WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported effects ranged

  1. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. – We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... range reporting are based on a novel combination of suffix trees and range reporting data structures. The reductions are simple and general and may apply to other combinations of string indexing with range reporting....

  2. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. – We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...

  3. Substring Range Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. {itemize} We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems to a new problem, which we call \\emph{substring range reporting}. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of...

  4. Substring Range Reporting

    OpenAIRE

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2011-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. {itemize} We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems to a new problem, which we call \\emph{substring range reporting}. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of...

  5. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries in ...

  6. Substring Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2014-01-01

    We revisit various string indexing problems with range reporting features, namely, position-restricted substring searching, indexing substrings with gaps, and indexing substrings with intervals. We obtain the following main results. We give efficient reductions for each of the above problems...... to a new problem, which we call substring range reporting. Hence, we unify the previous work by showing that we may restrict our attention to a single problem rather than studying each of the above problems individually. We show how to solve substring range reporting with optimal query time and little...... space. Combined with our reductions this leads to significantly improved time-space trade-offs for the above problems. In particular, for each problem we obtain the first solutions with optimal time query and O(nlog O(1) n) space, where n is the length of the indexed string. We show that our techniques...

  7. 2012 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a NASA Range Safety (NRS) overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program (RSP) activities performed during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be conducted in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2012 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2012 highlights; Range Safety Training; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities.

  8. 2009 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This year, NASA Range Safety transitioned to a condensed annual report to allow for Secretariat support to the Range Safety Group, Risk Committee. Although much shorter than in previous years, this report contains full-length articles concerning various subject areas, as well as links to past reports. Additionally, summaries from various NASA Range Safety Program activities that took place throughout the year are presented, as well as information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. The sections include a program overview and 2009 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy; Independent Assessments Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities.

  9. Kenai National Moose Range : Narrative report 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. Kenai National Moose Range : Narrative report : 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. 2010 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2010-01-01

    this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2010 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2010 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again, the web-based format was used to present the annual report.

  12. 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Welcome to the 2011 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. As is typical with odd year editions, this is an abbreviated Range Safety Annual Report providing updates and links to full articles from the previous year's report. It also provides more complete articles covering new subject areas, summaries of various NASA Range Safety Program activities conducted during the past year, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be done in the future. Specific topics discussed and updated in the 2011 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2011 highlights; Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy revision; Independent Assessments; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations; a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. Once again the web-based format was used to present the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition and hope you enjoy this year's product as well. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. In conclusion, it has been a busy and productive year. I'd like to extend a personal Thank You to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the upcoming year.

  13. 2013 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Alan G.

    2013-01-01

    Welcome to the 2013 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides an Agency overview for current and potential range users. This report contains articles which cover a variety of subject areas, summaries of various activities performed during the past year, links to past reports, and information on several projects that may have a profound impact on the way business will be conducted in the future. Specific topics discussed in the 2013 NASA Range Safety Annual Report include a program overview and 2013 highlights, Range Safety Training, Independent Assessments, support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch/flight operations, a continuing overview of emerging range safety-related technologies, and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. Every effort has been made to include the most current information available. We recommend this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. As is the case each year, we had a wide variety of contributors to this report from across our NASA Centers and the national range safety community at large, and I wish to thank them all. On a sad note, we lost one of our close colleagues, Dr. Jim Simpson, due to his sudden passing in December. His work advancing the envelope of autonomous flight safety systems software/hardware development leaves a lasting impression on our community. Such systems are being flight tested today and may one day be considered routine in the range safety business. The NASA family has lost a pioneer in our field, and he will surely be missed. In conclusion, it has been a very busy and productive year, and I look forward to working with all of you in NASA Centers/Programs/Projects and with the national Range Safety community in making Flight/Space activities as safe as they can be in the upcoming year.

  14. [National Bison Range: Annual narrative report 1924

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range during 1924. Wildlife- including buffalo, elk, deer, mountain sheep, predators, rodents, and...

  15. 2008 NASA Range Safety Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Welcome to the 2008 edition of the NASA Range Safety Annual Report. Funded by NASA Headquarters, this report provides a NASA Range Safety overview for current and potential range users. This year, along with full length articles concerning various subject areas, we have provided updates to standard subjects with links back to the 2007 original article. Additionally, we present summaries from the various NASA Range Safety Program activities that took place throughout the year, as well as information on several special projects that may have a profound impact on the way we will do business in the future. The sections include a program overview and 2008 highlights of Range Safety Training; Range Safety Policy; Independent Assessments and Common Risk Analysis Tools Development; Support to Program Operations at all ranges conducting NASA launch operations; a continuing overview of emerging Range Safety-related technologies; Special Interests Items that include recent changes in the ELV Payload Safety Program and the VAS explosive siting study; and status reports from all of the NASA Centers that have Range Safety responsibilities. As is the case each year, contributors to this report are too numerous to mention, but we thank individuals from the NASA Centers, the Department of Defense, and civilian organizations for their contributions. We have made a great effort to include the most current information available. We recommend that this report be used only for guidance and that the validity and accuracy of all articles be verified for updates. This is the third year we have utilized this web-based format for the annual report. We continually receive positive feedback on the web-based edition, and we hope you enjoy this year's product as well. It has been a very busy and productive year on many fronts as you will note as you review this report. Thank you to everyone who contributed to make this year a successful one, and I look forward to working with all of you in the

  16. Dynamic Range Reporting in External Memory

    CERN Document Server

    Nekrich, Yakov

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a dynamic external memory data structure that supports range reporting queries in three dimensions in $O(\\log_B^2 N + \\frac{k}{B})$ I/O operations, where $k$ is the number of points in the answer and $B$ is the block size. This is the first dynamic data structure that answers three-dimensional range reporting queries in $\\log_B^{O(1)} N + O(\\frac{k}{B})$ I/Os.

  17. Final Report for DOE Project: Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgham, Scott D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Johnson, Bart [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2013-09-26

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 ºC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges

  18. Optimal Static Range Reporting in One Dimension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Rauhe, Theis

    2001-01-01

    We consider static one dimensional range searching problems. These problems are to build static data structures for an integer set S \\subseteq U, where U = \\{0,1,\\dots,2^w-1\\}, which support various queries for integer intervals of U. For the query of reporting all integers in S contained within...... a query interval, we present an optimal data structure with linear space cost and with query time linear in the number of integers reported. This result holds in the unit cost RAM model with word size w and a standard instruction set. We also present a linear space data structure for approximate range...... counting. A range counting query for an interval returns the number of integers in S contained within the interval. For any constant &egr;>0, our range counting data structure returns in constant time an approximate answer which is within a factor of at most 1+&egr; of the correct answer....

  19. The Effectiveness of Manual Therapy Versus Surgery on Self-reported Function, Cervical Range of Motion, and Pinch Grip Force in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua; Palacios-Ceña, María; Fuensalida-Novo, Stella; Pareja, Juan A; Alonso-Blanco, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Study Design Randomized parallel-group trial. Background Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common pain condition that can be managed surgically or conservatively. Objective To compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving self-reported function, cervical range of motion, and pinch-tip grip force in women with CTS. Methods In this randomized clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either a manual therapy (n = 50) or a surgery (n = 50) group. The primary outcome was self-rated hand function, assessed with the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes included active cervical range of motion, pinch-tip grip force, and the symptom severity subscale of the Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire. Patients were assessed at baseline and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the last treatment by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat, with mixed analyses of covariance adjusted for baseline scores. Results At 12 months, 94 women completed the follow-up. Analyses showed statistically significant differences in favor of manual therapy at 1 month for self-reported function (mean change, -0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.1, -0.5) and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic side (thumb-index finger: mean change, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.9 and thumb-little finger: mean change, 1.0; 95% CI: 0.5, 1.5). Improvements in self-reported function and pinch grip force were similar between the groups at 3, 6, and 12 months. Both groups reported improvements in symptom severity that were not significantly different at all follow-up periods. No significant changes were observed in pinch-tip grip force on the less symptomatic side and in cervical range of motion in either group. Conclusion Manual therapy and surgery had similar effectiveness for improving self-reported function, symptom severity, and pinch-tip grip force on the symptomatic hand in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted

  20. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    ranges and other training facilities at Fort Drum. Using the Combined Arms Training Strategies ( CATS ), the largest individual Fort Drum land requirement...species, the presence of feral horses, and wetlands have developed over the last two years, and are anticipated to result in continued impacts to...Factors Assigned Training Mission Score Comments Range Transients Movement & Maneuver h Range transients on Fort Polk include trespass horses and feral

  1. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    energy goals and a national broadband infrastructure, while exploring cooperative land-use strategies to reduce congestion on stressed ranges. These...0 0 0 N N Y N Y N N Y N N Y Hohe Warte OS Germany USAREUR 160 0 0 0 N N Y N N N N N N N N Table A-1: Army Training and Testing Range Complex

  2. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Barry M. Goldwater Range (West), the Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range (CMAGR) and additional designated airspace areas. In addition to...above. Scoring & Feedback System Strategic Attack h The current JAWSS scoring system is limited by antequated analog technology. This prevents...optic cable and make the change from analog to digital throughout facilities. Encroachment Observations Factors Assigned Training Mission Score Comment

  3. 7th annual report 1998. UN ECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution. International cooperative programme on integrated monitoring of air pollution effects on ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleemola, S.; Forsius, M. [eds.

    1998-11-01

    The Integrated Monitoring Programme (ICP IM) is part of the Effects Monitoring Strategy under the UN ECE Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution Convention. The main aim of ICP IM is to provide a framework to observe and understand the complex changes occurring in the external environment. The monitoring and prediction of complex ecosystem effects on undisturbed reference areas require a continuous effort to improve the collection and assessment of data on the international scale. At the 1997 Task Force meeting it was decided that future annual reports from ICP IM would have a more technical character. The report could include some scientific material but also short technical descriptions of recent national activities and publications. Scientific articles should preferably be published in recognised scientific journals. The responsibility for producing annual reports would still lie on the Programme Centre, but more contributions from National Focal Points were welcomed. The content of the present Annual Report reflects the decisions of the Task Force meeting. The report gives a general overview of the ICP IM activities, the present content of the ICP IM database, and presents results from assessment activities carried out by several collaborating institutes and the ICP IM Programme Centre during the programme year 1997/98. The resources of the Programme Centre have been targeted to the revision of the Programme Manual and the EU/LIFE-project `Development of Assessment and Monitoring Techniques at Integrated Monitoring Sites in Europe`, which has limited the possibilities to carry out additional evaluations of ICP IM data. Section 1 is a short status report of the ICP IM activities, content of the IM database, including the contents of the GIS database, and the present geographical coverage of the monitoring network. Section 2 contains a report on multivariate gradient analysis applied to relate chemical and biological observations (prepared by D. de Zwart, RIVM

  4. Arctic National Wildlife Range, Annual Narrative Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Arctic National Wildlife Range (ANWR) was established by executive order in 1960 for the purpose of preserving unique wildlife, wilderness and recreational...

  5. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    segments training/reduces realism, and reduces live fire proficiency. Investment in range clearance of UXO for Hicacal, Palma , and Granadillo ranges...Tyndall and NAS Pensacola, expansion of oil /gas drilling, and projected growth in civilian general aviation activities causing increased competition...for existing airspace between training, test, and civilian use, while the amount of SUA available for weapons releases is shrinking due to oil /gas

  6. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Chocolate Mountains Aerial Gunnery Range (CMAGR) which is a part of the Bob Stump Training Complex and is located in southern California. CMAGR is... industry (below 3 GHz) is heavily encumbered with existing users, including many military subscribers. Relocating these users to other portions of the...institutions, and industry to build on current agreements and allow for additional negotiated agreements as appropriate on the placement of sensors and

  7. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    of military operations ( ROMO ) Realistic LVC representations of opposing forces (OPFOR), as well as neutral and factional entities that may be...throughput and surge requirements necessary to support training for the Range of Military Operations ( ROMO ). Sim ula ted Ene my For ce Com ma nde r...potential to impact Army training and testing. These energy initiatives include wind turbines, new energy corridors for gas/oil pipelines and high

  8. Tonopah Test Range 2030 Meeting Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Closed, Closed in Place, or Closure in Progress. CASs and CAUs where contaminants were either not detected or were cleaned up to within regulatory action levels are summarized. CASs and CAUs where contaminants and/or waste have been closed in place are summarized. There is also a table that summarizes the contaminant that has been closed at each site, if land-use restrictions are present, and if post-closure inspections are required.

  9. Report to Congress on Sustainable Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    ARNG 230 0 0 0 Y Y Y HARVEY BARRACKS OS GERMANY USAREUR 235 0 0 0 Y Y HAWTHORNE AD US NV AMC 35,789 0 0 0 Y Y Y HIGH... NATHANIEL GREENE US RI USARC 96 0 0 0 Y Y Y VOLKSTONE US WV ARNG 291 0 0 0 Y Y Y WACKERNHEIM SMALL ARMS RANGES OS GERMANY USAREUR 32 0...JACKSONVILLE ARTCC Fort Stewart FL290 SURFACE USA 50 R3005E FAA, JACKSONVILLE ARTCC Fort Stewart FL290 SURFACE USA 35 R4811 FAA, OAKLAND ARTCC Hawthorne

  10. Arctic National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Arctic National Wildlife Range outlines Range accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  11. 32 CFR 644.526 - Reporting target ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Reporting target ranges. 644.526 Section 644.526... and Improvements § 644.526 Reporting target ranges. All Reports of Excess to GSA covering lands which have been used as target ranges of any kind will contain an affirmative or negative statement in regard...

  12. The effects of mobilization with movement on dorsiflexion range of motion, dynamic balance, and self-reported function in individuals with chronic ankle instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbreath, Julie P; Gaven, Stacey L; Van Lunen, L; Hoch, Matthew C

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have examined the effectiveness of a manual therapy intervention known as Mobilization with Movement (MWM) to increase dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). While a single talocrural MWM treatment has increased dorsiflexion ROM in these individuals, examining the effects of multiple treatments on dorsiflexion ROM, dynamic balance, and self-reported function would enhance the clinical application of this intervention. This study sought to determine if three treatment sessions of talocrural MWM would improve dorsiflexion ROM, Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances, and self-reported function using the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) in individuals with CAI. Eleven participants with CAI (5 Males, 6 Females, age: 21.5 ± 2.2 years, weight: 83.9 ± 15.6 kg, height: 177.7 ± 10.9 cm, Cumberland Ankle Instability Tool: 17.5 ± 4.2) volunteered in this repeated-measures study. Subjects received three MWM treatments over one week. Weight-bearing dorsiflexion ROM (cm), normalized SEBT reach distances (%), and self-reported function (%) were assessed one week before the intervention (baseline), prior to the first MWM treatment (pre-intervention), and 24–48 h following the final treatment (post-intervention). No significant changes were identified in dorsiflexion ROM, SEBT reach distances, or the FAAM-Activities of Daily Living scale (p > 0.05). Significant changes were identified on the FAAM-Sport (p = 0.01). FAAM-Sport scores were significantly greater post-intervention (86.82 ± 9.18%) compared to baseline (77.27 ± 11.09%; p = 0.01) and pre-intervention (79.82 ± 13.45%; p = 0.04). These results indicate the MWM intervention did not improve dorsiflexion ROM, dynamic balance, or patient-centered measures of activities of daily living. However, MWM did improve patient-centered measures of sport-related activities in individuals with CAI.

  13. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    OpenAIRE

    Midya, Bikashkali; Evrard, Jérémie; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Ramirez Suarez, Oscar Leonardo; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Thir...

  14. National Bison Range, Ninepipe and Pablo Refuges: Narrative report - 1970

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range, Pablo NWR, and Ninepipe NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report begins...

  15. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  16. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year: 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  17. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  18. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  19. National Bison Range: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  20. Refuge narrative report : January - April, 1959 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Refuge narrative report : 1967 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Kenai National Moose Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  3. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: Calendar year 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  6. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  7. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  8. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: Calendar year 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. Kenai National Moose Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  10. National Bison Range: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  11. National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  12. National Bison Range: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1993 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  13. A general approach for cache-oblivious range reporting and approximate range counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Hamilton, Chris; Zeh, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    We present cache-oblivious solutions to two important variants of range searching: range reporting and approximate range counting. Our main contribution is a general approach for constructing cache-oblivious data structures that provide relative (1+ε)-approximations for a general class of range...... counting queries. This class includes three-sided range counting in the plane, 3-d dominance counting, and 3-d halfspace range counting. The constructed data structures use linear space and answer queries in the optimal query bound of O(logB(N/K)) block transfers in the worst case, where K is the number...... of points in the query range. As a corollary, we also obtain the first approximate 3-d halfspace range counting and 3-d dominance counting data structures with a worst-case query time of O(log(N/K)) in internal memory. An easy but important consequence of our main result is the existence of -space cache...

  14. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2004-04-01

    This post-closure inspection report provides documentation of the semiannual inspection activities, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for calendar year 2003 for eight corrective action units located on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada.

  15. Botanical studies in the Arctic National Wildlife Range: Field report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a botanical study in the Arctic National Wildlife Range during 1970. Cooperative studies on flora and fauna were done on selected sites. Sites include...

  16. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: Calendar year 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range, Ninepipe National Wildlife Refuge, Pablo National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  17. [National Bison Range: Narrative report: January - June, 1931

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and June, 1931. Big game animals, predators, rodents, furbearers, birds, and...

  18. Report of the Long-Range Planning Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-07-01

    This is the final report of the Long-Range Planning Committee of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It describes the make-up, purpose, working assumptions, and activities of the Committee and discusses the work done by the Committee on defense matters, energy, a number of additional topics, and future long-range planning activities.

  19. Improved Space Bounds for Cache-Oblivious Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Zeh, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    We provide improved bounds on the size of cacheoblivious range reporting data structures that achieve the optimal query bound of O(logB N + K/B) block transfers. Our first main result is an O(N √ logN log logN)-space data structure that achieves this query bound for 3-d dominance reporting and 2-...

  20. Supersymmetric inversion of effective-range expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Midya, Bikashkali; Abramowicz, Sylvain; Suárez, O L Ramírez; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    A complete and consistent inversion technique is proposed to derive an accurate interaction potential from an effective-range function for a given partial wave in the neutral case. First, the effective-range function is Taylor or Pad\\'e expanded, which allows high precision fitting of the experimental scattering phase shifts with a minimal number of parameters on a large energy range. Second, the corresponding poles of the scattering matrix are extracted in the complex wave-number plane. Third, the interaction potential is constructed with supersymmetric transformations of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation. As an illustration, the method is applied to the experimental phase shifts of the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the $^1S_0$ and $^1D_2$ channels on the $[0-350]$ MeV laboratory energy interval.

  1. Improved Space Bounds for Cache-Oblivious Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Zeh, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    second main result shows that any cache-oblivious 2-d three-sided range reporting data structure with the optimal query bound has to use Ω(N logε N) space, thereby improving on a recent lower bound for the same problem. Using known transformations, the lower bound extends to 3-d dominance reporting and 3......We provide improved bounds on the size of cacheoblivious range reporting data structures that achieve the optimal query bound of O(logB N + K/B) block transfers. Our first main result is an O(N √ logN log logN)-space data structure that achieves this query bound for 3-d dominance reporting and 2-d...... three-sided range reporting. No cache-oblivious o(N log N/ log logN)-space data structure for these problems was known before, even when allowing a query bound of O(logO(1) 2 N + K/B) block transfers.1 Our result also implies improved space bounds for general 2-d and 3-d orthogonal range reporting. Our...

  2. The Efimov effect with finite range interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms are receiving a lot of attention because of their interesting features in the few- and many-body sector. Strong interactions are frequently obtained in experiment by using a Feshbach resonance to tune the scattering to large values. A striking feature of three-body systems with a large scattering is the emergence of a discrete scaling symmetry that is also known as the Efimov effect. The Efimov effect has been observed through the measurement of loss rates in experiments with ultracold atoms. It is, however, also relevant to nuclear physics where the three-nucleon bound state and some halo nuclei are considered to be examples of Efimov states. Such systems can be modeled conveniently with the zero-range limit, however, in many of such experiments the finite range of the interaction leads to significant corrections that need to be taken into account. I will discuss how a finite effective range can be included in calculations for three-body systems that display the Efimov effect and how this leads to novel universal relations. Applications to experiments with homonuclear and heteronuclear ultracold atomic gases are discussed. National Science Foundation PHY-1516077, PHY-1555030.

  3. Near-Optimal Range Reporting Structures for Categorical

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kasper Green; Walderveen, Freek van

    2013-01-01

    Range reporting on categorical (or colored) data is a well-studied generalization of the classical range reporting problem in which each of the N input points has an associated color (category). A query then asks to report the set of colors of the points in a given rectangular query range, which...... may be far smaller than the set of all points in the query range. We study two-dimensional categorical range reporting in both the word-RAM and I/O-model. For the I/O-model, we present two alternative data structures for three-sided queries. The first answers queries in optimal O(lgB N + K/B) I....../Os using O(N lg*N) space, where K is the number of distinct colors in the output, B is the disk block size, and lg*N is the iterated logarithm of N. Our second data structure uses linear space and answers queries in O(lg B N + lg(h) N + K/B) I/Os for any constant integer h ≥ 1. Here lg(1) N = lg N and lg...

  4. White Sands Missile Range 2011 Drinking Water Quality Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    acerca de su agua potable . Haga que alguien lo traduzca para usted, o hable con alguien que lo entienda. Main Post White Sands Missile Range 2011...standards. What is This Water Quality Report? Este informe contiene informacion importante acerca de su agua potable . Haga que alguien lo traduzca

  5. 1994 site environmental report, Tonopah Test Range, Tonopah, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, W. [Kirk-Mayer, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the environmental surveillance activities conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and Kirk-Mayer, Inc., for the Tonopah Test Range operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories` responsibility for environmental surveillance results extends to those activities performed by Sandia National Laboratories or under its direction. Results from other environmental surveillance activities are included to provide a measure of completeness in reporting. Other environmental compliance programs such as the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, environmental permits, and environmental restoration and waste management programs are also included in this report, prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) in compliance with DOE Order 5400. 1.

  6. Short range correlations and the EMC effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, L B; Piasetzky, E; Higinbotham, D W; Gomez, J; Hen, O; Shneor, R

    2011-02-04

    This Letter shows quantitatively that the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at intermediate x(B), 0.35≤x(B)≤0.7, is linearly related to the short range correlation (SRC) scale factor obtained from electron inclusive scattering at x(B)≥1. The observed phenomenological relationship is used to extract the ratio of the deuteron to the free pn pair cross sections and F(2)(n)/F(2)(p), the ratio of the free neutron to free proton structure functions. We speculate that the observed correlation is because both the EMC effect and SRC are dominated by the high virtuality (high momentum) nucleons in the nucleus.

  7. Effective-range dependence of two-dimensional Fermi gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonenberg, L. M.; Verpoort, P. C.; Conduit, G. J.

    2017-08-01

    The Feshbach resonance provides precise control over the scattering length and effective range of interactions between ultracold atoms. We propose the ultratransferable pseudopotential to model effective interaction ranges -1.5 ≤kF2Reff2≤0 , where Reff is the effective range and kF is the Fermi wave vector, describing narrow to broad Feshbach resonances. We develop a mean-field treatment and exploit the pseudopotential to perform a variational and diffusion Monte Carlo study of the ground state of the two-dimensional Fermi gas, reporting on the ground-state energy, contact, condensate fraction, momentum distribution, and pair-correlation functions as a function of the effective interaction range across the BEC-BCS crossover. The limit kF2Reff2→-∞ is a gas of bosons with zero binding energy, whereas ln(kFa )→-∞ corresponds to noninteracting bosons with infinite binding energy.

  8. Military Training: DOD Met Annual Reporting Requirements in Its 2016 Sustainable Ranges Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    infrastructure and renewable energy impacts, (6) anticipate climate change impacts,15 and (7) sustain excellence in environmental stewardship. Using...to which DOD’s 2016 Sustainable Ranges Report met statutory reporting requirements. To conduct this work, GAO reviewed DOD’s 2016 report and...GAO’s report after reviewing the draft. What GAO Found The Department of Defense’s (DOD) 2016 Sustainable Ranges Report met the annual statutory

  9. Range of drainage effect of surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sozanski, J.

    1978-03-01

    This paper discusses methods of calculating the range of effects of water drainage from surface coal mines and other surface mines. It is suggested that methods based on test pumping (water drainage) are time consuming, and the results can be distorted by atmospheric factors such as rain fall or dry period. So-called empirical formulae produce results which are often incorrect. The size of a cone shaped depression calculated on the basis of empirical formulae can be ten times smaller than the size of the real depression. It is suggested that using a formula based on the Dupuit formula is superior to other methods of depression calculation. According to the derived formulae the radius of the depresion cone is a function of parameters of the water bearing horizons, size of surface mine working and of water depression. The proposed formula also takes into account the influence of atmospheric factors (water influx caused by precipitation, etc.). (1 ref.) (In Polish)

  10. Tonopah Test Range Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-08-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Annual Report provides documentation of the semiannual inspections conducted at the following Corrective Action Units (CAU)s: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill; CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench; CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area; CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes; CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches; CAU 427: Septic Waste Systems 2, 6; and CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, all located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. Post-closure inspections are not required at CAU 400 but are conducted to monitor vegetation and fencing at the site. Site inspections were conducted in May and November 2002. All site inspections were made after Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) approval of the appropriate Closure Report (CR), excluding CAU 400 which did not require a CR, and were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Inspection Plans in the NDEP-approved CRs. Post-closure inspections conducted during 2002 identified several areas requiring maintenance/repairs. Maintenance work and proposed additional monitoring are included in the appropriate section for each CAU. This report includes copies of the Post-Closure Inspection Plans, Post-Closure Inspection Checklists, copies of the field notes, photographs, and the Post-Closure Vegetative Monitoring Report. The Post-Closure Inspection Plan for each CAU is located in Attachment A. Post-Closure Inspection Checklists are in Attachment B. Copies of the field notes from each inspection are included in Attachment C. Attachment D consists of the photographic logs and photographs of the sites. The post-closure vegetative monitoring report for calendar year 2002 is included in Attachment E.

  11. 1998 Annual Site Environmental Report Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, D.K.; Fink, C.H.; Sanchez, R.V.

    1999-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1998) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance at TTR extends only to those areas where SNL activities are carried out. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990a).

  12. 2006 Long Range Development Plan Final Environmental ImpactReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philliber, Jeff

    2007-01-22

    This environmental impact report (EIR) has been prepared pursuant to the applicable provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and its implementing guidelines (CEQA Guidelines), and the Amended University of California Procedures for Implementation of the California Environmental Quality Act (UC CEQA Procedures). The University of California (UC or the University) is the lead agency for this EIR, which examines the overall effects of implementation of the proposed 2006 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP; also referred to herein as the 'project' for purposes of CEQA) for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL; also referred to as 'Berkeley Lab,' 'the Laboratory,' or 'the Lab' in this document). An LRDP is a land use plan that guides overall development of a site. The Lab serves as a special research campus operated by the University employees, but it is owned and financed by the federal government and as such it is distinct from the UC-owned Berkeley Campus. As a campus operated by the University of California, the Laboratory is required to prepare an EIR for an LRDP when one is prepared or updated pursuant to Public Resources Code Section 21080.09. The adoption of an LRDP does not constitute a commitment to, or final decision to implement, any specific project, construction schedule, or funding priority. Rather, the proposed 2006 LRDP describes an entire development program of approximately 980,000 gross square feet of new research and support space construction and 320,000 gross square feet of demolition of existing facilities, for a total of approximately 660,000 gross square feet of net new occupiable space for the site through 2025. Specific projects will undergo CEQA review at the time proposed to determine what, if any, additional review is necessary prior to approval. As described in Section 1.4.2, below, and in Chapter 3 of this EIR (the Project Description), the size of the project has been

  13. 1996 Site environmental report Tonopah test range Tonopah, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culp, T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, W. [Kirk-Mayer, Inc., Tonopah, NV (United States); Duncan, D. [ed.] [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sanchez, R. [Jobs Plus, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. This annual report (calendar year 1996) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management, clean-up of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). In compliance with DOE Orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL`s responsibility for environmentals surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL`s responsibility for environmental surveillance extends only to those activities performed by SNL or under its direction. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized herein.

  14. Immediate Effects of Angular Joint Mobilization (a New Concept of Joint Mobilization) on Pain, Range of Motion, and Disability in a Patient with Shoulder Adhesive Capsulitis: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Younghoon; Lee, GyuChang

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 53 Final Diagnosis: Adhesive capsulitis Symptoms: Pain • limited range of motion Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Manual therapy (joint mobilization) Specialty: Physical Therapy Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Adhesive capsulitis is a common disabling condition, with reviews reporting up to 5.3% of the population being affected, the burden placed upon individuals and healthcare services may therefore be considered substantial. For recovering the normal extensibility of the capsule in individuals with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder, passive stretching of the capsule through end-range mobilization has been suggested. Recently, the concept of joint mobilization into angular joint mobilization (AJM), which is rotational joint mobilization with joint axis shift, was proposed. This case report aimed to investigate the immediate effect of AJM on pain, range of motion (ROM), and disability in a patient with shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Case Report: The patient was a 53-year-old woman who was diagnosed with left shoulder adhesive capsulitis. Her left shoulder gradually stiffened, affecting functional activity. The patient attended 12 joint mobilization sessions over a period of six weeks (two times per week). The intervention consisted of rotary oscillations of the left shoulder, which were applied with overpressure and stops before the end of the pathological limit. After intervention, the patient reported 3/100 pain intensity on the visual analogue scale (VAS) (before versus after: 58 versus 3). Active ROM improved by 51° in flexion, 76.4° in abduction, 38.7° in external rotation, and 51.4° in active internal rotation. Passive ROM improved by 49° in flexion, 74.6° in abduction, 39.4° in external rotation, 51.4° in internal rotation. The total shoulder, pain and disability index (SPADI) score improved by 53.9%. Conclusions: The patient reacted positively to AJM, resulting in improved shoulder pain, ROM

  15. Effect of short range hydrodynamic on bimodal colloidal gel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal Gels and disordered arrested systems has been studied extensively during the past decades. Although, they have found their place in multiple industries such as cosmetic, food and so on, their physical principals are still far beyond being understood. The interplay between different types of interactions from quantum scale, Van der Waals interaction, to short range interactions, depletion interaction, and long range interactions such as electrostatic double layer makes this systems challenging from simulation point of view. Many authors have implemented different simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD) to capture better picture during phase separation of colloidal system with short range attractive force. However, BD is not capable to include multi-body hydrodynamic interaction and MD is limited by the computational resources and is limited to short time and length scales. In this presentation we used Core-modified dissipative particle dynamics (CM-DPD) with modified depletion potential, as a coarse-grain model, to address the gel formation process in short ranged-attractive colloidal suspensions. Due to the possibility to include and separate short and long ranged-hydrodynamic forces in this method we studied the effect of each of those forces on the final morphology and report one of the controversial question in this field on the effect of hydrodynamics on the cluster formation process on bimodal, soft-hard colloidal mixtures.

  16. [Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: February-April 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from February through April of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  17. Refuge Narrative Report: September - December 1954: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  18. Refuge Narrative Report: January - April 1961: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  19. Kenai National Moose Range: Narrative Report: January - December 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions, habitat...

  20. Izembek National Wildlife Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Izembek, Eastern Aleutians, Semidi, and Simeonof NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year. The report begins with...

  1. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: September - December 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by...

  2. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: September - December 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by...

  3. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: May - August 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  4. Refuge Narrative Report: January -- April, 1954: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  5. Refuge Narrative Report: September - December, 1956: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  6. [Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: August-October, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  7. Refuge Narrative Report: September -- December, 1961: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  8. Fort Peck Game Range: Quarterly report: February, March, April 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from February through April of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  9. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: September - December 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by...

  10. Izembek National Wildlife Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Izembek, Eastern Aleutians, Semidi, and Simeonof NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1978 calendar year. The report begins with...

  11. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: May - August 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  12. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: January - April 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by...

  13. Narrative report: Fort Peck Game Range: May - August 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  14. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: January - April, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1956. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Narrative report: Fort Peck Game Range: January - April 1948

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1948. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  16. Fort Peck Game Range: Narrative report: September - December, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1959. The report begins by...

  17. Fort Peck Game Range: January - April 1945: Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  18. Range Information Systems Management (RISM) Phase 1 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Harris, William G.; Nelson, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    RISM investigated alternative approaches, technologies, and communication network architectures to facilitate building the Spaceports and Ranges of the future. RISM started by document most existing US ranges and their capabilities. In parallel, RISM obtained inputs from the following: 1) NASA and NASA-contractor engineers and managers, and; 2) Aerospace leaders from Government, Academia, and Industry, participating through the Space Based Range Distributed System Working Group (SBRDSWG), many of whom are also; 3) Members of the Advanced Range Technology Working Group (ARTWG) subgroups, and; 4) Members of the Advanced Spaceport Technology Working Group (ASTWG). These diverse inputs helped to envision advanced technologies for implementing future Ranges and Range systems that builds on today s cabled and wireless legacy infrastructures while seamlessly integrating both today s emerging and tomorrow s building-block communication techniques. The fundamental key is to envision a transition to a Space Based Range Distributed Subsystem. The enabling concept is to identify the specific needs of Range users that can be solved through applying emerging communication tech

  19. Range Condition Assessment Report for Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Laboratory Ranges, Dahlgren, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    base like a small reef where organisms such as oysters, invertebrates, and algae colonize (NSWC 2005a). Other projectiles include sophisticated...primary game species for RSEPA RCA Report September 2010 Final 5-47 hunting includes white- tailed deer, wild turkey, quail, rabbit, dove, and...have dislodged many benthic organisms from the sampled material, thereby artificially depressing the number of collected organisms. It was

  20. Study on evaluation of photoelectric jamming effectiveness on ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jinxi; Yang, Haiqiang; Gao, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Lidar (Light Detection and Range) is a brand-new field and research hotspot. Ranging lidar is studied in this paper. Specifically, its basic working principle and photoelectric jamming mechanism are introduced. Then, the ranging error jamming success rate rule is developed for laser distance deception jamming. And the effectiveness evaluation of laser blinding jamming is based on the influence level on ranging accuracy and ranging function. The results have some reference value to evaluation of jamming test effectiveness.

  1. Arctic National Wildlife Range, 1962: Summer field work report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the summer field work outlined in this report was to determine the feasibility of hiking and back-packing as a recreational use of Arctic National...

  2. Sampling Number Effects in 2D and Range Imaging of Range-gated Acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Seong-Ouk; Park, Seung-Kyu; Baik, Sung-Hoon; Cho, Jai-Wan; Jeong, Kyung-Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we analyzed the number effects of sampling images for making a 2D image and a range image from acquired RGI images. We analyzed the number effects of RGI images for making a 2D image and a range image using a RGI vision system. As the results, 2D image quality was not much depended on the number of sampling images but on how much well extract efficient RGI images. But, the number of RGI images was important for making a range image because range image quality was proportional to the number of RGI images. Image acquiring in a monitoring area of nuclear industry is an important function for safety inspection and preparing appropriate control plans. To overcome the non-visualization problem caused by airborne obstacle particles, vision systems should have extra-functions, such as active illumination lightening through disturbance airborne particles. One of these powerful active vision systems is a range-gated imaging system. The vision system based on the range-gated imaging system can acquire image data from raining or smoking environments. Range-gated imaging (RGI) is a direct active visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Currently, the range-gated imaging technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The range-gated imaging system gets vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, a high intensity illuminant illuminates for ultra-short time and a highly sensitive image sensor is gated by ultra-short exposure time to only get the illumination light. Here, the illuminant illuminates objects by flashing strong light through airborne disturbance particles. Thus, in contrast to passive conventional vision systems, the RGI active vision technology robust for low-visibility environments.

  3. Adaptive optics instrument for long-range imaging. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, T.M.

    1998-06-01

    The science and history of imaging through a turbulent atmosphere is reviewed in detail. Traditional methods for reducing the effects of turbulence are presented. A simplified method for turbulence reduction called the Sheared Coherent Interferometric Photography (SCIP) method is presented. Implementation of SCIP is discussed along with experimental results. Limitations in the use of this method are discussed along with recommendations for future improvements.

  4. Observed Orbit Effects during Long Range Beam-Beam Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2012-01-01

    Possible limitations due to long range beam-beam effects at the LHC have been studied and are presented in this note. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, the crossing angles were reduced to enhance long range beam-beam effects. The analysis of the effects on the dynamic aperture and losses are documented in [1]. This note concentrates on the bunch-by-bunch orbit effects observed during the experiment.

  5. 8th Annual report 1999. UN ECE convention on long-range transboundary air pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleemola, S.; Forsius, M. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    The Integrated Monitoring Programme (ICP IM) is part of the Effects Monitoring Strategy under the UN ECE Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution. The main aim of ICP IM is to provide a framework to observe and understand the complex changes occurring in the external environment. This report summarizes the work carried out by the ICP IM Programme Centre and several collaborating institutes. The emphasis of the report is in the work done during the programme year 1998/99 including: - a short summary of previous data assessments - a short status report of the ICP IM activities, content of the IM database, and the present geographical coverage of the monitoring network - a documentation of the scientific strategies to carry out data assessment on two priority topics: - assessment of heavy metal pools and fluxes - assessment of cause-effect relationships for understorey vegetation - a description of the WATBAL-model for estimating monthly water balance components, including soil water fluxes. (orig.)

  6. Refuge Narrative Report: September to December 1948: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1948 September to December Narrative Report for the Kenai National Moose Range. The Kenai National Moose Range was established on December 16, 1941 after the...

  7. A Unified View of Finite Range Effects in Efimov Trimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platter, Lucas; Ji, Chen; Braaten, Eric; Phillips, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Three-body recombination in ultracold atoms is a process that can demonstrate the appearance of discrete scale invariance due to the Efimov effect. Different features in the scattering length dependent recombination rate are related by universal relations in the so-called zero-range limit. However, experiments are usually carried out with systems that display non-neglible corrections due to the finite range of interatomic interaction. We explain the origin of recently constructed universal relations for systems of three identical bosons interacting through a large scattering length. Range corrected universal relations are calculated using first order perturbation theory and are benchmarked against microcopic calculations that by construction contain finite range effects. We relate our results to work done in other frameworks and explain differences and similarities. We present also relations that are crucial for analyzing experiments in the future.

  8. Partial wave decomposition of finite-range effective tensor interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Davesne, D; Pastore, A; Navarro, J

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the properties of the finite-range tensor term associated with the Gogny and M3Y effective interactions. In particular, by using a partial wave decomposition of the equation of state of symmetric nuclear matter, we show how we can extract their tensor parameters directly from microscopic results based on bare nucleon-nucleon interactions. Furthermore, we show that the zero-range limit of both finite-range interactions has the form of the N3LO Skyrme pseudo-potential, which thus constitutes a reliable approximation in the density range relevant for finite nuclei. Finally, we use Brueckner-Hartree-Fock results to fix the tensor parameters for the three effective interactions.

  9. Refuge narrative report : May-August, 1960 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. [National Bison Range: Quarterly narrative report: August, September and October, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1945

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1945. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Annual Narrative Report : Calendar year 1979 : Kenai National Moose Range, Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report...

  18. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1950. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1946

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1946. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Refuge narrative report January 1 to April 30, 1963 : Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1955

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1955. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  15. National Bison Range Narrative report: Fiscal year 1974: July 1, 1973 to June 30, 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  16. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1944

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1944. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. [Narrative report: National Bison Range: November 1, 1941 to January 31, 1942

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from November, 1941 through January 1942. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Biological report: National Bison Range: Second quarter: August 1 , 1939 to October 31, 1939

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from August through October of 1939. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  19. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  20. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  2. [Biological narrative report: National Bison Range: February 1, 1941 to April 30, 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from February through April of 1941. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  3. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  4. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  6. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: May 1 to August 31, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  7. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1958

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1958. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  8. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  9. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1957. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  10. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: January 1 to April 30, 1956

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1956. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  11. Biological narrative report: May 1, 1939 to July 31, 1939: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through July of 1939. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  12. National Bison Range Narrative report: Fiscal year 1975: July 1, 1974 to June 30, 1975

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  13. National Bison Range: Refuge narrative report: September 1 to December 31, 1943

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1943. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  14. Effect of Tensor Range in Nuclear Two-Body Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feshbach, H.; Schwinger, J.; Harr, J. A.

    1949-11-01

    The interaction between neutron and proton in the triplet state is investigated, a wide variation in the values of both central and tensor ranges are included; the per cent D state in the deuteron and the effective triplet range have been computed; the results are applied tot he discussion of the magnetic moment of the deuteron, the photoelectric disintegration of the deuteron, and neutron-proton scattering.

  15. EFFECTS OF LONG-RANGE INTERACTIONS ON THE FERROELECTRIC FILM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴银忠; 李振亚

    2001-01-01

    The effect of long-range interactions on the spontaneous polarization and the Curie temperature of the ferroelectricfilm is investigated by use of the Landau theory. On the assumption that the nearest-n eighbour interaction remains constant, we find that the spontaneous polarization and the phase transition temperature increase with the enhancement of the long-range interactions. In the case of positive extrapolation length, the critical thickness of the ferroelectric film,in which a size-driven phase transition occurs, decreases with the enhancement of the long-range interactions.

  16. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  17. Perceptual effects of dynamic range compression in popular music recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    The belief that the use of dynamic range compression in music mastering deteriorates sound quality needs to be formally tested. In this study normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range...... compression. Surprisingly, the results failed to reveal any evidence of the effects of dynamic range compression on subjective preference or perceived depth cues. Perceptual data suggest that listeners are less sensitive than commonly believed to even high levels of compression. As measured in terms...... of differences in the peak-to-average ratio, compression has little perceptual effect other than increased loudness or clipping effects that only occur at high levels of compression. One explanation for the inconsistency between data and belief might result from the fact that compression is frequently...

  18. Extreme long range process effects characterization and compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiro, Thiago; Browning, Clyde; Thornton, Martin J.; Vannuffel, Cyril; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Hohle, Christoph; Tortai, Jean-Herve; Schiavone, Patrick

    2013-10-01

    Proximity Effects in electron beam lithography impact feature dimensions, pattern fidelity and uniformity. These effects are addressed using a mathematical model representing the radial exposure intensity distribution induced by a point electron source, commonly named as the Point Spread Function (PSF). PSF models are usually employed for predicting and compensating for effects up to 15μm. It is well known that there are also some process related phenomena that impact pattern uniformity that have a longer range, namely CMP effects, fogging, etc. Performing proximity effects corrections can result in lengthy run times as file size and pattern densities continue to increase exponentially per technology node. Running corrections for extreme long range phenomena becomes computational and file size prohibitive. Nevertheless, since extreme long range may reach up several millimeters, and new technology nodes require a high level of precision, a strategy for predicting and compensating these phenomena is crucial. In this paper a set of test patterns are presented in order to verify and calibrate the so called extreme long range effects in the electron beam lithography. Moreover, a strategy to compensate for extreme long range effects based on the pattern density is presented. Since the evaluation is based on a density map instead of the actual patterns, the computational effort is feasible. The proposed method may be performed off-line (in contrast to machine standard in-line correction). The advantage of employing off-line compensation relies on enhancing the employ of dose and/or geometry modulation. This strategy also has the advantage of being completely decoupled from other e-beam writer's internal corrections (like Fogging Effect Correction - FEC).

  19. Long-range boundary effects in simple fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwoudt, J. C.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Dorfman, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss long-range boundary effects in simple two- or three-dimensional fluids. These boundary effects are due to the existence of long-range correlations in nonequilibrium fluids and can be computed either by means of kinetic theory or phenomenological mode-coupling theories. In particular, we use kinetic theory to compute the stress tensor and heat flux vector for a fluid in a nonequilibrium steady state in a finite geometry and show that both the effective shear viscosity and effective heat conductivity have contributions due to the walls of the container that influence the behavior of the system far into the fluid. We also show that the mechanocaloric effect is present in the bulk of a three-dimensional fluid and that there are normal stresses in a fluid whenever the temperature gradient is nonzero.

  20. Long-range interaction effects on calcium-wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepseu, W. D.; Woafo, P.

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, numerical simulation of calcium waves in a network of cells coupled together by a paracrine signaling is investigated. The model takes into account the long-range interaction between cells due to the action of extracellular messengers, which provide links between first-neighbor cells, but also on cells located far away from the excited cell. When considering bidirectional coupling, the long-range interaction influences neither the frequency nor the amplitude of oscillations, contrary to one-directional coupling. The long-range interaction influences the speed of propagation of Ca2+ waves in the network and induces enlargement of the transition zone before the steady regime of propagation is attained. We also investigate the long-range effects on the colonization of a given niche by a pathogenic microorganism signal on calcium wave propagation in the network.

  1. Effects of Numerosity Range on Tactile and Visual Enumeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Zahira Z; Henik, Avishai

    2016-01-01

    Our study explores tactile enumeration using both hands and investigates the effects of numerosity range's (NR) on general enumeration. In Experiment 1, using custom-made vibro-tactile apparatus, we replicated results of Cohen, Naparstek, and Henik (2014, Acta Psychologica, 150C, 26-34) and again found a moderate increase in RT up to four stimuli and then a decrease for five stimuli. In Experiment 2, we used a within participants design and compared NR 1 to 5 and 1 to 10 in tactile and visual enumeration. The results showed that enumeration for NR 5 to 1 was faster than for NR 1 to 10, especially for numerosities four and five. Within NR 1 to 10, in the visual modality the subitizing range was 4, the counting range was from 5 to 9, and there was an end effect of 10 dots. In the tactile modality, when excluding one-hand arrangements, the subitizing range was 2, the counting range was from 3 to 5, there was an acceleration of counting from 5 and on, and there was an end effect for 10 stimuli that was stronger than for 10 visual stimuli. We suggest that NR influences enumeration and that number-hand association (i.e. resulting from finger counting) influences enumeration, resulting in faster counting. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. EFFECT OF VISIBLE RANGE ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATIONS ON ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeemi, Samina T Yousuf; Shaukat, Saleem Farooq; Azeemi, Khawaja Shamsuddin; Khan, Idrees; Mahmood, Khalid; Naz, Farah

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the agent responsible for a range of clinical diseases. With emerging antimicrobial resistance, other treatment options including solar/photo-therapy are becoming increasingly common. Visible Range Radiation Therapy/Colour Therapy is an emerging technique in the field of energy/vibrational medicine that uses visible spectrum of Electromagnetic Radiations to cure different diseases. In this study, our goal was to understand the effect of Visible Range Electromagnetic Radiations on E. coli (in vitro) and therefore find out the most appropriate visible range radiation for the treatment of diseases caused by E. coli. A total of 6 non-repetitive E. coli isolates were obtained from urine samples obtained from hospitalized patients with UTI. Single colony of E. coli was inoculated in 3 ml of Lysogeny Broth (LB) and 40 μl of this E. coli suspension was poured into each of the plastic tubes which were then irradiated with six different wavelengths in the visible region (Table. 1) after 18 hours with one acting as a control. The Optical Densities of these irradiated samples were then measured. Furthermore, scanning electron microscopy (TEFCAN ZEGA3) was carried out. The analysis of the microscopic and SEM images of irradiated E. coli samples with six different visible range radiations is representative of The fact that E. coli responded differently to every applied radiation in the visible region and the most profound inhibitory effects were that of 538nm Visible Range Radiation (Green) which proved to be bactericidal and 590nm Visible Range Radiation (yellow) which was bacteriostatic. The enhanced growth of E. coli with varying degrees was clearly observed in 610nm (orange), 644nm (red), 464nm (Purple) and 453nm (blue). It can be concluded that 538nm (Green) and 590nm (Yellow) can effectively be used for treating E. coli borne diseases.

  3. Effect of Wind on Long Range Propagation in Shallow Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ainslie, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Long range acoustic propagation in isothermal conditions is considered, involving multiple reflections from the sea surface. If the sea is calm there is almost perfect reflection and hence low loss. The effect of wind is to increase propagation loss due to the interaction with near-surface bubble cl

  4. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...

  5. Perceptual Effects of Dynamic Range Compression in Popular Music Recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortkjær, Jens; Walther-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    There is a widespread belief that the increasing use of dynamic range compression in music mastering (the loudnesswar) deteriorates sound quality but experimental evidence of perceptual effects is lacking. In this study, normal hearing listeners were asked to evaluate popular music recordings...... in original versions and in remastered versions with higher levels of dynamic range compression. Surprisingly, we found no evidence of preference for the less compressed music. We also failed to find differences in ratings of perceived "depth" between the original and more compressed audio. A low degree...... of response consistency between different presentations of the same music suggests that listeners are less sensitive to even high levels of dynamic range compression than often argued....

  6. From resonantly interacting fermions with effective range to neutron matter

    CERN Document Server

    Lacroix, Denis

    2016-01-01

    A density functional theory is proposed for strongly interacting fermions with arbitrary large negative scattering length. The functional has only two parameters that are directly fixed to reproduce the universal properties of unitary gas: the so-called "Bertsch parameter" $\\xi_0$ and a parameter $\\eta_e$ related to the possible influence of the effective range $r_e$ at infinite scattering length $a$. Using most recent quantum Monte-Carlo (QMC) estimates of these two parameters, it is shown that the functional properly reproduces the experimental measurements of interacting Fermi systems not only at unitarity but also away from this limit over a wide range of $(ak_F)^{-1}$ values. The functional is applied to obtain an expression of the Tan's contact parameter including the effect of $r_e$. Application is finally made to neutron matter. It is shown that most recent QMC results are well reproduced.

  7. Refuge narrative report 1972 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The...

  8. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-01

    This post-closure inspection report includes the results of inspections, maintenance and repair activities, and conclusions and recommendations for Calendar Year 2005 for nine Corrective Action Units located on the Tonopah Test Range , Nevada.

  9. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January - December 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range (includes satellite refuges: Hailstone, Halfbreed, Mason, Miller, Yellow Water, War...

  10. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January - December 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range (includes satellite refuges: Hailstone, Halfbreed, Mason, Miller, Yellow Water, War...

  11. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January - December 1967

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range (includes satellite refuges: Hailstone, Halfbreed, Mason, Miller, Yellow Water, War...

  12. National Bison Range, Ninepipe, Pablo and Swan River NWR's, Northwest Montana Wetlands: 1976 [Narrative report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for National Bison Range, Ninepipe NWR, Pablo NWR, Swan River NWR, and Northwest Montana Wetlands outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  13. Refuge narrative report 1969 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The...

  14. Refuge narrative report 1970 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The...

  15. Refuge narrative report 1975 : Kenai National Moose Range, Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The...

  16. Effects of standard and modified gravity on interplanetary ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the impact on the two-body range by several Newtonian and non-Newtonian dynamical effects for some Earth-planet pairs in view of the expected cm-level accuracy in future planned or proposed interplanetary ranging operations. The general relativistic gravitomagnetic Lense-Thirring effect should be modeled and solved-for in future, accurate ranging tests of Newtonian and post-Newtonian gravity because it falls within their measurability domain. It could a-priori "imprint" the determination of some of the target parameters of the tests considered. Moreover, the ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta and the Trans-Neptunian Objects (TNOs) act as sources of non-negligible systematic uncertainty on the larger gravitoelectric post-Newtonian signals from which it is intended to determine the parameters \\gamma and \\beta of the Parameterized Post Newtonian (PPN) formalism with very high precision (orders of magnitude better than the current 10^-4-10^-5 levels). Also other putative,...

  17. Effects of short range correlations on Ca isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Lalazissis, G A

    1996-01-01

    The effect of Short Range Correlations (SRC) on Ca isotopes is studied using a simple phenomenological model. Theoretical expressions for the charge (proton) form factors, densities and moments of Ca nuclei are derived. The role of SRC in reproducing the empirical data for the charge density differences is examined. Their influence on the depletion of the nuclear Fermi surface is studied and the fractional occupation probabilities of the shell model orbits of Ca nuclei are calculated. The variation of SRC as function of the mass number is also discussed.

  18. Long-range effects in electron scattering by polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrikant, Ilya I.

    2016-11-01

    We review long-range effects in electron collisions with polar molecules, starting with elastic scattering. We then go to rotationally and vibrationally inelastic processes and dissociative electron attachment. The last two are strongly affected by vibrational Feshbach resonances which have been observed and described theoretically in many systems from simple diatomic molecules to more complex polyatomics, biologically relevant molecules, and van der Waals clusters. We then review environmental effects which include electron interaction with molecules adsorbed on surfaces and molecules in cluster environments. We concentrate on physics rather than on listing results of ab initio calculations. With increasing complexity of targets and processes model approaches become more relevant. We demonstrate their success in the theoretical description of electron attachment to polyatomic molecules and to molecules in complex environments.

  19. The effects of tidal range on saltmarsh morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Guillaume; Mudd, Simon

    2017-04-01

    Saltmarshes are highly productive coastal ecosystems that act simultaneously as flood barriers, carbon storage, pollutant filters and nurseries. As halophytic plants trap suspended sediment and decay in the settled strata, innervated platforms emerge from the neighbouring tidal flats, forming sub-vertical scarps on their eroding borders and sub-horizontal pioneer zones in areas of seasonal expansion. These evolutions are subject to two contrasting influences: stochastically generated waves erode scarps and scour tidal flats, whereas tidally-generated currents transport sediment to and from the marsh through the channel network. Hence, the relative power of waves and tidal currents strongly influences saltmarsh evolution, and regional variations in tidal range yield marshes of differing morphologies. We analyse several sheltered saltmarshes to determine how their morphology reflects variations in tidal forcing. Using tidal, topographic and spectral data, we implement an algorithm based on the open-source software LSDTopoTools to automatically identify features such as marsh platforms, tidal flats, erosion scarps, pioneer zones and tidal channels on local Digital Elevation Models. Normalised geometric properties are then computed and compared throughout the spectrum of tidal range, highlighting a notable effect on channel networks, platform geometry and wave exposure. We observe that micro-tidal marshes typically display jagged outlines and multiple islands along with wide, shallow channels. As tidal range increases, we note the progressive disappearance of marsh islands and linearization of scarps, both indicative of higher hydrodynamic stress, along with a structuration of channel networks and the increase of levee volume, suggesting higher sediment input on the platform. Future research will lead to observing and modelling the evolution of saltmarshes under various tidal forcing in order to assess their resilience to environmental change.

  20. First report of Rhodnius montenegrensis (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae infection by Trypanosoma rangeli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionatas Ulises de Oliveira Meneguetti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study reports for the first time the infection of Rhodnius montenegrensis by Trypanosoma rangeli. Methods: The triatomines were manually collected in Attalea speciosa in the municipality of Buritis, Rondônia. The identification of the trypanosomatid species was confirmed by multiplex PCR. Results: All of the collected triatomines were R. montenegrensis. The analysis confirmed that all of the adults were infected with the epimastigote form of T. rangeli. Conclusions: This report of a new vector of T. rangeli raises a warning for the State of Rondônia because the simultaneous presence of T. rangeli with T. cruzi in the same geographic region enables the occurrence of mixed infections in hosts and vectors, which complicates the differential diagnosis.

  1. Effective field theory for long-range properties of bottomonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Gastão

    2017-03-01

    In this communication we present selected results from a recent study [N. Brambilla, G. Krein, J. Tarrús Castellà and A. Vairo, Phys. Rev. D 93, 054002 (2016)] of long-range properties of bottomonium. An analytical expression for the chromopolarizability of 1S bottomonium states is derived within the framework of potential nonrelativistic QCD (pNRQCD). Next, after integrating out the ultrasoft scale associated with the binding energy of bottomonium, the QCD trace anomaly is used to obtain the two-pion production amplitude for the chromopolarizability operator and the result is matched to a chiral effective field theory having bottomonium states and pions as degrees of freedom. We present results for the leading chiral logarithm correction to the mass of the 1S bottomonium and the van der Waals potential between two bottomonium states.

  2. Subleading Effects and the Field Range in Axion Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Parameswaran, Susha; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-01-01

    An attractive candidate for the inflaton is an axion slowly rolling down a flat potential protected by a perturbative shift symmetry. Realisations of this idea within large field, natural and chaotic inflation have been disfavoured by observations and are difficult to embed in string theory. We show that subleading, but significant non-perturbative corrections can superimpose sharp cliffs and gentle plateaus into the potential, whose overall effect is to enhance the number of e-folds of inflation. Sufficient e-folds are therefore achieved for smaller field ranges compared to the potential without such corrections. Thus, both single-field chaotic and natural inflation in UV complete theories like string theory, can be restored into the favour of current observations, with distinctive signatures. Tensor modes result un-observably small, but there is a large negative running of the spectral index. Remarkably, natural inflation can be achieved with a single field whose axion decay constant is sub-Planckian.

  3. Subleading effects and the field range in axion inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Susha; Tasinato, Gianmassimo; Zavala, Ivonne

    2016-04-01

    An attractive candidate for the inflaton is an axion slowly rolling down a flat potential protected by a perturbative shift symmetry. Realisations of this idea within large field, natural and monomial inflation have been disfavoured by observations and are difficult to embed in string theory. We show that subleading, but significant non-perturbative corrections can superimpose sharp cliffs and gentle plateaus into the potential, whose overall effect is to enhance the number of e-folds of inflation. Sufficient e-folds are therefore achieved for smaller field ranges compared to the potential without such corrections. Thus, both single-field natural and monomial inflation in UV complete theories like string theory, can be restored into the favour of current observations, with distinctive signatures. Tensor modes result un-observably small, but there is a large negative running of the spectral index. Remarkably, natural inflation can be achieved with a single field whose axion decay constant is sub-Planckian.

  4. Long-range spin Seebeck effect and acoustic spin pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Adachi, H; An, T; Ota, T; Toda, M; Hillebrands, B; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2011-10-01

    Imagine that a metallic wire is attached to a part of a large insulator, which itself exhibits no magnetization. It seems impossible for electrons in the wire to register where the wire is positioned on the insulator. Here we found that, using a Ni₈₁Fe₁₉/Pt bilayer wire on an insulating sapphire plate, electrons in the wire recognize their position on the sapphire. Under a temperature gradient in the sapphire, surprisingly, the voltage generated in the Pt layer is shown to reflect the wire position, although the wire is isolated both electrically and magnetically. This non-local voltage is due to the coupling of spins and phonons: the only possible carrier of information in this system. We demonstrate this coupling by directly injecting sound waves, which realizes the acoustic spin pumping. Our finding provides a persuasive answer to the long-range nature of the spin Seebeck effect, and it opens the door to 'acoustic spintronics' in which sound waves are exploited for constructing spin-based devices.

  5. Electron scattering from neon via effective range theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedus, Kamil, E-mail: kamil@fizyka.umk.pl [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    Elastic cross-sections for electron scattering on neon from 0 energy up to 16 eV are analyzed by an analytical approach to the modified effective range theory (MERT). It is shown that energy and angular variations of elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections can be accurately parameterized by six MERT coefficients up to the energy threshold for the first Feshbach resonance. MERT parameters are determined empirically by numerical comparison with large collection of available experimental data of elastic total (integral) cross-sections. The present analysis is validated against numerous electron beams and swarm experiments. The comparison of derived MERT parameters with those found for other noble gases, helium, argon and krypton, is done. The derived scattering length (for the s-partial wave) in neon, 0.227a0, agrees well with recent theories; it is small but, differently from Ar and Kr, still positive. Analogue parameters for the p-wave and the d-wave are negative and positive respectively for all the four gases compared. (author)

  6. Effects of GPS sampling intensity on home range analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey J. Kolodzinski; Lawrence V. Tannenbaum; David A. Osborn; Mark C. Conner; W. Mark Ford; Karl V. Miller

    2010-01-01

    The two most common methods for determining home ranges, minimum convex polygon (MCP) and kernel analyses, can be affected by sampling intensity. Despite prior research, it remains unclear how high-intensity sampling regimes affect home range estimations. We used datasets from 14 GPS-collared, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to describe...

  7. Modelling the effect of climate change on species ranges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerke, C.J.; Alkemade, J.R.M.

    2003-01-01

    Three main types of models can be used to understand and predict climate-related range shifts. Equilibrium models predict potential future distributions from the current climate envelope of a species, but do not take migration constraints into account. They show that future range changes can be

  8. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-03-30

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2010 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  9. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2013-01-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2012 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  10. NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2015 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  11. Report: Physics Constrained Stochastic Statistical Models for Extended Range Environmental Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    for Extended Range Environmental Prediction Andrew J. Majda New York University Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences 251 Mercer Street...UCLA), and Dimitri Giannakis ( Courant Institute) with their post docs and Ph.D. students: A. Reemergence Mechanisms for North Pacific Sea Ice...ES) New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences,251 Mercer Street,New York,NY,10012 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9

  12. 10-decade wide-range neutron-monitoring system. Final test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, W.K.

    1970-10-01

    The objective of Project Agreement 49 was to design, fabricate, test, and evaluate under actual nuclear reactor operating conditions, one prototype counting-Campbelling wide-range type thermal neutron flux measurement channel. This report describes the basic system designed for PA 49, and describes and presents the results of tests conducted on the system. Individual module descriptions and schematics are contained in the instruction manual which was issued with the system.

  13. A range-rate extraction unit for determining Doppler effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Active ranging technique devised for VHF or S-band radar systems divides target Doppler frequency by counter-generated number that is proportional to transmitting frequency, thus producing target velocity data in terms of speed and distance relative to target transponder.

  14. Effects of dynamic-range compression on temporal acuity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, Alan; Jepsen, Morten Løve; Epp, Bastian

    2016-01-01

    processing, temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) and “supra-threshold” modulation-depth discrimination (MDD) thresholds were obtained in normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners with and without wide-dynamic range compression (WDRC). The TMTFs were obtained using tonal carriers of 1...

  15. Orthogonal Range Reporting: Query Lower Bounds, Optimal Structures in 3-d, and Higher Dimensional Improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Arge, Lars Allan; Larsen, Kasper Dalgaard

    2010-01-01

    Orthogonal range reporting is the problem of storing a set of n points in d-dimensional space, such that the k points in an axis-orthogonal query box can be reported efficiently. While the 2-d version of the problem was completely characterized in the pointer machine model more than two decades ago...... data structure for the d-dimensional orthogonal range reporting problem in the pointer machine model of computation that uses S(n) space must spend Ω((log n/ log(S(n)/n))⌊d/2⌋--1) time to answer queries. Thus, if S(n)/n is poly-logarithmic, then the query time is at least Ω((log n/ log log n)⌊d/2......) to Ω((log n/ log log n)2 + k) somewhere between three and six dimensions. Finally, we show that our techniques also lead to improved structures for point location in rectilinear subdivisions, that is, the problem of storing a set of n disjoint d-dimensional axis-orthogonal rectangles...

  16. Summary Report on the SAE 2016 Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curran, Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Campbell, Russ [SRA International, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The SAE 2016 Range Extenders for Electric Vehicles Symposium was a 2-day technical meeting focused on the role of advanced internal combustion engines (ICEs) and other novel energy converter technologies for extending the range of electric vehicles (EVs). The first-of-its-kind symposium was notable for focusing solely on the range extender (REx) technologies and not the EVs. The technical program featured presentations from international leaders from industry, government, national laboratories, and academia. The opening keynote presentations covered a broad range of topics including consumer behavior, policy implications, regulatory considerations, and REx architectures as enablers for advanced technologies. The technical sessions focused on an array of REx technologies including conventional ICEs, as well as less conventional or emerging technologies such as microturbines, fuel cells, low-temperature combustion engines, and aluminum-air batteries. The symposium included two panel sessions. The trend toward increasing vehicle electrification and the changing role of ICEs and other auxiliary power unit technologies for use as REx’s is leading to new research and design development needs. The symposium captured the interest of the industry and research communities in exploring the opportunities and challenges associated with REx’s for EVs. This report includes key takeaways, summarized below, and draft notes for each presentation and panel discussion.

  17. Femoroacetabular impingement and its implications on range of motion: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bloem Rolf M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Femoroacetabular impingement leads to limited hip motion, pain and progressive damage to the labrum. Assessment of the amount and location of excessive ossification can be difficult, and removal does not always lead to pain relief and an increase of function. One of the challenges ahead is to discover why certain cases have poor outcomes. Case presentation The technical and clinical results of two consecutive arthroscopic shavings of an osseous cam protrusion are described in our patient, a 50-year-old Caucasian man with complaints of femoroacetabular impingement. At 12 weeks after the first arthroscopic shaving, our patient still experienced pain. Using a range of motion simulation system based on computed tomography images the kinematics of his hip joint were analyzed. Bone that limited range of motion was removed in a second arthroscopic procedure. At six months post-operatively our patient is almost pain free and has regained a range of motion to a functional level. Conclusion This case demonstrates the relevance of range of motion simulation when the outcome of primary arthroscopic management is unsatisfactory. Such simulations may aid clinicians in determining the gain of a second operation. This claim is supported by the correlation of the simulations with clinical outcome, as shown in this case report.

  18. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-03-19

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2008 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following ten CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR)

  19. Dynamical effects of General Relativity on the satellite-to-satellite range and range-rate in the GRACE mission

    CERN Document Server

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We numerically investigate the impact of the General Theory of Relativity (GTR) on the satellite-to-satellite range \\rho and range-rate \\dot\\rho of the twin GRACE A/B spacecrafts through their dynamical equations of motion. The present-day accuracies in measuring such observables are \\sigma_\\rho <= 1-10 micron, \\sigma_\\dot\\rho <= 1 micron s^-1. Studies for a follow-on of such a mission points toward a range-rate accuracy of the order of \\sigma_\\dot\\rho = 1 nm s^-1 or better. We also compute the dynamical range and range-rate perturbations caused by the first six zonal harmonic coefficients J_L, L=2,3,4,5,6,7$ of the classical multipolar expansion of the terrestrial gravitational potential in order to evaluate their aliasing impact on the relativistic effects. Conversely, we also quantitatively assessed the possible a-priori \\virg{imprinting} of GTR itself, not solved-for in all the GRACE-based Earth's gravity models produced so far, on the estimated values of the low degree zonals of the geopotential. T...

  20. Indoor radiation mapping using the Laser Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS). Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear facilities require characterization and documentation of the results as part of planning and decision-making for decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) projects and to release areas that have been cleaned up. Conducting radiation surveys of indoor and outdoor surfaces and generating accurate survey reports is an important component of the D and D program. The Laser Assisted Ranging and Data System (LARADS) is a characterization technology that provides real-time data on the location and concentration levels of radiological contamination. The system can be utilized with a number of available detection instruments and can be integrated with existing data analysis and mapping software technologies to generate superior quality survey data reports. This innovative technology is competitive with baseline technologies in terms of cost and survey times, but is much more flexible and provides more useful reports. The system also has the capability of electronically logging survey data, making it easy to store and retrieve. Such data are scientifically derived and not subject to interpretation. The LARADS is an extremely attractive alternative to manually generated survey data reports.

  1. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvas, A. J. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Test Site; Lantow, Tiffany A. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Test Site

    2015-03-25

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2014 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs; CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix D. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 28, 2014. Maintenance was required at CAU 407. Animal burrows were backfilled and erosion repairs were performed. Vegetation monitoring was performed at CAU 407 in June 2014. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix E.

  2. Long-Range Coulomb Effect in Intense Laser-Driven Photoelectron Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Wei; Hao, Xiaolei; Chen, Yongju; Yu, Shaogang; Xu, Songpo; Wang, Yanlan; Sun, Renping; Lai, Xuanyang; Wu, Chengyin; Gong, Qihuang; He, Xiantu; Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jing

    2016-06-01

    In strong field atomic physics community, long-range Coulomb interaction has for a long time been overlooked and its significant role in intense laser-driven photoelectron dynamics eluded experimental observations. Here we report an experimental investigation of the effect of long-range Coulomb potential on the dynamics of near-zero-momentum photoelectrons produced in photo-ionization process of noble gas atoms in intense midinfrared laser pulses. By exploring the dependence of photoelectron distributions near zero momentum on laser intensity and wavelength, we unambiguously demonstrate that the long-range tail of the Coulomb potential (i.e., up to several hundreds atomic units) plays an important role in determining the photoelectron dynamics after the pulse ends.

  3. The size and range effect: lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions of electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ager-Wick Ellingsen, Linda; Singh, Bhawna; Hammer Strømman, Anders

    2016-05-01

    The primary goal of this study is to investigate the effect of increasing battery size and driving range to the environmental impact of electric vehicles (EVs). To this end, we compile cradle-to-grave inventories for EVs in four size segments to determine their climate change potential. A second objective is to compare the lifecycle emissions of EVs to those of conventional vehicles. For this purpose, we collect lifecycle emissions for conventional vehicles reported by automobile manufacturers. The lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions are calculated per vehicle and over a total driving range of 180 000 km using the average European electricity mix. Process-based attributional LCA and the ReCiPe characterisation method are used to estimate the climate change potential from the hierarchical perspective. The differently sized EVs are compared to one another to find the effect of increasing the size and range of EVs. We also point out the sources of differences in lifecycle emissions between conventional- and electric vehicles. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis assesses the change in lifecycle emissions when electricity with various energy sources power the EVs. The sensitivity analysis also examines how the use phase electricity sources influences the size and range effect.

  4. Waterfowl Production Areas Under the administration of the National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1981

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1981 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  5. Waterfowl Production Areas Under the administration of the National Bison Range Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for the National Bison Range outlines Refuge accomplishments for the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with an introduction to the...

  6. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on spinal range of motion: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millan Mario

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT has been shown to have an effect on spine-related pain, both clinically and in experimentally induced pain. However, it is unclear if it has an immediate noticeable biomechanical effect on spinal motion that can be measured in terms of an increased range of motion (ROM. Objective To assess the quality of the literature and to determine whether or not SMT is associated with an immediate increase in ROM. Design A systematic critical literature review. Method Systematic searches were performed in Pubmed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE using terms relating to manipulation, movement and the spine. Selection of articles was made according to specific criteria by two independent reviewers. Two checklists were created based on the needs of the present review. Articles were independently reviewed by two reviewers. Articles were given quality scores and the data synthesized for each region treated in the literature. Findings were summarized in tables and reported in a narrative fashion. Results Fifteen articles were retained reporting on experiments on the neck, lumbar spine, hip and jaw. The mean quality score was 71/100 (ranges 33/100 - 92/100. A positive effect of SMT was reported in both studies where mouth opening was assessed after cervical manipulation. In five of the nine studies on cervical ROM a positive effect was reported, whereas the remaining four studies did not show improvement. None of the three studies of the lumbar spine showed an effect of SMT on lumbar ROMs and one study of sacroiliac manipulation reported no effect on the ROM of the hip joint. In relation to the quality score, the seven highest ranked studies, showed significant positive effects of SMT on ROM. Continuing down the list, the other studies reported no significant differences in the outcomes between groups. Conclusion SMT seems sometimes to have a small effect on ROM, at least in the cervical spine. Further research

  7. Short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin on gelatin-based composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Liming; Xu, Yongbin; Liang, Weijie; Li, Xinying; Li, Defu; Mu, Changdao

    2016-11-01

    Genipin is an ideal cross-linking agent in biomedical applications, which can undergo ring-opening polymerization in alkaline condition. The polygenipin can create short-range and long-range intermolecular cross-linking between protein chains. In this article, the polygenipin with different degree of polymerization was successfully prepared and used to fix gelatin composite materials. The short-range and long-range cross-linking effects of polygenipin were systematically studied. The results show that the composite materials present porous structure with tunable pore sizes in the gel state, which can be easily controlled by adjusting the degree of polymerization of polygenipin. Long-range cross-linking can increase the pore size of the gel. However, during the drying process, the composite films cross-linked by polygenipin with higher degree of polymerization shrank to smaller size to create more compact structure, resulting in the improvement of water resistance properties, thermal stability, tensile strength, and darker color for the composite films. It is interesting that the composite films can partly swell to the original gel structure when in contact with water and saturated water vapor. All the composite films have excellent barrier properties against UV light. However, the compatibility of gelatin and polygenipin is reduced when the degree of polymerization of polygenipin increases to a certain extent, which will result in the formation of phase separation structure. The obtained composite films are ideal candidates for food and pharmaceutical packaging materials. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2712-2722, 2016.

  8. Mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hase, Yoshihiro, E-mail: hase.yoshihiro@jaea.go.jp [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay [Ion Beam Mutagenesis Research Group, Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2012-03-01

    To gain insight into the mutagenic effects of accelerated heavy ions in plants, the mutagenic effects of carbon ions near the range end (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 425 keV/{mu}m) were compared with the effects of carbon ions penetrating the seeds (mean LET: 113 keV/{mu}m). Mutational analysis by plasmid rescue of Escherichia coli rpsL from irradiated Arabidopsis plants showed a 2.7-fold increase in mutant frequency for 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions, whereas no enhancement of mutant frequency was observed for carbon ions near the range end. This suggested that carbon ions near the range end induced mutations that were not recovered by plasmid rescue. An Arabidopsis DNA ligase IV mutant, deficient in non-homologous end-joining repair, showed hyper-sensitivity to both types of carbon-ion irradiation. The difference in radiation sensitivity between the wild type and the repair-deficient mutant was greatly diminished for carbon ions near the range end, suggesting that these ions induce irreparable DNA damage. Mutational analysis of the Arabidopsis GL1 locus showed that while the frequency of generation of glabrous mutant sectors was not different between the two types of carbon-ion irradiation, large deletions (>{approx}30 kb) were six times more frequently induced by carbon ions near the range end. When 352 keV/{mu}m neon ions were used, these showed a 6.4 times increase in the frequency of induced large deletions compared with the 113 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. We suggest that the proportion of large deletions increases with LET in plants, as has been reported for mammalian cells. The nature of mutations induced in plants by carbon ions near the range end is discussed in relation to mutation detection by plasmid rescue and transmissibility to progeny.

  9. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2012-02-21

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2011 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (3) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (4) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (5) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C, field notes are included in Appendix D, and photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 3 and 4, 2011. Maintenance was performed at CAU 424, CAU 453, and CAU 487. At CAU 424, two surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 could not be located during the inspection. The two monuments were located and marked with lava rock on July 13, 2011. At CAU 453, there was evidence of animal burrowing. Animal burrows were backfilled on July 13, 2011. At CAU 487, one use restriction warning sign was missing, and wording was faded on the remaining signs. A large animal burrow was also present. The signs were replaced, and the animal burrow was backfilled on July 12, 2011. As a best management practice, the use restriction warning signs at CAU 407 were replaced with standard Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order signs on July 13, 2011. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2011, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvas, A. J.

    2014-03-03

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2013 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs: • CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) • CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) • CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) • CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) • CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. Photographs taken during inspections are included in Appendix E. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 14, 2013. Maintenance was performed at CAU 400, CAU 424, and CAU 453. At CAU 400, animal burrows were backfilled. At CAU 424, erosion repairs were completed at Landfill Cell A3-3, subsidence was repaired at Landfill Cell A3-4, and additional lava rock was placed in high-traffic areas to mark the locations of the surface grade monuments at Landfill Cell A3-3 and Landfill Cell A3-8. At CAU 453, two areas of subsidence were repaired and animal burrows were backfilled. Vegetation monitoring was performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill and CAU 407 in June 2013. The vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F.

  11. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

    2009-01-01

    The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

  12. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  13. Long-range weather prediction and prevention of climate catastrophes: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira, K; Caravan, G; Govindasamy, B; Grossman, A; Hyde, R; Ishikawa, M; Ledebuhr, A; Leith, C; Molenkamp, C; Teller, E; Wood, L

    1999-08-18

    As the human population of Earth continues to expand and to demand an ever-higher quality-of-life, requirements for ever-greater knowledge--and then control--of the future of the state of the terrestrial biosphere grow apace. Convenience of living--and, indeed, reliability of life itself--become ever more highly ''tuned'' to the future physical condition of the biosphere being knowable and not markedly different than the present one, Two years ago, we reported at a quantitative albeit conceptual level on technical ways-and-means of forestalling large-scale changes in the present climate, employing practical means of modulating insolation and/or the Earth's mean albedo. Last year, we reported on early work aimed at developing means for creating detailed, high-fidelity, all-Earth weather forecasts of two weeks duration, exploiting recent and anticipated advances in extremely high-performance digital computing and in atmosphere-observing Earth satellites bearing high-technology instrumentation. This year, we report on recent progress in both of these areas of endeavor. Preventing the commencement of large-scale changes in the current climate presently appears to be a considerably more interesting prospect than initially realized, as modest insolation reductions are model-predicted to offset the anticipated impacts of ''global warming'' surprisingly precisely, in both space and time. Also, continued study has not revealed any fundamental difficulties in any of the means proposed for insolation modulation and, indeed, applicability of some of these techniques to other planets in the inner Solar system seems promising. Implementation of the high-fidelity, long-range weather-forecasting capability presently appears substantially easier with respect to required populations of Earth satellites and atmospheric transponders and data-processing systems, and more complicated with respect to transponder lifetimes in the actual

  14. Long-range Weather Prediction and Prevention of Climate Catastrophes: A Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, K.; Caravan, G.; Govindasamy, B.; Grossman, A.; Hyde, R.; Ishikawa, M.; Ledebuhr, A.; Leith, C.; Molenkamp, C.; Teller, E.; Wood, L.

    1999-08-18

    As the human population of Earth continues to expand and to demand an ever-higher quality-of-life, requirements for ever-greater knowledge--and then control--of the future of the state of the terrestrial biosphere grow apace. Convenience of living--and, indeed, reliability of life itself--become ever more highly ''tuned'' to the future physical condition of the biosphere being knowable and not markedly different than the present one. Two years ago, we reported at a quantitative albeit conceptual level on technical ways-and-means of forestalling large-scale changes in the present climate, employing practical means of modulating insolation and/or the Earth's mean albedo. Last year, we reported on early work aimed at developing means for creating detailed, high-fidelity, all-Earth weather forecasts of two weeks duration, exploiting recent and anticipated advances in extremely high-performance digital computing and in atmosphere-observing Earth satellites bearing high-technology instrumentation. This year, we report on recent progress in both of these areas of endeavor. Preventing the commencement of large-scale changes in the current climate presently appears to be a considerably more interesting prospect than initially realized, as modest insolation reductions are model-predicted to offset the anticipated impacts of ''global warming'' surprisingly precisely, in both space and time. Also, continued study has not revealed any fundamental difficulties in any of the means proposed for insolation modulation and, indeed, applicability of some of these techniques to other planets in the inner Solar system seems promising. Implementation of the high-fidelity, long-range weather-forecasting capability presently appears substantially easier with respect to required populations of Earth satellites and atmospheric transponders and data-processing systems, and more complicated with respect to transponder lifetimes in the actual atmosphere; overall, the enterprise seems more

  15. Quality Factor Effect on the Wireless Range of Microstrip Patch Antenna Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Daliri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently introduced passive wireless strain sensors based on microstrip patch antennas have shown great potential for reliable health and usage monitoring in aerospace and civil industries. However, the wireless interrogation range of these sensors is limited to few centimeters, which restricts their practical application. This paper presents an investigation on the effect of circular microstrip patch antenna (CMPA design on the quality factor and the maximum practical wireless reading range of the sensor. The results reveal that by using appropriate substrate materials the interrogation distance of the CMPA sensor can be increased four-fold, from the previously reported 5 to 20 cm, thus improving considerably the viability of this type of wireless sensors for strain measurement and damage detection.

  16. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2006 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 9, 2006, May 31, 2006, and November 15, 2006. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2006, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 400, CAU 407, CAU 426, CAU 453, and CAU 487 in 2006. During the May inspection of CAU 400, it was identified that the east and west sections of chickenwire fencing beyond the standard fencing were damaged; they were repaired in June 2006. Also in June 2006, the southeast corner fence post and one warning sign at CAU 407 were reinforced and reattached, the perimeter fencing adjacent to the gate at CAU 426 was tightened, and large animal

  17. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, For Calendar Year 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-06-01

    This report provides the results of the semiannual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2007 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following nine CAUs: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR); (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2, 6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). In a letter from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) dated December 5, 2006, NDEP concurred with the request to reduce the frequency of post-closure inspections of CAUs at TTR to an annual frequency. This letter is included in Attachment B. Post-closure inspections were conducted on May 15-16, 2007. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in May 2007, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection at CAU 453 were backfilled on August 1, 2007. At this time, the TTR post-closure site inspections should continue as

  18. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-05-28

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed Corrective Action Unit (CAU) sites located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2009 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following seven CAUs: · CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR) · CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR) · CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR) · CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR) · CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR) · CAU 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (TTR) · CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) The annual post-closure inspections were conducted May 5–6, 2009. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports. The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Attachment B, with the exception of CAU 400. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Attachment C, the field notes are included in Attachment D, and the site photographs are included in Attachment E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2009, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Attachment F. Maintenance was performed at CAU 453. Animal burrows observed during the annual inspection were backfilled, and a depression was restored to grade on June 25, 2009. Post-closure site inspections should continue as scheduled. Vegetation survey inspections have been conducted annually at CAUs 400, 404, 407, and 426. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is recommended at the CAU 400 Bomblet Pit and CAU 426, which have been successfully revegetated. Discontinuation of vegetation surveys is also recommended at CAU 404, which has been changed to an administrative closure with no inspections required. Vegetation

  19. Continuum and Symmetry-Conserving Effects in Drip-line Nuclei Using Finite-range Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Schunck, N

    2007-01-01

    We report the first calculations of nuclear properties near the drip-lines using the spherical Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov mean-field theory with a finite-range force supplemented by continuum and particle number projection effects. Calculations were carried out in a basis made of the eigenstates of a Woods-Saxon potential computed in a box, thereby garanteeing that continuum effects were properly taken into account. Projection of the self-consistent solutions on good particle number was carried out after variation, and an approximation of the variation after projection result was used. We give the position of the drip-lines and examine neutron densities in neutron-rich nuclei. We discuss the sensitivity of nuclear observables upon continuum and particle-number restoration effects.

  20. Johnson Space Center's Free Range Bicycle Program.- Fall 2015 Intern Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Stockton, Willem

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center is a big place, encompassing 1,620 acres and more than a hundred buildings. Furthermore, there are reportedly 15 thousand employees, all of which have somewhere to be. To facilitate the movement of all these people JSC has historically relied on human power. Pedaling their way towards deep space, bicycles have been the go to method. Currently there are about 200 Free Range Bicycles at JSC. Free Range Bicycles belong to nobody, except NASA, and are available for anybody to use. They are not to be locked or hidden (although frequently are) and the intention is that there will always be a bike to hop on to get where you're going (although it may not be the bike you rode in on). Although not without its own shortcomings, the Free Range Bicycle Program has continued to provide low cost, simple transportation for NASA's JSC. In addition to the approximately 200 Free Range Bicycles, various larger divisions (like engineering) will often buy a few dozen bikes for their team members to use or individuals will bring their own personal bike to either commute or use on site. When these bicycles fall into disrepair or are abandoned (from retirees etc) they become a problem at JSC. They are an eye sore, create a safety hazard and make it harder to find a working bike in a time of need. The Free Range Program hopes to address this first problem by "tagging out" abandoned or out of service bicycles. A bright orange "DO NOT OPERATE" tag is placed on the bike and given a serial number for tracking purposes. See picture to the right. If the bike has an active owner with intentions to repair the bike the bottom of the tag has instructions for how to claim the abandoned bicycle. After being tagged the owner of the bicycle has 30 days to claim the bicycle and either haul it off site or get it repaired (and labeled) in accordance with Johnson's Bicycle Policy. If the abandoned bicycle is not claimed within 30 days it becomes the property of the Government. The

  1. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-07-01

    This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 499: Hydrocarbon Spill Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada (US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2001). CAU 499 consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS): RG-25-001-RD24: Radar 24 Diesel Spill Site which is approximately 4.0 kilometers (2.5 miles) southwest of the Area 3 Compound at the end of Avenue 24. The Hydrocarbon Spill Site is a diesel fuel release site that is assumed to have been caused by numerous small historical over-fillings, spills, and leaks from an above-ground storage tank (AST) over a period of approximately 36 years. The tank was located on the east side of Building 24-50 on the TTR.

  3. Study report recommendations for the next generation Range Safety System (RSS) Integrated Receiver/Decoder (IRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Robert H.

    1992-01-01

    The Integrated Receiver/Decoder (IRD) currently used on the Space Shuttle was designed in the 1980 and prior time frame. Over the past 12 years, several parts have become obsolete or difficult to obtain. As directed by the Marshall Space Flight Center, a primary objective is to investigate updating the IRD design using the latest technology subsystems. To take advantage of experience with the current designs, an analysis of failures and a review of discrepancy reports, material review board actions, scrap, etc. are given. A recommended new design designated as the Advanced Receiver/Decoder (ARD) is presented. This design uses the latest technology components to simplify circuits, improve performance, reduce size and cost, and improve reliability. A self-test command is recommended that can improve and simplify operational procedures. Here, the new design is contrasted with the old. Possible simplification of the total Range Safety System is discussed, as is a single-step crypto technique that can improve and simplify operational procedures.

  4. Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, Hohenfels Training Area, Germany: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Hinchman, R.R.; Johnson, D.O. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.); Severinghaus, W.D. (Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)); Brent, J.J. (Army Construction Engineering Research Lab., Champaign, IL (United States))

    1991-11-01

    More than 30 years of intensive and continual tactical training has caused extensive environmental damage at the US Army Hohenfels Training Area in Germany. The Range 8C Rehabilitation Demonstration Project, followed by a three-year monitoring effort, was conducted to develop and evaluate the environmental and economic effectiveness of seven revegetation and four erosion control prescriptions implemented at a 16-ha site. The point-intercept method was used to measure the types and amounts of vegetation established and the changes in the vegetative community during three years of military use on the seven areas treated with revegetation prescriptions. Field observations were made to determine the suitability and durability of four types of erosion control structures. Soil fertility and a source of seed appeared to be the most limiting factors in establishing vegetation, while seedbed preparation had only a minor influence. Grasses appeared to be more resistant to vehicle traffic than did other types of vegetation. Because grassed waterways were used as roads by military vehicles and a system of graded terraces was expensive, these erosion control prescriptions were unsuitable and uneconomical for use on training areas. Low-cost riprap waterbars and porous check dams slowed the velocity of runoff, trapped sediments, and were durable. Recommendations were formulated to improve the environmental and economic effectiveness of future rehabilitation efforts on tactical training areas.

  5. POST-CLOSURE INSPECTION REPORT FOR THE TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-04-01

    This Post-Closure Inspection Report provides an analysis and summary of the semi-annual inspections conducted at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) during Calendar Year 2004. The report includes the inspection and/or repair activities completed at the following nine Corrective Action Units (CAUs) located at TTR, Nevada: (1) CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); (2) CAU 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (TTR); (3) CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); (4) CAU 423: Area 3 Underground Discharge Point, Building 0360 (TTR) (5) CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); (6) CAU 426: Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (TTR); (7) CAU 427: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2,6 (TTR); (8) CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and (9) CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR). Site inspections were conducted on July 7,2004, and November 9-10,2004. All inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved Closure Reports (CRs). The post-closure inspection plan for each CAU is included in Appendix B, with the exception of CAU 400 and CAU 423. CAU 400 does not require post-closure inspections, but inspections of the vegetation and fencing are conducted as a best management practice. In addition, post-closure inspections are not currently required at CAU 423; however, the CR is being revised to include inspection requirements. The inspection checklists for each site inspection are included in Appendix C, the field notes are included in Appendix D, and the site photographs are included in Appendix E. Vegetation monitoring of CAU 400, CAU 404, CAU 407, and CAU 426 was performed in June 2004, and the vegetation monitoring report is included in Appendix F. In addition, topographic survey results of two repaired landfill cells in CAU 424 are included in Appendix G. Maintenance and/or repairs were performed at the CAU 400 Five Points Landfill, CAU 407, CAU 424, CAU 427, and CAU 487. CAU 400 repairs included mending the fence, reseeding of a flood damaged area, and

  6. Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range and Nunivak National Wildlife Refuge Narrative report : January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range and Nunivak National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar...

  7. Quarterly report of wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from January 1, 1936 to March 31, 1936: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1936. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  8. Narrative report FY 1977 for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range and Hailstone, Halfbreed, Lake Mason & War Horse Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1977 calendar year....

  9. Quarterly report on wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from April 1, 1936 to June 30, 1936: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between April and June, 1936. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  10. Quarterly report on wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from July 1, 1936 to September 30, 1936: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1936. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  11. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: October 1, 1938 to December 31, 1938: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1938. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  12. Quarterly report of wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: April 1, 1937 to June 30, 1937: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between April and June, 1937. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  13. Quarterly report of wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: January 1, 1939 to March 31, 1939: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1939. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  14. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: July 1, 1938 to September 30, 1938: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1938. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  15. Quarterly report of wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto from January 1, 1937 to March 31, 1937: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1937. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  16. Quarterly report on wildlife and activities appurtenant thereto: July 1, 1937 to September 30, 1937: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1937. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  17. Mutualist-mediated effects on species' range limits across large geographic scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Michelle E; McIntyre, Patrick J; Strauss, Sharon Y

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the processes determining species range limits is central to predicting species distributions under climate change. Projected future ranges are extrapolated from distribution models based on climate layers, and few models incorporate the effects of biotic interactions on species' distributions. Here, we show that a positive species interaction ameliorates abiotic stress, and has a profound effect on a species' range limits. Combining field surveys of 92 populations, 10 common garden experiments throughout the range, species distribution models and greenhouse experiments, we show that mutualistic fungal endophytes ameliorate drought stress and broaden the geographic range of their native grass host Bromus laevipes by thousands of square kilometres (~ 20% larger) into drier habitats. Range differentiation between fungal-associated and fungal-free grasses was comparable to species-level range divergence of congeners, indicating large impacts on range limits. Positive biotic interactions may be underappreciated in determining species' ranges and species' responses to future climates across large geographic scales.

  18. End-range mobilization techniques in adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder joint: a multiple-subject case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.M.; Obermann, W.R.; Burger, B.J.; Kok, G.J.; Rozing, P.M.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of end-range mobilization techniques in the management of patients with adhesive capsulitis. CASE DESCRIPTION: Four men and 3 women (mean age=50.2 years, SD=6.0, range=41-65) with adhesive capsulitis of the glenohumeral j

  19. End-range mobilization techniques in adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder joint: a multiple-subject case report.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.M.; Obermann, W.R.; Burger, B.J.; Kok, G.J.; Rozing, P.M.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this case report is to describe the use of end-range mobilization techniques in the management of patients with adhesive capsulitis. CASE DESCRIPTION: Four men and 3 women (mean age=50.2 years, SD=6.0, range=41-65) with adhesive capsulitis of the glenohumeral

  20. Medical Judgments Across the Range of Reported Pain Severity: Clinician and Lay Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Raymond C; Chibnall, John T; House, Kylie; Biehl, Joann

    2016-07-01

    While increasing evidence suggests that observers discount high-severity chronic pain, factors that occasion such discounting are poorly understood, particularly regarding health provider vs lay perspectives. This study examined the effects of supporting medical evidence and comorbid psychological distress (pain behavior) on medical student and lay clinical judgments of increasingly severe patient pain reports. In a 2 × 2 × 2 × (7) mixed between- and within-subject design, participants (medical students vs lay) made clinical judgments after reading vignettes describing a hypothetical patient that varied in levels of medical evidence and pain behavior (low vs high) and pain severity (4/10-10/10). Fourth-year medical students (N = 115) and lay persons in the community (N = 300) participated in this research. While both medical student and lay judgments plateaued at high levels of pain severity, judgments regarding cause (medical vs psychological), treatment (opioid prescription), and disability showed growing divergence as levels of reported pain severity increased. Divergence relative to medical and psychological causes of pain was found irrespective of the level of supporting medical evidence; divergence relative to opioid treatment and support for a disability claim was found when supporting medical evidence was low. The results indicate differing expectations of chronic pain treatment for health care providers relative to the lay public that could impact clinical care, especially at high pain severity levels, where lay expectations diverge significantly from those of health professionals. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Ardoch Lake and Kellys Slough National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : May to August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Ardoch Lake and Kelly Slough National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1963. The report begins by...

  2. Ardoch Lake and Kellys Slough National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January to April 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Ardoch Lake and Kelly Slough National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from January to April of 1963. The report begins by...

  3. Refuge Narrative Report : September-December 1952 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from September through December of 1952. The report begins with general...

  4. Refuge Narrative Report : May-August 1963 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1963. The report begins with general information...

  5. Refuge Narrative Report : May-August 1952 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1952. The report begins with general information...

  6. Narrative report of Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range : April - August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  7. Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1979

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  8. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1952 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1952. The report begins with general information...

  9. Refuge Narrative Report : September-December 1963 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from September through December of 1963. The report begins with general...

  10. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1949 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1949. The report begins with general information...

  11. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1962 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1962. The report begins with general information...

  12. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1963 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1963. The report begins with general information...

  13. Refuge Narrative Report : September-December 1953 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from September through December of 1953. The report begins with general...

  14. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions and...

  15. Refuge narrative report : January 1, 1972 - December 31, 1972 : Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Izembek, Simeonof, and Semidi NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  16. Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Range: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1978 calendar year. The report begins with an...

  17. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing...

  18. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1953 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1953. The report begins with general information...

  19. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : May- August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell outlines Refuge accomplishments from May to August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions,...

  20. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : September to December 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  1. Narrative report of Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range : April - August, 1961

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1961. The report begins by summarizing the...

  2. Narrative report: Fort Peck Game Range: January, February, March, April, 1949

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1949. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions...

  3. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1953. The report begins by...

  4. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January - April 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  5. Ardoch Lake and Kellys Slough National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : September to December 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Ardoch Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1963. The report begins by...

  6. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: January, February, March, April 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Refuge narrative report : September - December, 1962 : Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  8. Refuge Narrative Report : May-August 1950 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1950. The report begins with general information...

  9. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1951 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1951. The report begins with general information...

  10. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August, 1953

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1953. The report begins by summarizing...

  11. Refuge Narrative Report : September-December 1950 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from September through December of 1950. The report begins with general...

  12. Refuge Narrative Report : May-August 1953 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from May through August of 1953. The report begins with general information...

  13. Refuge Narrative Report: May to August, 1954: Kanai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1954. The report begins by summarizing the weather conditions during...

  14. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: May, June, July, August 1952

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1952. The report begins by summarizing...

  15. Refuge Narrative Report : January-April 1950 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from January through April of 1950. The report begins with general information...

  16. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1954. The report begins by...

  17. Refuge Narrative Report : September-December 1949 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge summarizes refuge activities from September through December of 1949. The report begins with general...

  18. Fort Peck Game Range: Refuge narrative report: September, October, November, December 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Fort Peck NWR and the easement refuges outlines Refuge accomplishments from September through December of 1950. The report begins by...

  19. Refuge narrative report : January - April 1963 : Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1963. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Finite Range Effects in Energies and Recombination Rates of Three Identical Bosons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Peder Klokmose; V. Fedorov, D.; S. Jensen, A.;

    2013-01-01

    is large. The models are built on contact potentials which take into account finite range effects; one is a two-channel model and the other is an effective range expansion model implemented through the boundary condition on the three-body wave function when two of the particles are at the same point...... in space. We compare the results with the results of the ubiquitous single-parameter zero-range model where only the scattering length is taken into account. Both finite range models predict variations of the well-known geometric scaling factor 22.7 that arises in Efimov physics. The threshold value...... at negative scattering length for creation of a bound trimer moves to higher or lower values depending on the sign of the effective range compared to the location of the threshold for the single-parameter zero-range model. Large effective ranges, corresponding to narrow resonances, are needed...

  1. The coming revolution in particle physics: Report of the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Appel et al.

    2004-06-22

    In early 2003, the Fermilab Director formed a committee (Appendix A) to examine options for the long-range future of Fermilab. Specifically, the committee was asked to respond to a charge (Appendix B), which laid out the assumptions, which were to underlie our discussions. The committee met a few times during the spring of 2003 and formulated a plan of action. It identified a number of issues that deserved attention, and a subcommittee was formed to focus on each. We agreed that in addressing these key issues, a broader participation was appropriate. The manner in which that was achieved varied from subcommittee to subcommittee to group. In some cases the expanded membership participated in all the discussions, in others, particular presentations were solicited and heard. Some subgroups met regularly over several months, others convened only for a small number of discussions. We have attempted to list participants in Appendix C. General presentations indicating the purpose of the work were given, for example at the Fermilab Users Annual Meeting. Towards the end of the summer some sense of direction developed and a series of open meetings was organized by the different subgroups. These meetings of two and more hour's duration gave the broader laboratory and user community a further chance to react to perceived directions and to make their opinions known. They were extremely well attended. In all, nearly 100 people have participated in the process including the development of initial drafts and proto-recommendations. A larger number attended the various open sessions. It is therefore likely, even expected, that the general thrusts of this report are no surprise. Nevertheless, the committee met in a number of plenary closed sessions including a two-day retreat in which all the issues were discussed and a common view was developed. The Director and Deputy Director heard and interacted with the discussions in most of these meetings. In attempting to converge, we

  2. The coming revolution in particle physics: Report of the Fermilab Long Range Planning Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeff Appel et al.

    2004-06-22

    In early 2003, the Fermilab Director formed a committee (Appendix A) to examine options for the long-range future of Fermilab. Specifically, the committee was asked to respond to a charge (Appendix B), which laid out the assumptions, which were to underlie our discussions. The committee met a few times during the spring of 2003 and formulated a plan of action. It identified a number of issues that deserved attention, and a subcommittee was formed to focus on each. We agreed that in addressing these key issues, a broader participation was appropriate. The manner in which that was achieved varied from subcommittee to subcommittee to group. In some cases the expanded membership participated in all the discussions, in others, particular presentations were solicited and heard. Some subgroups met regularly over several months, others convened only for a small number of discussions. We have attempted to list participants in Appendix C. General presentations indicating the purpose of the work were given, for example at the Fermilab Users Annual Meeting. Towards the end of the summer some sense of direction developed and a series of open meetings was organized by the different subgroups. These meetings of two and more hour's duration gave the broader laboratory and user community a further chance to react to perceived directions and to make their opinions known. They were extremely well attended. In all, nearly 100 people have participated in the process including the development of initial drafts and proto-recommendations. A larger number attended the various open sessions. It is therefore likely, even expected, that the general thrusts of this report are no surprise. Nevertheless, the committee met in a number of plenary closed sessions including a two-day retreat in which all the issues were discussed and a common view was developed. The Director and Deputy Director heard and interacted with the discussions in most of these meetings. In attempting to converge, we

  3. Range and nummer-of-levels effects in derived and stated attribute importances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlegh, P.W.J.; Schifferstein, H.N.J.; Wittink, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    We study how the range of variation and the number of ttribute levels affect five measures of attribute importance: full profile conjoint estimates, ranges in attribute level attractiveness ratings. regression coefficients. graded paired comparisons. and self-reported ratings, We find that all impor

  4. Range and number-of-levels effects in derived and stated measures of attribute importance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlegh, PWJ; Schifferstein, HNJ; Wittink, DR

    2002-01-01

    We study how the range of variation and the number of ttribute levels affect five measures of attribute importance: full profile conjoint estimates, ranges in attribute level attractiveness ratings. regression coefficients. graded paired comparisons. and self-reported ratings, We find that all impor

  5. Waterfowl population and habitat study, Kenai National Moose Range, Kenai, Alaska: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During the period between May 27 and August 28, 1961, a waterfowl population and habitat study was conducted on the Kenai National Moose Range by personnel of the...

  6. Hunting range of a breeding peregrine falcon on Franklin Bluff, Sagavanirktok River: Interim report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Peregrines were studied to determine their hunting range, or the radius away from the nesting site used for food gathering. Study was done in connection with oil...

  7. Report of findings: Contaminant study of the environment surrounding the Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Cape Romanzof Long Range Radar Site (Cape Romanzof) contains many petroleum-related spills and hazardous substances. Therefore, in 1987 and 1988 a field study...

  8. Effects of dynamic range compression on spatial selective auditory attention in normal-hearing listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew H.; Shinn-Cunningham, Barbara G.

    2013-01-01

    Many hearing aids introduce compressive gain to accommodate the reduced dynamic range that often accompanies hearing loss. However, natural sounds produce complicated temporal dynamics in hearing aid compression, as gain is driven by whichever source dominates at a given moment. Moreover, independent compression at the two ears can introduce fluctuations in interaural level differences (ILDs) important for spatial perception. While independent compression can interfere with spatial perception of sound, it does not always interfere with localization accuracy or speech identification. Here, normal-hearing listeners reported a target message played simultaneously with two spatially separated masker messages. We measured the amount of spatial separation required between the target and maskers for subjects to perform at threshold in this task. Fast, syllabic compression that was independent at the two ears increased the required spatial separation, but linking the compressors to provide identical gain to both ears (preserving ILDs) restored much of the deficit caused by fast, independent compression. Effects were less clear for slower compression. Percent-correct performance was lower with independent compression, but only for small spatial separations. These results may help explain differences in previous reports of the effect of compression on spatial perception of sound. PMID:23556599

  9. The effect of virtual reality on pain and range of motion in adults with burn injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrougher, Gretchen J; Hoffman, Hunter G; Nakamura, Dana; Lezotte, Dennis; Soltani, Maryam; Leahy, Laura; Engrav, Loren H; Patterson, David R

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have empirically investigated the effects of immersive virtual reality (VR) on postburn physical therapy pain control and range of motion (ROM). We performed a prospective, randomized controlled study of the effects of adding VR to standard therapy in adults receiving active-assisted ROM physical therapy, by assessing pain scores and maximal joint ROM immediately before and after therapy on two consecutive days. Thirty-nine inpatients, aged 21 to 57 years (mean 35 years), with a mean TBSA burn of 18% (range, 3-60%) were studied using a within-subject, crossover design. All patients received their regular pretherapy pharmacologic analgesia regimen. During physical therapy sessions on two consecutive days (VR one day and no VR the other day; order randomized), each patient participated in active-assisted ROM exercises with an occupational or physical therapist. At the conclusion of each session, patients provided 0 to 100 Graphic Rating Scale measurements of pain after each 10-minute treatment condition. On the day with VR, patients wore a head-position-tracked, medical care environment-excluding VR helmet with stereophonic sound and interacted in a virtual environment conducive to burn care. ROM measurements for each joint exercised were recorded before and after each therapy session. Because of nonsignificant carryover and order effects, the data were analyzed using simple paired t-tests. VR reduced all Graphic Rating Scale pain scores (worst pain, time spent thinking about the pain, and pain unpleasantness by 27, 37, and 31% respectively), relative to the no VR condition. Average ROM improvement was slightly greater with the VR condition; however, this difference failed to reach clinical or statistical significance (P = .243). Ninety-seven percent of patients reported zero to mild nausea after the VR session. Immersive VR effectively reduced pain and did not impair ROM during postburn physical therapy. VR is easily used in the hospital setting and

  10. Short Range Correlations and the EMC Effect in Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Lynn, Joel E; Schwenk, Achim

    2016-01-01

    We show that the empirical linear relation between the magnitude of the EMC effect in deep inelastic scattering on nuclei and the short range correlation scaling factor $a_2$ extracted from high-energy quasi-elastic scattering at $x\\ge 1$ is a natural consequence of scale separation and derive the relationship using effective field theory. While the scaling factor $a_2$ is a ratio of nuclear matrix elements that depend on the calculational scheme, we show that the ratio is independent of this choice. We perform Green's function Monte Carlo calculations with both chiral and Argonne-Urbana potentials to verify this and determine the scaling factors for light nuclei. The resulting values for $^3$He and $^4$He are in good agreement with experimental values. We also present results for $^9$Be and $^{12}$C extracted from variational Monte Carlo calculations.

  11. Field report: Exploring the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range, Alaska, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin V. Strauss

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Alaska is a ‘suspect’ terrane that encompasses approximately 20% of Alaska, stretching from the southern Brooks Range all the way to the continental shelves of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Although the origin and subsequent travels of this large crustal fragment are debated among geologists, most researchers agree upon its composite nature and exotic origin. To constrain the early geological history of this terrane, we describe a recent expedition to the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range. This area has long been regarded as a key locality for understanding the structural evolution of the Mesozoic–Cenozoic Brooks Range orogen; however, our target was different: a unique sequence of volcanic and siliciclastic rocks (Apoon assemblage exposed beneath a profound pre-Mississippian unconformity, which we argue is of key importance to understanding the early Paleozoic tectonic history of northern Alaska and the greater Arctic.

  12. Ardoch Lake, Kellys Slough, Devils Lake National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ardoch Lake, Kellys Slough, Devils Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The...

  13. Ardoch Lake, Kellys Slough, Devils Lake National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Ardoch Lake, Kellys Slough, Devils Lake National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The...

  14. Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range : Narrative Report : January - December 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell NWR (including the satellite refuges: Hailstone, Halfbreed, Mason, Miller, Yellow Water, War Horse, and Wild...

  15. A Computer Simulation Modeling Tool to Assist Colleges in Long-Range Planning. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Richard; And Others

    Long-range planning involves the establishment of educational objectives within a rational philosophy, the design of activities and programs to meet stated objectives, the organization and allocation of resources to implement programs, and the analysis of results in terms of the objectives. Current trends of educational growth and complexity…

  16. A miniature powerplant for very small, very long range autonomous aircraft. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tad McGeer

    1999-09-29

    The authors have developed a new piston engine offering unprecedented efficiency for a new generation of miniature robotic aircraft. Following Phase 1 preliminary design in 1996--97, they have gone forward in Phase 2 to complete detail design, and are nearing completion of a first batch of ten engines. A small-engine dynamometer facility has been built in preparation for the test program. Provisions have been included for supercharging, which will allow operation at ceilings in the 10,000 m range. Component tests and detailed analysis indicate that the engine will achieve brake-specific fuel consumption well below 300 gm/kWh at power levels of several hundred watts. This level of performance opens the door to development of tabletop-sized aircraft having transpacific range and multi-day endurance, which will offer extraordinary new capabilities for meteorology, geomagnetic, and a variety of applications in environmental monitoring and military operations.

  17. A miniature powerplant for very small, very long range autonomous aircraft. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tad McGeer

    1999-09-29

    The authors have developed a new piston engine offering unprecedented efficiency for a new generation of miniature robotic aircraft. Following Phase 1 preliminary design in 1996--97, they have gone forward in Phase 2 to complete detail design, and are nearing completion of a first batch of ten engines. A small-engine dynamometer facility has been built in preparation for the test program. Provisions have been included for supercharging, which will allow operation at ceilings in the 10,000 m range. Component tests and detailed analysis indicate that the engine will achieve brake-specific fuel consumption well below 300 gm/kWh at power levels of several hundred watts. This level of performance opens the door to development of tabletop-sized aircraft having transpacific range and multi-day endurance, which will offer extraordinary new capabilities for meteorology, geomagnetic, and a variety of applications in environmental monitoring and military operations.

  18. Military Hydrology. Report 2. Formulation of a Long-Range Concept for Streamflow Prediction Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    temperature, cloud cover, wind qpeed and direction, humidity, vapor pressure, stream velocity and discharge, and stream stage. Most of these data call be...34: Uniti,.d SI at’.. Wter- ways Experiment .Stati Ini, Viclshurf, M . M.i::r’,.lianOuf; peper EL-79-(6, Report 2. TA7.W34m no. EI,-7)-( Peport, p 4.

  19. Semiannual Status Report. [excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    During the last six months, we have continued our study of the excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range and the role that these waves will play in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral region. A paper entitled 'Electron Beam Excitation of Upstream Waves in the Whistler Mode Frequency Range' was listed in the Journal of Geophysical Research. In this paper, we have shown that an anisotropic electron beam (or gyrating electron beam) is capable of generating both left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range. Since right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can interact with background electrons and left-hand polarized waves can interact with background ions through cyclotron resonance, it is possible that these beam generated left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can accelerate either ions or electrons (or both), depending on the physical parameters under consideration. We are currently carrying out a comprehensive study of the electromagnetic whistler and lower hybrid like waves observed in the auroral zone using both wave and particle data. Our first task is to identify these wave modes and compare it with particle observations. Using both the DE-1 particle and wave measurements, we can positively identify those electromagnetics lower hybrid like waves as fast magnetosonic waves and the upper cutoff of these waves is the local lower hybrid frequency. From the upper cutoff of the frequency spectrum, one can infer the particle density and the result is in very good agreement with the particle data. Since these electromagnetic lower hybrid like waves can have frequencies extended down to the local ion cyclotron frequency, it practically confirms that they are not whistler waves.

  20. Semiannual Status Report. [excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    During the last six months, we have continued our study of the excitation of electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range and the role that these waves will play in the acceleration of electrons and ions in the auroral region. A paper entitled 'Electron Beam Excitation of Upstream Waves in the Whistler Mode Frequency Range' was listed in the Journal of Geophysical Research. In this paper, we have shown that an anisotropic electron beam (or gyrating electron beam) is capable of generating both left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves in the whistler frequency range. Since right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can interact with background electrons and left-hand polarized waves can interact with background ions through cyclotron resonance, it is possible that these beam generated left-hand and right-hand polarized electromagnetic waves can accelerate either ions or electrons (or both), depending on the physical parameters under consideration. We are currently carrying out a comprehensive study of the electromagnetic whistler and lower hybrid like waves observed in the auroral zone using both wave and particle data. Our first task is to identify these wave modes and compare it with particle observations. Using both the DE-1 particle and wave measurements, we can positively identify those electromagnetics lower hybrid like waves as fast magnetosonic waves and the upper cutoff of these waves is the local lower hybrid frequency. From the upper cutoff of the frequency spectrum, one can infer the particle density and the result is in very good agreement with the particle data. Since these electromagnetic lower hybrid like waves can have frequencies extended down to the local ion cyclotron frequency, it practically confirms that they are not whistler waves.

  1. Ordered and Unordered Top-K Range Reporting in Large Data Sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afshani, Peyman; Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Zeh, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    We study the following problem: Given an array A storing N real numbers, preprocess it to allow fast reporting of the K smallest elements in the subarray A[i, j] in sorted order, for any triple (i, j,K) with 1 ≤ i ≤ j ≤ N and 1 ≤ K ≤ j − i + 1. We are interested in scenarios where the array A is ...

  2. Immediate Effects of Mirror Therapy in Patients With Shoulder Pain and Decreased Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Reese, Dave; Parker, Paula; Miller, Terra; Mintken, Paul E

    2017-05-05

    To determine the effects of a brief single component of the graded motor imagery (GMI) sequence (mirror therapy) on active range of motion (AROM), pain, fear avoidance, and pain catastrophization in patients with shoulder pain. Single-blind case series. Three outpatient physical therapy clinics. Patients with shoulder pain and limited AROM (N=69). Patients moved their unaffected shoulder through comfortable AROM in front of a mirror so that it appeared that they were moving their affected shoulder. We measured pain, pain catastrophization, fear avoidance, and AROM in 69 consecutive patients with shoulder pain and limited AROM before and immediately after mirror therapy. There were significant differences in self-reported pain (P=.014), pain catastrophization (Pmirror therapy; however, the means did not meet or exceed the minimal detectable change (MDC) for each outcome measure. There was a significant increase (mean, 14.5°) in affected shoulder flexion AROM immediately postmirror therapy (Pmirror therapy intervention can result in statistically significant improvements in pain, pain catastrophization, fear avoidance, and shoulder flexion AROM in patients presenting with shoulder pain with limited AROM. The immediate changes may allow a quicker transition to multimodal treatment, including manual therapy and exercise in these patients. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed to investigate these findings and determine longer-term effects. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of geothermal potential of the basin and range province of New Mexico. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landis, G.P.; Callender, J.F.; Elston, W.E.; Jiracek, G.R.; Kudo, A.M.; Woodward, L.A.; Swanberg, C.A.

    1976-06-01

    This continuing research is designed to provide an integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical study of the geothermal energy potential of promising thermal anomalies in the Rio Grande rift, Basin and Range province, the Mogollon--Datil volcanic field of New Mexico. Specific objectives undertaken in this study include the following: (a) reconnaissance and detailed geologic mapping (Animas Valley, Radium Springs, Alum Mountain, Truth or Consequences, Ojo Caliente, Albuquerque---Belene basin, and San Ysidro); (b) geochemical studies including reconnaissance water sampling (Animas Valley, Radium Springs and Alum Mountain); and (c) geophysical surveys using deep electric-resistivity, gravity, and magnetic techniques (Radium Springs, Animas Valley and Truth or Consequences). The results of one and one-half summer field seasons and approximately two years of analytical work, laboratory research, and development of research equipment and facilities are covered. Publications, communications, and public service resulting from the first years of U.S.G.S. and State funding are listed in Appendix A.

  4. Effects of angular range on image quality of chest digital tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haenghwa; Kim, Ye-seul; Choi, Sunghoon; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Seungyeon; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2016-03-01

    Chest digital tomosynthesis (CDT) is a new 3D imaging technique that can be expected to improve clinical diagnosis over conventional chest radiography. We investigated the effect of the angular range of data acquisition on the image quality using newly developed CDT system. The four different acquisition sets were studied using +/-15°, +/-20°, +/-30°, and +/-35° angular ranges with 21 projection views (PVs). The point spread function (PSF), modulation transfer function (MTF), artifact spread function (ASF), and normalized contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were used to evaluate the image quality. We found that increasing angular ranges improved vertical resolution. The results indicated that there was the opposite relationship of the CNR with angular range for the two tissue types. While CNR for heart tissue increased with increasing angular range, CNR for spine bone decreased. The results showed that the angular range is an important parameter for the CDT exam.

  5. Soil pollution at outdoor shooting ranges: Health effects, bioavailability and best management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayiga, A O; Saha, U K

    2016-09-01

    The total lead (Pb) concentrations of the surface soil, sub surface soil, vegetation and surface waters of outdoor shooting ranges are extremely high and above regulatory limits. Lead is dangerous at high concentrations and can cause a variety of serious health problems. Shooters and range workers are exposed to lead dust and can even take Pb dust home to their families while some animals around the shooting range can ingest the Pb bullets. The toxicity of Pb depends on its bioavailability which has been determined to be influenced greatly by the geochemical properties of each site. The bioavailability of Pb in shooting ranges has been found to be higher than other metal contaminated soils probably because of its very low residual Pb (soil, migration of Pb within shooting ranges and offsite has been reported in literature. Best management practices to reduce mobility of Pb in shooting ranges involve an integrated Pb management program which has been described in the paper. The adoption of the non-toxic "green bullet" which has been developed to replace Pb bullets may reduce or prevent environmental pollution at shooting ranges. However, the contaminated soil resulting from decades of operation of several shooting ranges still needs to be restored to its natural state.

  6. Report of the Analysis of the Joint Medium Range Air to Surface Missile Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-23

    military hardward which includes the design, development, and procurement of equipment or systems. - A draft Joint Service Operational Requirement ( JSOR ...Requirement ( JSOR ), a draft Joint Mission Element Need Statement (JMENS) was generated for review in December 1978. b. The Undersecretary of Defense for...practical, and cost-effective method of achieving the goals set forth in the Joint Services Operational Requirements ( JSOR ) document and meeting the other

  7. Occurrence of Belonolaimus in Sinaloa, Northwestern Mexico: A New Report on Distribution and Host Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo-Ocampo, Manuel; Baldwin, J. G.; Pereira, T. J.; Camacho-Baez, J. R.; Armenta-Bojorquez, A. D.; Camacho-Haro, M.; Becker, J. O.

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports the occurrence of the genus Belonolaimus in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, associated with native plants (i.e., Ziziphus amole and Stenocereus alamosensis) in a natural coastal ecosystem. Both morphological and molecular approaches were employed to characterize the Sinaloa population. Notwithstanding of some morphological and morphometric variation between Belonolaimus from Sinaloa and other valid species, the characterization indicates that this population might belong to the Belonolaimus longicaudatus species complex. Molecular analyses based on the 28S gene and ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) identified four major clades within Belonolaimus; however, none of the species including B. longicaudatus, B. gracilis, and B. euthychilus were supported as monophyletic; yet monophyly is argued to be a basic requirement of species status. Sequence divergence among different Belonolaimus populations and species varied according to the rRNA dataset (i.e., ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 > 28S > 18S) used, thus showing the importance of using genes with different rates of evolution to estimate species relationships. The fact that Belonolaimus has not been found in other cultivated (including on suitable hosts) areas in Sinaloa and that this population is relatively distant from the common B. longicaudatus groups (i.e., clades A and B) suggests that its appearance was not due to a recent introduction associated with the local agriculture. PMID:28512382

  8. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren-Yan Duan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5 and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s. Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137–4,124 m to 286–4,396 m in the 2050s or 314–4,448 m in the 2070s, and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded.

  9. The effects of a single game of rugby on active cervical range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, Sally D; McCarthy, Peter W

    2009-03-01

    The cumulative effect of playing rugby over many years decreases active cervical range of motion, especially in the forwards. This in itself should influence long-term neck care; however, it leaves the important question of how noticeable the acute effects of active cervical range of motion are following a single game. The active cervical range of motion was measured in 21 elite rugby players (mean age 24.4 +/- 4.3 years; average professional career of 7 +/- 3.4 years) before and after a single game of rugby at the start of the season. The active cervical range of motion was recorded in flexion, extension, left and right side flexion, plus left and right rotation using a cervical range of motion device. The results show generally decreased active cervical range of motion from before to after a game independent of position played. Rugby backs had significantly (P cervical range of motion in flexion, while forwards were affected in extension and left lateral flexion (P cervical range of motion), and the affected neck movement appears to be related to the role of positional play. The authors suggest that neck training and muscle damage repair should be an important part of a rugby player's post-game recovery to limit the reduction in functional capacity.

  10. The potential effects of climate change on amphibian distribution, range fragmentation and turnover in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ren-Yan; Kong, Xiao-Quan; Huang, Min-Yi; Varela, Sara; Ji, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Many studies predict that climate change will cause species movement and turnover, but few have considered the effect of climate change on range fragmentation for current species and/or populations. We used MaxEnt to predict suitable habitat, fragmentation and turnover for 134 amphibian species in China under 40 future climate change scenarios spanning four pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, RCP6 and RCP8.5) and two time periods (the 2050s and 2070s). Our results show that climate change may cause a major shift in spatial patterns of amphibian diversity. Amphibians in China would lose 20% of their original ranges on average; the distribution outside current ranges would increase by 15%. Suitable habitats for over 90% of species will be located in the north of their current range, for over 95% of species in higher altitudes (from currently 137-4,124 m to 286-4,396 m in the 2050s or 314-4,448 m in the 2070s), and for over 75% of species in the west of their current range. Also, our results predict two different general responses to the climate change: some species contract their ranges while moving westwards, southwards and to higher altitudes, while others expand their ranges. Finally, our analyses indicate that range dynamics and fragmentation are related, which means that the effects of climate change on Chinese amphibians might be two-folded.

  11. Effect of long- and short-range interactions on the thermodynamics of dipolar spin ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, Yuriy, E-mail: shevchenko.ya@dvfu.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Makarov, Aleksandr, E-mail: makarov.ag@dvfu.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Nefedev, Konstantin, E-mail: nefedev.kv@dvfu.ru [School of Natural Sciences, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok (Russian Federation); Institute of Applied Mathematics of Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Science, 7 Radio Str, Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-05

    The thermodynamic properties of dipolar spin ice on square, honeycomb and shakti lattices in the long-range and short-range dipole interaction models are studied. Exact solutions for the density of states, temperature dependencies of heat capacity, and entropy are obtained for these lattices with a finite number of point dipoles by means of complete enumeration. The magnetic susceptibility and average size of the largest low-energy cluster are calculated for square spin ice by means of Wang–Landau and Metropolis methods. We show that the long-range interaction leads to a blurring of the energy spectrum for all considered lattices. The inclusion of the long-range interaction leads to a significant change in the thermodynamic behaviour. An additional peak of heat capacity appears in the case of the honeycomb lattice. The critical temperature shifts in the direction of low or high temperatures; the direction depends on the lattice geometry. The critical temperature of the phase transition of square spin ice in the long-range model with frustrated ground states is obtained with the Wang–Landau and Metropolis methods independently. - Highlights: • The long-range and short-range dipole interaction effects are compared. • Differences are showed for Honeycomb, Shakti and Square spin ice lattices. • The additional heat capacity peaks appear for long-range interaction. • The temperature of heat capacity peak shifts while changing the interaction range.

  12. Traffic flow effects of Integrated full-range Speed Assistance (IRSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilmink, I.R.; Klunder, G.; Arem, B. van

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the assessment of the effects of Integrated full-Range Speed Assistance (IRSA), using the ITS modeller. The aim of IRSA is to assist drivers in their longitudinal driving task by providing speed advice or speed warnings and cruise control-like functionalities. The effects of the

  13. Researchers' choice of the number and range of levels in experiments affects the resultant variance-accounted-for effect size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kensuke; Hoshino, Takahiro

    2016-08-08

    In psychology, the reporting of variance-accounted-for effect size indices has been recommended and widely accepted through the movement away from null hypothesis significance testing. However, most researchers have paid insufficient attention to the fact that effect sizes depend on the choice of the number of levels and their ranges in experiments. Moreover, the functional form of how and how much this choice affects the resultant effect size has not thus far been studied. We show that the relationship between the population effect size and number and range of levels is given as an explicit function under reasonable assumptions. Counterintuitively, it is found that researchers may affect the resultant effect size to be either double or half simply by suitably choosing the number of levels and their ranges. Through a simulation study, we confirm that this relation also applies to sample effect size indices in much the same way. Therefore, the variance-accounted-for effect size would be substantially affected by the basic research design such as the number of levels. Simple cross-study comparisons and a meta-analysis of variance-accounted-for effect sizes would generally be irrational unless differences in research designs are explicitly considered.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  15. The effects of taping, stretching, and joint exercise on hip joint flexibility and range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Kyung-Tae; An, Ho-Jung; Choi, Wan-Suk; Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Jae-Ic; Kim, Nyeon-Jun

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of joint exercise, taping, and stretching on hip joint flexion, flexibility, and range of motion. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five college students in their 20s were randomly assigned and equally divided into three groups, as follows: a stretching group, a taping and exercise group, and an exercise group. Changes in trunk range of motion and hip joint flexibility of the three groups were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] Comparison between flexibility before and after the intervention revealed statistically significant changes in all three groups. Moreover, the evaluation of joint range of motion after the intervention showed that there were statistically significant changes in all three groups. [Conclusion] Taping, stretching, and joint exercise are considered effective for the increase in flexibility and joint range of motion.

  16. Effects of box handle position and carrying range on bi-manual carrying capacity for females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Swei-Pi; Loiu, Yi; Chien, Te Hong

    2015-01-01

    This study utilizes a psychophysical approach to examine the effects on carrying capacity for bi-manual carrying tasks involving different handle positions and carrying ranges. A total of 16 female subjects participated in the experiment in groups of two people, and each group of subjects performed the tasks in a random order with 12 different combinations of carrying task. The independent variables are handle position (upper, middle, lower) and carrying range (F-F: floor height carried to floor height, F-W: floor height carried to waist height, W-W: waist height carried to waist height, W-F: waist height carried to floor height), the dependent variable is the maximum acceptable carried weight (MAWC), heart rate (HR), and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE). The results show that the handle position has a significant effect on MAWC and overall RPE but no significant effect on HR. Carrying range has a significant effect on the MAWC and HR, but no significant effect on overall HR. The handle position and carrying range have a significant interaction on the MAWC and HR. The RPE for different body parts shows significant differences, and the hands feel the most tired. Overall, this study confirms that the lower handle position with the W-W carrying range is the best combination for a two-person carrying task.

  17. A model study on a pair of trapped particles interacting with an arbitrary effective range

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Partha

    2016-01-01

    We study the effects of the effective range of interaction on the eigenvalues and eigenstates of two particles confined in a three-dimensional (3D) isotropic as well as one- or quasi-one dimensional harmonic (1D) traps. For this we employ model potentials which mimic finite-range s-wave interactions over a wide range of s-wave scattering length $a_s$ including the unitarity limits $a_s \\rightarrow \\pm\\infty$. Our results show that when the range is larger than the 3D or 1D harmonic oscillator length scale, the eigenvalues and eigenstates are nearly similar to those of noninteracting two particles in the 3D or 1D trap, respectively. In case of 3D, we find that when the range goes to zero, the results of contact potential as derived by Busch {\\it et al.} [Foundations of Physics, {\\bf28}, 549 (1998)] are reproduced. However, in the case of 1D, such reproducibility does not occur as the range goes to zero. We have calculated the eigenvalues and eigenstates in 1D harmonic trap taking one-dimensional finite- range ...

  18. OBSERVATION OF LONG-RANGE BEAM-BEAM EFFECT IN RHIC AND PLANS FOR COMPENSATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISCHER, W.; CALAGA, R.; DORDA, U.; DOUTCHOUK, J.-P.; ZIMMERMANN, F.; RANJBAR, V.; SEN, T.; SHI, J.; QIANG, J.; KABEL, A.

    2006-06-23

    At large distances the electromagnetic field of a wire is the same as the field produced by a bunch. Such a long-range beam-beam wire compensator was proposed for the LHC, and single beam tests with wire compensators were successfully done in the SPS. RHIC offers the possibility to test the compensation scheme with colliding beams. We report on measurements of beam losses as a function of transverse separation in RHIC at 100 GeV, and comparisons with simulations. We present a design for a long-range wire compensator in RHIC.

  19. Effect of simple solutes on the long range dipolar correlations in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baul, Upayan; Kanth, J. Maruthi Pradeep; Anishetty, Ramesh; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2016-03-01

    Intermolecular correlations in liquid water at ambient conditions have generally been characterized through short range density fluctuations described through the atomic pair distribution functions. Recent numerical and experimental results have suggested that such a description of order or structure in liquid water is incomplete and there exist considerably longer ranged orientational correlations in water that can be studied through dipolar correlations. In this study, using large scale classical, atomistic molecular dynamics simulations using TIP4P-Ew and TIP3P models of water, we show that salts such as sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), caesium chloride (CsCl), and magnesium chloride (MgCl2) have a long range effect on the dipolar correlations, which cannot be explained by the notion of structure making and breaking by dissolved ions. Observed effects are explained through orientational stratification of water molecules around ions and their long range coupling to the global hydrogen bond network by virtue of the sum rule for water. The observations for single hydrophilic solutes are contrasted with the same for a single methane (CH4) molecule. We observe that even a single small hydrophobe can result in enhancement of long range orientational correlations in liquid water, contrary to the case of dissolved ions, which have been observed to have a reducing effect. The observations from this study are discussed in the context of hydrophobic effect.

  20. Impact of echo broadening effect on active range-gated imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwei Wang; Yan Zhou; Yuliang Liu

    2012-01-01

    Analytical formulas and experimental proof of the echo broadening effect in active range-gated imaging,including atmospheric interference,currently exist.We investigate the impact of this effect on target detection.Our research demonstrates that the echo broadening effect affects the energy profile of the depth of view and collects only part of the signals of targets in head and tail zones.Under bad weather conditions,the effect weakens the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images,especially in cases with large laser pulse width.Fortunately,by modifying the laser pulse width,the effect can be controlled.These results are valuable to the applications of active range-gated imaging.

  1. Wide-range tunability, thermal locking, and mode-crossing effects in Kerr optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guoping; Saleh, Khaldoun; Henriet, Rémi; Diallo, Souleymane; Martinenghi, Romain; Coillet, Aurélien; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2014-12-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate some effects related to the Kerr optical frequency comb generation, using a millimeter-size magnesium fluoride ultrahigh quality disk resonator. We show that the Kerr comb tunability can be extremely wide in the Turing pattern (or primary comb) regime, with an intermodal frequency that can be tuned from 4 to 229 multiple free spectral ranges (corresponding to a frequency spacing ranging from 24 GHz to 1.35 THz). We also discuss the role played by thermal locking while pumping the resonator, as well as the effect of modal crossing when broadband combs are generated.

  2. Modeling the effects of distortion, contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio on stereophotogrammetric range mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellar, R. Glenn; Deen, Robert G.; Huffman, William C.; Willson, Reginald G.

    2016-09-01

    Stereophotogrammetry typically employs a pair of cameras, or a single moving camera, to acquire pairs of images from different camera positions, in order to create a three dimensional `range map' of the area being observed. Applications of this technique for building three-dimensional shape models include aerial surveying, remote sensing, machine vision, and robotics. Factors that would be expected to affect the quality of the range maps include the projection function (distortion) of the lenses and the contrast (modulation) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the acquired image pairs. Basic models of the precision with which the range can be measured assume a pinhole-camera model of the geometry, i.e. that the lenses provide perspective projection with zero distortion. Very-wide-angle or `fisheye' lenses, however (for e.g. those used by robotic vehicles) typically exhibit projection functions that differ significantly from this assumption. To predict the stereophotogrammetric range precision for such applications, we extend the model to the case of an equidistant lens projection function suitable for a very-wide-angle lens. To predict the effects of contrast and SNR on range precision, we perform numerical simulations using stereo image pairs acquired by a stereo camera pair on NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. Contrast is degraded and noise is added to these data in a controlled fashion and the effects on the quality of the resulting range maps are assessed.

  3. The Consumer Reports Effectiveness Score: What Did Consumers Report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Stevan Lars; Smart, David W.; Isakson, Richard L.; Worthen, Vaughn E.; Gregersen, Ann T.; Lambert, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    From readers' ratings of satisfaction, problem resolution, and perceived emotional change during treatment, Consumer Reports magazine (CR, 1995) concluded both that psychotherapy is effective and that longer, more intensive therapy is more effective. The authors compared prospectively gathered 45-Item Outcome Questionnaire scores (OQ-45; M. J.…

  4. Extending the Effective Ranging Depth of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography by Spatial Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a spatial frequency domain multiplexing method for extending the imaging depth range of a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT system without any expensive device. This method uses two galvo scanners with different pivot-offset distances in two independent reference arms for spatial frequency modulation and multiplexing. The spatial frequency contents corresponding to different depth regions of the sample can be shifted to different frequency bands. The spatial frequency domain multiplexing SDOCT system provides an approximately 1.9-fold increase in the effective ranging depth compared with that of a conventional full-range SDOCT system. The reconstructed images of phantom and biological tissue demonstrate the expected increase in ranging depth. The parameters choice criterion for this method is discussed.

  5. Long-Range Effects on the Pyroelectric Coefficient of Ferroelectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Wen; YAO Dong-Lai; WU Yin-Zhong; LI Zhen-Ya

    2002-01-01

    Long-range effects on the pyroelectric coefficient of a ferroelectric superlattice consisting of two differentferroelectric materials are investigated based on the transverse Ising model. The effects of the interfacial coupling andthe thickness of one period on the pyroelectric coefficient of the ferroelectric superlattice are studied by taking intoaccount the long-range interaction. It is found that with the increase of the strength of the long-range interaction, thepyroelectric coefficient decreases when the temperature is lower than the phase transition temperature; the number ofthe pyroelectric peaks decreases gradually and the phase transition temperature increases. It is also found that with thedecrease of the interfacial coupling and the thickness of one period, the phase transition temperature and the number ofthe pyroelectric peaks decrease.

  6. Long—Range Effects on the Pyroelectric Coefficient of Ferroelectric Superlattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONGWen; WUYin-Zhong; 等

    2002-01-01

    Long-range effects on the pyroelectric coefficient of a ferroelectric superlattice consisting of two different ferroelectric materials are investigated based on the transverse Ising model.The effects of the interfacial coupling and the thickness of one period on the pyroelectric coefficient of the ferroelectric superlattics are studied by taking into account the long-range interaction.It is found that with the increase of the strength of the long-range interaction,the pyroelectric coefficient decreases when the temperature is lower than the phase transition temperature;the mumber of the pyroelectric peaks decreases gradually and the phase transition temperature increases,It is also found that with the decrease of the interfacial coupling and the thickness of one period.the phase transition temperature and the number of the pyroelectric peaks decrease.

  7. Effective theory and breakdown of conformal symmetry in a long-range quantum chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepori, L.; Vodola, D.; Pupillo, G.; Gori, G.; Trombettoni, A.

    2016-11-01

    We deal with the problem of studying the symmetries and the effective theories of long-range models around their critical points. A prominent issue is to determine whether they possess (or not) conformal symmetry (CS) at criticality and how the presence of CS depends on the range of the interactions. To have a model, both simple to treat and interesting, where to investigate these questions, we focus on the Kitaev chain with long-range pairings decaying with distance as power-law with exponent α. This is a quadratic solvable model, yet displaying non-trivial quantum phase transitions. Two critical lines are found, occurring respectively at a positive and a negative chemical potential. Focusing first on the critical line at positive chemical potential, by means of a renormalization group approach we derive its effective theory close to criticality. Our main result is that the effective action is the sum of two terms: a Dirac action SD, found in the short-range Ising universality class, and an "anomalous" CS breaking term SAN. While SD originates from low-energy excitations in the spectrum, SAN originates from the higher energy modes where singularities develop, due to the long-range nature of the model. At criticality SAN flows to zero for α > 2, while for α effective Lorentz invariance (ELI) for every finite α. As α increases such ELI breakdown becomes less and less pronounced and in the short-range limit α → ∞ the ELI is restored. In order to test the validity of the determined effective theory, we compared the two-fermion static correlation functions and the von Neumann entropy obtained from them with the ones calculated on the lattice, finding agreement. These results explain two observed features characteristic of long-range models, the hybrid decay of static correlation functions within gapped phases and the area-law violation for the von Neumann entropy. The proposed scenario is expected to hold in other long-range models displaying quasiparticle

  8. Effect of diffraction on the ultrasonic velocity measured by the pulse interference method in VHF range

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Tingcun

    2002-01-01

    The effect of diffraction on the ultrasonic velocity measured by the pulse interference method has been investigated in VHF range theoretically and experimentally. Two silicate glasses are taken as the specimens, their frequency dependences of longitudinal velocities are measured in the frequency range of 50-350 MHz, and the phase advances of ultrasonic signals caused by diffraction effect are calculated using A. O. Williams' theoretical expression. For the velocity error due to diffraction effect, the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. It has been shown that the velocity error due to diffraction effect is directly proportional to d θ21 (f)/df, where θ21 (f) is the phase advances difference between the two partial reflection signals used in velocity measurement and f is the ultrasonic frequency.

  9. Link Design Rules for Cost-Effective Short-Range Radio Over Multimode Fiber Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Tartarini, Giovanni; Petersen, Martin Nordal

    2010-01-01

    Referring to short-range radio over multimode fiber links, we find out important guidelines for the realization of cost-effective intensity modulated directly detected systems. Since the quality of today's connectors is considerably higher than in the past, we demonstrate that two important param...

  10. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri-Khorasani; Kellis

    2015-01-01

    Background Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materia...

  11. Long-Range Effects on Polymer Diffusion Induced by a Bounding Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, X.; Rafailovich, M.H.; Sokolov, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794-2275 (United States); Strzhemechny, Y.; Schwarz, S.A. [Physics Department, Queens College of The City University of New York, Flushing, New York 11376 (United States); Sauer, B.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours Company, Inc., Experimental Station, Wilmington, Delaware 19880 (United States); Rubinstein, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

    1997-07-01

    We have measured the diffusion of deuterated polystyrene of molecular weight 90{times}10{sup 3} in various matrices of hydrogenated polystyrene as a function of distance from an attractive interface, oxide-covered silicon. Surprisingly long-range effects are observed. Diffusion rates an order of magnitude slower than bulk persist up to 10R{sub g} (radius of gyration) from the interface of either the diffusant or matrix polymers. The slowdown is independent of matrix molecular weight over a broad range. However, mixing of polymers within the matrix strongly influences the rates of diffusion. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Effect of Kinesio Tape Application on Calf Pain and Ankle Range of Motion in Duathletes

    OpenAIRE

    Merino-Marban, Rafael; Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the kinesio tape immediately after its application and after a duathlon competition on calf pain and the ankle range of motion in duathletes. A sample of 28 duathletes (age 29.11 ± 10.35 years; body height 172.57 ± 6.17 cm; body mass 66.63 ± 9.01 kg; body mass index 22.29 ± 2.00 kg/m 2 ) were recruited from the competitors in a duathlon sprint. The Numerical Pain Rating Scale and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion measures were obtained a...

  13. Effect of Modeling Range on Structural Analysis for Powerhouse of Hydroelectric Power Plant by FEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiling; WU Hegao; YANG Huaquan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, three different modeling ranges were selected in the structural analysis for a hydropower house. The analysis was carried out using ABAQUS 6.6. The modeling range has a remarkable effect on finite ele-ment method(FEM)calculation result at the middle position of typical cross-sections where the concrete is rela-tively thin, and at the region close to turbine floor. If the ventilation barrel, floor slabs and columns above turbine floor are excluded from FEM model, the maximum rise difference of pedestal structure increases by about 24% compared with that of the whole model. It is indicated that different modeling ranges indeed affect FEM calculation result, and the structure above turbine floor in the FEM model should be included.

  14. An Attempt at the Northward Extension of the Breeding Range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle by Egg Transplant Progress Report #3

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The object of this study is to attempt to extend the breeding range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle northward to some of its reported previous range along the...

  15. An Attempt at the Northward Extension of the Breeding Range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle by Egg Transplant Progress Report #2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The object of this study is to attempt to extend the breeding range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle northward to some of its reported previous range along the...

  16. An Attempt at the Northward Extension of the Breeding Range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle by Egg Transplant Progress Report #1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The object of this study is to attempt to extend the breeding range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle northward to some of its reported previous range along the...

  17. An Attempt at the Northward Extension of the Breeding Range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle by Egg Transplant Progress Report #4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The object of this study is to attempt to extend the breeding range of the Atlantic Loggerhead Turtle northward to some of its reported previous range along the...

  18. Orthogonal design on range hood with air curtain and its effects on kitchen environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xing; Xi, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Conventional range hoods cannot effectively prevent the oil fumes containing cooking-induced harmful material from escaping into the kitchen Air curtains and guide plates have been used in range hoods to reduce the escape of airborne emissions and heat, thereby improving the kitchen environment and the cook's degree of comfort. In this article, numerical simulations are used to study the effects of the jet velocity of an air curtain, the jet angle of the air curtain, the width of the jet slot, the area of the guide plate, and the exhaust rate of the range hood on the perceived temperature, the perceived concentration of oil fumes, the release temperature of oil fumes, and the concentration of escaped oil fumes in a kitchen. The orthogonal experiment results show that the exhaust rate of the range hood is the main factor influencing the fumes concentration and the temperature distribution in the kitchen. For the range hood examined in the present study, the optimum values of the exhaust rate, the jet velocity of the air curtain, the jet angle of the air curtain, the width of the jet slot, and the area of the guide plate are 10.5 m(3)/min, 1.5 m/s, -5°, 4 mm, and 0.22 m(2), respectively, based on the results of the parametric study. In addition, the velocity field, temperature field, and oil fumes concentration field in the kitchen using the proposed range hood with the air curtain and guide plate are analyzed for those parameters. The study's results provide significant information needed for improving the kitchen environment.

  19. Zero-Range Effective Field Theory for Resonant Wino Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Evan; Braaten, Eric; Zhang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The most dramatic ``Sommerfeld enhancements'' of neutral-wino-pair annihilation occur when the wino mass is tuned to near critical values where there is a zero-energy S-wave resonance at the neutral-wino-pair threshold. If the wino mass is larger than the critical value, the resonance is a wino-pair bound state. If the wino mass is near a critical value, low-energy winos can be described by a zero-range effective field theory in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a contact interaction. The parameters of the zero-range effective field theory can be determined by matching wino scattering amplitudes calculated by solving the Schrödinger equation for a nonrelativistic effective field theory in which the winos interact nonperturbatively through a potential due to the exchange of weak gauge bosons. The power of the zero-range effective field theory is illustrated by calculating the rate for formation of the bound state in the collision of two neutral winos through the emission of two soft photons. Supported in part by DOE grant DE-FG02-05ER15715.

  20. Effect of long-range repulsive Coulomb interactions on packing structure of adhesive particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Li, Shuiqing; Liu, Wenwei; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-02-14

    The packing of charged micron-sized particles is investigated using discrete element simulations based on adhesive contact dynamic model. The formation process and the final obtained structures of ballistic packings are studied to show the effect of interparticle Coulomb force. It is found that increasing the charge on particles causes a remarkable decrease of the packing volume fraction ϕ and the average coordination number 〈Z〉, indicating a looser and chainlike structure. Force-scaling analysis shows that the long-range Coulomb interaction changes packing structures through its influence on particle inertia before they are bonded into the force networks. Once contact networks are formed, the expansion effect caused by repulsive Coulomb forces are dominated by short-range adhesion. Based on abundant results from simulations, a dimensionless adhesion parameter Ad*, which combines the effects of the particle inertia, the short-range adhesion and the long-range Coulomb interaction, is proposed and successfully scales the packing results for micron-sized particles within the latest derived adhesive loose packing (ALP) regime. The structural properties of our packings follow well the recent theoretical prediction which is described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function, indicating some kind of universality in the low packing density regime of the phase diagram regardless of adhesion or particle charge. Based on the comprehensive consideration of the complicated inter-particle interactions, our findings provide insight into the roles of short-range adhesion and repulsive Coulomb force during packing formation and should be useful for further design of packings.

  1. The Effects of Dynamic Range of Motion Exercises and Static Stretching on Strength and Range of Motion of the Hip Joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanetzke, Carol A.

    The effects of Dynamic Range of Motion (D'ROM) exercises and static stretch on hip flexibility and hip strength were examined. One hundred one male and female college students were divided into three groups: D'ROM, static stretch (ST), and control (C). All subjects were measured before and after treatment for hip flexibility and strength. Two…

  2. Effective range of reproductive interference exerted by an alien dandelion, Taraxacum officinale, on a native congener.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Koh-Ichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Nishida, Takayoshi; Nishida, Sachiko

    2011-03-01

    Reproductive interference (RI), defined as the fitness cost of interspecific sexual interactions, such as interspecific pollen transfer (IPT) in plants, is ecologically important. Theoretically, RI could result in competitive exclusion, as it operates in a frequency-dependent manner. Additionally, IPT may have a greater range than resource competition, although information about the range of IPT is lacking. In the present study, we measured the range of IPT exerted by Taraxacum officinale (an alien species) on a native dandelion, T. japonicum. We used two approaches. In one, we analyzed the RI effect on a native seed set at three spatial scales. In the second, we tracked IPT from alien to native flower heads using fluorescent pigments as markers. We estimated that pollination distances were in the order of several meters. These distances exceeded the mean distance from each native plant to the nearest alien. As hypothesized, the effect of RI reached farther than neighboring individuals. These data indicate the spatial range from which alien dandelions should be removed to allow the conservation of natives.

  3. Towards biodiversity hotspots effective for conserving mammals with small geographic ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; San Blas, Germán; Agrain, Federico; Roig-Juñent, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    The main goal of using global biodiversity hotspots for conservation purposes is to protect taxa with small geographic ranges because these are highly vulnerable to extinction. However, the extent to what different hotspots types are effective for meeting this goal remains controversial because hotspots have been previously defined as either the richest or most threatened and richest sites in terms of total, endemic or threatened species. In this regard, the use of species richness to set conservation priorities is widely discussed because strategies focused on this diversity measure tend to miss many of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Here we use data on global terrestrial mammal distributions to show that, hotspots of total species, endemism and threat defined in terms of species richness are effective in including 27%, 29% and 11% respectively, of the taxa with small geographic ranges. Whilst, the same hotspot types defined in terms of a simple diversity index, which is a function of species richness and range-size rarity, include 68%, 44% and 90% respectively, of these taxa. In addition, we demonstrate that index hotspot types are highly efficient because they conserve 79% of mammal species (21% more species than richness hotspot types), with 59% of species shared by three hotspot types (31% more than richness hotspot types). These results suggest that selection of different diversity measures to define hotspots may strongly affect the achievement of conservation goals.

  4. Effects of ADC Nonlinearity on the Spurious Dynamic Range Performance of Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzong Kang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Analog-to-information converter (AIC plays an important role in the compressed sensing system; it has the potential to significantly extend the capabilities of conventional analog-to-digital converter. This paper evaluates the impact of AIC nonlinearity on the dynamic performance in practical compressed sensing system, which included the nonlinearity introduced by quantization as well as the circuit non-ideality. It presents intuitive yet quantitative insights into the harmonics of quantization output of AIC, and the effect of other AIC nonlinearity on the spurious dynamic range (SFDR performance is also analyzed. The analysis and simulation results demonstrated that, compared with conventional ADC-based system, the measurement process decorrelates the input signal and the quantization error and alleviate the effect of other decorrelates of AIC, which results in a dramatic increase in spurious free dynamic range (SFDR.

  5. Effective sampling range of food-based attractants for female Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendra, Paul E; Epsky, Nancy D; Heath, Robert R

    2010-04-01

    Release-recapture studies were conducted with both feral and sterile females of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew) (Diptera: Tephritidae), to determine sampling range for a liquid protein bait (torula yeast/borax) and for a two-component synthetic lure (ammonium acetate and putrescine). Tests were done in a guava, Psidium guajava L., grove and involved releasing flies at a central point and recording the numbers captured after 7 h and 1, 2, 3, and 6 d in an array of 25 Multilure traps located 9-46 m from the release point. In all tests, highest rate of recapture occurred within the first day of release, so estimations of sampling range were based on a 24-h period. Trap distances were grouped into four categories (30 m from release point) and relative trapping efficiency (percentage of capture) was determined for each distance group. Effective sampling range was defined as the maximum distance at which relative trapping efficiency was > or = 25%. This corresponded to the area in which 90% of the recaptures occured. Contour analysis was also performed to document spatial distribution of fly dispersal. In tests with sterile flies, immature females dispersed farther and were recovered in higher numbers than mature females, regardless of attractant, and recapture of both cohorts was higher with torula yeast. For mature feral flies, range of the synthetic lure was determined to be 30 m. With sterile females, effective range of both attractants was 20 m. Contour maps indicated that wind direction had a strong influence on the active space of attractants, as reflected by distribution of captured flies.

  6. Evaluation of the Dynamic Velocity Effect for Steam Generator Wide Range Water Level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, In Soo; Nam, Ki Haeng; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Yun, Jae Hee [Korea Power Engineering Company, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The measurement of Steam Generator (SG) water level is based upon pressure differential of the level transmitter. As shown in Fig. 1, if the location of a lower tap is in the downcomer region, a deviation between the indicated level and the actual level occurs. This phenomenon is called 'velocity effect' or 'dynamic effect.' This effect needs to be addressed to obtain a more accurate SG water level. Korean Utility Requirements Document (KURD) requires Downcomer Velocity Effect (DVE) to be quantified and to be considered in the instrument requirements. In this paper, DVE occurred through downcomer will be evaluated for SG wide range (WR) level for OPR1000

  7. Long-range effect of ion implantation of Raex and Hardox steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzyński, P.; Kamiński, M.; Droździel, A.; Wiertel, M.

    2016-09-01

    Ion implantation involves introduction of ionized atoms of any element (nitrogen) to metals thanks to the high kinetic energy that they acquired in the electric field. The distribution of nitrogen ions implanted at E = 65 keV energy and D = 1.1017 N+ /cm2 fluence in the steel sample and vacancies produced by them was calculated using the SRIM program. This result was confirmed by RBS measurements. The initial maximum range of the implanted nitrogen ions is ∼⃒0.17 μm. This value is relatively small compared to the influence of nitriding on the thickness surface layer of modified steel piston rings. Measurements of the friction coefficient during the pin-on-disc tribological test were performed under dry friction conditions. The friction coefficient of the implanted sample increased to values characteristic of an unimplanted sample after ca. 1500 measurement cycles. The depth of wear trace is ca. 2.4 μm. This implies that the thickness of the layer modified by the implantation process is ∼⃒2.4 μm and exceeds the initial range of the implanted ions by an order of magnitude. This effect, referred to as a long-range implantation effect, is caused by migration of vacancies and nitrogen atoms into the sample. This phenomenon makes ion implantation a legitimate process of modification of the surface layer in order to enhance the tribological properties of critical components of internal combustion engines such as steel piston rings.

  8. Investigating Effects of Participatory Range Management Plans on Species Diversity in Semirum-Isfahan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Borhani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the effects of range management plans on species diversity, richness and evenness in Semirum rangelands, 52 sites (28 with treated plan and 24 without treated plan were selected. The non-parametric indices for species richness (Margalof, Menhinick, Jacknife and counting method and species diversity (Simpson, Camargo, Smith and Wilson and modified Nee were compared in two management plans. The mean comparisons were made by independent T Student Test and Mann-Witheny U Test, and correlation was determined between diversity indices and vegetation parameters. Based on the results there was no significant difference between the two management systems regarding environmental features, while the implementation of range management plans caused significant reduction of stocking rate. Among the studied indices, evenness of species in sites without treated plan was significantly more than the sites with treated plan. The correlation matrix showed that there was a significant positive correlation between species richness and vegetation cover, production of perennial plans, and the rangeland condition and trend, while evenness showed significant negative correlation with these indices. Generally, implementation of range management plans has considerable effect on increasing climax species, dominance of Bromus tomentellus and it causes improvement of rangeland condition and reduction of evenness. This behavior could be explained by the balance between species competition and grazing pressure. Further, succession process of the studied communities demonstrates domination of some desirable species, high production and less diversity.

  9. Serial founder effects and genetic differentiation during worldwide range expansion of monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Amanda A.; Zalucki, Myron P.; Bangura, Marie; Udawatta, Milan; Kronforst, Marcus R.; Altizer, Sonia; Haeger, Juan Fernández; de Roode, Jacobus C.

    2014-01-01

    Range expansions can result in founder effects, increasing genetic differentiation between expanding populations and reducing genetic diversity along the expansion front. However, few studies have addressed these effects in long-distance migratory species, for which high dispersal ability might counter the effects of genetic drift. Monarchs (Danaus plexippus) are best known for undertaking a long-distance annual migration in North America, but have also dispersed around the world to form populations that do not migrate or travel only short distances. Here, we used microsatellite markers to assess genetic differentiation among 18 monarch populations and to determine worldwide colonization routes. Our results indicate that North American monarch populations connected by land show limited differentiation, probably because of the monarch's ability to migrate long distances. Conversely, we found high genetic differentiation between populations separated by large bodies of water. Moreover, we show evidence for serial founder effects across the Pacific, suggesting stepwise dispersal from a North American origin. These findings demonstrate that genetic drift played a major role in shaping allele frequencies and created genetic differentiation among newly formed populations. Thus, range expansion can give rise to genetic differentiation and declines in genetic diversity, even in highly mobile species. PMID:25377462

  10. Study of the effect of short ranged ordering on the magnetism in FeCr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jena, Ambika Prasad, E-mail: apjena@bose.res.in [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India); Sanyal, Biplab, E-mail: biplab.sanyal@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Mookerjee, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.mookerjee61@gmail.com [Department of Condensed Matter and Materials Science, S N Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2014-01-15

    For the study of magnetism in systems where the local environment plays an important role, we propose a marriage between the Monte Carlo simulation and Zunger's special quasi-random structures. We apply this technique on disordered FeCr alloys and show that our estimates of the transition temperature is in good agreement with earlier experiments. - Highlights: • The magnetism in FeCr is sensitively depended on the ordering of the atoms : disordered or with short ranged ordering. • This work uses the SQS technique suggested by Zunger has been used to generate various degrees of short range ordering in FeCr. • The electronic structure and pair energies have been obatined from first principles ASR and Lichtenstein methods. • The effect of chemical ordering on magnetic ordering is studied in detail. • Only those situations where the chemical ordering is complete have been studied.

  11. Casimir Effect as a Test for Thermal Corrections and Hypothetical Long-Range Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Klimchitskaya, G L; Fischbach, E; Krause, D E; López, D; Mostepanenko, V M

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a precise experimental determination of the Casimir pressure between two gold-coated parallel plates by means of a micromachined oscillator. In contrast to all previous experiments on the Casimir effect, where a small relative error (varying from 1% to 15%) was achieved only at the shortest separation, our smallest experimental error ($\\sim 0.5$%) is achieved over a wide separation range from 170 nm to 300 nm at 95% confidence. We have formulated a rigorous metrological procedure for the comparison of experiment and theory without resorting to the previously used root-mean-square deviation, which has been criticized in the literature. This enables us to discriminate among different competing theories of the thermal Casimir force, and to resolve a thermodynamic puzzle arising from the application of Lifshitz theory to real metals. Our results lead to a more rigorous approach for obtaining constraints on hypothetical long-range interactions predicted by extra-dimensional physics and other exte...

  12. A Hamiltonian for the inclusion of spin effects in long-range Rydberg molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Eiles, Matthew T

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a Rydberg electron and a neutral atom situated inside its extended orbit is described via contact interactions for each atom-electron scattering channel. In ultracold environments, these interactions lead to ultra-long-range molecular states with binding energies typically ranging from $10$-$10^4$MHz. These energies are comparable to the relativistic and hyperfine structure of the separate atomic components. Studies of molecular formation aiming to reproduce observations with spectroscopic accuracy must therefore include the hyperfine splitting of the neutral atom and the spin-orbit splittings of both the Rydberg atom and the electron-atom interaction. Adiabatic potential energy curves that fully include these additional effects are presented for Rb$_2$ and Cs$_2$. The influence of spin degrees of freedom on the potential energy curves and molecular multipole moments probed in recent experimental work is elucidated and contrasted with other recent theoretical effort in this direction.

  13. Effect of kinesio tape application on calf pain and ankle range of motion in duathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Marban, Rafael; Mayorga-Vega, Daniel; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of the kinesio tape immediately after its application and after a duathlon competition on calf pain and the ankle range of motion in duathletes. A sample of 28 duathletes (age 29.11 ± 10.35 years; body height 172.57 ± 6.17 cm; body mass 66.63 ± 9.01 kg; body mass index 22.29 ± 2.00 kg/m(2)) were recruited from the competitors in a duathlon sprint. The Numerical Pain Rating Scale and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion measures were obtained at baseline, immediately after taping and 10 to 15 minutes after ending the duathlon competition. The kinesio tape was applied on the calf of duathletes 20 to 90 minutes before the competition, only on one of their legs (experimental leg) with the other leg acting as a control (control leg) in a randomized order. According to the between-group comparison, no differences were found immediately after the application of the kinesio tape and after the competition in the ankle range of motion and calf pain. However, a significant difference from baseline to immediately after taping was found in the ankle range of motion in the experimental leg. Applying the kinesio tape on the calf seems to immediately increase ankle dorsiflexion range of motion, but not after a duathlon competition. Applying the kinesio tape on the calf does not reduce muscle pain immediately or after a duathlon competition, but it appears to control an increase in pain.

  14. A new smoothing function to introduce long-range electrostatic effects in QM/MM calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Dong [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Duke, Robert E.; Andrés Cisneros, G., E-mail: andres@chem.wayne.edu [Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    A new method to account for long range electrostatic contributions is proposed and implemented for quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics long range electrostatic correction (QM/MM-LREC) calculations. This method involves the use of the minimum image convention under periodic boundary conditions and a new smoothing function for energies and forces at the cutoff boundary for the Coulomb interactions. Compared to conventional QM/MM calculations without long-range electrostatic corrections, the new method effectively includes effects on the MM environment in the primary image from its replicas in the neighborhood. QM/MM-LREC offers three useful features including the avoidance of calculations in reciprocal space (k-space), with the concomitant avoidance of having to reproduce (analytically or approximately) the QM charge density in k-space, and the straightforward availability of analytical Hessians. The new method is tested and compared with results from smooth particle mesh Ewald (PME) for three systems including a box of neat water, a double proton transfer reaction, and the geometry optimization of the critical point structures for the rate limiting step of the DNA dealkylase AlkB. As with other smoothing or shifting functions, relatively large cutoffs are necessary to achieve comparable accuracy with PME. For the double-proton transfer reaction, the use of a 22 Å cutoff shows a close reaction energy profile and geometries of stationary structures with QM/MM-LREC compared to conventional QM/MM with no truncation. Geometry optimization of stationary structures for the hydrogen abstraction step by AlkB shows some differences between QM/MM-LREC and the conventional QM/MM. These differences underscore the necessity of the inclusion of the long-range electrostatic contribution.

  15. Measurement of peak impact loads differ between accelerometers - Effects of system operating range and sampling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebart, Christina; Giangregorio, Lora M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Levine, Iris C; Tung, James; Laing, Andrew C

    2017-06-14

    A wide variety of accelerometer systems, with differing sensor characteristics, are used to detect impact loading during physical activities. The study examined the effects of system characteristics on measured peak impact loading during a variety of activities by comparing outputs from three separate accelerometer systems, and by assessing the influence of simulated reductions in operating range and sampling rate. Twelve healthy young adults performed seven tasks (vertical jump, box drop, heel drop, and bilateral single leg and lateral jumps) while simultaneously wearing three tri-axial accelerometers including a criterion standard laboratory-grade unit (Endevco 7267A) and two systems primarily used for activity-monitoring (ActiGraph GT3X+, GCDC X6-2mini). Peak acceleration (gmax) was compared across accelerometers, and errors resulting from down-sampling (from 640 to 100Hz) and range-limiting (to ±6g) the criterion standard output were characterized. The Actigraph activity-monitoring accelerometer underestimated gmax by an average of 30.2%; underestimation by the X6-2mini was not significant. Underestimation error was greater for tasks with greater impact magnitudes. gmax was underestimated when the criterion standard signal was down-sampled (by an average of 11%), range limited (by 11%), and by combined down-sampling and range-limiting (by 18%). These effects explained 89% of the variance in gmax error for the Actigraph system. This study illustrates that both the type and intensity of activity should be considered when selecting an accelerometer for characterizing impact events. In addition, caution may be warranted when comparing impact magnitudes from studies that use different accelerometers, and when comparing accelerometer outputs to osteogenic impact thresholds proposed in literature. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of Prestressing on the ns Range Electrical Breakdown in Polymeric Insulating Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitani, Isamu; Arii, Kiyomitsu

    1983-05-01

    The electrical impulse breakdown of prestressed polymer films was investigated in the ns range. The effect of prestressing on the breakdown was observed in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC), but not in polystyrene (PS) or polypropylene (PP). The amount of space charge estimated from the transient currents was large enough to induce electric field distortion in the bulk for all specimens. The effect in PET and PC is attributed to field distortion due to space charge accumulation near the electrodes, which can be estimated as electrons at the cathode and holes at the anode. The reason why the effect was not observed in PP and PS can be explained as the result of their own high breakdown strength in strong non-uniform fields.

  17. Effective-medium approximation for lattice random walks with long-range jumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Felix; Sokolov, Igor M

    2016-07-01

    We consider the random walk on a lattice with random transition rates and arbitrarily long-range jumps. We employ Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (EMA) to find the disorder-averaged (coarse-grained) dynamics. The EMA procedure replaces the disordered system with a cleverly guessed reference system in a self-consistent manner. We give necessary conditions on the reference system and discuss possible physical mechanisms of anomalous diffusion. In the case of a power-law scaling between transition rates and distance, lattice variants of Lévy-flights emerge as the effective medium, and the problem is solved analytically, bearing the effective anomalous diffusivity. Finally, we discuss several example distributions and demonstrate very good agreement with numerical simulations.

  18. Effective-medium approximation for lattice random walks with long-range jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Felix; Sokolov, Igor M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider the random walk on a lattice with random transition rates and arbitrarily long-range jumps. We employ Bruggeman's effective-medium approximation (EMA) to find the disorder-averaged (coarse-grained) dynamics. The EMA procedure replaces the disordered system with a cleverly guessed reference system in a self-consistent manner. We give necessary conditions on the reference system and discuss possible physical mechanisms of anomalous diffusion. In the case of a power-law scaling between transition rates and distance, lattice variants of Lévy-flights emerge as the effective medium, and the problem is solved analytically, bearing the effective anomalous diffusivity. Finally, we discuss several example distributions and demonstrate very good agreement with numerical simulations.

  19. Effects of Analog-to-Digital Converter Nonlinearities on Radar Range-Doppler Maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dubbert, Dale F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tise, Bertice L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Radar operation, particularly Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) radar modes, are very sensitive to anomalous effects of system nonlinearities. These throw off harmonic spurs that are sometimes detected as false alarms. One significant source of nonlinear behavior is the Analog to Digital Converter (ADC). One measure of its undesired nonlinearity is its Integral Nonlinearity (INL) specification. We examine in this report the relationship of INL to GMTI performance.

  20. Dissecting the roles of local packing density and longer-range effects in protein sequence evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmoradi, Amir; Wilke, Claus O

    2016-06-01

    What are the structural determinants of protein sequence evolution? A number of site-specific structural characteristics have been proposed, most of which are broadly related to either the density of contacts or the solvent accessibility of individual residues. Most importantly, there has been disagreement in the literature over the relative importance of solvent accessibility and local packing density for explaining site-specific sequence variability in proteins. We show that this discussion has been confounded by the definition of local packing density. The most commonly used measures of local packing, such as contact number and the weighted contact number, represent the combined effects of local packing density and longer-range effects. As an alternative, we propose a truly local measure of packing density around a single residue, based on the Voronoi cell volume. We show that the Voronoi cell volume, when calculated relative to the geometric center of amino-acid side chains, behaves nearly identically to the relative solvent accessibility, and each individually can explain, on average, approximately 34% of the site-specific variation in evolutionary rate in a data set of 209 enzymes. An additional 10% of variation can be explained by nonlocal effects that are captured in the weighted contact number. Consequently, evolutionary variation at a site is determined by the combined effects of the immediate amino-acid neighbors of that site and effects mediated by more distant amino acids. We conclude that instead of contrasting solvent accessibility and local packing density, future research should emphasize on the relative importance of immediate contacts and longer-range effects on evolutionary variation. Proteins 2016; 84:841-854. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2003-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  2. Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2004-09-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

  3. Calendar year 2007 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii,

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agogino, Karen [Department of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States). National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); Sanchez, Rebecca [Sandia Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2008-09-30

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Offi ce (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Washington Group International subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2007. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Site Offi ce (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2007a) and DOE Manual 231.1-1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual (DOE 2007).

  4. Increased frequency and range of sexual behavior in a patient with Parkinson's disease after use of pramipexole: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Renato P; Fabiani, Giorgio; Becker, Nilson; Teive, Hélio A G

    2009-04-01

    Several recent reports have linked the use of dopamine agonists (DAs) to a variety of compulsive behaviors in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). These inappropriate behaviors may include pathological gambling, compulsive shopping, and hypersexuality. To report the case of a patient with increased range of sexual behavior after use of pramipexole, a DA. A 67-year-old man with a 7-year diagnosis of PD treated with levodopa and pramipexole presented with a dramatic change in sexual behavior after an increase in DA dose. The patient, who historically was a very shy and conservative person, started to present increased frequency of sexual intercourse with his wife, during which he began speaking obscenities with an extreme preference for anal intercourse, preferences never requested before. After pramipexole was withdrawn, complete remission was observed with return to his usual sexual behavior. Hypersexuality and paraphilias are complications not uncommonly found in patients with PD under dopaminergic treatment. Further studies are needed for the understanding of this complex complication, and particularly the most prevalent relationship between pathological hypersexuality and use of DAs.

  5. 2013 Annual Site Environmental Report for Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range Nevada & Kauai Test Facility Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffith, Stacy Rene [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Agogino, Karen [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Washington, DC (United States); Li, Jun [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Nancy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Minitrez, Alexandra [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Avery, Penny [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bailey-White, Brenda [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonaguidi, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Catechis, Christopher [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); duMond, Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Eckstein, Joanna [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Forston, William [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herring, III, Allen [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lantow, Tiffany [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Reuben [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mauser, Joseph [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Amy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Payne, Jennifer [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Peek, Dennis [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reiser, Anita [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ricketson, Sherry [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roma, Charles [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Salinas, Stephanie [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ullrich, Rebecca [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities managed and operated by Sandia Corporation (Sandia), a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Field Office (SFO), in Albuquerque, New Mexico, administers the contract and oversees contractor operations at TTR and KTF. Sandia manages and conducts operations at TTR in support of the DOE/NNSA’s Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Navarro Research and Engineering subcontracts to Sandia in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report summarizes data and the compliance status of the sustainability, environmental protection, and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year 2013. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities, and the National Environmental Policy Act. Sandia is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA/Nevada Field Office retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of TTR ER sites. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 231.1B, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2012).

  6. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A.; Blanco-Canosa, S.; Schierle, E.; Lu, Y.; Wu, M.; Bluschke, M.; Minola, M.; Christiani, G.; Habermeier, H. U.; Logvenov, G.; Wang, Y.; van Aken, P. A.; Benckiser, E.; Weschke, E.; Le Tacon, M.; Keimer, B.

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ~ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  7. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe.

  8. Long-range charge-density-wave proximity effect at cuprate/manganate interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frano, A; Blanco-Canosa, S; Schierle, E; Lu, Y; Wu, M; Bluschke, M; Minola, M; Christiani, G; Habermeier, H U; Logvenov, G; Wang, Y; van Aken, P A; Benckiser, E; Weschke, E; Le Tacon, M; Keimer, B

    2016-08-01

    The interplay between charge density waves (CDWs) and high-temperature superconductivity is currently under intense investigation. Experimental research on this issue is difficult because CDW formation in bulk copper oxides is strongly influenced by random disorder, and a long-range-ordered CDW state in high magnetic fields is difficult to access with spectroscopic and diffraction probes. Here we use resonant X-ray scattering in zero magnetic field to show that interfaces with the metallic ferromagnet La2/3Ca1/3MnO3 greatly enhance CDW formation in the optimally doped high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6+δ (δ ∼ 1), and that this effect persists over several tens of nanometres. The wavevector of the incommensurate CDW serves as an internal calibration standard of the charge carrier concentration, which allows us to rule out any significant influence of oxygen non-stoichiometry, and to attribute the observed phenomenon to a genuine electronic proximity effect. Long-range proximity effects induced by heterointerfaces thus offer a powerful method to stabilize the charge-density-wave state in the cuprates and, more generally, to manipulate the interplay between different collective phenomena in metal oxides.

  9. Biological effects of tritium on fish cells in the concentration range of international drinking water standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marilyne; Festarini, Amy; Schleicher, Krista; Tan, Elizabeth; Kim, Sang Bog; Wen, Kendall; Gawlik, Jilian; Ulsh, Brant

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether the current Canadian tritium drinking water limit is protective of aquatic biota, an in vitro study was designed to assess the biological effects of low concentrations of tritium, similar to what would typically be found near a Canadian nuclear power station, and higher concentrations spanning the range of international tritium drinking water standards. Channel catfish peripheral blood B-lymphoblast and fathead minnow testis cells were exposed to 10-100,000 Bq l(-1) of tritium, after which eight molecular and cellular endpoints were assessed. Increased numbers of DNA strand breaks were observed and ATP levels were increased. There were no increases in γH2AX-mediated DNA repair. No differences in cell growth were noted. Exposure to the lowest concentrations of tritium were associated with a modest increase in the viability of fathead minnow testicular cells. Using the micronucleus assay, an adaptive response was observed in catfish B-lymphoblasts. Using molecular endpoints, biological responses to tritium in the range of Canadian and international drinking water standards were observed. At the cellular level, no detrimental effects were noted on growth or cycling, and protective effects were observed as an increase in cell viability and an induced resistance to a large challenge dose.

  10. Post-Closure Inspection Report for the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. For Calendar Year 2015, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Petrello, Jaclyn [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report provides the results of the annual post-closure inspections conducted at the closed corrective action units (CAUs) located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. This report covers calendar year 2015 and includes inspection and repair activities completed at the following CAUs; CAU 400: Bomblet Pit and Five Points Landfill (TTR); CAU 407: Roller Coaster RadSafe Area (TTR); CAU 424: Area 3 Landfill Complexes (TTR); CAU 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill (TTR); and CAU 487: Thunderwell Site (TTR) Inspections were conducted according to the post-closure plans in the approved closure reports and subsequent correspondence with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. The post-closure inspection plans and subsequent correspondence modifying the requirements for each CAU are included in Appendix B. The inspection checklists are included in Appendix C. Field notes are included in Appendix D. The annual post-closure inspections were conducted on May 12, 2015. Maintenance was required at CAU 453. Cracking along the north trench was repaired. One monument is missing at CAU 424; it will be replaced in 2016. Postings at CAUs 407, 424, 453, and 487 contain contact information for TTR Security. It was noted that protocols may not be in place to ensure that the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) is notified if access is needed at these sites. NNSA/NFO is working with the U.S. Air Force and Sandia to determine whether more appropriate contact information or new protocols are warranted for each CAU. Based on these inspections, there has not been a significant change in vegetation, and vegetation monitoring was not recommended at CAU 400 or CAU 407 in 2015.

  11. Biological Effects of Osteoblast-Like Cells on Nanohydroxyapatite Particles at a Low Concentration Range

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaochen Liu; Jie Wei; Shicheng Wei

    2011-01-01

    The biological effects of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells on nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA) at the low concentration range (5–25  g/mL) for 5 days was investigated. The results showed the viability and actin cytoskeleton of the cells descended with the increase of the concentration of n-HA, and the actin cytoskeleton of cells was depolymerised and became more disordered. Apoptotic rate of cells (1.85%, 1.99%, and 2.29%) increased with the increase of n-HA concentration (5, 15, and 25  g/mL) and be...

  12. Tool for Studying the Effects of Range Restriction in Correlation Coefficient Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-07-01

    AFHRL-TP-90-6 AIR FORCE TOOL FOR STUDYING THE EFFECTS OF RANGE RESTRICTION IN CORRELATION COEFFICIENT ESTIMATION H U Douglas E. JacksonM Eastern New...the Lftects of kange Restriction in Correlation Coefficient Estimation PE - 62703F PR - 7719 4. AUTHOR(S) TA - 18 Douglas E. Jackson WU - 46 Malcolm J...that one must try to estimate the correlation coefficient between two random variables X and Y in some population P using data taken f-om a

  13. Covariant spectator theory of $np$ scattering:\\\\ Effective range expansions and relativistic deuteron wave functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz Gross, Alfred Stadler

    2010-09-01

    We present the effective range expansions for the 1S0 and 3S1 scattering phase shifts, and the relativistic deuteron wave functions that accompany our recent high precision fits (with \\chi^2/N{data} \\simeq 1) to the 2007 world np data below 350 MeV. The wave functions are expanded in a series of analytical functions (with the correct asymptotic behavior at both large and small arguments) that can be Fourier-transformed from momentum to coordinate space and are convenient to use in any application. A fortran subroutine to compute these wave functions can be obtained from the authors.

  14. Eigenvectors and scalar products for long range interacting spin chains II: the finite size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Serban, D

    2013-01-01

    In this note, we study the eigenvectors and the scalar products the integrable long-range deformation of a XXX spin chain which is solved exactly by algebraic Bethe ansatz, and it coincides in the bulk with the Inozemtsev spin chain. At the closing point it contains a defect which effectively removes the wrapping interactions. Here we concentrate on determining the defect term for the first non-trivial order in perturbation in the deformation parameter and how it affects the Bethe ansatz equations. Our study is motivated by the relation with the dilatation operator of the N = 4 gauge theory in the su(2) sector.

  15. Serial founder effects during range expansion: a spatial analog of genetic drift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatkin, Montgomery; Excoffier, Laurent

    2012-05-01

    Range expansions cause a series of founder events. We show that, in a one-dimensional habitat, these founder events are the spatial analog of genetic drift in a randomly mating population. The spatial series of allele frequencies created by successive founder events is equivalent to the time series of allele frequencies in a population of effective size ke, the effective number of founders. We derive an expression for ke in a discrete-population model that allows for local population growth and migration among established populations. If there is selection, the net effect is determined approximately by the product of the selection coefficients and the number of generations between successive founding events. We use the model of a single population to compute analytically several quantities for an allele present in the source population: (i) the probability that it survives the series of colonization events, (ii) the probability that it reaches a specified threshold frequency in the last population, and (iii) the mean and variance of the frequencies in each population. We show that the analytic theory provides a good approximation to simulation results. A consequence of our approximation is that the average heterozygosity of neutral alleles decreases by a factor of 1-1/(2ke) in each new population. Therefore, the population genetic consequences of surfing can be predicted approximately by the effective number of founders and the effective selection coefficients, even in the presence of migration among populations. We also show that our analytic results are applicable to a model of range expansion in a continuously distributed population.

  16. Effect of spectral range in surface inactivation of Listeria innocua using broad-spectrum pulsed light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodling, Sarah E; Moraru, Carmen I

    2007-04-01

    Pulsed light (PL) treatment is an alternative to traditional thermal treatment that has the potential to achieve several log-cycle reductions in the concentration of microorganisms. One issue that is still debated is related to what specifically causes cell death after PL treatments. The main objective of this work was to elucidate which portions of the PL range are responsible for bacterial inactivation. Stainless steel coupons with controlled surface properties were inoculated with a known concentration of Listeria innocua in the stationary growth phase and treated with 1 to 12 pulses of light at a pulse rate of 3 pulses per s and a pulse width of 360 micros. The effects of the full spectrum (lambda = 180 to 1,100 nm) were compared with the effects obtained when only certain regions of UV, visible, and near-infrared light were used. The effectiveness of the treatments was determined in parallel by the standard plate count and most-probable-number techniques. At a fluence of about 6 J/cm(2), the full-spectrum PL treatment resulted in a 4.08-log reduction of L. innocua on a Mill finish surface, the removal of lambda light resulted in no lethal effects on L. innocua. Overwhelmingly, the portions of the PL spectrum responsible for bacterial death are the UV-B and UV-C spectral ranges (X light (lambda > 400 nm). This work provides additional supporting evidence that cell death in PL treatment is due to exposure to UV light. Additionally, it was shown that even a minor modification of the light path or the UV light spectrum in PL treatments can have a significant negative impact on the treatment intensity and effectiveness.

  17. Confinement effects upon the separation of structural transitions in linear systems with restricted bond fluctuation ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koci, Tomas; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-10-01

    By means of advanced parallel replica-exchange Monte Carlo methods we examine the influence of elasticity and confinement on the structural transitions of linear systems with restricted bonded interaction. For this purpose, we adopt a model for coarse-grained flexible polymers of finite length in the dilute regime. Hyperphase diagrams are constructed using energy-dependent canonical quantities to demonstrate the effects of the changes in the range of the confined interaction on the liquid and solid structural phases. With increasing bonded interaction range we observe the disappearance of the liquid phase and the fusion of the gas-liquid (or Θ) and the liquid-solid transitions. One of the most remarkable features, the liquid-gas transition, changes from second to first order if the confined interaction range exceeds a threshold that separates polymeric from nonpolymeric systems. The notoriously difficult sampling of the entropically suppressed conformations in the region of very strong first-order transitions is improved by using multiple Gaussian modified ensembles.

  18. Simulating the Wire Compensation of LHC Long-Range Beam-beam Effects.

    CERN Document Server

    Rijoff, T

    2012-01-01

    The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its minimum crossing angle are limited by long-range beam-beam collisions. Wire compensators can mitigate part of the long-range effects. We perform simulations to explore the efficiency of the compensation at possible wire locations by examining the tune footprint and the dynamic aperture. Starting from the weak-strong simulation code BBTrack we developed a new Lyapunov calculation tool, which seems to better diagnose regular or chaotic particle behavior. We also developed faster ways to execute the simulation and the post-processing. These modifications have allowed us to study different wire positions (longitudinal and transverse), varying wire currents, several wire shapes, and a range of beam-beam crossing angles, in view of a prototype wire installation in the LHC foreseen for 2014/15. Our simulations demonstrate that the wire can provide a good compensation, including for reduced crossing angle. Among the benefits of an LHC wire compensator are a b...

  19. Breakup and finite-range effects on the 8B(d,n)9C reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Tokuro; Yahiro, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    The astrophysical factor of 8B(p,{\\gamma})9C at zero energy, S18(0), is determined by a three-body coupled-channels analysis of the transfer reaction 8B(d,n)9C at 14.4 MeV/nucleon. Effects of the breakup channels of deuteron are investigated with the continuum-discretized coupled-channels method (CDCC). It is found that the transfer process through the deuteron breakup states, its interference with that through the deuteron ground state in particular, gives a large increase in the transfer cross section. The finite-range effects with respect to the proton- neutron relative coordinate are found to be less than 5%. As a result of the present analysis, S18(0) = 33 +/- 10 eVb is obtained that is smaller than the result of the previous DWBA analysis by about 26%.

  20. Connections among residual strong interaction, the EMC effect and short range correlations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Rong

    2015-01-01

    A linear correlation is shown quantitatively between the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and the nuclear residual strong interaction energy (RSIE) obtained from the nuclear binding energy subtracting the Coulomb energy part. The observed correlation supports the recent speculation that the nuclear dependence of quark distributions depend on the local nuclear density. This phenomenological relationship can be used to extract the size of in-medium correction (IMC) effect on deuteron. Most importantly, the EMC slopes $dR_{EMC}/dx$ of nuclei can be predicted with the nuclear binding energy data. The relationship between nucleon-nucleon (N-N) short range correlation (SRC) and RSIE is also presented.

  1. The dependence of the nuclear charge form factor on short range correlations and surface fluctuation effects

    CERN Document Server

    Massen, S E; Grypeos, M E

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the effects of fluctuations of the nuclear surface on the harmonic oscillator elastic charge form factor of light nuclei, while simultaneously approximating the short-range correlations through a Jastrow correlation ~factor. Inclusion of surface-fluctuation effects within this description, by truncating the cluster expansion at the two-body part, is found to improve somewhat the fit to the elastic charge form-factor of ^{16}O and ^{40}Ca. However, the convergence of the cluster expansion is expected to deteriorate. An additional finding is that the surface-fluctuation correlations produce a drastic change in the asymptotic behavior of the point-proton form factor, which now falls off quite slowly (i.e. as const. \\cdot q^{-4}) at large values of the momentum transfer q.

  2. Even-Odd Effects of Heisenberg Chains on Long-range Interaction and Entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Oh, Sangchul; Hu, Xuedong

    2010-01-01

    A strongly coupled Heisenberg chain provides an important channel for quantum communication through its many-body ground state. Yet, the nature of the effective interactions and the ability to mediate long-range entanglement differs significantly for chains of opposite parity. Here, we contrast the characters of even and odd-size chains when they are coupled to external qubits. Additional parity effects emerge in both cases, depending on the positions of the attached qubits. Some striking results include (i) the emergence of maximal entanglement and (ii) Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interactions for qubits attached to an even chain, and (iii) the ability of chains of either parity to mediate qubit entanglement that is undiminished by distance.

  3. Dissecting the roles of local packing density and longer-range effects in protein sequence evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoradi, Amir

    2015-01-01

    What are the structural determinants of protein sequence evolution? A number of site-specific structural characteristics have been proposed, most of which are broadly related to either the density of contacts or the solvent accessibility of individual residues. Most importantly, there has been disagreement in the literature over the relative importance of solvent accessibility and local packing density for explaining site-specific sequence variability in proteins. We show here that this discussion has been confounded by the definition of local packing density. The most commonly used measures of local packing, such as the contact number and the weighted contact number, represent by definition the combined effects of local packing density and longer-range effects. As an alternative, we here propose a truly local measure of packing density around a single residue, based on the Voronoi cell volume. We show that the Voronoi cell volume, when calculated relative to the geometric center of amino-acid side chains, be...

  4. Cell separator operation within temperature ranges to minimize effects on Chinese hamster ovary cell perfusion culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Hans; Ritter, Joachim B; Gorenflo, Volker M; Bowen, Bruce D; Piret, James M

    2007-01-01

    A cell retention device that provides reliable high-separation efficiency with minimal negative effects on the cell culture is essential for robust perfusion culture processes. External separation devices generally expose cells to periodic variations in temperature, most commonly temperatures below 37 degrees C, while the cells are outside the bioreactor. To examine this phenomenon, aliquots of approximately 5% of a CHO cell culture were exposed to 60 s cyclic variations of temperature simulating an acoustic separator environment. It was found that, for average exposure temperatures between 31.5 and 38.5 degrees C, there were no significant impacts on the rates of growth, glucose consumption, or t-PA production, defining an acceptable range of operating temperatures. These results were subsequently confirmed in perfusion culture experiments for average exposure temperatures between 31.6 and 38.1 degrees C. A 2(5-1) central composite factorial design experiment was then performed to systematically evaluate the effects of different operating variables on the inlet and outlet temperatures of a 10L acoustic separator. The power input, ambient temperature, as well as the perfusion and recycle flow rates significantly influenced the temperature, while the cell concentration did not. An empirical model was developed that predicted the temperature changes between the inlet and the outlet of the acoustic separator within +/-0.5 degrees C. A series of perfusion experiments determined the ranges of the significant operational settings that maintained the acoustic separator inlet and outlet temperatures within the acceptable range. For example, these objectives were always met by using the manufacturer-recommended operational settings as long as the recirculation flow rate was maintained above 15 L day(-1) and the ambient temperature was near 22 degrees C.

  5. Effect of Pilates Exercise on Range of Motion and Edema of Upper Limb in Mastectomy Side

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ghorbani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives : The surgery of breast cancer like any other surgeries may bring about some problems and complications, which the knowledge of these problems may be an effective way for prevention or dealing with the complications. The motor and sensory impairments in the upper limb of the surgery side necessitate the utilization of the rehabilitation methods. The main purpose of this research was to show the effect of Pilates exercise on range of motion and edema of upper limb in females suffering from breast cancer after going through surgery.   Methods: This quasi- experimental study was conducted on 25 patients randomly chosen among the patients referring to Cancer Institute. The designed exercise included five "Mat Pilates" moves which were done for 15 sessions until the patient reached fatigue borderlines. Meantime, the control group was doing routine active exercises in physiotherapy center. The range of motion and edema of upper limb was measured before and after applying the designed exercise. For describing the data, the mean and standard deviation, and for inferential analysis, the correlated T-tests and one way analysis of variance were used in level of significance of 5%, to compare the variants before and after applying the designed exercise.   Results: The results showed a significant difference between the flexion, extension, and internal, external rotation of shoulder, flexion and extension of elbow, flexion, extension, supination deviation and pronation deviation of the wrist and forearm before and after experiment in Pilates group. While in the control group, flexion, extension, internal and external rotation of shoulder, flexion and extension of elbow, and flexion of wrist showed a significant difference before and after the experiment.   Conclusion: The use of Pilates exercise after mastectomy surgery can increase the range of motion of the upper limb in the involved side of the patients, and decrease the edema

  6. Effects on vocal range and voice quality of singing voice training: the classically trained female voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabon, Peter; Stallinga, Rob; Södersten, Maria; Ternström, Sten

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was performed on the acoustical effects of singing voice training under a given study program, using the voice range profile (VRP). Pretraining and posttraining recordings were made of students who participated in a 3-year bachelor singing study program. A questionnaire that included questions on optimal range, register use, classification, vocal health and hygiene, mixing technique, and training goals was used to rate and categorize self-assessed voice changes. Based on the responses, a subgroup of 10 classically trained female voices was selected, which was homogeneous enough for effects of training to be identified. The VRP perimeter contour was analyzed for effects of voice training. Also, a mapping within the VRP of voice quality, as expressed by the crest factor, was used to indicate the register boundaries and to monitor the acoustical consequences of the newly learned vocal technique of "mixed voice." VRPs were averaged across subjects. Findings were compared with the self-assessed vocal changes. Pre/post comparison of the average VRPs showed, in the midrange, (1) a decrease in the VRP area that was associated with the loud chest voice, (2) a reduction of the crest factor values, and (3) a reduction of maximum sound pressure level values. The students' self-evaluations of the voice changes appeared in some cases to contradict the VRP findings. VRPs of individual voices were seen to change over the course of a singing education. These changes were manifest also in the average group. High-resolution computerized recording, complemented with an acoustic register marker, allows a meaningful assessment of some effects of training, on an individual basis and for groups that comprise singers of a specific genre. It is argued that this kind of investigation is possible only within a focused training program, given by a faculty who has agreed on the goals. Copyright © 2014 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effective optical constants of silver nanofilms calculated in wide frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsysar, Kseniya M.; Andreev, Valery G.; Vdovin, Vladimir A.

    2016-12-01

    The optical properties of Ag ultrathin films in dependence of their thickness are studied theoretically in a wavelength range 0.3 - 10 μm. The extinction coefficient (k) and refractive index (n) for thin Ag films with smooth surface structure are calculated with software package VASP. It was found the effect of growth of extinction coefficient and shift of its peak into long wavelength range with the thickness increasing. The effect is explained by the significant increasing of the surface electron states. Refractive index n is increased with the wavelength growth and attains saturation value ns at the wavelength λs. The thicker the films the higher the magnitude of ns and the larger the wavelength λs. Our results of calculations of k(λ) are in a good agreement with experimental data from ref.[25]. The difference in magnitudes of n obtained experimentally and theoretically can be explained by the formation of Ag nanoclusters on the surface of sputtered film.

  8. A Model for One-Dimensional Coherent Synchrotron Radiation including Short-Range Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ryne, Robert D; Qiang, Ji; Yampolsky, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    A new model is presented for simulating coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in one dimension. The method is based on convolving an integrated Green function (IGF) with the longitudinal charge density. Since it is based on an IGF, the accuracy of this approach is determined by how well one resolves the charge density and not by resolving the single particle wake function. Since short-range wakefield effects are included analytically, the approach can be much more efficient than ordinary (non-IGF) approaches in situations where the wake function and charge density have disparate spatial scales. Two cases are presented: one derived from the full wake including short-range effects, and one derived from the asymptotic wake. In the latter case the algorithm contains the same physics as others based on the asymptotic approximation, but requires only the line charge density and not its derivative. Examples are presented that illustrate the limitations of the asymptotic-wake approximation, and that illustrate how mic...

  9. Spectral Range Optimization to Enhance the Effectiveness of Phototherapy for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavskii, V. Yu.; Mikulich, A. V.; Leusenko, I. A.; Tretyakova, A. I.; Plavskaya, L. G.; Serdyuchenko, N. S.; Gao, J.; Xiong, D.; Wu, X.

    2017-03-01

    The effectiveness of phototherapy for hyperbilirubinemia of newborns using narrowband LED sources was found to depend not only on the position of the LED emission spectrum peak within the absorption band of bilirubin but also on the width of the incident radiation spectrum. Extension of the spectral range of radiation by adding a green component with λmax ≈ 505 nm to the blue light band with λmax ≈ 462 nm (provided equal integrated power density) gives a more efficient decrease in the total bilirubin level in the blood of newborns. This effect was attributed to heterogeneity of the spectral characteristics of bilirubin in different microenvironments as well as dependence of the optimal wavelength for photoisomerization of the pigment on the depth of the blood vessels where the bilirubin phototransformation reactions occur. Moreover, extension of the spectral range of the incident radiation by adding a green component increases the irradiated volumes of blood where the photoisomerization reactions with a high lumirubin quantum yield underlying this phototherapy are initiated.

  10. Biological Effects of Osteoblast-Like Cells on Nanohydroxyapatite Particles at a Low Concentration Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochen Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biological effects of osteoblast-like MG-63 cells on nanohydroxyapatite (n-HA at the low concentration range (5–25 g/mL for 5 days was investigated. The results showed the viability and actin cytoskeleton of the cells descended with the increase of the concentration of n-HA, and the actin cytoskeleton of cells was depolymerised and became more disordered. Apoptotic rate of cells (1.85%, 1.99%, and 2.29% increased with the increase of n-HA concentration (5, 15, and 25 g/mL and become significantly higher than the control. Total intracellular protein content decreased with n-HA concentration increase, showing significant difference between 25 g/mL and the control, and no significant change of ALP activity was observed at the 5th day. The results revealed that the cell growth was inhibited by n-HA in a concentration-dependent manner, and the obvious biological effects of MG-63 cells on n-HA existed at the low concentration range from 5 to 25 g/mL.

  11. Orientational order as the origin of the long-range hydrophobic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saikat; Singh, Rakesh S; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-04-07

    The long range attractive force between two hydrophobic surfaces immersed in water is observed to decrease exponentially with their separation-this distance-dependence of effective force is known as the hydrophobic force law (HFL). We explore the microscopic origin of HFL by studying distance-dependent attraction between two parallel rods immersed in 2D Mercedes Benz model of water. This model is found to exhibit a well-defined HFL. Although the phenomenon is conventionally explained by density-dependent theories, we identify orientation, rather than density, as the relevant order parameter. The range of density variation is noticeably shorter than that of orientational heterogeneity. The latter is comparable to the observed distances of hydrophobic force. At large separation, attraction between the rods arises primarily from a destructive interference among the inwardly propagating oppositely oriented heterogeneity generated in water by the two rods. As the rods are brought closer, the interference increases leading to a decrease in heterogeneity and concomitant decrease in free energy of the system, giving rise to the effective attraction. We notice formation of hexagonal ice-like structures at the onset of attractive region which suggests that metastable free energy minimum may play a role in the origin of HFL.

  12. The influence of non-locality on fluctuation effects for 3D short-ranged wetting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, A O; Bernardino, N R [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Romero-Enrique, J M [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado de Correos 1065, 41080 Seville (Spain); Rascon, C [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain)

    2008-12-17

    We use a non-local interfacial Hamiltonian to revisit a number of problems associated with the fluctuation theory of critical wetting transitions in three-dimensional systems with short-ranged forces. These centre around previous renormalization group predictions of strongly non-universal critical singularities and also possible fluctuation-induced first-order (stiffness-instability) behaviour, based on local interfacial models, which are not supported by extensive Monte Carlo simulations of wetting in the three-dimensional Ising model. Non-locality gives rise to long-ranged two-body interfacial interactions controlling the repulsion from the wall not modelled correctly in previous interfacial descriptions. In particular, correlation functions are characterized by two diverging parallel correlation lengths, {xi}{sub ||} and {xi}{sub NL} {proportional_to} {radical} ln {xi}{sub ||}, not one as previously thought. Mean-field, Ginzburg criterion and linear renormalization group analyses all show that some interfacial fluctuation effects are strongly damped for wavenumbers q>1/{xi}{sub NL}. This prevents a stiffness-instability and reduces the size of the asymptotic critical regime where non-universality can be observed. Non-universal critical singularities along the critical wetting isotherm are determined by a smaller, effective value of the wetting parameter which slowly approaches its asymptotic limit as the wetting film grows. This is confirmed by numerical simulation of a discretized version of the non-local model.

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-08-22

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the clean closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR), located on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. CAU 412 consists of a release of radionuclides to the surrounding soil from a storage–transportation test conducted on May 25, 1963. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed in April and May 2015, as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objectives process. The CAU 412 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the data needs identified by the data quality objectives process. This CR provides documentation and justification for the clean closure of CAU 412 under the FFACO without further corrective action. This justification is based on historical knowledge of the site, previous site investigations, implementation of the 1997 interim corrective action, and the results of the CAI. The corrective action of clean closure was confirmed as appropriate for closure of CAU 412 based on achievement of the following closure objectives: Radiological contamination at the site is less than the final action level using the ground troops exposure scenario (i.e., the radiological dose is less than the final action level): Removable alpha contamination is less than the high contamination area criterion: No potential source material is present at the site, and any impacted soil associated with potential source material has been removed so that remaining soil contains contaminants at concentrations less than the final action levels: and There is

  14. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR) Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Patrick [Navarro, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the clean closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR), located on the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. CAU 412 consists of a release of radionuclides to the surrounding soil from a storage–transportation test conducted on May 25, 1963. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed in April and May 2015, as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 412: Clean Slate I Plutonium Dispersion (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objectives process. The CAU 412 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the data needs identified by the data quality objectives process. This CR provides documentation and justification for the clean closure of CAU 412 under the FFACO without further corrective action. This justification is based on historical knowledge of the site, previous site investigations, implementation of the 1997 interim corrective action, and the results of the CAI. The corrective action of clean closure was confirmed as appropriate for closure of CAU 412 based on achievement of the following closure objectives: • Radiological contamination at the site is less than the final action level using the ground troops exposure scenario (i.e., the radiological dose is less than the final action level). • Removable alpha contamination is less than the high contamination area criterion. • No potential source material is present at the site, and any impacted soil associated with potential source material has been removed so that remaining soil contains contaminants at concentrations less than the final action levels.

  15. Range Tracing

    OpenAIRE

    Jenke, Philipp; Huhle, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we tackle the problem of merging an arbitrary number of range scans (depth images) into a single surface mesh. The mesh-based representation is superior to point-based approaches since it contains important connectivity information. Most previous mesh-based merge methods, however, lose surface details by using simplifying intermediate surface representations (e.g.\\ implicit functions). Such details are essential for further processing steps, especially for feature-preserving r...

  16. CRADA Final Report: Properties of Vacuum Deposited Thin Films of Lithium Phosphorous Oxynitride (Lipon) with an Expanded Composition Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudney, N.J.

    2003-12-29

    Thin films of an amorphous, solid-state, lithium electrolyte, referred to as ''Lipon'', were first synthesized and characterized at ORNL in 1991. This material is typically prepared by magnetron sputtering in a nitrogen plasma, which allows nitrogen atoms to substitute for part of the oxygen ions of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Lipon is the key component in the successful fabrication of ORNL's rechargeable thin film microbatteries. Cymbet and several other US Companies have licensed this technology for commercialization. Optimizing the properties of the Lipon material, particularly the lithium ion conductivity, is extremely important, yet only a limited range of compositions had been explored prior to this program. The goal of this CRADA was to develop new methods to prepare Lipon over an extended composition range and to determine if the film properties might be significantly improved beyond those previously reported by incorporating a larger N component into the film. Cymbet and ORNL investigated different deposition processes for the Lipon thin films. Cymbet's advanced deposition process not only achieved a higher deposition rate, but also permitted independent control the O and N flux to the surface of the growing film. ORNL experimented with several modified sputtering techniques and found that by using sectored sputter targets, composed of Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and Li{sub 3}N ceramic disks, thin Lipon films could be produced over an expanded composition range. The resulting Lipon films were characterized by electrical impedance, infrared spectroscopy, and several complementary analytical techniques to determine the composition. When additional N plus Li are incorporated into the Lipon film, the lithium conductivity was generally degraded. However, the addition of N accompanied by a slight loss of Li gave an increase in the conductivity. Although the improvement in the conductivity was only very modest and was a disappointing conclusion of

  17. Nonlinear effects in propagation of long-range surface plasmon polaritons in gold strip waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-04-01

    This paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical studies of nonlinear propagation of a long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) in gold strip waveguides. The plasmonic waveguides are fabricated in house, and contain a gold layer, tantalum pentoxide adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. The optical characterization was performed using a high power picosecond laser at 1064 nm. The experiments reveal two nonlinear optical effects: nonlinear power transmission and spectral broadening of the LRSPP mode in the waveguides. Both nonlinear optical effects depend on the gold layer thickness. The theoretical model of these effects is based on the third-order susceptibility of the constituent materials. The linear and nonlinear parameters of the LRSPP mode are obtained, and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation is solved. The dispersion length is much larger than the waveguides length, and the chromatic dispersion does not affect the propagation of the plasmonic mode. We find that the third-order susceptibility of the gold layer has a dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the LRSPP mode. The real part of the effective third-order susceptibility leads to the observed spectral broadening through the self-phase modulation effect, and its imaginary part determines the nonlinear absorption parameter and leads to the observed nonlinear power transmission. The experimental values of the third-order susceptibility of the gold layers are obtained. They indicate an effective enhancement of the third-order susceptibility for the gold layers, comparing to the bulk gold values. This enhancement is explained in terms of the change of the electrons motion.

  18. IMMEDIATE EFFECT OF CERVICAL MANIPULATION ON PAIN AND RANGE OF MOTION IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC MECHANICAL NECK PAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Isah Mayana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain has been reported as a prevalent musculoskeletal disorder globally with more than half of the general population being affected once or more within their life span. Methods: A randomized clinical trial research design was used which investigated the immediate effect of cervical manipulation on neck pain and cervical range of motion among patients with chronic mechanical neck pain. 20 male and female participants between the ages of 26 to 60 years with chronic mechanical neck pain attending physiotherapy clinics were recruited. They were randomly assigned into two groups (A and B of 10 patients each. Group A received soft tissue massage, and cervical manipulation and group B served as the control group, and they received only soft tissue massage. There were two outcomes measured; Pain intensity was rated using visual analog scale (VAS before and immediately after the intervention. Pre and Post intervention measurements of cervical spine range of motion using Goniometer were also taken. Results: Findings of the study revealed significant immediate improvement of pain and Cervical Range of Motions (p<0.05 in all dimensions in the experimental group while Pain, flexion and right side Cervical flexion significantly improved in the control group. It was also found out after comparing the outcomes between the two groups that, the experimental group had significantly (p<0.05 better improvement than the control group in post-intervention pain, cervical flexion, cervical extension and cervical (right and left lateral rotations. Conclusion: Cervical manipulation is effective in immediate pain relief and improvement in cervical range of motion in patients with mechanical neck pain

  19. SPECIFIC AND CROSS-OVER EFFECTS OF FOAM ROLLING ON ANKLE DORSIFLEXION RANGE OF MOTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Flexibility is an important physical quality. Self-myofascial release (SMFR) methods such as foam rolling (FR) increase flexibility acutely but how long such increases in range of motion (ROM) last is unclear. Static stretching (SS) also increases flexibility acutely and produces a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs. FR may also produce a cross-over effect to contralateral limbs but this has not yet been identified. Purpose To explore the potential cross-over effect of SMFR by investigating the effects of a FR treatment on the ipsilateral limb of 3 bouts of 30 seconds on changes in ipsilateral and contralateral ankle DF ROM and to assess the time-course of those effects up to 20 minutes post-treatment. Methods A within- and between-subject design was carried out in a convenience sample of 26 subjects, allocated into FR (n=13) and control (CON, n=13) groups. Ankle DF ROM was recorded at baseline with the in-line weight-bearing lunge test for both ipsilateral and contralateral legs and at 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes following either a two-minute seated rest (CON) or 3 3 30 seconds of FR of the plantar flexors of the dominant leg (FR). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to examine differences in ankle DF ROM. Results No significant between-group effect was seen following the intervention. However, a significant within-group effect (p<0.05) in the FR group was seen between baseline and all post-treatment time-points (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 minutes). Significant within-group effects (p<0.05) were also seen in the ipsilateral leg between baseline and at all post-treatment time-points, and in the contralateral leg up to 10 minutes post-treatment, indicating the presence of a cross-over effect. Conclusions FR improves ankle DF ROM for at least 20 minutes in the ipsilateral limb and up to 10 minutes in the contralateral limb, indicating that FR produces a cross-over effect into the contralateral limb. The mechanism producing these cross-over effects is

  20. New data strengthen the connection between Short Range Correlations and the EMC effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hen, O; Weinstein, L B

    2012-01-01

    Recently published measurements of the two nucleon short range correlation ($NN$-SRC) scaling factors, $a_2(A/d)$, strengthen the previously observed correlation between the magnitude of the EMC effect measured in electron deep inelastic scattering at $0.35\\le x_B\\le 0.7$ and the SRC scaling factor measured at $x_B \\ge 1$. The new results have improved precision and include previously unmeasured nuclei. The measurements of $a_2(A/d)$ for $^9$Be and $^{197}$Au agree with published predictions based on the EMC-SRC correlation. This paper examines the effects of the new data and of different corrections to the data on the slope and quality of the EMC-SRC correlation, the size of the extracted deuteron IMC effect, and the free neutron structure function. The results show that the linear EMC-SRC correlation is robust and that the slope of the correlation is insensitive to most combinations of corrections examined in this work. The inclusion of new nuclei shows that while neither the EMC effect nor the SRC scaling ...

  1. Confidence Intervals: From tests of statistical significance to confidence intervals, range hypotheses and substantial effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Beaulieu-Prévost

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available For the last 50 years of research in quantitative social sciences, the empirical evaluation of scientific hypotheses has been based on the rejection or not of the null hypothesis. However, more than 300 articles demonstrated that this method was problematic. In summary, null hypothesis testing (NHT is unfalsifiable, its results depend directly on sample size and the null hypothesis is both improbable and not plausible. Consequently, alternatives to NHT such as confidence intervals (CI and measures of effect size are starting to be used in scientific publications. The purpose of this article is, first, to provide the conceptual tools necessary to implement an approach based on confidence intervals, and second, to briefly demonstrate why such an approach is an interesting alternative to an approach based on NHT. As demonstrated in the article, the proposed CI approach avoids most problems related to a NHT approach and can often improve the scientific and contextual relevance of the statistical interpretations by testing range hypotheses instead of a point hypothesis and by defining the minimal value of a substantial effect. The main advantage of such a CI approach is that it replaces the notion of statistical power by an easily interpretable three-value logic (probable presence of a substantial effect, probable absence of a substantial effect and probabilistic undetermination. The demonstration includes a complete example.

  2. Short-range correlation effects on the nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Benhar, Omar; Speranza, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of a calculation of the nuclear matrix element of neutrinoless double-$\\beta$ decay of $^{48}$Ca, carried out taking into account nucleon-nucleon correlations in both coordinate- and spin-space. Our numerical results, obtained using nuclear matter correlation functions, suggest that inclusion of correlations leads to a $\\sim$ $20\\%$ decrease of the matrix element, with respect to the shell model prediction. This conclusion is supported by the results of an independent calculation, in which correlation effects are taken into account using the spectroscopic factors of $^{48}$Ca obtained from an {\\em ab intitio} many body approach.

  3. 3D Maxwell-Vlasov boundary value problem solution in stellarator geometry in ion cyclotron frequency range. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, V.; Watari, T.; Fukuyama, A.

    1996-12-01

    We develop the theory for the wave excitation, propagation and absorption in 3-dimensional (3D) stellarator equilibrium high beta plasma in ion cyclotron frequency range (ICRF). This theory forms a basis for a 3D code creation, urgently needed for the ICRF heating scenarios development for the constructed LHD and projected W7-X stellarators and for the stellarators being at operation (like CHS, W7-AS, etc.). The theory solves the 3D Maxwell-Vlasov antenna-plasma-conducting shell boundary value problem in the non - orthogonal flux coordinates ({psi}, {theta}, {phi}), {psi} being magnetic flux function, {theta} and {phi} being the poloidal and toroidal angles, respectively. All basic physics, like wave refraction, reflection and diffraction are firstly self consistently included, along with the fundamental ion and ion minority cyclotron resonances, two ion hybrid resonance, electron Landau and TTMP absorption. Antenna reactive impedance and loading resistance are also calculated and urgently needed for an antenna -generator matching. This is accomplished in a real confining magnetic field being varying in a plasma major radius direction, in toroidal and poloidal directions, through making use of the hot dense plasma dielectric kinetic tensor. The theory is developed in a manner that includes tokamaks and magnetic mirrors as the particular cases through general metric tensor (provided by an equilibrium solver) treatment of the wave equations. We describe the structure of newly developed stellarator ICRF 3D full wave code STELION, based on theory described in this report. (J.P.N.)

  4. Novel cytokinin derivatives do not show negative effects on root growth and proliferation in submicromolar range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Podlešáková

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: When applied to a nutrition solution or agar media, the non-substituted aromatic cytokinins caused thickening and shortening of the primary root, had an inhibitory effect on lateral root branching, and even showed some negative effects on development of the aerial part at as low as a 10 nanomolar concentration. Novel analogues of aromatic cytokinins ranking among topolins substituted on N9-atom of adenine by tetrahydropyranyl or 4-chlorobutyl group have been prepared and tested in standardized cytokinin bioassays [1]. Those showing comparable activities with N(6-benzylaminopurine were further tested in planta. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The main aim of the study was to explain molecular mechanism of function of novel cytokinin derivatives on plant development. Precise quantification of cytokinin content and profiling of genes involved in cytokinin metabolism and perception in treated plants revealed several aspects of different action of m-methoxytopolin base and its substituted derivative on plant development. In contrast to standard cytokinins, N9- tetrahydropyranyl derivative of m-topolin and its methoxy-counterpart showed the negative effects on root development only at three orders of magnitude higher concentrations. Moreover, the methoxy-derivative demonstrates a positive effect on lateral root branching and leaf emerging in a nanomolar range of concentrations, in comparison with untreated plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tetrahydropyranyl substitution at N9-position of cytokinin purine ring significantly enhances acropetal transport of a given cytokinins. Together with the methoxy-substitution, impedes accumulation of non-active cytokinin glucoside forms in roots, allows gradual release of the active base, and has a significant effect on the distribution and amount of endogenous isoprenoid cytokinins in different plant tissues. The utilization of novel aromatic cytokinin derivatives can distinctively improve expected

  5. Lagged effect of diurnal temperature range on mortality in a subtropical megacity of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Luo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many studies have found extreme temperature can increase the risk of mortality. However, it is not clear whether extreme diurnal temperature range (DTR is associated with daily disease-specific mortality, and how season might modify any association. OBJECTIVES: To better understand the acute effect of DTR on mortality and identify whether season is a modifier of the DTR effect. METHODS: The distributed lag nonlinear model (DLNM was applied to assess the non-linear and delayed effects of DTR on deaths (non-accidental mortality (NAD, cardiovascular disease (CVD, respiratory disease (RD and cerebrovascular disease (CBD in the full year, the cold season and the warm season. RESULTS: A non-linear relationship was consistently found between extreme DTR and mortality. Immediate effects of extreme low DTR on all types of mortality were stronger than those of extreme high DTR in the full year. The cumulative effects of extreme DTRs increased with the increment of lag days for all types of mortality in cold season, and they were greater for extreme high DTRs than those of extreme low DTRs. In hot season, the cumulative effects for extreme low DTRs increased with the increment of lag days, but for extreme high DTR they reached maxima at a lag of 13 days for all types of mortality except for CBD(at lag6 days, and then decreased. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that extreme DTR is an independent risk factor of daily mortality, and season is a modifier of the association of DTR with daily mortality.

  6. Size effect on high temperature variable range hopping in Al+ implanted 4H-SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisini, Antonella; Parisini, Andrea; Nipoti, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    The hole transport properties of heavily doped 4H-SiC (Al) layers with Al implanted concentrations of 3  ×  1020 and 5  ×  1020 cm-3 and annealed in the temperature range 1950-2100 °C, have been analyzed to determine the main transport mechanisms. This study shows that the temperature dependence of the resistivity (conductivity) may be accounted for by a variable range hopping (VRH) transport into an impurity band. Depending on the concentration of the implanted impurities and the post-implantation annealing treatment, this VRH mechanism persists over different temperature ranges that may extend up to room temperature. In this framework, two different transport regimes are identified, having the characteristic of an isotropic 3D VRH and an anisotropic nearly 2D VRH. The latter conduction mechanism appears to take place in a rather thick layer (about 400 nm) that is too large to induce a confinement effect of the carrier hops. The possibility that an anisotropic transport may be induced by a structural modification of the implanted layer because of a high density of basal plane stacking faults (SF) in the implanted layers is considered. The interpretation of the conduction in the heaviest doped samples in terms of nearly 2D VRH is supported by the results of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigation on one of the 5  ×  1020 cm-3 Al implanted samples of this study. In this context, the average separation between basal plane SFs, measured along the c-axis, which is orthogonal to the carrier transport during electrical characterization, appears to be in keeping with the estimated value of the optimal hopping length of the VRH theory. Conversely, no SFs are detected by TEM in a sample with an Al concentration of 1  ×  1019 cm-3 where a 3D nearest neighbor hopping (NNH) transport is observed.

  7. Effect of higher strain range cycling on near fatigue-limit fatigue life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, Chie; Nakagawa, Y.G. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Research Inst; Rosinski, S.T.

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this study is to clarify the effects of pre-cycling above the fatigue limit on near the fatigue-limit fatigue behaviors of SA508, low alloy steel for nuclear pressure vessels, correlating fatigue lifetime with microstructural changes in the bulk. It has been observed that dislocation cell structure is well developed in an as-received SA508 sample and the misorientation among cells increases with fatigue accumulation during fatigue tests. The cell to cell misorientation was measured and statistically quantified by the Selected Area electron beam Diffraction (SAD). It was shown that a fatigue crack started growing abruptly when the SAD value (the mean misorientation among cells) exceeded a critical angle, 4-5 degrees. Fatigue tests were performed for SA508 samples, first at a high total strain range (0.62%) to 10, 100, and 6000 cycles followed by cycling at near the fatigue-limit strain range (0.40%). The sample with pre-cycling for 100 and 6000 cycles failed while ones with pre-cycling for 10 cycles and without pre-cycling did not rupture till about 10{sup 6} cycles where the tests were terminated. Small surface cracks were found all samples pre-cycled at the high strain range but the cracks were arrested for a long time at the near fatigue limit cycling followed by an abrupt growth at the failure. It was found by the SAD that samples failed at the fatigue limit when the average misorientation among cells exceeds the critical angle regardless of pre-cycling histories. The SAD value changed even during cycling below the fatigue limit, and the change in SAD value was strongly influenced by the number of pre-cycling above the fatigue limit. These changes well agreed with fatigue lifetime of the samples. (author)

  8. Endocrine, metabolic, and behavioral effects of and recovery from acute stress in a free-ranging bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviche, Pierre; Bittner, Stephanie; Davies, Scott; Valle, Shelley; Gao, Sisi; Carpentier, Elodie

    2016-08-01

    Acute stress in vertebrates generally stimulates the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and is often associated with multiple metabolic changes, such as increased gluconeogenesis, and with behavioral alterations. Little information is available, especially in free-ranging organisms, on the duration of these reversible effects once animals are no longer exposed to the stressor. To investigate this question, we exposed free-ranging adult male Rufous-winged Sparrows, Peucaea carpalis, in breeding condition to a standard protocol consisting of a social challenge (conspecific song playback) followed with capture and restraint for 30min, after which birds were released on site. Capture and restraint increased plasma corticosterone (CORT) and decreased plasma testosterone (T), glucose (GLU), and uric acid (UA). In birds that we recaptured the next day after exposure to conspecific song playback, plasma CORT and UA levels no longer differed from levels immediately after capture the preceding day. However, plasma T was similar to that measured after stress exposure the preceding day, and plasma GLU was markedly elevated. Thus, exposure to social challenge and acute stress resulted in persistent (⩾24h) parameter-specific effects. In recaptured sparrows, the territorial aggressive response to conspecific song playback, as measured by song rate and the number of flights over the song-broadcasting speakers, did not, however, differ between the first capture and the recapture, suggesting no proximate functional association between plasma T and conspecific territorial aggression. The study is the first in free-ranging birds to report the endocrine, metabolic, and behavioral recovery from the effects of combined social challenge and acute stress.

  9. RF Wire Compensator of Long-Range Beam-Beam Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Dorda, U; Kroyer, T; Zimmermann, F

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic aperture of the proton beam circulating in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to be limited by up to 120 long-range beam-beam encounters. In order to perfectly compensate the LHC long-range beambeam effect for nominal as well as for so-called "PACMAN" bunches, i.e. bunches at the start or end of a bunch train, the strength of a wire compensator should be adjusted for each bunch individually. Here an RF-based compensator is proposed as a practical solution for the PACMAN compensation. We show that this approach also allows relaxing the power and precision requirements compared with those of a pulsed DC device, to a level within the state-of-the-art of RF technology. Furthermore it permits the use of a passive circulator in the tunnel close to the beam and thus a significant reduction of the transmission line length and of the associated multiple reflections. Simulations of dynamic aperture and emittance growth, issues related to RF phase noise, and first experimental results from laborator...

  10. Strouhal number effect on synchronized vibration range of a circular cylinder in cross flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Tsutomu; Nakao, Toshitsugu; Hayashi, Masaaki; Murayama, Kouichi [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    Synchronized vibrations were measured for a circular cylinder in a water cross flow at subcritical Reynolds numbers to compare the synchronization range between the subcritical and supercritical regions and clarify the effect of the Strouhal number on the range. A small vibration in the lift direction was found in only the subcritical region when the Karman vortex shedding frequency was about 1/5 of the cylinder natural frequency. The ratio of the Karman vortex shedding frequency to the natural frequency where the self-excited vibration in the drag direction by the symmetrical vortex shedding began was about 1/4 in the subcritical region, and increased to 0.32 at the Strouhal number of 0.29 in the supercritical region. The frequency ratio at the beginning of the lock-in vibration in the drag direction by the Karman vortex shedding was about 1/2, and that in the lift direction decreased from 1 to 0.8 with decreasing Strouhal number. (author)

  11. Water mist effect on cooling range and efficiency of casting die

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Władysiak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This project is showing investigation results of cooling process of casting die in the temperature range 570÷100 °C with 0.40 MPa compressed air and water mist streamed under pressure 0.25÷0.45 MPa in air jet 0.25÷0.50 MPa using open cooling system.The character and the speed of changes of temperature, forming of the temperture’s gradient along parallel layer to cooled surface of die is shawing with thermal and derivative curves. The effect of kind of cooling factor on the temperature and time and distance from cooling nozzle is presented in the paper. A designed device for generating the water mist cooling the die and the view of sprying water stream is shown here. It’s proved that using of the water mist together with the change of heat transfer interface increases intensity of cooling in the zone and makes less the range cooling zone and reduces the porosity of cast microstructure.

  12. The Effect of Whole Body Vibration on Ankle Range of Motion and the H-reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apple, Stacey; Ehlert, Kelly; Hysinger, Pam; Nash, Cara; Voight, Michael; Sells, Pat

    2010-02-01

    Limited research suggests that an effect of whole body vibration (WBV) on the central nervous system (CNS) is suppression. An indirect measure used to assess CNS level of activation is the Soleus H-reflex. If true suppression does occur, other factors such as range of motion may be impacted. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of WBV on H-reflex amplitude and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers between the ages of 21-41 participated. Subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (n=13) or WBV group (n=14). H-reflex and ankle dorsiflexion measures were assessed before and after a three minute WBV perturbation (40 μHz, amplitude 2-4 mm). These measurements were repeated every five minutes up to twenty minutes following the intervention. The H-reflex amplitude showed a significant decrease (pmotion showed significant interaction (pcontrol group also showed this change, WBV does not appear to be a key cause of suppression. Range of motion was not clinically significant for either group.

  13. Energy Impacts of Effective Range Hood Use for all U.S. Residential Cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logue, Jennifer M; Singer, Brett

    2014-06-01

    Range hood use during residential cooking is essential to maintaining good indoor air quality. However, widespread use will impact the energy demand of the U.S. housing stock. This paper describes a modeling study to determine site energy, source energy, and consumer costs for comprehensive range hood use. To estimate the energy impacts for all 113 million homes in the U.S., we extrapolated from the simulation of a representative weighted sample of 50,000 virtual homes developed from the 2009 Residential Energy Consumption Survey database. A physics-based simulation model that considered fan energy, energy to condition additional incoming air, and the effect on home heating and cooling due to exhausting the heat from cooking was applied to each home. Hoods performing at a level common to hoods currently in U.S. homes would require 19?33 TWh [69?120 PJ] of site energy, 31?53 TWh [110-190 PJ] of source energy; and would cost consumers $1.2?2.1 billion (U.S.$2010) annually in the U.S. housing stock. The average household would spend less than $15 annually. Reducing required airflow, e.g. with designs that promote better pollutant capture has more energy saving potential, on average, than improving fan efficiency.

  14. Differential effects of melatonin as a broad range UV-damage preventive dermato-endocrine regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleszczyński, Konrad; Hardkop, Lena H; Fischer, Tobias W

    2011-01-01

    Melatonin or N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a compound derived from tryptophan that is found in all organisms from single cells to vertebrates and the human. It is one of the most evolutionarily conserved and pleiotropic hormone still active in humans and has been implicated in vital skin functions such as hair growth, fur pigmentation as well as melanoma control. Being a main secretory product of the pineal gland, melatonin regulates seasonal biorhythms, reproductive mechanisms or mammary gland metabolism. Due to its wide range endocrine properties it is also recognized to modulate numerous additional functions ranging from scavenging free radicals, immunomodulation-mediated DNA repair, wound healing, involvement in gene expression connected with circadian clocks and modulation of secondary endocrine signaling including prolactin release. Recently, apart from above mentioned entities, it was shown that melatonin suppresses ultraviolet (UV)-induced damage in human skin and human derived cell lines (e.g., keratinocytes, fibroblasts). The magnitude of UV-induced damage is mediated apparently by various molecular mechanisms related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis and mitochondrial-mediated cell death which are all counteracted or modulated by melatonin. We provide here an update of the relevant protective effects and molecular mechanisms of action of melatonin in the skin.

  15. Investigating relativity using lunar laser ranging - Geodetic precession and the Nordtvedt effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. O.; Newhall, X. X.; Williams, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    The emplacement of retroreflectors on the moon by Apollo astronauts and the Russian Lunakhod spacecraft marked the inception of lunar laser ranging (LLR) and provided a natural laboratory for the study of general relativity. Continuing acquisition of increasingly accurate LLR data has provided enhanced sensitivity to general relativity parameters. Two relativistic effects are investigated in this paper: (1) the Nordtvedt effect, yielding a test of the strong equivalence principle, would appear as a distortion of the geocentric lunar orbit in the direction of the sun. The inclusion of recent LLR data limits the size of any such effect to 3 + or - 4 cm. The sensitivities to the various PPN quantities are also highlighted. (2) the geodetic precession of the lunar perigee is predicted by general relativity as a consequence of the motion of the earth-moon system about the sun; its theoretical magnitude is 19.2 mas/yr. Analysis presented here confirms this value and determines this quality to a 2 percent level.

  16. Climate Effects on Plant Range Distributions and Community Structure of Pacific Northwest Prairies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridgham, Scott D. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States); Johnson, Bart [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States)

    2013-09-26

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) prairies are an imperiled ecosystem that contain a large number of plant species with high fidelity to this habitat. The few remaining high-quality PNW prairies harbor a number of sensitive, rare, and endangered plant species that may be further at-risk with climate change. Thus, PNW prairies are an excellent model system to examine how climate change will affect the distribution of native plant species in grassland sites. Our experimental objectives were to determine: (i) how climate change will affect the range distribution of native plant species; (ii) what life history stages are most sensitive to climate change in a group of key indicator native species; (iii) the robustness of current restoration techniques and suites of species to changing climate, and in particular, the relative competitiveness of native species versus exotic invasive species; and (iv) the effects of climate change on carbon and nutrient cycling and soil-microbial-plant feedbacks. We addressed these objectives by experimentally increasing temperature 2.5 to 3.0 ºC above ambient with overhead infrared lamps and increasing wet-season precipitation by 20% above ambient in three upland prairie sites in central-western Washington, central-western Oregon, and southwestern Oregon from fall 2010 through 2012. Additional precipitation was applied within 2 weeks of when it fell so precipitation intensity was increased, particularly during the winter rainy season but with minimal additions during the summer dry season. These three sites also represent a 520-km natural climate gradient of increasing degree of severity of Mediterranean climate from north to south. After removing the extant vegetation, we planted a diverse suite of 12 native species that have their northern range limit someplace within the PNW in each experimental plot. An additional 20 more wide-spread native species were also planted into each plot. We found that recruitment of plant species within their ranges

  17. Modelling channel network formation: the effect of tidal range and initial bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coco, G.; van Maanen, B.; Bryan, K.

    2010-12-01

    Tidal embayments are of key importance to coastal communities because they can be used as transport routes and they are amongst the most productive ecosystems in the world. These environments can host extensive channel networks which have a strong control on the hydrodynamics and sediment transport. As a result, channel networks affect both the short- and long-term morphological evolution of tidal embayments. Despite their importance, observations of channel network formation involve large spatial and temporal scales so that detailed studies have rarely been reported. Modelling techniques have been developed which overcome the problem related to the difference in time scales over which hydrodynamic and morphodynamic processes occur. Here we use this type of models to assess the influence of tidal range and initial bathymetry on the long-term evolution of tidal basins and the formation of channel network patterns. A numerical model has been developed to simulate morphological evolution as a result of the interactions between hydrodynamics, sediment transport, and bed elevation change. Simulations were undertaken using idealised initial bathymetries consisting of an offshore area, inlet, and basin. Flow velocities are computed using an open source numerical model (ELCOM; Estuary and Lake Computer Model) that is based on the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible flow using the hydrostatic assumption. The computed flow velocities drive sediment transport, which is calculated using formulas widely adopted in sediment transport studies. Gradients in sediment transport rate yield morphological change which feed back into the hydrodynamic part of the model, thus coupling the different subsystems of the morphodynamic feedback loop. Model results indicate that morphodynamic interactions can cause channel initiation and potentially give rise to channel pattern development. Numerous simulations have been performed to test the sensitivity of the

  18. Mass dependence of nuclear short- range correlations and the EMC effect

    CERN Document Server

    Cosyn, Wim; Ryckebusch, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We sketch an approximate method to quantify the number of correlated pairs in any nucleus $A$. It is based on counting independent-particle model (IPM) nucleon-nucleon pairs in a relative $S$-state with no radial excitation. We show that IPM pairs with those quantum numbers are most prone to short-range correlations and are at the origin of the high-momentum tail of the nuclear momentum distributions. Our method allows to compute the $a_2$ ratios extracted from inclusive electron scattering. Furthermore, our results reproduce the observed linear correlation between the number of correlated pairs and the magnitude of the EMC effect. We show that the width of the pair center-of-mass distribution in exclusive two-nucleon knockout yields information on the quantum numbers of the pairs.

  19. Human-Induced Effects on RSS Ranging Measurements for Cooperative Positioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Rosa, Francescantonio; Pelosi, Mauro; Nurmi, Jari

    2012-01-01

    We present experimental evaluations of human-induced perturbations on received-signal-strength-(RSS-) based ranging measurements for cooperative mobile positioning. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt to gain insight and understand the impact of both body loss and hand grip...... on the RSS for enhancing proximity measurements among neighbouring devices in cooperative scenarios. Our main contribution is represented by experimental investigations. Analysis of the errors introduced in the distance estimation using path-loss-based methods has been carried out. Moreover, the exploitation...... of human-induced perturbations for enhancing the final positioning accuracy through cooperative schemes has been assessed. It has been proved that the effect of cooperation is very limited if human factors are not taken into account when performing experimental activities....

  20. Discrete solitons in waveguide arrays with long-range linearly coupled effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mai, Zhijie; Wu, Jianxiong; Li, Yongyao

    2014-01-01

    We study the influences to the discrete soliton (DS) by introducing linearly long-range nonlocal interactions, which give rise to the off-diagonal elements of the linearly coupled matrix in the discrete nonlinear schrodinger equation to be filled by non-zero terms. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations find that the DS under this circumstance can exhibit strong digital effects: the fundamental DS is a narrow one, which occupies nearly only one waveguide, the dipole and double-monopole solitons, which occupy two waveguides, can be found in self-focusing and -defocusing nonlinearities, respectively. Stable flat-top solitons and their stagger counterparts, which occupy a controllable number of waveguides, can also be obtained through this system. Such digital properties may give rise to additional data processing applications and have potential in fabricating digital optical devices in all-optical networks.

  1. The effect of temperature, interaction range, and pair potential on the formation of dodecagonal quasicrystals in core-corona systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattabhiraman, Harini; Dijkstra, Marjolein

    2017-03-01

    A two-dimensional dodecagonal quasicrystal was previously reported by Dotera et al (2014 Nature 506 208) in a system of particles interacting with a hard core of diameter σ and a repulsive square shoulder of diameter δ =1.40σ . In the current work, we examine the formation of this quasicrystal using bond orientational order parameters, correlation functions and tiling distributions. We find that this dodecagonal quasicrystal forms from a fluid phase. We further study the effect of the width of the repulsive shoulder by simulating the system over a range of values of δ. For the range of densities and temperatures considered, we observe the formation of the dodecagonal quasicrystal between δ =1.30σ and 1.44σ . We also study the effect of shape of the interaction potential by simulating the system using three other interaction potentials with two length scales, namely hard-core plus a linear ramp, modified exponential, or Buckingham (exp-6) potential. We observe the presence of the quasicrystal in all three systems. However, depending on the shape of the potential, the formation of the quasicrystal takes place at lower temperatures (or higher interaction strengths). Using free-energy calculations, we demonstrate that the quasicrystal is thermodynamically stable in the square-shoulder and linear-ramp system.

  2. Effects of thoracic kyphosis and forward head posture on cervical range of motion in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quek, June; Pua, Yong-Hao; Clark, Ross A; Bryant, Adam L

    2013-02-01

    It is unclear how age-related postural changes such as thoracic spine kyphosis influence cervical range-of-motion (ROM) in patients with cervical spine dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to explore the mediating effects of forward head posture (FHP) on the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical mobility in older adults with cervical spine dysfunction. Fifty-one older adults (30 females, mean[SD]age = 66[4.9] years) with cervical spine dysfunction - that is, cervical pain with or without referred pain, numbness or paraesthesia - participated. Pain-related disability was measured using the neck disability index (NDI). Thoracic kyphosis was measured using a flexicurve. FHP was assessed via the craniovertebral angle (CVA) measured from a digitized, lateral-view photograph of each subject. Cervical ROM - namely, upper and general cervical rotation and cervical flexion - was measured by the Cervical Range-of-Motion (CROM) device. Greater thoracic kyphosis was significantly associated with lesser CVA (Spearman ρ = -0.48) whereas greater CVA was significantly associated with greater cervical flexion (Spearman ρ = 0.30) and general rotation ROM (ρ = 0.33), but not with upper cervical rotation ROM (ρ = 0.15). Bootstrap mediational analyses, adjusted for age, gender, weight and NDI, revealed significant indirect effects of thoracic kyphosis on cervical flexion and general rotation ROM through a FHP. Our results show that FHP mediated the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and cervical ROM, specifically general cervical rotation and flexion. These results not only support the justifiable attention given to addressing FHP to improve cervical impairments, but they also suggest that addressing thoracic kyphosis impairments may constitute an "upstream" approach.

  3. Effect of Climate Change on Mediterranean Winter Ranges of Two Migratory Passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellería, José L; Fernández-López, Javier; Fandos, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    We studied the effect of climate change on the distribution of two insectivorous passerines (the meadow pipit Anthus pratensis and the chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita) in wintering grounds of the Western Mediterranean basin. In this region, precipitation and temperature can affect the distribution of these birds through direct (thermoregulation costs) or indirect effects (primary productivity). Thus, it can be postulated that projected climate changes in the region will affect the extent and suitability of their wintering grounds. We studied pipit and chiffchaff abundance in several hundred localities along a belt crossing Spain and Morocco and assessed the effects of climate and other geographical and habitat predictors on bird distribution. Multivariate analyses reported a positive effect of temperature on the present distribution of the two species, with an additional effect of precipitation on the meadow pipit. These climate variables were used with Maxent to model the occurrence probabilities of species using ring recoveries as presence data. Abundance and occupancy of the two species in the study localities adjusted to the distribution models, with more birds in sectors of high climate suitability. After validation, these models were used to forecast the distribution of climate suitability according to climate projections for 2050-2070 (temperature increase and precipitation reduction). Results show an expansion of climatically suitable sectors into the highlands by the effect of warming on the two species, and a retreat of the meadow pipit from southern sectors related to rain reduction. The predicted patterns show a mean increase in climate suitability for the two species due to the warming of the large highland expanses typical of the western Mediterranean.

  4. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark Krauss

    2010-09-01

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: • Mid Target • Flightline Bomblet Location • Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 • SAC Target Location 2 • South Antelope Lake • Tomahawk Location 1 • Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: • Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. • Investigate potential disposal pit locations. • Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are

  5. Narrative report: Calendar year 1976: Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range and Hailstone, Halfbreed, Lake Mason & War Horse National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1976 calendar year....

  6. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From July 1, 1933 to September 30, 1933 inclusive: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1933. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  7. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1934 to December 31, 1934: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1934. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  8. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from July 1, 1935 to September 30, 1935: National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1935. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  9. Quarterly report of reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from January 1, 1935 to March 31, 1935: National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1935. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  10. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from April 1, 1935 to June 30, 1935 : National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between April and June, 1935. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  11. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From April 1, 1933 to June 30, 1933 inclusive: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between April and June, 1933. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  12. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from July 1, 1934 to September 30, 1934 inclusive: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between July and September, 1934. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  13. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from April 1, 1934 to June 30, 1934: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between April and June, 1934. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  14. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From October 1, 1933, to December 31, 1933: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1933. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  15. Quarterly report on reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto, from October 1, 1935 to December 31, 1935: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between October and December, 1935. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement...

  16. Quarterly report of reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From January 1, 1933 to March 31, 1933 inclusive: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1933. Wildlife, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  17. Quarterly report of reservation wild life and activities appurtenant thereto: From January 1, 1934 to March 31, 1934: [National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report summarizes conditions on the National Bison Range between January and March, 1934. Wildlife, birds, grazing, fire prevention, improvement and...

  18. Evaluating the effects of cutoffs and treatment of long-range electrostatics in protein folding simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Piana

    Full Text Available The use of molecular dynamics simulations to provide atomic-level descriptions of biological processes tends to be computationally demanding, and a number of approximations are thus commonly employed to improve computational efficiency. In the past, the effect of these approximations on macromolecular structure and stability has been evaluated mostly through quantitative studies of small-molecule systems or qualitative observations of short-timescale simulations of biological macromolecules. Here we present a quantitative evaluation of two commonly employed approximations, using a test system that has been the subject of a number of previous protein folding studies--the villin headpiece. In particular, we examined the effect of (i the use of a cutoff-based force-shifting technique rather than an Ewald summation for the treatment of electrostatic interactions, and (ii the length of the cutoff used to determine how many pairwise interactions are included in the calculation of both electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Our results show that the free energy of folding is relatively insensitive to the choice of cutoff beyond 9 Å, and to whether an Ewald method is used to account for long-range electrostatic interactions. In contrast, we find that the structural properties of the unfolded state depend more strongly on the two approximations examined here.

  19. Long-range memory and non-Markov statistical effects in human sensorimotor coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Yulmetyev, Renat; Emelyanova, Natalya; Hänggi, Peter; Gafarov, Fail; Prokhorov, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the non-Markov statistical processes and long-range memory effects in human sensorimotor coordination are investigated. The theoretical basis of this study is the statistical theory of non-stationary discrete non-Markov processes in complex systems (Phys. Rev. E 62, 6178 (2000)). The human sensorimotor coordination was experimentally studied by means of standard dynamical tapping test on the group of 32 young peoples with tap numbers up to 400. This test was carried out separately for the right and the left hand according to the degree of domination of each brain hemisphere. The numerical analysis of the experimental results was made with the help of power spectra of the initial time correlation function, the memory functions of low orders and the first three points of the statistical spectrum of non-Markovity parameter. Our observations demonstrate, that with the regard to results of the standard dynamic tapping-test it is possible to divide all examinees into five different dynamic types. We have introduced the conflict coefficient to estimate quantitatively the order-disorder effects underlying life systems. The last one reflects the existence of disbalance between the nervous and the motor human coordination. The suggested classification of the neurophysiological activity represents the dynamic generalization of the well-known neuropsychological types and provides the new approach in a modern neuropsychology.

  20. First principle calculations of long range correlation effects within the random phase approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Deyu; Li, Yan; Wilson, Hugh; Galli, Giulia

    2009-03-01

    The local and semi-local approximations to Density Functional Theory fail to describe correctly certain types of weak interactions (e.g. van der Waals forces) due an incorrect account of long range correlation effects. Such effects may be described by computing correlation energies within the random phase approximation (RPA), using the fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the adiabatic connection. We present an approach to compute RPA correlation energies based on an eigenmode expansion of the dielectric matrix [1,2]. By solving the frequency dependent Sternheimer equation within linear response theory [3], we eliminate the need to compute single particle unoccupied states, which makes our approach more efficient than methods using the direct-summation technique. Furthermore, the use of a dielectric eigenmode representation allows for a physical interpretation of several, different contributions to correlation energies. Results for graphite and the benzene crystal will be discussed. [1] H. Wilson, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. B, 78:113303, (2008). [2] D. Lu, F. Gygi and G. Galli, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100:147601(2008). [3] S. Baroni, S. de Gironcoli, A. Dal Corso, and P. Giannozzi, Rev. Mod. Phys. 73:515, (2001).

  1. Effect of flow characteristics on ultrafine particle emissions from range hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ching; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2013-08-01

    In order to understand the physical mechanisms of the production of nanometer-sized particulate generated from cooking oils, the ventilation of kitchen hoods was studied by determining the particle concentration, particle size distribution, particle dimensions, and hood's flow characteristics under several cooking scenarios. This research varied the temperature of the frying operation on one cooking operation, with three kinds of commercial cooking oils including soybean oil, olive oil, and sunflower oil. The variations of particle concentration and size distributions with the elevated cooking oil temperatures were presented. The particle concentration increases as a function of temperature. For oil temperatures ranging between 180°C and 210°C, a 5°C increase in temperature increased the number concentration of ultrafine particles by 20-50%. The maximum concentration of ultrafine particles was found to be approximately 6 × 10(6) particles per cm(3) at 260°C. Flow visualization techniques and particle distribution measurement were performed for two types of hood designs, a wall-mounted range hood and an island hood, at a suction flow rate of 15 m(3) min(-1). The flow visualization results showed that different configurations of kitchen hoods induce different aerodynamic characteristics. By comparing the results of flow visualizations and nanoparticle measurements, it was found that the areas with large-scale turbulent vortices are more prone to dispersion of ultrafine particle leakage because of the complex interaction between the shear layers and the suction movement that results from turbulent dispersion. We conclude that the evolution of ultrafine particle concentration fluctuations is strongly affected by the location of the hood, which can alter the aerodynamic features. We suggest that there is a correlation between flow characteristics and amount of contaminant leakage. This provides a comprehensive strategy to evaluate the effectiveness of kitchen hoods

  2. Global change effects on Bromus tectorum L. (Poaceae) at its high-elevation range margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concilio, Amy L.; Loik, Michael E.; Belnap, Jayne

    2013-01-01

    Global change is likely to affect invasive species distribution, especially at range margins. In the eastern Sierra Nevada, California, USA, the invasive annual grass, Bromus tectorum, is patchily distributed and its impacts have been minimal compared with other areas of the Intermountain West. We used a series of in situ field manipulations to determine how B. tectorum might respond to changing climatic conditions and increased nitrogen deposition at the high-elevation edge of its invaded range. Over 3 years, we used snow fences to simulate changes in snowpack, irrigation to simulate increased frequency and magnitude of springtime precipitation, and added nitrogen (N) at three levels (0, 5, and 10 g m-2) to natural patches of B. tectorum growing under the two dominant shrubs, Artemisia tridentata and Purshia tridentata, and in intershrub spaces (INTR). We found that B. tectorum seedling density in April was lower following deeper snowpack possibly due to delayed emergence, yet there was no change in spikelet production or biomass accumulation at the time of harvest. Additional spring rain events increased B. tectorum biomass and spikelet production in INTR plots only. Plants were primarily limited by water in 2009, but colimited by N and water in 2011, possibly due to differences in antecedent moisture conditions at the time of treatments. The threshold at which N had an effect varied with magnitude of water additions. Frequency of rain events was more influential than magnitude in driving B. tectorum growth and fecundity responses. Our results suggest that predicted shifts from snow to rain could facilitate expansion of B. tectorum at high elevation depending on timing of rain events and level of N deposition. We found evidence for P-limitation at this site and an increase in P-availability with N additions, suggesting that stoichiometric relationships may also influence B. tectorum spread.

  3. Correction of Overlapping Multispectral LIDAR Intensity Data: Polynomial Approximation of Range and Angle Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, W. Y.; Shaker, A.

    2017-07-01

    Recent development of radiometric calibration, correction and normalization approaches have facilitated the use of monochromatic LiDAR intensity and waveform data for land surface analysis and classification. Despite the recent successful attempts, the majority of existing approaches are mainly tailor made for monochromatic LiDAR toward specific land surface scenario. In view of the latest development of multispectral LiDAR sensor, such as the Optech Titan manufactured by Teledyne Optech, a more generic approach should be developed so that the radiometric correction model is able to handle and compensate the laser energy loss with respect to different wavelengths. In this study, we propose a semi-physical approach that aims to utilize high order polynomial functions to model the distortion effects due to the range and the angle. To estimate the parameters of the respect polynomial functions for the range and angle, our approach first locates a pair of closest points within the overlapping LiDAR data strips and subsequently uses a non-linear least squares adjustment to retrieve the polynomial parameters based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The approach was tested on a multispectral airborne LiDAR dataset collected by the Optech Titan for the Petawawa Research Forest located in Ontario, Canada. The experimental results demonstrated that the coefficient of variation of the intensity of channel 1 (1550 nm), channel 2 (1064 nm) and channel 3 (532 nm) were reduced by 0.1 % to 39 %, 10 % to 45 % and 12 % to 54 %, respectively. The striping noises, no matter found within single strip and overlapping strips, were significantly reduced after implementing the proposed radiometric correction.

  4. The effect of stretch rate and activation state on skeletal muscle force in the anatomical range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Joel P; Corr, David T; Toumi, Hechmi; Manthei, David M; Oza, Ashish L; Vanderby, Ray; Best, Thomas M

    2007-03-01

    The effects of stretch rate and activation state on muscle mechanics require further clarification. This subject is of particular interest because of the role of skeletal muscle undergoing eccentric contractions in musculoskeletal injuries. The present study investigated the force-displacement behavior of rabbit tibialis anterior muscle at three stretch rates (2.5, 10, 25 cm/s) and three activation states (passive, tetanic, denervated). A phenomenological power law model and a dynamic systems model were used to describe the mechanical responses. The power law model showed excellent agreement with the passive and denervated responses to stretch (R(mean)=0.97). Repeated measures analysis of variance found a difference (P=0.042) in peak force between the passive and denervated states at a stretch rate of 2.5 cm/s. The dynamic systems model closely fit the tetanized muscle responses (R(mean)=0.95). There was no difference in the displacement at yield (P=0.83) for the three stretch rates of the tetanized muscle undergoing stretch. Differences between the passive and denervated responses suggest that mechanoreceptors may play a role in stimulating the muscle as it is stretched through the anatomical range. The displacement at yield did not change significantly over a decade range of stretch velocities, suggesting that a strain threshold exists beyond which cross bridges cannot remain bound. The power law and dynamic systems models presented offer mathematically tractable approaches to interpret the response of lengthening skeletal muscle. These findings on active, passive, and denervated muscle point to a possible role of the muscle spindle to tissue mechanical behavior that should be accounted for in future studies of force-elongation behavior of skeletal muscle.

  5. Effect of Gd polarization on the large magnetocaloric effect of GdCrO4 in a broad temperature range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, E.; Tomasi, C.; Sáez-Puche, R.; Dos santos-García, A. J.; Fernández-Martínez, F.; Burriel, R.

    2016-02-01

    The ferromagnetic zircon-type phase of GdCrO4 presents high values for the magnetocaloric (MC) parameters. This compound has large isothermal entropy changes Δ ST under the magnetic field action in a wide temperature range, from 5 to 35 K, reaching a maximum |Δ ST|=29.0 ±0.1 J /kg K at 22 K, for a field increment Δ B =9 T. It orders ferromagnetically at TC=21.3 K via the Cr-Cr exchange interaction and shows a second transition at 4.8 K due to the ordering of the Gd sublattice. The large MC effect is enhanced by the polarization of the Gd3 + ions by the Cr5 + ones via a weaker Gd-Cr interaction. This effect is an interesting feature to be considered in the search for new compounds with a high MC effect in the range of liquid hydrogen or natural gas, regarding the liquefaction of gases by magnetization-demagnetization cycles. This paper contains experimental measurements of magnetization, heat capacity, and direct determinations of the MC effect. The magnetic contribution to the heat capacity Cm has been obtained after subtracting the lattice component. Approximate values for the exchange constants J1 (Cr-Cr) and J3 (Gd-Cr) have been deduced from Cm.

  6. Effects of hearing-aid dynamic range compression on spatial perception in a reverberant environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassager, Henrik Gert; Wiinberg, Alan; Dau, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fast-acting hearing-aid compression on normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners’ spatial perception in a reverberant environment. Three compression schemes—independent compression at each ear, linked compression between the two ears, and “spatially ideal......” compression operating solely on the dry source signal—were considered using virtualized speech and noise bursts. Listeners indicated the location and extent of their perceived sound images on the horizontal plane. Linear processing was considered as the reference condition. The results showed that both...... independent and linked compression resulted in more diffuse and broader sound images as well as internalization and image splits, whereby more image splits were reported for the noise bursts than for speech. Only the spatially ideal compression provided the listeners with a spatial percept similar...

  7. Full range of proximity effect probed with superconductor/graphene/superconductor junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Guéron, S.; Chepelianskii, A.; Bouchiat, H.

    2016-09-01

    The high tunability of the density of states of graphene makes it an ideal probe of quantum transport in different regimes. In particular, the supercurrent that can flow through a nonsuperconducting (N) material connected to two superconducting (S) electrodes, crucially depends on the length of the N relative to the superconducting coherence length. Using graphene as the N material we have investigated the full range of the superconducting proximity effect, from short to long diffusive junctions. By combining several S/graphene/S samples with different contacts and lengths, and measuring their gate-dependent critical currents (Ic) and normal state resistance RN, we compare the product e RNIc to the relevant energies, the Thouless energy in long junctions and the superconducting gap of the contacts in short junctions, over three orders of magnitude of Thouless energy. The experimental variations strikingly follow a universal law, close to the predictions of the proximity effect both in the long and short junction regime, as well as in the crossover region, thereby revealing the interplay of the different energy scales. Differences in the numerical coefficients reveal the crucial role played by the interfacial barrier between graphene and the superconducting electrodes, which reduces the supercurrent in both short and long junctions. Surprisingly, the reduction of supercurrent is independent of the gate voltage and of the nature of the electrodes. A reduced induced gap and Thouless energy are extracted, revealing the role played by the dwell time in the barrier in the short junction, and an effective increased diffusion time in the long junction. We compare our results to the theoretical predictions of Usadel equations and numerical simulations, which better reproduce experiments with imperfect NS interfaces.

  8. Narrative report 1970: Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range and Hailstone, Halfbreed, Mason, Yellow Water, War Horse & Wild Horse

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell NWR (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The report...

  9. Refuge narrative report : January 1, 1966 - December 31, 1966 : Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  10. Narrative report FY 1974: Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range and Hailstone, Halfbreed, Lake Mason & War Horse Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell NWR (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report...

  11. Narrative report FY 1975: Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range and Hailstone, Halfbreed, Lake Mason & War Horse Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Charles M. Russell NWR (including the satellite refuges) outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report...

  12. Refuge narrative report : January 1, 1964 - December 31, 1964 : Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Aleutian Islands and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1964 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  13. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.R. Coyle; J. Blake; K. Britton; M.; R.G. Campbell; J. Cox; B. Cregg; D. Daniels; M. Jacobson; K. Johnsen; T. McDonald; K. McLeod; E.; D. Robison; R. Rummer; F. Sanchez; J.; B. Stokes; C. Trettin; J. Tuskan; L. Wright; S. Wullschleger

    2003-12-31

    Coleman, M.D., et. al. 2003. Production of Short-Rotation Woody Crops Grown with a Range of Nutrient and Water Availability: Establishment Report and First-Year Responses. Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 26 pp. Abstract: Many researchers have studied the productivity potential of intensively managed forest plantations. However, we need to learn more about the effects of fundamental growth processes on forest productivity; especially the influence of aboveground and belowground resource acquisition and allocation. This report presents installation, establishment, and first-year results of four tree species (two cottonwood clones, sycamore, sweetgum, and loblolly pine) grown with fertilizer and irrigation treatments. At this early stage of development, irrigation and fertilization were additive only in cottonwood clone ST66 and sweetgum. Leaf area development was directly related to stem growth, but root production was not always consistent with shoot responses, suggesting that allocation of resources varies among treatments. We will evaluate the consequences of these early responses on resource availability in subsequent growing seasons. This information will be used to: (1) optimize fiber and bioenergy production; (2) understand carbon sequestration; and (3) develop innovative applications such as phytoremediation; municipal, industrial, and agricultural wastes management; and protection of soil, air, and water resources.

  14. A plasmid-transposon hybrid mutagenesis system effective in a broad range of Enterobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eMonson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  15. A Plasmid-Transposon Hybrid Mutagenesis System Effective in a Broad Range of Enterobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Rita; Smith, Debra S.; Matilla, Miguel A.; Roberts, Kevin; Richardson, Elizabeth; Drew, Alison; Williamson, Neil; Ramsay, Josh; Welch, Martin; Salmond, George P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii, and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways. PMID:26733980

  16. The role of impulsive processes in self-determination theory: investigating the effects of implicit and explicit measures of motivation across a range of behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Keatley, David

    2013-01-01

    The current thesis reports six studies investigating the predictive validity and effects of implicit and explicit measures of motivation from self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 2008; Edmunds, Ntoumanis, & Duda, 2007; Ryan & Deci, 2000b), across a range of behaviours. In addition, the suitability of a dual-systems model (Strack & Deutsch, 2004) as a conceptual framework to understand the effects of implicit and explicit measures of motivation is also addressed. The research in this t...

  17. Metallicity determination of M dwarfs. Expanded parameter range in metallicity and effective temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Sara; Heiter, Ulrike

    2017-08-01

    Context. Reliable metallicity values for late K and M dwarfs are important for studies of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy and advancement of planet formation theory in low-mass environments. Historically it has been challenging to determine the stellar parameters of low-mass stars because of their low surface temperature, which causes several molecules to form in the photospheric layers. In our work we use the fact that infrared high-resolution spectrographs have opened up a new window for investigating M dwarfs. This enables us to use similar methods as for warmer solar-like stars. Aims: Metallicity determination with high-resolution spectra is more accurate than with low-resolution spectra, but it is rather time consuming. In this paper we expand our sample analyzed with this precise method both in metallicity and effective temperature to build a calibration sample for a future revised empirical calibration. Methods: Because of the relatively few molecular lines in the J band, continuum rectification is possible for high-resolution spectra, allowing the stellar parameters to be determined with greater accuracy than with optical spectra. We obtained high-resolution spectra with the CRIRES spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The metallicity was determined using synthetic spectral fitting of several atomic species. For M dwarfs that are cooler than 3575 K, the line strengths of FeH lines were used to determine the effective temperatures, while for warmer stars a photometric calibration was used. Results: We analyzed 16 targets with a range of effective temperature from 3350-4550 K. The resulting metallicities lie between -0.5< [M/H] < +0.4. A few targets have previously been analyzed using low-resolution spectra and we find a rather good agreement with our values. A comparison with available photometric calibrations shows varying agreement and the spread within all empirical calibrations is large. Conclusions: Including the targets from our previous

  18. Effect of repeated manipulation on range of motion in patients with stiff total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Rim; Siliski, John M; Malchau, Henrik; Kwon, Young-Min

    2015-03-01

    Although manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) has been considered effective first-line treatment for stiff total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there is no consensus regarding the usefulness of repeated MUA. The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of repeated MUA performed for patients in whom satisfactory range of motion (ROM) was not achieved by MUA. The authors retrospectively reviewed 15 patients who underwent repeated MUA after failure of initial MUA for stiff TKA. Demographic and ROM data were collected. A final ROM of less than 90° was considered a failed manipulation (failure group) and a final ROM of 90° or more was considered a successful manipulation (success group). Average pre-repeated MUA ROM (72.3°±19.5°) immediately improved to 112.3°±9.7° (Pstiff TKA. The success rate of repeated MUA was less than that of primary MUA; however, it is a useful treatment modality for stiff TKA. Decreased pre-TKA ROM appeared to be associated with poor outcomes after repeated MUA.

  19. Effects of Sevoflurane on the discharges of wide dynamic range neurons in spinally transected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-wei; XIONG Yuan-chang; DENG Xiao-ming; ZHAO Zhi-qi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of clinical concentration of sevoflurane on activity of wide dynamic range neurons. Methods: Eight Spraque-Dawley rats(male) were selected. Their spinal cords were exposed and transected at T9- 10 level. The rate of firings of single neurons in the dorsal horn in response to electrical stimulation of skin was recorded with microelectrodes. The early and late discharges were observed when rats inhaled 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%, and 2.0%sevoflurane. Results: Sevoflurane suppressed the early and late discharges at the concentration of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5%,and 2.0%. Compared with early discharges, the extent of inhibition of late discharges was wider at the concentration of1%, 1.5 %, and 2.0% of sevoflurane. Conclusion: It is indicated that sevoflurane could suppress the transmission of nociceptive and non-nociceptive stimulation at dorsal horn. The suppression on nociceptive imput is stronger than that on nonnociceptive imput when the concentration of sevoflurane is more than 1%.

  20. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  1. Molecular laser studies in the 7-16. mu. m range. Annual report, 1 June 1975-30 September 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colemen, P.D.

    1976-10-01

    An exploratory research effort to find new molecular lasers in the 7-16 ..mu..m wavelength range, in particular lasers with wavelengths at 7.7, 8.6, and 16 ..mu..m wavelengths, is described. The specific initial objectives were: (1) to explore Raman scattering of CO/sub 2/ radiation in a liquid and molecular gas and (2) to explore chemically excited metal fluorides as laser candidates for the 12-16 ..mu..m wavelength range.

  2. Modeling and Analysis of Target Echo and Clutter in Range-Dependent Bistatic Environments: FY13 Annual Report for ONR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    to reverberation ratio for isovelocity waveguides related to Weston Memorial Workshop Scenarios A2.I and A2.IV. In John S. Papadakis and Leif...Ell11] Dale D. Ellis. Solutions to range-dependent reverberation and sonar workshop problems using an adiabatic normal mode model. In Papadakis and...DRDC Clutter Model: Range-dependent predictions compared with towed array reverberation and clutter data from the Malta Plateau. In Papadakis and

  3. The effect of human-body shadowing on indoor UWB TOA-based ranging systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilic, Y.; Ali, Ameenulla J.; Meijerink, Arjan; Bentum, Marinus Jan; Scanlon, W.G.

    2012-01-01

    Because of its superior time resolution, ultra-wide bandwidth (UWB) transmission can be a highly accurate technique for ranging in indoor localization systems. Nevertheless, the presence of obstructions may deteriorate the ranging performance of the system. Indoor environments are often densely

  4. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy and Stretching for Baseball Players With Shoulder Range of Motion Deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Lane B; Thigpen, Charles A; Hawkins, Richard J; Beattie, Paul F; Shanley, Ellen

    Baseball players displaying deficits in shoulder range of motion (ROM) are at increased risk of arm injury. Currently, there is a lack of consensus regarding the best available treatment options to restore shoulder ROM. Instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching will result in clinically significant deficit reductions when compared with self-stretching alone. Controlled laboratory study. Shoulder ROM and humeral torsion were assessed in 60 active baseball players (mean age, 19 ± 2 years) with ROM deficits (nondominant - dominant, ≥15°). Athletes were randomly assigned to receive a single treatment of instrumented manual therapy plus self-stretching (n = 30) or self-stretching only (n = 30). Deficits in internal rotation, horizontal adduction, and total arc of motion were compared between groups immediately before and after a single treatment session. Treatment effectiveness was determined by mean comparison data, and a number-needed-to-treat (NNT) analysis was used for assessing the presence of ROM risk factors. Prior to intervention, players displayed significant ( P stretching group displaying greater increases in internal rotation (+5°, P = 0.010), total arc of motion (+6°, P = 0.010), and horizontal adduction (+7°, P = 0.004) compared with self-stretching alone. For horizontal adduction deficits, the added use of instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching decreased the NNT to 2.2 (95% CI, 2.1-2.4; P = 0.010). Instrumented manual therapy with self-stretching significantly reduces ROM risk factors in baseball players with motion deficits when compared with stretching alone. The added benefits of manual therapy may help to reduce ROM deficits in clinical scenarios where stretching alone is ineffective.

  5. Short-range effect at the semi-coherent metal/its native oxide interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Deqiang; Wu, Mingxia; Cen, Wanglai; Li, Hongping; Yang, Yi; Fang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Fundamentally understanding the variations of atomistic and electronic properties at the interface of metal/its native oxide systems plays a critical role in many important technological processes and applications, such as oxidization, corrosion, chemical catalysis, fuel reactions, and thin-film process. Here, we have adopted the representatively semi-coherent Cu2O(111)/Cu(100) interface and demonstrated, by first-principles calculations on energetic and electronic structures of a total 9 candidate interfacial models, that the preferred geometries (i.e., that having the largest adhesion energy) are those possess the shortest interfacial distance between O terminated Cu2O and substrate Cu. Using several analytic methods, we have thoroughly characterized the variation of electronic states from the interface to Cu2O constituent, and determined that the large degree of charge accumulation at the interface is at the expense of depletion of charge in both substrate Cu and neighboring Cu (Cu2O) to the interfacial O atoms. Strikingly, in Cu2O the conducting states appear only in monolayer proximal to Cu2O/Cu interface, as well, the second layer remains in semi-conducting state as its bulk, indicating a short-range effect in electronic properties induced by Cu substrate. The theoretical calculations provide insight into the complex electronic properties of the functional Cu2O/Cu interface, which was quite difficult to observe by experimental methods alone. The unique properties are of practical importance for further understanding and improvement of such a promising class of metal/native oxide interface at the atomic scale.

  6. TSDC study of XLPE recrystallization effects in the melting range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, J. A.; Belana, J.; Òrrit, J.; Sellarès, J.; Mudarra, M.; Cañadas, J. C.

    2006-05-01

    The electrical properties of crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), employed in mid-voltage cable insulation are studied using thermally stimulated depolarization currents (TSDC), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction. A complex heteropolar peak appears by TSDC between 50 and 110 °C, with a maximum at 105 °C. These measurements reveal that there is an optimal polarization temperature (Tpo) around 90 °C. For this polarization temperature, the measured discharge peak area is maximum. Although the presence of a Tpo is common in the study of relaxations by TSDC, in this case one would expect a monotonic decrease in the TSDC response with increasing polarization temperatures due to the decrease in the total crystalline fraction. In this paper, TSDC curves obtained under several conditions are interpreted in terms of recrystallization processes in XLPE during the polarization stage, if the sample is polarized in the melting temperature range. In this case, the recrystallization of a fraction of the material molten at this temperature promotes the formation of more stable and defect-free crystals. The presence of recrystallization processes is detected by DSC and confirmed by x-ray diffractometry. TSDC measurements have been performed with samples polarized at several temperatures (Tp) cooling from the melt or heating from room temperature. Also, TSDC results are obtained with previous annealing or with several cooling rates. These results allow us to infer that crystalline material grown from recrystallization processes that take place in the polarization stage attains a particularly stable polarization. Possible microscopical causes of this effect are discussed.

  7. Effect of growth stages and systems on range vegetation characteristics in el Rosa, north Kordofan, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.M.A. El Hag

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The range vegetation characteristics were studied in closed and open systems at flowering and seeding in (El Rosa El khuwei locality at September and November 2009. Sampling was using 2Km2 plots in a radiating manner from the centre of plot. CRD was used to analyses all parameters. Results of biomass, plant density and plant cover in the closed systems at the flowering were significantly (P < 0.0001 higher. These parameters were significantly lower in the open system at seeding. Bare soil and litter were significantly (P < 0.0001 higher in the open system at seeding. Total forage productivity kg/ha was significantly (P < 0.05 higher in the closed system at the flowering and least in the open system at seeding. Carrying capacity was significantly (P < 0.0001 higher in closed system at seeding and leas in open at flowering. Stoking rates in the closed system at flowering were significantly (P < 0.0001 higher and least in the open system at seeding. Plant frequencies were higher in the closed system at the two growth stages than open system like Huskneet (Cenchrus biflorus Bano (Eragrostis tremula Gaw (Aristida sp Difra (Echinocloa colonum Aboelrakhus (Andropogon gayanus Fisiya (Fimbristyls hispidula and Tmrfar (Oldenlandia senegalensis had higher frequencies. However leflef (Luffa aegyptiaca and Himeira (Hymenocardia acida had lower frequencies.  Simeima (Sesamum alatum Buid (Commelinia subulata Abodaib (Ceraotheca sesamoid Shuleny (Zornia glochidiata and Rabaa (Zalea sp were found only in the closed system at flowering. Nuida (Sida cordofolia were only found in the open system at the two growth stages. It was concluded that the closed system had higher plant density and cover, biomass, plant frequencies and forage production. Bare soil and litter were higher in open system at seeding. Carrying capacity was higher in the closed system at seeding. Stoking rates in the closed system at flowering were higher. Indicate that direct effects on

  8. Effect of diet supplementation on growth and reproduction in camels under arid range conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdouli H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen pregnant dromedary females (Camelus dromedarius were used to determine the effect of concentrate supplement on growth and reproductive performances in peri-partum period. The females were divided into supplemented (n = 9; S and unsupplemented (n = 9; C experimental groups. All animals grazed, with one mature male, 7 to 8 hours per day on salty pasture rangelands. During night, they were kept in pen, where each female of group S received 4 kg per day of concentrate supplement during the last 3 months of gestation and 5 kg per day during the first 3 months post-partum. During the last 90 days of gestation daily body weight gain (DBG was at least tenfold more important in group S than in group C (775 g vs. 72 g respectively. Supplementation affected birth weight of offspring (30.3 kg vs. 23.4 kg and its DBG (806 g vs. 430 g in group S and group C respectively. During the post-partum period, females in group S gained in weight (116 g per day whereas females in group C lost more than 200 g per day. The mean post-partum interval to the first heat and the percentage of females in heat were 29.5 day and 44.4/ vs. 41.2 day and 71.4/ for the C and S groups, respectively. We conclude that under range conditions, dietary supplementation of dromedary during late pregnancy stage and post-partum period improves productive and reproductive parameters.

  9. Effect of tissue heterogeneity on an in vivo range verification technique for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassane Bentefour, El; Shikui, Tang; Prieels, Damien; Lu, Hsiao-Ming

    2012-09-01

    It was proposed recently that time-resolved dose measurements during proton therapy treatment by passively scattered beams may be used for in vivo range verification. The method was shown to work accurately in a water tank. In this paper, we further evaluated the potential of the method for more clinically relevant situations where proton beams must pass through regions with significant tissue heterogeneities. Specifically, we considered prostate treatment where the use of anterior or anterior- oblique fields was recently proposed in order to reduce rectal dose by taking advantage of the sharp distal fall-off of the Bragg peak. These beam portals pass through various parts of pubic bone and potential air cavities in the bladder and bowels. Using blocks of materials with densities equivalent to bone, air, etc, arranged in the water tank in relevant configurations, we tested the robustness of the method against range shifting and range mixing. In the former, the beam range is changed uniformly by changes in tissue density in the beam path, while in the latter, variations in tissue heterogeneities across the beam cross section causes the mixing of beam energies downstream, as often occurs when the beam travels along the interface of materials with significantly different densities. We demonstrated that in the region of interest, the method can measure water-equivalent path length with accuracy better than ±0.5 mm for pure range shifting and still reasonable accuracy for range mixing between close beam energies. In situations with range mixing between significantly different beam energies, the dose rate profiles may be simulated for verifying the beam range. We also found that the above performances can be obtained with very small amount of dose (diodes are used as detectors. This makes the method suitable for in vivo range verification prior to each treatment delivery.

  10. Differential effects of experimental increases in sociality on ectoparasites of free-ranging raccoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monello, Ryan J; Gompper, Matthew E

    2010-05-01

    1. Parasite transmission depends on the rate at which hosts come into contact with one another or the infectious stages of parasites. However, host contact rates and their influence on parasite transmission are difficult to quantify in natural settings and can fluctuate with host behaviour and the ecological constraints of parasites. 2. We investigated how experimental increases in rates of contact and social aggregation affected ectoparasite prevalence and intensity of free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor). Twelve independent raccoon populations were subjected to differential resource provisions for 2 years: a clumped food distribution to aggregate hosts (n = 5 aggregated populations), a dispersed food distribution to control for the effects of food without aggregating hosts (n = 3) and a no food treatment (n = 4). 3. Remote cameras indicated that aggregation sizes and rates of contact were three to four times greater in aggregated compared with that in non-aggregated populations. The number of ticks (adult Dermacentor variabilis) on raccoons in aggregated populations was 1.5-2.5 times greater from May to July, the primary time of tick seasonal occurrence. Conversely, louse (Trichodectes octomaculatus) populations were c. 40% sparser on male raccoons in aggregated (compared with that in non-aggregated) populations because of greater overdispersion of lice and a larger number of male hosts harbouring fewer parasites. No treatment-related differences were found among fleas (Orchopeas howardi). 4. These results were not consistent with our current understanding of parasite transmission; greater rates of host sociality led to increases in a parasite that does not rely on host contact for transmission (ticks) and declines in a parasite that depends on host contact for transmission (lice). We concluded that D. variabilis increased in aggregated sites because they can detect and seek out hosts and were more likely to drop off after obtaining a blood meal and re-attach to

  11. Kinetic Testing of Nitrate-Based Sodalite Formation Over the Temperature Range of 40 to 100 Degrees Centigrade (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.

    2001-09-07

    The focus of this study was the desilication kinetics of a Savannah River Site (SRS) tank farm 2H simulant over the temperature range of 40 to 100 C. Results showed that the formation of nitrate-nitrite-based sodalite over aluminum-to-silicon (Al:Si) molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 20:1 exhibited overall-second order kinetics. The Arrhenius apparent activation energy associated with the crystal growth process of the sodalite was determined to be 35 kJ/mol over the temperature range investigated. Second-order rate constants were extrapolated to the 2H evaporator working temperature of {approx} 130 C and were found to be 0.012 L mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}. At this operating temperature, the half-life of a limiting reactant with a 0.1 M feed would be 14 min.

  12. A Unified Gaskinetic Methodology for Full-Knudsen-Range Flows with Chemically Reacting Effects Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ZONA proposes a Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme (UGKS) to cover the full Knudsen number range from the continuum flow to free molecular flow that can simultaneously exist...

  13. Effects of environment on accuracy of ultrasonic sensor operates in millimetre range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtan Gopal Panda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The growing use of ultrasonic sensor now demands millimetre range of operation with high accuracy. Ultrasonic sensor uses sound waves for its ranging and the speed of sound is influenced by a number of environmental parameters. The objective of this paper is to discuss on the list of environmental parameters which have the major influence on the accuracy of the ultrasonic sensor and also to formulate a simplified mathematical equation to calculate instantaneous speed of sound by taking these influencing parameters into consideration. Comparison result shows the derived simplified equation for calculating instantaneous speed of sound gives maximum percentage error of 0.33 for the temperature range of 0–50 °С. Here we also focus on the steps to calibrate ultrasonic sensor for millimetres range of operation.

  14. Spatial Organization of Alpha Range Potentials on EEG and Logical Thinking Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhebrailova, T D; Korobeinikova, I I; Dudnik, E N; Karatygin, N A

    2015-06-01

    We studied spatial organization of EEG alpha range potentials in volunteers with different results of tasks requiring logical thinking. The examinees with higher cognitive test performance have more labile coherent associations of EEG alpha range potentials, which manifested in changes in the level and structure of these associations at different stages of the test. In individuals with poor results, the number of significant coherent associations and their structure do not change during the problem solving process.

  15. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on sickness behaviour in hens kept in cage and free range environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, N G; Payne, S R; Devine, C D; Cook, C J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether environmental enrichment and environmental conditions can influence the expression of sickness behaviour. The behaviour in response to injection of lipopolysaccharide or saline was examined in a total of 96 62-weeks old hatchmate hens kept in a free range or cage environment. There were eight experimental treatments, each with 12 birds. Half the birds were sourced from a commercial cage layer unit (C/-) and half from a commercial free range unit (FR/-). After intraperitoneal injection with either lipopolysaccharide or saline (as a control), the hens were placed in either a cage (-/C) or free range (-/FR) environment. Lipopolysaccharide caused greater suppression of activity in free range (FR/FR) than in caged hens, including less walking (53% reduction), roosting (-86%) and preening (-60%) (pcaged birds released into free range, nor in free range birds introduced to cages, suggesting that both the presence of and the familiarity with an environment affected sickness behaviour patterns. Increased sleeping was the most consistent response (+147%; pcaged hens, and this may make it more difficult to recognise disease expression in the caged environment.

  16. Refuge narrative report : January 1, 1968 - December 31, 1968 : Aleutian Islands National Wildlife Refuge and Izembek National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Aleutian Islands (including Simeonof NWR, Bogoslof NWR, and Semidi NWR) and Izembek NWRs outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  17. Report on the Development of a Close Range Photogrammetry (CRP) Educational Technician Program (Museum and Archive Use).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobelin, Joel

    A close range photogrammetry (CRP) technician training program was developed at Miami-Dade Community College and used to teach the technology to 16 students. Although the results of the study show that it is possible to teach CRP in a two-year program, the technology is too new in the United States to support a sustaining educational program. The…

  18. The mid-domain effect matters: simulation analyses of range-size distribution data from Mount Kinabalu, Borneo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grytnes, John-Arvid; Beaman, John H.; Romdal, Tom Skovlund;

    2008-01-01

    Aim In simulation exercises, mid-domain peaks in species richness arise as a result of the random placement of modelled species ranges within simulated geometric constraints. This has been called the mid-domain effect (MDE). Where close correspondence is found between such simulations and empirical...... within the domain (range-restricted MDE), and a model encompassing all species with the theoretical midpoint within the domain (midpoint-restricted MDE). These predictions are compared with observations from the elevational pattern of range-size distributions and species richness of vascular plants....... The distribution of range sizes gives different predictions between models including the MDE or not. Here, we produce predictions for species richness and distribution of range sizes from one model without the MDE and from two MDE models: a classical MDE model encompassing only species with their entire range...

  19. Effect of tillage practices on least limiting water range in Northwest India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Meharban S.; Chawla, Karitika

    2017-04-01

    Tillage practices affect mechanical and hydrological characteristics of soil and subsequently the least limiting water range. This quality indicator under the wheat-maize system of northwest India has not been studied yet. The treatments included four tillage modes, namely conventional tillage, no-tillage without residue, no-tillage with residue, and deep tillage as well as three irrigation regimes based on the irrigation water and pan evaporation ratio i.e. 1.2, 0.9, and 0.6. The experiment was conducted in a split plot design with three replications. At the end of cropping system, the mean least limiting water range (m3 m-3) was found to be highest in deep tillage (0.26) and lowest in notillage without residue (0.15). The field capacity was a limiting factor for the upper range of the least limiting water range beyond soil bulk density 1.41 Mg m-3 and after that 10% air filled porosity played a major role. However, for the lower range, the permanent wilting point was a critical factor beyond soil bulk density 1.50 Mg m-3 and thereafter, the penetration resistance at 2 MPa becomes a limiting factor. Thus, deep tillage under compaction and no-tillage with residue under water stress is appropriate practice for achieving maximum crop and water productivity.

  20. Effect of long- and short-range interactions on the thermodynamics of dipolar spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Yuriy; Makarov, Aleksandr; Nefedev, Konstantin

    2017-02-01

    The thermodynamic properties of dipolar spin ice on square, honeycomb and shakti lattices in the long-range and short-range dipole interaction models are studied. Exact solutions for the density of states, temperature dependencies of heat capacity, and entropy are obtained for these lattices with a finite number of point dipoles by means of complete enumeration. The magnetic susceptibility and average size of the largest low-energy cluster are calculated for square spin ice by means of Wang-Landau and Metropolis methods. We show that the long-range interaction leads to a blurring of the energy spectrum for all considered lattices. The inclusion of the long-range interaction leads to a significant change in the thermodynamic behaviour. An additional peak of heat capacity appears in the case of the honeycomb lattice. The critical temperature shifts in the direction of low or high temperatures; the direction depends on the lattice geometry. The critical temperature of the phase transition of square spin ice in the long-range model with frustrated ground states is obtained with the Wang-Landau and Metropolis methods independently.

  1. Modeling and Analysis of Target Echo and Clutter in Range-Dependent Bistatic Environments: FY14 Annual Report for ONR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Clutter Model: Range-dependent predictions compared with towed array reverberation and clutter data from the Malta Plateau. In Papadakis and Bjørnø...dependent shallow water area. In John S. Papadakis and Leif Bjørnø, editors, 1st Underwater Acoustic Conference and Exhibition: Proceedings, pages 465–472... Papadakis and Leif Bjørnø, editors, 2nd Underwater Acoustic Conference and Exhibition: Proceedings, pages 715–722, 2014. Conference held at Island of

  2. Anomalous effect of turning off long-range mobility interactions in Stokesian Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Adam K Townsend Helen J

    2016-01-01

    In Stokesian Dynamics, particles are assumed to interact in two ways: through long-range mobility interactions and through short-range lubrication interactions. To speed up computations, in concentrated suspensions it is common to consider only lubrication. We show that, although this approximation provides acceptable results in monodisperse suspensions, in bidisperse suspensions it produces physically unreasonable results - "bunching" - whenever external forces are applied. We suggest that this problem could be mitigated by a careful choice of pairs of particles on which lubrication interactions should be included.

  3. Non-mean-field effects in systems with long-range forces in competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelard, R; Staniscia, F

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the canonical equilibrium of systems with long-range forces in competition. These forces create a modulation in the interaction potential and modulated phases appear at the system scale. The structure of these phases differentiate this system from monotonic potentials, where only the mean-field and disordered phases exist. With increasing temperature, the system switches from one ordered phase to another through a first-order phase transition. Both mean-field and modulated phases may be stable, even at zero temperature, and the long-range nature of the interaction will lead to metastability characterized by extremely long time scales.

  4. Chiral Magnetic Effect Task Force Report

    CERN Document Server

    Skokov, Vladimir; Koch, Volker; Schlichting, Soeren; Thomas, Jim; Voloshin, Sergei; Wang, Gang; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we briefly examine the current status of the study of the chiral magnetic effect including theory and experimental progress. We recommend future strategies for resolving uncertainties in interpretation including recommendations for theoretical work, recommendations for measurements based on data collected in the past five years, and recommendations for beam use in the coming years of RHIC. We have specifically investigated the case for colliding nuclear isobars (nuclei with the same mass but different charge) and find the case compelling. We recommend that a program of nuclear isobar collisions to isolate the chiral magnetic effect from background sources be placed as a high priority item in the strategy for completing the RHIC mission.

  5. Observation of short range ferromagnetic interactions and magnetocaloric effect in cobalt substituted Gd5Si2Ge2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthaman, Bhagya; Manju, P; Thomas, Senoy; Jaiswal Nagar, Deepshikha; Suresh, K G; Varma, Manoj Raama

    2017-05-17

    We report on the observation of double transition - a first order and a second order transition in Gd5Si2-xCoxGe2 with x = 0, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 with the appearance of short-range ferromagnetic correlations. The first order phase transition is due to a combined magnetostructural transition from monoclinic paramagnetic phase to orthorhombic ferromagnetic phase on cooling while the second order transition arises from an orthorhombic paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase on cooling. Structural studies show that the substituted compounds crystallize in a combination of Gd5Si2Ge2 and Gd5Si4 phases. Low-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements confirm the complete transformation from monoclinic to orthorhombic phase. DC magnetization measurements reveal an anomalous low field magnetic behaviour indicating a Griffiths-like phase. This unusual behaviour is attributed to the local disorder within the crystallographic structure indicating the presence of short-range magnetic correlations and ferromagnetic clustering, which is stabilized and enhanced by competing intra-layer and inter-layer magnetic interactions. The magnetostructural transition results in entropy changes (-ΔSM) of 9 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 260 K for x = 0.1, 8.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 245 K for x = 0.2 and 4.2 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 210 K for x = 0.4 for a field change of 50 kOe. Co substitution induces compelling crystallographic and magnetoresponsive effects in the Gd-Si-Ge system, which could be useful for potential and smart applications such as solid-state magnetic refrigeration and sensitive magnetic switching from paramagnetic to ferromagnetic state. Universal curve analysis has been carried out on the substituted samples to study the order of the magnetic transition.

  6. Developing effective invasive cardiology services. Guideline report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, P L; Franc, C W; Lewis, S J

    1988-01-01

    Diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death and the major reason for days stayed in the hospital and discharges from the hospital. Nearly 1 million Americans died last year from cardiac disease, and over 60 million suffer from some form of cardiac disease. Conservatively stated, 300,000 cardiac surgeries and 600,000 cardiac catheterizations are performed annually, and the number is rising. Therefore, heart disease is understandably big business for hospitals and physicians. The organization of cardiac delivery systems is changing dramatically, primarily as the result of advancements made in the nonsurgical treatment of cardiac disease. The balance of power is shifting from cardiac surgery to cardiology, resulting in political and economic consequences for hospitals. Cardiac diagnosis is also undergoing a transformation, as less invasive procedures increase in sophistication. As hospitals consider their options in this market and observe physicians, medical groups, and alternative delivery systems providing competing services, the strategic alternatives become confusing and decidedly difficult. This report is written as a guide to assist hospitals in understanding the technological forces underlying the changing market and the effect these changes will have on the ownership, organization, and structure of delivery systems and, most specifically, on the delivery of cardiovascular services. Because of the tremendous interest in invasive cardiology services and the significance of the financial, organizational, and quality commitment involved in the delivery of invasive cardiology services, this guideline report addresses primarily those services. Noninvasive technologies also are addressed because of their importance to a cardiology program, the magnitude of the technological changes taking place, and their potential impact on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease. The report begins with a discussion of the general planning issues that provide the

  7. [Electronic cigarettes - effects on health. Previous reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierała, Marta; Kulza, Maksymilian; Wachowiak, Anna; Jabłecka, Katarzyna; Florek, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Currently very popular in the market of tobacco products have gained electronic cigarettes (ang. E-cigarettes). These products are considered to be potentially less harmful in compared to traditional tobacco products. However, current reports indicate that the statements of the producers regarding to the composition of the e- liquids not always are sufficient, and consumers often do not have reliable information on the quality of the product used by them. This paper contain a review of previous reports on the composition of e-cigarettes and their impact on health. Most of the observed health effects was related to symptoms of the respiratory tract, mouth, throat, neurological complications and sensory organs. Particularly hazardous effects of the e-cigarettes were: pneumonia, congestive heart failure, confusion, convulsions, hypotension, aspiration pneumonia, face second-degree burns, blindness, chest pain and rapid heartbeat. In the literature there is no information relating to passive exposure by the aerosols released during e-cigarette smoking. Furthermore, the information regarding to the use of these products in the long term are not also available.

  8. Climate change effects on historical range and variability of two large landscapes in western Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert E. Keane; Lisa M. Holsinger; Russell A. Parsons; Kathy Gray

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying the historical range and variability of landscape composition and structure using simulation modeling is becoming an important means of assessing current landscape condition and prioritizing landscapes for ecosystem restoration. However, most simulated time series are generated using static climate conditions which fail to account for the predicted major...

  9. Effect of aquatic exercise on body composition, balance and joint range of motion in hemophilic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Turgut

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to examine the affect of ten week period aquatic exercise on children’s body composition, balance, and range motion who are under constant observation of Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology.Seven boys who were 10.71±3.1 mean aged voluntarily attended in this study. Participants made 60 minutes exercises twice a week, and study lasted for ten weeks. Bioelectricity impedance, kinesthetic balance, tandem stance-walk and joint range of motion measurements were obtained prior and post to the exercise program. Statistical analysis of data was made by Wilcoxon test. At the end of exercise program satisfying results in measures of height, weight, basal metabolic rate, free fat mass, and total body water were obtained (p<0.05. In hip and shoulder joint range of motion satisfying results were obtained in flexometric measures (p<0.05.As result of this study, it is founded that aquatic exercise may increase muscle mass, and may affect joint range of motion in three axed joints as hip and shoulder positively.

  10. Effect of aquatic exercise on body composition, balance and joint range of motion in hemophilic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Turgut

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study is to examine the affect of ten week period aquatic exercise on children’s body composition, balance, and range motion who are under constant observation of Akdeniz University Faculty of Medicine Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology.Seven boys who were 10.71±3.1 mean aged voluntarily attended in this study. Participants made 60 minutes exercises twice a week, and study lasted for ten weeks. Bioelectricity impedance, kinesthetic balance, tandem stance-walk and joint range of motion measurements were obtained prior and post to the exercise program. Statistical analysis of data was made by Wilcoxon test. At the end of exercise program satisfying results in measures of height, weight, basal metabolic rate, free fat mass, and total body water were obtained (p<0.05. In hip and shoulder joint range of motion satisfying results were obtained in flexometric measures (p<0.05.As result of this study, it is founded that aquatic exercise may increase muscle mass, and may affect joint range of motion in three axed joints as hip and shoulder positively.

  11. Effective sampling range of a synthetic protein-based attractant for Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted in Honduras to determine sampling range for female-targeted food-based synthetic attractants for pest tephritid fruit flies. Field studies were conducted in shaded coffee and adults of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), were captured. Traps (38 traps ...

  12. Effective sampling range of food-based attractants for female Anastrepha suspensa (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Release/recapture studies were conducted with both feral and sterile females of the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa (Loew), to determine sampling range for a liquid protein bait (hydrolyzed torula yeast) and for a two-component synthetic lure (ammonium acetate and putrescine). Tests were d...

  13. Modeling Climate-Change Effects on Snake Range Extents for Military Land Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    snakes are the largest snakes in North America , and also have the largest home ranges of North American snakes (Hyslop 2007). This means that home...selection in some Florida reptiles . Amer. Mus. Novitates 1358:1- 34. Breininger, David, M. Rebecca Bolt, Michael Legare, John Drese, and Eric Stolen

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi-Trypanosoma rangeli co-infection ameliorates negative effects of single trypanosome infections in experimentally infected Rhodnius prolixus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Graham, Andrea L; Elliott, Ryan J; Dobson, Andrew P; Triana Chávez, Omar

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, causative agent of Chagas disease, co-infects its triatomine vector with its sister species Trypanosoma rangeli, which shares 60% of its antigens with T. cruzi. Additionally, T. rangeli has been observed to be pathogenic in some of its vector species. Although T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infections are common, their effect on the vector has rarely been investigated. Therefore, we measured the fitness (survival and reproduction) of triatomine species Rhodnius prolixus infected with just T. cruzi, just T. rangeli, or both T. cruzi and T. rangeli. We found that survival (as estimated by survival probability and hazard ratios) was significantly different between treatments, with the T. cruzi treatment group having lower survival than the co-infected treatment. Reproduction and total fitness estimates in the T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatments were significantly lower than in the co-infected and control groups. The T. cruzi and T. rangeli treatment group fitness estimates were not significantly different from each other. Additionally, co-infected insects appeared to tolerate higher doses of parasites than insects with single-species infections. Our results suggest that T. cruzi-T. rangeli co-infection could ameliorate negative effects of single infections of either parasite on R. prolixus and potentially help it to tolerate higher parasite doses.

  15. Insulator-to-metal transition in vanadium supersaturated silicon: variable-range hopping and Kondo effect signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hemme, E.; Montero, D.; García-Hernansanz, R.; Olea, J.; Mártil, I.; González-Díaz, G.

    2016-07-01

    We report the observation of the insulator-to-metal transition in crystalline silicon samples supersaturated with vanadium. Ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid resolidification produce high quality single-crystalline silicon samples with vanadium concentrations that exceed equilibrium values in more than 5 orders of magnitude. Temperature-dependent analysis of the conductivity and Hall mobility values for temperatures from 10 K to 300 K indicate that a transition from an insulating to a metallic phase is obtained at a vanadium concentration between 1.1  ×  1020 and 1.3  ×  1021 cm-3. Samples in the insulating phase present a variable-range hopping transport mechanism with a Coulomb gap at the Fermi energy level. Electron wavefunction localization length increases from 61 to 82 nm as the vanadium concentration increases in the films, supporting the theory of impurity band merging from delocalization of levels states. On the metallic phase, electronic transport present a dispersion mechanism related with the Kondo effect, suggesting the presence of local magnetic moments in the vanadium supersaturated silicon material.

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Target Echo and Clutter in Range-Dependent Bistatic Environments: FY12 Annual Report for ONR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    and sonar workshop problems using an adiabatic normal mode model. In Papadakis and Bjørnø [PB11], pages 485–490. Contributed paper in Structured...Clutter Model: Range-dependent predictions compared with towed array reverberation and clutter data from the Malta Plateau. In Papadakis and Bjørnø...35(3):502–515, 2010. 10 [PB11] John S. Papadakis and Leif Bjørnø, editors. 4th International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements

  17. Effects of laser frequency chirp on modal noise in short-range radio over multimode fiber links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visani, Davide; Tartarini, Giovanni; Petersen, Martin Nordal;

    2010-01-01

    An important effect of the frequency chirp of the optical transmitter in radio over multimode fiber links is put into evidence experimentally and modeled theoretically for the first time, to our knowledge. This effect can have an important impact in short-range connections, where, although...

  18. Nonlinear effects in photoionization over a broad photon-energy range within the TDCIS scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamatskou, Antonia

    2017-01-01

    The present tutorial provides an overview of the time-dependent configuration interaction singles scheme applied to nonlinear ionization over a broad photon-energy range. The efficient propagation of the wave function and the calculation of photoelectron spectra within this approach are described and demonstrated in various applications. Above-threshold ionization of argon and xenon in the extreme ultraviolet energy range is investigated as an example. A particular focus is put on the xenon 4d giant dipole resonance and the information that nonlinear ionization can provide about resonance substructure. Furthermore, above-threshold ionization is studied in the x-ray regime and the intensity regime, at which multiphoton ionization starts to play a role at hard x-ray photon energies, is identified.

  19. Effect of Synaptic Connectivity on Long-Range Synchronization of Fast Cortical Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, M.; Rulkov, N. F.; Timofeev, I.

    2008-01-01

    Cortical gamma oscillations in the 20- to 80-Hz range are associated with attentiveness and sensory perception and have strong connections to both cognitive processing and temporal binding of sensory stimuli. These gamma oscillations become synchronized within a few milliseconds over distances spanning a few millimeters in spite of synaptic delays. In this study using in vivo recordings and large-scale cortical network models, we reveal a critical role played by the network geometry in achieving precise long-range synchronization in the gamma frequency band. Our results indicate that the presence of many independent synaptic pathways in a two-dimensional network facilitate precise phase synchronization of fast gamma band oscillations with nearly zero phase delays between remote network sites. These findings predict a common mechanism of precise oscillatory synchronization in neuronal networks. PMID:18632897

  20. Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF): Its Mechanisms and Effects on Range of Motion and Muscular Function

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Kayla B.; Whitcomb, Tyler J.; Briggs, Wyatt O.; Hong, Junggi

    2012-01-01

    Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) is common practice for increasing range of motion, though little research has been done to evaluate theories behind it. The purpose of this study was to review possible mechanisms, proposed theories, and physiological changes that occur due to proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques. Four theoretical mechanisms were identified: autogenic inhibition, reciprocal inhibition, stress relaxation, and the gate control theory. The studies s...