINE-indexed papers involving gene expression data analysis, which were published between 2003 and 2005. These papers were examined on the basis of their reporting of several factors, such as sample size, statistical power and software availability. Results Among the examined papers, we concentrated on 293 papers consisting of applications and new methodologies. These papers did not report approaches to sample size and statistical power estimation. Explicit statements on data transformation and descriptions of the normalisation techniques applied prior to data analyses (e.g. classification were not reported in 57 (37.5% and 104 (68.4% of the methodology papers respectively. With regard to papers presenting biomedical-relevant applications, 41(29.1 % of these papers did not report on data normalisation and 83 (58.9% did not describe the normalisation technique applied. Clustering-based analysis, the t-test and ANOVA represent the most widely applied techniques in microarray data analysis. But remarkably, only 5 (3.5% of the application papers included statements or references to assumption about variance homogeneity for the application of the t-test and ANOVA. There is still a need to promote the reporting of software packages applied or their availability. Conclusion Recently-published gene expression data analysis studies may lack key information required for properly assessing their design quality and potential impact. There is a need for more rigorous reporting of important experimental

  13. Design considerations and experimental observations for the TAMU air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system for the VHTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, S. A.; Dominguez-Ontiveros, E. E.; Alhashimi, T.; Budd, J. L.; Matos, M. D.; Hassan, Y. A.

    2015-04-01

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a promising passive decay heat removal system for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to ensure reliability of the transfer of the core residual and decay heat to the environment under all off-normal circumstances. A small scale experimental test facility was constructed at Texas A&M University (TAMU) to study pertinent multifaceted thermal hydraulic phenomena in the air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) design based on the General Atomics (GA) concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The TAMU Air-Cooled Experimental Test Facility is ⅛ scale from the proposed GA-MHTGR design. Groundwork for experimental investigations focusing into the complex turbulence mixing flow behavior inside the upper plenum is currently underway. The following paper illustrates some of the chief design considerations used in construction of the experimental test facility, complete with an outline of the planned instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out to furnish some insights on the overall behavior of the air flow in the system. CFD simulations assisted the placement of the flow measurement sensors location. Preliminary experimental observations of experiments at 120oC inlet temperature suggested the presence of flow reversal for cases involving single active riser at both 5 m/s and 2.25 m/s, respectively and four active risers at 2.25 m/s. Flow reversal may lead to thermal stratification inside the upper plenum by means of steady state temperature measurements. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiment was carried out to furnish some insight on flow patterns and directions.

  14. Design considerations and experimental observations for the TAMU air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system for the VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, S. A., E-mail: shamsulamri@tamu.edu; Dominguez-Ontiveros, E. E., E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu; Alhashimi, T., E-mail: jbudd123@tamu.edu; Budd, J. L., E-mail: dubaiboy@tamu.edu; Matos, M. D., E-mail: mailgoeshere@gmail.com; Hassan, Y. A., E-mail: yhasssan@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a promising passive decay heat removal system for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to ensure reliability of the transfer of the core residual and decay heat to the environment under all off-normal circumstances. A small scale experimental test facility was constructed at Texas A and M University (TAMU) to study pertinent multifaceted thermal hydraulic phenomena in the air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) design based on the General Atomics (GA) concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The TAMU Air-Cooled Experimental Test Facility is ⅛ scale from the proposed GA-MHTGR design. Groundwork for experimental investigations focusing into the complex turbulence mixing flow behavior inside the upper plenum is currently underway. The following paper illustrates some of the chief design considerations used in construction of the experimental test facility, complete with an outline of the planned instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out to furnish some insights on the overall behavior of the air flow in the system. CFD simulations assisted the placement of the flow measurement sensors location. Preliminary experimental observations of experiments at 120oC inlet temperature suggested the presence of flow reversal for cases involving single active riser at both 5 m/s and 2.25 m/s, respectively and four active risers at 2.25 m/s. Flow reversal may lead to thermal stratification inside the upper plenum by means of steady state temperature measurements. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiment was carried out to furnish some insight on flow patterns and directions.

  15. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume I, Report of the Developmental Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Herman G.; And Others

    In 1961, administrative personnel at Delhi College in New York observed that formal training programs for animal science technicians were virtually nonexistant. Response to this apparent need resulted in the initiation of perhaps the first 2-year Animal Science Technology Program in the nation. This two-volume report is the result of an extensive…

  16. Contextual influences on concordance between maternal report and laboratory observation of toddler fear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, Elizabeth J; Hummel, Alexandra C

    2017-03-01

    Emotion and temperament researchers have faced an enduring issue of how to best measure children's tendencies to express specific emotions. Inconsistencies between laboratory observation and parental report have made it challenging for researchers to determine the utility of these different forms of measurement. The current study examined the effect of laboratory episode characteristics (i.e., threat level of the episode, maternal involvement) on concordance between maternal report and laboratory observation of toddler fear. The sample included 111 mother-toddler dyads who participated in a laboratory assessment when toddlers were approximately 24 months old. Toddler fear was assessed both via maternal report and observation from a number of laboratory episodes that varied in their level of threat and whether mothers were free or constrained in their involvement in the task. Results indicated that maternal report related to the observed fear composites for low threat, but not high threat episodes. On the contrary, maternal involvement in the laboratory episodes did not moderate the relation between maternal report and laboratory observation of fear. These results suggest that the threat level of laboratory episodes designed to elicit fear, but not maternal involvement in these episodes, may be important to take into consideration when assessing their relation to maternal report of fear and fearful temperament. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF HIGH-INTENSITY PULSED-PERIODIC LASER RADIATION (CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    From the experience of clinical observations, we have shown a high therapeutic effectiveness of the medical laser KULON-MED in: cosmetics, non-cancer inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and cancer (cancer of the stomach and colon) as at different wavelengths, and with different types of photosensitizers. In the area of anti-tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT), based on experimental studies, we have showed the high antitumor (sarcoma S‑37) effectiveness of the laser (with the inhi...

  18. Finite element modelling of the mechanics of discrete carbon nanotubes filled with ZnS and comparison with experimental observations

    KAUST Repository

    Monteiro, André O.

    2013-09-25

    The mechanical response to a uniaxial compressive force of a single carbon nanotube (CNT) filled (or partially-filled) with ZnS has been modelled. A semi-empirical approach based on the finite element method was used whereby modelling outcomes were closely matched to experimental observations. This is the first example of the use of the continuum approach to model the mechanical behaviour of discrete filled CNTs. In contrast to more computationally demanding methods such as density functional theory or molecular dynamics, our approach provides a viable and expedite alternative to model the mechanics of filled multi-walled CNTs. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  19. Experimental observation of optical bandgaps for surface electromagnetic waves in a periodically corrugated one-dimensional silicon nitride photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descrovi, Emiliano; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Dominici, Lorenzo; Michelotti, Francesco

    2008-02-01

    Dispersion curves of surface electromagnetic waves (SEWs) in 1D silicon nitride photonic crystals having periodic surface corrugations are considered. We experimentally demonstrate that a bandgap for SEWs can be obtained by fabricating a polymeric grating on the multilayered structure. Close to the boundary of the first Brillouin zone connected to the grating, we observe the splitting of the SEW dispersion curve into two separate branches and identify two regions of very low group velocity. The proper design of the structure allows the two folded branches to lie beyond the light line in a wide spectral range, thus doubling the density of modes available for SEWs and avoiding light scattering.

  20. Recommending randomized trials for pediatric leukemia: observer and physician report of recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, Rebecca; Greenley, Rachel Neff; Drotar, Dennis; Kodish, Eric

    2007-06-01

    Physicians' presentation of treatment options in a non-coercive manner is critical for informed consent for participation in randomized clinical trials (RCTs). This study examined discrepancies between observer and physician report of treatment recommendations for pediatric leukemia RCTs. This study also assessed relationships between recommendations and decisions to participate in RCTs. Participants were 104 parents of children with leukemia and the treating physicians. Measures included observations of informed consent conferences (ICCs), physician report of treatment recommendations, and parent report of trial participation. Observation revealed that physicians recommended RCTs in 38% of ICCs, while physicians reported recommending RCTs in 73% of ICCs. Treatment recommendations were unrelated to decisions to participate in RCTs. Results highlight the importance of enhancing parent-physician communication regarding RCT participation.

  1. Self-reported and Observed Quality of ADL Task Performance in Adults with Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristina Tomra; Wæhrens, Eva

    2014-01-01

    reported (figure 1 and 2) and demonstrated increased effort and/or fatigue, increased use of time, need for assistance and safety problems. 85% had AMPS ADL motor ability measures below cut-off indicating clumsiness, fatigue, increased effort, safety risk and/or need of assistance during ADL task...... on self-report and observation to some extent provide similar information related to quality of ADL task performance in adults with depression. Thus, at group level problems in terms of increased physical effort and/or fatigue, inefficient use of time, some safety risk and/or need for assistance were both......Introduction Limited relationship between measures of self-reported and observed quality of ADL task performance has been revealed in a rheumatologic population, stressing the need to apply both self-report and observation in that population when evaluating ADL task performance. As occupational...

  2. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pordeus Isabela A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. Methods A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Results Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75. There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p Conclusions In general, there was low agreement between observed tooth brushing and mothers' reports. Moreover, the different methods of estimation resulted in differences in the frequencies of tooth brushing habits, indicative of reporting bias. Data regarding children's tooth-brushing habits as reported by mothers should be considered with caution in epidemiological surveys on fluoridated dentifrice use and the risk of dental fluorosis.

  3. Final report for CAFDA project entitled, Experimental and numerical investigation of accelerated fluid interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenough, J.A.; Jacobs, J.W.; Marcus, D.L.

    1997-03-26

    The main thrust of this collaborative effort can be summarized as an attempt to use the strengths of physical experiments and numerical simulations in understanding the dynamics of accelerated interfaces. Laboratory experiments represent the true nature of the physical processes and the simulations represent a model of these processes. We have taken the first steps toward this goal through development and calibration of new experimental techniques as well as validation and direct, systematic, and quantitative comparison with computational results. This report summarizes accomplishments made towards these goals. More detailed information is provided in reprints appended to this document.

  4. Operational readiness review for the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was conducted by EG&G Idaho, Inc., to verify the readiness of WERF to resume operations following a shutdown and modification period of more than two years. It is the conclusion of the ORR Team that, pending satisfactory resolution of all pre-startup findings, WERF has achieved readiness to resume unrestricted operations within the approved safety basis. ORR appraisal forms are included in this report.

  5. Experimental Design and Data Analysis in Receiver Operating Characteristic Studies: Lessons Learned from Reports in Radiology from 1997 to 20061

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junji; Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Metz, Charles E.; Doi, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a broad perspective concerning the recent use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging by reviewing ROC studies published in Radiology between 1997 and 2006 for experimental design, imaging modality, medical condition, and ROC paradigm. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ninety-five studies were obtained by conducting a literature search with PubMed with two criteria: publication in Radiology between 1997 and 2006 and occurrence of the phrase “receiver operating characteristic.” Studies returned by the query that were not diagnostic imaging procedure performance evaluations were excluded. Characteristics of the remaining studies were tabulated. Results: Two hundred thirty-three (79.0%) of the 295 studies reported findings based on observers' diagnostic judgments or objective measurements. Forty-three (14.6%) did not include human observers, with most of these reporting an evaluation of a computer-aided diagnosis system or functional data obtained with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The remaining 19 (6.4%) studies were classified as reviews or meta-analyses and were excluded from our subsequent analysis. Among the various imaging modalities, MR imaging (46.0%) and CT (25.7%) were investigated most frequently. Approximately 60% (144 of 233) of ROC studies with human observers published in Radiology included three or fewer observers. Conclusion: ROC analysis is widely used in radiologic research, confirming its fundamental role in assessing diagnostic performance. However, the ROC studies reported in Radiology were not always adequate to support clear and clinically relevant conclusions. © RSNA, 2009 Supplemental material: http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.2533081632/-/DC1 PMID:19864510

  6. Effects of experimental protocol on global vegetation model accuracy: a comparison of simulated and observed vegetation patterns for Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guoping; Shafer, Sarah L.; Barlein, Patrick J.; Holman, Justin O.

    2009-01-01

    Prognostic vegetation models have been widely used to study the interactions between environmental change and biological systems. This study examines the sensitivity of vegetation model simulations to: (i) the selection of input climatologies representing different time periods and their associated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, (ii) the choice of observed vegetation data for evaluating the model results, and (iii) the methods used to compare simulated and observed vegetation. We use vegetation simulated for Asia by the equilibrium vegetation model BIOME4 as a typical example of vegetation model output. BIOME4 was run using 19 different climatologies and their associated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The Kappa statistic, Fuzzy Kappa statistic and a newly developed map-comparison method, the Nomad index, were used to quantify the agreement between the biomes simulated under each scenario and the observed vegetation from three different global land- and tree-cover data sets: the global Potential Natural Vegetation data set (PNV), the Global Land Cover Characteristics data set (GLCC), and the Global Land Cover Facility data set (GLCF). The results indicate that the 30-year mean climatology (and its associated atmospheric CO2 concentration) for the time period immediately preceding the collection date of the observed vegetation data produce the most accurate vegetation simulations when compared with all three observed vegetation data sets. The study also indicates that the BIOME4-simulated vegetation for Asia more closely matches the PNV data than the other two observed vegetation data sets. Given the same observed data, the accuracy assessments of the BIOME4 simulations made using the Kappa, Fuzzy Kappa and Nomad index map-comparison methods agree well when the compared vegetation types consist of a large number of spatially continuous grid cells. The results of this analysis can assist model users in designing experimental protocols for simulating vegetation.

  7. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  8. EXPERIMENTAL CURRICULA IN CHEMISTRY, A REPORT OF THE A.C.C.C. CONFERENCE ON CURRICULUM EXPERIMENTATION (CHICAGO, OCTOBER 1963).

    Science.gov (United States)

    HUME, DAVID N.

    FOUR PROGRAMS ARE IDENTIFIED AND DESCRIBED AS REPRESENTATIVE OF THE EXPERIMENTATION BEING CONDUCTED IN THE UNDERGRADUATE CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM IN AMERICAN HIGHER EDUCATION. (1) THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AND THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY REQUIRE THAT A STUDENT TAKE A GROUP OF "CORE" COURSES WHICH PROVIDE, RELATIVELY EARLY IN HIS…

  9. Invited review: Experimental design, data reporting, and sharing in support of animal systems modeling research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, J P; Hanigan, M D; White, R R

    2016-12-01

    The National Animal Nutrition Program "National Research Support Project 9" supports efforts in livestock nutrition, including the National Research Council's committees on the nutrient requirements of animals. Our objective was to review the status of experimentation and data reporting in animal nutrition literature and to provide suggestions for the advancement of animal nutrition research and the ongoing improvement of field-applied nutrient requirement models. Improved data reporting consistency and completeness represent a substantial opportunity to improve nutrition-related mathematical models. We reviewed a body of nutrition research; recorded common phrases used to describe diets, animals, housing, and environmental conditions; and proposed equivalent numerical data that could be reported. With the increasing availability of online supplementary material sections in journals, we developed a comprehensive checklist of data that should be included in publications. To continue to improve our research effectiveness, studies utilizing multiple research methodologies to address complex systems and measure multiple variables will be necessary. From the current body of animal nutrition literature, we identified a series of opportunities to integrate research focuses (nutrition, reproduction and genetics) to advance the development of nutrient requirement models. From our survey of current experimentation and data reporting in animal nutrition, we identified 4 key opportunities to advance animal nutrition knowledge: (1) coordinated experiments should be designed to employ multiple research methodologies; (2) systems-oriented research approaches should be encouraged and supported; (3) publication guidelines should be updated to encourage and support sharing of more complete data sets; and (4) new experiments should be more rapidly integrated into our knowledge bases, research programs and practical applications. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association

  10. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely-collected health Data (RECORD statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric I Benchimol

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Routinely collected health data, obtained for administrative and clinical purposes without specific a priori research goals, are increasingly used for research. The rapid evolution and availability of these data have revealed issues not addressed by existing reporting guidelines, such as Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE. The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely collected health Data (RECORD statement was created to fill these gaps. RECORD was created as an extension to the STROBE statement to address reporting items specific to observational studies using routinely collected health data. RECORD consists of a checklist of 13 items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of articles, and other information required for inclusion in such research reports. This document contains the checklist and explanatory and elaboration information to enhance the use of the checklist. Examples of good reporting for each RECORD checklist item are also included herein. This document, as well as the accompanying website and message board (http://www.record-statement.org, will enhance the implementation and understanding of RECORD. Through implementation of RECORD, authors, journals editors, and peer reviewers can encourage transparency of research reporting.

  11. Impulsivity in Multiplayer Online Battle Arena Gamers: Preliminary Results on Experimental and Self-Report Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyens, Filip; Deleuze, Jory; Maurage, Pierre; Griffiths, Mark D; Kuss, Daria J; Billieux, Joël

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims Multiplayer Online Battle Arena (MOBA) games have become the most popular type of video games played worldwide, superseding the playing of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games and First-Person Shooter games. However, empirical studies focusing on the use and abuse of MOBA games are still very limited, particularly regarding impulsivity, which is an indicator of addictive states but has not yet been explored in MOBA games. In this context, the objective of the present study is to explore the associations between impulsivity and symptoms of addictive use of MOBA games in a sample of highly involved League of Legends (LoL, currently the most popular MOBA game) gamers. Methods Thirty-six LoL gamers were recruited and completed both experimental (Single Key Impulsivity Paradigm) and self-reported impulsivity assessments (s-UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), in addition to an assessment of problematic video game use (Problematic Online Gaming Questionnaire). Results Results showed links between impulsivity-related constructs and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Findings indicated that impaired ability to postpone rewards in an experimental laboratory task was strongly related to problematic patterns of MOBA game involvement. Although less consistent, several associations were also found between self-reported impulsivity traits and signs of excessive MOBA game involvement. Conclusions Despite these results are preliminary and based upon a small (self-selected) sample, the present study highlights potential psychological factors related to the addictive use of MOBA games.

  12. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach;

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported......A usability evaluation provides a strong and rich basis for understanding and improving the design of user interaction with a software system. Exploiting this evaluation requires feedback that significantly impacts the developers' understanding of usability data about the interaction design...

  13. The impact of usability reports and user test observations on developers understanding of usability data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup; Nielsen, Christian Monrad; Pedersen, Michael Bach

    2006-01-01

    of the system. This article presents results from an exploratory study of 2 ways of providing feedback from a usability evaluation: observation of user tests and reading usability reports. A case study and a field experiment were used to explore how observation and usability reports impact developers......A usability evaluation provides a strong and rich basis for understanding and improving the design of user interaction with a software system. Exploiting this evaluation requires feedback that significantly impacts the developers' understanding of usability data about the interaction design......' understanding of usability data. The results indicate that observation of user tests facilitated a rich understanding of usability problems and created empathy with the users and their work. The usability report had a strong impact on the developers' understanding of specific usability problems and supported...

  14. Constructing experimental designs for discrete-choice experiments: report of the ISPOR Conjoint Analysis Experimental Design Good Research Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed Johnson, F; Lancsar, Emily; Marshall, Deborah; Kilambi, Vikram; Mühlbacher, Axel; Regier, Dean A; Bresnahan, Brian W; Kanninen, Barbara; Bridges, John F P

    2013-01-01

    Stated-preference methods are a class of evaluation techniques for studying the preferences of patients and other stakeholders. While these methods span a variety of techniques, conjoint-analysis methods-and particularly discrete-choice experiments (DCEs)-have become the most frequently applied approach in health care in recent years. Experimental design is an important stage in the development of such methods, but establishing a consensus on standards is hampered by lack of understanding of available techniques and software. This report builds on the previous ISPOR Conjoint Analysis Task Force Report: Conjoint Analysis Applications in Health-A Checklist: A Report of the ISPOR Good Research Practices for Conjoint Analysis Task Force. This report aims to assist researchers specifically in evaluating alternative approaches to experimental design, a difficult and important element of successful DCEs. While this report does not endorse any specific approach, it does provide a guide for choosing an approach that is appropriate for a particular study. In particular, it provides an overview of the role of experimental designs for the successful implementation of the DCE approach in health care studies, and it provides researchers with an introduction to constructing experimental designs on the basis of study objectives and the statistical model researchers have selected for the study. The report outlines the theoretical requirements for designs that identify choice-model preference parameters and summarizes and compares a number of available approaches for constructing experimental designs. The task-force leadership group met via bimonthly teleconferences and in person at ISPOR meetings in the United States and Europe. An international group of experimental-design experts was consulted during this process to discuss existing approaches for experimental design and to review the task force's draft reports. In addition, ISPOR members contributed to developing a consensus

  15. Global Positioning System: Observations on Quarterly Reports from the Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-17

    Positioning System: Observations on Quarterly Reports from the Air Force The satellite-based Global Positioning System (GPS) provides positioning, navigation...infrastructure, and transportation safety. The Department of Defense (DOD)—specifically, the Air Force—develops and operates the GPS system, which...National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 contained a provision that the Air Force provide quarterly reports to GAO on the next

  16. Comparison between observed children's tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Information bias can occur in epidemiological studies and compromise scientific outcomes, especially when evaluating information given by a patient regarding their own health. The oral habits of children reported by their mothers are commonly used to evaluate tooth brushing practices and to estimate fluoride intake by children. The aim of the present study was to compare observed tooth-brushing habits of young children using fluoridated toothpaste with those reported by mothers. Methods A sample of 201 mothers and their children (aged 24-48 months) from Montes Claros, Brazil, took part in a cross-sectional study. At day-care centres, the mothers answered a self-administered questionnaire on their child's tooth-brushing habits. The structured questionnaire had six items with two to three possible answers. An appointment was then made with each mother/child pair at day-care centres. The participants were asked to demonstrate the tooth-brushing practice as usually performed at home. A trained examiner observed and documented the procedure. Observed tooth brushing and that reported by mothers were compared for overall agreement using Cohen's Kappa coefficient and the McNemar test. Results Cohen's Kappa values comparing mothers' reports and tooth brushing observed by the examiner ranged from poor-to-good (0.00-0.75). There were statistically significant differences between observed tooth brushing habits and those reported by mothers (p dentifrice dispersed on all bristles (35.9%), children who brushed their teeth alone (33.8%) and those who did not rinse their mouths during brushing (42.0%) were higher than those reported by the mothers (12.1%, 18.9% and 6.5%, respectively; p dentifrice use and the risk of dental fluorosis. PMID:21888664

  17. Experimental observation of the luminescence flash at the collapse phase of a bubble produced by pulsed discharge in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yifan; Zhang, Liancheng; Zhu, Xinlei; Liu, Zhen, E-mail: zliu@zju.edu.cn; Yan, Keping [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310007 (China); Chen, Jim [Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310007 (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Western University, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2015-11-02

    This letter presents an experimental observation of luminescence flash at the collapse phase of an oscillating bubble produced by a pulsed discharge in water. According to the high speed records, the flash lasts around tens of microseconds, which is much longer than the lifetime of laser and ultrasound induced luminescence flashes in nanoseconds and picoseconds, respectively. The pulse width of temperature waveform and minimum radius calculated at the collapse phase also show that the thermodynamic and dynamic signatures of the bubbles in this work are much larger than those of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles both in time and space scales. However, the peak temperature at the point of collapse is close to the results of ultrasound and laser induced bubbles. This result provides another possibility for accurate emission spectrum measurement other than amplification of the emitted light, such as increasing laser energy or sound energy or substituting water with sulphuric acid.

  18. Experimental observations of Z-dependence of saturation thickness of 662 keV gamma rays in metals and glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindraswami, K.; Kiran, K. U.; Eshwarappa, K. M.; Somashekarappa, H. M.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper the energy, intensity and angular distributions of multiple scattering of 662 keV gamma photons, emerging from targets of aluminium, copper, iron and glass samples are studied as a function of target thickness. An intense collimated beam obtained from a 137Cs source of 5.8 mCi is allowed to impinge on samples of varying thickness. The scattered photons are detected by a properly shielded 76 mm × 76 mm NaI (Tl) scintillation detector. In Compton scattering experiments, it is observed that the number of multiple backscattered photons increase with an increase in target thickness and become almost constant for particular target thickness called saturation thickness. The saturation thickness decreases with increasing atomic number. The multiple scattering, an interfering background noise in Compton profile, has been successfully used to assign effective atomic number (Z eff ) to composite materials. The experimental results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculations using Monte Carlo nuclear particle code.

  19. Exposure to soda commercials affects sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young women. An observational experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koordeman, Renske; Anschutz, Doeschka J; van Baaren, Rick B; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2010-06-01

    The present study examines the direct effects of television commercials advertising soda on actual sugar-sweetened soda consumption among young women. An experimental-observational study design was used, in which 51 female students (ages 18-29) were exposed to a 35-min movie clip, interrupted by two commercial breaks consisting of soda or water commercials. Their actual soda consumption while watching the movie clip was examined. An analysis of variance was used to examine the effects of commercial condition on soda consumption. Thirst and first glass consumed before the first commercial break were added as covariates in the analyses. Results indicated that participants assigned to the condition with soda commercials consumed 1.3 ounces more soda than participants in the water commercial condition. Exposure to soda commercials while watching a movie can have a strong influence on increasing sugar-sweetened soda consumption in young women.

  20. From MHD regime to quiescent non-inductive discharges in Tore Supra: experimental observations and MHD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maget, P.; Huysmans, G. T. A.; Lütjens, H.; Ottaviani, M.; Moreau, Ph; Ségui, J.-L.

    2009-06-01

    Attempts to run non-inductive plasma discharges on Tore Supra sometimes fail due to the triggering of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) instabilities that saturate at a large amplitude, producing degraded confinement and loss of wave driven fast electrons (the so-called MHD regime (Maget et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 69-80)). In this paper we investigate the transition to this soft (in the sense of non-disruptive) MHD limit from experimental observations, and compare it with non-linear code predictions. Such a comparison suggests that different non-linear regimes, with periodic relaxations or saturation, are correctly understood. However, successful non-inductive discharges without detectable magnetic island at q = 2 cannot be reproduced if realistic transport coefficients are used in the computation. Additional physics seems mandatory for explaining these discharges, such as diamagnetic effects, that could also justify cases of abrupt transition to the MHD regime.

  1. Predictive value of self-reported and observer-rated defense style in depression treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van, H.L.; Dekker, J.J.M.; Peen, J.; Abraham, R.E.; Schoevers, R.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of observer-rated and self-reported defensive functioning on the outcome of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Defense styles were measured according to the Developmental Profile (DP) and the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) in 81 moderately seve

  2. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta Derma

  3. Galileo Infrared Observations of the Shoemaker-Levy 9 G Impact Fireball: A Preliminary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R. W.; Weissman, P. R.; Segura, M.; Hui, J.; Smythe, W. D.; Johnson, T.; Baines, K. H.; Drossart, P.; Encrenaz, T.; Leader, F. E.; Team, NIMS Science

    1995-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft was fortuitously situated for a direct view of the impacts of the fragments of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 in Jupiter's atmosphere. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer instrument observed several of the impact events in several discrete bands and with a temporal resolution of roughly five seconds. This report provides a preliminary description of the fireball phase.

  4. The Reporting of Observational Research Studies in Dermatology Journals A Literature-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langan, Sinead; Schmitt, Jochen; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Svensson, Ake; von Elm, Erik; Williams, Hywel

    Objective: To assess the quality of reporting in observational studies in dermatology. Data Sources: Five dermatology journals-the Archives of Dermatology, the British Journal of Dermatology, the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, and Acta

  5. Bullying Predicts Reported Dating Violence and Observed Qualities in Adolescent Dating Relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy E; Wolfe, David A

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between reported bullying, reported dating violence, and dating relationship quality measured through couple observations was examined. Given past research demonstrating similarity between peer and dating contexts, we expected that bullying would predict negative dating experiences. Participants with dating experience (n = 585; 238 males, M(age) = 15.06) completed self-report assessments of bullying and dating violence perpetration and victimization. One month later, 44 opposite-sex dyads (M(age) = 15.19) participated in behavioral observations. In 10-min sessions, couples were asked to rank and discuss areas of relationship conflict while being video-recorded. Qualities of the relationship were later coded by trained observers. Regression analysis revealed that bullying positively predicted dating violence perpetration and victimization. Self-reported bullying also predicted observations of lower relationship support and higher withdrawal. Age and gender interactions further qualified these findings. The bullying of boys, but not girls, was significantly related to dating violence perpetration. Age interactions showed that bullying was positively predictive of dating violence perpetration and victimization for older, but not younger adolescents. Positive affect was also negatively predicted by bullying, but only for girls. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that adolescents carry forward strategies learned in the peer context to their dating relationships. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Assessing agreement of self-reported and observed physical exposures of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Ann Marie; Strickland, Jaime; Gardner, Bethany; Symanzik, Juergen; Evanoff, Bradley Allen

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of workplace physical exposures by self-reported questionnaires has logistical advantages in population studies, but is subject to exposure misclassification. This study measured agreement between eight self-reported and observer-rated physical exposures to the hands and wrists, and evaluated predictors of intermethod agreement. Workers (n = 341) from three occupational categories (clerical/technical, construction, and service) completed self-administered questionnaires and worksite assessments. Analyses compared self-reported and observed ratings using a weighted kappa coefficient. Personal and psychosocial factors, presence of upper extremity symptoms, andjob type were evaluated as predictors of agreement. Weighted kappa values were substantial for lifting (0.67) and holding vibrating tools (0.61), moderate for forceful grip (0.58), and fair to poor for all other exposures. Upper extremity symptoms did not predict greater disagreement between self-reported and observed exposures. Occupational category was the only significant predictor of inter-method agreement. Self-reported exposures may provide a useful estimate of some work exposures for population studies.

  7. UAS Reports (UREPs): EnablingExchange of Observation Data Between UAS Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Joseph; Smith, David; Smith, Irene

    2017-01-01

    As the volume of small unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) operations increases, the lack of weather products to support these operations becomes more problematic. One early solution to obtaining more information about weather conditions is to allow operators to share their observations and measurements with other airspace users. This is analogous to the AIREP and PIREP reporting systems in traditional aviation wherein pilots report weather phenomena they have observed or experienced to provide better situational awareness to other pilots. Given the automated nature of the small (under 55 lbs.) UAS platforms and operations, automated reporting of relevant information should also be supported. To promote automated exchange of these data, a well-defined data schema needs to be established along with the mechanisms for sending and retrieving the data. This paper examines this concept and offers an initial definition of the necessary elements to allow for immediate implementation and use.

  8. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) shield and blanket work package report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report summarizes nuclear-related work in support of the US effort for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Study. The purpose of this work was to prepare for the first international ITER workshop devoted to defining a basic ITER concept that will serve as a basis for an indepth conceptual design activity over the next 2-1/2 years. Primary tasks carried out during the past year included: design improvements of the inboard shield developed for the TIBER concept, scoping studies of a variety of tritium breeding blanket options, development of necessary design guidelines and evaluation criteria for the blanket options, further safety considerations related to nuclear components and issues regarding structural materials for an ITER device. 44 refs., 31 figs., 29 tabs.

  9. Experimental studies of pion-nucleus interactions at intermediate energies. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report summarizes investigations of various pion-nucleus interactions and nucleon-nucleus charge-exchange reactions. The work was carried out with the LAMPF accelerator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and the cyclotrons at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) near Zurich, Switzerland, and at Indiana University (IUCF), as a collaborative effort among several laboratories and universities. The experimental activity at LAMPF involved measurements of new data on pion double-charge-exchange scattering, some initial work on a new Neutral Meson Spectrometer system, a search for deeply-bound pionic atoms, measurements of elastic scattering, and studies of the (n,p) reaction on various nuclei. At PSI measurements of pion quasielastic scattering were carried out, with detection of the recoil proton. Work on the analysis of data from a previous experiment at PSI on pion absorption in nuclei was continued. This experiment involved using a detector system that covered nearly the full solid angle.

  10. Final report of experimental laboratory-scale brittle fracture studies of glasses and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L.J.; Mecham, W.J.; Reedy, G.T.; Steindler, M.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental program was conducted to characterize the fragments generated when brittle glasses and ceramics are impacted. The direct application of the results is to radioactive waste forms for which the effects of accidental impacts must be known or predictable. Two major measurable experimental responses used for characterization of these effects are (1) the size distribution of the fragments, including the sizes that are respirable, and (2) the increase in surface area of the brittle test specimen. This report describes the glass and ceramic materials characterized, the procedures and techniques used for the characterization of size distributions and surface areas, and the results of the two key responses of the impact tests. Five alternative methods of determining size distributions were compared. Also examined were the effects of diametral and axial specimen impact configurations and the use of mechanical stops to eliminate secondary crushing during testing. Microscopic characterizations of Pyrex and SRL 131 simulated waste glass and SYNROC fragments were also performed. Preliminary correlations of impact energy with key size-distribution parameters, fragment surface areas, and respirable fines were proposed as useful for future verification and for use with modeling and scale-up studies of brittle fracture of larger realistic waste forms. The impact fragments of all specimens could be described by lognormal size distributions.

  11. An experimental and theoretical study to relate uncommon rock/fluid properties to oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.

    1995-07-01

    Waterflooding is the most commonly used secondary oil recovery technique. One of the requirements for understanding waterflood performance is a good knowledge of the basic properties of the reservoir rocks. This study is aimed at correlating rock-pore characteristics to oil recovery from various reservoir rock types and incorporating these properties into empirical models for Predicting oil recovery. For that reason, this report deals with the analyses and interpretation of experimental data collected from core floods and correlated against measurements of absolute permeability, porosity. wettability index, mercury porosimetry properties and irreducible water saturation. The results of the radial-core the radial-core and linear-core flow investigations and the other associated experimental analyses are presented and incorporated into empirical models to improve the predictions of oil recovery resulting from waterflooding, for sandstone and limestone reservoirs. For the radial-core case, the standardized regression model selected, based on a subset of the variables, predicted oil recovery by waterflooding with a standard deviation of 7%. For the linear-core case, separate models are developed using common, uncommon and combination of both types of rock properties. It was observed that residual oil saturation and oil recovery are better predicted with the inclusion of both common and uncommon rock/fluid properties into the predictive models.

  12. An experimental and theoretical study to relate uncommon rock/fluid properties to oil recovery. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.

    1995-07-01

    Waterflooding is the most commonly used secondary oil recovery technique. One of the requirements for understanding waterflood performance is a good knowledge of the basic properties of the reservoir rocks. This study is aimed at correlating rock-pore characteristics to oil recovery from various reservoir rock types and incorporating these properties into empirical models for Predicting oil recovery. For that reason, this report deals with the analyses and interpretation of experimental data collected from core floods and correlated against measurements of absolute permeability, porosity. wettability index, mercury porosimetry properties and irreducible water saturation. The results of the radial-core the radial-core and linear-core flow investigations and the other associated experimental analyses are presented and incorporated into empirical models to improve the predictions of oil recovery resulting from waterflooding, for sandstone and limestone reservoirs. For the radial-core case, the standardized regression model selected, based on a subset of the variables, predicted oil recovery by waterflooding with a standard deviation of 7%. For the linear-core case, separate models are developed using common, uncommon and combination of both types of rock properties. It was observed that residual oil saturation and oil recovery are better predicted with the inclusion of both common and uncommon rock/fluid properties into the predictive models.

  13. Inter-observer agreement in reporting HER 2 Neu protein over expression by immunohistochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Al Haddabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HER 2 Neu protein overexpression and its detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC has become quiet critical because of its relevance in regards to Herceptin treatment. This peer review was done at a tertiary care center, which aimed at determining the inter-observer variation among five pathologists and evaluating the degree of agreement between them. Aims: The aim of our study was to determine the reproducibility of HER 2 Neu system of reporting in breast cancer cases and determine inter-observer variability among five pathologists at a tertiary care center. To compare the results with similar studies done at other centers. Settings and Design: Retrospective descriptive study. Materials and Methods: Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E and IHC stained slides of 104 cases of carcinoma breast, on which HER 2 Neu status had been reported were reviewed. The time period for selection was from January 2010 to December 2011 (2 year period. Five pathologists reviewed the H and E and IHC slides independently and scored the results on a specially designed work sheet. Kappa values for inter-observer variation and Cornbach′s alpha for internal consistency were calculated. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS 20.0 (IBM. not known. Results: Complete agreement was seen between all five pathologists in 70 cases (70/104 = 67%. Agreement between four pathologists was seen in 78 cases (78/104 = 75%. Agreement between three pathologists was seen in 92 cases (92/104 = 88%. The global value for kappa co efficient for agreement between two pathologists was 0.706 and Cornbach alpha for internal consistency of reporting in the department was 0.987. Conclusion/Key Messages: Our departmental peer review indicated that there is good inter-observer concordance (agreement between two pathologists and there is strong overall internal consistency of reporting for HER 2 Neu reporting by IHC. Our results are comparable to International reported data of similar studies.

  14. Observed and self-reported pesticide protective behaviors of Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, AnnMarie Lee; LePrevost, Catherine; Wong, Bob; Linnan, Laura; Sanchez-Birkhead, Ana; Mooney, Kathi

    2016-05-01

    Agricultural pesticide exposure has potential adverse health effects for farmworkers that may be reduced by pesticide protective behaviors (PPBs). The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Worker Protection Standard (WPS) requires PPBs be taught to farmworkers prior to field work. Studies to date have not utilized observational methods to evaluate the degree to which PPBs are practiced by Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe, compare, and contrast observed and self-reported PPBs used by Latino farmworkers; both PPBs that the WPS requires be taught and other PPBs were included. Observed and self-reported data were collected from 71 Latino farmworkers during the 2014 tobacco growing season in North Carolina. Participants were consistent in reporting and using long pants and closed shoes in the field most of the time. In addition, gloves, hats/bandanas, and water-resistant outerwear were frequently observed, although they are not required to be taught by the WPS. Farmworkers reported more long-sleeve (p=.028) and glove use (p=.000) than what was observed. It was uncommon to observe washing behavior before eating or drinking, even when washing supplies were available. Washing behaviors were significantly overreported for hand (p=.000; p=.000) and face (p=.000; p=.058) washing before eating and drinking in the field. This study documents that protective clothing behaviors that the WPS requires be taught, plus a few others are commonly practiced by Latino migrant and seasonal farmworkers, but washing behaviors in the field are not. Targeted strategies to improve washing behaviors in the field are needed.

  15. Women With Addictions Report Reduced Anxiety After Group Music Therapy: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke S. Diestelkamp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Roughly six million females in the USA abuse or are addicted to alcohol. Women are more likely than men to report depression and anxiety as triggers for substance use and relapse, which emphasizes the importance of therapies designed to help women mitigate anxiety.Research supporting music therapy (MT with women with addictions is scarce. In this quasi-experimental investigation, we hoped to learn: (1 What percentage of women with addictive disorders in a 45-minute group MT session will report pre-session anxiety?; and (2 of these, what percentage will report a palpable reduction in their post-session anxiety? We used a single group design: Participants self-reported anxiety before and after each session.Study participants were 53 women in a gender-specific residential program. Voluntary group MT sessions were held twice weekly for 9 weeks. Four MT methods were used: Composition, Receptive (Listening, Improvisation, and Re-Creative (Performing. Of 53 first-session surveys, 39 (73.6% indicated pre-session anxiety. Of these, 33 (84.6% showed a reduction in post-session anxiety. A sign test confirmed an overall reduction in anxiety.Outcomes may have been related to interventions, group cohesion, or other factors. The absence of a comparison group prevents suppositions of causality. Nonetheless, the results present a compelling case for the use of MT with women with anxiety. Because of the link between trauma and addictive disorders, we encourage exploration of the role and benefits of MT within trauma-informed models of addiction treatment.

  16. Routes towards the experimental observation of the large fluctuations due to chaos-assisted tunneling effects with cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubertrand, R.; Billy, J.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Georgeot, B.; Lemarié, G.

    2016-10-01

    In the presence of a complex classical dynamics associated with a mixed phase space, a quantum wave function can tunnel between two stable islands through the chaotic sea, an effect that has no classical counterpart. This phenomenon, referred to as chaos-assisted tunneling, is characterized by large fluctuations of the tunneling rate when a parameter is varied. To date, the full extent of this effect as well as the associated statistical distribution have never been observed in a quantum system. Here, we analyze the possibility of characterizing these effects accurately in a cold-atom experiment. Using realistic values of the parameters of an experimental setup, we examine through analytical estimates and extensive numerical simulations a specific system that can be implemented with cold atoms, the atomic modulated pendulum. We assess the efficiency of three possible routes to observe in detail chaos-assisted tunneling properties. Our main conclusion is that due to the fragility of the symmetry between positive and negative momenta as a function of quasimomentum, it is very challenging to use tunneling between classical islands centered on fixed points with opposite momentum. We show that it is more promising to use islands symmetric in position space, and characterize the regime where it could be done. The proposed experiment could be realized with current state-of-the-art technology.

  17. Experimental Observations on the Deformation and Breakup of Water Droplets Near the Leading Edge of an Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Feo, Alex

    2011-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study on droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The experiment was conducted in the rotating rig test cell at the Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial (INTA) in Madrid, Spain. An airfoil model placed at the end of the rotating arm was moved at speeds of 50 to 90 m/sec. A monosize droplet generator was employed to produce droplets that were allowed to fall from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil at a given location. High speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets and the airfoil. The high speed imaging allowed observation of droplet deformation and breakup as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation line. A tracking software program was used to measure from the high speed movies the horizontal and vertical displacement of the droplet against time. The velocity, acceleration, Weber number, Bond number, Reynolds number, and the drag coefficients were calculated along the path of a given droplet from beginning of deformation to breakup and/or hitting the airfoil. Results are presented for droplets with a diameter of 490 micrometers at airfoil speeds of 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 m/sec

  18. A case study of the mechanism of alcohol-mediated Morita Baylis-Hillman reactions. The importance of experimental observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plata, R Erik; Singleton, Daniel A

    2015-03-25

    The mechanism of the Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction has been heavily studied in the literature, and a long series of computational studies have defined complete theoretical energy profiles in these reactions. We employ here a combination of mechanistic probes, including the observation of intermediates, the independent generation and partitioning of intermediates, thermodynamic and kinetic measurements on the main reaction and side reactions, isotopic incorporation from solvent, and kinetic isotope effects, to define the mechanism and an experimental mechanistic free-energy profile for a prototypical Morita Baylis-Hillman reaction in methanol. The results are then used to critically evaluate the ability of computations to predict the mechanism. The most notable prediction of the many computational studies, that of a proton-shuttle pathway, is refuted in favor of a simple but computationally intractable acid-base mechanism. Computational predictions vary vastly, and it is not clear that any significant accurate information that was not already apparent from experiment could have been garnered from computations. With care, entropy calculations are only a minor contributor to the larger computational error, while literature entropy-correction processes lead to absurd free-energy predictions. The computations aid in interpreting observations but fail utterly as a replacement for experiment.

  19. Observing Proton Transfer Reactions Inside the MALDI Plume: Experimental and Theoretical Insight into MALDI Gas-Phase Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabelli, Mario F.; Zenobi, Renato

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the contribution of gas-phase in-plume proton transfer reactions to the formation of protonated and deprotonated molecules in the MALDI process. A split sample holder was used to separately deposit two different samples, which avoids any mixing during sample preparation. The two samples were brought very close to each other and desorbed/ionized by the same laser pulse. By using a combination of deuterated and non-deuterated matrices, it was possible to observe exclusively in-plume proton transfer processes. The hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) kinetics were evaluated by varying the delayed extraction (DE) time, allowing the desorbed ions and neutrals to interact inside the plume for a variable period of time before being extracted and detected. Quantum mechanical calculations showed that the HDX energy barriers are relatively low for such reactions, corroborating the importance of gas-phase proton transfer in the MALDI plume. The experimental results, supported by theoretical simulations, confirm that the plume is a very reactive environment, where HDX reactions could be observed from 0 ns up to 400 ns after the laser pulse. These results could be used to evaluate the relevance of previously proposed (and partially conflicting) ionization models for MALDI.

  20. Self-reported and observed seat belt use--A case study: Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovac, Krsto; Tešić, Milan; Marić, Bojan; Đerić, Miroslav

    2015-11-01

    The issue of seat belt use in middle- and low-income countries is strongly evident and has as a result higher rates of fatalities and seriously injured on the roads. The first systematic field research of the seat belt use while driving was carried out in Bosnia and Herzegovina, in 2011-2012. Research methodology consisted of two mutually conditioned parts (observation and self-reported behavior). Specific features of the methodology used are in the relationship between the observed and interviewed drivers which enabled the analysis of their observed and self-reported behavior while driving. The logistic regression method was used in this work to make the analysis of the influence of personal human characteristics (gender, age, education, exposure) and vehicles' characteristics (age) on the observed and self-reported driving behavior, from the point of view of seat belt use while driving. The influence of the listed factors on driving behavior, depending on road type (urban or rural), was given special attention in the analysis. The paper shows that certain factors do not have the same impact on driving behavior, in various conditions. Based on results from this study, it will be possible to define certain critical groups of road users and the way in which they must be addressed in order to increase the seat belt wearing rate.

  1. Design of the Grimethorpe Experimental Facility as of March 1981: a technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-06-01

    The Experimental Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor, which has been built as an extension to the National Coal Board Power Station, which is adjacent to Grimethorpe Colliery, Yorkshire, England, is described in this report. The Governments of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the Federal Republic of Germany, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, have agreed to share equally between them the costs of building and operating the plant. Control of the project was vested in an Executive Committee consisting of one representative of each Government with all decisions requiring unanimity. The actual operation of the project was vested in an Operating Agent, NCB (IEA Services) Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Coal Board. The Implementing Agreement envisages a seven year project to be executed in four stages: (1) Procurement of Design Study with accompanying tender documents. (2) Tendering for construction of the Plant; study of appraisal of tenders. (3) Construction and acceptance of the Plant. (4) Operation of the Plant. The project is now towards the end of Stage 3. Construction has been completed and commissioning is in progress to prepare the plant for the start of the operational phase in Autumn 1981. Because of the confidentiality of much of the design information, for the purposes of this report technical descriptions have been confined to that of a general appraisal.

  2. Assessing the reporting of categorised quantitative variables in observational epidemiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabikwa, Onkabetse V; Greenwood, Darren C; Baxter, Paul D; Fleming, Sarah J

    2017-03-14

    One aspect to consider when reporting results of observational studies in epidemiology is how quantitative risk factors are analysed. The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guidelines recommend that researchers describe how they handle quantitative variables when analysing data. For categorised quantitative variables, the authors are required to provide reasons and justifications informing their practice. We investigated and assessed the practices and reporting of categorised quantitative variables in epidemiology. The assessment was based on five medical journals that publish epidemiological research. Observational studies published between April and June 2015 and investigating the relationships between quantitative exposures (or risk factors) and the outcomes were considered for assessment. A standard form was used to collect the data, and the reporting patterns amongst eligible studies were quantified and described. Out of 61 articles assessed for eligibility, 23 observational studies were included in the assessment. Categorisation of quantitative exposures occurred in 61% of these studies and reasons informing the practice were rarely provided. Only one article explained the choice of categorisation in the analysis. Transformation of quantitative exposures into four or five groups was common and dominant amongst studies using equally spaced categories. Dichotomisation was not popular; the practice featured in one article. Overall, the majority (86%) of the studies preferred ordered or arbitrary group categories. Other criterions used to decide categorical boundaries were based on established guidelines such as consensus statements and WHO standards. Categorisation of continuous variables remains a dominant practice in epidemiological studies. The reasons informing the practice of categorisation within published work are limited and remain unknown in most articles. The existing STROBE guidelines could provide stronger

  3. Big Bang, inflation, standard Physics… and the potentialities of new Physics and alternative cosmologies. Present statuts of observational and experimental Cosmology. Open questions and potentialities of alternative cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2016-11-01

    A year ago, we wrote [1] that the field of Cosmology was undergoing a positive and constructive crisis. The possible development of more direct links between the Mathematical Physics aspects of cosmological patterns and the interpretation of experimental and observational results was particularly emphasized. Controversies on inflation are not really new, but in any case inflation is not required in pre-Big Bang models and the validity of the standard Big Bang + inflation + ΛCDM pattern has not by now been demonstrated by data. Planck has even explicitly reported the existence of "anomalies". Remembering the far-reaching work of Yoichiro Nambu published in 1959-61, it seems legitimate to underline the need for a cross-disciplinary approach in the presence of deep, unsolved theoretical problems concerning new domains of matter properties and of the physical world. The physics of a possible preonic vacuum and the associated cosmology constitute one of these domains. If the vacuum is made of superluminal preons (superbradyons), and if standard particles are vacuum excitations, how to build a suitable theory to describe the internal structure of such a vacuum at both local and cosmic level? Experimental programs (South Pole, Atacama, AUGER, Telescope Array…) and observational ones (Planck, JEM-EUSO…) devoted to the study of cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) and of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) are crucial to elucidate such theoretical interrogations and guide new phenomenological developments. Together with a brief review of the observational and experimental situation, we also examine the main present theoretical and phenomenological problems and point out the role new physics and alternative cosmologies can potentially play. The need for data analyses less focused a priori on the standard models of Particle Physics and Cosmology is emphasized in this discussion. An example of a new approach to both fields is provided by the pre-Big Bang pattern

  4. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  5. Methods and Processes of Developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology – Veterinary (STROBE‐Vet) Statement

    OpenAIRE

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I.R.; Erb, H N; Cevallos, M.; Egger, M; Ersbøll, A.; Martin, S W; Nielsen, L.; Pearl, D. L.; Pfeiffer, D U; J. Sanchez; Torrence, M E; Vigre, Håkan; Waldner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges that often are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies in veterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety.Design: A consensus meeting of experts was o...

  6. The reporting of statistics in medical educational studies: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desbiens Norman A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is confusion in the medical literature as to whether statistics should be reported in survey studies that query an entire population, as is often done in educational studies. Our objective was to determine how often statistical tests have been reported in such articles in two prominent journals that publish these types of studies. Methods For this observational study, we used electronic searching to identify all survey studies published in Academic Medicine and the Journal of General Internal Medicine in which an entire population was studied. We tallied whether inferential statistics were used and whether p-values were reported. Results Eighty-four articles were found: 62 in Academic Medicine and 22 in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Overall, 38 (45% of the articles reported or stated that they calculated statistics: 35% in Academic Medicine and 73% in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. Conclusion Educational enumeration surveys frequently report statistical tests. Until a better case can be made for doing so, a simple rule can be proffered to researchers. When studying an entire population (e.g., all program directors, all deans, and all medical schools for factual information, do not perform statistical tests. Reporting percentages is sufficient and proper.

  7. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut: An Extension of the STROBE Statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Lachat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Concerns have been raised about the quality of reporting in nutritional epidemiology. Research reporting guidelines such as the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE statement can improve quality of reporting in observational studies. Herein, we propose recommendations for reporting nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research by extending the STROBE statement into Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology-Nutritional Epidemiology (STROBE-nut.Recommendations for the reporting of nutritional epidemiology and dietary assessment research were developed following a systematic and consultative process, coordinated by a multidisciplinary group of 21 experts. Consensus on reporting guidelines was reached through a three-round Delphi consultation process with 53 external experts. In total, 24 recommendations for nutritional epidemiology were added to the STROBE checklist.When used appropriately, reporting guidelines for nutritional epidemiology can contribute to improve reporting of observational studies with a focus on diet and health.

  8. Timelike Compton Scattering off the nucleon: observables and experimental perspectives for JLab at 12 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, Marie [Inst. of Nuclear Physics (IPN), Orsay (France); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Hard exclusive processes such as photoproduction or electroproduction of photon or meson off the nucleon provide access to the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), in the regime where the scattering amplitude is factorized into a hard and a soft part. GPDs contain the correlation between the longitudinal momentum fraction and the transverse spatial densities of quarks and gluons in the nucleon. Timelike Compton Scattering (TCS) correspond to the reaction gammaN --> gamma*N --> e+e?N, where the photon is scattered off a quark. It is measured through its interference with the associated Bethe-Heitler process, which has the same final state. TCS allows to access the GPDs and test their universality by comparison to the results obtained with the DVCS process (eN --> e gamma N). Also, results obtained with TCS provide additional independent constrains to the GPDs parameterization. We will present the physical motivations for TCS, with our theoretical predictions for TCS observables and their dependencies. We calculated for JLab 12 GeV energies all the single and double beam and/or target polarization observables off the proton and off the neutron. We will also present the experimental perspectives for the next years at JLab. Two proposals were already accepted at JLab: in Hall B, with the CLAS12 spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and in Hall A, with the SoLID spectrometer, in order to measure the unpolarized cross section and the beam spin asymmetry at high intensity. A Letter Of Intent was also submitted in order to measure the transverse target spin asymmetries in Hall C. We will discuss the merits of this different experiments and present some of the expected results.

  9. Experimental observation of transient δ18O interaction between snow and advective airflow under various temperature gradient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Ebner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stable water isotopes (δ18O obtained from snow and ice samples of polar regions are used to reconstruct past climate variability, but heat and mass transport processes can affect the isotopic composition. Here we present an experimental study on the effect of airflow on the snow isotopic composition through a snow pack in controlled laboratory conditions. The influence of isothermal and controlled temperature gradient conditions on the δ18O content in the snow and interstitial water vapour is elucidated. The observed disequilibrium between snow and vapour isotopes led to the exchange of isotopes between snow and vapour under non-equilibrium processes, significantly changing the δ18O content of the snow. The type of metamorphism of the snow had a significant influence on this process. These findings are pertinent to the interpretation of the records of stable isotopes of water from ice cores. These laboratory measurements suggest that a highly resolved climate history is relevant for the interpretation of the snow isotopic composition in the field.

  10. EVALUATION OF THE THERAPEUTIC EFFICACY OF HIGH-INTENSITY PULSED-PERIODIC LASER RADIATION (CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Sokolov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the experience of clinical observations, we have shown a high therapeutic effectiveness of the medical laser KULON-MED in: cosmetics, non-cancer inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and cancer (cancer of the stomach and colon as at different wavelengths, and with different types of photosensitizers. In the area of anti-tumor photodynamic therapy (PDT, based on experimental studies, we have showed the high antitumor (sarcoma S‑37 effectiveness of the laser (with the inhibition of tumor growth of up to 100% for repetitively pulsed irradiation mode, and for mode fractionation doses laser radiation. In addition, significant differences are shown in the effectiveness of anticancer PDT methods in the application of high-intensity lasers, continuous and pulsed caused fundamental properties of laser radiation characteristics – time structure of the radiation pulses. Thus, for the first time we have shown that the time of high-intensity laser pulses structure significantly affects therapeutic efficacy laser system, and hence on the mechanisms of interaction of laser radiation with biological tissue.

  11. Experimental observations and dissipative particle dynamic simulations on microstructures of pH-sensitive polymer containing amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mengchi; Li, Bingyu; Li, Yanchun; Liu, Yangdan; Liu, Qi; Jiang, Hailun; He, Zhonggui; Zhao, Yongshan; Sun, Jin

    2017-01-30

    Amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) technique is an effective strategy to increase the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs. However, it is inherently unstable, and the molecular basis for achieving kinetic stability is not well understood. In this study, lacidipine-Eudragit_E_100 solid dispersions with 20% drug loading were prepared using the solvent evaporation. Dissolution tested showed that ASD had a significantly high rate, which was dependent on the pH of the medium. Based on time-dependent measurement of supersaturation and particle size, inhibition of crystal growth by Eudragit_E_100 differed at pH 1.2 and 6.8 to a great extent. Dissipative particle dynamic (DPD) simulation revealed that at pH 1.2, the swollen microstructures of the particles were associated with rapid drug release. At pH 6.8, a compacted microstructure of small amorphous particle-aggregated large particles was associated with slow dissolution. The DPD simulation provides insight into the structural basis for experimental observations, and thus is a useful tool to investigate the microstructures of ASD.

  12. Theoretical modeling and experimental observations of the atomic layer deposition of SrO using a cyclopentadienyl Sr precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Kurt D.; McDaniel, Martin D.; Slepko, Alex; Ekerdt, John G.; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2016-08-01

    First-principle calculations are used to model the adsorption and hydration of strontium bis(cyclopentadienyl) [Sr(Cp)2] on TiO2-terminated strontium titanate, SrTiO3 (STO), for the deposition of strontium oxide, SrO, by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The Sr(Cp)2 precursor is shown to adsorb on the TiO2-terminated surface, with the Sr atom assuming essentially the bulk position in STO. The C-Sr bonds are weaker than in the free molecule, with a Ti atom at the surface bonding to one of the C atoms in the cyclopentadienyl rings. The surface does not need to be hydrogenated for precursor adsorption. The calculations are compared with experimental observations for a related Sr cyclopentadienyl precursor, strontium bis(triisopropylcyclopentadienyl) [Sr(iPr3Cp)2], adsorbed on TiO2-terminated STO. High-resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy show adsorption of the Sr precursor on the TiO2-terminated STO after a single precursor dose. This study suggests that ALD growth from the strontium precursors featuring cyclopentadienyl ligands, such as Sr(Cp)2, may initiate film growth on non-hydroxylated surfaces.

  13. Antiepileptic effect of fisetin in iron-induced experimental model of traumatic epilepsy in rats in the light of electrophysiological, biochemical, and behavioral observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jharana; Singh, Rameshwar; Sharma, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    Traumatic epilepsy is defined by episodes of recurring seizures secondary to severe brain injury. Though drugs are found effective to control seizures, their long-term use have been observed to increase reactive oxygen species in animals. Flavonoid fisetin, a natural bioactive phytonutrient reported to exert anticonvulsive effect in experimental seizure models. But, trauma-induced seizures could not be prevented by anticonvulsants was reported in some clinical studies. To study the effect of fisetin on epileptiform electrographic activity in iron-induced traumatic epilepsy and also the probable reason behind the effect in rats. Fisetin pretreatment (20 mg/kg body wt., p.o.) of rats for 12 weeks were chosen followed by injecting iron (5 µl, 100 mM) stereotaxically to generate iron-induced epilepsy. Experimental design include electrophysiological study (electroencephalograph in correlation with multiple unit activity (MUA) in the cortex and CA1 subfield of the hippocampus; spectral analysis of seizure and seizure-associated behavioral study (Morris water maze for spatial learning, open-field test for anxiety) and biochemical study (lipid peroxidation, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity) in both the cortex and the hippocampus. Fisetin pretreatment was found to prevent the development of iron-induced electrical seizure and decrease the corresponding MUA in the cortex (*P˂0.05) as well as in the hippocampus (***P˂0.001). Fisetin pretreatment decreased the lipid peroxides (*P˂0.05) and retained the Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity (*P˂0.05) which was found altered in the epileptic animals and also found to attenuate the seizure-associated cognitive dysfunctions. This study demonstrated the antiepileptic action of fisetin in iron-induced model of epileptic rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

  14. First Report on the 2016 March 9 Total Solar Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2016-06-01

    Totality swept across Indonesia and into the Pacific on 2016 March 9, lasting up to 2 min 45 s on Ternate in the Spice Islands (Malukus). I provide a first report on our observations. Our scientific goal is to follow changes in the corona over the solar-activity cycle, now past its 2012 and 2014 double peak, and to measure temporal changes in the corona on the scale of minutes or hours by comparing eclipse observations made at several sites along the path. I also discuss the near-simultaneous coronal observations made with SOHO/LASCO, SDO/AIA, STEREO/SECCHI, PROBA2/SWAP, and Hinode XRT.For the forthcoming 2017 eclipse, we acknowledge grants to JMP and Williams College from the Solar Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation and from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  15. Condensed argon isentropic compression with ultrahigh magnetic field pressure: Experimental design. Post-shot report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykov, A.I.; Boriskov, G.V.; Dolotenko, M.I. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Experimental Physics, Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    This report continues the series of work devoted to experimental study of a high-dense condensed argon state. Remember that according to work of Kwon et. al., hexagonal close-packed structure is profitable in terms of energy rather than face-centered argon structure (stable with zero pressure). What is most interesting and intriguing here is the issue of possible argon metallization, when it is compressed up to the densities more than 9.17 g/cm{sup 3}. In the experiment of 1995 (the arrangement and data are described in a cited reference) the authors recorded appearance of conductivity in argon, which is non-conductive in the initial state, when it is compressed more than a factor of four. The peak value of argon specific conductivity recorded in this experiment did not exceed 10 (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. This value of conductivity is characteristic of semiconductors, but not metals, which have 10{sup 4} (Ohm x cm){sup {minus}1}. At this stage of the work the main attention is paid to recording of argon conductive state and studying the possibilities of multiframed radiography of the sample in the compressed state.

  16. Cockpit Interruptions and Distractions: An Analysis of ASRS Reports and an Experimental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dismukes, R. K.; Young, Grant E.; Connors, Mary (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A recent detailed analysis of 107 ASRS incident reports focusing on interruptions and distractions as their primary feature revealed several interesting and surprising findings. Of those tasks that were interfered with, over 40% fell within the category of monitoring; for example, monitoring the autopilot flying the aircraft, monitoring the pilot flying, or monitoring the altimeter or navigation instruments for future action. Surprisingly, over 60% of the tasks that were considered distractions fell under the broad category of communication or conversation. Using these findings, we have developed an experimental paradigm that will help us understand the method by which pilots perform certain monitoring tasks. Specifically, we hope to determine the degree to which pilots rely on internal time mechanisms versus external cues as a means of successfully completing a monitoring task. In addition, we will incorporate a battery of competing aviation type tasks, including communication, to see how these tasks affect the process of monitoring. The long range goal of this research is to find operational solutions that facilitate effective monitoring in the presence of both sudden interruptions and distractions that lead to unintended multiple tasks situations.

  17. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak (fusion) experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-11-01

    This report presents the results of ''Conceptual Studies of Toroidal Field Magnets for the Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor'' performed for the Energy Research and Development Administration, Oak Ridge Operations. Two conceptual coil designs are developed. One design approach to produce a specified 8 Tesla maximum field uses a novel NbTi superconductor design cooled by pool-boiling liquid helium. For a highest practicable field design, a unique NbSn/sub 3/ conductor is used with forced-flow, single-phase liquid helium cooling to achieve a 12 Tesla peak field. Fabrication requirements are also developed for these approximately 7 meter horizontal bore by 11 meter vertical bore coils. Cryostat design approaches are analyzed and a hybrid cryostat approach selected. Structural analyses are performed for approaches to support in-plane and out-of-plane loads and a structural approach selected. In addition to the conceptual design studies, cost estimates and schedules are prepared for each of the design approaches, major uncertainties and recommendations for research and development identified, and test coil size for demonstration recommended.

  18. Experimental heavy ion physics at high energies. Progress report, September 1992--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This report summarizes the research activities of the experimental high energy heavy ion physics group at Vanderbilt University carried out under Grant No. DE-FG05092ER40712 with the Department of Energy during the period Oct 1, 1992 to Nov 30, 1993. This research encompasses four areas of related inquiry in relativistic and high energy nuclear reactions. The preparation of the PHENIX experiment which has been approved as one of the two major experiments at RHIC to start in 1998. The RD10/RD45 Muon Identifier experiment which will provide essential input for the design of the Muon Endcap arm detector sub-system in PHENIX. The E855 Soft Photon Experiment at the AGS designed to clarify the status of a possible quark-gluon-plasma signature with presently available heavy-ion collisions. The construction CsI Ball detector project at Texas A&M which is designed as part of a comprehensive detector system which will probe the nuclear equation of state in the 50 MeV/nucleon domain.

  19. Review of Ginkgo biloba-induced toxicity, from experimental studies to human case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Nan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Ren, Zhen; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Wada, Keiji; Guo, Lei

    2017-01-02

    Ginkgo biloba seeds and leaves have been used as a traditional herbal remedy for thousands of years, and its leaf extract has been consumed as a botanical dietary supplement for decades. Ginkgo biloba extract is a complex mixture with numerous components, including flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones, and is one of the most widely sold botanical dietary supplements worldwide. Concerns about potential health risks for the general population have been raised because of the widespread human exposure to Ginkgo biloba and its potential toxic and carcinogenic activities in rodents. The National Toxicology Program conducted 2-year gavage studies on one Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and concluded that there was clear evidence of carcinogenic activity of this extract in mice based on an increased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatoblastoma. Recently, Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been classified as a possible human carcinogen (Group 2B) by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. This review presents updated information on the toxicological effects from experimental studies both in vitro and in vivo to human case reports (caused by ginkgo seeds or leaves), and also summarizes the negative results from relatively large clinical trials.

  20. Experimental observation of the elusive double-peak structure in R-dependent strong-field ionization rate of H2+

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Han; Kielpinski, D; Sang, R T; Litvinyuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    When a diatomic molecule is ionized by an intense laser field, the ionization rate depends very strongly on the inter-nuclear separation. That dependence exhibits a pronounced maximum at the inter-nuclear separation known as the critical distance. This phenomenon was first demonstrated theoretically in H2+ and became known as charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI, in reference to a proposed physical mechanism) or simply enhanced ionisation (EI). All theoretical models of this phenomenon predict a double-peak structure in the R-dependent ionization rate of H2+. However, such double-peak structure has never been observed experimentally. It was even suggested that it is impossible to observe due to fast motion of the nuclear wavepackets. Here we report a few-cycle pump-probe experiment which clearly resolves that elusive double-peak structure. In the experiment, an expanding H2+ ion produced by an intense pump pulse is probed by a much weaker probe pulse. The predicted double-peak structure is clearly seen ...

  1. Analysis Dataset - West Coast Groundfish Observer Program and At-Sea Hake Observer Program data collection, analysis and reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer programs are the most comprehensive fishery dependent data collection system for total mortality estimation, protected species monitoring and discard data...

  2. Recommendations for reporting whole-grain intake in observational and intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alastair B; Kristensen, Mette; Seal, Chris J; Jacques, Paul; McKeown, Nicola M

    2015-05-01

    The finding that people who eat the most whole grains have a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, compared with those who eat the least, is one of the most consistent findings in nutritional epidemiology. However, criteria for reporting whole-grain intake have varied widely, making it difficult to precisely explore the relation of whole grains and grain components with health outcomes. To enable better understanding of the health benefits of whole grain-rich diets, we propose that both observational and intervention studies should as far as possible be required to report as follows when describing whole grains: 1) quantify the amount of whole grain in the food or product in grams on a dry-weight basis, 2) describe the whole-grain definition used, 3) report and separate the different types of grains used, 4) if possible, report the structure of the grains (intact, crushed, partially milled) in foods, and 5) describe the main types of products used and processes used to make them. Added bran and germ should be reported distinctly from whole grains. In addition, we strongly recommend the incorporation of biomarkers of whole-grain intake to check compliance to intervention diets and help attenuate for errors in dietary recall of whole-grain intake. Of these measures, reporting whole-grain intake in grams is essential for future research work in the area. Improving reporting and estimation of whole-grain intake will enable easier comparison between different studies and lead to stronger meta-analyses in the future.

  3. [Hydroxyapatite/collagen. Experimental study of its application in facial surgery and report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacle, M; Marbaix, E; Mustin, V

    1990-01-01

    A new implant made of purified fibrillar collagen (P.F.C.) and hydroxylapatite particles (HA) (Maxill-HAPR) is tested in canine mandibulae and surrounding tissues so that its integration and its bone-induction capacity can be histologically studied. A clinical case is also reported. The goal of this combined implant is to improve the interface of the HA particles with the host-tissues through the P.F.C. This study shows that P.F.C. is replaced after two months by host fibro-conjunctive tissues. Between 3 and 4 months, ossification areas are observed. After 6 months, the host conjunctive tissue is replaced by bone surrounding the HA particles. P.F.C.-HA implants can be made for replacement or restoration of facial bones not submitted to important forces like the frontal or malar bones.

  4. Report control Chrysomelids in the experimental field of camu-camu from Embrapa Roraima-Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Abanto Rodriguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Camu-camu is a native fruit tree of the Amazon, is highly value nutritious and great economic potential due to the high content of ascorbic acid (6112 mg/100 g present in fruits. Camu-camu, like any other plant, when it becomes cultivated outside their natural environment, loses its ecological balance and, consequently, is attacked by phytophagous and severe insect pests, which cause serious damage to the orchard. In this sense, the aim with this study, reporting the identification and control of insect pests in the cultivation of camu-camu, using different methods to attract and capture. It was observed that the best results were obtained in applying Neenmax®, followed by traps shading of black color screen, furthermore, higher occurrence of insects were recorded belonging to the family Chrysomelidae.

  5. Longitudinal intergroup contact effects on prejudice using self- and observer-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, Kristof; Van Hiel, Alain; De Bolle, Marleen; Roets, Arne

    2012-06-01

    Longitudinal effects of intergroup contact on prejudice were investigated in a sample of 65 young adults (Sample 1) and a sample of their close friends (Sample 2, N= 172), adopting a full cross-lagged panel design. We first validated the self-report measure of intergroup contact from Sample 1 with observer ratings from Sample 2 by demonstrating that self-reports and observer ratings of contact were highly correlated. Moreover, we obtained significant cross-lagged effects of intergroup contact on prejudice with both contact measures, thereby providing a second validation for the use of self-reports of intergroup contact. Finally, by the use of latent change modelling, we demonstrated that, although no overall significant change in contact and prejudice over time was found, there was meaningful variation in absolute change in the individual levels of intergroup contact and prejudice. In particular, some individuals showed increases while others showed decreases in contact or prejudice across time. Moreover, higher levels of intergroup contact at Time 1 were followed by larger subsequent decreases in prejudice between Time 1 and Time 2, and changes in contact were significantly and negatively related to changes in prejudice. Methodological implications of the findings are discussed.

  6. Advanced experimental analysis of controls on microbial Fe(III) oxide reduction. First year progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roden, E.E.; Urrutia, M.M.

    1997-07-01

    pattern of FeRB growth with different Fe(III) forms, a roughly consistent long-term biomass yield of 5 to 15 mg protein per mmol Fe(III) reduced was observed during growth on different forms of Fe(III). These results should prove useful for quantitative modeling of FeRB growth and metabolism in various types of experimental and in situ anaerobic sedimentary systems.'

  7. Alterations in creatine metabolism observed in experimental autoimmune myocarditis using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, Frédéric; Retel, Joren; Jeuthe, Sarah; O h-Ici, Darach; van Rossum, Barth; Wassilew, Katharina; Schmerler, Patrick; Kuehne, Titus; Berger, Felix; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Messroghli, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rodents is an accepted model of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Altered metabolism is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DCM and heart failure (HF). Study of the metabolism may provide new diagnostic information and insights into the mechanisms of myocarditis and HF. Proton MRS ((1)H-MRS) has not yet been used to study the changes occurring in myocarditis and subsequent HF. We aimed to explore the changes in creatine metabolism using this model and compare them with the findings in healthy animals. Myocardial function of male young Lewis rats with EAM was quantified by performing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) analysis in short-axis cine images throughout the whole heart. Inflammatory cellular infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Myocardial tissue was analyzed using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS ((1)H-MAS-MRS). Myocarditis was confirmed histologically by the presence of an inflammatory cellular infiltrate and CD68 positive staining. A significant increase in the metabolic ratio of Tau/tCr (taurine/total creatine) obtained by (1)H-MAS-MRS was observed in myocarditis compared with healthy controls (21 d acute EAM, 4.38 (±0.23); 21 d control, 2.84 (±0.08); 35 d chronic EAM, 4.47 (±0.83); 35 d control, 2.59 (±0.38); P myocarditis. Myocardial Tau/tCr ratio as detected by (1)H-MRS correlates with LVEF and is able to differentiate between healthy myocardium and myocardium from rats with EAM.

  8. Comparative observation of protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-jun; ZHU Pei-fang; LIU Zhao-hua; WANG Zheng-guo; YANG Cheng; CHEN Hai-bin; NING Xin; ZHOU Ji-hong; Chen Jian

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protective effects of earplug and barrel on auditory organs of guinea pigs exposed to experimental blast underpressure (BUP).Methods: The hearing thresholds of the guinea pigs were assessed with auditory brainstem responses (ABR).The traumatic levels of tympanic membrane and ossicular chain were observed under stereo-microscope. The rate of outer hair cells (OHCs) loss was analyzed using a light microscope. The changes of guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug were compared with those of the control group without any protection.Results: An important ABR threshold shift of the guinea pigs without any protection was detected from 8h to 14d after being exposed to BUP with a peak ranging from -64.5kPa to -69.3kPa (P<0.01). The rate of perforation of tympanic membrane reached 87.5 % and that of total OHCs loss was 19.46% + 5.38% at 14d after exposure. The guinea pigs protected with barrel and earplug had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate compared with the animals without any protection (P < 0.01 ). All of the tympanic membrane and ossicular chain of the protected animals maintained their integrities.Meanwhile, the guinea pigs protected with the barrel had lower ABR threshold and total OHCs loss rate than those with earplug (P<0.01).Conclusions: The earplug and barrel have protective effects against BUP-induced trauma on auditory organs of the guinea pigs and the protective effects of barrel are better than those of earplug.

  9. Application of a simple dynamic vegetation model to an experimental plot and validation through satellite data and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Pérez, Guiomar; Pasquato, Marta; Medici, Chiara; González-Sanchis, María; Molina, Antonio; Fernandes, Tarcísio José Gualberto; del Campo, Antonio; Francés, Félix

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that the vegetation plays a key role in the catchment's water balance particularly for semi-arid areas that generally are water-controlled ecosystems. For this reason, the number of hydrological models which include vegetation as a state variable has increased substantially in the last decade. However, many of the available dynamic vegetation models are quite complex.To cope with the difficulty of estimating a large number of parameters and inputs, the authors focused on the use of a parsimonious model called LUE-model. This model is based on the amount of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by green vegetation (APAR) and the Light Use Efficiency index (the efficiency by which that radiation is converted to plant biomass increment) in order to compute the gross primary production (GPP). The advantages of this simple conceptualization are: (1) the low number of parameters, (2) it could be easily coupled with a hydrological model and, (3) as it is based on APAR, it is directly connected with satellite data. This model has been calibrated and validated using remote sensing data and afterwards further tested against field observations. Plant transpiration and soil moisture were obtained in an experimental plot of a semi-arid catchment (La Hunde, East of Spain), during the period from 27/03/2009 to 31/05/2011, covered by Aleppo pine.The satellite data used in this study were: the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), both included in the products MOD13Q1 and MYD13Q1. Concerning NDVI, its own definition links this index to the "greenness" of the target, so that it appears highly linked to chlorophyll content and vegetation condition. Recent studies about Aleppo pine have shown that NDVI is sensitive to water stress, because the photosynthetic pigment is it. For this reason, the model simulated LAI was corrected by a plant water-stress factor. After such correction, the correlation coefficient with

  10. The Aggression Observation Short Form Identified Episodes Not Reported on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the underreporting of violence and aggression on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) when compared to a simpler assessment: the Aggression Observation Short Form (AOS). During a period of one year, two open and two closed wards gathered...... for open wards and for patients with short admission lengths. Standard instruments such as the SOAS-R underreport aggressive episodes by 45% or more. Underreporting can be reduced by introducing shorter instruments, but it cannot be completely eliminated....

  11. The Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Elm, Erik; Altman, Douglas G; Egger, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    -control, or cross-sectional studies. A detailed Explanation and Elaboration document is published separately and is freely available on the Web sites of PLoS Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and Epidemiology. We hope that the STROBE Statement will contribute to improving the quality of reporting...... recommendations on what should be included in an accurate and complete report of an observational study. We defined the scope of the recommendations to cover three main study designs: cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies. We convened a 2-day workshop in September 2004, with methodologists...... and the subsequent iterative process of consultation and revision resulted in a checklist of 22 items (the STROBE Statement) that relate to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of articles. 18 items are common to all three study designs and four are specific for cohort, case...

  12. Self-report and observer ratings of personality functioning: a study of the OPD system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Ulrike; Schauenburg, Henning; Hörz, Susanne; Rentrop, Michael; Komo-Lang, Miriam; Klinkerfuß, Mathias; Köhling, Johanna; Grande, Tilman; Ehrenthal, Johannes C

    2014-01-01

    Recent considerations around DSM-5 criteria of personality disorders (PDs) demand new concepts of assessing levels of personality functioning. Of special interest are multiperspective approaches accounting for clinicians' as well as patients' points of view. The study investigates observer-rated and self-assessed levels of personality functioning measured by the level of structural integration as defined by the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnosis System (OPD). Both perspectives were positively related. The combination of both measures was most efficient in discriminating among 3 diagnostic groups of varying degrees of personality dysfunction. Future studies should take into account expert ratings as well as self-report data.

  13. Geomechanics of penetration : experimental and computational approaches : final report for LDRD project 38718.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Fossum, Arlo Frederick; Rivas, Raul R.; Bronowski, David R.; Preece, Dale S.

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to increase our understanding of which properties of geomaterials most influence the penetration process with a goal of improving our predictive ability. Two primary approaches were followed: development of a realistic, constitutive model for geomaterials and designing an experimental approach to study penetration from the target's point of view. A realistic constitutive model, with parameters based on measurable properties, can be used for sensitivity analysis to determine the properties that are most important in influencing the penetration process. An immense literature exists that is devoted to the problem of predicting penetration into geomaterials or similar man-made materials such as concrete. Various formulations have been developed that use an analytic or more commonly, numerical, solution for the spherical or cylindrical cavity expansion as a sort of Green's function to establish the forces acting on a penetrator. This approach has had considerable success in modeling the behavior of penetrators, both as to path and depth of penetration. However the approach is not well adapted to the problem of understanding what is happening to the material being penetrated. Without a picture of the stress and strain state imposed on the highly deformed target material, it is not easy to determine what properties of the target are important in influencing the penetration process. We developed an experimental arrangement that allows greater control of the deformation than is possible in actual penetrator tests, yet approximates the deformation processes imposed by a penetrator. Using explosive line charges placed in a central borehole, we loaded cylindrical specimens in a manner equivalent to an increment of penetration, allowing the measurement of the associated strains and accelerations and the retrieval of specimens from the more-or-less intact cylinder. Results show clearly that the deformation zone is highly concentrated

  14. Final Scientific Report: Experimental Investigation of Reconnection in a Line-tied Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Cary [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-10-25

    This grant used funding from the NSF/DoE Partnership on Plasma Science to investigate magnetic reconnection phenomena in a line-tied pinch experiment. The experiment was upgraded from a previous device intended to study fusion plasma-related instabilities to a new configuration capable of studying a number of new, previously unstudied configurations. A high spatial and time resolution array of magnetic probes was constructed to measure time evolving structures present as instability and turbulence developed. The most important new equilibrium made possible by this grant was a Zero-Net-Current equilibrium that models the footpoint twisting of solar flux tubes that occurs prior to solar eruptions (flares and coronal mass ejections). This new equilibrium was successfully created in the lab, and it exhibited a host of instabilities. In particular, at low current when the equilibrium was not overly stressed, a saturated internal kink mode oscillation was observed. At high current, 2 D magnetic turbulence developed which we attribute to the lack of a equilibrium brought about by a subcritical transition to turbulence. A second set of experiments involved the turbulent interactions of a collection of flux tubes all being twisted independently, a problem known as the Parker Problem. Current profiles consisting of 2, 3 and 4 guns were used to impose a fine scale drive, and resulted in a new experimental platform in which the injection scale of the magnetic turbulence could be controlled. First experiments in this configuration support the conclusion that an inverse cascade of magnetic energy occurred which self-organized the plasma into a nearly axisymmetric current distribution.

  15. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Kevin C.; Solberg, Timothy D.; Avery, Stephen, E-mail: Stephen.Avery@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Vander Stappen, François; Janssens, Guillaume; Prieels, Damien [Ion Beam Applications SA, Louvain-la-Neuve 1348 (Belgium); Bawiec, Christopher R.; Lewin, Peter A. [School of Biomedical Engineering, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sehgal, Chandra M. [Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. Methods: An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. Results: The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. Conclusions: The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  16. Experimental Engineering Section semiannual progress report, March 1-August 31, 1976. Volume 2. Biotechnology and environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitt, Jr., W. W.; Mrochek, J. E. [comps.

    1978-03-01

    This volume contains the progress report of the biotechnology and environmental programs in the Experimental Engineering Section of the Chemical Technology Division. Research efforts in these programs during this report period have been in five areas: (1) environmental research; (2) centrifugal analyzer development; (3) advanced analytical systems development; (4) bioengineering research; and (5) bioengineering development. Summaries of these programmatic areas are contained in Volume I.

  17. At-Sea Hake Observer Program (ASHOP) Dataset - West Coast Groundfish Observer Program and At-Sea Hake Observer Program data collection, analysis and reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer programs are the most comprehensive fishery dependent data collection system for total mortality estimation, protected species monitoring and discard data...

  18. Methods and Processes of Developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J.M.; O'Connor, A.M.; Dohoo, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    Background:  The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges that often are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines. Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology....... The use of this extension to the STROBE statement should improve the reporting of observational studies in veterinary research related to animal health, production, welfare, or food safety outcomes by recognizing the unique features of observational studies involving food-producing and companion animals......) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies in veterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety. Design: A consensus meeting of experts was organized to develop an extension of the STROBE statement to address observational studies in veterinary...

  19. Predictive value of self-reported and observer-rated defense style in depression treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Henricus, L; Dekker, Jack; Peen, Jaap; Abraham, Robert E; Schoevers, Robert

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the predictive value of observer-rated and self-reported defensive functioning on the outcome of psychotherapy for the treatment of depression. Defense styles were measured according to the Developmental Profile (DP) and the Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ) in 81 moderately severely depressed patients. All patients were treated with Short-term Psychodynamic Supportive Psychotherapy (SPSP). At baseline, women appeared to have a more mature level of overall defensive functioning. A lower level of defensive function was found in patients with recurrent depressions. We also found a rather modest relationship between self-reported and observer-rated defense. Remitted patients had a more mature overall defensive functioning on the DP and the DSQ. In particular, patients with a symbiotic defense style (giving up, apathetic withdrawal) were at risk for poor outcome. This exploratory study provides further evidence of the relevance of defense styles for depression. It suggests a differential predictive value of separate defense levels, which may help to tailor psychotherapeutic strategies.

  20. Controls on the turnover of fluvial organic carbon in UK rivers - combining experimental, observational and modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.

    2015-12-01

    In-stream processing of allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC) within the UK has been shown to be significant flux pathways in the terrestrial carbon cycle with both DOC and POC evolving into carbon dioxide (CO2). A mass balance approach based upon long term monitoring records was used to consider the loss of DOM and POM across UK watersheds. The total flux of carbon to UK rivers from the terrestrial biosphere was 21.8 tonnes C/km2/yr and the net catchment loss was 70%. Including the role of fluvial organic nitrogen means that for total nitrogen species UK rivers are gaining 9.6 tonnes N/km2/yr from the terrestrial biosphere but are losing 63% of this nitrogen by the tidal limit. In a parallel study, in-situ experiments investigating rates of degradation in unfiltered surface water from a headwater, peat-dominated stream. Experiments were conducted on unfiltered samples (DOM and POM could be considered); on fresh samples (experiments were started stream-side); and over 70 hours (similar to in-stream residence time of the UK). The study found that the DOC concentration of samples in the daylight declined by 64%, compared with 6% decline for the samples kept in the dark: the POC loss in the light was 13%. The organic matter was characterised using elemental analysis (CHNOP); uv-vis spectroscopy, pyrolysis GC-MS; thermos-gravimetric analysis; bomb calorimetry and solid-state 13C nmr. Initial rate kinetics in the light were as high as 3rd order, but the study could show that no single rate law could describe the whole diurnal degradation cycle. Developing a physically-based set of rate laws for the turnover of DOM and POM over the appropriate timescales showed that the derived set of rate laws was able to explain experimental data with a 13% MAPE based on turnover in three types of organic matter (particulate, labile dissolved, refractory dissolved) although the order and rate of reactions did change between sets of

  1. Progress report of a research program in experimental and theoretical high energy physics, 1 January 1992--31 May 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, R.; Cutts, D.; Fried, H.M.; Guralnik, G.; Jevicki, A.; King, K.; Lanou, R.E.; Partridge, R.; Tan, C.I.; Widgoff, M.

    1992-06-01

    This report discusses research at Brown University in experimental and theoretical high energy physics. Some of the research programs conducted are: interactions of leptons and hadrons form accelerator and astrophysical sources; hadron interactions with hydrogen and heavier nuclei; large volume detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory; GEM collaboration at SSC; and hadron colliders and neutrino physics. (LSP)

  2. Experimental and Demonstration Program, Copper Country Intermediate School District. End of Budget Period Reports 1972 and 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    End of budget period reports are presented for an experimental and demonstration program aimed at increasing the learning process and achievement of K-4 children and to effect internal and external change in teachers' attitudes and behavior. The program, instituted in a rural, low income area, consists of an Orff music program and a theater…

  3. Can mindful parenting be observed? Relations between observational ratings of mother-youth interactions and mothers' self-report of mindful parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Larissa G; Coatsworth, J Douglas; Gayles, Jochebed G; Geier, Mary H; Greenberg, Mark T

    2015-04-01

    Research on mindful parenting, an extension of mindfulness to the interpersonal domain of parent-child relationships, has been limited by its reliance on self-report assessment. The current study is the first to examine whether observational indices of parent-youth interactions differentiate between high and low levels of self-reported mindful parenting. The Iowa Family Interaction Rating Scales (IFIRS) were used to code interactions between mothers and their 7th grade youth. Mothers drawn from the top and bottom quartiles (n = 375) of a larger distribution of self-reported interpersonal mindfulness in parenting (N = 804) represented clearly defined high- and low-mindful parenting groups. Discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to analyze how well 6 composite IFIRS observational rating variables (e.g., parental warmth, consistent discipline) discriminated between high and low self-reports of mindful parenting. DFA results were cross-validated, with statistically significant canonical correlations found for both subsamples (p < .05). Subsequent independent samples t tests revealed that group means were significantly different on all 6 IFIRS composite ratings. Confirmation of the relations between self-report mindful parenting and the observational ratings was also provided through hierarchical regression analyses conducted with a continuous predictor of mindful parenting using the full sample. Thus, the present study provides preliminary evidence for a link between self-reported mindful parenting and observed interactions between parents and youth.

  4. Patient-reported outcomes with lanreotide Autogel/Depot for carcinoid syndrome: An international observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszniewski, Philippe; Valle, Juan W; Lombard-Bohas, Catherine; Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Perros, Petros; Holubec, Luboš; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Smith, Denis; Niccoli, Patricia; Maisonobe, Pascal; Atlan, Philippe; Caplin, Martyn E

    2016-05-01

    Lanreotide Autogel/Depot effectively controls symptoms in patients with carcinoid syndrome associated with neuroendocrine tumours. Data on patient-reported outcomes are sparse. To evaluate the effect of lanreotide on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) with carcinoid syndrome. This was an international, open-label, observational study of adults with neuroendocrine tumours and history of diarrhoea, receiving lanreotide for >3 months for relief of carcinoid syndrome symptoms. The primary PRO measure was satisfaction with diarrhoea control. Secondary PRO measures included severity, change in symptoms and impact on daily life of diarrhoea; and patient satisfaction with flushing control. Of 273 patients enrolled, 76% were 'completely' or 'rather' satisfied with diarrhoea control; 79% reported improvement in diarrhoea with lanreotide. The proportion of patients with 'mild', 'minimal', or 'no diarrhoea' increased from 33% before treatment to 75% during treatment; 75% were unconcerned about the impact of diarrhoea on daily life. Satisfaction with flushing control amongst patients with significant flushing at treatment initiation was 73%. Lanreotide treatment was associated with improvements in symptoms as well as a range of PROs in patients with neuroendocrine tumours and carcinoid syndrome (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01234168). Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. The Aggression Observation Short Form identified episodes not reported on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale--Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvidhjelm, Jacob; Sestoft, Dorte; Bjørner, Jakob Bue

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the underreporting of violence and aggression on the Staff Observation Aggression Scale-Revised (SOAS-R) when compared to a simpler assessment: the Aggression Observation Short Form (AOS). During a period of one year, two open and two closed wards gathered data on both the SOAS-R and the AOS for all of their patients. The 22-item SOAS-R is to be filled out after each violent episode. The 3-item AOS is to be filled out during each shift and should also record the absence of violence. The SOAS-R registered 703 incidents and the AOS registered 1,281 incidents. The agreement between the SOAS-R and the AOS was good (kappa = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.62-0.67). Among the 1,281 AOS episodes, 51% were also registered on the SOAS-R. For the 176 AOS episodes with harm, 42% were also registered on the SOAS-R. We found 44% missing registrations on the AOS, primarily for open wards and for patients with short admission lengths. Standard instruments such as the SOAS-R underreport aggressive episodes by 45% or more. Underreporting can be reduced by introducing shorter instruments, but it cannot be completely eliminated.

  6. Paederus fuscipes dermatitis: a report of nine cases observed in Italy and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, Stefano; Cuka, Ermira; Chiaratti, Anna; Nazzaro, Gianluca; Gianotti, Raffaele; Süss, Luciano

    2013-01-01

    Paederus sp. is a beetle belonging to Staphylinidae family and Coleoptera order. Its distribution is worldwide, especially in hot climates. Over 600 species of Paederus are known, approximately 50 are able to cause an irritant contact dermatitis. When the beetle is accidentally crushed on the skin, it releases pederin, a potent toxin with vesicating action. In Europe, only anecdotical cases of Paederus sp. dermatitis have been reported. Since 1993, we have observed approximately 25 patients with suspected Paederus sp. dermatitis. In 9 the clinical diagnosis was confirmed because Paederus fuscipes were found. The case list includes 6 males and 3 females, ages ranging from 6 to 53 years (mean age: 26.3 years). Six patients presented with one lesion and 3 with 2 lesions. Eyelids (3 patients), shoulders (3), neck (2), cheek (1), breast (1), back (1) and calf (1) were involved. All patients showed erythema, 2 oedema, 2 blisters, 1 vesicles, 1 pustules and 1 crusts. In the patient with pustules, bacteriological examinations were negative. A biopsy was carried out in 4 patients. In the early stages, spongiosis with exocytosis of neutrophils was observed. Vesicles with neutrophils and necrosis of the epidermis were typical of the advanced stage. Oedema of the dermis and a mixed infiltrate, with eosinophils, neutrophils and lymphocytes, in the papillary and upper reticular dermis, were also observed. Direct immunofluorescence was negative in all patients. Paederus sp. should also be considered in temperate climates as a possible aetiological agent in cases of acute dermatitis.

  7. Impact of STROBE statement publication on quality of observational study reporting: interrupted time series versus before-after analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Bastuji-Garin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In uncontrolled before-after studies, CONSORT was shown to improve the reporting of randomised trials. Before-after studies ignore underlying secular trends and may overestimate the impact of interventions. Our aim was to assess the impact of the 2007 STROBE statement publication on the quality of observational study reporting, using both uncontrolled before-after analyses and interrupted time series. METHODS: For this quasi-experimental study, original articles reporting cohort, case-control, and cross-sectional studies published between 2004 and 2010 in the four dermatological journals having the highest 5-year impact factors (≥ 4 were selected. We compared the proportions of STROBE items (STROBE score adequately reported in each article during three periods, two pre STROBE period (2004-2005 and 2006-2007 and one post STROBE period (2008-2010. Segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series was also performed. RESULTS: Of the 456 included articles, 187 (41% reported cohort studies, 166 (36.4% cross-sectional studies, and 103 (22.6% case-control studies. The median STROBE score was 57% (range, 18%-98%. Before-after analysis evidenced significant STROBE score increases between the two pre-STROBE periods and between the earliest pre-STROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2004-05 48% versus median score2008-10 58%, p<0.001 but not between the immediate pre-STROBE period and the post-STROBE period (median score2006-07 58% versus median score2008-10 58%, p = 0.42. In the pre STROBE period, the six-monthly mean STROBE score increased significantly, by 1.19% per six-month period (absolute increase 95%CI, 0.26% to 2.11%, p = 0.016. By segmented analysis, no significant changes in STROBE score trends occurred (-0.40%; 95%CI, -2.20 to 1.41; p = 0.64 in the post STROBE statement publication. INTERPRETATION: The quality of reports increased over time but was not affected by STROBE. Our findings raise

  8. Experimental measurements of the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate vs. observations of type I X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Wiescher, M; Cooper, R L; Fisker, Jacob Lund; Tan, Wanpeng; Goerres, Joachim; Wiescher, Michael; Cooper, Randall L.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron stars in close binary star systems often accrete matter from their companion stars. Thermonuclear ignition of the accreted material in the atmosphere of the neutron star leads to a thermonuclear explosion which is observed as an X-ray burst occurring periodically between hours and days depending on the accretion rate. The ignition conditions are characterized by a sensitive interplay between the continuously accreting fuel supply and depletion by nuclear burning via the hot CNO cycles. Therefore the ignition depends critically on the hot CNO breakout reaction O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 that regulates the flow between the beta-limited hot CNO cycle and the rapid proton capture process. Until recently, the O15(alpha,gamma)Ne19 reaction rate was not known experimentally and the theoretical estimates carried significant uncertainties. In this paper we report on the astrophysical consequences of the first measurement of this reaction rate on the thermonuclear instability that leads to type I X-ray bursts on accr...

  9. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wenhua [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Singh, Dileep [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); France, David M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  10. EFFORTS Sub-task report on task 4.1: Experimental Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Bay, Niels

    1998-01-01

    Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling.......Task 4.1 is a sub-task of task 4: Physical modelling validation. In sub-task 4.1 the existing experimental techniques has been conditioned to the tasks ahead in physical modelling....

  11. Reported analgesic administration to rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates undergoing experimental surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, C A; Flecknell, P A; Richardson, C A

    2009-07-01

    Reported analgesic use following experimental surgery is low in rodents and there has been little published information on the frequency of analgesic use in other laboratory species. A structured literature review was conducted to examine analgesic administration in larger laboratory animals. The Scirus search engine was used to identify studies published in peer-reviewed journals that reported carrying out experimental surgery on 'large' laboratory animals, specifically rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates. Seventy-four studies between 2000 and 2001 and 75 studies between 2005 and 2006 were included in the review. There was an increase in the reported administration of systemic analgesics to these species from 50% in 2000-2001 to 63% in 2005-2006. When all agents with analgesic properties were considered (systemic analgesics, local anaesthetics and anaesthetics with analgesic components), the proportion of papers that reported some form of analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory animals increased from 86% in 2000-2001 to 89% in 2005-2006. Overall rabbits, pigs, sheep, dogs and non-human primates were more likely to receive analgesics following potentially painful experimental procedures than has been reported in laboratory rodents but analgesic administration to 'large' laboratory species is still not optimal.

  12. Methods and processes of developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents challenges that often are not addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement that addresses...... used for other extensions of the STROBE statement. The use of this STROBE statement extension should improve reporting of observational studies in veterinary research by recognizing unique features of observational studies involving food-producing and companion animals, products of animal origin...... unique reporting requirements for observational studies in veterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety.Design: Consensus meeting of experts.Setting: Mississauga, Canada.Participants: Seventeen experts from North America, Europe, and Australia.Methods: Experts, completed...

  13. Methods and processes of developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges thatoften are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studiesin Epidemiology......) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies inveterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety.Design: A consensus meeting of experts was organized to develop an extension of the STROBE statementto address observational studies in veterinary...... studies in animal species with health, production, welfare, or food safety outcomes. Atthe meeting, the participants were provided with the survey responses and relevant literature concerningthe reporting of veterinary observational studies. During the meeting, each STROBE item was discussedto determine...

  14. Integrated Reporting and Assurance of Sustainability Information: An Experimental Study on Professional Investors’ Information Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimsbach, D.; Hahn, R.; Gürtürk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability-related non-financial information is increasingly deemed value relevant. Against this background, two recent trends in non-financial reporting are frequently discussed: integrated reporting and assurance of sustainability information. Using an established framework of information acqu

  15. [Diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection by PCR: report of 3 cases observed in French Guiana].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, A; Couppié, P; Sainte-Marie, D; Pradinaud, R

    2003-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans infection is the third most important mycobacterial infection in the world. It has been described in many different countries including French Guiana. The diagnosis of M. ulcerans infection by culture is often difficult because culture is hard to perform in endemic areas and their sensitivity is not reliable. As a result the diagnosis of this infection is often delayed. However, molecular methods are now available to diagnose rapidly infections by M. ulcerans and distinguish it from other mycobacteria. We report three cases of skin infection due to M. ulcerans observed in French Guiana. Diagnosis was initially made by polymerase chain reaction and was confirmed later by culture (in two patients) and inoculation to mice (in one patient). A faster diagnosis of M. ulcerans infection should lead to a better prognosis of this infection.

  16. Reforestation Programs in Southwest China: Reported Success, Observed Failure, and the Reasons Why

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ever since the disastrous floods of 1998,the Chinese government has used the Natural Forest Protection and Sloping Land Conversion Programs to promote afforestation and reforestation as means to reduce runoff, control erosion, and stabilize local livelihoods. These two ambitious programs have been reported as large-scale successes, contributing to an overall increase in China's forest cover and to the stated goals of environmental stabilization. A small-scale field study at the project level of the implementation of these two programs in Baiwu Township, Yanyuan County, Sichuan, casts doubt upon the accuracy and reliability of these claims of success; ground observations revealed utter failure in some sites and only marginal success in others. Reasons for this discrepancy are posited as involving ecological, economic, and bureaucratic factors.Further research is suggested to determine whether these discrepancies are merely local aberrations or represent larger-scale failures in reforestation programs.

  17. [The experimental surgery and your relation with the university: an experience report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaki, Vitor Nagai; Teixeira, Renan Kleber Costa; Feijo, Daniel Haber; Silva, José Antonio Cordero da; Botelho, Nara Macedo; Henriques, Marcus Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory of experimental surgery represents one of the key points for the university, especially in the biomedical area. This focuses on the university's tripod of primary structure that are teaching, research and extension, which are essential for formation of humanistic and practice of a good doctor that is based, first of all, on scientific evidence and critical knowledge. The importance of a laboratory of experimental surgery centers for medical education was regulated from the new curriculum guidelines of the Ministério da Educação e Cultura, establishing a mandatory laboratory within college centers. Therefore, it is of great importance to the contribution of the laboratories of experimental surgery in the curriculum, both in the discipline of surgical technics and experimental surgery, and an incentive for basic research. Thus, the study presents the experience of 15 years of the Laboratory of Experimental Surgery from Universidade do Estado do Pará, with the goal show the importance of this to medical graduation and the university.

  18. Method for diagnostics of characteristic patterns of observable time series and its real-time experimental implementation for neurophysiological signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikov, A.; Hramov, A.E.; Luttjohann, A.K.; Koronovskii, A.A.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2011-01-01

    A method is proposed for analysis and automatic diagnostics of characteristic oscillatory patterns of the electric activity of the brain in real time on the basis of a continuous wavelet transformation. The results of experimental investigation of automatic recognition of epileptic activity episodes

  19. Clinical observations, pathology, bioassay in mice and serological response at slaughter in pigs experimentally infected with Toxoplasma gondii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Anne; Lind, Peter; Haugegaard, J.;

    1997-01-01

    Experimental infections of a total of 47 pigs with tachyzoites of the Toxoplasma gondii RH-strain, tissue cysts of the SSI-119 and R92 strains as well as oocysts of the SSI-119 strain were performed to determine the sensitivity of an indirect IgG-ELISA, using tachyzoite lysate of the RH-strain as...

  20. Normal-Pressure Hydrocephalus Case Report: Self-Documented Over 8 Years with the Author's Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabbagh, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Normal-pressure hydrocephalus is an almost curable disease, but the results of management are still not encouraging owing to the deceptive nature of the disease and its sensitivity to treatment. This has made the management of the disease controversial. The following self-documented report clarifies this. I have reported my experience in a scientific manner so that my colleagues can understand thoroughly certain facts related to intracranial hypertension. Achieving the optimal adjustment of the valve is a real challenge. I describe in detail the adjustment criteria I discovered. I believe that the use of biofeedback waves are almost the best way to make a proper adjustment of the valve, that is, if waves come from this machine and show increased tension of the facial muscles (high spiky waves) the valve adjustment has to be reduced without risking overdrainage. I have been observing my symptoms in some detail, which led me to a better understanding of the clinical pictures related to cerebrospinal fluid changes. I hope that uncovering my story can help with further research and improve management in this important and interesting field.

  1. Going once, going twice, reported! Cartel activity and the effectiveness of antitrust policies in experimental auctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Onderstal, S.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally examine the effectiveness of antitrust policies against bidding rings in the English auction (EN) and the first-price sealed-bid auction (FP). We consider both traditional antitrust policy (without a leniency program) and modern antitrust policy (with a leniency program). In EN, ne

  2. Going once, going twice, reported!: cartel activity and the effectiveness of leniency programs in experimental auctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Onderstal, S.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally examine the effectiveness of a leniency program against bidding rings in two commonly used auctions: the English auction (EN) and the first-price sealed-bid auction (FPSB). Our results show that the leniency program does not affect the average winning bid, nor the average winning c

  3. Experimental hydrogen-fueled automotive engine design data-base project. Volume 2. Main technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swain, M.R.; Adt, R.R. Jr.; Pappas, J.M.

    1983-05-01

    Operational performance and emissions characteristics of hydrogen-fueled engines are reviewed. The project activities are reviewed including descriptions of the test engine and its components, the test apparatus, experimental techniques, experiments performed and the results obtained. Analyses of other hydrogen engine project data are also presented and compared with the results of the present effort.

  4. Going once, going twice, reported! Cartel activity and the effectiveness of antitrust policies in experimental auctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Onderstal, S.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally examine the effectiveness of antitrust policies against bidding rings in the English auction (EN) and the first-price sealed-bid auction (FP). We consider both traditional antitrust policy (without a leniency program) and modern antitrust policy (with a leniency program). In EN,

  5. Going once, going twice, reported!: cartel activity and the effectiveness of leniency programs in experimental auctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, J.; Onderstal, S.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally examine the effectiveness of a leniency program against bidding rings in two commonly used auctions: the English auction (EN) and the first-price sealed-bid auction (FPSB). Our results show that the leniency program does not affect the average winning bid, nor the average winning

  6. Going once, going twice, reported! Cartel activity and the effectiveness of antitrust policies in experimental auctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinloopen, Jeroen; Onderstal, Sander

    We experimentally examine the effectiveness of antitrust policies against bidding rings in the English auction (EN) and the first-price sealed-bid auction (FP). We consider both traditional antitrust policy (without a leniency program) and modern antitrust policy (with a leniency program). In EN,

  7. Survey of basic medical researchers on the awareness of animal experimental designs and reporting standards in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jia-ke; Wu, Wen-jing; Liu, Hong-yan; Kou, Cheng-kun; Liu, Na; Zhao, Lulu

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the awareness and use of the Systematic Review Center for Laboratory Animal Experimentation’s (SYRCLE) risk-of-bias tool, the Animal Research: Reporting of In Vivo Experiments (ARRIVE) reporting guidelines, and Gold Standard Publication Checklist (GSPC) in China in basic medical researchers of animal experimental studies. Methods A national questionnaire-based survey targeting basic medical researchers was carried in China to investigate the basic information and awareness of SYRCLE’s risk of bias tool, ARRIVE guidelines, GSPC, and animal experimental bias risk control factors. The EpiData3.1 software was used for data entry, and Microsoft Excel 2013 was used for statistical analysis in this study. The number of cases (n) and percentage (%) of classified information were statistically described, and the comparison between groups (i.e., current students vs. research staff) was performed using chi-square test. Results A total of 298 questionnaires were distributed, and 272 responses were received, which included 266 valid questionnaires (from 118 current students and 148 research staff). Among the 266 survey participants, only 15.8% was aware of the SYRCLE’s risk of bias tool, with significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.003), and the awareness rates of ARRIVE guidelines and GSPC were only 9.4% and 9.0%, respectively; 58.6% survey participants believed that the reports of animal experimental studies in Chinese literature were inadequate, with significant difference between the two groups (P = 0.004). In addition, only approximately 1/3 of the survey participants had read systematic reviews and meta-analysis reports of animal experimental studies; only 16/266 (6.0%) had carried out/participated in and 11/266 (4.1%) had published systematic reviews/meta-analysis of animal experimental studies. Conclusions The awareness and use rates of SYRCLE’s risk-of-bias tool, the ARRIVE guidelines, and the GSPC were low among Chinese

  8. Standard of reporting animal-based experimental research in Indian Journal of Pharmacology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umme Aiman

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Present study demonstrates relatively good reporting standards in animal studies published in IJP. The items which need to be improved are randomization, blinding, sample size calculation, stating the limitations of study, sources of support and conflict of interest. The knowledge shared in the present paper could be used for better reporting of animal based experiments.

  9. Experimental Physics Division of the Los Alamos Project. Progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-09-01

    Included in this semi-monthly report written in 1943 are progress with neutron beams, neutron absorption in enriched materials, equipment operation and maintenance reports of the cyclotron neutron source facility, and instrumentation maintenance activities of individuals in the cyclotron group. (GHT)

  10. It counts who counts: an experimental evaluation of the importance of observer effects on spotlight count estimates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sunde, Peter; Jessen, Lonnie

    2013-01-01

    Spotlight surveys conducted by volunteers is a promising method to assess the abundance of nocturnally active mammals, but estimates are subject to bias if different observer groups differ in their ability to detect animals in the dark. We quantified the variation amongst volunteer spotlight...... with non-hunters and decreased as function of age but were independent of sex or educational background. If observer-specific detection probabilities were applied to real counting routes, point count estimates from inexperienced observers without a hunting background would only be 43 % (95 % CI, 39...

  11. Physics modeling support for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-30

    There are two major sections to this report. The first section of the report is an executive summary of the work done this year. For each task, the major results are condensed for the reader's convenience. The major result of each memo, report or presentation is summarized briefly in this section. The second section of the report is a collection of appendices containing reports, memos, and presentations written this year. Here, the interested reader can investigate any topic discussed in the summary in more detail. The documentation is presented in chronological order, and we would like to note that the content of later documents may supercede that of earlier ones. The summaries are divided into sections, corresponding to the tasks outlined in the original proposal for the work. These sections are: MUMAK code development and application; Alfven wave stability problem; TETRA systems code development and application; lower hybrid heating and current drive; and advanced blanket modeling.

  12. Analytical and experimental study of instabilities in buoyancy-driven convection in porous media. Progress report, August 1991--April 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiadis, J.G.; Behringer, R.; Johnson, G.A.

    1992-04-01

    During the second year of support under the DOE grant, significant progress was made in two directions: (1) Visualization of structure and tow field in randomly packed beds via Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and (2) Shadowgraphic visualization of natural convection in porous systems. This report describes the activities in detail, cite publications which resulted from this project, and conclude with plans for the last phase of the experimental investigation.

  13. An experimental predeployment training program improves self-reported patient treatment confidence and preparedness of Army combat medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Hermstad, Erik L; Oakes, Michael; Wiegert, Richard S; Oliver, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    To develop and assess impact of a focused review of International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) and combat casualty care with hands-on procedure training for U.S. Army medics deploying to Iraq. The setting was a U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School and Camp Eagle, Iraq. Investigators developed and implemented a command-approved prospective educational intervention with a post hoc survey. Subjects completed a three-day course with simulator and live-tissue procedure laboratories. At deployment's end, medics were surveyed for experience, confidence, and preparedness in treating various casualty severity levels. Investigators used two-tailed t-test with unequal variance for continuous data and chi-square for categorical data. Twenty-nine medics deployed. Eight completed the experimental program. Twenty-one of 25 (84%) available medics completed the survey including six of the eight (75%) experimental medics. The experimental group reported significantly greater levels of preparedness and confidence treating "minimal," "delayed," and "immediate" casualties at arrival in Iraq. These differences dissipated progressively over the time course of the deployment. This experimental program increased combat medic confidence and perceived level of preparedness in treating several patient severity levels. Further research is warranted to determine if the experimental intervention objectively improves patient care quality and translates into lives saved early in deployment.

  14. Influenza newspaper reports and the influenza epidemic: an observational study in Fukuoka City, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Akihito; Onozuka, Daisuke; Miyazaki, Shougo; Abe, Takeru

    2015-12-30

    We examined whether the weekly number of newspaper articles reporting on influenza was related to the incidence of influenza in a large city. Prospective, non-randomised, observational study. Registry data of influenza cases in Fukuoka City, Japan. A total of 83,613 cases of influenza cases that occurred between October 1999 and March 2007 in Fukuoka City, Japan. A linear model with autoregressive time series errors was fitted to time series data on the incidence of influenza and the accumulated number of influenza-related newspaper articles with different time lags in Fukuoka City, Japan. In order to obtain further evidence that the number of newspaper articles a week with specific time lags is related to the incidence of influenza, Granger causality was also tested. Of the 16 models including 'number of newspaper articles' with different time lags between 2 and 17 weeks (xt-2 to t-17), the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' at time lags between t-5 and t-13 were significant. However, the β coefficients of 'number of newspaper articles' that are significant with respect to the Granger causality tests (pnewspaper articles at time lags between t-6 and t-10 (time shift of 10 weeks, β=-0.301, pnewspaper articles reporting on influenza in a week was related to the incidence of influenza 6-10 weeks after media coverage in a large city in Japan. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  15. Plasmodium relictum (lineage P-SGS1): Further observation of effects on experimentally infected passeriform birds, with remarks on treatment with Malarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palinauskas, Vaidas; Valkiūnas, Gediminas; Krizanauskiene, Asta; Bensch, Staffan; Bolshakov, Casimir V

    2009-10-01

    Plasmodium relictum (lineage P-SGS1) is a widespread malaria parasite that causes disease of different severity in different species of birds. However, experimental studies on the effects of this parasite on avian hosts are uncommon. We investigated development of this lineage in experimentally infected greenfinches Carduelis chloris and compared the obtained data with the literature information about the virulence of the same parasite lineage for phylogenetically closely related bird species. We also used an opportunity to test the efficacy of the antimalarial drug Malarone in treatment of the experimental infection. The cryopreserved strain of the lineage P-SGS1 was multiplied in 4 experimentally infected chaffinches. Light parasitemia developed in these birds; the parasites were then inoculated to 6 uninfected recipient greenfinches. Six uninfected greenfinches were used as negative controls. Light parasitemia developed in all experimental greenfinches. There were no significant effects of malaria on the body mass of greenfinches, but haematocrit value was slightly lower in experimental birds than in control ones; the infection did not cause mortality or morbidity in these birds. According to available data, all investigated fringillid birds are susceptible to P. relictum (P-SGS1), but the same malaria parasite develops markedly differently in different bird species, even closely related hosts. Thus, the observed effects of the same malaria lineage on one species of bird cannot be generalized to others, even closely related ones. The cure with Malarone was highly efficient for blood stages of P. relictum, but exoerythrocytic stages were unaffected.

  16. `An observational report of intensive robotic and manual gait training in sub-acute stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conesa Lucas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of automated electromechanical devices for gait training in neurological patients is increasing, yet the functional outcomes of well-defined training programs using these devices and the characteristics of patients that would most benefit are seldom reported in the literature. In an observational study of functional outcomes, we aimed to provide a benchmark for expected change in gait function in early stroke patients, from an intensive inpatient rehabilitation program including both robotic and manual gait training. Methods We followed 103 sub-acute stroke patients who met the clinical inclusion criteria for Body Weight Supported Robotic Gait Training (BWSRGT. Patients completed an intensive 8-week gait-training program comprising robotic gait training (weeks 0-4 followed by manual gait training (weeks 4-8. A change in clinical function was determined by the following assessments taken at 0, 4 and 8 weeks (baseline, mid-point and end-point respectively: Functional Ambulatory Categories (FAC, 10 m Walking Test (10 MWT, and Tinetti Gait and Balance Scales. Results Over half of the patients made a clinically meaningful improvement on the Tinetti Gait Scale (> 3 points and Tinetti Balance Scale (> 5 points, while over 80% of the patients increased at least 1 point on the FAC scale (0-5 and improved walking speed by more than 0.2 m/s. Patients responded positively in gait function regardless of variables gender, age, aetiology (hemorrhagic/ischemic, and affected hemisphere. The most robust and significant change was observed for patients in the FAC categories two and three. The therapy was well tolerated and no patients withdrew for factors related to the type or intensity of training. Conclusions Eight-weeks of intensive rehabilitation including robotic and manual gait training was well tolerated by early stroke patients, and was associated with significant gains in function. Patients with mid-level gait dysfunction

  17. The experimental observation on the repairing spinal cord injury by olfactory ensheathing cells allograft of different sources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objecttive To observe the repaired effect of distinct source olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) on spinal cord injury (SCI) rats. Methods These OECs were dissociated from olfactory bulb and olfactory mucosa of SD rats and transplanted to the injuried region of spinal cord injury rats. The function of nerve, motor evoked potential of hind legs and the histopathlogical diversities of injuried spinal cord were observed. Results The OECs grafts into the SCI area could survive longer time. The BBB scale, incubat...

  18. Methods and benefits of experimental seismic evaluation of nuclear power plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-07-01

    This study reviews experimental techniques, instrumentation requirements, safety considerations, and benefits of performing vibration tests on nuclear power plant containments and internal components. The emphasis is on testing to improve seismic structural models. Techniques for identification of resonant frequencies, damping, and mode shapes, are discussed. The benefits of testing with regard to increased damping and more accurate computer models are oulined. A test plan, schedule and budget are presented for a typical PWR nuclear power plant.

  19. The freshwater snail lymnaea rubiginosa as an experimental host of Angiostrongylus malaysiensis: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondero, T J; Lim, B L

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary studies have shown that Lymnaea rubiginosa, a common fresh-water snail in Peninsular Malaysia, which is easily colonized and reared in the laboratory, is a capable experimental intermediate host for Angiostrongylus malaysiensis. Overall 73% of the snails tested became infected following 6 hours exposure to infective rat faeces. Higher infection rates, up to 100%, and heavier worm loads, occurred among the larger sized snails. Snail attrition was low except when very heavy worm loads were acquired.

  20. Experimental observation of plasmons in a graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Yan, Wei; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate graphene-plasmon polariton excitation in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The subwavelength silicon grating is fabricated by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self-assembled nanosphere array...... as a template. Measured transmission spectra illustrate the excitation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, which is further supported by numerical simulations and theoretical prediction of plasmon-band diagrams. Our grating-assisted coupling to graphene-plasmon polaritons forms an important platform for graphene...

  1. Experimental observation of plasmons in a graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Jepsen, Peter Uhd; Hansen, Ole; Mortensen, N Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate graphene-plasmon polariton excitation in a continuous graphene monolayer resting on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon grating. The subwavelength silicon grating is fabricated by a nanosphere lithography technique with a self-assembled nanosphere array as a template. Measured transmission spectra illustrate the excitation of graphene-plasmon polaritons, which is further supported by numerical simulations and theoretical prediction of plasmonband diagrams. Our grating-assisted coupling to graphene-plasmon polaritons forms an important platform for graphene-based opto-electronics applications.

  2. Direct experimental observation of giant Goos-Hänchen shifts from bandgap-enhanced total internal reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuhang; Zheng, Zheng; Kong, Weijing; Liu, Ya; Lu, Zhiting; Bian, Yusheng

    2011-09-15

    Giant Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts are experimentally demonstrated from a prism-coupled multilayer structure incorporating a one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) through a bandgap-enhanced total internal reflection scheme. By combining the large phase changes near the bandgap of the PC and the low reflection loss of the total internal reflection, 2 orders of magnitude enhancement of the GH shift is realized with rather low extra optical loss, which might help to open the door toward many interesting applications for GH effects.

  3. Leadership in the clinical workplace : what residents report to observe and supervisors report to display: an exploratory questionnaire study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Martha A.; Scheele, Fedde; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2015-01-01

    Background: Within the current health care system, leadership is considered important for physicians. leadership is mostly self-taught, through observing and practicing. Does the practice environment offer residents enough opportunities to observe the supervisor leadership behaviours they have to le

  4. FINAL REPORT:Observation and Simulations of Transport of Molecules and Ions Across Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MURAD, SOHAIL [University of Illinois at Chicago; JAMESON, CYNTHIA J [University of Illinois at Chicago

    2013-10-22

    During the this new grant we developed a robust methodology for investigating a wide range of properties of phospho-lipid bilayers. The approach developed is unique because despite using periodic boundary conditions, we can simulate an entire experiment or process in detail. For example, we can follow the entire permeation process in a lipid-membrane. This includes transport from the bulk aqueous phase to the lipid surface; permeation into the lipid; transport inside the lipid; and transport out of the lipid to the bulk aqueous phase again. We studied the transport of small gases in both the lipid itself and in model protein channels. In addition, we have examined the transport of nanocrystals through the lipid membrane, with the main goal of understanding the mechanical behavior of lipids under stress including water and ion leakage and lipid flip flop. Finally we have also examined in detail the deformation of lipids when under the influence of external fields, both mechanical and electrostatic (currently in progress). The important observations and conclusions from our studies are described in the main text of the report

  5. Endoscopically observable white nodule caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread of rectal cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsumura Ayako

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes a case of rectal cancer with endoscopically observable white nodules caused by distal intramural lymphatic spread. A 57-year-old female presented to our hospital with frequent diarrhea and hemorrhoids. Computed tomography showed bilateral ovarian masses and three hepatic tumors diagnosed as rectal cancer metastases, and also showed multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was preoperatively diagnosed with stage IV rectal cancer. Colonoscopy demonstrated that primary rectal cancer existed 15 cm from the anal verge and that there were multiple white small nodules on the anal side of the primary tumor extending to the dentate line. Biopsies of the white spots were performed, and they were identified as adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent Hartmann’s procedure because of the locally advanced primary tumor. The white nodules were ultimately diagnosed as being caused by intramural lymphatic spreading because lymphatic permeation was strongly positive at the surrounding area. Small white nodules near a primary rectal cancer should be suspected of being intramural spreading. Endoscopic detection of white nodules may be useful for the diagnosis of distal intramural spread.

  6. Experimental Observation and Analytical Modeling of Melting and Solidification during Aluminum Alloy Repair by Turbulence Flow Casting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muki Satya Permana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview on the state of the art of applicable casting technology for applications in the field of repairing aluminum alloy components. Repair process on the Al alloy sample using similar metal has been carried out to investigate the micro-structural effect. Joining occurs as a result of convection heat transfer of molten flow into the sand mold which melts the existing base metal inside the mold and subsequent solidification. The analytical model has been developed to describe aluminum alloy component repair by turbulence flow casting. The model is designed based on heat transfer principle that can handle the phenomena of heat flow. The experimental result and analytical model analyses pointed out that joint quality are greatly affected by parameters of preheating temperature and duration of molten metal flow in the mold. To obtain a desired metallurgical sound at the joint, the optimum temperature and time were adjusted in order to obtain a similarity of microstructure between filler and base metal. This model is aimed to predict the use of the process parameter ranges in order to have the optimum parameters when it is applied to the experiment. The fixed parameters are flow rate, sand ratio, and pouring temperature. The process parameters are preheating temperature and pouring time. It is concluded that analytical modeling has good agreement with the experimental result.

  7. Report on experimental research and best practice for surface treatment solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavillet, Jerome; Tosello, Guido; Gasparin, S.

    2011-01-01

    The present deliverable contains the report of the work and results achieved within the framework of WP 2.3 / Task 2.3.2 on “Surface treatments and thin layers/films deposition to improve process output”....

  8. Aviation Weather Observations for Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS) and Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS). Federal Meteorological Handbook No. 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation, Washington, DC.

    This handbook provides instructions for observing, identifying, and recording aviation weather at Limited Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (LAWRS) and Supplementary Aviation Weather Reporting Stations (SAWRS). Official technical definitions, meteorological and administrative procedures are outlined. Although this publication is intended for use…

  9. Methods and processes of developing the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary (STROBE-Vet) statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sargeant, J. M.; O'Connor, A. M.; Dohoo, I. R.;

    2016-01-01

    ) statement that addresses unique reporting requirements for observational studies inveterinary medicine related to health, production, welfare, and food safety.Design: A consensus meeting of experts was organized to develop an extension of the STROBE statementto address observational studies in veterinary......Background: The reporting of observational studies in veterinary research presents many challenges thatoften are not adequately addressed in published reporting guidelines.Objective: To develop an extension of the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studiesin Epidemiology...... medicine with respect to animal health, animal production,animal welfare, and food safety outcomes.Setting: Consensus meeting May 11–13, 2014 in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.Participants: Seventeen experts from North America, Europe, and Australia attended the meeting. Theexperts were epidemiologists...

  10. The University of Virginia Experimental and Theoretical High Energy Physics Closeout Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Principal Investigator: Harry B. Thacker

    2012-08-13

    The work covered in this report includes a joint project on using gauge-gravity duality to discover qualitatively new results on jet quenching in strongly-coupled QCD-like plasmas. Other topics addressed by the theoretical work include jet stopping and energy loss in weakly-coupled plasmas, perturbative QCD amplitudes, AdS/CMT, dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking with a heavy fourth generation, electroweak-scale {nu}{sub R} model, vacuum topological structure and chiral dynamics in strongly coupled gauge theory. Effort committed to the CMS experiment is reported, particularly the management, maintenance, operation and upgrade of the CMS electromagnetic detector (ECAL). Activities in various physics analyses including Supersymmetry, Higgs, Top, and QCD analyses are reported. Physics projects covering wide areas of physics at the LHC are reported. CY2010 saw the accumulation of a data sample corresponding to approximately 36 pb{sup -1}; in CY 2011 the data sample swelled to more than 5 fb{sup -1}. The UVa CMS analysis efforts are focused on this large 2011 data sample in a suite of crucial measurements and searches. KTeV physics activities are reported. Efforts are reported pertaining to several experiments, including: HyperCP, CKM, MIPP, D, NO {nu}A, and Mu2e.

  11. Experimental Design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnott, James [AGCI

    2015-10-30

    The Aspen Global Change Institute hosted a technical science workshop entitled, “Experimental design for CMIP6: Aerosol, Land Use, and Future Scenarios,” on August 3-8, 2014 in Aspen, CO. Claudia Tebaldi (NCAR) and Brian O’Neill (NCAR) served as co-chairs for the workshop. The Organizing committee also included Dave Lawrence (NCAR), Jean-Francois Lamarque (NCAR), George Hurtt (University of Maryland), & Detlef van Vuuren (PBL Netherlands Environmental Change). The meeting included the participation of 22 scientists representing many of the major climate modeling centers for a total of 110 participant days.

  12. Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

    2006-11-01

    In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared

  13. Experimental observation of the spin Hall effect of light on a metal film nanostructure via weak measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Xinxing; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2011-01-01

    We theorize the spin Hall effect of light (SHEL) on a metal film nanostructure and demonstrate it experimentally via weak measurements. To reveal the SHEL on nanostructure, we establish a general model to describe the relationship between the spin-orbit coupling and the structural parameters of the nanostructure. We reveal that the spin-orbit coupling in the SHEL can be effectively modulated by adjusting the thickness of the metal film. Our findings show that the transverse displacement is sensitive to the thickness of metal film in certain range for horizontal polarization due to the large ratio of Fresnel coefficients. In addition, we find that the transverse shift takes on a large negative value as a consequence of the combined contributions of the ratio and the phase difference of Fresnel coefficients.

  14. Experimental observation of sub-terahertz backward-wave amplification in a multi-level microfabricated slow-wave circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Chan-Wook, E-mail: cw.baik@samsung.com; Ahn, Ho Young; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Lee, Sang Hun; Choi, Jun Hee; Kim, Sunil; Kim, Jong Min; Hwang, Sungwoo [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Suwon 443-803 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, So-Yeon; Yu, SeGi [Department of Physics, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Collins, George; Read, Michael E.; Lawrence Ives, R. [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, California 94404-1010 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    In our earlier paper dealing with dispersion retrieval from ultra-deep, reactive-ion-etched, slow-wave circuits on silicon substrates, it was proposed that splitting high-aspect-ratio circuits into multilevels enabled precise characterization in sub-terahertz frequency regime. This achievement prompted us to investigate beam-wave interaction through a vacuum-sealed integration with a 15-kV, 85-mA, thermionic, electron gun. Our experimental study demonstrates sub-terahertz, backward-wave amplification driven by an external oscillator. The measured output shows a frequency downshift, as well as power amplification, from beam loading even with low beam perveance. This offers a promising opportunity for the development of terahertz radiation sources, based on silicon technologies.

  15. Beneficial Effect of Ultra-Low-Dose Aspirin in Platelet Activity Alterations and Haemorrhage Observed in Experimental Portal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. X. Eizayaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-low-dose aspirin has shown a prothrombotic effect in the laser-induced thrombosis model. Several studies of our laboratory have shown a positive effect in rats with two different experimental models of portal hypertension: portal vein ligation, a model with an almost normal liver, and 30 days of bile duct ligation, a model with cirrhosis and presence of ascitis. In both models of portal hypertensive rats, bleeding time was prolonged and thrombi formation, in a laser-induced model of thrombi production, decreased. The hypotheses of the presented studies were that ultra-low-dose aspirin could decrease the bleeding complications in these models and that the mechanism for these effects could act thorough the COX pathway. In different studies, ultra-low dose of aspirin normalized the induced hemorrhage time, thrombi production, and platelet-endothelial cell interaction. The possible beneficial role of these doses of aspirin and mechanism of COX 2 inhibition are discussed.

  16. Experimental observation of electron bounce resonance through electron energy distribution measurement in a finite size inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Seuli [Department of Nanoscale Semiconductor Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Yu-Sin; Chang, Yoon-Min; Chung, Chin-Wook, E-mail: joykang@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Deuk-Chul [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34133 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The electron bounce resonance was experimentally investigated in a low pressure planar inductively coupled plasma. The electron energy probability functions (EEPFs) were measured at different chamber heights and the energy diffusion coefficients were calculated by the kinetic model. It is found that the EEPFs begin to flatten at the first electron bounce resonance condition, and the plateau shifts to a higher electron energy as the chamber height increases. The plateau which indicates strong electron heating corresponds not only to the electron bounce resonance condition but also to the peaks of the first component of the energy diffusion coefficients. As a result, the plateau formation in the EEPFs is mainly due to the electron bounce resonance in a finite inductive discharge.

  17. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, A M; Sargeant, J M; Dohoo, I R;

    2016-01-01

    The STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) statement was first published in 2007 and again in 2014. The purpose of the original STROBE was to provide guidance for authors, reviewers and editors to improve the comprehensiveness of reporting; however, STROBE h...

  18. Pakistan; Report on Observance of Standards and Codes—Fiscal Transparency Module—Update

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an Update to the Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the Fiscal Transparency Module for Pakistan. Under the Project for Improvement of Financial Reporting and Auditing (PIFRA), key steps to enhance fiscal reporting and monitoring were taken recently. Accounting offices that process budget data are gradually being transformed to support the New Accounting Model and new information technology processes. Nineteen sites, including two core federal accounting off...

  19. The Design of a Critical Thinking Test on Appraising Observations. Studies in Critical Thinking, Research Report No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Stephen P.; King, Ruth

    This report describes the design of a test of one aspect of critical thinking ability, the ability to correctly appraise observations. Intended for classroom use with senior high school students, the 50 item Test on Appraising Observations is based on a comprehensive set of principles modified from Robert Ennes' conception of good observation…

  20. Explanation and Elaboration Document for the STROBE-Vet Statement: Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology - Veterinary Extension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Connor, A M; Sargeant, J M; Dohoo, I R

    2016-01-01

    a unique focus on observational studies. Although much of the guidance provided by the original STROBE document is directly applicable, it was deemed useful to map those statements to veterinary concepts, provide veterinary examples and highlight unique aspects of reporting in veterinary observational...