WorldWideScience

Sample records for reported developmental milestones

  1. Infant developmental milestones and adult intelligence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-01-01

    Background: A number of studies suggest a positive association between faster infant motor development and intellectual function in childhood and adolescence. However, studies investigating the relationship between infant motor development and intelligence in adulthood are lacking. Aims: To inves......Background: A number of studies suggest a positive association between faster infant motor development and intellectual function in childhood and adolescence. However, studies investigating the relationship between infant motor development and intelligence in adulthood are lacking. Aims......: To investigate whether age at achievement of 12 motor developmental milestones was associated with adult intelligence and to evaluate the influence of sex, parental social status, parity,mother's cigarette consumption in the last trimester, gestational age, birthweight, and birth length on this association....... Methods: Mothers of 9125 children of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort recorded 12 developmental milestones during the child's first year of life. A subsample of the cohort comprising 1155 individuals participated in a follow-up when they were aged 20–34 years and were administered the Wechsler Adult...

  2. Developmental milestones in post-term born children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Annette Wind; Olsen, Jørn; Zhu, Jinliang

    at achieving developmental milestones with gestational age at birth in 9 out of 14 milestone items. Conclusion: Post-term born children appear to reach the main developmental milestones at an earlier age since birth than term born children. The association could also be due to bias related to a longer time......DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES IN POST-TERM BORN CHILDREN Annette Wind Olesen (1), Jorn Olsen (2), Jinliang Zhu (2) (1)Institute of Regional Health Research, University of Southern Denmark, (2)The Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Aarhus University Objective: To examine the timing of reaching...... developmental milestones in children born post-term. Design: Cohort study. Material: The Danish National Birth Cohort; children born between 1997 and 2003. Data was obtained from a cohort of 92,892 pregnancies participating in the first pregnancy interview. All singletons born in gestational week 39-45 were...

  3. September 2014 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shelton, Jacob H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ericson, Milton Nance [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bobrek, Miljko [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Blalock, Benjamin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This is a report of the activities involving Task 2 of the NEET 2 project Radiation Hardened Circuitry Using Mask-Programmable Analog Arrays [1]. Using the analog blocks available in our currently pre-configured Via-Configured Array (VCA), we will perform a detailed schematic design of our system to include the signal-processing blocks for temperature, radiation and pressure. Control and data acquisition will be implemented with the Spartan-6 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as well as wired serial communications with a remote computer to be used with this project. In addition, batteries and associated voltage regulators will be selected for powering the system. Fabrication may include a polyimide, printed circuit board (PCB) for improved radiation and temperature tolerance. The PCB will go through a layout process by one of the organizations we utilize for this function and be fabricated by another external vendor. Population of the system board will be performed using one of our in-house technicians or an outside vendor we commonly use. Five prototype systems (sensors, electronics board, battery power supply, and personal computer (PC) serial communications port) will be constructed to support the testing objectives of this work. Quality assurance will be performed at each step by both the submitters and the vendors.

  4. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbels, Cynthia Sophia; Maurice-Stam, Heleen; Berry, Gerard Thomas; Bosch, Annet Maria; Waisbren, Susan; Rubio-Gozalbo, Maria Estela; Grootenhuis, Martha Alexandra

    2011-04-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial developmental milestones more slowly than male peers from the general Dutch population, we assessed their development with the Course of Life Questionnaire (CoLQ). A total of 18 male galactosemia patients participated in this study (response rate 69%): 11 Dutch patients and seven American patients. We found severe delays in the social and psychosexual scales of this questionnaire, but not on the autonomy axis. These results are comparable to an earlier study with a limited number of male patients. The observed delays could be secondary to less developed social skills, cognitive dysfunction, or disrupted language development. We strongly recommend screening of galactosemia patients for developmental delays, to ensure early intervention through social skills training.

  5. Predictors of motor developmental milestones during the first year of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2017-01-01

    of a broad selection of possible predictors of age at milestone attainment and to identify factors that explain significant inter-individual variance. Mothers of 5765 children of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort (1959-61) recorded 12 developmental milestones prospectively during the child's first year of life...... in the first year, were significantly associated with milestone attainment in the first year of life. Variables within the domain of Pregnancy and delivery explained the largest proportion of variance in milestone attainment compared to the other domains. What is known: • Younger age at attainment of motor...

  6. Early motor developmental milestones and level of neuroticism in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg-Madsen, T; Sørensen, H J; Revsbech, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    Studies investigating early developmental factors in relation to psychopathology have mainly focused on schizophrenia. The personality dimension of neuroticism seems to be a general risk factor for psychopathology, but evidence on associations between early developmental precursors and personalit...... analysed by multiple linear regression adjusting for for sex, single-mother status, parity, mother's age, father's age, parental social status and birth weight....... traits is almost non-existent. This study is therefore the first to investigate associations between early motor developmental milestones and neuroticism in adulthood. Method Mothers of 9125 children of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort recorded 12 developmental milestones during the child's first year...

  7. Milestone Report - Level-2 Milestone 5589: Modernization and Expansion of LLNL Archive Disk Cache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoopman, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-02-04

    This report documents Livermore Computing (LC) activities in support of ASC L2 milestone 5589: Modernization and Expansion of LLNL Archive Disk Cache, due March 31, 2016. The full text of the milestone is included in Attachment 1. The description of the milestone is: Description: Configuration of archival disk cache systems will be modernized to reduce fragmentation, and new, higher capacity disk subsystems will be deployed. This will enhance archival disk cache capability for ASC archive users, enabling files written to the archives to remain resident on disk for many (6–12) months, regardless of file size. The milestone was completed in three phases. On August 26, 2015 subsystems with 6PB of disk cache were deployed for production use in LLNL’s unclassified HPSS environment. Following that, on September 23, 2015 subsystems with 9 PB of disk cache were deployed for production use in LLNL’s classified HPSS environment. On January 31, 2016, the milestone was fully satisfied when the legacy Data Direct Networks (DDN) archive disk cache subsystems were fully retired from production use in both LLNL’s unclassified and classified HPSS environments, and only the newly deployed systems were in use.

  8. Endorsement and Timing of Sexual Orientation Developmental Milestones Among Sexual Minority Young Adults in the Growing Up Today Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz-Wise, Sabra L; Rosario, Margaret; Calzo, Jerel P; Scherer, Emily A; Sarda, Vishnudas; Austin, S Bryn

    2017-02-01

    This research examined endorsement and timing of sexual orientation developmental milestones. Participants were 1,235 females and 398 males from the Growing Up Today Study, ages 22 to 29 years, who endorsed a sexual minority orientation (lesbian/gay, bisexual, mostly heterosexual) or reported same-gender sexual behavior (heterosexual with same-gender sexual experience). An online survey measured current sexual orientation and endorsement and timing (age first experienced) of five sexual orientation developmental milestones: same-gender attractions, other-gender attractions, same-gender sexual experience, other-gender sexual experience, and sexual minority identification. Descriptive analyses and analyses to test for gender and sexual orientation group differences were conducted. Results indicated that women were more likely than men to endorse same-gender attraction, other-gender attraction, and other-gender sexual experience, with the most gender differences in endorsement among mostly heterosexuals and heterosexuals with same-gender sexual experience. In general, men reached milestones earlier than women, with the most gender differences in timing among lesbian and gay individuals and heterosexuals with same-gender sexual experience. Results suggest that the three sexual minority developmental milestones may best characterize the experiences of lesbians, gay males, and female and male bisexuals. More research is needed to understand sexual orientation development among mostly heterosexuals and heterosexuals with same-gender sexual experience.

  9. Early motor developmental milestones and schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, S; Koivumaa-Honkanen, H; Hirvonen, N; Freeman, A; Ivandic, I; Hurtig, T; Khandaker, G M; Jones, P B; Moilanen, K; Miettunen, J

    2017-01-25

    The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia proposes that impaired brain development is a cause of the illness. Early motor developmental milestones, such as learning to walk, are predictors of later schizophrenia but studies have not been systematically reviewed. The aim of the present systematic review and meta-analysis was to explore the association between early motor developmental milestones and the risk of adult schizophrenia. In addition, we updated a systematic review on motor function and risk of schizophrenia. The PubMed, PsycINFO and Scopus databases were searched for original research articles published up to July 2015. Motor milestones were measured between ages 0 and 13years. Random effect meta-analysis calculated effect estimates (Hedges' g) for the association between individual motor milestones and schizophrenia risk. An electronic database and selected articles reference list search identified 5990 articles after removing duplicates. Sixty-nine full text articles were assessed for eligibility of which six were included in the review. Five studies provided sufficient data for meta-analyses. The following motor milestones were significantly associated with adult schizophrenia risk: walking unsupported (g=0.46; 95% CI 0.27-0.64; pmotor milestones in childhood and can contribute to the identification of individuals at risk of psychosis.

  10. Early motor developmental milestones and level of neuroticism in young adulthood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Sørensen, Holger Jelling; Revsbech, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    intelligence. CONCLUSIONS: The findings are the first of their kind and suggest that delays in early motor development may not only characterize psychopathological disorders such as schizophrenia, but may also be associated with the personality dimension of neuroticism in adulthood.......BACKGROUND: Studies investigating early developmental factors in relation to psychopathology have mainly focused on schizophrenia. The personality dimension of neuroticism seems to be a general risk factor for psychopathology, but evidence on associations between early developmental precursors...... and personality traits is almost non-existent. This study is therefore the first to investigate associations between early motor developmental milestones and neuroticism in adulthood. Method Mothers of 9125 children of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort recorded 12 developmental milestones during the child's first...

  11. Psychosocial developmental milestones in men with classic galactosemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gubbels, C.S.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Berry, G.T.; Bosch, A.M.; Waisbren, S.; Rubio-Gozalbo, M.E.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with classic galactosemia suffer from several long term effects of their disease. Research in a group of mainly female patients has shown that these patients may also have a developmental delay with regard to their social aptitude. To study if male galactosemia patients achieve psychosocial

  12. Health-related quality of life, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in young adults with bleeding disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limperg, P.F. (P. F.); L. Haverman (Lotte); H. Maurice-Stam (Heleen); M. Coppens; Valk, C. (C.); M.J.H.A. Kruip (Marieke); J.C.J. Eikenboom (Jeroen); M. Peters; M.A. Grootenhuis (Martha)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The treatment of bleeding disorders improved in the last decades. However, the effect of growing up with bleeding disorders on developmental, emotional, and social aspects is understudied. Therefore, this study assesses HRQOL, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in

  13. Health-related quality of life, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in young adults with bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limperg, P F; Haverman, L; Maurice-Stam, H; Coppens, M; Valk, C; Kruip, M J H A; Eikenboom, J; Peters, M; Grootenhuis, M A

    2017-09-12

    The treatment of bleeding disorders improved in the last decades. However, the effect of growing up with bleeding disorders on developmental, emotional, and social aspects is understudied. Therefore, this study assesses HRQOL, developmental milestones, and self-esteem in Dutch young adults (YA) with bleeding disorders compared to peers. Ninety-five YA (18-30 years) with bleeding disorders (78 men; mean 24.7 years, SD 3.5) and 17 women (mean 25.1 years, SD 3.8) participated and completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Young Adult version, the Course of Life Questionnaire, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Differences between patients with bleeding disorders and their peers, and between hemophilia severity groups, were tested using Mann-Whitney U tests. YA men with bleeding disorders report a slightly lower HRQOL on the total scale, physical functioning, and school/work functioning in comparison to healthy peers (small effect sizes). YA men with severe hemophilia report more problems on the physical functioning scale than non-severe hemophilia. YA men with bleeding disorders achieved more psychosexual developmental milestones than peers, but show a delay in 'paid jobs, during middle and/or high school.' A somewhat lower self-esteem was found in YA men with bleeding disorders in comparison to peers (small effect size). For YA women with bleeding disorders, no differences were found on any of the outcomes in comparison to peers. This study demonstrates some impairments in HRQOL and self-esteem in YA men with bleeding disorders. By monitoring HRQOL, problems can be identified early, especially with regard to their physical and professional/school functioning.

  14. Gauging knowledge of developmental milestones among Albertan adults: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tough Suzanne

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental knowledge of child development has been associated with more effective parenting strategies and better child outcomes. However, little is known about what adults who interact with children under the age of 14 years know about child development. Methods Between September 2007 and March 2008, computer assisted telephone interviews were completed with 1443 randomly selected adults. Adults were eligible if they had interacted with a child less than 14 years of age in the past six months and lived in Alberta, Canada. Results Sixty three percent of respondents answered two (or more out of four questions on physical development correctly. Fifteen percent of respondents answered two (or more out of three questions on cognitive development correctly. Seven percent of respondents answered three (or more out of five questions on social development correctly. Two percent of respondents answered three (or more out of five questions on emotional development correctly. Parents and females were better able to identify physical developmental milestones compared to non-parents and males. 81% of adults correctly responded that a child's experience in the first year of life has an important impact on later school performance, 70% correctly responded that a child's ability to learn is not set from birth, 50% of adults correctly responded that children learn more from hearing someone speak than from television, and 45% recognized that parents' emotional closeness with a baby influences later achievement. Parents were most likely to use doctors/paediatricians, books, and nurses as resources. Among parents, there was no relationship between knowledge and parenting morale. Conclusions The majority of adults were unable to correctly answer questions related to when children under six years of age typically achieve developmental milestones. Knowledge of physical development exceeded knowledge about cognitive, emotional and social development

  15. Duration of breastfeeding and developmental milestones during the latter half of infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Obel, Carsten; Henriksen, Tine Brink

    1999-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that breastfeeding has a long-term influence on brain development. However, interpretation of these findings is complicated by the presence of many potential confounding factors. Only a few studies have examined infants before 1 y of age, although very early...... assessment might reduce the role of environmental influence. We investigated the association between exclusive breastfeeding and three developmental milestones related to general and fine motor skills and early language development at the age of 8 mo. We followed 1656 healthy, singleton, term infants......, with a birthweight of at least 2500 g, born between May 1991 and February 1992 in Aarhus, Denmark. Information was collected at 16 wk gestation, at delivery and when the infant was 8 mo old. Motor skills were evaluated by measurement of crawling and pincer grip. Early language development was defined as the ability...

  16. Extending the Developmental Milestones Checklist for use in a different context in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Elizabeth L; Abubakar, Amina A; Abbeddou, Souheila; Jimenez, Elizabeth Y; Somé, Jérôme W; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco

    2014-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa bears a disproportionate amount of global diseases related to neurodevelopmental delays in infancy, including malnutrition, malaria and HIV. Evaluating interventions to prevent such delays requires developmental assessment tools appropriate for Sub-Saharan Africa. This study aimed to develop and evaluate such a tool. The Developmental Milestones Checklist (DMC) was developed in Kenya to provide motor, language and personal-social scores for children aged from 3 to 24 months. We developed an extended version (DMC-II) in Burkina Faso, West Africa, and then evaluated the reliability and sensitivity of the scores to age and nutritional and environmental measures. The internal, interinterviewer and test-retest reliability of the DMC-II scores were >0.7. In 214 children aged 11.6-25.4 months, each score correlated with age (rs > 0.7). In 1123 children aged 16.8-19.9 months, the scores were sensitive to stunting, wasting and underweight (effect sizes 0.31-0.87 SD). The scores also showed expected correlations with measures of play materials in the home and activities with caregivers (rs = 0.13-0.41). The DMC-II is easily used by trained fieldworkers with no previous experience in developmental assessment. It is a practical, reliable and sensitive tool for evaluating motor, language and personal-social development in different contexts in Sub-Saharan Africa. ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Both Maternal and Pup Genotype Influence Ultrasonic Vocalizations and Early Developmental Milestones in Tsc2+/− Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. Greene-Colozzi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by tumor growth and neuropsychological symptoms such as autistic behavior, developmental delay, and epilepsy. While research has shed light on the biochemical and genetic etiology of TSC, the pathogenesis of the neurologic and behavioral manifestations remains poorly understood. TSC patients have a greatly increased risk of developmental delay and autism spectrum disorder, rendering the relationship between the two sets of symptoms an extremely pertinent issue for clinicians. We have expanded on previous observations of aberrant vocalizations in Tsc2+/− mice by testing vocalization output and developmental milestones systematically during the early postnatal period. In this study, we have demonstrated that Tsc2 haploinsufficiency in either dams or their pups results in a pattern of developmental delay in sensorimotor milestones and ultrasonic vocalizations.

  18. Milestones of critical thinking: a developmental model for medicine and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Klara K; Huang, Grace C; Lauzon Clabo, Laurie M; Delva, Dianne; Fischer, Melissa; Konopasek, Lyuba; Schwartzstein, Richard M; Gusic, Maryellen

    2014-05-01

    Critical thinking is essential to a health professional's competence to assess, diagnose, and care for patients. Defined as the ability to apply higher-order cognitive skills (conceptualization, analysis, evaluation) and the disposition to be deliberate about thinking (being open-minded or intellectually honest) that lead to action that is logical and appropriate, critical thinking represents a "meta-competency" that transcends other knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviors required in health care professions. Despite its importance, the developmental stages of critical thinking have not been delineated for nurses and physicians. As part of a task force of educators who considered different developmental stage theories, the authors have iteratively refined and proposed milestones in critical thinking. The attributes associated with unreflective, beginning, practicing, advanced, accomplished, and challenged critical thinkers are conceived as independent of an individual's level of training. Depending on circumstances and environmental factors, even the most experienced clinician may demonstrate attributes associated with a challenged thinker. The authors use the illustrative case of a patient with abdominal pain to demonstrate how critical thinking may manifest in learners at different stages of development, analyzing how the learner at each stage applies information obtained in the patient interaction to arrive at a differential diagnosis and plan for evaluation. The authors share important considerations and provide this work as a foundation for the development of effective approaches to teaching and promoting critical thinking and to establishing expectations for learners in this essential meta-competency.

  19. Early developmental milestones and risk of schizophrenia: a 45-year follow-up of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L; Schiffman, Jason

    2010-01-01

    disorders and in the 4982 cohort controls who were never admitted to a psychiatric department. Group comparisons were adjusted for gender, mother's age, father's age, parental social status, breadwinner's education, single mother status and parity. Individuals who developed schizophrenia reached all......The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between age of neuromotor milestone attainment and risk of adult schizophrenia. 5765 mothers of the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort recorded 12 developmental milestones during the child's first year of life. Cohort members were followed...

  20. Norms for developmental milestones using VABS-II and association with anthropometric measures among apparently healthy urban Indian preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, Sumithra; Thomas, Tinku; Shetty, Priya; Zhu, Jianjun; Raman, Vijaya; Khanna, Deepti; Mehra, Ruchika; Kurpad, Anura V; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari

    2016-12-01

    Assessment of developmental milestones based on locally developed norms is critical for accurate estimate of overall development of a child's cognitive, behavioral, social, and emotional development. A cross-sectional study was done to develop age specific norms for developmental milestones using Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS-II) (Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2005) for apparently healthy children from 2 to 5 years from urban Bangalore, India, and to examine its association with anthropometric measures. Mothers (or caregivers) of 412 children participated in the study. Age-specific norms using inferential norming method and adaptive levels for all domains and subdomains were derived. Low adaptive level, also called delayed developmental milestone, was observed in 2.3% of the children, specifically 2.7% in motor and daily living skills and 2.4% in communication skills. When these children were assessed on the existing U.S. norms, there was a significant overestimation of delayed development in socialization and motor skills, whereas delay in communication and daily living skills were underestimated (all p VABS-II in preschool children, the prevalence of developmental delay could either be under- or overestimated using Western norms. Thus, locally referenced norms are critical for reliable assessments of development in children. Stunted and underweight children are more likely to have poorer developmental scores compared with healthy children. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Prenatal smoking exposure, measured as maternal serum cotinine, and children's motor developmental milestones and motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Line Høgenhof; Høyer, Birgit Bjerre; Pedersen, Henning Sloth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cohort studies have indicated an association between prenatal smoking exposure and children's motor difficulties. However, results are inconsistent and exposure is most often self-reported. Studies indicate that measurement of serum cotinine can result in a more accurate status...... of smoking exposure in comparison with self-report. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether prenatal smoking exposure, measured as maternal serum cotinine, is associated with maternal interview based assessment of motor development in infancy (age at crawling, standing-up and walking) and motor skills at young...... school age (assessed by the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 (DCDQ'07)). METHOD: In 2002-2004, 1,253 pregnant women from Greenland and Ukraine were included in the INUENDO birth cohort. The participating women filled in questionnaires and 1,177 provided blood samples, which were...

  2. [Evaluating language acquisition using the Early Language Milestone (ELM) and Munich developmental scales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páez-Pineda, Oscar D; Valencia-Valencia, Doris; Ortiz Calderón, Martha Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Evaluating language development by comparing the Munich Development method to the Early Language Milestone scale for identifying both diagnostic tests' agreement and enriching neurodevelopmental consultation. The clinical histories of a cohort of 129 children were evaluated, as prematurity is a risk factor for deviation in children's language development. The children had less than 40 weeks gestational age and 0 to 12 months corrected age. They were given both tests between 2008 and 2011. The results from both scales were compared regarding receptive and expressive language and visual response (Early Language Milestone scale) and evaluation of verbal response, vocal play, understanding and expression (Munich scale). Student's T-test was used for comparing means for paired samples. Results: A statistically significant correlation (p<0.05) was found between both tests and between them and corrected age. It was seen that the higher the corrected age, the greater correlation there was between tests. The Early Language Milestone and Munich Development scales, regarding their components dealing with language, both represent useful tools for following-up premature children's language development.

  3. Disorders of childhood growth and development: screening and evaluation of the child who misses developmental milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Maureen

    2013-07-01

    The family physician is one of the few individuals from whom families receive feedback about their children's development; this makes early identification of potential delays an important responsibility. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends formal developmental screening for all children at the 9-, 18-, and 24- and/or 30-month well-child visits as well as developmental surveillance at every office visit through age 5 years. A formal screening measure is recommended, taking into account administration time and cost, characteristics of the patient population (eg, availability of screening tool in numerous languages), and psychometrics (eg, reliability, sensitivity, specificity). In the case of abnormal screening results, family physicians must determine the need for further medical evaluation (eg, by a developmental pediatric subspecialist or a pediatric neurology, genetics, or physiatry subspecialist) and/or further developmental evaluation (eg, by a physical therapy [PT], occupational therapy [OT], speech/language pathology, psychology, or audiology subspecialist). Knowledge of early intervention and early childhood programs is necessary for directing parents to evaluation and treatment sources. In treating patients with developmental delays, family physicians must possess knowledge regarding traditional modalities (eg, speech/language therapy, OT, PT) as well as newer treatments with less research support (eg, gluten-free/casein-free diet, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, neurodevelopmental treatment) that families may consider.

  4. Plug-In Hybrid Vehicle Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markel, T.; Brooker, A.; Gonder, J.; O' Keefe, M.; Simpson, A.; Thornton, M.

    2006-11-01

    NREL's plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) analysis activities made great strides in FY06 to objectively assess PHEV technology, support the larger U.S. Department of Energy PHEV assessment effort, and share technical knowledge with the vehicle research community and vehicle manufacturers. This report provides research papers and presentations developed in FY06 to support these efforts. The report focuses on the areas of fuel economy reporting methods, cost and consumption benefit analysis, real-world performance expectations, and energy management strategies.

  5. The release of iron during coal combustion. Milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1995-06-01

    Iron plays an important role in the formation of both fly ash and deposits in many pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Several authors indicate that iron content is a significant indicator of the slagging propensity of a majority of US bituminous coals, in particular eastern bituminous coals. The pyritic iron content of these coals is shown to be a particularly relevant consideration. A series of investigations of iron release during combustion is reported for a suite of coals ranging in rank from lignite to low-volatile bituminous coal under combustion conditions ranging from oxidizing to inert. Experimental measurements are described in which, under selected conditions, major fractions of the iron in the coal are released within a 25 ms period immediately following coal devolatilization. Mechanistic interpretation of the data suggest that the iron is released as a consequence of oxygen attack on porous pyrrhotite particles. Experimental testing of the proposed mechanism reveals that the release is dependent on the presence of both pyrite in the raw coal and oxygen in the gas phase, that slow preoxidation (weathering) of the pyrite significantly inhibits the iron release, and that iron loss increases as oxygen penetration of the particle increases. Each observation is consistent with the postulated mechanism.

  6. Milestone report on MD potential development for uranium silicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jianguo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.; Hales, Jason Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Fuel Modeling and Simulation Dept.

    2016-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress on the interatomic potential development of triuranium-disilicide (U3Si2) for molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The development is based on the Tersoff type potentials for single element U and Si. The Si potential is taken from the literature and a Tersoff type U potential is developed in this project. With the primary focus on the U3Si2 phase, some other U-Si systems such as U3Si are also included as a test of the transferability of the potentials for binary U-Si phases. Based on the potentials for unary U and Si, two sets of parameters for the binary U-Si system are developed using the Tersoff mixing rules and the cross-term fitting, respectively. The cross-term potential is found to give better results on the enthalpy of formation, lattice constants and elastic constants than those produced by the Tersoff mixing potential, with the reference data taken from either experiments or density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In particular, the results on the formation enthalpy and lattice constants for the U3Si2 phase and lattice constants for the high temperature U3Si (h-U3Si) phase generated by the cross-term potential agree well with experimental data. Reasonable agreements are also reached on the elastic constants of U3Si2, on the formation enthalpy for the low temperature U3Si (m-U3Si) and h-U3Si phases, and on the lattice constants of m-U3Si phase. All these phases are predicted to be mechanically stable. The unary U potential is tested for three metallic U phases (α, β, γ). The potential is found capable to predict the cohesive energies well against experimental data for all three phases. It matches reasonably with previous experiments on the lattice constants and elastic constants of αU.

  7. Do developmental milestones at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months predict IQ at 5-6 years old? Results of the EDEN mother-child cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyre, Hugo; Charkaluk, Marie-Laure; Forhan, Anne; Heude, Barbara; Ramus, Franck

    2017-03-01

    The present study aims: (i) to determine how well developmental milestones at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months may predict IQ at 5-6 years old, (ii) to identify cognitive domains during the first two years that best predict later IQ and (iii) to determine whether children with IQ in the normal range at 5-6 years old may differ from disabled (IQ  130) with regard to their early cognitive development. The main developmental milestones were collected through self-administered questionnaires rated by parents at 4, 8, 12 and 24 months and through parental questionnaires administered by a trained interviewer and questionnaires completed following a medical examination at 12 months. These questionnaires were derived from the Brunet-Lézine Psychomotor Development Scale and they addressed several cognitive domains (gross and fine motor skills, language and socialization). (i) Developmental milestones predict a substantial part of the later IQ variance from 24 months (R(2) ∼ 20%). (ii) Early language skills more strongly predict later IQ than the other cognitive domains. (iii) Several cognitive domains, but particularly language skills, predict disabled children at 5-6 years old (from the age of 8 months) and gifted children (from the age of 12 months). The present study provides valuable information for early developmental assessment and could contribute to a better understanding of intellectual development. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 1.2.1.1 Harvest, Collection and Storage Quarter 3 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Lynn M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, William A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cafferty, Kara G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bonner, Ian J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Huang, Qiyang [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Colby, Rachel D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Single pass baling of corn stover is required in order to meet targets for the herbaceous biomass 2017 logistics design case. Single-pass pass stover harvest is based on the grain harvest and generally results in stover with a moisture content of 30-50% wet basis (w.b). Aerobic storage of corn stover with high moisture results in high levels of dry matter loss (DML), up to 25%. Anaerobic storage (ensiling) reduces DML to less than 5%, but additional costs are associated with handling and transporting the extra moisture in the biomass. This milestone provides a best-estimate of costs for using high moisture feedstock within the conventional baled logistics system. The costs of three (3) anaerobic storage systems that reduce dry matter losses (bale wrap, silage tube, and silage drive over pile) are detailed in this milestone and compared to both a conventional dry-baled corn stover case and a high moisture bale case, both stored aerobically. The total logistics cost (harvest, collection, storage, and transportation) of the scenarios are as follows: the conventional multi-pass dry bale case and the single-pass high moisture case stored aerobically were nearly equivalent at $61.15 and $61.24/DMT. The single-pass bale wrap case was the lowest at $57.63/DMT. The bulk anaerobic cases were the most expensive at $84.33 for the silage tube case and $75.97 for the drive over pile, which reflect the additional expense of transporting high-moisture bulk material; however, a reduction in preprocessing costs may occur because these feedstocks are size reduced in the field. In summary, the costs estimates presented in this milestone report can be used to determine if anaerobic storage of high-moisture corn stover is an economical option for dry matter preservation.

  9. Developmental milestones record

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activity in response Walks while holding on to furniture or other support Toddler -- 1 to 3 years ... Hops on one foot Rides tricycle well Starts school Understands size concepts Understands time concepts School-age ...

  10. FY17 CSSE L2 Milestone Report: Analyzing Power Usage Characteristics of Workloads Running on Trinity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedretti, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    This report summarizes the work performed as part of a FY17 CSSE L2 milestone to in- vestigate the power usage behavior of ASC workloads running on the ATS-1 Trinity plat- form. Techniques were developed to instrument application code regions of interest using the Power API together with the Kokkos profiling interface and Caliper annotation library. Experiments were performed to understand the power usage behavior of mini-applications and the SNL/ATDM SPARC application running on ATS-1 Trinity Haswell and Knights Landing compute nodes. A taxonomy of power measurement approaches was identified and presented, providing a guide for application developers to follow. Controlled scaling study experiments were performed on up to 2048 nodes of Trinity along with smaller scale ex- periments on Trinity testbed systems. Additionally, power and energy system monitoring information from Trinity was collected and archived for post analysis of "in-the-wild" work- loads. Results were analyzed to assess the sensitivity of the workloads to ATS-1 compute node type (Haswell vs. Knights Landing), CPU frequency control, node-level power capping control, OpenMP configuration, Knights Landing on-package memory configuration, and algorithm/solver configuration. Overall, this milestone lays groundwork for addressing the long-term goal of determining how to best use and operate future ASC platforms to achieve the greatest benefit subject to a constrained power budget.

  11. FITARA Milestones

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Fulfills OMB's requirement to submit an update on progress of actions/milestones that were listed in SSA's FITARA Implementation Plan. This JSON file allows OMB to...

  12. Pathology Milestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Stacey Klutts MD, PhD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available All Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accredited pathology residency training programs are now required to evaluate residents using the new Pathology Milestones assessment tool. Similar to implementation of the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies a decade ago, there have been challenges in implementation of the new milestones for many residency programs. The pathology department at the University of Iowa has implemented a process that divides the labor of the task in rating residents while also maintaining consistency in the process. The process is described in detail, and some initial trends in milestone evaluation are described and discussed. Our experience indicates that thoughtful implementation of the Pathology Milestones can provide programs with valuable information that can inform curricular changes.

  13. Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and achievement of infant motor developmental milestones in the Upstate KIDS Study

    OpenAIRE

    Wylie, Amanda; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Kus, Christopher; Ghassabian, Akhgar; Yeung, Edwina H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Maternal pre-pregnancy obesity is associated with several poor infant health outcomes; however studies that investigated motor development have been inconsistent. Thus, we examined maternal pre-pregnancy weight status and infants’ gross motor development. Design and Methods Participants consisted of 4,901 mother-infant pairs from the Upstate KIDS study, a longitudinal cohort in New York. Mothers indicated dates when infants achieved each of six gross motor milestones when infants we...

  14. Where do we go from here? Moving from systems-based practice process measures to true competency via developmental milestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Martinez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For many educators it has been challenging to meet the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's requirements for teaching systems-based practice (SBP. An additional layer of complexity for educators is evaluating competency in SBP, despite milestones and entrustable professional activities (EPAs. In order to address this challenge, the authors present the results of a literature review for how SBP is currently being taught and a series of recommendations on how to achieve competency in SBP for graduate medical trainees with the use of milestones. The literature review included 29 articles and demonstrated that only 28% of the articles taught more than one of the six core principles of SBP in a meaningful way. Only 7% of the articles received the highest grade of A. The authors summarize four guiding principles for creating a competency-based curriculum that is in alignment with the Next Accreditation System (NAS: 1 the curriculum needs to include all of the core principles in that competency, 2 the objectives of the curriculum should be driven by clinical outcomes, 3 the teaching modalities need to be interactive and clinically relevant, and 4 the evaluation process should be able to measure competency and be directly reflective of pertinent milestones and/or EPAs. This literature review and the provided guiding principles can guide other residency educators in their development of competency-based curricula that meets the standards of the NAS.

  15. Pretreatment status report on the identification and evaluation of alternative processes. Milestone Report No. C064

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, D.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Brothers, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Beary, M.M.; Nicholson, G.A. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to support the development and demonstration of a pretreatment system that will (1) destroy organic materials and ferrocyanide in tank wastes so that the wastes can be stored safely, (2) separate the high-activity and low-activity fractions, (3) remove radionuclides and remove or destroy hazardous chemicals in LLW as necessary to meet waste form feed requirements, (4) support development and demonstration of vitrification technology by providing representative feeds to the bench-scale glass melter, (5) support full-scale HLW vitrification operations, including near-term operation, by providing feed that meets specifications, and (6) design and develop pretreatment processes that accomplish the above objectives and ensure compliance with environmental regulations. This report is a presentation of candidate technologies for pretreatment of Hanford Site tank waste. Included are descriptions of studies by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory of Battelle Memorial Institute; Science Applications International Corporation, an independent consultant; BNFL, Inc. representing British technologies; Numatec, representing French technologies; and brief accounts of other relevant activities.

  16. Revised management plan, milestone plan, cost plan, and manpower plan. Sixth and seventh monthly status reports, October 1-November 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1978-01-01

    The following are included: project background and discussion, technical progress reports for all subtasks, contract management summary report, milestone schedule and status report, milestone log, cost plans, cost management reports, manpower plans, and manpower management reports. The following appendices are included: selection of heat pumps simulation locations, economic computations, fuel costs, system studies, recommended methodology for calculating residential load models, potential performance of heat pumps, data required from cooling contractors, cooling locations, thermal outputs: cooling, recommended inputs for the 25 ton advanced cooling simulation study, meteorological data, and contract modification. (MHR)

  17. ASC Tri-lab Co-design Level 2 Milestone Report 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornung, Rich [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, Holger [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Keasler, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Neely, Rob [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearce, Olga [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hammond, Si [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Trott, Christian [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vaughan, Courtenay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cook, Jeanine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoekstra, Rob [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergen, Ben [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Payne, Josh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Womeldorff, Geoff [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-23

    In 2015, the three Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories that make up the Advanced Sci- enti c Computing (ASC) Program (Sandia, Lawrence Livermore, and Los Alamos) collaboratively explored performance portability programming environments in the context of several ASC co-design proxy applica- tions as part of a tri-lab L2 milestone executed by the co-design teams at each laboratory. The programming environments that were studied included Kokkos (developed at Sandia), RAJA (LLNL), and Legion (Stan- ford University). The proxy apps studied included: miniAero, LULESH, CoMD, Kripke, and SNAP. These programming models and proxy-apps are described herein. Each lab focused on a particular combination of abstractions and proxy apps, with the goal of assessing performance portability using those. Performance portability was determined by: a) the ability to run a single application source code on multiple advanced architectures, b) comparing runtime performance between \

  18. The Silicon Wheel of CMS-SiB1 Milestone Report

    CERN Document Server

    Wittmer, Bruno

    1998-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Barrel Detector is a subsystem of the CMS Tracker and consists of seven wheels. For the SiB1-Milestone, that was completed in Summer 1997, one of these wheels has been built and equipped with 14 working silicon microstrip detector modules and 112 dummy modules. The working modules consist of two detectors glued together each one having 1024 strips with a pitch of 50 micron that are read out by eight PreMux 128 Chips. In the dummy modules the Readout Electronics have been substituted by resistors simulating the heat load. The dummy silicon sensors have fiducial marks and were alligned with a precision of 5 micron. The supporting wheel structure is made out of carbon fiber and incorporates all services. The assembly precision of the support structure was better than 100 micron.

  19. Implementation of nephrology subspecialty curricular milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Christina M; Prince, Lisa K; Oliver, James D; Abbott, Kevin C; Nee, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Beginning in the 2014-2015 training year, the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) required that nephrology Clinical Competency Committees assess fellows' progress toward 23 subcompetency "context nonspecific" internal medicine subspecialty milestones. Fellows' advancement toward the "ready for unsupervised practice" target milestone now is tracked in each of the 6 competencies: Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Professionalism, Interpersonal Communication Skills, Practice-Based Learning and Improvement, and Systems-Based Practice. Nephrology program directors and subspecialty societies must define nephrology-specific "curricular milestones," mapped to the nonspecific ACGME milestones. Although the ACGME goal is to produce data that can discriminate between successful and underperforming training programs, the approach is at risk to produce biased, inaccurate, and unhelpful information. We map the ACGME internal medicine subspecialty milestones to our previously published nephrology-specific milestone schema and describe entrustable professional activities and other objective assessment tools that inform milestone decisions. Mapping our schema onto the ACGME subspecialty milestone reporting form allows comparison with the ACGME subspecialty milestones and the curricular milestones developed by the American Society of Nephrology Program Directors. Clinical Competency Committees may easily adapt and directly translate milestone decisions reached using our schema onto the ACGME internal medicine subspecialty competency milestone-reporting format.

  20. Developmental milestones record - 18 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. ... Normal development. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ... . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  1. Developmental milestones record - 4 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 12. ... Normal development. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  2. Developmental milestones record - 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  3. Developmental milestones record - 12 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 10. ... Normal development. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ... . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  4. Developmental milestones record - 9 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 10. ... Normal development. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials of Pediatrics . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  5. Developmental milestones record - 4 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 10. ... Normal development. In: Marcdante KJ, Kliegman RM, eds. Nelson Essentials ... . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  6. Developmental milestones record - 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when he or she makes mistakes Shows less aggressive behavior Outgrows earlier childhood fears Accepts other points of ... take part in -- and learn the rules of -- sports and games Encouraging the child to play with ...

  7. Speech and Language Developmental Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also use special spoken tests to evaluate your child. A hearing test is often included in the evaluation because a hearing problem can affect speech and language development. Depending on the result of the evaluation, the ...

  8. The ADMSEP Milestones Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Brenda; Schatte, Dawnelle; Frank, Julia; Brouette, Thomas; Brand, Michael; Talley, Brenda; Ramchandani, Dilip; Lewis, Catherine; Blazek, Mary; Carlson, David; Smith, Mary Kay

    2016-04-01

    Credentialing bodies mandate that a medical school's curriculum be based upon recognized guidelines. Within the field of psychiatry, the Association of Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP) has previously published recommended guidelines for the pre-clinical and clerkship curriculum. Ongoing changes within the Liaison Committee on Medical Education's requirements for medical school curricula, and the publication of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition, necessitated review of these guidelines. ADMSEP convened a task force of psychiatric educators to develop a consensus report outlining new guidelines. The ADMSEP membership reviewed and approved this final document. The guidelines outline six core learning objectives with corresponding competencies. Each of these competencies specifies accompanying milestones to be achieved through the course of medical school. ADMSEP believes these guidelines will aid educators in crafting a school's psychiatric curriculum. Clearly articulated milestones may foster the further development of validated educational and assessment tools by ADMSEP and other organizations.

  9. Developmental Regimes in Africa synthesis report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, D.; Dietz, A.J.; Golooba-Mutebi, F.; Fuady, A.H.; Henley, D.; Kelsall, T.; Leliveld, A.H.M.; Donge, van J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Many African countries have experienced sustained economic growth, but few have achieved the type of structural change, driven by rising productivity, that has transformed mass living standards in parts of Asia. In the Developmental Regimes in Africa Synthesis Report, editor David Booth examines how

  10. Developmental Regimes in Africa synthesis report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booth, D.; Dietz, A.J.; Golooba-Mutebi, F.; Fuady, A.H.; Henley, D.; Kelsall, T.; Leliveld, A.H.M.; Donge, van J.K.

    2015-01-01

    Many African countries have experienced sustained economic growth, but few have achieved the type of structural change, driven by rising productivity, that has transformed mass living standards in parts of Asia. In the Developmental Regimes in Africa Synthesis Report, editor David Booth examines how

  11. Studies in developmental immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1976-05-26

    Progress is reported on studies of genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms, and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. Results are reported from studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms; cellular aspects of the immune system; the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems, primarily from an immunogenetic viewpoint and with particular reference to leukemias in the mouse; and the disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development.

  12. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T. [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Gill, Gary [PNNL; Kuo, Li-Jung [PNNL; Wood, Jordana [PNNL

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  13. Milestone 5 test report. Task 5, subtask 5.2: Tile to foam strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H. S.

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes work that has been performed to date on the strength of a cryotank insulation system using Rohacell foam and TUFI-coated AETB-12 ceramic tiles directly bonded to a simulated graphite-epoxy tank wall. Testing utilized a custom specimen design which consists of a long tensile specimen with eccentric loading to induce curvature similar to the curvature expected due to 'pillowing' of the tank when pressurized. A finite element model was constructed to predict the specific element strains in the test article, and to assist with design of the test specimen to meet the specific goals of curvature and laminate strain. The results indicate that the heat treated 3.25-pcf density Rohacell foam does not provide sufficient strength for the induced stresses due to curvature and stress concentration at the RTV bondline to the TUFI tile. The test was repeated using higher density non-heat treated Rohacell foam (6.9 pcf) without foam failure. The finite element model was shown to predict specimen behavior, and validation of the model was successful. It is pertinent to mention that the analyses described herein accurately predicted the failure of the heat treated foams and based on this analysis method it is expected that the untreated 3.25 pcf Rohacell foam will be successful.

  14. Assessment Report Sandia National Laboratories Fuel Cycle Technologies Quality Assurance Evaluation of FY15 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) program activities are conducted in accordance with FCT Quality Assurance Program Document (FCT-QAPD) requirements. The FCT-QAPD interfaces with SNL approved Quality Assurance Program Description (SNL-QAPD) as explained in the Sandia National Laboratories QA Program Interface Document for FCT Activities (Interface Document). This plan describes SNL's FY16 assessment of SNL's FY15 FCT M2 milestone deliverable's compliance with program QA requirements, including SNL R&A requirements. The assessment is intended to confirm that SNL's FY15 milestone deliverables contain the appropriate authenticated review documentation and that there is a copy marked with SNL R&A numbers.

  15. Milestone Report - Demonstrate Braided Material with 3.5 g U/kg Sorption Capacity under Seawater Testing Condition (Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 - 1/30/2015)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Das, Sadananda [ORNL; Oyola, Yatsandra [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Gill, Gary [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kuo, Li-Jung [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wood, Jordana [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 (1/30/2015) entitled, Demonstrate braided material with 3.5 g U/kg sorption capacity under seawater testing condition . This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent braided materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed four braided fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 3.5 g U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. The braided adsorbents were synthesized by braiding or leno weaving high surface area polyethylene fibers and conducting radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile monomers onto the braided materials followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. The four braided adsorbents demonstrated capacity values ranging from 3.7 to 4.2 g U/kg adsorbent after 56 days of exposure in natural coastal seawater at 20 oC. All data are normalized to a salinity of 35 psu.

  16. Associations of maternal fish intake during pregnancy and breastfeeding duration with attainment of developmental milestones in early childhood : a study from the Danish National Birth Cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oken, Emily; Osterdal, Marie Louise; Gillman, Matthew W.; Knudsen, Vibeke K.; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I.; Strom, Marin; Bellinger, David C.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Michaelsen, Kim Fleischer; Olsen, Sjurdur F.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined the overall effect of maternal fish intake during pregnancy on child development or examined whether the developmental benefits of maternal fish intake are greater in infants breastfed for a shorter duration. Objective: We aimed to study associations of maternal

  17. Milestones of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullin, Jorge

    2017-02-01

    We present a summary for non-specialists of the special issue of the journal Classical and Quantum Gravity on ‘Milestones of general relativity’, commemorating the 100th anniversary of the theory.

  18. Greater length-for-age increases the odds of attaining motor milestones in Vietnamese children aged 5-18 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Shibani; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Dearden, Kirk A; Marsh, David R; Ha, Tran Thu; Tran, Thach Duc; Pachón, Helena

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood malnutrition has been associated with delayed development. Limited data exist however about the timing of developmental delay early in life. We assessed motor milestone (MM) achievement using the World Health Organization's windows of achievement for gross motor milestones. We performed secondary analysis of baseline data of 158 Vietnamese children aged 5-18 months from a randomized community intervention trial. Median age of motor milestone achievement was compared to WHO reported medians. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify socioeconomic, anthropometric and dietary factors associated with motor milestone achievement during the windows of achievement. Thirty four per cent of the children were stunted. Median age of MM achievement of Vietnamese children lagged by 2.4-3.7 months, compared to the WHO median for all MMs. Greater length-for-age increased the odds for walking with assistance, standing alone and walking alone by more than 3 times. Greater weight-for-age increased the odds by 3.6 for hand-and-knees crawling. Likewise, frequency of daily complementary feeding raised the odds by 3.6 for standing with assistance. In this first application of WHO windows of achievement in Viet Nam, pre-schoolers achieved motor milestones later than WHO reported median age. High prevalence of stunting and association of length-for-age with motor milestone achievement underscore the importance of addressing chronic malnutrition to optimize children's growth and development.

  19. A milestone in safety

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Over recent days, we’ve achieved some historic milestones in LHC physics as we’ve made the transition from proton to ion running. These have been widely reported and I’ve communicated the news to you by e-mail. Less visible, but nonetheless vital to the functioning of the Lab, is an agreement that we’ll be signing with our Host States on 15 November. It will be the second tripartite agreement to be signed in as many months, and it is set to streamline our radiation protection and radiation safety.   The new agreement replaces existing bilateral agreements governing the procedures applying on the French and Swiss parts of the site. From an operational point of view, the new agreement simplifies matters by harmonising administrative processes while guaranteeing best practice in terms of radiation protection and radiation safety at CERN. The agreement is the result of many months of detailed discussions with the Autorité de Sûret&eac...

  20. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non-milestone-based feedback. We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback "extremely useful" or "very useful" in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback "not very useful" or "not at all useful" in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development.

  1. Milestone Completion Report WBS 1.3.5.05 ECP/VTK-m FY17Q3 [MS-17/02] Faceted Surface Normals STDA05-3.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, Kenneth D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-01

    The FY17Q3 milestone of the ECP/VTK-m project includes the completion of a VTK-m filter that computes normal vectors for surfaces. Normal vectors are those that point perpendicular to the surface and are an important direction when rendering the surface. The implementation includes the parallel algorithm itself, a filter module to simplify integrating it into other software, and documentation in the VTK-m Users’ Guide. With the completion of this milestone, we are able to necessary information to rendering systems to provide appropriate shading of surfaces. This milestone also feeds into subsequent milestones that progressively improve the approximation of surface direction.

  2. Studies in developmental immunogenetics. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, R D

    1977-06-29

    This contract provides the research support for a group concerned with a relatively large range of problems. The integrating thread that runs through it is that of an interest in development and its genetic regulation, mainly in complex organisms and with an emphasis on the immune system as a model for developmental analysis and as a tool for following the development of other systems, especially the brain. It includes studies of biochemical genetics, primarily from a developmental viewpoint and with particular regard to defense mechanisms, and cellular aspects of the immune system. It extends into the area of cancer immunology and cell specificities as related to tumor systems and to disruptions of genetic control mechanisms in tumor development, especially as approached through the reappearance of fetal antigens associated with tumor development. During the past year, our attention has turned increasingly to genetic factors predisposing to autoimmune disease, and to factors that have been claimed to transfer specific cellular immunity from immune to nonimmune animals.

  3. Level-2 Milestone 5213. CTS-1 Contract Award Completed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leininger, Matt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-24

    This report documents the fact that the first commodity technology (CT) system contract award, CTS-1, has been completed. The description of the milestone is: Based on Tri-Lab CTS-1 process and review, LLNL successfully awards the procurement for the next-generation Tri-Lab Linux CTS-1. The milestone completion criterion is: Signed contract. The milestone was completed on September 24th. 2015.

  4. Quality of statistical reporting in developmental disability journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namasivayam, Aravind K; Yan, Tina; Wong, Wing Yiu Stephanie; van Lieshout, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) dominates quantitative data analysis, but its use is controversial and has been heavily criticized. The American Psychological Association has advocated the reporting of effect sizes (ES), confidence intervals (CIs), and statistical power analysis to complement NHST results to provide a more comprehensive understanding of research findings. The aim of this paper is to carry out a sample survey of statistical reporting practices in two journals with the highest h5-index scores in the areas of developmental disability and rehabilitation. Using a checklist that includes critical recommendations by American Psychological Association, we examined 100 randomly selected articles out of 456 articles reporting inferential statistics in the year 2013 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders (JADD) and Research in Developmental Disabilities (RDD). The results showed that for both journals, ES were reported only half the time (JADD 59.3%; RDD 55.87%). These findings are similar to psychology journals, but are in stark contrast to ES reporting in educational journals (73%). Furthermore, a priori power and sample size determination (JADD 10%; RDD 6%), along with reporting and interpreting precision measures (CI: JADD 13.33%; RDD 16.67%), were the least reported metrics in these journals, but not dissimilar to journals in other disciplines. To advance the science in developmental disability and rehabilitation and to bridge the research-to-practice divide, reforms in statistical reporting, such as providing supplemental measures to NHST, are clearly needed.

  5. Developmentally Disabled Persons in Family Settings: Report No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Wendy M.; Wilson, Wendell L.

    The second in a series of three reports, this document presents findings of clients of Washington's Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), ages 22-29, who were living with their families at age 18 but now live elsewhere (group B). Findings are based on telephone interviews with families of 224 DDD clients and analysis of DDD records. The…

  6. A Heavy Milestone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Changes to China’s employment law have proved controversial,pitting pro-labor against pro-employer After more than two years of deliber- ation and public comments,the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Employment Contracts, or Employment Contract Law,has been ratified and will officially come into force on January 1,2008.What does the new law imply for employers and employees? The new law is a milestone in building an employment and social security system in China since the current Employment Law of China was enacted in 1994.It has been for- mulated to protect the lawful rights and inter-

  7. CASL L1 Milestone report : CASL.P4.01, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for CIPS with VIPRE-W and BOA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Yixing (Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA); Adams, Brian M.; Secker, Jeffrey R. (Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA)

    2011-12-01

    The CASL Level 1 Milestone CASL.P4.01, successfully completed in December 2011, aimed to 'conduct, using methodologies integrated into VERA, a detailed sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification of a crud-relevant problem with baseline VERA capabilities (ANC/VIPRE-W/BOA).' The VUQ focus area led this effort, in partnership with AMA, and with support from VRI. DAKOTA was coupled to existing VIPRE-W thermal-hydraulics and BOA crud/boron deposit simulations representing a pressurized water reactor (PWR) that previously experienced crud-induced power shift (CIPS). This work supports understanding of CIPS by exploring the sensitivity and uncertainty in BOA outputs with respect to uncertain operating and model parameters. This report summarizes work coupling the software tools, characterizing uncertainties, and analyzing the results of iterative sensitivity and uncertainty studies. These studies focused on sensitivity and uncertainty of CIPS indicators calculated by the current version of the BOA code used in the industry. Challenges with this kind of analysis are identified to inform follow-on research goals and VERA development targeting crud-related challenge problems.

  8. NEAMS FPL M2 Milestone Report: Development of a UO₂ Grain Size Model using Multicale Modeling and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, Michael R [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-06-01

    This report summarizes development work funded by the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling Simulation program's Fuels Product Line (FPL) to develop a mechanistic model for the average grain size in UO₂ fuel. The model is developed using a multiscale modeling and simulation approach involving atomistic simulations, as well as mesoscale simulations using INL's MARMOT code.

  9. Developmental milestones of vertically HIV infected and seroreverters children: follow up of 83 children Desenvolvimento psicomotor de crianças verticalmente infectadas pelo HIV e sororevertidas: seguimento de 83 crianças

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isac Bruck

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to detect neurological abnormalities in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected children. This was achieved by a prospective evaluation, from November/1995 to April/2000, of 43 HIV infected children (group I and 40 HIV seroreverters children (group II through neurological exam and neurodevelopmental tests: Denver Developmental Screening Test (DDST and Clinical Adaptive Test / Clinical Linguistic and Auditory Milestone Scale (CAT/CLAMS. A control group (III, of 67 children, were evaluated by CAT/CLAMS. Hyperactivity, irritability and hypotonia were the findings on neurological examination, without statistical differences between group I and II. On CAT/CLAMS, the group I developmental quotient (DQ was significantly lower than the other groups. The same occurred in DDST, with group I presenting significantly more failures than group II. Nineteen HIV children of group I had brain computed tomographic scan, with abnormalities in three of them (basal ganglia calcification, white matter hypodensity and asymmetry of lateral ventricles. We conclude that in HIV infected children a neurodevelopment delay occur early in the disease, and it can be detected by screening tests.Objetivou-se com o presente estudo detectar anormalidades neurológicas em crianças infectadas pelo vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV. Avaliou-se prospectivamente, de novembro de 1995 a abril de 2000, 43 crianças infectadas pelo HIV (grupo I e 40 crianças sororevertidas (grupo II, por meio de exame neurológico, testes de screening de neurodesenvolvimento: Teste Denver de Triagem de Desenvolvimento (DDST e Teste de Adaptação Clínica / Escala Linguística e Desenvolvimento Auditivo (CAT/CLAMS. Como grupo controle (III, foram avaliadas 67 crianças pelo CAT/CLAMS. Hiperatividade, irritabilidade e hipotonia foram as alterações encontradas ao exame neurológico, não ocorrendo diferenças estatísticas entre as crianças infectadas ou sororevertidas

  10. Report for the ASC CSSE L2 Milestone (4873) - Demonstration of Local Failure Local Recovery Resilient Programming Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heroux, Michael Allen; Teranishi, Keita

    2014-06-01

    Recovery from process loss during the execution of a distributed memory parallel application is presently achieved by restarting the program, typically from a checkpoint file. Future computer system trends indicate that the size of data to checkpoint, the lack of improvement in parallel file system performance and the increase in process failure rates will lead to situations where checkpoint restart becomes infeasible. In this report we describe and prototype the use of a new application level resilient computing model that manages persistent storage of local state for each process such that, if a process fails, recovery can be performed locally without requiring access to a global checkpoint file. LFLR provides application developers with an ability to recover locally and continue application execution when a process is lost. This report discusses what features are required from the hardware, OS and runtime layers, and what approaches application developers might use in the design of future codes, including a demonstration of LFLR-enabled MiniFE code from the Matenvo mini-application suite.

  11. Milestones in welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolby, Richard E.

    2013-09-01

    Sir Alan's PhD thesis describes his research into cracking during arc welding of armour steels. Throughout his career, he had a strong interest in defects of all types, how they formed in metallic structures and how the larger ones could be detected and sized by non-destructive techniques. He was also vitally concerned with how defects impacted on the engineering integrity of welded structures, particularly the risk of fracture in nuclear plant. This study presents a view of some of the major milestones in global welding technology that took place over the 60 or more years of Sir Alan's career and highlights those where he had a personal and direct involvement.

  12. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

  13. Milestone Report:3.2.2.26 Appliances, HVAC & Water Heating R&D-Select Sorption Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ally, Moonis Raza [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to select a sorption technology based on recent work completed on characterizing working pairs for both absorption and adsorption technologies based on Global Warming Potential (GWP) of less than 100 (relative to carbon dioxide, 100-year atmospheric life span) and zero Ozone Depletion Potential (ODP). From a total of eighty-three potential working pairs (absorption technology), there were only two candidate working pairs for the absorption technology, and 8 potential working pairs for adsorption technology. After screening these ten potential candidates on the basis of sizes of the desorber, absorber/adsorber, evaporator, condenser, and rectifier (where applicable), the ORNL-Georgia Tech study concluded that best working pairs are NH3-H2O for the most compact system in terms of heat transfer equipment surface area, and NH3-LiNO3 and MeOH-[mmin][DMP] where efficiency is most important. Based on a single-stage absorption and adsorption modeling using the Engineering Equation Solver (EES), the performance of both sorption systems was evaluated from known heat transfer correlations, and thermos-physical properties. Based on these results, the technology chosen is absorption technology. The selected technology is absorption for the reasons cited in Section 4.

  14. Tritium Separation from High Volume Dilute Aqueous Streams- Milestone Report for M3FT-15OR0302092

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, S. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-02-29

    This report describes the synthesis and evaluation of molecular sieve zeolite membranes to separate and concentrate tritiated water (HTO) from dilute HTO-bearing aqueous streams. Several silico alumino phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve zeolite membranes were synthesized and characterized with gas and vapor permeation measurements. The pervaporation process performance was evaluated for the separation and concentration of tritiated water. Experiments were performed over a range of tritiated water concentration covering the range of concentration anticipated in nuclear fuel processing where potentially both acid and water streams are recycled. The permeate was recovered under vacuum. The tritium concentration ranged from 0.5 to 1 mCi/mL which is about 0.1 mg/L or 0.1 ppm. The HTO concentration was three orders of magnitude lower than experiments performed with simulated feed containing HDO (>100 ppm) using deuterated water where high separation factors (>10) were obtained using SAPO membranes. Separation factor calculated from the measured tritium concentrations ranged from 0.83-0.98. Although the membrane performance characterization results were lower than expected, they can be explained on the basis of low feed volume and three orders of magnitude lower HTO concentration compared to HDO concentration in deuterated water. We have identified several new approaches, such as tuning the diffusion coefficient of HTO, that may help achieve preferential transport of tritium (HTO) resulting in a substantially more concentrated permeate.

  15. Synthesis and Performance Evaluations of SAPO-34 Membranes- Milestone Report for FCRD-MRWFD-2016-000263

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhave, Ramesh R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nair, Sankar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report describes the synthesis and evaluation of molecular sieve zeolite membranes to separate and concentrate tritiated water (HTO) from dilute HTO-bearing aqueous streams. Several silico alumino phosphate (SAPO-34) molecular sieve zeolite membranes were synthesized on tubular supports and characterized with gas and vapor permeation measurements. The pervaporation process performance was evaluated for the separation and concentration of tritiated water. Experiments were performed over a range of tritiated water concentration that correspond to the range anticipated in a nuclear fuel processing system that includes both acid and water streams recycling. The permeate was recovered under vacuum. The tritium concentration ranged from 0.5 to 1 mCi/mL which is about 0.1 mg/L or 0.1 ppm. The separation factors calculated from the measured tritium concentrations ranged from 0.83-0.98. The HTO concentration was three orders of magnitude lower than prior experiments performed with simulated feed containing HDO (>100 ppm) using deuterated water where high separation factors (>10) were obtained using SAPO membranes on alumina disk supports. Although the membrane performance characterization results for HTO were lower than expected, they can be explained on the basis of low feed volume and three orders of magnitude lower HTO concentration compared to HDO concentration in deuterated water. Several new approaches are proposed, such as tuning the diffusion coefficient of HTO, and optimization of membrane thickness that may help achieve preferential transport of tritium (HTO) resulting in a substantially more concentrated permeate.

  16. Age-aware solder performance models : level 2 milestone completion.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K.; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Neidigk, Matthew Aaron; Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-09-01

    Legislated requirements and industry standards are replacing eutectic lead-tin (Pb-Sn) solders with lead-free (Pb-free) solders in future component designs and in replacements and retrofits. Since Pb-free solders have not yet seen service for long periods, their long-term behavior is poorly characterized. Because understanding the reliability of Pb-free solders is critical to supporting the next generation of circuit board designs, it is imperative that we develop, validate and exercise a solder lifetime model that can capture the thermomechanical response of Pb-free solder joints in stockpile components. To this end, an ASC Level 2 milestone was identified for fiscal year 2010: Milestone 3605: Utilize experimentally validated constitutive model for lead-free solder to simulate aging and reliability of solder joints in stockpile components. This report documents the completion of this milestone, including evidence that the milestone completion criteria were met and a summary of the milestone Program Review.

  17. RELAP-7 Level 2 Milestone Report: Demonstration of a Steady State Single Phase PWR Simulation with RELAP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Andrs; Ray Berry; Derek Gaston; Richard Martineau; John Peterson; Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou

    2012-05-01

    The document contains the simulation results of a steady state model PWR problem with the RELAP-7 code. The RELAP-7 code is the next generation nuclear reactor system safety analysis code being developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The code is based on INL's modern scientific software development framework - MOOSE (Multi-Physics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment). This report summarizes the initial results of simulating a model steady-state single phase PWR problem using the current version of the RELAP-7 code. The major purpose of this demonstration simulation is to show that RELAP-7 code can be rapidly developed to simulate single-phase reactor problems. RELAP-7 is a new project started on October 1st, 2011. It will become the main reactor systems simulation toolkit for RISMC (Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization) and the next generation tool in the RELAP reactor safety/systems analysis application series (the replacement for RELAP5). The key to the success of RELAP-7 is the simultaneous advancement of physical models, numerical methods, and software design while maintaining a solid user perspective. Physical models include both PDEs (Partial Differential Equations) and ODEs (Ordinary Differential Equations) and experimental based closure models. RELAP-7 will eventually utilize well posed governing equations for multiphase flow, which can be strictly verified. Closure models used in RELAP5 and newly developed models will be reviewed and selected to reflect the progress made during the past three decades. RELAP-7 uses modern numerical methods, which allow implicit time integration, higher order schemes in both time and space, and strongly coupled multi-physics simulations. RELAP-7 is written with object oriented programming language C++. Its development follows modern software design paradigms. The code is easy to read, develop, maintain, and couple with other codes. Most importantly, the modern software design allows the RELAP-7 code to

  18. Methods for Analyzing the Attainment of Graduate School Milestones: A Case Study. GRE Board Professional Report No. 86-3P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Rebecca; Braun, Henry I.

    Using a data base compiled by the Graduate School of Northwestern University, a longitudinal study of the graduate school careers of 2,211 students in 14 programs was conducted. Among the most prominent findings was the increase in the enrollment of foreign students. The patterns of attainment of graduate school milestones, such as Ph. D.…

  19. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE energy storage systems program (FY11 Quarter 3: April through June 2011).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

    2011-09-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 3 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of a control as well as three carbon-containing negative plates in the raw, as cast form as well as after formation. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within each plate was evaluated. In addition, baseline electrochemical measurements were performed on each battery to establish their initial performance. These measurements included capacity, internal resistance, and float current. The results obtained for the electrochemical testing were in agreement with previous evaluations performed at East Penn manufacturing. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated.

  20. Milestones in ataxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, Thomas; Paulson, Henry

    2010-01-01

    The past 25 years have seen enormous progress in the deciphering of the genetic and molecular basis of ataxias resulting in an improved understanding of their pathogenesis. The most significant milestones during this period were the cloning of the genes associated with the common spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs), ataxia telangiectasia (AT) and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA). To date, the causative mutations of more than 30 SCAs and 20 recessive ataxias have been identified. In addition, there are numerous acquired ataxias with defined molecular causes so that the entire number of distinct ataxia disorders exceeds 50 and possibly approaches 100. Despite this enormous heterogeneity, a few recurrent pathopyhsiological themes stand out. These include protein aggregation, failure of protein homoestasis, perturbations in ion channel function, defects in DNA repair and mitochondrial dysfunction. The clinical phenotypes of the most common ataxia disorders have been firmly established, and their natural history is being studied in ongoing large observational trials. Effective therapies for ataxias are still lacking. However, novel drug targets are under investigation, and it is expected that there will be an increasing number of therapeutic trials in ataxia. PMID:21626557

  1. TRT Barrel milestones passed

    CERN Multimedia

    Ogren, H

    2004-01-01

    The barrel TRT detector passed three significant milestones this spring. The Barrel Support Structure (BSS) was completed and moved to the SR-1 building on February 24th. On March 12th the first module passed the quality assurance testing in Building 154 and was transported to the assembly site in the SR-1 building for barrel assembly. Then on April 21st the final production module that had been scanned at Hampton University was shipped to CERN. TRT Barrel Module Production The production of the full complement of barrel modules (96 plus 9 total spares) is now complete. This has been a five-year effort by Duke University, Hampton University, and Indiana University. Actual construction of the modules in the United States was completed in the first part of 2004. The production crews at each of the sites in the United States have now completed their missions. They are shown in the following pictures. Duke University: Production crew with the final completed module. Indiana University: Module producti...

  2. Report of experiments and evidence for ASC L2 milestone 4467 : demonstration of a legacy application's path to exascale.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, Matthew L.; Ferreira, Kurt Brian; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Leung, Vitus Joseph; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Gentile, Ann C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Klundt, Ruth Ann; Ward, H. Lee; Laros, James H., III; Hemmert, Karl Scott; Fabian, Nathan D.; Levenhagen, Michael J.; Barrett, Brian W.; Brightwell, Ronald Brian; Barrett, Richard; Wheeler, Kyle Bruce; Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Rodrigues, Arun F.; Brandt, James M. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Thompson, David (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); VanDyke, John P.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Tucker, Thomas (Open Grid Computing, Inc., Austin, TX); Vaughan, Courtenay Thomas

    2012-03-01

    This report documents thirteen of Sandia's contributions to the Computational Systems and Software Environment (CSSE) within the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program between fiscal years 2009 and 2012. It describes their impact on ASC applications. Most contributions are implemented in lower software levels allowing for application improvement without source code changes. Improvements are identified in such areas as reduced run time, characterizing power usage, and Input/Output (I/O). Other experiments are more forward looking, demonstrating potential bottlenecks using mini-application versions of the legacy codes and simulating their network activity on Exascale-class hardware. The purpose of this report is to prove that the team has completed milestone 4467-Demonstration of a Legacy Application's Path to Exascale. Cielo is expected to be the last capability system on which existing ASC codes can run without significant modifications. This assertion will be tested to determine where the breaking point is for an existing highly scalable application. The goal is to stretch the performance boundaries of the application by applying recent CSSE RD in areas such as resilience, power, I/O, visualization services, SMARTMAP, lightweight LWKs, virtualization, simulation, and feedback loops. Dedicated system time reservations and/or CCC allocations will be used to quantify the impact of system-level changes to extend the life and performance of the ASC code base. Finally, a simulation of anticipated exascale-class hardware will be performed using SST to supplement the calculations. Determine where the breaking point is for an existing highly scalable application: Chapter 15 presented the CSSE work that sought to identify the breaking point in two ASC legacy applications-Charon and CTH. Their mini-app versions were also employed to complete the task. There is no single breaking point as more than one issue was found with the two codes. The results were

  3. Purdue, UCSD achieve networking milestones

    CERN Document Server

    Kapp, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    "Purdue University researchers have reached new milestones in Grid interoperability through the successful integration of two Open Science Grid (OSG) sites running a scientific application over the National Science Foundation TeraGrid network." (1,5 page)

  4. Fragrance Chemistry Milestones and Perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gautschi, Markus; Bajgrowicz, Jerzy A; Kraft, Philip

    2001-01-01

    This mini-review on Fragrance Chemistry focuses on milestones in the timelines of musk, ionone/ woody and sandalwood odorants, as well as on new perspectives arising from the development of fragrance precursors...

  5. Developmental Regression and Autism Reported to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Emily Jane; Ball, Robert; Landa, Rebecca; Zimmerman, Andrew W.; Braun, M. Miles

    2007-01-01

    We report demographic and clinical characteristics of children reported to the US Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) as having autism or another developmental disorder after vaccination. We completed 124 interviews with parents and reviewed medical records for 31 children whose records contained sufficient information to evaluate the…

  6. Putting the pediatrics milestones into practice: a consensus roadmap and resource analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Spector, Nancy D; Calaman, Sharon; West, Daniel C; Cruz, Mario; Frohna, John G; Gonzalez Del Rey, Javier; Gustafson, Kristina K; Poynter, Sue Ellen; Rosenbluth, Glenn; Southgate, W Michael; Vinci, Robert J; Sectish, Theodore C

    2014-05-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has partnered with member boards of the American Board of Medical Specialties to initiate the next steps in advancing competency-based assessment in residency programs. This initiative, known as the Milestone Project, is a paradigm shift from traditional assessment efforts and requires all pediatrics residency programs to report individual resident progression along a series of 4 to 5 developmental levels of performance, or milestones, for individual competencies every 6 months beginning in June 2014. The effort required to successfully make this shift is tremendous given the number of training programs, training institutions, and trainees. However, it holds great promise for achieving training outcomes that align with patient needs; developing a valid, reliable, and meaningful way to track residents' development; and providing trainees with a roadmap for learning. Recognizing the resources needed to implement this new system, the authors, all residency program leaders, provide their consensus view of the components necessary for implementing and sustaining this effort, including resource estimates for completing this work. The authors have identified 4 domains: (1) Program Review and Development of Stakeholders and Participants, (2) Assessment Methods and Validation, (3) Data and Assessment System Development, and (4) Summative Assessment and Feedback. This work can serve as a starting point and framework for collaboration with program, department, and institutional leaders to identify and garner necessary resources and plan for local and national efforts that will ensure successful transition to milestones-based assessment. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Social Withdrawal Behaviour at One Year of Age Is Associated with Delays in Reaching Language Milestones in the EDEN Mother-Child Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Guedeney

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between social withdrawal behaviour at one year and motor and language milestones.One-year old children from the EDEN French population-based birth cohort study (Study on the pre- and postnatal determinants of the child's development and prospective health Birth Cohort Study were included. Social withdrawal at one year was assessed by trained midwives using the Alarm Distress BaBy (ADBB scale. Midwives concurrently examined infants' motor and language milestones. Parents reported on child's psychomotor and language milestones, during the interview with the midwife.After adjusting for potential confounding factors, social withdrawal behaviour was significantly associated with concurrent delays in motor and language milestones assessed by the midwife or the parents.Higher scores on social withdrawal behaviour as assessed with the ADBB were associated with delays in reaching language milestones, and to a lesser extent with lower motor ability scores. Taking the contribution of social withdrawal behaviour into account may help understand the unfolding of developmental difficulties in children.

  8. Social Withdrawal Behaviour at One Year of Age Is Associated with Delays in Reaching Language Milestones in the EDEN Mother-Child Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedeney, Antoine; Forhan, Anne; Larroque, Beatrice; de Agostini, Maria; Pingault, Jean-Baptiste; Heude, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between social withdrawal behaviour at one year and motor and language milestones. One-year old children from the EDEN French population-based birth cohort study (Study on the pre- and postnatal determinants of the child's development and prospective health Birth Cohort Study) were included. Social withdrawal at one year was assessed by trained midwives using the Alarm Distress BaBy (ADBB) scale. Midwives concurrently examined infants' motor and language milestones. Parents reported on child's psychomotor and language milestones, during the interview with the midwife. After adjusting for potential confounding factors, social withdrawal behaviour was significantly associated with concurrent delays in motor and language milestones assessed by the midwife or the parents. Higher scores on social withdrawal behaviour as assessed with the ADBB were associated with delays in reaching language milestones, and to a lesser extent with lower motor ability scores. Taking the contribution of social withdrawal behaviour into account may help understand the unfolding of developmental difficulties in children.

  9. Toddlers’ Fine Motor Milestone Achievement is Associated with Early Touchscreen Scrolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachael Bedford

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Touchscreen technologies provide an intuitive and attractive source of sensory/cognitive stimulation for young children. Despite fears that usage may have a negative impact on toddlers’ cognitive development, empirical evidence is lacking. The current study presents results from the UK Toddler Attentional Behaviours and LEarning with Touchscreens (TABLET project, examining the association between toddlers’ touchscreen use and the attainment of developmental milestones. Data were gathered in an online survey of 715 parents of 6- to 36-month-olds to address two research questions: 1 How does touchscreen use change from 6 to 36 months? 2 In toddlers (19 to 36 months i.e., above the median age, n = 366, how does retrospectively reported age of first touchscreen usage relate to gross motor (i.e., walking, fine motor (i.e., stacking blocks and language (i.e., producing two-word utterances milestones? In our sample, the proportion of children using touchscreens, as well as the average daily usage time, increased with age (youngest quartile, 6-11 months: 51.22% users, 8.53 minutes per day; oldest quartile, 26-36 months: 92.05% users, average use of 43.95 minutes per day. In toddlers, aged 19-36 months, age of first touchscreen use was significantly associated with fine motor (stacking blocks, p = 0.03, after controlling for covariates age, sex, mother’s education (a proxy for SES as well as age of early fine motor milestone achievement (pincer grip. This effect was only present for active scrolling of the touchscreen p = 0.04, not for video watching. No significant relationships were found between touchscreen use and either gross motor or language milestones. Touchscreen use increases rapidly over the first three years of life. In the current study, we find no evidence to support a negative association between the age of first touchscreen usage and developmental milestones. Indeed, earlier touchscreen use, specifically scrolling of the screen, was

  10. The Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot: Development of Workplace-Based Assessment Content, Instruments, and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Patricia J; Margolis, Melissa; Poynter, Sue E; Chaffinch, Christa; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca; Turner, Teri L; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda; Lockridge, Robin; Clyman, Stephen G; Schwartz, Alan

    2016-05-01

    To report on the development of content and user feedback regarding the assessment process and utility of the workplace-based assessment instruments of the Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot (PMAP). One multisource feedback instrument and two structured clinical observation instruments were developed and refined by experts in pediatrics and assessment to provide evidence for nine competencies based on the Pediatrics Milestones (PMs) and chosen to inform residency program faculty decisions about learners' readiness to serve as pediatric interns in the inpatient setting. During the 2012-2013 PMAP study, 18 U.S. pediatric residency programs enrolled interns and subinterns. Faculty, residents, nurses, and other observers used the instruments to assess learner performance through direct observation during a one-month rotation. At the end of the rotation, data were aggregated for each learner, milestone levels were assigned using a milestone classification form, and feedback was provided to learners. Learners and site leads were surveyed and/or interviewed about their experience as participants. Across the sites, 2,338 instruments assessing 239 learners were completed by 630 unique observers. Regarding end-of-rotation feedback, 93% of learners (128/137) agreed the assessments and feedback "helped me understand how those with whom I work perceive my performance," and 85% (117/137) agreed they were "useful for constructing future goals or identifying a developmental path." Site leads identified several benefits and challenges to the assessment process. PM-based instruments used in workplace-based assessment provide a meaningful and acceptable approach to collecting evidence of learner competency development. Learners valued feedback provided by PM-based assessment.

  11. Developmental orofacial deficits associated with multimodal cancer therapy: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, R.J.; Neuman, P.; Spalding, P.; Novak, L.; Strandjord, S.; Coccia, P.F.

    1989-09-01

    Multimodal cancer therapy for pediatric head and neck tumors may be associated with significant developmental orofacial morbidity. This report details these effects in a child (C.I.) diagnosed at 2.5 years of age with a rhabdomyosarcoma, primary to the left buccinator. This case is of interest as C.I. has an unaffected identical twin (D.I.) for comparative study. Both were assessed by comparing panoramic radiographs and lateral and frontal tracings of cephalometric radiographs obtained at 8.25 years of age. C.I. had multiple dental anomalies which included agenesis, ectopia, crown malformation, and root malformation. Root malformation, ectopia, and agenesis were restricted to the left dentition, whereas crown malformation was noted bilaterally. C.I. had a generalized craniofacial skeletal hypoplasia relative to D.I. in all three planes, growth defects were greater on the side of the tumor, and the mandible was affected more than the nasomaxillary complex.

  12. FY14 Codesign Milestone Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Barrett, Richard Frederick [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Howell, Louis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Daniel, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This milestone was the 2nd in a series of Tri-Lab Co-Design L2 milestones supporting ‘Co-Design’ efforts in the ASC program. It is a crucial step towards evaluating the effectiveness of proxy applications in exploring code performance on next generation architectures. All three labs evaluated the performance of 2 proxy applications on modern architectures and/or testbeds for pre-production hardware. The results are captured in this document as well as annotated presentations from all 3 laboratories.

  13. Southeastern Environmental Resources Alliance [Status report on completion milestones incorporated in the Cooperative Agreement, and draft start-up plan March 24, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The Southeastern Environmental Resources Alliance (SERA) is a joint effort between the US Department of Energy, the states of Georgia and South Carolina, and Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The original proposal for SERA, submitted under the Technology Reinvestment Project (TRP), is based on improving the competitiveness of manufacturers within Georgia and South Carolina by addressing the costs associated with environmental and waste management issues. By using the many technologies available through the national laboratories, universities, the Savannah River Site, and the commercial sector, SERA will improve the competitive position of companies that would otherwise have no access to those technologies. This Start-Up Plan details the steps SERA will take to begin effective operations by June 1, 1995, and will focus on the short-term needs of the program. This plan will serve as a supplement to the original SERA proposal, and will address the major milestones included in the Department of Energy`s Cooperative Agreement. Also documented are the planning processes that SERA will use to ensure the long-term viability of the program. The planning process will include additional work elements that are referenced by the original proposal, but, for the purposes of program start-up, are not immediately addressed. The major milestones and schedules are provided for each goal.

  14. Developmentally Disabled Persons in Family Settings: Report No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Wendy M.; Wilson, Wendell L.

    The final part of a three part study of developmentally disabled persons in Washington State, this document focuses on clients of the Division of Developmental Disabilities (DDD), ages 19 through 26, who appeared to be eligible for DDD services but were not enrolled with the DDD (group C). Telephone interviews were conducted with parents of 55…

  15. Some LHC milestones...

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    October 1995 The LHC technical design report is published. This document details the operation and the architecture of the future accelerator. November 2000 The first of the 1232 main dipole magnets for the LHC are delivered. May 2005 The first interconnection between two magnets of the accelerator is made. To carry out the 1700 interconnections of the LHC, 123 000 operations are necessary. February 2006 The new CERN Control Centre, which combines all the control rooms for the accelerators, the cryogenics and the technical infrastructure, starts operation. The LHC will be controlled from here. October 2006 Construction of the largest refrigerator in the world is complete. The 27 km cryogenic distribution line inside the LHC tunnel will circulate helium in liquid and gas phases to provide cryogenic conditions for the superconducting magnets of the accelerator. November 2006 Magnet production for the LHC is complete. The last of t...

  16. CMS silicon tracker milestone 200

    CERN Document Server

    Dierlamm, A

    2002-01-01

    The tracker of CMS will fully consist of silicon micro-strip and pixel sensors. Building a detector with 210 m/sup 2/ sensor surface in about 3 years requires a tightly controlled construction schedule. All different aspects of the production are exercised within a pre- production of 200 modules (Milestone 200) to identify and eliminate possible bottlenecks and to test the complete electronic chain. The quality, process stability and radiation hardness of the silicon sensors will be permanently monitored. Automatic assembly procedure and industrial bonding machines will guarantee a fast and reliable construction. All modules will be tested for signal, noise and pedestals at room temperature and operation temperature of -10 degrees C. Quality assurance of the Milestone 200 sensors and modules including irradiation and stability tests are presented. (6 refs).

  17. Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome: report of a new case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eKeulen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the case of a 17-year-old right-handed Belgian boy with developmental FAS and comorbid developmental apraxia of speech (DAS. Extensive neuropsychological and neurolinguistic investigations demonstrated a normal IQ but impaired planning (visuo-constructional dyspraxia. A Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a significant hypoperfusion in the prefrontal and medial frontal regions, as well as in the lateral temporal regions. Hypoperfusion in the right cerebellum almost reached significance. It is hypothesized that these clinical findings support the view that FAS and DAS are related phenomena following impairment of the cerebro-cerebellar network.

  18. Developmental Foreign Accent Syndrome: Report of a New Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keulen, Stefanie; Mariën, Peter; Wackenier, Peggy; Jonkers, Roel; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Verhoeven, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 17-year-old right-handed Belgian boy with developmental FAS and comorbid developmental apraxia of speech (DAS). Extensive neuropsychological and neurolinguistic investigations demonstrated a normal IQ but impaired planning (visuo-constructional dyspraxia). A Tc-99m-ECD SPECT revealed a significant hypoperfusion in the prefrontal and medial frontal regions, as well as in the lateral temporal regions. Hypoperfusion in the right cerebellum almost reached significance. It is hypothesized that these clinical findings support the view that FAS and DAS are related phenomena following impairment of the cerebro-cerebellar network. PMID:27014011

  19. Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory 4th Quarter 2009 Milestone Report: Measure and simulate target temperature and dynamic response in optimized NDCX-I configurations with initial diagnostics suite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Barnard, J.J.; Henestroza, E.; Logan, B.G.; Lidia, S.; More, R.M.; Ni, P.A.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J.-L.; Grote, D.; Friedman, A.

    2009-09-30

    This milestone has been met. The effort contains two main components: (1) Experimental results of warm dense matter target experiments on optimized NDCX-I configurations that include measurements of target temperature and transient target behavior. (2) A theoretical model of the target response to beam heating that includes an equilibrium heating model of the target foil and a model for droplet formation in the target for comparison with experimental results. The experiments on ion-beam target heating use a 300-350-keV K{sup +} pulsed beam from the Neutralized Compression Drift Experiment (NDCX-I) accelerator at LBNL. The NDCX-I accelerator delivers an uncompressed pulse beam of several microseconds with a typical power density of >100 kW/cm{sup 2} over a final focus spot size of about 1 mm. An induction bunching module the NDCX-I compresses a portion of the beam pulse to reach a much higher power density over 2 nanoseconds. Under these conditions the free-standing foil targets are rapidly heated to temperatures to over 4000 K. We model the target thermal dynamics using the equation of heat conduction for the temperature T(x,t) as a function of time (t) and spatial dimension along the beam direction (x). The competing cooling processes release energy from the surface of the foil due to evaporation, radiation, and thermionic (Richardson) emission. A description of the experimental configuration of the target chamber and results from initial beam-target experiments are reported in our FY08 4th Quarter and FY09 2nd Quarter Milestone Reports. The WDM target diagnostics include a high-speed multichannel optical pyrometer, optical streak camera, VISAR, and high-speed gated cameras. The fast optical pyrometer is a unique and significant new diagnostic which provides valuable information on the temperature evolution of the heated target.

  20. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 2: January through March 2011).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 2 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails an ex situ analysis of the four carbons that have been added to the negative active material of valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries for the purposes of this study. The four carbons selected for this study were a graphitic carbon, a carbon black, an activated carbon, and acetylene black. The morphology, crystallinity, and impurity contents of each of the four carbons were analyzed; results were consistent with previous data. Cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) has been initiated. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown.

  1. ASDS Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery Fellowship Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Abigail; Arndt, Kenneth A; Avram, Mathew M; Brown, Mariah R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Fabi, Sabrina G; Friedmann, Daniel P; Geronemus, Roy G; Goldberg, David J; Goldman, Mitchel P; Green, Jeremy B; Ibrahimi, Omar A; Jones, Derek H; Kilmer, Suzanne L; McDaniel, David H; Obagi, Suzan; Ortiz, Arisa E; Rohrer, Thomas E; Taylor, Mark B; Torres, Abel; Weinkle, Susan H; Weiss, Margaret A; Weiss, Eduardo T; Weiss, Robert A; Poon, Emily; Alam, Murad

    2016-10-01

    The American Council of Graduate Medical Education, which oversees much of postgraduate medical education in the United States, has championed the concept of "milestones," standard levels of achievement keyed to particular time points, to assess trainee performance during residency. To develop a milestones document for the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery (ASDS) Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDS) fellowship program. An ad hoc milestone drafting committee was convened that included members of the ASDS Accreditation Work Group and program directors of ASDS-approved Cosmetic Dermatologic Surgery (CDC) fellowship training programs. Draft milestones were circulated through email in multiple rounds until consensus was achieved. Thirteen milestones were developed in the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competency areas, with 8 of these being patient-care milestones. Additional instructions for milestone administration more specific to the CDS fellowship than general ACGME instructions were also approved. Implementation of semiannual milestones was scheduled for the fellowship class entering in July 2018. Milestones are now available for CDS fellowship directors to implement in combination with other tools for fellow evaluation.

  2. A Mathematical Theory of Optimal Milestoning (with a Detour via Exact Milestoning)

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ling; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Milestoning is a computational procedure that reduces the dynamics of complex systems to memoryless jumps between intermediates, or milestones, and only retains some information about the probability of these jumps and the time lags between them. Here we analyze a variant of this procedure, termed optimal milestoning, which relies on a specific choice of milestones to capture exactly some kinetic features of the original dynamical system. In particular, we prove that optimal milestoning permits the exact calculation of the mean first passage times (MFPT) between any two milestones. In so doing, we also analyze another variant of the method, called exact milestoning, which also permits the exact calculation of certain MFPTs, but at the price of retaining more information about the original system's dynamics. Finally, we discuss importance sampling strategies based on optimal and exact milestoning that can be used to bypass the simulation of the original system when estimating the statistical quantities used in...

  3. The Pension Fund passes important milestones

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    In this column, the Chairman of the Pension Fund Governing Board (PFGB) presents the Board's latest main decisions, initiatives and accomplishments to the Fund's members and beneficiaries.   Since my last report in October, the PFGB has passed several milestones in actuarial, technical and investment matters. The PFGB has completed an analysis of a request by the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere (ESO) to reduce the increased cost of pension insurance for new ESO recruits that has been caused by the increased CHF/€ exchange ratio. Currently the staff of ESO are admitted to the CERN Pension Fund, pursuant to a co-operation agreement between CERN and ESO dating back to 1968. This analysis assessed the actuarial, financial, administrative and legal implications, and is scheduled to be presented to the CERN Council and the Finance Committee in December. After an open tendering process the PFGB has selected Buck Consultants Limited...

  4. CMS Forward-Backward MSGC milestone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O; Barthe, S; Beaumont, W; Beckers, T; Beissel, F; Benhammou, Ya; Bergdolt, A M; Bernier, K; Boulogne, I; Bozzo, M; Brom, J M; Camps, C; Chorowicz, V; Coffin, J; Commichau, V; Contardo, D; Croix, J; De Troy, J G; Drouhin, F; Eberle, H; Flügge, G; Fontaine, J C; Geist, Walter M; Goerlach, U; Gundlfinger, K; Hangarter, K; Haroutunian, R; Helleboid, J M; Hoffer, M; Hoffmann, C; Huss, D; Ischebeck, R; Jeanneau, F; Juillot, P; Kapp, M R; Krauth, M; Kremp, J; Lounis, A; Lübelsmeyer, K; Maazouzi, C; Macke, D; Mirabito, L; Nowack, A; Pandoulas, D; Petertill, M; Pooth, O; Racca, C; Ripp, I; Schmitz, P; Schulte, R; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schunck, J P; Schuster, G; Schwaller, B; Sigward, M H; Smadja, G; Stefanescu, J; Tissot, S; Todorov, T; Udo, Fred; Van Doninck, W K; Van Dyck, C; Van Lancker, L; Van der Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verdini, P G; Wortmann, R; Zghiche, A; Zhukov, V

    1998-01-01

    The CMS MF1 milestone was set in order to evaluate system aspects of the CMS forward-backward MSGC tracker, to check the design and feasibility of mass production and to set up assembly and test procedures. We describe the construction and the experience gained with the operation of a system of 38 MSGC detectors assembled in six multi-substrate detector modules corresponding to the geometry of the forward-backward MSGC tracker in CMS. These modules were equipped with MSGCs mounted side by side, forming a continuous detector surface of about 0.2 m2. Different designs were tried for these modules. The problems encountered are presented with the proposed solutions. Operation conditions for the 38 MSGCs are reported from an exposure to a muon beam at the CERN SPS. Gain uniformity along the wedge-shaped strip pattern and across the detector modules are shown together with the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, alignment and edge studies.

  5. CMS Forward-Backward MSGC milestone

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O; Barthe, S; Beaumont, W; Beckers, T; Beissel, F; Benhammou, Ya; Bergdolt, A M; Bernier, K; Boulogne, I; Bozzo, M; Brom, J M; Camps, C; Chorowicz, V; Coffin, J; Commichau, V; Contardo, D; Croix, J; De Troy, J G; Drouhin, F; Eberle, H; Flügge, G; Fontaine, J C; Geist, Walter M; Goerlach, U; Gundlfinger, K; Hangarter, K; Haroutunian, R; Helleboid, J M; Hoffer, M; Hoffmann, C; Huss, D; Ischebeck, R; Jeanneau, F; Juillot, P; Kapp, M R; Krauth, M; Kremp, J; Lounis, A; Lübelsmeyer, K; Maazouzi, C; Macke, D; Mirabito, L; Nowack, A; Pandoulas, D; Petertill, M; Pooth, O; Racca, C; Ripp, I; Schmitz, P; Schulte, R; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schunck, J P; Schuster, G; Schwaller, B; Sigward, M H; Smadja, G; Stefanescu, J; Tissot, S; Todorov, T; Udo, Fred; Van Doninck, W K; Van Dyck, C; Van Lancker, L; Van der Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Verdini, P G; Wortmann, R; Zghiche, A; Zhukov, V

    1998-01-01

    The CMS MF1 milestone was set in order to evaluate system aspects of the CMS forward-backward MSGC tracker, to check the design and feasibility of mass production and to set up assembly and test procedures. We describe the construction and the experience gained with the operation of a system of 38 MSGC detectors assembled in six multi-substrate detector modules corresponding to the geometry of the forward-backward MSGC tracker in CMS. These modules were equipped with MSGCs mounted side by side, forming a continuous detector surface of about 0.2 m2. Different designs were tried for these modules. The problems encountered are presented with the proposed solutions. Operation conditions for the 38 MSGCs are reported from an exposure to a muon beam at the CERN SPS. Gain uniformity along the wedge-shaped strip pattern and across the detector modules are shown together with the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, alignment and edge studies.

  6. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Developmental toxicity of chloroprene vapors in New Zealand white rabbits. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Chloroprene, 2-chloro-1,3-butadiene, is a colorless liquid with a pungent ethereal odor that is primarily used as an intermediate in the manufacture of neoprene rubber, and has been used as such since about 1930. This study addressed the potential for chloroprene to cause developmental toxicity in New Zealand white rabbits following gestational exposure to 0, 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene vapors, 6h/dy, 7dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 15 artificially inseminated females exposed on 6 through 28 days of gestation (dg). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 29 dg. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. There were no overt signs of maternal toxicity and the change in maternal body weight over the course of the study was not affected. Exposure of pregnant rabbits to chloroprene vapors on 6-28 dg had no effect on the number of implantation, the mean percent of live pups per litter, or on the incidence of resorptions per litter. The incidence of fetal malformations was not increased by exposure to chloroprene. Results of this study indicate that gestational exposure of New Zealand white rabbits to 10, 40, or 175 ppm chloroprene did not result in observable toxicity to either the dam or the offspring.

  7. Continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies in developmental toxicology: Report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity, 14-16 May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solecki, Roland; Rauch, Martina; Gall, Andrea; Buschmann, Jochen; Clark, Ruth; Fuchs, Antje; Kan, Haidong; Heinrich, Verena; Kellner, Rupert; Knudsen, Thomas B; Li, Weihua; Makris, Susan L; Ooshima, Yojiro; Paumgartten, Francisco; Piersma, Aldert H; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Schaefer, Christof; Shiota, Kohei; Ulbrich, Beate; Ding, Xuncheng; Chahoud, Ibrahim

    2015-11-01

    This article is a report of the 8th Berlin Workshop on Developmental Toxicity held in May 2014. The main aim of the workshop was the continuing harmonization of terminology and innovations for methodologies used in the assessment of embryo- and fetotoxic findings. The following main topics were discussed: harmonized categorization of external, skeletal, visceral and materno-fetal findings into malformations, variations and grey zone anomalies, aspects of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals, and innovations for new methodologies in developmental toxicology. The application of Version 2 terminology in the DevTox database was considered as a useful improvement in the categorization of developmental anomalies. Participants concluded that initiation of a project for comparative assessments of developmental anomalies in humans and laboratory animals could support regulatory risk assessment and university-based training. Improvement of new methodological approaches for alternatives to animal testing should be triggered for a better understanding of developmental outcomes.

  8. Predicting School Problems from Preschool Developmental Screening: A Four-Year Follow-Up of the Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test and the Role of Parent Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Karen E.

    1987-01-01

    The Revised Denver Developmental Screening Test and parental reports of developmental concerns were compared for effectiveness in predicting school problems four years after a preschool screening program. Results suggested the test accurately identified only those children later found to have severe learning problems. (Author/DB)

  9. Terminology used in research reports of developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Lívia C; Missiuna, Cheryl; Wong, Shirley

    2006-11-01

    A systematic search was performed of all articles from January 1995 to December 2005 published in peer-reviewed journals on children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). Criteria were applied to ensure that articles included DCD so 319 articles were included in the analysis. Since the publication of a systematic search conducted in 1994, the number of publications in this field has greatly increased across countries and disciplines. The term DCD was used in 52.7% of the articles. Other terms were used less frequently: clumsy children (7.2%), developmental dyspraxia (3.5%), handwriting problems (3.1%), hand-eye coordination problems (2.8%), sensory integration dysfunction (2.5%), deficits in attention, motor control, and perception (2.5%), minor neurological dysfunction (2.2%), and several other scattered terms (23.5%). The data indicated that progress has been made in the usage of the term DCD, but a standardized approach has not yet been achieved. Without consistent use of the term DCD, there is limited communication of research results internationally, slowed progress in understanding the condition, and limited development of intervention and management programmes for children with DCD.

  10. Milestone achievement in emerging adulthood in spina bifida: a longitudinal investigation of parental expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbein, Christina E; Zebracki, Kathy; Bechtel, Colleen F; Lennon Papadakis, Jaclyn; Franks Bruno, Elizabeth; Holmbeck, Grayson N

    2017-03-01

    To assess changes over time in parents' expectations of adult milestone achievement (college attendance, full-time job attainment, independent living, marriage, parenthood) for young people with spina bifida, to examine how expectancies relate to actual milestone achievement, and to compare milestone achievement in emerging adults with spina bifida with that of peers with typical development. Sixty-eight families of children with spina bifida (mean age 8y 4mo, 37 males, 31 females) and 68 families of children with typical development (mean age 8y 6mo, 37 males, 31 females) participated at Time 1. At all subsequent timepoints, parents of young people with spina bifida were asked to rate their expectations of emerging adulthood milestone achievement. At Time 7, when participants were 22 to 23 years old, milestone achievement was assessed. Parents of young people with spina bifida lowered their expectations over time for most milestones; parents of children with higher cognitive ability reported decreases of lower magnitude. Parent expectancies were optimistic and unrelated to actual milestone achievement. Emerging adults with spina bifida were less likely than individuals with typical development to achieve all milestones. Optimistic parental expectations may be adaptive for children with spina bifida and their families, although it is important for families to set realistic goals. Healthcare providers serve a key role in helping families of young people with spina bifida prepare for emerging adulthood. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  11. Milestone-Based Assessments Are Superior to Likert-Type Assessments in Illustrating Trainee Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Kathleen W; Whicker, Shari A; Bookman, Jack; Narayan, Aditee P; Staples, Betty B; Hering, Holly; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-03-01

    The Pediatrics Milestone Project uses behavioral anchors, narrative descriptions of observable behaviors, to describe learner progression through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies. Starting June 2014, pediatrics programs were required to submit milestone reports for their trainees semiannually. Likert-type scale assessment tools were not designed to inform milestone reporting, creating a challenge for Clinical Competency Committees. To determine if milestone-based assessments better stratify trainees by training level compared to Likert-type assessments. We compared assessment results for 3 subcompetencies after changing from a 5-point Likert scale to milestone-based behavioral anchors in July 2013. Program leadership evaluated the new system by (1) comparing PGY-1 mean scores on Likert-type versus milestone-based assessments; and (2) comparing mean scores on the Likert-type versus milestone-based assessments across PGY levels. Mean scores for PGY-1 residents were significantly higher on the prior year's Likert-type assessments than milestone-based assessments for all 3 subcompetencies (P Likert-type assessments (eg, interpersonal and communication skills 1 [ICS1] mean score for PGY-1, 3.99 versus PGY-3, 3.98; P  =  .98). In contrast, milestone-based assessments demonstrated stratification by PGY level (eg, the ICS1 mean score was 3.06 for PGY-1, 3.83 for PGY-2, and 3.99 for PGY-3; P Likert-type assessments. Average PGY-level scores from milestone-based assessments may ultimately provide guidance for determining whether trainees are progressing at the expected pace.

  12. Animal Science Technology. An Experimental Developmental Program. Volume I, Report of the Developmental Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Herman G.; And Others

    In 1961, administrative personnel at Delhi College in New York observed that formal training programs for animal science technicians were virtually nonexistant. Response to this apparent need resulted in the initiation of perhaps the first 2-year Animal Science Technology Program in the nation. This two-volume report is the result of an extensive…

  13. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program (FY11 Quarter 1: October through December 2010).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, R. (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George; Hund, Thomas D.

    2011-05-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 1 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails conducting a thorough literature review to establish the current level of understanding of the mechanisms through which carbon additions to the negative active material improve valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Most studies have entailed phenomenological research observing that the carbon additions prevent/reduce sulfation of the negative electrode; however, no understanding is available to provide insight into why certain carbons are successful while others are not. Impurities were implicated in one recent review of the electrochemical behavior of carbon additions. Four carbon samples have been received from East Penn Manufacturing and impurity contents have been analyzed. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO{sub 2}) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic

  14. Tilecal meets two major milestones

    CERN Multimedia

    Cavalli-Sforza, M.

    Over the last two months the Tile Calorimeter passed not one but two major milestones. In early May, the last of the 64 modules that make up one of the two Extended Barrels arrived at CERN from IFAE-Barcelona, equipped with optical components and tested. And during the Overview Week in Clermont-Ferrand, the last of the 64 Barrel modules, mechanically assembled, arrived from JINR-Dubna. Just a brief reminder: the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter is composed of 3 cylinders ("barrels") of steel, scintillating tiles and optical fibers, altogether about 12 m long, with an outer diameter of 8.4 m, and weighing about 2700 tons. The central cavity will contain the Liquid Argon cryostats, and the whole calorimetry system will measure the direction and energy of jets produced at the LHC, as well as the missing transverse energy, which as everyone knows is one of the telltale signals of new and exciting physics. Each of the three cylinders is divided azimuthally into 64 modules - much like the slices of an orange. The modules ar...

  15. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Acetonitrile in rats. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.; Boyd, P.J.; Hayden, B.K.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.

    1994-02-01

    The potential for acetonitrile to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 100, 400, or 1200 ppM acetonitrile, 6 hours/day, 7 days/week. Exposure of rats to these concentrations of acetonitrile resulted in mortality in the 1200 ppM group (2/33 pregnant females; 1/10 non-pregnant females). However, there were no treatment-related effects upon body weights or reproduction indices at any exposure level, nor was there a significant increase in the incidence of fetal malformations or variations. The only effect observed in the fetuses was a slight, but not statiscally significant, exposure-correlated increase in the incidence of supernumerary ribs. Determination of acetonitrile and cyanide concentrations in maternal rat blood showed that acetonitrile concentration in the blood increased with exposure concentration for all exposed maternal rats. Detectable amounts of cyanide in the blood were found only in the rats exposed to 1200 ppM acetonitrile ({approximately}2 {mu}g cyanide/g of blood).

  16. CERN receives prestigious Milestone recognition from IEEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    At a ceremony at CERN, Mr W. Cleon Anderson, President of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) formally a Milestone plaque in recognition of the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN

  17. Milestone Report #2: Direct Evaporator Leak and Flammability Analysis Modifications and Optimization of the Organic Rankine Cycle to Improve the Recovery of Waste Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2013-09-01

    The direct evaporator is a simplified heat exchange system for an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) that generates electricity from a gas turbine exhaust stream. Typically, the heat of the exhaust stream is transferred indirectly to the ORC by means of an intermediate thermal oil loop. In this project, the goal is to design a direct evaporator where the working fluid is evaporated in the exhaust gas heat exchanger. By eliminating one of the heat exchangers and the intermediate oil loop, the overall ORC system cost can be reduced by approximately 15%. However, placing a heat exchanger operating with a flammable hydrocarbon working fluid directly in the hot exhaust gas stream presents potential safety risks. The purpose of the analyses presented in this report is to assess the flammability of the selected working fluid in the hot exhaust gas stream stemming from a potential leak in the evaporator. Ignition delay time for cyclopentane at temperatures and pressure corresponding to direct evaporator operation was obtained for several equivalence ratios. Results of a computational fluid dynamic analysis of a pinhole leak scenario are given.

  18. Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

  19. Thermo-hydro-chemical Predictive analysis for the drift-scalepredictive heater test, version 1.0. Milestone Report SPY289M4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnenthal, Eric L.; Spycher, Nicolas; Apps, John; Simmons, Ardyth

    1998-06-30

    This report presents a predictive analysis of the geochemical and isotopic alteration of minerals, fluid, and gas accompanying the underground Drift-Scale Heater Test (DST) begun in December 1997. The aim of this analysis is to incorporate the important geochemical and physical phenomena in a numerical model, using and assessing the current information on pore-water chemistry, mineralogy, thermodynamic and kinetic data, and heater test conditions. This work represents an initial effort to understand the system behavior, and the results should not be used by YMP researchers to provide quantitative estimates of the processes investigated. The DST will operate over a period of eight years; as data are collected the models and understanding of the system will undergo refinement and reevaluation. In overall terms, the object is to provide a better understanding of the coupled thermo-hydrological-chemical (THC) system that could be applied with a higher level of confidence to constrain the behavior of the proposed repository for a period of ten thousand years or more.

  20. ASC Trilab L2 Codesign Milestone 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, Christian Robert [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hammond, Simon David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dinge, Dennis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Paul T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vaughan, Courtenay T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cook, Jeanine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Edwards, Harold C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rajan, Mahesh [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hoekstra, Robert J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    For the FY15 ASC L2 Trilab Codesign milestone Sandia National Laboratories performed two main studies. The first study investigated three topics (performance, cross-platform portability and programmer productivity) when using OpenMP directives and the RAJA and Kokkos programming models available from LLNL and SNL respectively. The focus of this first study was the LULESH mini-application developed and maintained by LLNL. In the coming sections of the report the reader will find performance comparisons (and a demonstration of portability) for a variety of mini-application implementations produced during this study with varying levels of optimization. Of note is that the implementations utilized including optimizations across a number of programming models to help ensure claims that Kokkos can provide native-class application performance are valid. The second study performed during FY15 is a performance assessment of the MiniAero mini-application developed by Sandia. This mini-application was developed by the SIERRA Thermal-Fluid team at Sandia for the purposes of learning the Kokkos programming model and so is available in only a single implementation. For this report we studied its performance and scaling on a number of machines with the intent of providing insight into potential performance issues that may be experienced when similar algorithms are deployed on the forthcoming Trinity ASC ATS platform.

  1. Cognitive Pretesting and the Developmental Validity of Child Self-Report Instruments: Theory and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Michael E; Bowen, Gary L; Bowen, Natasha K

    2004-05-01

    OBJECTIVE: In the context of the importance of valid self-report measures to research and evidence-based practice in social work, an argument-based approach to validity is presented and the concept of developmental validity introduced. Cognitive development theories are applied to the self-report process of children and cognitive pretesting is reviewed as a methodology to advance the validity of self-report instruments for children. An application of cognitive pretesting is presented in the development of the Elementary School Success Profile. METHOD: Two phases of cognitive pretesting were completed to gather data about how children read, interpret and answer self-report items. RESULTS: Cognitive pretesting procedures identified validity problems with numerous items leading to modifications. CONCLUSIONS: Cognitive pretesting framed by an argument-based approach to validity holds significant potential to improve the developmental validity of child self-report instruments.

  2. Is anorexia nervosa a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder? An illustrative case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbeshian, Jacob; Burd, Larry

    2009-01-01

    We propose the concept that anorexia nervosa is a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder. In support of the concept we present a case report of a 12-year-old girl with high functioning autistic disorder who developed Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. She subsequently experienced

  3. Brief Report: Representational Momentum for Dynamic Facial Expressions in Pervasive Developmental Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uono, Shota; Sato, Wataru; Toichi, Motomi

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD) have difficulty with social communication via emotional facial expressions, but behavioral studies involving static images have reported inconsistent findings about emotion recognition. We investigated whether dynamic presentation of facial expression would enhance subjective perception of…

  4. Attrition in Developmental Psychology: A Review of Modern Missing Data Reporting and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jody S.; Deboeck, Pascal R.; Howard, Waylon

    2017-01-01

    Inherent in applied developmental sciences is the threat to validity and generalizability due to missing data as a result of participant drop-out. The current paper provides an overview of how attrition should be reported, which tests can examine the potential of bias due to attrition (e.g., t-tests, logistic regression, Little's MCAR test,…

  5. Attrition in Developmental Psychology: A Review of Modern Missing Data Reporting and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jody S.; Deboeck, Pascal R.; Howard, Waylon

    2017-01-01

    Inherent in applied developmental sciences is the threat to validity and generalizability due to missing data as a result of participant drop-out. The current paper provides an overview of how attrition should be reported, which tests can examine the potential of bias due to attrition (e.g., t-tests, logistic regression, Little's MCAR test,…

  6. Is anorexia nervosa a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder? An illustrative case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbeshian, Jacob; Burd, Larry

    2009-01-01

    We propose the concept that anorexia nervosa is a neuropsychiatric developmental disorder. In support of the concept we present a case report of a 12-year-old girl with high functioning autistic disorder who developed Tourette syndrome and obsessive-compulsive disorder. She subsequently experienced

  7. Measuring Developmental Differences With an Age-of-Attainment Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren O. Eaton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The sensitive measurement of variation in rate of attainment is an underutilized but useful indicator of individual differences in development. To assess such individuality, we used longitudinal parental diary checklists of infant attainments to estimate the ages at which ubiquitous developmental milestones like sitting and walking were reached. Parents using this diary checklist have been shown to be valid reporters of milestone attainments. Present analyses show that multiple definitions of milestone onset have high reliability as well. Babies differ considerably in their rates of development, and such individual differences in rates may be predicted from other variables with survival (event history analysis. Ages of attainment for sustained sitting, crawling, and walking were calculated for 519 infants and predicted using 11 common covariates. Our discovery that babies of younger mothers reach these milestones sooner than those of older mothers reveals the value of an age-of-attainment (AOA approach. A framework with a SAS program for collecting and analyzing AOA data is presented.

  8. [Developmental dyslexia and dysgraphia--a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, M; Uno, A; Kaga, M; Inagaki, M; Haruhara, N

    1997-05-01

    We reported a 7-year-old, right-handed boy whose reading and writing of kana and kanji were impaired. He also showed a severe deficit in visuo-spatial perception skills. Nevertheless, his ability to read and write kana characters was facilitated by means of the Japanese Syllabaries. It is generally considered that the Syllabary involve two kinds of language modalities: auditory-verbal and visuo-verbal language systems. In spite of his intact auditory-verbal language system, his visuo-verbal language skills involved in writing kanji were severely impaired. It was suggested that a severe deficit of visuo-spatial perception skills influenced performance of visuo-verbal language systems. Accordingly, we inferred that the patient recalled a kana character by use of the Japanese Syllabaries based on his good auditory-verbal language system, and supposed that his reading and writing disorders were similar to alexia with agraphia in adult patients with angular lesions.

  9. Development of plating thickness standards. Milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, R.J.

    1978-01-01

    Standards which are unavailable from the National Bureau of Standards were developed to support the nondestructive measurement of plating thickness. Their fabrication, measurement, certification, and calibration-recall schedule are discussed. Reference standards that have been put into service include aluminum/Kapton, silver/copper, tin/steel, gold/silver, cadmium/Kovar, silver/iron, rhodium/copper, and gold/ceramic. 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. FCRD Milestone Report: M21AF050901

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelzer, David T [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL; Odette, George R. [University of California, Santa Barbara; Klingensmith, Doug [University of California, Santa Barbara; Gragg, David [University of California, Santa Barbara; Stergar, Eric [University of California, Santa Barbara; Fields, Kirk [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to perform mechanical testing on large scale heats of the advanced ODS 14YWT alloy to investigate the effects of processing parameters on mechanical properties. Mechanical properties tests were conducted on two heats of the advanced ODS 14YWT ferritic alloy: the 14YWT-SM11 was produced by extrusion at ORNL and OW4 was produced by HIP at UCSB. The 14YWT-SM11 showed very high tensile strength compared to OW4, but showed less ductility as a result. The fracture toughness transition temperature of 14YWT-SM11 was determined in two orientations and showed T{sub 0} = 48 C in the favorably strong L-T direction while shifting by 63 C to T{sub 0} = 111 C in the weaker T-L direction. The fracture toughness transition temperature for OW4 was not determined but appeared to be within the range observed for 14YWT-SM11. The fracture toughness of 14YWT-SM11 at room temperature was 86.8 MPa{radical}m and 93.1 MPa{radical}m, which was much higher than that of OW4 (27.4 MPa{radical}m). The strain rate jump tests conducted on OW4 indicated that the creep properties were similar to MA957 at 750 C.

  11. Understanding the function and performance of carbon-enhanced lead-acid batteries : milestone report for the DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (FY11 Quarter 4: July through September 2011).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Shane, Rodney (East Penn Manufacturing, Lyon Station, PA); Enos, David George

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the status of research being performed under CRADA No. SC10/01771.00 (Lead/Carbon Functionality in VRLA Batteries) between Sandia National Laboratories and East Penn Manufacturing, conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Storage Systems Program. The Quarter 4 Milestone was completed on time. The milestone entails the initiation of high rate, partial state of charge (HRPSoC) cycling of the carbon enhanced batteries. The morphology, porosity, and porosity distribution within the plates after 1k and 10k cycles were documented, illustrating the changes which take place in the early life of the carbon containing batteries, and as the battery approaches failure due to hard sulfation for the control battery. Longer term cycling on a subset of the received East Penn cells containing different carbons (and a control) continues, and will progress into FY12. Carbon has been explored as an addition to lead-acid battery electrodes in a number of ways. Perhaps the most notable to date has been the hybrid 'Ultrabattery' developed by CSIRO where an asymmetric carbon-based electrochemical capacitor is combined with a lead-acid battery into a single cell, dramatically improving high-rate partial-state-of-charge (HRPSoC) operation. As illustrated below, the 'Ultrabattery' is a hybrid device constructed using a traditional lead-acid battery positive plate (i.e., PbO2) and a negative electrode consisting of a carbon electrode in parallel with a lead-acid negative plate. This device exhibits a dramatically improved cycle life over traditional VRLA batteries, as well as increased charge power and charge acceptance. The 'Ultrabattery' has been produced successfully by both The Furukawa Battery Co. and East Penn Manufacturing. An example illustrating the dramatic improvement in cycle life of the Ultrabattery over a conventional VRLA battery is shown in a graph. In addition to the aforementioned hybrid device, carbon has

  12. Validity Evidence From Ratings of Pediatric Interns and Subinterns on a Subset of Pediatric Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Teri L; Bhavaraju, Vasudha L; Luciw-Dubas, Ulana A; Hicks, Patricia J; Multerer, Sara; Osta, Amanda; McDonnell, Jennifer; Poynter, Sue; Schumacher, Daniel J; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda; Schwartz, Alan

    2017-06-01

    To investigate evidence for validity of faculty members' pediatric milestone (PM) ratings of interns (first-year residents) and subinterns (fourth-year medical students) on nine subcompetencies related to readiness to serve as a pediatric intern in the inpatient setting. The Association of Pediatric Program Directors Longitudinal Educational Assessment Research Network (APPD LEARN) and the National Board of Medical Examiners collaborated to investigate the utility of assessments of the PMs for trainees' performance. Data from 32 subinterns and 179 interns at 17 programs were collected from July 2012 through April 2013. Observers used several tools to assess learners. At each site, a faculty member used these data to make judgments about the learner's current developmental milestone in each subcompetency. Linear mixed models were fitted to milestone judgments to examine their relationship with learner's rank and subcompetency. On a 5-point developmental scale, mean milestone levels for interns ranged from 3.20 (for the subcompetency Work effectively as a member of a team) to 3.72 (Humanism) and for subinterns from 2.89 (Organize and prioritize care) to 3.61 (Professionalization). Mean milestone ratings were significantly higher for the Professionalism competency (3.59-3.72) for all trainees compared with Patient Care (2.89-3.24) and Personal and Professional Development (3.33-3.51). Mean intern ratings were significantly higher than mean subintern ratings for all nine subcompetencies except Professionalization, Humanism, and Trustworthiness. The PMs had a coherent internal structure and could distinguish between differing levels of trainees, which supports their validation for documenting developmental progression of pediatric trainees.

  13. CERN receives prestigious Milestone recognition from IEEE

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Nobel prize winner Georges Charpak and W. Cleon Anderson, IEEE President, unveil the Milestone bronze plaques. At a ceremony on 26 September at the Globe of Science and Innovation, Mr W. Cleon Anderson, President of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) formally dedicated Milestone plaques recognising the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN. The plaque were unveiled by Mr Anderson and Georges Charpak, the Nobel-prize winning inventor of wire chamber technology at CERN in 1968. The IEEE is the world's largest professional association dedicated to the advancement of technology with 365,000 individual members in over 150 countries. Established in 1983, there are currently over 60 Milestones around the world. They honour momentous achievements in the history of electrical and electronics engineering, such as the landing of the first transatlantic cable, code breaking at Bletchley Park during World War II, and the development of the Japanese Bullet train, the Tokaido Shin...

  14. Toddlers’ Fine Motor Milestone Achievement Is Associated with Early Touchscreen Scrolling

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Touchscreen technologies provide an intuitive and attractive source of sensory/cognitive stimulation for young children. Despite fears that usage may have a negative impact on toddlers’ cognitive development, empirical evidence is lacking. The current study presents results from the UK Toddler Attentional Behaviours and LEarning with Touchscreens (TABLET) project, examining the association between toddlers’ touchscreen use and the attainment of developmental milestones. Data were gathered in ...

  15. Venous infraction of developmental venous anomaly: A case report with perfusion imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Kim, Hye Jeong; Hyun, Su Jeong; Kim, Hee Yeong; Kim, Han Myun; Hwang, Ji Young; Hong, Hye Suk; Woo, Ji Young; Yang, Ik [Dept. of Radiology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Developmental venous anomaly (DVA) is a common congenital venous malformation characterized by dilated medullary veins in caput medusa configuration and a draining vein. Despite the high incidence of DVAs, they are benign anatomic variations and rarely cause symptoms. Here, we report computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings with perfusion images of acute infarction from underlying DVA in a 63-year-old female patient who presented with acute onset of neurologic symptoms and recovered without any neurologic deficit.

  16. The IEEE Milestone event at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    On the initiative of its French and Swiss Sections, the IEEE has honoured CERN with an 'IEEE Milestone in the history of electricity and electronics' for the invention of the multi-wire proportional chamber in 1968. The IEEE established the Electrical Engineering Milestones programe in 1983 to honour significant achievements in the history of electrical and electronics engineering. To be designated, an achievement must be at least 25 years old, must have involved a unique solution to an engineering problem, and must have had at least regional impact. Currently there are more than  50 IEEE Milestones around the world. http://www.ieee.org/organizations/history_center/cern.html The installation and unveiling of this IEEE Milestone will provide the opportunity to emphasize the close relationship between science, technology, industry and well-being in society.  A ceremony, organised with the support of a group of IEEE members working at CERN, will be held at the CERN Globe of Science and Inn...

  17. Directional asymmetry estimates developmental instability in plants: A case report in Plantago major L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veličković Miroslava V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an additional approach was used to evaluate the potential effects of the industrial development on natural population of the common plantain (Plantago major L., previously estimated using si2 as an index of fluctuation asymmetry (FA together with the coefficient of variation (CV. In this study, directional asymmetry (DA, a form of asymmetry in bilaterally symmetric traits, was used in order to estimate its rule as a potential indicator of developmental instability in leaf traits. Obtained results shows significantly higher DA values for the vein distances within a leaf (VD on environmentally stressed area than in the control site. Reporting significantly higher values of DA for VD on the environmentally stressed sample and a positive relationship between FA and CV values obtained for the same trait within the same site, in a previous study, the study corroborates the potential of DA as an indicator of developmental perturbations.

  18. Developmental Venous Anomaly With Asymmetrical Basal Ganglia Calcification: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarp

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Developmental venous anomaly (DVA is a common lesion formerly known as venous angioma. DVAs drain normal brain parenchyma; however, parenchymal abnormalities surrounding DVAs have been reported. Unilateral putamen and caudate calcification in the drainage territory of DVAs has so far been reported in 7 cases, all with deep venous drainage. We present two additional cases of DVAs, one with superficial and the other one with deep venous drainage, associated with basal ganglia calcifications. We emphasize that DVAs should be in the differential diagnosis of unilateral basal ganglia calcifications.

  19. Parent Report and Actigraphically Defined Sleep in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder; Links with Fatigue and Sleepiness

    OpenAIRE

    Luci Wiggs; Anna Barnett; Masako Sparrowhawk

    2016-01-01

    Background Impaired sleep is associated with negative effects on quality of life and daytime functioning. Higher rates of sleep disturbance are reported in children with various developmental disorders. However, little is known about sleep in children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a condition characterized by everyday movement difficulties. Previously, in a preliminary study, we found higher rates of parent-reported sleep disturbance in children with DCD compared to controls...

  20. Leigh’s Disease: A case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Verma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leigh disease is a progressive degenerative, mitochondrial disorder of childhood with most cases become apparent during infancy. In most cases it presents as a progressive neurological disease with motor and intellectual developmental delay, developmental regression and signs and symptoms of brain stem and/or basal ganglia involvement. Raised lactate levels in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid is noted. It is the neuro imaging, mainly the Magnetic Resonance Imaging showing characteristic symmetrical necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia and/or brain stem that leads to the diagnosis. Here, we report a case of 3years old male child presenting to us with status epilepticus, delayed developmental milestones and regression of the achieved milestones suspected to be a case of neurodegenerative disorder, which on MRI was diagnosed as Leigh’s disease.

  1. Milestone Completion Report WBS 1.3.5.05 ECP/VTK-m FY17Q2 [MS-17/01] Better Dynamic Types Design SDA05-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2017-04-01

    The FY17Q2 milestone of the ECP/VTK-m project, which is the first milestone, includes the completion of design documents for the introduction of virtual methods into the VTK-m framework. Specifically, the ability from within the code of a device (e.g. GPU or Xeon Phi) to jump to a virtual method specified at run time. This change will enable us to drastically reduce the compile time and the executable code size for the VTK-m library. Our first design introduced the idea of adding virtual functions to classes that are used during algorithm execution. (Virtual methods were previously banned from the so called execution environment.) The design was straightforward. VTK-m already has the generic concepts of an “array handle” that provides a uniform interface to memory of different structures and an “array portal” that provides generic access to said memory. These array handles and portals use C++ templating to adjust them to different memory structures. This composition provides a powerful ability to adapt to data sources, but requires knowing static types. The proposed design creates a template specialization of an array portal that decorates another array handle while hiding its type. In this way we can wrap any type of static array handle and then feed it to a single compiled instance of a function. The second design focused on the mechanics of implementing virtual methods on parallel devices with a focus on CUDA. Our initial experiments on CUDA showed a very large overhead for using virtual C++ classes with virtual methods, the standard approach. Instead, we are using an alternate method provided by C that uses function pointers. With the completion of this milestone, we are able to move to the implementation of objects with virtual (like) methods. The upshot will be much faster compile times and much smaller library/executable sizes.

  2. Self-report computer-based survey of technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Emily Shea; Palmer, Susan; Wehmeyer, Michael; Davies, Daniel K; Stock, Steven E; Lobb, Kathy; Bishop, Barbara

    2012-02-01

    Advancements of technologies in the areas of mobility, hearing and vision, communication, and daily living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has the potential to greatly enhance independence and self-determination. Previous research, however, suggests that there is a technological divide with regard to the use of such technologies by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities when compared with the use reported by the general public. To provide current information with regard to technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities by examining the technology needs, use, and barriers to such use experienced by 180 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, we used QuestNet, a self-directed computer survey program. Results suggest that although there has been progress in technology acquisition and use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, an underutilization of technologies across the population remains.

  3. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  4. Emerging from the fog: hypotheses and paradigms in developmental biology--the Society for Developmental Biology 2005 Annual Meeting Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Barolo, Scott; Bilder, David; Montgomery, Mary; Sinha, Neelima

    2006-01-15

    The Society for Developmental Biology 64th annual meeting took place by the beautiful San Francisco Bay from July 27th to August 1st, 2005. Organized under the leadership of Judith Kimble (SDB President, U. Wisconsin-Madison), the meeting attracted over one thousand developmental biologists from all over the world. They gathered to present data, exchange ideas and enjoy basking in the warm sun on the piers. Strong themes emerged from the diverse subjects discussed at the meeting, demonstrating exciting trends towards the unifying goal of understanding the progression from a single cell to an adult organism. Cell and Tissue Polarity was a recurring topic at the meeting. Questions like "is there polarity", "how is it achieved" and "how is it linked to stem cell maintenance" were discussed. Post-transcriptional regulation involving protein degradation and microRNA (miRNA) modulation of gene expression was featured in the context of transition between meiosis to mitosis and asymmetries in the embryo. It is apparent that Evolutionary Developmental Biology, once a major driving influence in the early days of the field, continues to enjoy a renaissance as researchers familiar with traditional model organisms are increasingly attracted to the field and as modern genetic and molecular approaches are applied to an increasingly varied assortment of organisms. The attention is beginning to pay off as laboratories are starting to generate significant results shedding light into how developmental programs are altered to generate morphological diversity. In the Satellite Symposium on Plant Development held on July 27th, 2005, the overriding theme was on the identity and maintenance of Stem Cells in Plants. Finally, researchers working on diverse organisms have shown a strong effort to address Developmental Coordination: on the subcellular, cellular and tissue levels. Advanced imaging techniques are combined with traditional genetic methods to scrutinize and compare dynamic

  5. The 20-item prosopagnosia index (PI20): a self-report instrument for identifying developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Punit; Gaule, Anne; Sowden, Sophie; Bird, Geoffrey; Cook, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Self-report plays a key role in the identification of developmental prosopagnosia (DP), providing complementary evidence to computer-based tests of face recognition ability, aiding interpretation of scores. However, the lack of standardized self-report instruments has contributed to heterogeneous reporting standards for self-report evidence in DP research. The lack of standardization prevents comparison across samples and limits investigation of the relationship between objective tests of face processing and self-report measures. To address these issues, this paper introduces the PI20; a 20-item self-report measure for quantifying prosopagnosic traits. The new instrument successfully distinguishes suspected prosopagnosics from typically developed adults. Strong correlations were also observed between PI20 scores and performance on objective tests of familiar and unfamiliar face recognition ability, confirming that people have the necessary insight into their own face recognition ability required by a self-report instrument. Importantly, PI20 scores did not correlate with recognition of non-face objects, indicating that the instrument measures face recognition, and not a general perceptual impairment. These results suggest that the PI20 can play a valuable role in identifying DP. A freely available self-report instrument will permit more effective description of self-report diagnostic evidence, thereby facilitating greater comparison of prosopagnosic samples, and more reliable classification.

  6. Anterior capsulotomy improves persistent developmental stuttering with a psychiatric disorder: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang SZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Shizhen Zhang,* Peng Li,* Zhujun Zhang, Wei WangDepartment of Neurosurgery, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Stuttering is characterized by disrupted fluency of verbal expression, and occurs mostly in children. Persistent developmental stuttering (PDS may occur in adults. Reports of the surgical management of PDS are limited. Here we present the case of a 28-year-old man who had had PDS since the age of 7 years, was diagnosed with depression and anxiety disorder at the age of 24 years, and had physical concomitants. He underwent a bilateral anterior capsulotomy 4 years after the diagnosis. Over one year of follow-up, his physical concomitants resolved, and significant improvements in his psychiatric disorders and PDS were observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of simultaneous improvement in a patient's PDS and psychiatric disorder after a bilateral anterior capsulotomy.Keywords: persistent developmental stuttering, psychiatric disorders, anterior capsulotomy

  7. 2016 CSSE L3 Milestone: Deliver In Situ to XTD End Users

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patchett, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nouanesengsy, Boonthanome [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fasel, Patricia Kroll [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahrens, James Paul [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-13

    This report summarizes the activities in FY16 toward satisfying the CSSE 2016 L3 milestone to deliver in situ to XTD end users of EAP codes. The Milestone was accomplished with ongoing work to ensure the capability is maintained and developed. Two XTD end users used the in situ capability in Rage. A production ParaView capability was created in the HPC and Desktop environment. Two new capabilities were added to ParaView in support of an EAP in situ workflow. We also worked with various support groups at the lab to deploy a production ParaView in the LANL environment for both desktop and HPC systems. . In addition, for this milestone, we moved two VTK based filters from research objects into the production ParaView code to support a variety of standard visualization pipelines for our EAP codes.

  8. A MILESTONE IN CROSS-STRAITS RELATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG YUNGUANG; DING XING

    2010-01-01

    @@ Chongqing, the southwestern municipality that served as China's capital during World War Ⅱ, will be remembered again for hosting a landmark event in the Chinese history on June 29. On that day, Chen Yunlin,President of the mainland's Association for Relations Across the Taiwan Straits,and Chiang Pin-kung, Chairman of Taiwan's Straits Exchange Foundation,signed the long-awaited Economic Cooperation Framework Agreement (ECFA) in Chongqing, a move hailed by many as a milestone in cross-Straits relations.

  9. First report on interferon related developmental regulator-1 from Macrobrachium rosenbergii: bioinformatic analysis and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiaraj, Jesu; Easwvaran, Sarasvathi; Vanaraja, Puganeshwaran; Singh, Arun; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Bhassu, Subha

    2012-05-01

    This study reports the first full length gene of interferon related developmental regulator-1 (designated as MrIRDR-1), identified from the transcriptome of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The complete gene sequence of the MrIRDR-1 is 2459 base pair long with an open reading frame of 1308 base pairs and encoding a predicted protein of 436 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 48 kDa. The MrIRDR-1 protein contains a long interferon related developmental regulator super family domain between 30 and 330. The mRNA expressions of MrIRDR-1 in healthy and the infectious hypodermal and hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHHNV) infected M. rosenbergii were examined using qRT-PCR. The MrIRDR-1 is highly expressed in hepatopancreas along with all other tissues (walking leg, gills, muscle, haemocyte, pleopods, brain, stomach, intestine and eye stalk). After IHHNV infection, the expression is highly upregulated in hepatopancreas. This result indicates an important role of MrIRDR-1 in prawn defense system.

  10. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Aasen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1 detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2 validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3 demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system’s excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  11. Failure to meet language milestones at two years of age is predictive of specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, F.B.; Dusseldorp, E.; Bol, G.W.; Oudesluys-Murphy, A.M.; Verkerk, P.H.

    2016-01-01

    Aim This study established predictive properties of single language milestones for specific language impairment (SLI) after the age of four, as these had not previously been reported in the literature. Methods In this nested case-control study, children attending special needs schools for severe spe

  12. Failure to meet language milestones at two years of age is predictive of specific language impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, Babette; Dusseldorp, Elise; Bol, Gerard; Oudesluys-Murphy, Anne Marie; Verkerk, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study established predictive properties of single language milestones for specific language impairment (SLI) after the age of four, as these had not previously been reported in the literature. Methods In this nested case–control study, children attending special needs schools for severe spe

  13. Found in transition: applying milestones to three unique discharge curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B. Meade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A safe and effective transition from hospital to post-acute care is a complex and important physician competency. Milestones and Entrustable Professional Activities (EPA form the new educational rubric in Graduate Medical Education Training. “A safe and effective discharge from the hospital” is an EPA ripe for educational innovation.Methods. The authors collaborated in a qualitative process called mapping to define 22 of 142 Internal Medicine (IM curricular milestones related to the transition of care. Fifty-five participant units at an Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM workshop prioritized the milestones, using a validated ranking process called Q-sort. We analyzed the Q-sort results, which rank the milestones in order of priority. We then applied this ranking to three innovative models of training IM residents in the transitions of care: Simulation (S, Discharge Clinic Feedback (DCF and TRACER (T.Results. We collected 55 Q-sort rankings from particpants at the APDIM workshop. We then identified which milestones are a focus of the three innovative models of training in the transition of care: Simulation = 5 of 22 milestones, Discharge Clinic Feedback = 9 of 22 milestones, and TRACER = 7 of 22 milestones. Milestones identified in each innovation related to one of the top 8 prioritized milestones 75% of the time; thus, more frequently than the milestones with lower priority. Two milestones are shared by all three curricula: Utilize patient-centered education and Ensure succinct written communication. Two other milestones are shared by two curricula: Manage and coordinate care transitions across multiple delivery systems and Customize care in the context of the patient’s preferences. If you combine the three innovations, all of the top 8 milestones are included.Discussion. The milestones give us a context to share individual innovations and to compare and contrast using a standardized frame. We

  14. Inter-laboratory assessment of a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicology assay - progress report on phase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, A-L; Stedman, D B; Ball, J; Hillegass, J M; Flood, A; Zhang, C X; Panzica-Kelly, J; Cao, J; Coburn, A; Enright, B P; Tornesi, M B; Hetheridge, M; Augustine-Rauch, K A

    2012-04-01

    This report provides a progress update of a consortium effort to develop a harmonized zebrafish developmental toxicity assay. Twenty non-proprietary compounds (10 animal teratogens and 10 animal non-teratogens) were evaluated blinded in 4 laboratories. Zebrafish embryos from pond-derived and cultivated strain wild types were exposed to the test compounds for 5 days and subsequently evaluated for lethality and morphological changes. Each of the testing laboratories achieved similar overall concordance to the animal data (60-70%). Subsequent optimization procedures to improve the overall concordance focused on compound formulation and test concentration adjustments, chorion permeation and number of replicates. These optimized procedures were integrated into a revised protocol and all compounds were retested in one lab using embryos from pond-derived zebrafish and achieved 85% total concordance. To further assess assay performance, a study of additional compounds is currently in progress at two laboratories using embryos from pond-derived and cultivated-strain wild type zebrafish.

  15. Preparation of social workers for serving individuals with developmental disabilities: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePoy, E; Miller, M

    1996-02-01

    A survey was sent to program directors of 498 social work schools to explore the developmental disabilities content in their curricula. The survey measured developmental disabilities content in terms of course content, practice opportunities, research opportunities, and value content. The response rate was 28.9%. Results indicated that very few schools offered developmental disabilities content in their curricula, and those that did offered it primarily as a field practica experience. Survey findings raise concerns about how well social work students are being prepared for practice in the field of developmental disabilities.

  16. Milestones in the history of personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2013-06-01

    This paper analyzes the major historical milestones in the study of normal and abnormal personality, from antiquity up until the 20th century. Special attention is paid to the interaction between dimensional and typological approaches, which was a major issue during the preparation of DSM-5. Theories of personality started with the humoral theory of Greek medicine. Pinel, and later Esquirol and Prichard, are credited with the first descriptions of abnormal personalities in textbooks of psychiatry. Between the late 19th and early 20th centuries, elaborate systems of normal and abnormal personality, associating to some degree types and dimensions, were devised by a succession of European psychologists, such as Ribot, Heymans, and Lazursky. Emil Kraepelin and Kurt Schneider proposed classifications of abnormal personality types. In parallel, psychoanalysts stressed the role of early life experiences. Towards the mid-20th century, statistical methods were applied to the scientific validation of personality dimensions with pioneers such as Cattell, anticipating the five-factor model.

  17. Artificial insemination history: hurdles and milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombelet, W; Van Robays, J

    2015-01-01

    Artificial insemination with homologous (AIH) or donor semen (AID) is nowadays a very popular treatment procedure used for many subfertile women worldwide. The rationale behind artificial insemination is to increase gamete density at the site of fertilisation. The sequence of events leading to today's common use of artificial insemination traces back to scientific studies and experimentation many centuries ago. Modern techniques used in human artificial insemination programmes are mostly adapted from the work on cattle by dairy farmers wishing to improve milk production by using artificial insemination with sperm of selected bulls with well chosen genetic traits. The main reason for the renewed interest in artificial insemination in human was associated with the refinement of techniques for the preparation of washed motile spermatozoa in the early years of IVF. The history of artificial insemination is reviewed with particular interest to the most important hurdles and milestones.

  18. Noise-induced hearing loss milestones: Past and future

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Edwards, A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available At the 2003 Mine Health and Safety Summit, the milestones for elimination of Noise-induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in the mining industry were agreed on. The first milestone, December 2008, has passed and the next one in 2013 is looming. The study...

  19. Vojta method in the treatment of developmental hip dysplasia – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiebzak W

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Wojciech Kiebzak,1,2 Arkadiusz Żurawski,2 Michał Dwornik3 1Center for Pediatrics, Regional Hospital in Kielce, Kielce, Poland; 2Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce, Poland; 3Department of Osteopathic Medicine and Physiotherapy, Medical College of Podkowa Lesna, Podkowa Lesna, Poland Background: Developmental dysplasia of the hip joint is one of the most common congenital defects and often results in functional and structural disorders. Such cases particularly demand optimizing therapeutic effects and maximally reducing the duration of therapy. Purpose: The aim of this case report is to present the therapeutic process in a child with developmental hip dysplasia. Case report: This is a case report of a female child with a birth weight of 2,800 g and an Apgar score of 9 points born to a gravida 3 para 3 mother at 37 weeks. The child was delivered by cesarean section, and the pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios. Subluxation of the left hip joint was diagnosed by an orthopedist in the third month of life. The treatment followed was the Vojta method (the first phase of reflex turning and reflex crawling. Results: During the 6 weeks of the Vojta treatment, the left half of the femoral head was centralized, and the process of formation of the hip joint acetabulum was influenced effectively enough to change the acetabulum’s Graff type from the baseline D to IIb after 41 days of treatment. Conclusion: The diagnostic work-up of congenital hip joint dysplasia should involve a physiotherapist who will investigate the child’s neuro­muscular coordination, in addition to a neonatologist and a pediatrician. The therapy for a disorder of hip joint development of neuromotor origin should involve the application of global patterns according to Vojta. Children with congenital dysplasia of the hip joint should commence rehabilitation as early as possible. Keywords: global pattern

  20. Neural Dissociation of Phonological and Visual Attention Span Disorders in Developmental Dyslexia: fMRI Evidence from Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyrin, C.; Lallier, M.; Demonet, J. F.; Pernet, C.; Baciu, M.; Le Bas, J. F.; Valdois, S.

    2012-01-01

    A dissociation between phonological and visual attention (VA) span disorders has been reported in dyslexic children. This study investigates whether this cognitively-based dissociation has a neurobiological counterpart through the investigation of two cases of developmental dyslexia. LL showed a phonological disorder but preserved VA span whereas…

  1. Campaign 2 Level 2 Milestone Review 2009: Milestone # 3131 Grain Scale Simulation of Pore Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A J

    2009-09-28

    The milestone reviewed on Sept. 16, 2009 was 'High-fidelity simulation of shock initiation of high explosives at the grain scale using coupled hydrodynamics, thermal transport and chemistry'. It is the opinion of the committee that the team has satisfied the milestone. A detailed description of how the goals were met is provided. The milestone leveraged capabilities from ASC Physics and Engineering Materials program combined with experimental input from Campaign 2. A combined experimental-multiscale simulation approach was used to create and validate the various TATB model components. At the lowest length scale, quantum chemical calculations were used to determine equations of state, thermal transport properties and reaction rates for TATB as it is decomposing. High-pressure experiments conducted in diamond anvil cells, gas guns and the Z machine were used to validate the EOS, thermal conductivity, specific heat and predictions of water formation. The predicted reaction networks and chemical kinetic equations were implemented in Cheetah and validated against the lower length scale data. Cheetah was then used within the ASC code ALE3D for high-resolution, thermo-mechanically coupled simulations of pore collapse at the micron size scale to predict conditions for detonation initiation.

  2. Brief Report: Developmental Change in Theory of Mind Abilities in Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Shelly; Joseph, Robert M.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2003-01-01

    A longitudinal study investigated developmental change in theory of mind among 57 children (ages 4-14) with autism. Theory of mind tests were administered on an initial visit and one year later. Data indicated significant developmental improvement in theory of mind ability, which was primarily related to the children's language ability. (Contains…

  3. Family Members' Reports of the Technology Use of Family Members with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S. B.; Wehmeyer, M. L.; Davies, D. K.; Stock, S. E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: A nationwide survey of family members of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities ranging in age from birth through adulthood was conducted to replicate a similar effort by Wehmeyer and update the knowledge base concerning technology use by people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Method: Survey responses…

  4. Developmental Patterns in the Solution of Verbal Analogies. Technical Report No. 3. Cognitive Development Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Nigro, Georgia

    Developmental patterns in the solution of verbal analogies, especially the recognition of higher-order analogical relations, were traced. The investigation sought to: (1) provide new developmental tests of a componential theory of analogical reasoning; (2) identify strategy changes during the transition from midchildhood (grade 3) to adulthood…

  5. Moral Developmental Science between Changing Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Monika

    2012-01-01

    This review encompasses a time-span of about 50 years of research on morality and moral development. It discusses Kohlberg's (1984) work as a milestone that constituted the cognitive developmental viewpoint of morality and that dominated research for about three decades. In this paradigm the role of reasoning and deliberation was emphasized as the…

  6. Burn-injured adolescents report gaining multiple developmental benefits and improved life skills as a result of burn camp attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Ruth Brubaker; Pressman, Melissa S; Takach, Oliver P; Bay, R Curtis; Croteau, Renee; Hansen, Linda D; Foster, Kevin N; Caruso, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotally, burn camp has been reported to be a positive developmental and rehabilitative experience for attendees; there is little empirical data to support this belief. This study sought to explore whether burn camp either directly or indirectly elicits positive development outcomes in pediatric burn survivors or increases their psychosocial well-being and achievement. The Youth Experience Survey 2.0, a 66-item self-report inventory designed to measure developmental experiences in an organized youth activity, was administered to children aged 11 to 18 years attending summer burn camp. One hundred and ten burn-injured youth, 58 male and 52 female, reported that burn camp had positively impacted their lives through improved identity exploration, goal-setting and problem-solving abilities, increased physical activity, communication, emotional regulation, and time management skills (P camp for more than 5 years resulted in greater improvement. Study results support the burn camp experience as a far-reaching and positive developmental activity. Participants credited the camp experience with helping them with identity formation and reflection, improved social interactions, and increased initiative; all positive developmental outcomes for youth. Results suggest that burn camp participation not only helps burn-injured youth to deal with their burns but also assists them in the development of social and basic life skills, which will allow them to navigate the transition from youth to adulthood, more effectively and successfully.

  7. Pseudoaneurysm Accompanied by Crowe Type IV Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotake Yo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 72-year-old woman whose pseudoaneurysm was difficult to diagnose and treat. The patient had a history of congenital dislocated hip and was undergoing anticoagulation therapy with warfarin due to the mitral valve replacement. Her chief complaint was pain and enlargement of the left buttock, and the laboratory tests revealed severe anemia. However, her elderly depression confused her chief complaint, and she was transferred to a psychiatric hospital. Two months after the onset of the symptoms, she was finally diagnosed with a pseudoaneurysm by contrast-enhanced CT and angiography. IDC coils were used for embolization. A plain CT showed hemostasis as well as a reduced hematoma at 2 months after the embolization. The possible contributing factors for the pseudoaneurysm included bleeding due to warfarin combined with an intramuscular hematoma accompanied by Crowe type IV developmental dysplasia of the hip that led to an arterial rupture by impingement between pelvis and femoral head. Since the warfarin treatment could not be halted due to the valve replacement, embolization was chosen for her treatment, and the treatment outcome was favorable.

  8. Brief report: Response inhibition and processing speed in children with motor difficulties and developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Marialivia; Leonard, Hayley C; Hill, Elisabeth L; Henry, Lucy A

    2016-01-01

    A previous study reported that children with poor motor skills, classified as having motor difficulties (MD) or Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD), produced more errors in a motor response inhibition task compared to typically developing (TD) children but did not differ in verbal inhibition errors. The present study investigated whether these groups differed in the length of time they took to respond in order to achieve these levels of accuracy, and whether any differences in response speed could be explained by generally slow information processing in children with poor motor skills. Timing data from the Verbal Inhibition Motor Inhibition test were analyzed to identify differences in performance between the groups on verbal and motor inhibition, as well as on processing speed measures from standardized batteries. Although children with MD and DCD produced more errors in the motor inhibition task than TD children, the current analyses found that they did not take longer to complete the task. Children with DCD were slower at inhibiting verbal responses than TD children, while the MD group seemed to perform at an intermediate level between the other groups in terms of verbal inhibition speed. Slow processing speed did not account for these group differences. Results extended previous research into response inhibition in children with poor motor skills by explicitly comparing motor and verbal responses, and suggesting that slow performance, even when accurate, may be attributable to an inefficient way of inhibiting responses, rather than slow information processing speed per se.

  9. Developmental venous anomalies of the posterior fossa with transpontine drainage: report of 3 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueker, W. [Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52 057 Aachen (Germany); Mull, M. [Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52 057 Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Technical University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, D-52 057 Aachen (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Developmental venous anomalies (DVA) are considered as variant patterns of cerebral venous drainage. Although generally not rare in the cerebellum, DVA of the brain stem or of the cerebellum with drainage through the brain stem are exceptional findings. Because it is not clear whether DVA may sometimes be of clinical significance, we try to correlate the clinical findings of the patients with the course of the variant vessels. We reviewed the literature and report three additional cases. All patients were examined by MRI and digital subtraction angiography. In particular, we discuss the drainage route as compared with the established patterns of posterior fossa blood drainage, which is directed to the dural sinuses, the petrosal vein or the vein of Galen. In one of our patients suffering from trigeminal neuralgia, the close topical relation of the DVA and the trigeminal nucleus and trigeminal nerve entry zone suggests a causal relationship. In a second case the brain stem symptoms were due to haemorrhage of a concomitant cavernoma. It remains unclear if the occurrence of dysarthria and dysaesthesia in the third patient with brain stem DVA was purely coincidental. The only clinical symptom directly attributable to a DVA with transpontine drainage in our series was trigeminal neuralgia. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Important ATLAS Forward Calorimeter Milestone Reached

    CERN Multimedia

    Loch, P.

    The ATLAS Forward Calorimeter working group has reached an important milestone in the production of their detectors. The mechanical assembly of the first electromagnetic module (FCal1C) has been completed at the University of Arizona on February 25, 2002, only ten days after the originally scheduled date. The photo shows the University of Arizona FCal group in the clean room, together with the assembled FCal1C module. The module consists of a stack of 18 round copper plates, each about one inch thick. Each plate is about 90 cm in diameter, and has 12260 precision-drilled holes in it, to accommodate the tube/rod electrode assembly. The machining of the plates, which was done at the Science Technology Center (STC) at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, required high precision to allow for easy insertion of the electrode copper tube. The plates have been carefully cleaned at the University of Arizona, to remove any machining residue and metal flakes. This process alone took about eleven weeks. Exactly 122...

  11. Important Milestone for REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    CERN's new nuclear physics facility, REX-ISOLDE, reached an important milestone on Thursday 23 August. Scheduled for full commissioning later this year, REX-ISOLDE will take beams of unstable ions from the ISOLDE facility and accelerate them, opening up a wide range of new research avenues. Members of the REX-ISOLDE team with REXEBIS - successfully tested last week. The key to REX-ISOLDE is the process of accumulating and cooling unstable ions in a trap and then stripping them of electrons in a so-called charge breeder before accelerating them in a linear accelerator. The first part of this process is the job of REXTRAP, the largest particle trap of its kind, which was successfully tested in 1999 (Bulletin 49/99). Last week it was the turn of REXEBIS (Electron Beam Ion Source), which strips the ions of electrons, to be put through its paces. By increasing the charge of the ions by removing electrons, the length of the linear accelerator needed to accelerate the ions can be reduced, since higher charge mean...

  12. Milestones in avian coccidiosis research: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H D

    2014-03-01

    This article describes some of the milestones in research concerned with protozoan parasites of the genus Eimeria that infect birds and cause the disease coccidiosis. The time period covered is from 1891, when oocysts were first found in the ceca of diseased chickens, to the present. Progress in our understanding has lagged behind that of other protozoan parasites such as Toxoplasma and Plasmodium despite the enormous importance of Eimeria to animal livestock production. Nevertheless, applied research by universities, government agencies, and private industry has resulted in the successful development of methods of control, research that continues today. The topics covered and the references provided are selective and include life cycles and biology, pathology, ultrastructure, biochemistry, immunity, genetics, host cell invasion, species identification, taxonomy, chemotherapy, vaccination, and literature concerned with avian coccidiosis. This review is primarily concerned with the avian species of Eimeria that infect poultry, but some important advances, principally in immunology, have been made using species that infect rodents and rabbits. These are included where appropriate.

  13. 'Beyond Milestones': a randomised controlled trial evaluating an innovative digital resource teaching quality observation of normal child development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Anne M; Cunningham, Clare; Sinclair, Adriane J; Rao, Arjun; Lonergan, Amy; Bye, Ann M E

    2014-05-01

    The study aimed to create and evaluate the educational effectiveness of a digital resource instructing paediatric trainees in a systematic approach to critical and quality observation of normal child development. A digital educational resource was developed utilising the skills of an expert developmental paediatrician who was videoed assessing normal early child development at a series of critical stages. Videos illustrated aspects of language, sophistication of play and socialisation, cognition, and motor progress. Expert commentary, teaching text and summaries were used. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the resource. Paediatric trainees were recruited from The Sydney Children's Hospitals Network. Outcome measures were repeated at three time points (pre-teaching, immediate-post and 1 month) and included self-rated attitudes, knowledge of markers of development and observational expertise. Qualitative data on teaching usefulness were obtained through open-ended questions. Fifty-six paediatric trainees (registrar 79%, women 82%; mean age 31 years) completed the pre-assessment, 46 the immediate-post and 45 the 1-month follow-up (20% attrition). Compared with the Control group, the Teaching group scored higher over time on markers of development (P = 0.006), observational expertise (P video and expert commentary and reported improvement in confidence and understanding and acquiring a more structured approach. The 'Beyond Milestones' free online resource for medical professionals improves knowledge, increases confidence and is useful, providing a structured approach to developmental assessment. The techniques taught can be applied to every paediatric consultation. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  14. Level-1 Milestone 350 Definitions v1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T

    2006-11-17

    This milestone is the direct result of work that started seven years ago with the planning for a 100-teraFLOP platform and will be satisfied when 100 teraFLOPS is placed in operation and readied for Stockpile Stewardship Program simulations. The end product of this milestone will be a production-level, high-performance computing system, code named Purple, designed to be used to solve the most demanding stockpile stewardship problems, that is, the large-scale application problems at the edge of our understanding of weapon physics. This fully functional 100 teraFLOPS system must be able to serve a diverse scientific and engineering workload. It must also have a robust code development and production environment, both of which facilitate the workload requirements. This multi-year effort includes major activities in contract management, facilities, infrastructure, system software, and user environment and support. Led by LLNL, the trilabs defined the statement of work for a 100-teraFLOP system that resulted in a contract with IBM known as the Purple contract. LLNL worked with IBM throughout the contract period to resolve issues and collaborated with the Program to resolve contractual issues to ensure delivery of a platform that best serves the Program for a reasonable cost. The Purple system represents a substantial increase in the classified compute resources at LLNL for NNSA. The center computer environment must be designed to accept the Purple system and to scale with the increase of compute resources to achieve required end-to-end services. Networking, archival storage, visualization servers, global file systems, and system software will all be enhanced to support Purple's size and architecture. IBM and LLNL are sharing responsibility for Purple's system software. LLNL is responsible for the scheduler, resource manager, and some code development tools. Through the Purple contract, IBM is responsible for the remainder of the system software including the

  15. QUALITY MILESTONES OF THE SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomescu Ada Mirela

    2014-12-01

    "! As a final remark, we mention as milestone of ecological behaviour (green connected to sustainable development are certification to ISO 14001 and eco-labelling of accommodation.

  16. Summary of FY 17 Assessments Sandia National Laboratories: Evaluation of FY16 SNL FCT M2 Milestone Deliverables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appel, Gordon John

    2017-03-01

    This report is the milestone deliverable M4FT-17SN111102091 “Summary of Assessments Performed FY17 by SNL QA POC” for work package FT-17SN11110209 titled “Quality Assurance – SNL”. This report summarizes the FY17 assessment performed on Fuel Cycle Technologies / Spent Fuel and Waste Disposition efforts.

  17. A rare mitochondrial disorder: Leigh sydrome - a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrikhande Dhananjay Y

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive neurodegenerative, mitochondrial disorder of childhood with only a few cases documented from India. The clinical presentation of Leigh syndrome is highly variable. However, in most cases it presents as a progressive neurological disease with motor and intellectual developmental delay and signs and symptoms of brain stem and/or basal ganglia involvement. Raised lactate levels in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid is noted. It is the neuroimaging, mainly the Magnetic Resonance Imaging showing characteristic symmetrical necrotic lesions in the basal ganglia and/or brain stem that leads to the diagnosis. Here, we report a case of 7 months old female child presenting to us with status epilepticus, delayed developmental milestones and regression of the achieved milestones suspected to be a case of neurodegenerative disorder, which on MRI was diagnosed as Leigh syndrome.

  18. Guide to DCP Study Close-Out: Milestones and Tasks | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide assists Consortium Lead Organization (CLO) planning for DCP study close-out. Study close-out tasks are organized under milestones, which help mark progress toward completion of the close-out process. Once tasks associated with a milestone are underway, planning for the next milestone may begin. Click on a milestone to view the associated close-out tasks. |

  19. Brief Report: State of the Science Symposium on Aging and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Tamar; Janicki, Matthew P.; Marks, Beth; Hammel, Joy; Factor, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The overall goal of the "2007 State of the Science Symposium on Aging with Developmental Disabilities: Charting Lifespan Trajectories and Supportive Environments for Healthy Community Living" (held in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.) was to increase the understanding and definition of how to improve the health, psychosocial well-being, and community…

  20. First Year Experience Courses for Students in Developmental Education. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "First year experience courses for students in developmental education" are designed to ease the transition to college by providing academic and social development supports. Although course content and focus may vary, most are designed to introduce students to campus resources, provide training in time management and study skills, and…

  1. Developmental Theories and Instructional Strategies: A Summary Paper. SIDRU Research Report No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Beeke

    This paper provides curriculum makers with an overview of developmental theory and relates the theory to instructional strategies. The section on socioemotional development addresses Erikson's eight ages of man, Kohlberg's stages of moral development, motivation and Maslow's hierarchy of needs, Taylor's stage model of creative development, and…

  2. Visualization on supercomputing platform level II ASC milestone (3537-1B) results from Sandia.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geveci, Berk (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Fabian, Nathan; Marion, Patrick (Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY); Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2010-09-01

    This report provides documentation for the completion of the Sandia portion of the ASC Level II Visualization on the platform milestone. This ASC Level II milestone is a joint milestone between Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratories. This milestone contains functionality required for performing visualization directly on a supercomputing platform, which is necessary for peta-scale visualization. Sandia's contribution concerns in-situ visualization, running a visualization in tandem with a solver. Visualization and analysis of petascale data is limited by several factors which must be addressed as ACES delivers the Cielo platform. Two primary difficulties are: (1) Performance of interactive rendering, which is most computationally intensive portion of the visualization process. For terascale platforms, commodity clusters with graphics processors(GPUs) have been used for interactive rendering. For petascale platforms, visualization and rendering may be able to run efficiently on the supercomputer platform itself. (2) I/O bandwidth, which limits how much information can be written to disk. If we simply analyze the sparse information that is saved to disk we miss the opportunity to analyze the rich information produced every timestep by the simulation. For the first issue, we are pursuing in-situ analysis, in which simulations are coupled directly with analysis libraries at runtime. This milestone will evaluate the visualization and rendering performance of current and next generation supercomputers in contrast to GPU-based visualization clusters, and evaluate the performance of common analysis libraries coupled with the simulation that analyze and write data to disk during a running simulation. This milestone will explore, evaluate and advance the maturity level of these technologies and their applicability to problems of interest to the ASC program. Scientific simulation on parallel supercomputers is traditionally performed in four

  3. Simultaneous occurrence of compound odontoma and arrested root formation as developmental disturbances after maxillofacial trauma: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngörmüş, Metin; Yolcu, Umit; Aras, Mutan-Hamdi; Halicioğlu, Koray

    2010-03-01

    Traumatic injury to a primary tooth and/or a bone fracture has the potential to damage the underlying permanent tooth germ which may disturb its development. The extent of the malformation depends on the developmental stage of the permanent tooth and the intensity of the trauma. The presence of infection may be a predictive factor for these abnormalities. Open surgical procedures can also potentially cause impaction and developmental disturbances. Several developmental alterations such as discolouration, hypoplasia, crown dilaceration, root angulation or dilaceration, sequestration of permanent tooth buds and disturbance in eruption have been reported in permanent teeth after trauma. However, odontoma-like malformations and partial or complete arrest of root formation are rare complications developed after trauma. This article presents a rare case with simultaneous occurrence of an odontoma-like malformation and complete and partial arrested root formations as the results of maxillofacial trauma. Almost all pediatric fractures must be managed with closed reduction as much as possible. However, if it is necessary to perform an open reduction, careful attention must be paid during placement of the osteosynthetic plates and screws; and tooth bud development must be followed periodically.

  4. Effect of thermal shock on developmental stages of estuarine fish. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dean, J. M.

    1978-12-01

    Physiological data and ecological data show that the few estuarine spawners have a higher thermal tolerance in the embryonic and larval stages than do the freshwater, coastal, or oceanic spawning species. However, since all three groups (freshwater, estuarine, and oceanic spawners) occupy the estuary and coastal waters at different times of the year, knowledge of their physiology and ecology at different developmental or life cycle stages is critical for estuarine management decisions.

  5. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Decker, J.R.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-05-01

    Gestational exposure to n-hexane resulted in an increase in the number of resorbed fetuses for exposure groups relative to the control group; however, the increases were not directly correlated to exposure concentration. The differences were statistically significant for the 200-ppM with respect to total intrauterine death (early plus late resorptions), and with respect to late resorptions for the 5000-ppM group. A small, but statistically significant, reduction in female (but not male) fetal body weight relative to the control group was observed at the 5000-ppM exposure level. There were no exposure-related increases in any individual fetal malformation or variation, nor was there any increase in the incidence of combined malformations or variations. Gestational exposure of CD-1 mice to n-hexane vapors appeared to cause a degree of concentration-related developmental toxicity in the absence of overt maternal toxicity, but the test material was not found to be teratogenic. This developmental toxicity was manifested as an increase in the number of resorptions per litter for all exposure levels, and as a decrease in the uterine: extra-gestational weight gain ratio at the 5000-ppM exposure level. Because of the significant increase in the number of resorptions at the 200-ppM exposure level, a no observable effect level (NOEL) for developmental toxicity was not established for exposure of mice to 200, 1000 or 5000-ppM n-hexane vapors. 21 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Construction Milestone Announced on Green Bank Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory announces completion of a major construction milestone on the world's largest fully steerable radio telescope - the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The last of 2,004 aluminum surface panels was recently installed on the GBT's two-acre (100 m x 110 m) collecting dish. The telescope is located at NRAO's Green Bank site, in rural Pocahontas County, West Virginia. The GBT will be used to study everything from the formation of galaxies in the early universe, to the chemical make-up of the dust and gas inside galaxies and in the voids that separate them, to the birth processes of stars. In conjunction with other instruments, it will help make highly accurate radar maps of some familiar objects in our own solar system. The GBT is an engineering marvel. At 485 feet tall, it is comparable in height to the Washington Monument. It weighs 16 million pounds, yet by swiveling the dish in both azimuth and elevation, it can be pointed to any point in the sky with exquisite accuracy. Additionally, the telescope's two-acre collecting dish has many novel features. Most radio telescopes in use today use receivers suspended above the dish by four struts. These struts block some of the surface of the dish, scattering some of the incoming radio waves from celestial objects under study. The GBT's offset feedarm has no struts to block incoming radio waves. The GBT also boasts an active surface. The surface of the dish is composed of 2,004 panels. On the underside of the dish, actuators are located at each corner (i.e., intersection of four panels). These actuators are motors that move the surface panels up and down, keeping the (paraboloid) shape of the dish precisely adjusted, no matter what the tilt of the telescope. The combination of its unblocked aperture and active surface promise that the GBT will display extremely high sensitivity to faint radio signals. The GBT itself is not the only precious national resource in

  7. The Team Milestone Process: Integrated Team Activities to Track Team Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J. Knott

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The well established use of teams in the classroom and in business has increased the need for teaching students tangible team skills. More than merely imparting knowledge about teams from an abstract perspective students need to graduate with effective team experiences. This paper presents a milestone process that helps students develop as a team and provides students with the opportunity to reflect on and learn from their experiences. As students familiarize themselves with different team processes and dynamics, this process allows students to hone their team skill with feedback from instructors who now have an additional tool to monitor and coach the students on an ongoing basis. For example, the milestone process allows the instructor to provide students with an early progress report on their semester projects while giving the instructor an opportunity for course content clarification and valuable early feedback that students can use for project revision. This paper describes the team milestone process along with instructions, grading, and possible modification and also presents feedback from instructors and students after use in an undergraduate organizational behavior course.

  8. Milestone-compatible neurology resident assessments: A role for observable practice activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyell K; Dimberg, Elliot L; Boes, Christopher J; Eggers, Scott D Z; Dodick, David W; Cutsforth-Gregory, Jeremy K; Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Capobianco, David J

    2015-06-02

    Beginning in 2014, US neurology residency programs were required to report each trainee's educational progression within 29 neurology Milestone competency domains. Trainee assessment systems will need to be adapted to inform these requirements. The primary aims of this study were to validate neurology resident assessment content using observable practice activities (OPAs) and to develop assessment formats easily translated to the Neurology Milestones. A modified Delphi technique was used to establish consensus perceptions of importance of 73 neurology OPAs among neurology educators and trainees at 3 neurology residency programs. A content validity score (CVS) was derived for each neurology OPA, with scores ≥4.0 determined in advance to indicate sufficient content validity. The mean CVS for all OPAs was 4.4 (range 3.5-5.0). Fifty-seven (78%) OPAs had a CVS ≥4.0, leaving 16 (22%) below the pre-established threshold for content validity. Trainees assigned a higher importance to individual OPAs (mean CVS 4.6) compared to faculty (mean 4.4, p = 0.016), but the effect size was small (η(2) = 0.10). There was no demonstrated effect of length of education experience on perceived importance of neurology OPAs (p = 0.23). Two sample resident assessment formats were developed, one using neurology OPAs alone and another using a combination of neurology OPAs and the Neurology Milestones. This study provides neurology training programs with content validity evidence for items to include in resident assessments, and sample assessment formats that directly translate to the Neurology Milestones. Length of education experience has little effect on perceptions of neurology OPA importance. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  9. Commentary: Theoretical and Methodological Dimensions of Convergence and Divergence of Adolescent and Parent Reports about Youth Development and Family Structure and Function-A Relational Developmental Systems Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard M; Konowitz, Lily S

    2016-10-01

    Using ideas associated with relational developmental systems metatheory, we discuss the links among the operation triad model of adolescent report-parent report convergence, divergence, or compensation and the research reported in this special issue. These contributions highlight the important implications for adolescent adjustment of youth and parent reports about adolescent development and family structure and function. Relational developmental systems metatheory raises both theoretical and methodological issues for research framed by the operation triad model. These issues emphasize the specificity (non-ergodicity) of mutually influential relationships between a youth and his/her parent, that is, the specificity of the adolescent-parent relationship. Relational developmental systems -based ideas may enable the operation triad model to be a means through which the study of adolescent self-reports and parent reports will have a more central place in the construction of key features of the dynamics of adolescent-parent relationships.

  10. Anesthesia for a patient with Fanconi anemia for developmental dislocation of the hip: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafer Dogan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is a rare autosomal recessive inherited bone marrow failure syndrome with congenital and hematological abnormalities. Literature regarding the anesthetic management in these patients is limited. A management of a developmental dislocation of the hip was described in a patient with fanconi anemia. Because of the heterogeneous nature, a patient with fanconi anemia should be established thorough preoperative evaluation in order to diagnose on clinical features. In conclusion, we preferred caudal anesthesia in this patient with fanconi anemia without thrombocytopenia, because of avoiding from N2O, reducing amount of anesthetic, existing microcephaly, hypothyroidism and elevated liver enzymes, providing postoperative analgesia, and reducing amount of analgesic used postoperatively.

  11. For developmental period specific tasks in psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy: The case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Židanik

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The patient – therapist relationship is always unique, depending from both personalities – the patient's and the therapist's one. Therefore the rules for therapeutic interventions are strict and rigid – they should give some objective frames for the therapy. In this article I present psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy, where I outrouled the rigidness of psychotherapeutic interventions.At deep pathology of personality structure, especially at ego and self pathology, it is sometimes advisable to overcame the therapeutic boundaries for a more active healing process of developmental deficits.

  12. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of tetrahydrofuran in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1988-08-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF), a four-carbon cyclic ether, is widely used as an industrial solvent. Although it has been used in large quantities for many years, few long-term toxicology studies, and no reproductive or developmental studies, have been conducted on THF. This study addresses the potential for THF to cause developmental toxicity in rodents by exposing Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 600, 1800, or 5000 ppm tetrahydrofuran (THF) vapors, 6 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.33 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6--17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6--19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as O dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded and live fetuses were examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 27 refs., 6 figs., 23 tabs.

  13. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1989-02-01

    Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. Actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) carbonate speciation studies by PAS and NMR spectroscopies; Yucca Mountain Project: Milestone report 3031-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.L.; Ekberg, S.A.; Morris, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Tait, C.D.

    1994-09-01

    Pulsed-laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and Fourier-transform nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were used to study speciation of actinide(IV) and actinide(VI) ions (Np, Pu, Am) in aqueous carbonate solutions vs pH, carbonate content, actinide content, temperature. PAS focused on Pu(IV) speciation. Stability fields on a pH (8.4 to 12.0) versus total carbonate content (0.003 to 1.0 M) plot for dilute Pu(IV) carbonate species ([Pu]{sub tot} = 1 mM) were mapped. Four plutonium species, with absorption peaks at 486, 492, 500, and 512 nm were found. Loss of a single carbonate ligand does not account for the difference in speciation for the 486 and 492 nm absorption peaks, nor can any of the observed species be identified as colloidal Pu(IV). NMR data have been obtained for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. This report focuses on results for PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on the PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. In each of the six different PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} samples, two NMR signals are present, one for the free carbonate ligand and one for the carbonate ligand coordinated to a paramagnetic plutonium metal center. The single{sup 13}C resonance line for coordinated carbonate is consistent with expectations of a monomeric PuO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} species in solution. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was used for determining ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Eyring analysis at standard conditions provided activation parameters of {Delta}H = 38 KJ/M and {Delta}S = {minus}60 J/K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl(VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction.

  15. Adults' Insensitivity to Developmental Changes in Children's Ability to Report When and How Many Times Abuse Occurred.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Kyndra C; Quas, Jodi A

    2016-01-01

    In legal settings, children are frequently asked to provide temporal information about alleged abuse, such as when it occurred and how often. Although there is a sizeable body of work in the literature regarding children's ability to provide such information, virtually nothing is known about how adults evaluate the veracity of that information. This omission is especially noteworthy given that adults' evaluations are critical to the progression and outcome of legal cases. We examined adults' perceptions of children's reports of temporal details regarding alleged sexual abuse. We varied both children's age (6 vs. 11 years) and how certain children were when providing such details to assess whether adults were sensitive to changes in how children of different ages typically talk about temporal information. With regard to credibility, adults were insensitive to children's age, perceiving younger and older children who reported temporal details with confidence as more credible than those who reported information tentatively. Normative developmental trends, however, would suggest that, with age, children are often tentative when reporting true temporal details. With regard to perceptions of children's accuracy in reporting temporal information, adults found younger children who were confident to be the most accurate. Regarding guilt judgments, adults rated defendants as having a higher degree of guilt when children were confident in reporting temporal details. The findings have implications for juror decision-making in cases of alleged sexual abuse in which children report when or how often abuse occurred. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Apparatus as Milestones in the History of Comparative Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, David A.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Putney, R. Thompson

    1994-01-01

    Significant apparatus developments from the history of comparative psychology are reviewed, including the contemporary trend toward computer use in research with nonhuman animals. It is argued that milestone apparatus served not only to open new lines of inquiry but also to shape or delimit the nature of the answers that were obtained.

  17. A Year of Milestones in Saudi Aramco's Relations with China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Geng

    2010-01-01

    @@ 2010 has been a year of outstanding milestones in the bilateral relationship between China and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.China and Saudi Arabia conducted the fourth meeting of the Joint Committee on Economy and Trade this year,agreeing that bilateral trade will surpass US$60 billion annually by 2015.

  18. Milestones in history of adult vaccination in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Myoung-don; Lee, Jong-koo

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that reduced the mortality. Major vaccine preventable diseases have decreased dramatically after the introduction of immunization program in Korea. In this article, we review milestones in history of immunization program, especially in adult vaccination.

  19. 10 CFR 603.570 - Determining milestone payment amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....570 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS... milestone payments should be associated with the well-defined, observable, and verifiable technical outcomes (e.g., demonstrations, tests, or data analysis) that are established for the project in accordance...

  20. UI researchers celebrate latest milestone in construction of atom smasher

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    University of Iowa researchers joined their U.S. and international colleagues Dec. 19 in celebrating a major construction mile-stone that brings them one step closer to the completion of the most powerful device ever designed to search for the basic build-ing blocks of matter.

  1. UI researchers celebrate latest milestone in construction of atom smasher

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "University of Iowa researchers joined their U.S. and international colleagues De. 19 in celebrating a major construction mile-stone that brings them one step closer to the completion of the most powerful device ever designed to search for the basic build-ing blocks of matter." (1/2 page)

  2. Brief report: narratives of personal events in children with autism and developmental language disorders: unshared memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Sylvie

    2008-11-01

    Narrative analysis of personal events provides an opportunity for identifying autism specific issues related to language and social impairments. Eight personal events were elicited from three groups of school age children: 14 high-functioning with Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFA), 12 non-autistic with developmental language disorders (DLD), and 12 typically developing matched for chronological age and non-verbal IQ. The coding focused on narrative format (constituents) and style (coherence). The analyses indicate basic knowledge of conventional narrative format in all groups but a consistent lack of high-point in HFA children's stories interpreted as a consequence of their lack of social understanding of narrative. The results suggest novel interventions to foster autobiographical memory in HFA children which may assist in their self-awareness development.

  3. WDR45 mutations in Rett (-like) syndrome and developmental delay: Case report and an appraisal of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffjan, Sabine; Ibisler, Aysegül; Tschentscher, Anne; Dekomien, Gabriele; Bidinost, Carla; Rosa, Alberto L

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the WDR45 gene have been identified as causative for the only X-linked type of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA), clinically characterized by global developmental delay in childhood, followed by a secondary neurological decline with parkinsonism and/or dementia in adolescence or early adulthood. Recent reports suggest that WDR45 mutations are associated with a broader phenotypic spectrum. We identified a novel splice site mutation (c.440-2 A > G) in a 5-year-old Argentinian patient with Rett-like syndrome, exhibiting developmental delay, microcephaly, seizures and stereotypic hand movements, and discuss this finding, together with a review of the literature. Additional patients with a clinical diagnosis of Rett (-like) syndrome were also found to carry WDR45 mutations before (or without) clinical decline or signs of iron accumulation by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This information indicates that WDR45 mutations should be added to the growing list of genetic alterations linked to Rett-like syndrome. Further, clinical symptoms associated with WDR45 mutations ranged from early-onset epileptic encephalopathy in a male patient with a deletion of WDR45 to only mild cognitive delay in a female patient, suggesting that analysis of this gene should be considered more often in patients with developmental delay, regardless of severity. The increasing use of next generation sequencing technologies as well as longitudinal follow-up of patients with an early diagnosis will help to gain additional insight into the phenotypic spectrum associated with WDR45 mutations.

  4. Relationship between early motor milestones and severity of restricted and repetitive behaviors in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uljarević, Mirko; Hedley, Darren; Alvares, Gail A; Varcin, Kandice J; Whitehouse, Andrew J O

    2017-03-16

    This study explored the relationships between the later age of achievement of early motor milestones, current motor atypicalities (toe walking), and the severity of restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Parents of 147 children and adolescents with ASD (Mage  = 8.09 years, SD = 4.28; 119 males) completed an early developmental milestones questionnaire and the Social Responsiveness Scale as a measure of Insistence on Sameness (IS) and Repetitive Mannerisms (RM). Two hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to test whether RM and IS behaviors were predicted by early motor milestones, or current toe walking. The final model predicting RM accounted for 15% of the variance (F = 3.02, p = .009), with toe walking as a unique and independent predictor of RM scores (t = 3.568, p = .001). The final model predicting IS accounted for 19.1% of variance in IS scores (F = 4.045, p = .001), with chronological age (CA) (t = 2.92, p = .004), age when first standing (t = 2.09, p = .038), and toe walking (t = 2.53, p = .013) as unique independent predictors. Toe walking (t = 2.4, p = .018) and age when first sitting (t = 2.08, p = .04) predicted the severity of RRBs on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (F = 2.334, p = .036). Our study replicates previous findings on the relationship between concurrent motor impairments and RRBs, and provides the first evidence for the association between RRBs and age of attainment of early motor milestones. Autism Res 2017. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Developmental screening and detection of developmental delays in infants and toddlers with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirrett, Penny L; Bailey, Donald B; Roberts, Jane E; Hatton, Deborah D

    2004-02-01

    Three developmental screening tests (the Denver-II, Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test, and Early Language Milestone Scale-2) were administered to 18 infants and toddlers (13 boys and 5 girls) with confirmed diagnoses of fragile X syndrome as part of a comprehensive developmental assessment at 9, 12, and 18 months of age. The Denver-II identified delays for 10 of 11 boys at 9 months of age and the Denver-II and the Early Language Milestone Scale-2 identified delays in 100% of the boys at 12 and 18 months. The Battelle Developmental Inventory Screening Test identified delays in 75% of the children at 12 and 18 months. When compared with more comprehensive developmental tests (Mullen Scales of Early Learning and Receptive-Expressive Emergent Language Scale-2), the screening tests concurred at least 76% of the time at the 12- and 18-month assessments. These results indicate that developmental delays could be detected in most children with fragile X syndrome through routine developmental screening by the age of 9 to 12 months.

  6. Developmental profiles from the Battelle developmental inventory: a comparison of toddlers diagnosed with Down Syndrome, global developmental delay and premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L; Hess, Julie A; Sipes, Megan; Horovitz, Max

    2010-01-01

    Developmental profiles and milestone attainment have been examined for children suffering from various developmental disabilities. However, research comparing the same across numerous developmental disabilities is scant. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine the developmental profiles of toddlers (i.e. aged 17-34 months) who were premature, diagnosed with Down Syndrome, or diagnosed with Global Developmental Delay. A total of 28 toddlers met inclusion criteria for the study. Those diagnosed with Global Developmental Delay or Down Syndrome scored significantly lower on the Battelle Developmental Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-2), compared to those who were born premature. More specifically, differences emerged on the BDI-2 domains of personal-social and motor. Implications of these findings and directions for future research are discussed.

  7. Screening for developmental delay in the setting of a community pediatric clinic: a prospective assessment of parent-report questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydz, David; Srour, Myriam; Oskoui, Maryam; Marget, Nancy; Shiller, Mitchell; Birnbaum, Rena; Majnemer, Annette; Shevell, Michael I

    2006-10-01

    Our goal for this study was to prospectively test whether parent-completed questionnaires can be effectively used in the setting of a busy ambulatory pediatric clinic to accurately screen for developmental impairments. Specific objectives included (1) assessing the feasibility of using parent-report instruments in the setting of a community pediatric clinic, (2) evaluating the accuracy of 2 available screening tests (the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and Child Development Inventory), and (3) ascertaining if the pediatrician's clinical judgment could be used as a potential modifier. Subjects were recruited from the patient population of a community clinic providing primary ambulatory pediatric care. Subjects without previous developmental delay or concerns noted were contacted at the time of their routine 18-month-old visit. Those subjects who agreed to participate were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups and completed either the Ages and Stages Questionnaire or Child Development Inventory. The child's pediatrician also completed a brief questionnaire regarding his or her opinion of the child's development. Those children for whom concerns were identified by either questionnaire underwent additional detailed testing by the Battelle Development Inventory, the "gold standard" for the purposes of this study. An equal number of children scoring within the norms of the screening measures also underwent testing with the Battelle Development Inventory. Of the 356 parents contacted, 317 parents (90%) agreed to participate. Most parents correctly completed the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (81%) and the Child Development Inventory (75%). Predictive values were calculated for the Ages and Stages Questionnaire and the Child Development Inventory (sensitivity: 0.67 and 0.50; specificity: 0.39 and 0.86; positive predictive value: 34% and 50%; negative predictive value: 71% and 86%, respectively). Incorporating the physician's opinion regarding the developmental status of the

  8. Brief report: Assessing youth well-being in global emergency settings: Early results from the Emergency Developmental Assets Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Peter C; Roehlkepartain, Eugene C; Wallace, Teresa; Inselman, Ashley; Stephenson, Paul; Rodriguez, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The 13-item Emergency Developmental Assets Profile measures the well-being of children and youth in emergency settings such as refugee camps and armed conflict zones, assessing whether young people are experiencing adequate positive relationships and opportunities, and developing positive values, skills, and self-perceptions, despite being in crisis circumstances. The instrument was found to have acceptable and nearly identical internal consistency reliability in 22 administrations in non-emergency samples in 15 countries (.75), and in 4 samples of youth ages 10-18 (n = 1550) in the emergency settings (war refugees and typhoon victims, .74) that are the measure's focus, and evidence of convergent validity. Confirmatory Factor Analysis showed acceptable model fit among those youth in emergency settings. Measures of model fit showed that the Em-DAP has configural and metric invariance across all emergency contexts and scalar invariance across some. The Em-DAP is a promising brief cross-cultural tool for assessing the developmental quality of life as reported by samples of youth in a current humanitarian crisis situation. The results can help to inform international relief program decisions about services and activities to be provided for children, youth, and families in emergency settings.

  9. Visual Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT) Uncertainty Analysis (Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, A.; Lewandowski, A.; Wendelin, T.

    2010-10-01

    In 1997, an uncertainty analysis was conducted of the Video Scanning Hartmann Optical Tester (VSHOT). In 2010, we have completed a new analysis, based primarily on the geometric optics of the system, and it shows sensitivities to various design and operational parameters. We discuss sources of error with measuring devices, instrument calibrations, and operator measurements for a parabolic trough mirror panel test. These help to guide the operator in proper setup, and help end-users to understand the data they are provided. We include both the systematic (bias) and random (precision) errors for VSHOT testing and their contributions to the uncertainty. The contributing factors we considered in this study are: target tilt; target face to laser output distance; instrument vertical offset; laser output angle; distance between the tool and the test piece; camera calibration; and laser scanner. These contributing factors were applied to the calculated slope error, focal length, and test article tilt that are generated by the VSHOT data processing. Results show the estimated 2-sigma uncertainty in slope error for a parabolic trough line scan test to be +/-0.2 milliradians; uncertainty in the focal length is +/- 0.1 mm, and the uncertainty in test article tilt is +/- 0.04 milliradians.

  10. Risk Analysis and Decision Making FY 2013 Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Dale, Crystal; Jones, Edward; Thompson, J.

    2013-06-01

    Risk analysis and decision making is one of the critical objectives of CCSI, which seeks to use information from science-based models with quantified uncertainty to inform decision makers who are making large capital investments. The goal of this task is to develop tools and capabilities to facilitate the development of risk models tailored for carbon capture technologies, quantify the uncertainty of model predictions, and estimate the technical and financial risks associated with the system. This effort aims to reduce costs by identifying smarter demonstrations, which could accelerate development and deployment of the technology by several years.

  11. NSTX Report on FES Joint Facilities Research Milestone 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maingi, R.; Ahn, J- W.; Gray, T. K.; McLean, A. G.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2011-03-24

    Annual Target: Conduct experiments on major fusion facilities to improve understanding of the heat transport in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, strengthening the basis for projecting divertor conditions in ITER. The divertor heat flux profiles and plasma characteristics in the tokamak scrape-off layer will be measured in multiple devices to investigate the underlying thermal transport processes. The unique characteristics of C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX will enable collection of data over a broad range of SOL and divertor parameters (e.g., collisionality ν*, beta β, parallel heat flux q||, and divertor geometry). Coordinated experiments using common analysis methods will generate a data set that will be compared with theory and simulation.

  12. 2006 B100 Quality Survey Results: Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.; Deutch, S.

    2007-05-01

    In 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a nationwide quality survey of pure biodiesel (B100) intended to be used as a blendstock. The study collected random samples throughout the United States and analyzed them for quality against the current and proposed ASTM D6751 fuel quality specifications.

  13. Release of inorganic material during coal devolatilization. Milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, L.L.

    1995-07-01

    Experimental results presented in this paper indicate that coal devolatilization products convectively remove a fraction of the nonvolatile components of inorganic material atomically dispersed in the coal matrix. Results from three facilities burning six different coals illustrate this mechanism of ash transformation and release from coal particles. Titanium is chosen to illustrate this type of mass release from coal particles on the basis of its low volatility and mode of occurrence in the coal. During moderate rates of devolatilization (10{sup 4} K/s heating rate), no significant loss of titanium is noted. At more rapid rates of heating/devolatilization (10{sup 5} K/s) a consistent but minor (3-4 %) loss of titanium is noted. During rapid devolatilization (5xl0{sup 5} K/s and higher), significant (10-20 %) amounts of titanium leave the coal. The loss of titanium monitored in coals ranging in rank from subbituminous to high-volatile bituminous coals and under conditions typical of pulverized-coal combustion. The amount of titanium lost during devolatilization exhibits a complex rank dependence. These results imply that other atomically dispersed material (alkali and alkaline earth elements) may undergo similar mechanisms of transformation and release.

  14. Speed of response characteristics of goalkeepers: a descriptive and developmental report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, G D; Moyls, P W

    1979-03-01

    Photoelectric cells and accelerometers enabled the measurement of reaction, movement and total response times of the limbs of representative goalkeepers (N = 12) from five levels of organized hockey, under simple and choice test conditions. Speed of response characteristics fundamental to success at these levels of competition and the developmental improvement, which must occur annually to permit progress through the goalkeeping hierarchy, were suggested. The point at which the beginner's "reaction-type" pattern of goaltending must be augmented with "anticipation-type" behavior was explored. The concept that the ability to react and move is specific to the direction of the response was upheld at all levels of investigation. Standard deviation of the RT/MT/TRT's of each group reflected the degree of variability of performance that is tolerable at each level. This variability generally decreased with each ascending level within both testing conditions, with the exception of the CRT measures. Data collected over a two year period, for four subjects, revealed that the most evident longitudinal changes occurred in MT and that the youngest player experienced the greatest degree of overall improvement.

  15. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of acetone in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Stoney, K.H.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1988-11-01

    Acetone, an aliphatic ketone, is a ubiquitous industrial solvent and chemical intermediate; consequently, the opportunity for human exposure is high. The potential for acetone to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 0, 440, 2200, or 11000 ppm, and in Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed to 0, 440, 2200, and 6600 ppm acetone vapors, 6 h/day, 7 days/week. Each of the four treatment groups consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.32 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 46 refs., 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of n-hexane in rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.

    1987-12-01

    The straight chain hydrocarbon, n-hexane, is a volatile, ubiquitous solvent used in industrial, academic, and smaller commercial environments. The significant opportunity for women of child-bearing age to be exposed to this chemical prompted the undertaking of a study to assess the developmental toxicity of n-hexane in an animal model. Timed-pregnant (30 animals per group) and virgin (10 animals per group) Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 0 (filtered air), 200, 1000, and 5000 ppM n-hexane (99.9% purity) vapor in inhalation chambers for 20 h/day for a period of 14 consecutive days. Sperm-positive females were exposed for 6 to 19 days of gestation (dg) and virgins were exposed concurrently for 14 consecutive days. The day of sperm detection was designated as 0 dg for mated females. Adult female body weights were monitored prior to, throughout the exposure period, and at sacrifice. Uterine, placental, and fetal body weights were obtained for gravid females at sacrifice. Implants were enumerated and their status recorded as live fetus, early or late resorption, or dead. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 16 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

  17. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of 1,3-butadiene in mice: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in CD-1 mice following whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200 and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female mice, which had mated with unexposed males were exposed to the chemical for 6 hours/day on 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 18 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11 and 18 dg; the mice were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. Significant concentration-related decreases were detected in a number of maternal body weight measures. There was a significant concentration-related depression of fetal body weights and placental weights. Body weights of male fetuses of all exposed groups were significantly lower than values for control fetuses; weights of female fetuses were significantly depressed in the mice exposed to 200 and 1000 ppM. In the 200- and 1000-ppM exposure groups, weights of placentas of male fetuses were significantly decreased, but placental weights of female fetuses were significantly affected only in litters exposed to the highest 1,3-butadiene concentration. This exposure regimen produced significant signs of maternal toxicity at concentrations of 200 and 1000 ppM 1,3-butadiene.

  18. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Using Primary Care Parenting Interventions to Improve Outcomes in Children with Developmental Disabilities: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Tellegen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parenting is central to the health and well-being of children. Children with developmental disabilities have been shown to be at increased risk of developing emotional and behavioral problems. Parent training programs are effective interventions for improving child behavior and family functioning. This paper describes the outcomes of a brief 4-session parenting intervention (Primary Care Stepping Stones Triple P targeting compliance and cooperative play skills in an 8-year-old girl with Asperger’s disorder and ADHD combined type. The intervention was associated with decreases in child behavior problems, increases in parenting confidence, and decreases in dysfunctional parenting styles. This paper demonstrates that low-intensity parenting interventions can lead to significant improvements in child behavior and family functioning. Such brief interventions are cost effective, can be widely disseminated, and have been designed to be delivered within primary health care settings. Pediatricians can play a key role in identifying parents in need of assistance and in helping them access evidence-based parenting interventions.

  20. Microwave-induced developmental defects in the common mealworm (Tenebrio molitor). A decade of research. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, R.G.

    1981-12-09

    Microwave-induced developmental effects in insects have been studied at several laboratories during the past decade. Results of the initial experiments were interpreted to show a 'nonthermal' microwave effect, but as more studies were conducted by various investigators, a predominantly thermal effect appeared to be the best explanation. This report presents the results of a comprehensive series of insect irradiation experiments including a rigorous statistical analysis of the data. Statistical analysis shows no microwave-induced effects for exposure of up to 4 hours at dose rates of 63 watts/kilogram. Irradiation at higher intensities (102-126 W/kg) did produce statistically significant effects when applied over a 2-4 hour period.

  1. Nutrition factors predict earlier acquisition of motor and language milestones among young children in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannotti, Lora; Jean Louis Dulience, Sherlie; Wolff, Patricia; Cox, Katherine; Lesorogol, Carolyn; Kohl, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    To examine the nutrition-related factors associated with motor and language development among young children living in a poor urban area of Haiti. Children aged 6-11 months (n = 583) were enrolled and followed monthly for one year. World Health Organization motor developmental milestones and vowel and consonant counts were assessed. Longitudinal regression models were applied to assess the association of anthropometric, dietary intake, infectious disease morbidity and socio-economic and demographic factors on developmental outcomes. At baseline, 9.4% were stunted or length-for-age Z score language acquisition at each time point during infancy. Several nutrition factors significantly predicted earlier achievement of motor and language development outcomes in longitudinal models: child anthropometry; breastfeeding and complementary feeding frequencies; dietary diversity; egg and oil intake; and reduced infectious disease morbidities. Increases in the length-for-age Z score significantly predicted all motor and language outcomes and yielded the best fit models compared to other anthropometric indicators (p < 0.001). Child development interventions may be enhanced by incorporating nutrition strategies such as improved diet quality, breastfeeding promotion and diarrhoeal disease mitigation. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Parent Report and Actigraphically Defined Sleep in Children with and without Developmental Coordination Disorder; Links with Fatigue and Sleepiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luci Wiggs

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Impaired sleep is associated with negative effects on quality of life and daytime functioning. Higher rates of sleep disturbance are reported in children with various developmental disorders. However, little is known about sleep in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD, a condition characterized by everyday movement difficulties. Previously, in a preliminary study, we found higher rates of parent-reported sleep disturbance in children with DCD compared to controls. Aims: To examine sleep in DCD using objective measures and to examine links with daytime fatigue and sleepiness. Methods: Two groups (primary and secondary school-aged of 15 children with DCD, plus matched controls, participated. Parent reported child sleep was assessed using the Children’s Sleep Habits Questionnaire and actigraphy provided an objective measure of sleep-wake patterns over one week (including weekdays and weekend. Pediatric Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS Semi-Structured Diagnostic Interview was conducted with each child and parent to capture symptoms of RLS. Aspects of self-rated child functioning were assessed with questionnaires (Pre-sleep Arousal Scale, Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale, PedsQL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale and mothers’ reported thoughts about child sleep with the Maternal Cognitions about Infant Sleep Questionnaire.Results: The DCD groups had greater parent-reported sleep disturbance. Actigraphy results suggested that for secondary aged children with DCD their sleep quality was impaired and there were differences in the timing of sleep compared to controls (including some differences in the variation between weekday and weekend sleep times. The actigraphy of the primary age group with DCD was unremarkable compared to controls. No child in the study met the criteria for RLS. Exploratory analyses suggested that daytime fatigue, aspects of pre-sleep arousal and daytime sleepiness were reported as greater in the DCD

  3. Inhalation developmental toxicology studies of 1,3-butadiene in the rat: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, P.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Mast, T.J.; Brown, M.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Clark, M.L.; Decker, J.R.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Rowe, S.E.; Westerberg, R.B.

    1987-11-01

    Maternal toxicity, reproductive performance and developmental toxicology were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley-derived rats during and following 6 hours/day, whole-body, inhalation exposures to 0, 40, 200, and 1000 ppM of 1,3-butadiene. The female rats (Ns = 24 to 28), which had mated with unexposed males, were exposed to the chemical from 6 through 15 dg and sacrificed on 20 dg. Maternal animals were weighed prior to mating and on 0, 6, 11, 16 and 20 dg; the rats were observed for mortality, morbidity and signs of toxicity during exposure and examined for gross tissue abnormalities at necropsy. Live fetuses were weighed and subjected to external, visceral and skeletal examinations to detect growth retardation and morphologic anomalies. There were no significant differences among treatment groups in maternal body weights or extragestational weights of rats exposed to 1,3-butadiene concentrations of 40 or 200 ppM, but, in animals exposed to 1000 ppM, significantly depressed body weight gains were observed during the first 5 days of exposure and extragestational weight gains tended to be lower than control values. These results, and the absence of clinical signs of toxicity, were considered to indicate that there was no maternal toxicity at exposure levels of 200 ppM or lower. The percentage of pregnant animals and the number of litters with live fetuses were unaffected by treatment. Under the conditions of this exposure regimen, there was no evidence for a teratogenic response to 1,3-butadiene exposure.

  4. Developmental Prosopagnosia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kress

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the published literature on developmental prosopagnosia, a condition in which the ability to recognize other persons by facial information alone has never been acquired. Due to the very low incidence of this syndrome, case reports are sparse. We review the available data and suggest assessment strategies for patients suffering from developmental prosopagnosia. It is suggested that developmental prosopagnosia is not a unitary condition but rather consists of different subforms that can be dissociated on the grounds of functional impairments. On the basis of the available evidence, hypotheses about the aetiology of developmental prosopagnosia as well as about the selectivity of deficits related to face recognition are discussed.

  5. Parent-Reported Developmental Regression in Autism: Epilepsy, IQ, Schizophrenia Spectrum Symptoms, and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Perlman, Greg; Weber, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Examined the psychiatric and clinical correlates of loss of previously acquired skills (regression) as reported by parents of youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Study sample comprised 6- to 18-year old (N = 213) children and adolescents with ASD. Parents reported regression in 77 (36%) youth. A more homogeneous subgroup with regression…

  6. Milestones toward Majorana-based quantum computing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishmash, Ryan V.; Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and readout of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate-control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current; (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit; and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and readout schemes as well.

  7. Case report of 5 siblings: malnutrition? Rickets? DiGeorge syndrome? Developmental delay?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris William

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents of six children are facing a trial on charges of aggravated manslaughter in the care a 5 1/2 month old infant who died suddenly and neglect of their four older children for causing them to be malnourished by feeding them all an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. Both parents declined plea bargains and plan to defend themselves in court. Case presentation The fifth child born to a married couple was breast-fed until 2 1/2 months. Subsequently, the parents fed the baby an exclusively raw foods diet prepared in a blender at home. The four older children, ages 18 months – 6 1/2 years also ate an exclusively raw foods vegan diet. None of the four older children had significant previous injuries or serious illnesses. At autopsy, the infant weighed 3180 mg (6.99 pounds and appeared emaciated. The thymus gland was absent and parathyroid glands were not located. The lungs were "congested." DiGeorge anomaly cannot be ruled out from these findings. Although, the coroner ruled that "malnutrition" was the sole cause of death, malnutrition, according to the World Health Organization definition, cannot be diagnosed in this infant. Compared with standard growth charts, the older children fell 2.1–4.1 standard deviations below the mean for North American children in height and weight. Labs were normal except for a low cholesterol level in all and a low prealbumin in one of three children tested. Therefore, malnutrition cannot be diagnosed in these children. The pediatrician diagnosed rickets in the four-year-old. However, chest x-rays were normal in all and long bone x-rays showed minimal changes in one child – no sign of rickets. The clinical diagnosis of rickets was not confirmed by the Center for Disease Control's criteria. A psychologist diagnosed the 18-month-old as developmentally delayed to the level of a 15-month-old, but this diagnosis is questionable. Conclusion The raw foods vegan diet and possibly inherited small

  8. Historical milestones and discoveries that shaped the toxicology sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Antoinette N; Gilbert, Steven G

    2009-01-01

    Knowledge of the toxic and healing properties of plants, animals, and minerals has shaped civilization for millennia. The foundations of modern toxicology are built upon the significant milestones and discoveries of serendipity and crude experimentation. Throughout the ages, toxicological science has provided information that has shaped and guided society. This chapter examines the development of the discipline of toxicology and its influence on civilization by highlighting significant milestones and discoveries related to toxicology. The examples shed light on the beginnings of toxicology, as well as examine lessons learned and re-learned. This chapter also examines how toxicology and the toxicologist have interacted with other scientific and cultural disciplines, including religion, politics, and the government. Toxicology has evolved to a true scientific discipline with its own dedicated scientists, educational institutes, sub-disciplines, professional societies, and journals. It now stands as its own entity while traversing such fields as chemistry, physiology, pharmacology, and molecular biology. We invite you to join us on a path of discovery and to offer our suggestions as to what are the most significant milestones and discoveries in toxicology. Additional information is available on the history section of Toxipedia (www.toxipedia.org).

  9. Integrating the NAS Milestones and handheld technology to improve residency training and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Carisa M; Redett, Richard J; Dorafshar, Amir H; Zarrabi, Bahar; Lifchez, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    To incorporate the use of an intuitive and robust assessment tool in conjunction with the Next Accreditation System Milestones to maximize opportunities for trainee performance feedback and continuous trainee assessment, with the long-term goal of increasing the rate of performance improvement and mastery of knowledge and surgical skills. Pilot study. Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Primary, tertiary, and quaternary clinical care; institutional environment. Experimental group: two randomly selected postgraduate year-1 integrated training program residents per year for 2 consecutive years from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. traditionally trained residents from the integrated training program in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Study duration: 7 years (until residents complete residency training). This assessment strategy would create large amounts of informative data on trainees, which can be cross-referenced to determine trainee progress. Assessment data would be collected continuously from all faculty surgeons. Comparisons of faculty and resident self-assessments would facilitate resident evaluations. Ease of use of the data collection structure would improve faculty evaluation compliance and timely resident case report completion. Improving the efficiency and efficacy of competency documentation is critical. Using portable technologies is an intuitive way to improve the trainee assessment process. We anticipate that this 2-pronged approach to trainee assessments would quickly provide large amounts of informative data to better assess trainee progress and inform Milestone assessments in a manner that facilitates immediate feedback. Assessments of faculty and resident satisfaction would help us further refine the assessment process as needed. If successful, this format could easily be implemented by other training programs. Innovations in Surgical Education: Milestones. © 2013 Published by Association of Program

  10. NTP-CERHR EXPERT PANEL REPORT ON THE REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ACRYLAMIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Toxicology Program Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (NTP-CERHR) convened an expert panel in May 2004 to evaluate acrylamide. The report of the expert panel, prepared in accordance with CERHR Guidelines, provides a detailed summary of all publi...

  11. Increased Intensity of Physical Therapy for a Child with Gross Motor Developmental Delay: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The intensity of physical therapy provided for children in early intervention (EI) programs may be influenced by a number of factors. In an individualized program, however, some children and families may benefit from an increased frequency of services. The purpose of this case report was to systematically document and…

  12. NTP-CERHR EXPERT PANEL REPORT ON THE REPRODUCTIVE AND DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF ACRYLAMIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Toxicology Program Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction (NTP-CERHR) convened an expert panel in May 2004 to evaluate acrylamide. The report of the expert panel, prepared in accordance with CERHR Guidelines, provides a detailed summary of all publi...

  13. SOUTHWESTERN STATES DEVELOPMENTAL PROJECT RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF ADULT AGRICULTURAL MIGRANTS. THE ARIZONA REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOORE, HAROLD E.; SCHUFLETOWSKI, CHARLES

    A STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL NEEDS OF MIGRANTS WAS CONDUCTED FROM SEPTEMBER THROUGH DECEMBER, 1964, IN ARIZONA, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, AND TEXAS. THIS REPORT, CONCERNED WITH THE ARIZONA STUDY, IDENTIFIED THE MOST COMPLICATED PROBLEM AS THE LACK OF A COORDINATED ATTACK ON MIGRANT SOCIAL, ECONOMIC, HEALTH, AND EDUCATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS BY LOCAL, STATE, AND…

  14. Determine Operating Reactor to Use for the 2016 PCI Level 1 Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-30

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) (CASL) Level 1 milestone to “Assess the analysis capability for core-wide [pressurized water reactor] PWR Pellet- Clad Interaction (PCI) screening and demonstrate detailed 3-D analysis on selected sub-region” (L1:CASL.P13.03) requires a particular type of nuclear power plant for the assessment. This report documents the operating reactor and cycles chosen for this assessment in completion of the physics integration (PHI) milestone to “Determine Operating Reactor to use for PCI L1 Milestone” (L3:PHI.CMD.P12.02). Watts Bar Unit 1 experienced (at least) one fuel rod failure in each of cycles 6 and 7, and at least one was deemed to be duty related rather than being primarily related to a manufacturing defect or grid effects. This brief report documents that the data required to model cycles 1–12 of Watts Bar Unit 1 using VERA-CS contains sufficient data to model the PHI portion of the PCI challenge problem. A list of additional data needs is also provided that will be important for verification and validation of the BISON results.

  15. Parent-Reported Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Symptomatology in Preschool-Aged Children: Factor Structure, Developmental Change, and Early Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willoughby, Michael T.; Pek, Jolynn; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Although Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has increasingly been studied in preschool-aged children, relatively few studies have provided a comprehensive evaluation of the factor structure and patterns of developmental changes in parent-reported ADHD symptomatology across the early childhood period. This study used confirmatory…

  16. Using a Faculty Survey of College-Level Reading and Writing Requirements To Revise Developmental Reading and Writing Objectives. Kellogg Institute Final Report, Practicum 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarusso, Kathleen

    The report discusses the findings of a study on the reading and writing demands of college-level courses at Maryland's Charles County Community College (College of Southern Maryland as of July 1, 2000). The Language and Literature Department wanted to determine whether its developmental courses were actually preparing students for the reading and…

  17. Toward Mastery Leadership in Access, Assessment, and Developmental Education: Summary Report of a Colloquium Held in Traverse City, Michigan, July, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, John S., Ed.; Floyd, Deborah L., Ed.

    In July 1986, a colloquium was convened to develop a position paper on access, assessment, and developmental education. This colloquium report contains the keynote speeches presented at the event, along with a statement developed by the participants regarding the issues. First, introductory material describes the purposes, sponsorship, and group…

  18. Self-Reports of Increased Prospective and Retrospective Memory Problems in Adults with Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Spark, James H; Zięcik, Adam P; Sterling, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Short-term and working memory problems in dyslexia are well-documented, but other memory domains have received little empirical scrutiny, despite some evidence to suggest that they might be impaired. Prospective memory is memory for delayed intentions, whilst retrospective memory relates to memory for personally experienced past events. To gain an understanding of subjective everyday memory experience, a self-report measure designed to tap prospective and retrospective memory was administered to 28 adults with dyslexia and 26 IQ-matched adults without dyslexia. Adults with dyslexia reported experiencing significantly more frequent problems with memory than the adults without dyslexia. Group differences were found across seven out of the eight questionnaire scales. Further to these analyses, the participants' own ratings were compared with proxy ratings provided by close associates. The perception of poorer memory abilities in the participants did not differ between respondent types. The self-reported difficulties are, thus, unlikely to be the result of lowered self-esteem or metacognitive awareness. More frequent difficulties with both types of memory would seem, therefore, to be experienced by adults with dyslexia in everyday life. Further laboratory-based research is recommended to explore both memory domains in dyslexia and to identify the cognitive mechanisms by which these problems occur. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Developmental research study of coal-fines agglomeration for fixed-bed gasification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmquist, S.A.; Girimont, J.A.; Korosi, F.A.; Kuby, O.A.; Nelson, S.G.; Paulin, M.O.; Peterson, C.A.; Baker, R.L.; Saller, E.

    1983-05-31

    This report presents the results of an intensive program to develop and evaluate agglomerates made from coal fines for use in a fixed-bed gasifier. There were several tasks completed earlier and their results published prior to this final report. These included: Task 1-A, a literature survey of coal agglomeration, binders and techniques used in coal agglomeration, coal and binder treatments and the results of work done by others; Task 1-B, an examination of performance of lump coals in coal gasification, testing and evaluation of the properties of these coals, and evaluation of mine site coal upgrading methods; and Task 1-C/D, a laboratory investigation of coal agglomerates, including wafers, briquettes and pellets, in which the agglomerated coal fines were formed and tested, and the performance of various coal/binder combinations was recorded and evaluated, and factors affecting commercial scale coal agglomeration and gasification were evaluated. These three prior tasks are presented in this report in condensed form.

  20. A Process Evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity. Interim Report II, Part A: Program Case Studies. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lynn, Ed.

    These 8 case studies are part of a series of documents on the evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity (PDC), a Head Start demonstration program aimed at providing educational and developmental continuity between children's Head Start and primary school experiences. Each case study reviews the planning year at a PDC demonstration site in one…

  1. A Process Evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity. Interim Report II, Part A: Program Case Studies. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Lynn, Ed.

    These 7 case studies are part of a series of documents on the evaluation of Project Developmental Continuity (PDC), a Head Start demonstration program aimed at providing educational and developmental continuity between children's Head Start and primary school experiences. Each case study reviews the planning year at a PDC demonstration site in one…

  2. Inherited partial direct duplication of 11q: First report and possible association with a midline developmental field defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witt, D.R.; Jenkins, L.; Pinheiro, S. [Kaiser Permanente, San Jose, CA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A 36-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis for advanced maternal age. The fetal karyotype had an extra dark staining G band on the long arm of chromosome 11 with no other identifiable abnormalities. FISH studies using a chromosome 11 paint probe confirmed the origin of the extra band. The abnormality was identified as a partial duplication of 11q: 46,XX dir dup (11)(q13.5q21) or (q21q23.1). The specific duplicated band could not be identified with certainty. Detailed fetal sonograms were normal. Family studies revealed the identical duplication in the mother but normal karyotypes in both maternal grandparents. The mother had strabismus and a short tongue frenulum which required surgical correction. Menses occurred late in adolescence and complete development of secondary sexual characteristics was delayed until adulthood. An infertility evaluation revealed duplication of the uterus, cervix, and vagina. An evaluation for metorrhagia identified a pituitary adenoma which was resected. Her intelligence was normal. To our knowledge this is the first report of a heritable direct duplication of 11q. It is possible that one or more gene in the duplicated segment played a causal role in the pathophysiology of the patient`s anomalies through a disturbance of the so-called {open_quotes}midline developmental field{close_quotes}. Alternatively, the cytogenetic findings could be unrelated to the malformations. Rare instances of partial gain or loss of specific late-replicating heterochromatic regions without phenotypic effect have been reported. This region of 11q is also relatively late-replicating. This is consistent with previous reports suggesting a paucity of expressed genes in this 11q region. Molecular studies of the duplication are underway to determine the specific location and extent of duplication. Phenotypic evaluation of the patient`s baby will also be reported.

  3. Immunizations and Developmental Milestones for Your Child from Birth Through 6 Years Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mom or dad leaves n Says “mama” and “dada” n Copies gestures (for ex- ample, waves “bye ... a couple of words other than "mama" and "dada" n Points to show others something interesting n ...

  4. Developmental test report, assessment of XT-70E percussion drill rig operation in tank farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougherty, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-10

    The following report documents the testing of the XT-70E percussion drill rig for use in the 241-SX Tank Farm. The test is necessary to support evaluation of the safety and authorization level of the proposed activity of installing up to three new drywells in the 241- SX Tank Farm. The proposed activity plans to install drywells by percussion drilling 7 inch O.D./6 inch I.D. pipe in close proximity of underground storage tanks and associated equipment. The load transmitted from the drill rig`s percussion hammer through the ground to the tank structure and equipment is not known and therefore testing is required to ensure the activity is safe and authorized.

  5. Analyzing milestoning networks for molecular kinetics: definitions, algorithms, and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanath, Shruthi; Kreuzer, Steven M; Cardenas, Alfredo E; Elber, Ron

    2013-11-07

    Network representations are becoming increasingly popular for analyzing kinetic data from techniques like Milestoning, Markov State Models, and Transition Path Theory. Mapping continuous phase space trajectories into a relatively small number of discrete states helps in visualization of the data and in dissecting complex dynamics to concrete mechanisms. However, not only are molecular networks derived from molecular dynamics simulations growing in number, they are also getting increasingly complex, owing partly to the growth in computer power that allows us to generate longer and better converged trajectories. The increased complexity of the networks makes simple interpretation and qualitative insight of the molecular systems more difficult to achieve. In this paper, we focus on various network representations of kinetic data and algorithms to identify important edges and pathways in these networks. The kinetic data can be local and partial (such as the value of rate coefficients between states) or an exact solution to kinetic equations for the entire system (such as the stationary flux between vertices). In particular, we focus on the Milestoning method that provides fluxes as the main output. We proposed Global Maximum Weight Pathways as a useful tool for analyzing molecular mechanism in Milestoning networks. A closely related definition was made in the context of Transition Path Theory. We consider three algorithms to find Global Maximum Weight Pathways: Recursive Dijkstra's, Edge-Elimination, and Edge-List Bisection. The asymptotic efficiency of the algorithms is analyzed and numerical tests on finite networks show that Edge-List Bisection and Recursive Dijkstra's algorithms are most efficient for sparse and dense networks, respectively. Pathways are illustrated for two examples: helix unfolding and membrane permeation. Finally, we illustrate that networks based on local kinetic information can lead to incorrect interpretation of molecular mechanisms.

  6. Retrospective reports of developmental stressors, syndemics, and their association with sexual risk outcomes among gay men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulloch, Tyler G; Rotondi, Nooshin K; Ing, Stanley; Myers, Ted; Calzavara, Liviana M; Loutfy, Mona R; Hart, Trevor A

    2015-10-01

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) continue to have a disproportionately higher HIV incidence than any other group in Canada and the United States. This study examined how multiple co-occurring psychosocial problems, also known as a syndemic, contribute to high-risk sexual behavior among GBM. It also examined the impact of early life adversity on high-risk sexual behavior as mediated by syndemic severity. A sample of 239 GBM completed self-report questionnaires at baseline and 6-month follow-up. Syndemic variables included depression, polysubstance use, and intimate partner violence. Early life adversity variables measured retrospectively included physical and verbal bullying by peers and physical and sexual abuse by adults. A Cochran-Armitage trend test revealed a proportionate increase between number of syndemic problems and engagement in high-risk sex (p indirect effects of two types of early life adversity on high-risk sex via syndemic severity: verbal bullying by peers and physical abuse by adults. There was also an overall effect of physical bullying by peers on high-risk sexual behavior, but no specific direct or indirect effects were observed. Consistent with syndemic theory, results provide evidence that certain types of early life adversity impact high-risk sex later in life via syndemic problems. Behavioral interventions to reduce sexual risk among GBM should address anti-gay discrimination experienced before adulthood as well as adult psychological problems.

  7. The Fifth Milestone in the Development of Chinese Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja PETROVČIČ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chinese language has changed drastically in the recent century. Papers on the language development mainly stress four big events in the Chinese history that imposed changes in language, i.e. The May Fourth Movement (1919, establishment of the People’s Republic of China (1949, Cultural Revolution (1966, and China’s reform and opening (1978. According to the features of recent neologisms, we suggest that the widening gap between rich and poor should be considered as the fifth milestone for changes in Chinese language.

  8. Timing of motor milestones achievement and development of overweight in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo; Due, P;

    2014-01-01

    on motor milestones and childhood overweight is limited and results are inconsistent. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: Weight status in early life and timing of achievement of gross motor milestones (the ability to sit and walk) are largely independent of each other. Timing of achievement of motor milestones in early...... life does not predict overweight or increased BMI later in childhood. BACKGROUND: Overweight may hinder achievement of gross motor milestones and delayed achievement of milestones may increase the risk of later overweight for reasons involving physical activity and the building of lean body mass....... OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether increased birth weight and body mass index (BMI) at 5 months is associated with the achievement of the ability to sit up and walk and whether delayed achievement of these milestones is associated with overweight at age 7 years. METHODS: We used data from the Danish National...

  9. Iodine status and associations with feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development in six-month-old South African infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei, Jennifer; Baumgartner, Jeannine; Rothman, Marinel; Matsungo, Tonderayi M; Covic, Namukolo; Faber, Mieke; Smuts, Cornelius M

    2016-12-28

    Iodine is important for normal growth and psychomotor development. While infants below 6 months of age receive iodine from breast milk or fortified infant formula, the introduction of complementary foods poses a serious risk for deteriorating iodine status. This cross-sectional analysis assessed the iodine status of six-month-old South African infants and explored its associations with feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development. Iodine concentrations were measured in infant (n = 386) and maternal (n = 371) urine (urinary iodine concentration [UIC]), and in breast milk (n = 257 [breast milk iodine concentrations]). Feeding practices and psychomotor milestone development were assessed in all infants. The median (25th-75th percentile) UIC in infants was 345 (213-596) μg/L and was significantly lower in stunted (302 [195-504] μg/L) than non-stunted (366 [225-641] μg/L) infants. Only 6.7% of infants were deficient. Maternal UIC (128 [81-216] μg/L; rs  = 0.218, p psychomotor developmental scores were observed. Our results suggest that iodine intake in the studied six-month-old infants was adequate. Iodine in breast milk and commercial infant cereals potentially contributed to this adequate intake.

  10. Predicting real-world functional milestones in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Anna-Karin; Hjärthag, Fredrik; Helldin, Lars

    2016-08-30

    Schizophrenia is a severe disorder that often causes impairments in major areas of functioning, and most patients do not achieve expected real-world functional milestones. The aim of this study was to identify which variables of demography, illness activity, and functional capacity predict patients' ability to attain real-world functional milestones. Participants were 235 outpatients, 149 men and 86 women, diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorder. Our results showed that younger patients managed to achieve a higher level of functioning in educational level, marital status, and social contacts. Patients' functional capacity was primarily associated with educational level and housing situation. We also found that women needed less support regarding housing and obtained a higher level of marital status as compared with men. Our findings demonstrate the importance of considering current symptoms, especially negative symptoms, and remission stability over time, together with age, duration of illness, gender, educational level, and current functional capacity, when predicting patients' future real-world functioning. We also conclude that there is an advantage in exploring symptoms divided into positive, negative, and general domains considering their probable impact on functional achievements.

  11. OUTLINING THE WINDOWS OF ACHIEVEMENT OF INTERSUBJECTIVE MILESTONES IN TYPICALLY DEVELOPING TODDLERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadurní Brugué, Marta; Pérez Burriel, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Babies are born with an innate drive or intrinsic motive formation with which to communicate and share meanings with others and that some authors have called intersubjectivity (S. Bråten & C. Trevarthen, 2007; C. Trevarthen, 1974, 2001). Around the ninth month of life, this motivation changes and passes from a person-to-person dyadic (primary intersubjectivity) to a person-person-object relationship (secondary intersubjectivity). S. Bråten and C. Trevarthen (2007) also proposed a third form or layer of intersubjectivity known as tertiary intersubjectivity. One hundred fifteen free-play sessions of 27 mother-child dyads (13 girls and 14 boys ages 9-37 months) were filmed and categorized using the Level of Intersubjective Attunement Scale (LISA-T; M. Pérez Burriel & M. Sadurní Brugué, 2014; M. Sadurní Brugué & M. Pérez Burriel, 2012). Results from these nine hierarchical levels are presented, following a developmental sequence or population trajectory around an interindividual variability. In this article, we propose viewing these age-related levels as windows of achievement of intersubjective milestones. The statistical analysis suggested a redesign of the LISA-T levels of intersubjectivity; thus, results from this redesign and the debate on the implications of these transitions in infant mental health development are presented.

  12. Parent-Reported Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Symptomatology in Preschool-Aged Children: Factor Structure, Developmental Change, and Early Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Willoughby, Michael T.; Pek, Jolynn; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Although Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has increasingly been studied in preschool-aged children, relatively few studies have provided a comprehensive evaluation of the factor structure and patterns of developmental changes in parent-reported ADHD symptomatology across the early childhood period. This study used confirmatory factor analyses to test for longitudinal measurement invariance of ADHD symptoms and semi-parametric finite mixture models to identify prototypic pattern...

  13. Developmental Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Michael Quinn

    1994-01-01

    Developmental evaluation is proposed as a term to describe certain long-term partnering relationships with clients who are, themselves, engaged in ongoing program development. Rather than a model, developmental evaluation is a relationship founded on a shared purpose and is a way of being useful in innovative settings. (SLD)

  14. Project Milestone. Analysis of Range Extension Techniques for Battery Electric Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Jeremy [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wood, Eric [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This report documents completion of the July 2013 milestone as part of NREL’s Vehicle Technologies Annual Operating Plan with the U.S. Department of Energy. The objective was to perform analysis on range extension techniques for battery electric vehicles (BEVs). This work represents a significant advancement over previous thru-life BEV analyses using NREL’s Battery Ownership Model, FastSim,* and DRIVE.* Herein, the ability of different charging infrastructure to increase achievable travel of BEVs in response to real-world, year-long travel histories is assessed. Effects of battery and cabin thermal response to local climate, battery degradation, and vehicle auxiliary loads are captured. The results reveal the conditions under which different public infrastructure options are most effective, and encourage continued study of fast charging and electric roadway scenarios.

  15. GTRF Calculations Using Hydra-TH (L3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakosi, Jozsef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nourgaliev, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    This report describes the work carried out for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A series of body-fitted computational meshes have been generated by Numeca's Hexpress/Hybrid, a.k.a. 'Spider', meshing technology for the V5H 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 rod bundle geometries and subsequently used to compute the fluid dynamics of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF). Spider is easy to use, fast, and automatically generates high-quality meshes for extremely complex geometries, required for the GTRF problem. Hydra-TH has been used to carry out large-eddy simulations on both 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 geometries, using different mesh resolutions. The results analyzed show good agreement with Star-CCM+ simulations and experimental data.

  16. Applying the milestones in an internal medicine residency program curriculum: a foundation for outcomes-based learner assessment under the next accreditation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Becky N; Vansaghi, Lisa M; Rigler, Sally K; Stites, Steven W

    2013-11-01

    In 2010, University of Kansas Medical Center internal medicine residency program leaders concluded that their competency-based curriculum and evaluation system was not sufficient to promote accurate assessment of learners' performance and needed revision to meet the requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Next Accreditation System (NAS). Evaluations of learners seldom referenced existing curricular goals and objectives and reflected an "everyone is exceptional, no one is satisfactory" view.The authors identified the American Board of Internal Medicine and ACGME's Developmental Milestones for Internal Medicine Residency Training as a published standard for resident development. They incorporated the milestones into templates, a format that could be modified for individual rotations. A milestones-based curriculum for each postgraduate year of training and every rotation was then created, with input from educational leaders within each division in the Department of Internal Medicine and with the support of the graduate medical education office.In this article, the authors share their implementation process, which took approximately one year, and discuss their current work to create a documentation system for direct observation of entrustable professional activities, with the aim of providing guidance to other programs challenged with developing an outcomes-based curriculum and assessment system within the time frame of the NAS.

  17. Identification of milestone papers through time-balanced network centrality

    CERN Document Server

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Citations between scientific papers and related bibliometric indices, such as the $h$-index for authors and the impact factor for journals, are being increasingly used -- often in controversial ways -- as quantitative tools for research evaluation. Yet, a fundamental research question remains still open: to which extent do quantitative metrics capture the significance of scientific works? We analyze the network of citations among the $449,935$ papers published by the American Physical Society (APS) journals between $1893$ and $2009$, and focus on the comparison of metrics built on the citation count with network-based metrics. We contrast five article-level metrics with respect to the rankings that they assign to a set of fundamental papers, called Milestone Letters, carefully selected by the APS editors for "making long-lived contributions to physics, either by announcing significant discoveries, or by initiating new areas of research". A new metric, which combines PageRank centrality with the explicit requi...

  18. Milestones in the discovery of antiviral agents: nucleosides and nucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik de Clercq

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, a number of milestones in the antiviral research field on nucleosides and nucleotides are reviewed in which the author played a significant part, especially in the initial stages of their development. Highlighted are the amino acyl esters of acyclovir, particularly valacyclovir (VACV, brivudin (BVDU and the valine ester of Cf1743 (FV-100, the 2′,3′-dideoxynucleosides (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, NRTIs, the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates (S-HPMPA, (S-HPMPC (cidofovir and alkoxyalkyl esters thereof (HDP-, ODE-CDV, adefovir and adefovir dipivoxil, tenofovir and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF, combinations containing TDF and emtricitabine, i.e., Truvada®, Atripla®, Complera®/Eviplera® and the Quad pill, and the phosphonoamidate derivatives GS-7340, GS-9131, GS-9191 and GS-9219.

  19. Collider baseline parameters: Milestone M1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Schulte, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The deliverable D1.1 provided a preliminary specification of the layout and target operation parameters for the FCC-hh hadron collider concept. It serves as the basis for the studies in all work packages. Tis milestone summarises the outcome of the first studies of this design. The goal of the FCC hadron collider is to provide proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 100 TeV. The machine is compatible with ion beam operation. Assuming a nominal dipole field of 16 T, such a machine is based on a perimeter of 100 km. The machine is designed to accommodate two main proton experiments that are operated simultaneously. The machine delivers a peak luminosity of 5-30 x 1034 cm-2s-1. The layout allows for two additional special-purpose experiments.

  20. EPA Interim Evaluation of 2012-2013 Milestone Progress in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides the EPA interim evaluations of the 2012-2013 milestones for the Chesapeake Bay TMDL. These interim assessments provide a mid-point check on the progress made on the 2012-2013 milestones, recognizing the achievements made in 2012.

  1. A Process for Curricular Improvement Based on Evaluation of Student Performance on Milestone Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Ann C.; Justice, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify and address areas for curricular improvement by evaluating student achievement of expected learning outcomes and competencies on annual milestone examinations. Design. Students were tested each professional year with a comprehensive milestone examination designed to evaluate student achievement of learning outcomes and professional competencies using a combination of multiple-choice questions, standardized patient assessments (SPAs), and objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) questions. Assessment. Based on student performance on milestone examinations, curricular changes were instituted, including an increased emphasis on graded comprehensive cases, OSCE skills days, and use of patient simulation in lecture and laboratory courses. After making these changes, significant improvements were observed in second and third-year pharmacy students’ grades for the therapeutic case and physician interaction/errors and omissions components of the milestone examinations. Conclusion. Results from milestone examinations can be used to identify specific areas in which curricular improvements are needed to foster student achievement of learning outcomes and professional competencies. PMID:28090108

  2. Self-Report Computer-Based Survey of Technology Use by People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Emily Shea; Palmer, Susan; Wehmeyer, Michael; Davies, Daniel K.; Stock, Steven E.; Lobb, Kathy; Bishop, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Advancements of technologies in the areas of mobility, hearing and vision, communication, and daily living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities has the potential to greatly enhance independence and self-determination. Previous research, however, suggests that there is a technological divide with regard to the use of such…

  3. Brief Report: Interpretation of Facial Expressions, Postures, and Gestures in Children with a Pervasive Developmental Disorder not Otherwise Specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, M.; Jackson, A. E.; van Geert, P. L. C.; Minderaa, R. B.

    1998-01-01

    A Dutch study failed to find differences in the ability of 31 normally intelligent children (ages 6-12) with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified and matched controls to recognize and label emotional states in various nonverbal expressive modalities, such as facial expressions, bodily postures, and gestures. (CR)

  4. Developmental Dyslexia: A Diagnostic Screening Procedure on Three Characteristic Patterns of Reading and Spelling. A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Elena

    A diagnostic screening procedure for developmental dyslexia which analyzes how a child reads and writes rather than at what level, is outlined. Briefly, the test entails a presentation of a word list at each reading level to determine the child's sight vocabulary and his ability to employ word-attack skills. Following the administration of the…

  5. Medical Student Core Clinical Ultrasound Milestones: A Consensus Among Directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Vi Am; Lakoff, Daniel; Hess, Jamie; Bahner, David P; Hoppmann, Richard; Blaivas, Michael; Pellerito, John S; Abuhamad, Alfred; Khandelwal, Sorabh

    2016-02-01

    Many medical schools are implementing point-of-care ultrasound in their curricula to help augment teaching of the physical examination, anatomy, and ultimately clinical management. However, point-of-care ultrasound milestones for medical students remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to formulate a consensus on core medical student clinical point-of-care ultrasound milestones across allopathic and osteopathic medical schools in the United States. Directors who are leading the integration of ultrasound in medical education (USMED) at their respective institutions were surveyed. An initial list of 205 potential clinical ultrasound milestones was developed through a literature review. An expert panel consisting of 34 USMED directors across the United States was used to produce consensus on clinical ultrasound milestones through 2 rounds of a modified Delphi technique, an established anonymous process to obtain consensus through multiple rounds of quantitative questionnaires. There was a 100% response rate from the 34 USMED directors in both rounds 1 and 2 of the modified Delphi protocol. After the first round, 2 milestones were revised to improve clarity, and 9 were added on the basis of comments from the USMED directors, resulting in 214 milestones forwarded to round 2. After the second round, only 90 milestones were found to have a high level of agreement and were included in the final medical student core clinical ultrasound milestones. This study established 90 core clinical milestones that all graduating medical students should obtain before graduation, based on consensus from 34 USMED directors. These core milestones can serve as a guide for curriculum deans who are initiating ultrasound curricula at their institutions. The exact method of implementation and competency assessment needs further investigation. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  6. Evolution and application of the competencies and educational milestones in physician graduate education in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Philibert

    2015-01-01

    The development of the milestones and initial testing by communities of practice in internal medicine, pediatrics, surgery, emergency medicine, neurological surgery and urology establishes the initial validity argument for the milestones. Further validity evidence will require study of the value of the milestones in assessment and accreditation, and linking educational outcomes to the performance and clinical outcomes of physicians in practice.

  7. Evolution of unusual morphologies in Lentibulariaceae (bladderworts and allies) and Podostemaceae (river-weeds): a pictorial report at the interface of developmental biology and morphological diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Various groups of flowering plants reveal profound ('saltational') changes of their bauplans (architectural rules) as compared with related taxa. These plants are known as morphological misfits that appear as rather large morphological deviations from the norm. Some of them emerged as morphological key innovations (perhaps 'hopeful monsters') that gave rise to new evolutionary lines of organisms, based on (major) genetic changes. This pictorial report places emphasis on released bauplans as typical for bladderworts (Utricularia, approx. 230 secies, Lentibulariaceae) and river-weeds (Podostemaceae, three subfamilies, approx. 54 genera, approx. 310 species). Bladderworts (Utricularia) are carnivorous, possessing sucking traps. They live as submerged aquatics (except for their flowers), as humid terrestrials or as epiphytes. Most Podostemaceae are restricted to rocks in tropical river-rapids and waterfalls. They survive as submerged haptophytes in these extreme habitats during the rainy season, emerging with their flowers afterwards. The recent scientific progress in developmental biology and evolutionary history of both Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is summarized. Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae follow structural rules that are different from but related to those of more typical flowering plants. The roots, stems and leaves - as still distinguishable in related flowering plants - are blurred ('fuzzy'). However, both families have stable floral bauplans. The developmental switches to unusual vegetative morphologies facilitated rather than prevented the evolution of species diversity in both families. The lack of one-to-one correspondence between structural categories and gene expression may have arisen from the re-use of existing genetic resources in novel contexts. Understanding what developmental patterns are followed in Lentibulariaceae and Podostemaceae is a necessary prerequisite to discover the genetic alterations that led to the evolution of these

  8. Inaugural meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology report: the importance of diversity in a multidisciplinary field

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the interdisciplinary state of evolutionary developmental biology based on the diversity of themes, taxa, levels of organization and scientists at the first meeting of the Pan-American Society for Evolutionary Developmental Biology (2015). We first highlight selected presentations representative of three themes: gene regulatory control, developmental patterning mechanisms, and ecological-evolutionary-developmental interactions. We summarize the questions, approaches, and taxonomic ...

  9. History of heat pumps - Swiss contributions and international milestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zogg, M.

    2008-05-15

    Compared to conventional boilers, heating by heat pumps cuts down fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions to about 50%. Compared to electric resistance heating, the energy consumption is even reduced up to 80%. Therefore, the impressive market penetration growth of heat pumps will continue. Swiss pioneers were the first to realize functioning vapour recompression plants. The first European heat pumps were realized in Switzerland. To date it remains one of the heat pump champions. Swiss pioneering work in the development of borehole heat exchangers, sewage heat recovery, oil free piston compressors and turbo compressors is well known. The biggest heat pump ever built comes from Switzerland. Although there is a fairly comprehensive natural gas distribution grid, 75% of the new single-family homes built in Switzerland are currently heated by heat pumps. This paper presents some of the highlights of this success story focusing on Swiss developments and relating them to the international milestones. In order to indicate the direction in which the future development might go to, some recent Swiss research projects are presented as well. (author)

  10. History and milestones of mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinhua; Huang, Qiaoniang; Petersen, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders mediated by self-reactive T cells and/or autoantibodies. Mice, as the most widely used animal for modeling autoimmune disorders, have been extensively used in the investigation of disease pathogenesis as well as in the search for novel therapeutics. Since the first mouse model of multiple sclerosis was established more than 60 years ago, hundreds of mouse models have been established for tens of autoimmune diseases. These mouse models can be divided into three categories based on the approaches used for disease induction. The first one represents the induced models in which autoimmunity is initiated in mice by immunization, adoptive transfer or environmental factors. The second group is formed by the spontaneous models where mice develop autoimmune disorders without further induction. The third group refers to the humanized models in which mice bearing humanized cells, tissues, or genes, develop autoimmune diseases either spontaneously or by induction. This article reviews the history and highlights the milestones of the mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Geo-Informatics in India: Major Milestones and Present Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Karnatak, H.; Raju, P. L. N.

    2016-06-01

    Geo-informatics has emerged globally as a useful tool to address spatial problems with significant societal implications that require integrative and innovative approaches for analysis, modelling, managing, and archiving of extensive and diverse data sets. Breakneck technological development and availability of satellite based data and information services in public domain along with real time geo-data n through participatory approaches, in the two last decades have led to a sea-change in our know-how of our natural resources and their effective management at various levels. It has led to a realization that every phenomena and requirement in our day to day life has some spatial, or geographic component that can be predicted and governed more effectively through geoinformatics tool. India also has come a long way in effective utilization of geoinformatics for various applications. This quantum leap owes its foundation in a humble beginning about half century back and almost parallel developments in the country's space programme to a current level where it touches almost all areas of life and living. Though geoinformatics technology (GIT) is believed to reach satisfactory level in the country, Indian geospatial community faces critical challenges with respect to research, education and training along with enhanced the access to the stakeholders and mobilization of the workforce, that are crucial in further penetration of this technology in context to India's development. In this paper we have critically reviewed milestones of GI development and its current utilization status in Indian context.

  12. Using motor milestones as a multistep process to screen preterm infants for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M C; Alexander, G R

    1997-01-01

    Pediatricians often informally use motor milestones to screen infant motor development, and one advantage is that they can be used during sequential office visits, as a multistep screening process. In this study we evaluated six motor milestones (roll prone to supine, roll supine to prone, sit with support, sit without support, crawl and cruise) as a multistep process in screening for cerebral palsy in 173 high-risk preterm infants (infants with delays in more than four motor milestones are referred for further evaluation and early intervention services.

  13. Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Susanne; MacWhinney, Brian; Otomo, Kiyoshi; Sirai, Hidetosi; Oshima-Takane, Yuriko; Hirakawa, Makiko; Shirai, Yasuhiro; Sugiura, Masatoshi; Itoh, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the development and use of the Developmental Sentence Scoring for Japanese (DSSJ), a new morpho-syntactical measure for Japanese constructed after the model of Lee's English Developmental Sentence Scoring model. Using this measure, the authors calculated DSSJ scores for 84 children divided into six age groups between 2;8…

  14. Developmental Scaffolding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2015-01-01

    . Within the developmental hierarchy, each module yields an inter-level relationship that makes it possible for the scaffolding to mediate the production of selectable variations. Awide range of genetic, cellular and morphological mechanisms allows the scaffolding to integrate these modular variations...... is eventually attained when the embryo acquires the capacity to impose a number of developmental constraints on its constituting parts in a top-down direction. The acquisition of this capacity allows a semiotic threshold to emerge between the living cellular world and the underlying nonliving molecular world...... to the complexity of sign recognition proper of a cellular community. In this semiotic perspective, the apparent goal directness of any developmental strategy should no longer be accounted for by a predetermined genetic program, but by the gradual definition of the relationships selected amongst the ones...

  15. Impact on house staff evaluation scores when changing from a Dreyfus- to a Milestone-based evaluation model: one internal medicine residency program's findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen A. Friedman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: As graduate medical education (GME moves into the Next Accreditation System (NAS, programs must take a critical look at their current models of evaluation and assess how well they align with reporting outcomes. Our objective was to assess the impact on house staff evaluation scores when transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model of evaluation to a Milestone-based model of evaluation. Milestones are a key component of the NAS. Method: We analyzed all end of rotation evaluations of house staff completed by faculty for academic years 2010–2011 (pre-Dreyfus model and 2011–2012 (post-Milestone model in one large university-based internal medicine residency training program. Main measures included change in PGY-level average score; slope, range, and separation of average scores across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME competencies. Results: Transitioning from a Dreyfus-based model to a Milestone-based model resulted in a larger separation in the scores between our three post-graduate year classes, a steeper progression of scores in the PGY-1 class, a wider use of the 5-point scale on our global end of rotation evaluation form, and a downward shift in the PGY-1 scores and an upward shift in the PGY-3 scores. Conclusions: For faculty trained in both models of assessment, the Milestone-based model had greater discriminatory ability as evidenced by the larger separation in the scores for all the classes, in particular the PGY-1 class.

  16. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work...

  17. Developmental Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Niels; Hvid, Helge; Kristensen, Tage Søndergaard;

    2003-01-01

    Human Deveoplment and Working Life - Work for Welfare explores whether the development of human resources at company level can improve individuals' quality of life, companies' possibilities of development, and welfare and democracy in society. Chapter two discuss the concept "developmental work...

  18. Milestone Age Affects the Role of Health and Emotions in Life Satisfaction: A Preliminary Inquiry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talya Miron-Shatz

    Full Text Available Jill turns 40. Should this change how she evaluates her life, and would a similar change occur when she turns 41? Milestone age (e.g., 30, 40, 50--a naturally occurring feature in personal timelines--has received much attention is popular culture, but little attention in academic inquiry. This study examines whether milestone birthdays change the way people evaluate their life. We show that life outlook is impacted by this temporal landmark, which appears to punctuate people's mental maps of their life cycle. At these milestone junctures, people take stock of where they stand and have a more evaluative perspective towards their lives when making life satisfaction judgments. Correspondingly, they place less emphasis on daily emotional experiences. We find that milestone agers (vs. other individuals place greater weight on health satisfaction and BMI and lesser weight on daily positive emotions in their overall life satisfaction judgments, whereas negative emotions remain influential.

  19. Milestone Age Affects the Role of Health and Emotions in Life Satisfaction: A Preliminary Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron-Shatz, Talya; Bhargave, Rajesh; Doniger, Glen M.

    2015-01-01

    Jill turns 40. Should this change how she evaluates her life, and would a similar change occur when she turns 41? Milestone age (e.g., 30, 40, 50)—a naturally occurring feature in personal timelines—has received much attention is popular culture, but little attention in academic inquiry. This study examines whether milestone birthdays change the way people evaluate their life. We show that life outlook is impacted by this temporal landmark, which appears to punctuate people’s mental maps of their life cycle. At these milestone junctures, people take stock of where they stand and have a more evaluative perspective towards their lives when making life satisfaction judgments. Correspondingly, they place less emphasis on daily emotional experiences. We find that milestone agers (vs. other individuals) place greater weight on health satisfaction and BMI and lesser weight on daily positive emotions in their overall life satisfaction judgments, whereas negative emotions remain influential. PMID:26244348

  20. Milestones in Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering History: A Comparative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel M. del Águila

    2014-01-01

    convergence or divergence of the software development methodologies. These milestones do not appear at the same time in software engineering and knowledge engineering, so lessons learned in one discipline can help in the evolution of the other one.

  1. Micro-CT imaging: Developing criteria for examining fetal skeletons in regulatory developmental toxicology studies - A workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Howard M; Makris, Susan L; Alsaid, Hasan; Bermudez, Oscar; Beyer, Bruce K; Chen, Antong; Chen, Connie L; Chen, Zhou; Chmielewski, Gary; DeLise, Anthony M; de Schaepdrijver, Luc; Dogdas, Belma; French, Julian; Harrouk, Wafa; Helfgott, Jonathan; Henkelman, R Mark; Hesterman, Jacob; Hew, Kok-Wah; Hoberman, Alan; Lo, Cecilia W; McDougal, Andrew; Minck, Daniel R; Scott, Lelia; Stewart, Jane; Sutherland, Vicki; Tatiparthi, Arun K; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Wise, L David; Wood, Sandra L; Ying, Xiaoyou

    2016-06-01

    During the past two decades the use and refinements of imaging modalities have markedly increased making it possible to image embryos and fetuses used in pivotal nonclinical studies submitted to regulatory agencies. Implementing these technologies into the Good Laboratory Practice environment requires rigorous testing, validation, and documentation to ensure the reproducibility of data. A workshop on current practices and regulatory requirements was held with the goal of defining minimal criteria for the proper implementation of these technologies and subsequent submission to regulatory agencies. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is especially well suited for high-throughput evaluations, and is gaining popularity to evaluate fetal skeletons to assess the potential developmental toxicity of test agents. This workshop was convened to help scientists in the developmental toxicology field understand and apply micro-CT technology to nonclinical toxicology studies and facilitate the regulatory acceptance of imaging data. Presentations and workshop discussions covered: (1) principles of micro-CT fetal imaging; (2) concordance of findings with conventional skeletal evaluations; and (3) regulatory requirements for validating the system. Establishing these requirements for micro-CT examination can provide a path forward for laboratories considering implementing this technology and provide regulatory agencies with a basis to consider the acceptability of data generated via this technology. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. China's Lunar Exploration Program——The Third Milestone for China's Space Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luan Enjie

    2006-01-01

    To explore the moon demonstrating the wisdom and capability of mankind. China's Lunar Exploration Program is the third milestone for China's space industry. We have formed China's lunar exploration program that features three milestones, i.e. "orbiting", "landing" and "returning". As a developing country, China conducts definite deep space activities under limited conditions, reflecting China's strong national strength and symbolizing ability of China's space industry.

  3. Competency milestones for medical students: Design, implementation, and analysis at one medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomis, Kimberly D; Russell, Regina G; Davidson, Mario A; Fleming, Amy E; Pettepher, Cathleen C; Cutrer, William B; Fleming, Geoffrey M; Miller, Bonnie M

    2017-05-01

    Competency-based assessment seeks to align measures of performance directly with desired learning outcomes based upon the needs of patients and the healthcare system. Recognizing that assessment methods profoundly influence student motivation and effort, it is critical to measure all desired aspects of performance throughout an individual's medical training. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) defined domains of competency for residency; the subsequent Milestones Project seeks to describe each learner's progress toward competence within each domain. Because the various clinical disciplines defined unique competencies and milestones within each domain, it is difficult for undergraduate medical education to adopt existing GME milestones language. This paper outlines the process undertaken by one medical school to design, implement and improve competency milestones for medical students. A team of assessment experts developed milestones for a set of focus competencies; these have now been monitored in medical students over two years. A unique digital dashboard enables individual, aggregate and longitudinal views of student progress by domain. Validation and continuous quality improvement cycles are based upon expert review, user feedback, and analysis of variation between students and between assessors. Experience to date indicates that milestone-based assessment has significant potential to guide the development of medical students.

  4. Colloidal nanocrystals for quality lighting and displays: milestones and recent developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Talha; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis of nanocrystals have enabled high-quality high-efficiency light-emitting diodes, displays with significantly broader color gamut, and optically-pumped lasers spanning the whole visible regime. Here we review these colloidal platforms covering the milestone studies together with recent developments. In the review, we focus on the devices made of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals), colloidal quantum rods (nanorods), and colloidal quantum wells (nanoplatelets) as well as those of solution processed perovskites and phosphor nanocrystals. The review starts with an introduction to colloidal nanocrystal photonics emphasizing the importance of colloidal materials for light-emitting devices. Subsequently,we continue with the summary of important reports on light-emitting diodes, in which colloids are used as the color converters and then as the emissive layers in electroluminescent devices. Also,we review the developments in color enrichment and electroluminescent displays. Next, we present a summary of important reports on the lasing of colloidal semiconductors. Finally, we summarize and conclude the review presenting a future outlook.

  5. Colloidal nanocrystals for quality lighting and displays: milestones and recent developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem Talha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in colloidal synthesis of nanocrystals have enabled high-quality high-efficiency light-emitting diodes, displays with significantly broader color gamut, and optically-pumped lasers spanning the whole visible regime. Here we review these colloidal platforms covering the milestone studies together with recent developments. In the review, we focus on the devices made of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals, colloidal quantum rods (nanorods, and colloidal quantum wells (nanoplatelets as well as those of solution processed perovskites and phosphor nanocrystals. The review starts with an introduction to colloidal nanocrystal photonics emphasizing the importance of colloidal materials for light-emitting devices. Subsequently,we continue with the summary of important reports on light-emitting diodes, in which colloids are used as the color converters and then as the emissive layers in electroluminescent devices. Also,we review the developments in color enrichment and electroluminescent displays. Next, we present a summary of important reports on the lasing of colloidal semiconductors. Finally, we summarize and conclude the review presenting a future outlook.

  6. A Self-Report Computer-Based Survey of Technology Use by People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Emily Shea; Palmer, Susan B.; Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Davies, Danial; Stock, Steven; Lobb, Kathy; Bishop, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Advancements of technologies in the areas of mobiliy, hearing and vision, communication, and daily living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) has the potential to greatly enhance indepencence and self-determination. Previous research, however, suggests that there is a “technological divide” with regard to the use of such technologies by people with IDD when compared with the general public. The present study sought to provide current information with regard to technology use by people with IDD by examining the technology needs, use, and barriers to such use experienced by 180 adults with IDD through QuestNet, a self-directed computer survey program. The study findings suggest that although there has been progress in technology acquisition and use by people IDD, yet there remains an underutilization of technologies across the population. PMID:22316226

  7. IEEE Milestone at CERN - W Cleon Anderson (right), president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, unveils the Milestone plaque at CERN, together with Georges Charpak

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    At a ceremony on 26 September at CERN, W Cleon Anderson, president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), formally dedicated a "Milestone" plaque in recognition of the invention of electronic particle detectors at CERN. The plaque was unveiled by Anderson and Georges Charpak, the Nobel-prize winning inventor of wire-chamber technology at CERN.

  8. Pyogenic Granuloma in a Patient of Sturge-Weber Syndrome with Bilateral Port Wine Stain- A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantala Arunkumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS also known as encephalotrigeminal angiomatosis. It is a neurocutaneous syndrome, characterized by a facial vascular birthmark and neurological abnormalities. An ipsilateral or bilateral facial cutaneous vascular malformation Port Wine Stain (PWS usually affects the upper face. Other clinical manifestations are seizures, glaucoma, hemiparesis, mental retardation and delayed developmental milestones. The main objective of this case report is to unravel such a rarest syndrome with bilateral port-wine stain, which has intraoral manifestation of pyogenic granuloma involving gingiva in an 11 year old boy.

  9. Milestones in the Observations of Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic fields are observed everywhere in the universe. In this review,we concentrate on the observational aspects of the magnetic fields of Galactic and extragalactic objects. Readers can follow the milestones in the observations of cosmic magnetic fields obtained from the most important tracers of magnetic fields,namely, the star-light polarization, the Zeeman effect, the rotation measures (RMs,hereafter) of extragalactic radio sources, the pulsar RMs, radio polarization observations, as well as the newly implemented sub-mm and mm polarization capabilities.The magnetic field of the Galaxy was first discovered in 1949 by optical polarization observations. The local magnetic fields within one or two kpc have been well delineated by starlight polarization data. The polarization observations of diffuse Galactic radio background emission in 1962 confirmed unequivocally the existence of a Galactic magnetic field. The bulk of the present information about the magnetic fields in the Galaxy comes from analysis of rotation measures of extragalactic radio sources and pulsars, which can be used to construct the 3-D magnetic field structure in the Galactic halo and Galactic disk. Radio synchrotron spurs in the Galactic center show a poloidal field, and the polarization mapping of dust emission and Zeeman observation in the central molecular zone reveal a toroidal magnetic field parallel to the Galactic plane. For nearby galaxies, both optical polarization and multifrequency radio polarization data clearly show the large-scale magnetic field following the spiral arms or dust lanes. For more distant objects, radio polarization is the only approach available to show the magnetic fields in the jets or lobes of radio galaxies or quasars. Clusters of galaxies also contain widely distributed magnetic fields, which are reflected by radio halos or the RM distribution of background objects. The intergalactic space could have been magnetized by outflows or galactic superwinds even in

  10. Brief report: do service dog providers placing dogs with children with developmental disabilities use outcome measures and, if so, what are they?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterly, Felicity; Percy, Carol; Ward, Gillian

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the outcomes expected and assessed by those providing service dogs to children with developmental disabilities. Seventeen registered service dog providers were invited to complete a mixed methods online survey. Five providers, who prepared dogs to work with a wide range of conditions and behaviours, mainly Asperger's syndrome, autism and communication disorders, completed the survey. All five participants reported that they expected to see positive changes as a consequence of the service dog placement, in both the recipient child and their family, including improvements in attention span and language skills, as well as increased familial cohesion. Survey responses indicated that not all desired outcomes were routinely assessed. The range of assessments used were interviews, intake conversations, pre-placement questionnaires, child social diaries filled in by parents, follow up surveys after placement, and child observation by parents. No specifically named valid and reliable clinical or research measures were referred to, showing an emphasis on assessments from parents and service dog providers. It is not clear whether pre-intervention assessments are repeated systematically at follow-up, which could show robust intervention effects. There is scope for professionals in developmental disability to work with service dog providers to improve the evidence base in this field.

  11. Pericentric inversion of chromosome 11 (p14.3q21) associated with developmental delays, hypopigmented skin lesions and abnormal brain MRI findings - a new case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachor, D.A.; Lofton, M. [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States)

    1994-09-01

    We report 3 year old male, referred for evaluation of developmental delays. Pregnancy was complicated by oligohydramnios, proteinuria and prematurity. Medical history revealed: bilateral inguinal hernia, small scrotal sac, undescended testes, developmental delays and behavioral problems. The child had: microcephaly, facial dysmorphic features, single palmar creases, hypopigmented skin lesions of variable size, intermittent exotropia and small retracted testes. Neurological examination was normal. Cognitive level was at the average range with mild delay in his adaptive behavior. Expressive language delays and severe articulation disorder were noted, as well as clumsiness, poor control and precision of gross and fine motor skills. Chromosomal analysis of peripheral leukocytes indicated that one of the number 11 chromosomes had undergone a pericentric inversion with breakpoints on the short (p) arm at band p14.3 and the long (q) arm at band q21. An MRI of the brain showed mild delay in myelinization pattern of white matter. Chromosome 11 inversion in other sites was associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and several malignancies. To our knowledge this is the first description of inv(11)(p14.3q21) that is associated with microcephaly, dysmorphic features, hypopigmented skin lesions and speech delay. This inversion may disrupt the expression of the involved genes. However, additional cases with the same cytogenetic anomaly are needed to explore the phenotypic significance of this disorder.

  12. Achievement of feeding milestones after primary repair of long-gap esophageal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Khalid M; Krosch, Tara C; Eickhoff, Jeffrey C; Sabati, Arash A; Brudney, James; Rivard, Andrew L; Foker, John E

    2009-06-01

    To determine the pattern of feeding milestones following primary repair of long-gap esophageal atresia (EA). A questionnaire based upon well established feeding milestones was used. Children after long-gap EA repair, n=40, were compared from after primary repair to healthy children from birth, n=102. The age when surveyed of the EA group and controls was different: 6.2+/-4.7 (mean+/-standard deviation) years, range 1.1-20.9, versus 2.5+/-2.4 years, range 0.0-12.1, p=0.00. The esophageal gap length in the EA group was 5.1+/-1.2 cm and age at repair was 5.5+/-5.0 months. There was no statistically significant difference between the atresia group and controls for feeding milestones; Self feeding finger foods approached significance. There was, however, greater variability in the timing of milestones in the atresia group compared to controls. Feeding milestones were negatively correlated with age at primary repair: drinking with a covered sippy cup, rho=-0.51, p=0.01 and self feeding finger foods, rho=-0.36, p=0.04 were statistically significant. Drinking from a cup correlated with gestational age, rho=0.38, p=0.04, and negatively correlated to esophageal gap length, rho=-0.45, p=0.01. Despite delayed onset of feeding, major milestones after EA repair occurred in similar pattern to normal infants. An early referral for primary repair is beneficial for earlier acquisition of milestones for infants with long-gap EA.

  13. Annual research review: Towards a developmental neuroscience of atypical social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happé, Francesca; Frith, Uta

    2014-06-01

    As a starting point for our review we use a developmental timeline, starting from birth and divided into major developmental epochs defined by key milestones of social cognition in typical development. For each epoch, we highlight those developmental disorders that diverge from the normal developmental pattern, what is known about these key milestones in the major disorders affecting social cognition, and any available research on the neural basis of these differences. We relate behavioural observations to four major networks of the social brain, that is, Amygdala, Mentalizing, Emotion and Mirror networks. We focus on those developmental disorders that are characterized primarily by social atypicality, such as autism spectrum disorder, social anxiety and a variety of genetically defined syndromes. The processes and aspects of social cognition we highlight are sketched in a putative network diagram, and include: agent identification, emotion processing and empathy, mental state attribution, self-processing and social hierarchy mapping involving social ‘policing’ and in-group/out-group categorization. Developmental disorders reveal some dissociable deficits in different components of this map of social cognition. This broad review across disorders, ages and aspects of social cognition leads us to some key questions: How can we best distinguish primary from secondary social disorders? Is social cognition especially vulnerable to developmental disorder, or surprisingly robust? Are cascading notions of social development, in which early functions are essential stepping stones or building bricks for later abilities, necessarily correct?

  14. Developmental screening in context: adaptation and standardization of the Denver Developmental Screening Test-II (DDST-II) for Sri Lankan children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijedasa, D

    2012-11-01

    Developmental problems in children can be alleviated to a great extent with early detection and intervention through periodic screening for developmental delays during pre-school ages. Currently, there is no established system for developmental screening of children in Sri Lanka. Although some developmental norms, which are similar to those of Denver Developmental Screening Test-II (DDST-II), have been introduced into the Sri Lankan Child Health Developmental Record (CHDR), those norms have not been standardized to the Sri Lankan child population. The aim of this research was to establish Sri Lankan norms for DDST-II and to test the universal and regional applicability of developmental screening tests by comparing the Sri Lankan norms with the norms of DDST-II and DDST-Singapore norms, the geographically nearest standardization of DDST-II. The norms were also compared with the milestones already available in the CHDR. DDST-II was adapted and standardized on a sample of 4251 Sri Lankan children aged 0-80 months. Thirteen public health nursing sisters were trained to collect the data as part of their routine work. The 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th percentile ages of acquiring each developmental milestone were then calculated using logistic regression. The Denver Developmental Screening Test for Sri Lankan Children (DDST-SL) was created. Most of the established DDST-SL norms were different to the comparable norms in DDST-II, DDST-Singapore and the CHDR. In view of the results of the study, it is imperative that developmental screening tests are used in context and are adapted and standardized to the populations in question before utilization. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Modeling kinetics and equilibrium of membranes with fields: Milestoning analysis and implication to permeation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardenas, Alfredo E. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Elber, Ron [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    Coarse graining of membrane simulations by translating atomistic dynamics to densities and fields with Milestoning is discussed. The space of the membrane system is divided into cells and the different cells are characterized by order parameters presenting the number densities. The dynamics of the order parameters are probed with Milestoning. The methodology is illustrated here for a phospholipid membrane system (a hydrated bilayer of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) lipid molecules). Significant inhomogeneity in membrane internal number density leads to complex free energy landscape and local maps of transition times. Dynamics and distributions of cavities within the membrane assist the permeation of nonpolar solutes such as xenon atoms. It is illustrated that quantitative and detailed dynamics of water transport through DOPC membrane can be analyzed using Milestoning with fields. The reaction space for water transport includes at least two slow variables: the normal to the membrane plane, and the water density.

  16. Immunization Milestones: A More Comprehensive Picture of Age-Appropriate Vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve G. Robison

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A challenge facing immunization registries is developing measures of childhood immunization coverage that contain more information for setting policy than present vaccine series up-to-date (UTD rates. This study combined milestone analysis with provider encounter data to determine when children either do not receive indicated immunizations during medical encounters or fail to visit providers. Milestone analysis measures immunization status at key times between birth and age 2, when recommended immunizations first become late. The immunization status of a large population of children in the Oregon ALERT immunization registry and in the Oregon Health Plan was tracked across milestone ages. Findings indicate that the majority of children went back and forth with regard to having complete age-appropriate immunizations over time. We also found that immunization UTD rates when used alone are biased towards relating non-UTD status to a lack of visits to providers, instead of to provider visits on which recommended immunizations are not given.

  17. Obesity with associated developmental delay and/or learning disability in patients exhibiting additional features: report of novel pathogenic copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Carla Sustek; Kohl, Ilana; Varela, Monica Castro; de Castro, Cláudia Irene Emílio; Kim, Chong Ae; Bertola, Débora Romeo; Lourenço, Charles Marques; Perez, Ana Beatriz Alvarez; Koiffmann, Celia Priszkulnik

    2013-03-01

    Obesity is a major threat to public health worldwide, and there is now mounting evidence favoring a role for the central nervous system (CNS) in weight control. A causal relationship has been recognized in both monogenic (e.g., BDNF, TRKB, and SIM1 deficiencies) and syndromic forms of obesity [e.g., Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)]. Syndromic obesity arising from chromosomal abnormalities, that typically also affect learning and development, are often associated with congenital malformations and behavioral characteristics. We report on nine unrelated patients with a diagnosis of learning disability and/or developmental delay (DD) in addition to obesity that were found to have copy number variants (CNVs) by single nucleotide polymorphism array-based analysis. Each patient also had a distinct and complex phenotype, and most had hypotonia and other neuroendocrine issues, such as hyperphagia and hypogonadism. Molecular and clinical characterization of these patients enabled us to determine with confidence that the CNVs we observed were pathogenic or likely to be pathogenic. Overall, the CNVs reported here encompassed a candidate gene or region (e.g., SIM1) that has been reported in patients associating obesity and DD and/or intellectual disability (ID) and novel candidate genes and regions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dark Sectors 2016 Workshop: Community Report

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Jim; Echenard, Bertrand; Essig, Rouven; Graham, Matthew; Izaguirre, Eder; Jaros, John; Krnjaic, Gordan; Mardon, Jeremy; Morrissey, David; Nelson, Tim; Perelstein, Maxim; Pyle, Matt; Ritz, Adam; Schuster, Philip; Shuve, Brian; Toro, Natalia; Van De Water, Richard G.; Akerib, Daniel; An, Haipeng; Aniol, Konrad; Arnquist, Isaac J.; Asner, David M.; Back, Henning O.; Baker, Keith; Baltzell, Nathan; Banerjee, Dipanwita; Batell, Brian; Bauer, Daniel; Beacham, James; Benesch, Jay; Bjorken, James; Blinov, Nikita; Boehm, Celine; Bondi, Mariangela; Bonivento, Walter; Bossi, Fabio; Brodsky, Stanley J.; Budnik, Ran; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bukhari, Masroor H.; Bunker, Raymond; Carpinelli, Massimo; Cartaro, Concetta; Cassel, David; Cavoto, Gianluca; Celentano, Andrea; Chaterjee, Animesh; Chaudhuri, Saptarshi; Chiodini, Gabriele; Cho, Hsiao-Mei Sherry; Church, Eric D.; Cooke, D.A.; Cooley, Jodi; Cooper, Robert; Corliss, Ross; Crivelli, Paolo; Curciarello, Francesca; D'Angelo, Annalisa; Davoudiasl, Hooman; De Napoli, Marzio; De Vita, Raffaella; Denig, Achim; deNiverville, Patrick; Deshpande, Abhay; Dharmapalan, Ranjan; Dobrescu, Bogdan; Donskov, Sergey; Dupre, Raphael; Estrada, Juan; Fegan, Stuart; Ferber, Torben; Field, Clive; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Filippi, Alessandra; Fornal, Bartosz; Freyberger, Arne; Friedland, Alexander; Galon, Iftach; Gardner, Susan; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Gninenko, Sergei; Golutvin, Andrey; Gori, Stefania; Grab, Christoph; Graziani, Enrico; Griffioen, Keith; Haas, Andrew; Harigaya, Keisuke; Hearty, Christopher; Hertel, Scott; Hewett, JoAnne; Hime, Andrew; Hitlin, David; Hochberg, Yonit; Holt, Roy J.; Holtrop, Maurik; Hoppe, Eric W.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Hsu, Lauren; Ilten, Phil; Incandela, Joe; Inguglia, Gianluca; Irwin, Kent; Jaegle, Igal; Johnson, Robert P.; Kahn, Yonatan; Kalicy, Grzegorz; Kang, Zhong-Bo; Khachatryan, Vardan; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Krasnikov, N.V.; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuflik, Eric; Kurinsky, Noah; Laha, Ranjan; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Li, Dale; Lin, Tongyan; Lisanti, Mariangela; Liu, Kun; Liu, Ming; Loer, Ben; Loomba, Dinesh; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Manalaysay, Aaron; Mandaglio, Giuseppe; Mans, Jeremiah; Marciano, W.J.; Markiewicz, Thomas; Marsicano, Luca; Maruyama, Takashi; Matveev, Victor A.; McKeen, David; McKinnon, Bryan; McKinsey, Dan; Merkel, Harald; Mock, Jeremy; Monzani, Maria Elena; Moreno, Omar; Nantais, Corina; Paul, Sebouh; Peskin, Michael; Poliakov, Vladimir; Polosa, Antonio D.; Pospelov, Maxim; Rachek, Igor; Radics, Balint; Raggi, Mauro; Randazzo, Nunzio; Ratcliff, Blair; Rizzo, Alessandro; Rizzo, Thomas; Robinson, Alan; Rubbia, Andre; Rubin, David; Rueter, Dylan; Saab, Tarek; Santopinto, Elena; Schnee, Richard; Shelton, Jessie; Simi, Gabriele; Simonyan, Ani; Sipala, Valeria; Slone, Oren; Smith, Elton; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Solt, Matthew; Sorensen, Peter; Soreq, Yotam; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spencer, James; Stepanyan, Stepan; Strube, Jan; Sullivan, Michael; Tadepalli, Arun S.; Tait, Tim; Taiuti, Mauro; Tanedo, Philip; Tayloe, Rex; Thaler, Jesse; Tran, Nhan V.; Tulin, Sean; Tully, Christopher G.; Uemura, Sho; Ungaro, Maurizio; Valente, Paolo; Vance, Holly; Vavra, Jerry; Volansky, Tomer; von Krosigk, Belina; Whitbeck, Andrew; Williams, Mike; Wittich, Peter; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Xue, Wei; Yoon, Jong Min; Yu, Hai-Bo; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Tien-Tien; Zhang, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Zhong, Yiming; Zurek, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years.

  19. Dark Sectors 2016 Workshop: Community Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Jim; et al.

    2016-08-30

    This report, based on the Dark Sectors workshop at SLAC in April 2016, summarizes the scientific importance of searches for dark sector dark matter and forces at masses beneath the weak-scale, the status of this broad international field, the important milestones motivating future exploration, and promising experimental opportunities to reach these milestones over the next 5-10 years.

  20. NORMA PERKEMBANGAN MOTOR MILESTONE ANAK SEHAT DAN BERGIZI BAIK DALAM RANGKA PENGEMBANGAN SUATU RUJUKAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas B. Jahari

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Norm of Motor Milestone Achievements In Healthy and Well Nourished Children Leading To The Development A Reference.Background: The prevalence of malnutrition is still high in Indonesia, and one of its functional consequences is level of the intelectual capacity of children. Motor development is an essential of cognitive performance, and it is generally believed related with nutritional status of children, however very few studies had been carried out in the field condition.Objectlves: To describe the ceiling of motor milestone achievements of healthy and well nourished children aged 3-18 months in the development of norms for Indonesian children.Methods: The study was conducted in 4 big cities: Surabaya, Malang, Bandung and Bogor in 2100 healthy and well nourished children aged 3-18 months came from high SES (socio-economic status families who had no constraints on achieving normal growth and development. There were 17 milestones observed by well trainned enumerators following standard procedure. Analysis of percentiles 5, 10, 50, 90, and 95 for age against motor achievement were carried out for all children.Results: The difference in the attainment of the ceiling of motor milestones between males and females were not significant at any points of observation, therefore sex combined norm curve of motor development for children aged 3-18 months was ilustrated.Conclusions: The norm of motor milestone development for Indonesian children aged 3-18 months has been developed. Before being used as a reference, it needs to be evaluated or it is reliability and feasibility.Keywords: motor milestone, motor development, reference of motor development.

  1. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2015-01-01

    This review uses a levels-of-analysis framework to summarize the current understanding of developmental dyslexia's etiology, brain bases, neuropsychology, and social context. Dyslexia is caused by multiple genetic and environmental risk factors as well as their interplay. Several candidate genes have been identified in the past decade. At the brain level, dyslexia is associated with aberrant structure and function, particularly in left hemisphere reading/language networks. The neurocognitive influences on dyslexia are also multifactorial and involve phonological processing deficits as well as weaknesses in other oral language skills and processing speed. We address contextual issues such as how dyslexia manifests across languages and social classes as well as what treatments are best supported. Throughout the review, we highlight exciting new research that cuts across levels of analysis. Such work promises eventually to provide a comprehensive explanation of the disorder as well as its prevention and remediation.

  2. Parents' Reports of Lexical and Grammatical Aspects of Toddlers' Language in European Portuguese: Developmental Trends, Age and Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carla; Cadime, Irene; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Santos, Sandra; Santos, Ana Lúcia; Viana, Fernanda Leopoldina

    2017-01-01

    The results from a large-scale study on toddlers' language acquisition in European Portuguese are presented. Toddlers' lexical and grammatical competencies were assessed using the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory: Words and Sentences. The results, based on 3012 reports completed by parents, indicate an increase in the lexical…

  3. Level-2 Milestone 5588: Deliver Strategic Plan and Initial Scalability Assessment by Advanced Architecture and Portability Specialists Team

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draeger, Erik W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report documents the fact that the work in creating a strategic plan and beginning customer engagements has been completed. The description of milestone is: The newly formed advanced architecture and portability specialists (AAPS) team will develop a strategic plan to meet the goals of 1) sharing knowledge and experience with code teams to ensure that ASC codes run well on new architectures, and 2) supplying skilled computational scientists to put the strategy into practice. The plan will be delivered to ASC management in the first quarter. By the fourth quarter, the team will identify their first customers within PEM and IC, perform an initial assessment and scalability and performance bottleneck for next-generation architectures, and embed AAPS team members with customer code teams to assist with initial portability development within standalone kernels or proxy applications.

  4. International vision requirements for driver licensing and disability pensions: using a milestone approach in characterization of progressive eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain M Bron

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Alain M Bron1, Ananth C Viswanathan2, Ulrich Thelen3, Renato de Natale4, Antonio Ferreras5, Jens Gundgaard6, Gail Schwartz7, Patricia Buchholz81Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Glaucoma Research Unit, Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Department of Genetics, University College of London Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK; 3Private Practice, Munster, Germany; 4Ospedale Civile di Monselice, Monselice, Italy; 5Ophthalmology, Miguel Servet University Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain; 6COWI, Kolding, Denmark; 7Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University, Glaucoma Consultants, Baltimore, MD, USA; 8Patricia Buchholz Consulting, Karlsruhe, GermanyObjective: Low vision that causes forfeiture of driver’s licenses and collection of disability pension benefits can lead to negative psychosocial and economic consequences. The purpose of this study was to review the requirements for holding a driver’s license and rules for obtaining a disability pension due to low vision. Results highlight the possibility of using a milestone approach to describe progressive eye disease.Methods: Government and research reports, websites, and journal articles were evaluated to review rules and requirements in Germany, Spain, Italy, France, the UK, and the US.Results: Visual acuity limits are present in all driver’s license regulations. In most countries, the visual acuity limit is 0.5. Visual field limits are included in some driver’s license regulations. In Europe, binocular visual field requirements typically follow the European Union standard of ≥120°. In the US, the visual field requirements are typically between 110° and 140°. Some countries distinguish between being partially sighted and blind in the definition of legal blindness, and in others there is only one limit.Conclusions: Loss of driving privileges could be used as a milestone to monitor progressive eye disease. Forfeiture could be standardized as a

  5. 20 CFR 411.566 - May an EN use outcome or milestone payments to make payments to the beneficiary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May an EN use outcome or milestone payments to make payments to the beneficiary? 411.566 Section 411.566 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY... an EN use outcome or milestone payments to make payments to the beneficiary? Yes, an EN may...

  6. 20 CFR 411.580 - Can an EN receive payments for milestones or outcome payment months that occur before the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can an EN receive payments for milestones or outcome payment months that occur before the beneficiary assigns a ticket to the EN? 411.580 Section 411... Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.580 Can an EN receive payments for milestones or outcome...

  7. 20 CFR 411.575 - How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How does the EN request payment for milestones or outcome payment months achieved by a beneficiary who assigned a ticket to the EN? 411.575... PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.575 How does the EN request payment for milestones...

  8. 20 CFR 411.560 - Is it possible to pay a milestone or outcome payment to more than one EN?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... payment to more than one EN? 411.560 Section 411.560 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION... possible to pay a milestone or outcome payment to more than one EN? It is possible for more than one EN (including a State VR agency acting as an EN) to receive payment based on the same milestone or outcome....

  9. From Kissing to Coitus? Sex-of-Partner Differences in the Sexual Milestone Achievement of Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiler, Andrew P.; Frankel, Loren B. W.; Savin-Williams, Ritch C.

    2011-01-01

    Scientific information regarding normative patterns of young men's sexual behavior is insufficient, especially regarding the impact of sex of partner. We explored the age at which 255 young adult men achieved several milestones (e.g., first kiss, manual-genital contact, intercourse) as well as the sequence of milestone achievement and stability in…

  10. Relations of Alcohol Consumption with Smoking Cessation Milestones and Tobacco Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jessica W.; Fucito, Lisa M.; Piasecki, Thomas M.; Piper, Megan E.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Berg, Kristin M.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Alcohol consumption is associated with smoking cessation failure in both community and clinical research. However, little is known about the relation between alcohol consumption and smoking cessation milestones (i.e., achieving initial abstinence, avoiding lapses and relapse). Our objective in this research was to examine the relations…

  11. Outcomes and milestone achievement differences for very low-birth-weight multiples compared with singleton infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Sharon; Genen, Linda; Turenne, Wendy; Dysart, Kevin

    2010-06-01

    We examined if very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants of multiple gestation pregnancies experience more complications and take longer to achieve clinical milestones compared with similar singletons. We performed a retrospective analysis of all infants less than 1500 g at birth in a large neonatal database. Singletons were compared with twins and higher-order multiples for demographic, morbidities, and process milestones including feeding, respiratory, thermoregulation, and length of stay. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to control for potential confounding variables. A total of 5507 infants were included: 3792 singletons, 1391 twins, and 324 higher-order multiples. There were no differences in Apgar scores, small for gestational age status, and incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis, severe retinopathy of prematurity, severe intraventricular hemorrhage, sepsis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or the need for surgery. Multiples had higher rates of apnea and patent ductus arteriosus than singletons. VLBW multiples achieved milestones at similar rates in most areas compared with singletons except for the achievement of full oral feedings. Length of stay, after controlling for confounding variables, did not differ between the groups. Compared with singletons, VLBW multiples had similar morbidity and achieved most feeding and thermoregulation milestones at similar rates.

  12. Effects of Family and Friend Support on LGB Youths' Mental Health and Sexual Orientation Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilo, Guy; Savaya, Riki

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of social support components and providers on mental health and sexual orientation (SO) milestones of lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) youths. Data were collected on 461 self-identified LGB adolescents and young adults. Family acceptance and support yielded the strongest positive effect on self-acceptance of SO,…

  13. Veterans' Gathering for Choosing Milestone-makers in the 60 Years' DEVELOPMENT OF SHIPPING INDUSTRY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The two-day Symposium on the Milestone-Makers in China's 60 Years of Shipping Industry was convened as planned in the beautiful ancient town of ZhuJiajiao in Shanghai.Over 30 authorities attended the symposium including the former Minister of Communications and current Chairman of China Communications and Transportation Association(CCTA)Mr.

  14. Motor Milestone Development in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if a sample of children currently diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) would have shown motor milestone delays before age three as compared to typically developing children. Given delays in motor skills, the study also strived to determine which specific skills might be delayed. Parents of 44 children who…

  15. 32 CFR 37.575 - What are my responsibilities for determining milestone payment amounts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DoD GRANT AND AGREEMENT REGULATIONS TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pre-Award Business Evaluation Accounting, Payments, and Recovery of Funds § 37.575 What are my responsibilities for determining... needs for carrying out that phase of the research effort. (b) The Federal share at each milestone need...

  16. Developmental dyspraxia and developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, M; Möbs, I

    1995-12-01

    This article discusses the role developmental dyspraxia plays in developmental coordination disorder (DCD), based upon a review of literature on apraxia, developmental dyspraxia, and DCD. Apraxia and dyspraxia have often been equated with DCD. However, it is argued that apraxia and dyspraxia primarily refer to the problems of motor sequencing and selection, which not all children with DCD exhibit. The author proposes to distinguish developmental dyspraxia from DCD. Other issues discussed include the assessment, etiology, and treatment of developmental dyspraxia and DCD, and the relationship between DCD and learning disabilities. A research agenda is offered regarding future directions to overcome current limitation.

  17. Addressing System Integration Issues Required for the Developmente of Distributed Wind-Hydrogen Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D; Salehfar, H.; Harrison, K.W.; Dale, N.; Biaku, C.; Peters, A.J.; Hernandez-Pacheco: E.

    2008-04-01

    Wind generated electricity is a variable resource. Hydrogen can be generated as an energy storage media, but is costly. Advancements in power electronics and system integration are needed to make a viable system. Therefore, the long-term goal of the efforts at the University of North Dakota is to merge wind energy, hydrogen production, and fuel cells to bring emission-free and reliable power to commercial viability. The primary goals include 1) expand system models as a tool to investigate integration and control issues, 2) examine long-term effects of wind-electrolysis performance from a systematic perspective, and 3) collaborate with NREL and industrial partners to design, integrate, and quantify system improvements by implementing a single power electronics package to interface wild AC to PEM stack DC requirements. This report summarizes the accomplishments made during this project.

  18. Addressing System Integration Issues Required for the Developmente of Distributed Wind-Hydrogen Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, M.D; Salehfar, H.; Harrison, K.W.; Dale, N.; Biaku, C.; Peters, A.J.; Hernandez-Pacheco: E.

    2008-04-01

    Wind generated electricity is a variable resource. Hydrogen can be generated as an energy storage media, but is costly. Advancements in power electronics and system integration are needed to make a viable system. Therefore, the long-term goal of the efforts at the University of North Dakota is to merge wind energy, hydrogen production, and fuel cells to bring emission-free and reliable power to commercial viability. The primary goals include 1) expand system models as a tool to investigate integration and control issues, 2) examine long-term effects of wind-electrolysis performance from a systematic perspective, and 3) collaborate with NREL and industrial partners to design, integrate, and quantify system improvements by implementing a single power electronics package to interface wild AC to PEM stack DC requirements. This report summarizes the accomplishments made during this project.

  19. Initial performance of a modified milestones global evaluation tool for semiannual evaluation of residents by faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borman, Karen R; Augustine, Rebecca; Leibrandt, Thomas; Pezzi, Christopher M; Kukora, John S

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether faculty could successfully evaluate residents using a competency-based modified Milestones global evaluation tool. A program's leadership team modified a draft Surgery Milestones Working Group summative global assessment instrument into a modified Milestones tool (MMT) for local use during faculty meetings devoted to semiannual resident review. Residents were scored on 15 items spanning all competencies using an 8-point graphic response scale; unstructured comments also were solicited. Arithmetic means were computed at the resident and postgraduate year cohort levels for items and competency item sets. Score ranges (highest minus lowest score) were calculated; variability was termed "low" (range 2.0). A subset of "low" was designated "small" (1.0-1.9). Trends were sought among item, competency, and total Milestones scores. MMT correlations with examination scores and multisource (360°) assessments were explored. The success of implementing MMT was judged using published criteria for educational assessment methods. Fully accredited, independently sponsored residency. Program leaders and 22 faculty members (71% voluntary, mean 12y of experience). Twenty-six residents were assessed, yielding 7 to 13 evaluations for MMT per categorical resident and 3 to 6 per preliminary trainee. Scores spanned the entire response scale. All MMT evaluations included narrative comments. Individual resident score variability was low (96% within competencies and 92% across competencies). Subset analysis showed that small variations were common (35% within competencies and 54% across competencies). Postgraduate year cohort variability was higher (61% moderate or high within competencies and 50% across competencies). Cohort scores at the item, competency, and total score levels exhibited rising trajectories, suggesting MMT construct validity. MMT scores did not demonstrate concurrent validity, correlating poorly with other metrics. The MMT met multiple criteria for

  20. Challenge problem and milestones for : Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeze, Geoffrey A.; Wang, Yifeng; Howard, Robert; McNeish, Jerry A.; Schultz, Peter Andrew; Arguello, Jose Guadalupe, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This report describes the specification of a challenge problem and associated challenge milestones for the Waste Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC) supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Campaign. The NEAMS challenge problems are designed to demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards IPSC goals. The goal of the Waste IPSC is to develop an integrated suite of modeling and simulation capabilities to quantitatively assess the long-term performance of waste forms in the engineered and geologic environments of a radioactive waste storage or disposal system. The Waste IPSC will provide this simulation capability (1) for a range of disposal concepts, waste form types, engineered repository designs, and geologic settings, (2) for a range of time scales and distances, (3) with appropriate consideration of the inherent uncertainties, and (4) in accordance with robust verification, validation, and software quality requirements. To demonstrate proof of concept and progress towards these goals and requirements, a Waste IPSC challenge problem is specified that includes coupled thermal-hydrologic-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes that describe (1) the degradation of a borosilicate glass waste form and the corresponding mobilization of radionuclides (i.e., the processes that produce the radionuclide source term), (2) the associated near-field physical and chemical environment for waste emplacement within a salt formation, and (3) radionuclide transport in the near field (i.e., through the engineered components - waste form, waste package, and backfill - and the immediately adjacent salt). The initial details of a set of challenge milestones that collectively comprise the full challenge problem are also specified.

  1. Association between congenital toxoplasmosis and parent-reported developmental outcomes, concerns, and impairments, in 3 year old children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Dorthe

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information is lacking on the effects of congenital toxoplasmosis on development, behavior, and impairment in later childhood, as well as on parental concerns and anxiety. This information is important for counselling parents about the prognosis for an infected child and for policy decisions on screening. Methods We prospectively studied a cohort of children identified by screening for toxoplasmosis in pregnant women or neonates between 1996 and 2000 in ten European centers. At 3 years of age, parents of children with and without congenital toxoplasmosis were surveyed about their child's development, behavior, and impairment, and about parental concerns and anxiety, using a postal questionnaire. Results Parents of 178/223 (80% infected, and 527/821 (64% uninfected children responded. We found no evidence that impaired development or behavior were more common in infected children, or that any potential effect of congenital toxoplasmosis was masked by prenatal treatment. Parents of infected children were significantly more anxious and reported more visual problems in their children. Conclusion On average, children aged three to four years with congenital toxoplasmosis identified by screening and treated during infancy in this European setting had risks of abnormal development and behavior similar to uninfected children. Parental anxiety about infected children needs to be addressed by clinicians. Future studies with longer follow up and clinician-administered assessments may be better able to detect any subtle differences in child outcomes.

  2. Final report on the developmental toxicity of naphthalene (CAS No. 91-20-3) in New Zealand White (trade name) rabbits. Rept. for 26 Mar-1 Aug 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, H.A.; Price, C.J.; Marr, M.C.; Myers, C.B.; Heindel, J.J.

    1992-07-13

    Naphthalene (NAP) is a polyaromatic hydrocarbon produced from petroleum and coal tar. NAP is widely used in the manufacture of dyes, synthetic tanning agents, and lubricants; it is also a common constituent of mothballs. Exposure to NAP can occur in the home and workplace, and ingestion or inhalation can cause severe toxicity in humans, especially in infants and individuals with a deficiency in the enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Because of the large population at risk, and since NAP readily crosses the placenta, it was evaluated as a developmental toxicant. Accordingly, NAP (0, 20, 80, or 120 mg/kg/day) was administered in corn oil by gavage to pregnant rabbits during the major period of organogenesis (gd 6-19). Maternal clinical signs, weight, and food consumption were monitored from gd 0 to 30. On gd 30, fetuses were removed from the does and examined for effects of NAP on growth, viability, and morphological development. The results from the study provide no definitive evidence for NAP being toxic to the fetus or doe at doses as high as 120 mg/kg/day. Higher doses were not examined in the study due to the reported incidence of 40% maternal mortality following administration of 150 mg/kg/day NAP to pregnant rabbits in a range-finding study.

  3. Ring Chromosome 9 and Chromosome 9p Deletion Syndrome in a Patient Associated with Developmental Delay: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankaran, Aswini; Kanakavalli, Murthy K; Anuradha, Deenadayalu; Samuel, Chandra R; Kandukuri, Lakshmi R

    2016-01-01

    Ring chromosomes have been described for all human chromosomes and are typically associated with physical and/or mental abnormalities resulting from a deletion of the terminal ends of both chromosome arms. This report describes the presence of a ring chromosome 9 in a 2-year-old male child associated with developmental delay. The proband manifested a severe phenotype comprising facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, and seizures. The child also exhibited multiple cell lines with mosaic patterns of double rings, a dicentric ring and loss of the ring associated with mitotic instability and dynamic tissue-specific mosaicism. His karyotype was 46,XY,r(9)(p22q34)[89]/46,XY,dic r(9; 9)(p22q34;p22q34)[6]/45, XY,-9[4]/47,XY,r(9),+r(9)[1]. However, the karyotypes of his parents and elder brother were normal. FISH using mBAND probe and subtelomeric probes specific for p and q arms for chromosome 9 showed no deletion in any of the regions. Chromosomal microarray analysis led to the identification of a heterozygous deletion of 15.7 Mb from 9p22.3 to 9p24.3. The probable role of the deleted genes in the manifestation of the phenotype of the proband is discussed.

  4. Reproductive Decision-Making: A Milestone, and the Road Ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philipov, D.; Klobas, J.E.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Philipov, D.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Klobas, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the main achievements of the REPRO project as reported in this volume and in other related publications by members of the REPRO team. It also considers limitations and discusses opportunities for future research that arise and are still to be addressed. Last but

  5. Reproductive Decision-Making: A Milestone, and the Road Ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philipov, D.; Klobas, J.E.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Philipov, D.; Liefbroer, A.C.; Klobas, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the main achievements of the REPRO project as reported in this volume and in other related publications by members of the REPRO team. It also considers limitations and discusses opportunities for future research that arise and are still to be addressed. Last but

  6. Completion of Level 4 Milestone M4AT-15OR2301039 for the Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements Work Package AT-15OR230103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-14

    This memorandum constitutes our September 2015 level 4 milestone for the project entitled “Johnson Noise Thermometry for Drift-free Temperature Measurements” and satisfies the Milestone/Activity (Conclude HFIR field demonstration of JNT prototype). The progress summary describes the work performed to complete the subject milestone.

  7. The relation between age of attainment of motor milestones and future cognitive and motor development in Bangladeshi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadani, Jena Derakhshani; Tofail, Fahmida; Cole, Tim; Grantham-McGregor, Sally

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for easily administered, low-cost measures to assess child development in large field studies. Many researchers evaluate the age of attainment of motor milestones, but there is little information on their validity. A large longitudinal study (MINIMat) was conducted in a poor rural area of Bangladesh and we assessed the age of attainment of motor milestones in a subsample of over 2000 children. We examined their association with scores on the Bayley psychomotor development index (PDI) and mental development index (MDI) at 18 months and with scores on the Movement Assessment Battery for Children and with intelligence quotient (IQ) on the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence at 64 months. A field worker visited the children's homes monthly from 3 to 12 months of age and then at 15 months and examined the children. Mothers recorded the date of attainment of the milestones. Age of attainment of walking and standing alone was moderately correlated with the PDI and had significant but low associations with later motor development. They were as good as the PDI in predicting later motor development and could be used in field studies for that purpose. Milestone age of attainment had significant but low correlations with MDI and later IQ. Height for age at 15 months was related to milestones and later IQ and motor development and accounted for some of the association between milestones and IQ. Milestone age of attainment may not be sensitive enough to be used as an indicator of later IQ.

  8. Draft Sequence of the Rice Genome:A Milestone Publication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ Following China's announcement of its completion of the draft genome sequence of the rice indica subspecies on October 12,2001 (page 126, Bulletin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Vol. 15 No.3), Chinese scientists published their findings in the April 5 issue of Science, the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). In the same issue, a team of scientists with the Switzerland-based Syngenta company reported a similar achievement for another major rice subspecies,japonica.

  9. Developmental Work Personality Scale: An Initial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; Keim, Jeanmarie

    2002-01-01

    The research reported in this article involved using the Developmental Model of Work Personality to create a scale to measure work personality, the Developmental Work Personality Scale (DWPS). Overall, results indicated that the DWPS may have potential applications for assessing work personality prior to client involvement in comprehensive…

  10. Reviews of engineering’s most notable milestones in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Turriago

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This section presents some outlines describing the advances made by engineering in Colombia. Turriago begins the section by describing aspects regarding the history of petrol in Colombia until the middle of the 20th century. René Andrés Meziat Restrepo then gives a summary of his book entitled GestiónAmbiental—Obras Civiles y Construcciones (Environmental Management–Civil Work and Construction and Hernando Monroy Valencia describes the development of Colombian construction-related engineering whilst Augusto Ruiz Corredor closes the section with a report about pre-stressed concrete bridges in Colombia. These reviews provide readers with an opportunity to learn more about part of the role which engineering has played in Colombia’s development.

  11. Milestones in software engineering and knowledge engineering history: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Águila, Isabel M; Palma, José; Túnez, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    We present a review of the historical evolution of software engineering, intertwining it with the history of knowledge engineering because "those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." This retrospective represents a further step forward to understanding the current state of both types of engineerings; history has also positive experiences; some of them we would like to remember and to repeat. Two types of engineerings had parallel and divergent evolutions but following a similar pattern. We also define a set of milestones that represent a convergence or divergence of the software development methodologies. These milestones do not appear at the same time in software engineering and knowledge engineering, so lessons learned in one discipline can help in the evolution of the other one.

  12. Post-processing V&V level II ASC milestone (2360) results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Elmer; Karelitz, David B.; Brunner, Thomas A.; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Weirs, V. Gregory; Shead, Timothy M.

    2007-09-01

    The 9/30/2007 ASC Level 2 Post-Processing V&V Milestone (Milestone 2360) contains functionality required by the user community for certain verification and validation tasks. These capabilities include loading of edge and face data on an Exodus mesh, run-time computation of an exact solution to a verification problem, delivery of results data from the server to the client, computation of an integral-based error metric, simultaneous loading of simulation and test data, and comparison of that data using visual and quantitative methods. The capabilities were tested extensively by performing a typical ALEGRA HEDP verification task. In addition, a number of stretch criteria were met including completion of a verification task on a 13 million element mesh.

  13. Timing of motor milestone achievement and development of overweight in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgen, Camilla Schmidt; Due, Pernille; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo;

    Background:  Late achievement of motor milestones may increase the risk of overweight since early achievers have an increased opportunity to build lean body mass and expend energy.  Overweight infants may have delayed achievement of gross motor milestones, as excess body fat limit mobility. Aim......: 1. To investigate whether delayed ability to sit and walk is associated with overweight at age 7 years 2. To examine whether age (in months) at achieving the ability to sit and walk is associated with a higher BMI at age 7. 3. To examine whether increasing weight at birth and at 5 months of age...... postpone the achievement of the ability to sit and walk independently. Methods: Data: The Danish National Birth Cohort. Study population consisted of 32,973 children who were followed from birth to age 7. Children were born between 1998 and 2003 and follow-up took place from 2003 to2010. Information...

  14. Milestones and entrustable professional activities: The key to practically translating competencies for interprofessional education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Susan J; Reeves, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based education and practice have become foundational for developing interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional collaboration. There has been a plethora of competencies developed in these areas recently, both at individual institutions and nationally; however, their effective integration and thus potential has not been fully realized educationally. Milestones and entrustable professional activities (EPAs) are new concepts and assessment approaches from medical education that provide a way to functionally use and maximize competencies to ensure that competency is attained. They are applicable to learning activities both within the classroom and the clinic, as well as to lifelong learning. This paper defines and describes milestones and EPAs, considers the importance of their application to IPE, and summarizes a future research project that will identify EPAs for an IPE curriculum.

  15. Developmental coordination disorders: state of art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaivre-Douret, L

    2014-01-01

    In the literature, descriptions of children with motor coordination difficulties and clumsy movements have been discussed since the early 1900s. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), it is a marked impairment in the development of fine or global motor coordination, affecting 6% of school-age children. All these children are characterized for developmental coordination disorder (DCD) in motor learning and new motor skill acquisition, in contrast to adult apraxia which is a disorder in the execution of already learned movements. No consensus has been established about etiology of DCD. Intragroup approach through factor and cluster analysis highlights that motor impairment in DCD children varies both in severity and nature. Indeed, most studies have used screening measures of performance on some developmental milestones derived from global motor tests. A few studies have investigated different functions together with standardized assessments, such as neuromuscular tone and soft signs, qualitative and quantitative measures related to gross and fine motor coordination and the specific difficulties -academic, language, gnosic, visual motor/visual-perceptual, and attentional/executive- n order to allow a better identification of DCD subtypes with diagnostic criteria and to provide an understanding of the mechanisms and of the cerebral involvement.

  16. Influence of height in neuropsychological functioning and acquisition of motor milestones in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Caycho Rodríguez

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available It aims to present a brief review on the effects of height above the sea level in neuropsychological functioning and the acquisition of motor milestones in children. While in Peru, there is no objective data to support such information, the reasoning described here is based on recent findings on the functional importance of the biophysical contexts that suggests the presence of slight alterations sensoperceptive functioning in high altitude conditions.

  17. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Helen; Marzano, David; Lanham, Michael; Stein, Tamara; Curran, Diana; Hammoud, Maya

    2014-01-01

    Background The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions) had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System. PMID:25430640

  18. Preparing medical students for obstetrics and gynecology milestone level one: a description of a pilot curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Morgan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME Milestones in the field of obstetrics and gynecology has arrived with Milestones Level One defined as the level expected of an incoming first-year resident. Purpose: We designed, implemented, and evaluated a 4-week elective for fourth-year medical school students, which utilized a multimodal approach to teaching and assessing the Milestones Level One competencies. Methods: The 78-hour curriculum utilized traditional didactic lectures, flipped classroom active learning sessions, a simulated paging curriculum, simulation training, embalmed cadaver anatomical dissections, and fresh-frozen cadaver operative procedures. We performed an assessment of student knowledge and surgical skills before and after completion of the course. Students also received feedback on their assessment and management of eight simulated paging scenarios. Students completed course content satisfaction surveys at the completion of each of the 4 weeks. Results: Students demonstrated improvement in knowledge and surgical skills at the completion of the course. Paging confidence trended toward improvement at the completion of the course. Student satisfaction was high for all of the course content, and the active learning components of the curriculum (flipped classroom, simulation, and anatomy sessions had higher scores than the traditional didactics in all six categories of our student satisfaction survey. Conclusions: This pilot study demonstrates a practical approach for preparing fourth-year medical students for the expectations of Milestones Level One in obstetrics and gynecology. This curriculum can serve as a framework as medical schools and specific specialties work to meet the first steps of the ACGME's Next Accreditation System.

  19. RAVEN: Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Diego Mandelli; Joshua Cogliati; Robert Kinoshita

    2013-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  20. RAVEN. Dynamic Event Tree Approach Level III Milestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinoshita, Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics are not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DPRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed to perform two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, the control logic infrastructure is used to model stochastic events, such as components failures, and perform uncertainty propagation. Such stochastic modeling is deployed using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This report focuses on the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, a DPRA analysis, using DET, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out (SBO) scenario is presented.

  1. A suggested emergency medicine boot camp curriculum for medical students based on the mapping of Core Entrustable Professional Activities to Emergency Medicine Level 1 milestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamba S

    2016-03-01

    simulation cases assessed students’ skills. Results: Students (n=9 reported increased confidence in the following procedures: intubation (1.5–2.1, thoracostomy (1.1–1.9, and central venous catheterization (1.3–2 (a three-point Likert-type scale, with 1= not yet confident/able to perform with supervision to 3= confident/able to perform without supervision. Psychomotor skills testing showed on average, 26% of students required verbal prompting with performance errors, 48% with minor performance errors, and 26% worked independently without performance errors. All participants reported: 1 increased knowledge and confidence in covered topics and 2 overall satisfaction with simulation experience. Conclusion: Mapping the Core EPAs for Entering Residency to the EM milestones at Level 1 identifies educational gaps for graduating medical students seeking a career in EM. Educators designing EM boot camps for medical students should consider these identified gaps, procedures, and clinical conditions during the development of a core standardized curriculum. Keywords: emergency medicine, clerkship, medical education, competency, EPA 10, milestones

  2. Developmental colour agnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zandvoort, Martine J E; Nijboer, Tanja C W; de Haan, Edward

    2007-08-01

    Colour agnosia concerns the inability to recognise colours despite intact colour perception, semantic memory for colour information, and colour naming. Patients with selective colour agnosia have been described and the deficit is associated with left hemisphere damage. Here we report a case study of a 43-year-old man who was referred to us with a stroke in his right cerebellar hemisphere. During the standard assessment it transpired that he was unable to name coloured patches. Detailed assessment of his colour processing showed that he suffers from a selective colour agnosia. As he claimed to have had this problem all his life, and the fact that the infratentorial infarct that he had incurred was in an area far away from the brain structures that are known to be involved in colour processing, we suggest that he is the first reported case of developmental colour agnosia.

  3. Medical Science: A Milestone in Scientific Field and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indraneel Banerjee

    2013-09-01

    a problem for the doctors. Communication Skills is a part of the undergraduate medical course followed in Manipal College of Medical Science by the pharmacology department. In Communication Skills a medical student is taught how to communicate with the student from the very beginning of their medical course [4].The article on the application of logistic regression model has also exhibited that how the standards and quality of the article can be increased by using Odds Ratio. The author has also rightly pointed that in Nepal most of the studies are reported by using percentages and the quality of article can be increased by using proper statistical techniques [5].All the articles are written well maintaining good standard and quality. The First edition of a journal is always an asset. I wish all the best for the Medical Science in future.

  4. Developmental coordination disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001533.htm Developmental coordination disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Developmental coordination disorder is a childhood disorder. It leads to ...

  5. Developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Robin L; Pennington, Bruce F

    2012-05-26

    Dyslexia is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterised by slow and inaccurate word recognition. Dyslexia has been reported in every culture studied, and mounting evidence draws attention to cross-linguistic similarity in its neurobiological and neurocognitive bases. Much progress has been made across research specialties spanning the behavioural, neuropsychological, neurobiological, and causal levels of analysis in the past 5 years. From a neuropsychological perspective, the phonological theory remains the most compelling, although phonological problems also interact with other cognitive risk factors. Work confirms that, neurobiologically, dyslexia is characterised by dysfunction of the normal left hemisphere language network and also implicates abnormal white matter development. Studies accounting for reading experience demonstrate that many recorded neural differences show causes rather than effects of dyslexia. Six predisposing candidate genes have been identified, and evidence shows gene by environment interaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Milestone – a selective herbicide for the control of important grasses and broadleaved weeds in winter oilseed rape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zotz, Agnes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available MilestoneTM herbicide contains the active substance propyzamide (500 g/L and aminopyralid (5.3 g a.e./L and is formulated as a suspension concentrate (SC. Registration for Milestone for the use in winter oilseed rape was granted in Germany in July 2014. The active substance propyzamide is well known from the product KerbTM FLO (containing 500 g/L propyzamide, suspension concentrate, SC which is widely used in winter oilseed rape (WITTROCK et al., 2008. Aminopyralid is formulated in the commercial product Runway (clopyralid + picloram + aminopyralid. Milestone is applied with a use rate of 1.5 L/ha as a post-emergence herbicide from growth stage BBCH 14 of the crop at the beginning of November until February. Kerb FLO is applied with a use rate of 1.875 L/ha at the same timing. The efficacy of Milestone and Kerb FLO was tested in randomised and replicated plot trials in Germany, France and the United Kingdom. Milestone and Kerb FLO showed comparable and very high control levels against monocotyledonous species such as Alopecurus myosuroides, Apera spica-venti, Bromus species and volunteer cereals. Milestone shows a broader spectrum of activity vs. Kerb FLO against dicotyledonous weeds such as Matricaria chamomilla, Papaver rhoeas and Centaurea cyanus. The use of Milestone in dense crops (as the situation was in autumn 2014 for many areas in Germany shows very high efficacy levels as well. The comparison of various application timings between end of October until beginning of December confirms the application date early November for best results. Milestone controls herbicide-resistant weed populations and can be considered an important part of a resistance management program not only in winter oilseed rape but as a component of an integrated weed management strategy in cropping systems.

  7. 1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLACK, D.G.

    1999-03-25

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

  8. 1996 Hanford site report on land disposal restrictions for mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, D.G.

    1996-04-01

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-26-OIF. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of land disposal-restricted mixed waste management at the Hanford Site.

  9. The Domain of Developmental Psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, L. Alan; Rutter, Michael

    1984-01-01

    Describes how developmental psychopathology differs from related disciplines, including abnormal psychology, psychiatry, clinical child psychology, and developmental psychology. Points out propositions underlying a developmental perspective and discusses implications for research in developmental psychopathology. (Author/RH)

  10. Prevalence and Functioning of Children with Cerebral Palsy in Four Areas of the United States in 2006: A Report from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Russell S.; Wingate, Martha S.; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Doernberg, Nancy S.; Arneson, Carrie L.; Benedict, Ruth E.; Mulvihill, Beverly; Durkin, Maureen S.; Fitzgerald, Robert T.; Maenner, Matthew J.; Patz, Jean A.; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To estimate the prevalence of cerebral palsy (CP) and the frequency of co-occurring developmental disabilities (DDs), gross motor function (GMF), and walking ability using the largest surveillance DD database in the US. Methods: We conducted population-based surveillance of 8-year-old children in 2006 (N = 142,338), in areas of Alabama,…

  11. Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 14 Sites, United States, 2008. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries. Volume 61, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baio, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Problem/Condition: Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are a group of developmental disabilities characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication and by restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Symptoms typically are apparent before age 3 years. The complex nature of these disorders, coupled with a lack of…

  12. Brief Report: Do Service Dog Providers Placing Dogs with Children with Developmental Disabilities Use Outcome Measures and, if So, What Are They?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterly, Felicity; Percy, Carol; Ward, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the outcomes expected and assessed by those providing service dogs to children with developmental disabilities. Seventeen registered service dog providers were invited to complete a mixed methods online survey. Five providers, who prepared dogs to work with a wide range of conditions and behaviours, mainly…

  13. Preemie Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head to follow familiar voices Laughs and squeals Combines sounds more often (for example, “aaah-oooh”, “gaaa- ... a time Puts small objects in container Language Combines movements with sounds (reaches for an object and ...

  14. Historic Milestone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    As a well-known Confucius saying reads, "At 30 years old, Iplanted my feet firm upon the ground." It means a 30-year-old is ex-pected to be mature and established. That is also true for the relationsbetween China and the United States.

  15. What is developmental dyspraxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, D

    1995-12-01

    The idea of developmental dyspraxia has been discussed in the research literature for almost 100 years. However, there continues to be a lack of consensus regarding both the definition and description of this disorder. This paper presents a neuropsychologically based operational definition of developmental dyspraxia that emphasizes that developmental dyspraxia is a disorder of gesture. Research that has investigated the development of praxis is discussed. Further, different types of gestural disorders displayed by children and different mechanisms that underlie developmental dyspraxia are compared to and contrasted with adult acquired apraxia. The impact of perceptual-motor, language, and cognitive impairments on children's gestural development and the possible associations between these developmental disorders and developmental dyspraxia are also examined. Also, the relationship among limb, orofacial, and verbal dyspraxia is discussed. Finally, problems that exist in the neuropsychological assessment of developmental dyspraxia are discussed and recommendations concerning what should be included in such an assessment are presented.

  16. TTP SR1-6-WT-31, Milestone XXX, Milestone C.1-2 Report: Functional Test of Pour Spout Insert and Knife Edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, D.F.

    1999-07-29

    During the first two years of radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility process, several areas for improvement in melter design were identified. Due to the need for a process that allows continuous melter operation, the down time associated with disruption to melter operation and pouring has significant cost impact. A major objective of this task is to address performance limitations and deficiencies identified by the user.

  17. Performance Criteria for Capture and/or Immobilization Technologies - Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Soelberg, Nick [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The capture and subsequent immobilization of the four regulated volatile radionuclides (3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I) from the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel (UNF) reprocessing facility has been a topic of substantial research interest for the US Department of Energy and its international colleagues. Removal of some or all of these radionuclides (e.g., based upon fuel burnup, fuel type, cooling time) from the plant effluent streams prior to discharge to the environment is required to meet regulations set forth by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Upon removal, the radionuclide, as well as associated sorbents that cannot be cost-effectively regenerated, is destined for conversion to a waste form. Research in separation and capture methodologies has included a wide range of technologies, including liquid caustic scrubbing systems, solid adsorbents, and cryogenic distillation. The studies of waste forms have been correspondingly diverse. In considering the technologies available for future development and implementation of both sorbents and waste forms, it is necessary to identify benchmark measures of performance to evaluate objectively each sorbent system or waste form.

  18. Milestone Report - M3FT-15OR03120215 - Recommend HIP Conditions for AgZ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to continue research to determine if HIPing could directly convert I-Ag0Z into a suitable waste form. Fiscal year (FY) 2015 work completed studies of Phase IIA, IIB, and IIC samples. Product consistency testing (PCT) of Phase IIA samples resulted in iodine release below detection limit for six of twelve samples. This is promising and indicates that a durable waste form may be produced through HIPing even if transformation of the zeolite to a distinct mineral phase does not occur. From PCT results of Phase IIA samples, it was determined that future pressing should be conducted at a temperature of 900°C. Phase IIC testing continued production of samples to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional variations, and an expanded temperature range. The density of each sample was determined and x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns were obtained. In all cases, there was nothing in the XRD analyses to indicate the creation of any AgI-containing silicon phase; the samples were found to be largely amorphous.

  19. Dissolver Off-gas Hot Operations Authorization (AFCI CETE Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL

    2009-06-01

    The head-end processing of the Coupled-End-to-End (CETE) Demonstration includes fuel receipt, fuel disassembly, exposure of fuel (e.g., by segmenting the fuel pins), voloxidation of the fuel to separate tritium, and fuel dissolution. All of these processing steps with the exception of the dissolution step will be accomplished in the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) (Building 3525). The final headend step will be performed in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (Building 7920). The primary purpose of the fuel dissolution step is to prepare the solid fuel for subsequent liquid separations steps. This is accomplished by dissolving the fuel solids using nitric acid. During the dissolution process gases are evolved. Oxides of nitrogen are the primary off-gas components generated by the reactions of nitric acid and the fuel oxides however, during the dissolution and sparging of the resulting solution, iodine, C-14 as carbon dioxide, xenon, and krypton gasses are also released to the off-gas stream. The Dissolver Off-gas treatment rack provides a means of trapping these volatile fission products and other gases via various trapping media. Specifically the rack will recover iodine on a solid sorbent bed, scrub NOx in a water/acid column, scrub CO{sub 2} in a caustic scrubber column, remove moisture with solid sorbent drier beds and recover Xe and Kr using solid absorbent beds. The primary purpose of this experimental rack and the off-gas rack associated with the voloxidation equipment located at IFEL is to close the material balances around the volatile gases and to provide an understanding of the impacts of specific processing conditions on the fractions of the volatile components released from the various head-end processing steps.

  20. Plutonium Immobilization Material Characterization: Milestone 1 Report - Initiate Design of Prototype Material Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C.J.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this task is to analyze impure oxide materials exiting from front-end processing prior to storage for feed blending. There are three goals to be accomplished with this task: reduce reblending (currently projected at 7% with an optimized ordering of the incoming material streams), determine if impure feed prep operations are performing adequately, and reduce plant operating costs by replacing wet prep elemental analyses whether conducted in the immobilization facility or in existing laboratories. An additional potential application is the analysis of blended oxide prior to first-stage UO{sub 2} and precursor addition.

  1. Line-Focus Solar Power Plant Cost Reduction Plan (Milestone Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.; Mehos, M.; Turchi, C.; Glatzmaier, G.; Moss, T.

    2010-12-01

    Line-focus solar collectors, in particular parabolic trough collectors, are the most mature and proven technology available for producing central electricity from concentrated solar energy. Because this technology has over 25 years of successful operational experience, resulting in a low perceived risk, it is likely that it will continue to be a favorite of investors for some time. The concentrating solar power (CSP) industry is developing parabolic trough projects that will cost billions of dollars, and it is supporting these projects with hundreds of millions of dollars of research and development funding. While this technology offers many advantages over conventional electricity generation -- such as utilizing plentiful domestic renewable fuel and having very low emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants -- it provides electricity in the intermediate power market at about twice the cost of its conventional competitor, combined cycle natural gas. The purpose of this document is to define a set of activities from fiscal year 2011 to fiscal year 2016 that will make this technology economically competitive with conventional means.

  2. FY 17 Q1 Commercial integrated heat pump with thermal storage milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Heiba, Ahmad [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Baxter, Van D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rice, C. Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The commercial integrated heat pump with thermal storage (AS-IHP) offers significant energy saving over a baseline heat pump with electric water heater. The saving potential is maximized when the AS-IHP serves coincident high water heating and high space cooling demands. A previous energy performance analysis showed that the AS-IHP provides the highest benefit in the hot-humid and hot-dry/mixed dry climate regions. Analysis of technical potential energy savings for these climate zones based on the BTO Market calculator indicated that the following commercial building market segments had the highest water heating loads relative to space cooling and heating loads education, food service, health care, lodging, and mercantile/service. In this study, we focused on these building types to conservatively estimate the market potential of the AS-IHP. Our analysis estimates maximum annual shipments of ~522,000 units assuming 100% of the total market is captured. An early replacement market based on replacement of systems in target buildings between 15 and 35 years old was estimated at ~136,000 units. Technical potential energy savings are estimated at ~0.27 quad based on the maximum market estimate, equivalent to ~13.9 MM Ton CO2 emissions reduction.

  3. L4 Milestone Report for MixEOS 2016 experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loomis, Eric Nicholas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, Paul Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merritt, Elizabeth Catherine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guzik, Joyce Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Denne, Patrick Hagen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Accurate simulations of fluid and plasma flows require accurate thermodynamic properties of the fluids or plasmas. This thermodynamic information is represented by the equations of state of the materials. For pure materials, the equations of state may be represented by analytical models for idealized circumstances, or by tabular means, such as the Sesame tables. However, when a computational cell has a mixture of two or more fluids, the equations of state are not well understood, particularly under the circumstances of high energy densities. This is a particularly difficult issue for Eulerian codes, wherein mixed cells arise simply due to the advection process. LANL Eulerian codes typically assume an “Amagat’s Law” (or Law of Partial Volumes) for the mixture in which the pressures and temperatures of fluids are at an equilibrium that is consistent with the fluids being segregated within the cell. However, for purposes of computing other EOS properties, e.g., bulk modulus, or sound speed, the fluids are considered to be fully “mixed”. LANL has also been investigating implementing instead “Dalton’s Law” in which the total pressure is considered to be the sum of the partial pressures within the cell. For ideal gases, these two laws give the same result. Other possibilities are nonpressure- temperature-equilibrated approaches in which the two fluids are not assumed to “mix” at all, and the EOS properties of the cell are computed from, say, volume-weighted averages of the individual fluid properties. The assumption of the EOS properties within a mixed cell can have a pronounced effect on the behavior of the cell, resulting in, for example, different shock speeds, pressures, temperatures and densities within the cell. There is no apparent consensus as to which approach is best under HED conditions, though we note that under typical atmospheric and near atmospheric conditions the differences may be slight.

  4. Piloting a Structured Practice Audit to Assess ACGME Milestones in Written Handoff Communication in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shannon K; Farnan, Jeanne M; McConville, John F; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-06-01

    Written communication skills are integral to patient care handoffs. Residency programs require feasible assessment tools that provide timely formative and summative feedback, ideally linked to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestones. We describe the use of 1 such tool-UPDATED-to assess written handoff communication skills in internal medicine interns. During 2012-2013, the authors piloted a structured practice audit at 1 academic institution to audit written sign-outs completed by 45 interns, using the UPDATED tool, which scores 7 aspects of sign-out communication linked to milestones. Intern sign-outs were audited by trained faculty members throughout the year. Results were incorporated into intern performance reviews and Clinical Competency Committees. A total of 136 sign-outs were audited (averaging 3.1 audits per intern). In the first trimester, 14 interns (31%) had satisfactory audit results. Five interns (11%) had critical deficiencies and received immediate feedback, and the remaining 26 (58%) were assigned future audits due to missing audits or unsatisfactory scores. In the second trimester, 21 interns (68%) had satisfactory results, 1 had critical deficiencies, and 9 (29%) required future audits. Nine of the 10 remaining interns in the final trimester had satisfactory audits. Faculty time was estimated at 10 to 15 minutes per sign-out audited. The UPDATED audit is a milestone-based tool that can be used to assess written sign-out communication skills in internal medicine residency programs. Future work is planned to adapt the tool for use by senior supervisory residents to appraise sign-outs in real time.

  5. Cutis laxa with growth and developmental delay, wrinkly skin syndrome and gerodermia osteodysplastica: a report of two unrelated patients and a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Steiner

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Two unrelated patients of different sexes are described, both presenting with congenital redundant skin (cutis laxa, growth deficiency, mental retardation and bone dystrophy. Parental consanguinity in both families and a more pronounced severity of the neurological disease in the male patient were present. Both patients were diagnosed in infancy as having De Barsy syndrome, but clinical follow-up revealed that the clinical picture was compatible with the diagnosis of cutis laxa with growth and developmental delay (CLGDD, gerodermia osteodysplastica (GO and wrinkly-skin syndrome (WWS. It has recently been suggested that cutis laxa with growth and developmental delay, gerodermia osteodysplastica and wrinkly skin syndrome are the same condition. A review concerning this diagnosis is also presented.

  6. 新一代里程碑 摩托罗拉Milestone2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    摩托罗拉的Droid2发布后,众多机友对它的GSM/WCDMA版本也十分期待,之前曾有流言称GSM/WCDMA版本的Droid2将不采用Milestone(里程碑)的商品名.而改称Droid Pro,不过这一流言随着摩托官方正式发布Milestone2后不攻自破。

  7. L2 Milestone 5433: Characterization of Dynamic Behavior of AM and Conventionally Processed Stainless Steel (316L and 304L)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, George Thompson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Livescu, Veronica [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rigg, P. A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. for Shock Physics; Trujillo, Carl Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cady, Carl McElhinney [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chen, Shuh-Rong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carpenter, John S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lienert, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fensin, Saryu Jindal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Knapp, Cameron M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Beal, Roberta Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morrow, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dippo, Olivia F. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Jones, David Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez, Daniel Tito [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valdez, James Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-26

    For additive manufacturing (AM) of metallic materials, the certification and qualification paradigm needs to evolve as there currently exists no broadly accepted “ASTM- or DIN-type” additive manufacturing certified process or AM-material produced specifications. Accordingly, design, manufacture, and thereafter implementation and insertion of AM materials to meet engineering applications requires detailed quantification of the constitutive (strength and damage) properties of these evolving materials, across the spectrum of metallic AM methods, in comparison/contrast to conventionally-manufactured metals and alloys. This report summarizes the 316L SS research results and presents initial results of the follow-on study of 304L SS. For the AM-316L SS investigation, cylindrical samples of 316L SS were produced using a LENS MR-7 laser additive manufacturing system from Optomec (Albuquerque, NM) equipped with a 1kW Yb-fiber laser. The microstructure of the AM-316L SS was characterized in both the “as-built” Additively Manufactured state and following a heat-treatment designed to obtain full recrystallization to facilitate comparison with annealed wrought 316L SS. The dynamic shock-loading-induced damage evolution and failure response of all three 316L SS materials was quantified using flyer-plate impact driven spallation experiments at peak stresses of 4.5 and 6.35 GPa. The results of these studies are reported in detail in the first section of the report. Publication of the 316L SS results in an archival journal is planned. Following on from the 316L SS completed work, initial results on a study of AM 304L SS are in progress and presented herein. Preliminary results on the structure/dynamic spallation property behavior of AM-304L SS fabricated using both the directed-energy LENS and an EOS powder-bed AM techniques in comparison to wrought 304L SS is detailed in this Level 2 Milestone report.

  8. [Neurotransmission in developmental disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoshihiro

    2008-11-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) is a heterogeneous developmental disorder with an etiology that is not fully understood. AD/HD has been considered to occur due to a disturbance in cathecholaminergic neurotransmission, with particular emphasis on dopamine. The neurotransmission of dopamine in subcortical regions such as the basal ganglia and limbic areas is synaptic; on the other hand, dopamine neurotransmission in the frontal cortex is quite different, because there are very few dopamine transporters (DAT) in the frontal cortex that allow dopamine to diffuse away from the dopamine synapse ("volume transmission"). It is now clear that noradrenergic neurons play a key regulatory role in dopaminergic function in the frontal cortex. Furthermore, serotonergic neurons exert an inhibitory effect on midbrain dopamine cell bodies, and they have an influence on dopamine release in terminal regions. There is accumulating neurobiological evidence pointing toward a role of the serotonin system in AD/HD. The etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is still unclear, but information from genetics, neuropathology, brain imaging, and basic neuroscience has provided insights into the understanding of this developmental disorder. In addition to abnormal circuitry in specific limbic and neocortical areas of the cerebral cortex, impairments in brainstem, cerebellar, thalamic, and basal ganglia connections have been reported. Numerous studies have pointed to abnormalities in serotonin and glutamate neurotransmission. Three important aspects involved in the pathophysiology of ASD have been proposed. The first is cell migration, the second is unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory networks, and the third is synapse formation and pruning, the key factors being reelin, neurexin, and neuroligin. Serotonin is considered to play an important role in all of these aspects of the pathophysiology of ASD. Finally, I would like to emphasize that it is crucial in the field of child

  9. Evolutionary developmental psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-01-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection...

  10. Reproductive and developmental toxicology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Ramesh C

    2011-01-01

    .... Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology is a comprehensive and authoritative resource providing the latest literature enriched with relevant references describing every aspect of this area of science...

  11. Multiple routes and milestones in the folding of HIV-1 protease monomer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Bonomi

    Full Text Available Proteins fold on a time scale incompatible with a mechanism of random search in conformational space thus indicating that somehow they are guided to the native state through a funneled energetic landscape. At the same time the heterogeneous kinetics suggests the existence of several different folding routes. Here we propose a scenario for the folding mechanism of the monomer of HIV-1 protease in which multiple pathways and milestone events coexist. A variety of computational approaches supports this picture. These include very long all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, an analysis of the network of clusters found in multiple high-temperature unfolding simulations and a complete characterization of free-energy surfaces carried out using a structure-based potential at atomistic resolution and a combination of metadynamics and parallel tempering. Our results confirm that the monomer in solution is stable toward unfolding and show that at least two unfolding pathways exist. In our scenario, the formation of a hydrophobic core is a milestone in the folding process which must occur along all the routes that lead this protein towards its native state. Furthermore, the ensemble of folding pathways proposed here substantiates a rational drug design strategy based on inhibiting the folding of HIV-1 protease.

  12. A milestone-based approach to breast imaging instruction for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Jennifer A; Nicholson, Brandi T; Rochman, Carrie M; Peppard, Heather R; Pease, Clinton S; DeMartini, Nicholas A

    2014-06-01

    Residency is historically an apprenticeship, learning through observation and instruction with varying degrees of structure. Since July 2013, the Next Accreditation System (NAS) of the ACGME has required the use of progressive milestones for each radiology residency rotation. The authors describe how a breast imaging curriculum can be structured to comply with the NAS. The breast imaging rotations move from basic recognition and management of suspicious findings, through the detection of more subtle findings and learning of biopsy skills, and finally to the synthesis and management of more advanced findings. Likewise, patient communication moves from sharing imaging findings to the more challenging situation of breaking the bad news of a cancer diagnosis. This progression of skills mirrors the objectives of levels 1 to 4 of the NAS. Learning objectives have been adapted to form very specific milestones for each rotation, which results in a shared responsibility between residents and faculty members. Using clear expectations may improve the uniformity of teaching, resident satisfaction, and facilitate performance review for residents who are struggling. Didactic lectures, case-based conferences, teaching file cases, and assigned readings provide different approaches to education, allowing variation in learning styles. Performance on the breast imaging section on the ACR Diagnostic Radiology In-Training examination at our institution has risen from below the 50th percentile to around the 80th percentile beginning in 2011.

  13. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  14. Genetics and Developmental Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plomin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    One of the major changes in developmental psychology during the past 50 years has been the acceptance of the important role of nature (genetics) as well as nurture (environment). Past research consisting of twin and adoption studies has shown that genetic influence is substantial for most domains of developmental psychology. Present research…

  15. Social worker assessment of bad news delivery by emergency medicine residents: a novel direct-observation milestone assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Alice Ann; Spear-Ellinwood, Karen; Berman, Melissa; Nisson, Peyton; Rhodes, Suzanne Michelle

    2016-09-01

    The skill of delivering bad news is difficult to teach and evaluate. Residents may practice in simulated settings; however, this may not translate to confidence or competence during real experiences. We investigated the acceptability and feasibility of social workers as evaluators of residents' delivery of bad news during patient encounters, and assessed the attitudes of both groups regarding this process. From August 2013 to June 2014, emergency medicine residents completed self-assessments after delivering bad news. Social workers completed evaluations after observing these conversations. The Assessment tools were designed by modifying the global Breaking Bad News Assessment Scale. Residents and social workers completed post-study surveys. 37 evaluations were received, 20 completed by social workers and 17 resident self-evaluations. Social workers reported discussing plans with residents prior to conversations 90 % of the time (18/20, 95 % CI 64.5, 97.8). Social workers who had previously observed the resident delivering bad news reported that the resident was more skilled on subsequent encounters 90 % of the time (95 % CI 42.2, 99). Both social workers and residents felt that prior training or experience was important. First-year residents valued advice from social workers less than advice from attending physicians, whereas more experienced residents perceived advice from social workers to be equivalent with that of attending physicians (40 versus 2.9 %, p = 0.002). Social worker assessment of residents' abilities to deliver bad news is feasible and acceptable to both groups. This formalized self-assessment and evaluation process highlights the importance of social workers' involvement in delivery of bad news, and the teaching of this skill. This method may also be used as direct-observation for resident milestone assessment.

  16. Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-RenLiu; Qian Liu; Jing Li; Sulpicio G. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    1 IntroductionMillions of newborn and infants receive anesthetic,sedative and analgesic drugs for surgery and painful procedures on a daily basis.Recent laboratory reports clearly demonstrate that anesthetic and sedative drugs induced both neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive deficits in laboratory models.This issue is of paramount interest to pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists because it questions the safety of anesthetics used for fetal and neonatal anesthesia[1-2].In an attempt to summarize the rapidly expanding laboratorybased literature on anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN),this review will examine published reports on the characterization,mechanisms and alleviation of this phenomenon.

  17. Milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. Build redesigned HFIR rabbit capsules and make ready for insertion for irradiation in HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Richard H [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Okuniewski, Maria A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report details the fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development irradiation capsules (FCRP20 and FCRP03), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. These irradiation experiments irradiate metal parallelepiped specimens that may consist of various compositions including uranium metal, steel, etc. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division. A complete fabrication package record is maintained by THIEG and is available upon request.

  18. Tank characterization report for double shell tank 241-AP-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelman, W.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-07

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AP-104. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  19. Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-S-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1996-09-19

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-S-107. This report supports the requirements of Tri- Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  20. Tank characterization report for single shell tank 241-S-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1996-09-19

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-S-107. This report supports the requirements of Tri- Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  1. A Milestone in China's Space History——The White Paper on China's Space Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Baozhu

    2007-01-01

    The white paper document titled "China's Space Activities", released in November 2000 by the Information Office of the State Council, represents the first time for China to fully,systematically and publicly introduce to the world China's space development strategy and concerned policies .Its release is a milestone event in the country's space history, bearing great importance and profound influence to its future space efforts .The paper here describes the shaping processes of some important new ideas and concepts, including the connotative meaning of "space activities in a broad sense" and the roles and positions of different sectors in such activities .It also briefly discusses related policies concerning the country's space development and shortterm concepts and plans on its civil space activities.

  2. Data co-processing for extreme scale analysis level II ASC milestone (4745).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, David; Moreland, Kenneth D.; Oldfield, Ron A.; Fabian, Nathan D.

    2013-03-01

    Exascale supercomputing will embody many revolutionary changes in the hardware and software of high-performance computing. A particularly pressing issue is gaining insight into the science behind the exascale computations. Power and I/O speed con- straints will fundamentally change current visualization and analysis work ows. A traditional post-processing work ow involves storing simulation results to disk and later retrieving them for visualization and data analysis. However, at exascale, scien- tists and analysts will need a range of options for moving data to persistent storage, as the current o ine or post-processing pipelines will not be able to capture the data necessary for data analysis of these extreme scale simulations. This Milestone explores two alternate work ows, characterized as in situ and in transit, and compares them. We nd each to have its own merits and faults, and we provide information to help pick the best option for a particular use.

  3. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  4. 20 CFR 411.581 - Can an EN receive milestone and outcome payments for months after a beneficiary takes his or her...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can an EN receive milestone and outcome... Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.581 Can an EN receive milestone and outcome payments for months... assigned to an EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) takes his or her ticket out of assignment (see §...

  5. 20 CFR 411.555 - Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome... Payment Systems § 411.555 Can the EN keep the milestone and outcome payments even if the beneficiary does not achieve all outcome months? (a) Yes. The EN (or State VR agency acting as an EN) can keep...

  6. Developmental Trajectories of Early Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatta, Sira; Laakso, Marja-Leena; Tolvanen, Asko; Ahonen, Timo; Aro, Tuija

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study focused on developmental trajectories of prelinguistic communication skills and their connections to later parent-reported language difficulties. Method: The participants represent a subset of a community-based sample of 508 children. Data include parent reports of prelinguistic communication skills at 12, 15, 18, and 21 months…

  7. Developmental Trajectories of Early Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatta, Sira; Laakso, Marja-Leena; Tolvanen, Asko; Ahonen, Timo; Aro, Tuija

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study focused on developmental trajectories of prelinguistic communication skills and their connections to later parent-reported language difficulties. Method: The participants represent a subset of a community-based sample of 508 children. Data include parent reports of prelinguistic communication skills at 12, 15, 18, and 21 months…

  8. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Milestones in Medical Research, The Human Genome and ClinicalTrials.gov Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents Donald West King, M.D. FNLM ... genetic foundation of all human beings; the second, a comprehensive information service to ...

  9. Movement skill assessment in children with profound multiple disabilities : a psychometric analysis of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Putten, A; Vlaskamp, C; Reynders, K; Nakken, H

    Objective: To analyse the psychometric properties of the Top Down Motor Milestone Test (TDMMT), an internationally used instrument in the planning and evaluation of movement-oriented interventions. Setting: Centres for special education in the Netherlands. Subjects: Children with profound multiple

  10. The relationship of training milestones with racing success in a population of Standardbred horses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J C; Rogers, C W; Firth, E C

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the association between attainment of training milestones by 2-year-old horses with racing outcomes in a population of Standardbred racehorses in New Zealand. Retrospective records of the 2001/2002-born Standardbred foals were obtained. The three training milestones used were: registered with a trainer, entered in a trial, and competed in a race. The racing outcomes were length of career in years raced and number of race starts, and total earnings. Cox regression analysis was used to assess the association between attainment of the three milestones by 2-year-olds and the number of race starts and years raced. Logistic regression models were used to determine the association between attainment of the milestones by 2-year-olds and the outcomes won and placed in a race. Linear regression was used to model the association between attainment of the milestones by 2-year-olds and annual earnings and total earnings (transformed using Ln (earnings+NZ$100)). Of 3,032 horses in the population, 1,018 (33.6%) registered with a trainer, 609 (20.1%) trialled, and 272 (9.0%) raced as 2-year-olds. Horses that first raced as 2-year-olds had a longer racing career and more race starts than those that that did not race as 2-year-olds (pHorses that were registered with a trainer, trialled or raced as 2-year-olds were more likely to have won or placed in a race than those that did not achieve the milestones as 2-year-olds (phorses that trialled and raced as 2-year-olds had greater total earnings than those that did not, and male horses had a greater total earnings than female horses. Only one third the Standardbred racehorses born in 2001/2002 registered with a trainer as 2-year-olds, but the results of this study indicate that horses that began training, trialling, or racing as 2-year-olds had longer and more successful careers than those that did not achieve the milestones as 2-year-olds. Further investigation is required to quantify the management practices of these

  11. Facts about Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sets MADDS Case Definitions Articles & Key Findings Free Materials Multimedia & ... Developmental disabilities are a group of conditions due to an impairment in physical, learning, language, or behavior areas. These conditions begin during ...

  12. Socialization and Developmental Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccoby, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Considers the divergent paths taken by research in cognitive development and research in social-emotional development, arguing that studies of socialization need to become more developmental. Discusses meanings of development that may affect the socialization process. (Author/CI)

  13. Developmental Idealism in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Arland; Xie, Yu

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the intersection of developmental idealism with China. It discusses how developmental idealism has been widely disseminated within China and has had enormous effects on public policy and programs, on social institutions, and on the lives of individuals and their families. This dissemination of developmental idealism to China began in the 19(th) century, when China met with several military defeats that led many in the country to question the place of China in the world. By the beginning of the 20(th) century, substantial numbers of Chinese had reacted to the country's defeats by exploring developmental idealism as a route to independence, international respect, and prosperity. Then, with important but brief aberrations, the country began to implement many of the elements of developmental idealism, a movement that became especially important following the assumption of power by the Communist Party of China in 1949. This movement has played a substantial role in politics, in the economy, and in family life. The beliefs and values of developmental idealism have also been directly disseminated to the grassroots in China, where substantial majorities of Chinese citizens have assimilated them. These ideas are both known and endorsed by very large numbers in China today.

  14. Bullying, hazing, and workplace harassment: the nexus in professional sports as exemplified by the first NFL Wells report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofler, Ian R

    2016-12-01

    In the sporting context there is a significant nexus between adult workplace harassment and two other critical, developmentally related areas, that of child and adolescent bullying, and college hazing. These are all addressed, albeit obliquely and perhaps inadvertently, in the Miami Dolphins saga and the subsequent NFL Wells Report of 2013-2014. This is a significant document. It is even a brave, if politically expedient milestone. It evaluates the complex inter-personal and inter- and intra-systemic contributions within a sporting organization. Wells also elucidates a case where there is overlapping damage to individuals and systems as a result of malignant bullying, harassment, and hazing within overlapping systems. Constructive approaches to team building, and other positive alternatives to hazing may be the best place to initiate trust and verify institutional change at all these levels.

  15. Transgenerational developmental programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Catherine E; Ozanne, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    The concept of developmental programming suggests that the early life environment influences offspring characteristics in later life, including the propensity to develop diseases such as the metabolic syndrome. There is now growing evidence that the effects of developmental programming may also manifest in further generations without further suboptimal exposure. This review considers the evidence, primarily from rodent models, for effects persisting to subsequent generations, and evaluates the mechanisms by which developmental programming may be transmitted to further generations. In particular, we focus on the potential role of the intrauterine environment in contributing to a developmentally programmed phenotype in subsequent generations. The literature was systematically searched at http://pubmed.org and http://scholar.google.com to identify published findings regarding transgenerational (F2 and beyond) developmental programming effects in human populations and animal models. Transmission of programming effects is often viewed as a form of epigenetic inheritance, either via the maternal or paternal line. Evidence exists for both germline and somatic inheritance of epigenetic modifications which may be responsible for phenotypic changes in further generations. However, there is increasing evidence for the role of both extra-genomic components of the zygote and the interaction of the developing conceptus with the intrauterine environment in propagating programming effects. The contribution of a suboptimal reproductive tract environment or maternal adaptations to pregnancy may be critical to inheritance of programming effects via the maternal line. As the effects of age exacerbate the programmed metabolic phenotype, advancing maternal age may increase the likelihood of developmental programming effects being transmitted to further generations. We suggest that developmental programming effects could be propagated through the maternal line de novo in generations

  16. Developmental attentional dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Naama; Kerbel, Noa; Shvimer, Lilach

    2010-01-01

    Attentional dyslexia is a reading deficit in which letters migrate between neighboring words, but are correctly identified and keep their correct relative position within the word. Thus, for example, fig tree can be read as fig free or even tie free. This study reports on 10 Hebrew-speaking individuals with developmental attentional dyslexia and explores in detail the characteristics of their between-word errors. Each participant read 2290 words, presented in word pairs: 845 horizontally presented word pairs, 240 vertically presented word pairs, and 60 nonword pairs. The main results are that almost all migrations preserve the relative position of the migrating letter within the word, indicating that the between-word position can be impaired while the within-word position encoding remains intact. This result is also supported by the finding that the participants did not make many letter position errors within words. Further analyses indicated that more errors occur in longer words, that most migrations occur in final letters (which are the leftmost letters in Hebrew), and that letters migrate both horizontally and vertically, and more frequently from the first to the second word in horizontal presentation. More migrations occurred when the result of migration was an existing word. Similarity between words in a pair did not increase error rates, and more migrations occurred when the words shared fewer letters. The between-word errors included the classic errors of migration of a letter between words, but also omission of one instance of a letter that appeared in the same position in the two words, an error that constituted a considerable percentage of the between-word errors, and intrusion of a letter from one word to the corresponding position in the neighboring word without erasing the original letter in the same position.

  17. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  18. The State of the States in Developmental Disabilities. Fifth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddock, David; Hemp, Richard; Parish, Susan; Westrich, James

    This volume reports on the fifth nationwide survey of trends in mental retardation (MR) and developmental disabilities (DD). It begins with four chapters summarizing trends in the nation as a whole. The first chapter is "Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives" (David Braddock). This chapter…

  19. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  20. Research in Developmental Writing Courses and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabrio, David; Burchfield, Mitchel

    2007-01-01

    This article briefly surveys the literature on ways that developmental writing students learn; reports on student learning style research carried out in developmental writing classrooms at Texas A&M University-Kingsville and Southwest Texas Junior College, using the "Productivity Environmental Preference Survey"; suggests specific…

  1. Oral Health Characteristics and Dental Rehabilitation of Children with Global Developmental Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global developmental delay (GDD is a chronic neurological disturbance which includes defects in one or more developmental domains. The developmental domain can be motor, cognitive, daily activities, speech or language, and social or personal development. The etiology for GDD can be prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal. It can be diagnosed early in childhood as the delay or absence of one or more developmental milestones. Hence the role of pedodontist and pediatricians becomes more crucial in identifying this condition. The diagnosis of GDD requires a detailed history including family history and environmental risk factors followed by physical and neurological examinations. Investigations for GDD include diagnostic laboratory tests, brain imaging, and other evidence-based evaluations. GDD affects multiple developmental domains that not only have direct bearing on maintenance of oral health, but also require additional behavior management techniques to deliver optimal dental care. This paper describes two different spectra of children with GDD. Since the severity of GDD can vary, this paper also discusses the different behavior management techniques that were applied to provide dental treatment in such children.

  2. Stem Cells of Dental Origin: Current Research Trends and Key Milestones towards Clinical Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    About, Imad

    2016-01-01

    Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs), including Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs), Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED), and Stem Cells From Apical Papilla (SCAP), have been extensively studied using highly sophisticated in vitro and in vivo systems, yielding substantially improved understanding of their intriguing biological properties. Their capacity to reconstitute various dental and nondental tissues and the inherent angiogenic, neurogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of their secretome have been a subject of meticulous and costly research by various groups over the past decade. Key milestone achievements have exemplified their clinical utility in Regenerative Dentistry, as surrogate therapeutic modules for conventional biomaterial-based approaches, offering regeneration of damaged oral tissues instead of simply “filling the gaps.” Thus, the essential next step to validate these immense advances is the implementation of well-designed clinical trials paving the way for exploiting these fascinating research achievements for patient well-being: the ultimate aim of this ground breaking technology. This review paper presents a concise overview of the major biological properties of the human dental MSCs, critical for the translational pathway “from bench to clinic.”

  3. Assessing EM Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Milestones Using a Novel Debate Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamtani, Mira; Scott, Kevin R; DeRoos, Francis J; Conlon, Lauren W

    2015-11-01

    Graduate medical education is increasingly focused on patient safety and quality improvement; training programs must adapt their curriculum to address these changes. We propose a novel curriculum for emergency medicine (EM) residency training programs specifically addressing patient safety, systems-based management, and practice-based performance improvement, called "EM Debates." Following implementation of this educational curriculum, we performed a cross-sectional study to evaluate the curriculum through resident self-assessment. Additionally, a cross-sectional study to determine the ED clinical competency committee's (CCC) ability to assess residents on specific competencies was performed. Residents were overall very positive towards the implementation of the debates. Of those participating in a debate, 71% felt that it improved their individual performance within a specific topic, and 100% of those that led a debate felt that they could propose an evidence-based approach to a specific topic. The CCC found that it was easier to assess milestones in patient safety, systems-based management, and practice-based performance improvement (sub-competencies 16, 17, and 19) compared to prior to the implementation of the debates. The debates have been a helpful venue to teach EM residents about patient safety concepts, identifying medical errors, and process improvement.

  4. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Votapka, Lane W; Amaro, Rommie E

    2015-10-01

    The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2-, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor.

  5. Multiscale Estimation of Binding Kinetics Using Brownian Dynamics, Molecular Dynamics and Milestoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane W Votapka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic rate constants of binding were estimated for four biochemically relevant molecular systems by a method that uses milestoning theory to combine Brownian dynamics simulations with more detailed molecular dynamics simulations. The rate constants found using this method agreed well with experimentally and theoretically obtained values. We predicted the association rate of a small charged molecule toward both a charged and an uncharged spherical receptor and verified the estimated value with Smoluchowski theory. We also calculated the kon rate constant for superoxide dismutase with its natural substrate, O2-, in a validation of a previous experiment using similar methods but with a number of important improvements. We also calculated the kon for a new system: the N-terminal domain of Troponin C with its natural substrate Ca2+. The kon calculated for the latter two systems closely resemble experimentally obtained values. This novel multiscale approach is computationally cheaper and more parallelizable when compared to other methods of similar accuracy. We anticipate that this methodology will be useful for predicting kinetic rate constants and for understanding the process of binding between a small molecule and a protein receptor.

  6. Stem Cells of Dental Origin: Current Research Trends and Key Milestones towards Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Bakopoulou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs, including Dental Pulp Stem Cells (DPSCs, Stem Cells from Human Exfoliated Deciduous teeth (SHED, and Stem Cells From Apical Papilla (SCAP, have been extensively studied using highly sophisticated in vitro and in vivo systems, yielding substantially improved understanding of their intriguing biological properties. Their capacity to reconstitute various dental and nondental tissues and the inherent angiogenic, neurogenic, and immunomodulatory properties of their secretome have been a subject of meticulous and costly research by various groups over the past decade. Key milestone achievements have exemplified their clinical utility in Regenerative Dentistry, as surrogate therapeutic modules for conventional biomaterial-based approaches, offering regeneration of damaged oral tissues instead of simply “filling the gaps.” Thus, the essential next step to validate these immense advances is the implementation of well-designed clinical trials paving the way for exploiting these fascinating research achievements for patient well-being: the ultimate aim of this ground breaking technology. This review paper presents a concise overview of the major biological properties of the human dental MSCs, critical for the translational pathway “from bench to clinic.”

  7. The IJHPR publishes its 100th article, and other momentous milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Bruce; Israeli, Avi

    2013-12-19

    The Israel Journal of Health Policy Research (IJHPR) was launched in January 2012 and it is now publishing its 100th article. It was accepted into PubMed after only six months of publication and it has now also been accepted by Thomson Reuters for inclusion in the Web of Science as well as the Social Science Citation Index. It is rare for a new journal to reach these milestones at such an early stage in its development.One of the key factors in the journal's acceptance into these prestigious databases has been its unique national/international approach - exploring both what Israel can learn from health systems in other countries and what other countries can learn from Israeli health care. Another key factor has been its ability to attract high quality contributions from virtually all of the Israeli universities and research centers involved in health policy. A third important factor has been the journal's ability to engage leading international scholars as contributors and/or editorial board members.

  8. Highlights from e-EPS: New milestone reached for the European XFEL construction

    CERN Multimedia

    Jorge Rivero González

    2013-01-01

    e-EPS News is an addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   In June 2013 an important milestone was reached for the European X-ray free-electron laser [XFEL] with the completion of its underground portion. Located in the Hamburg area (Germany), the European XFEL is one of the largest and most ambitious European projects to date. Starting full operations in 2016, the European XFEL is expected to generate intensive, ultrashort X-ray flashes that will open up entirely new areas of research with X-rays that are currently inaccessible. Organisations from 12 European countries, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland are members of the European XFEL consortium, with the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron [DESY] as the main shareholder. The total length of the facility will be 3.4km and ...

  9. Binge toluene exposure in pregnancy and pre-weaning developmental consequences in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Scott E; Hannigan, John H

    2013-01-01

    Binge Toluene Exposure in Pregnancy and Pre-weaning Developmental Consequences in Rats. Bowen, S.E. and Hannigan, J.H. The persistent rate of abuse of inhaled organic solvents, especially among women of child-bearing age, raises the risk for teratogenic effects of maternal toluene abuse. In this study, timed-pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were exposed from Gestation Day (GD) 8 to GD20 to 12,000 or 8000 parts per million (ppm) toluene, or 0ppm (controls) for 30min twice daily, 60min total daily exposure. Pups were assessed from postnatal day (PN) 4 to PN21 using a developmental battery measuring growth (i.e., body weight), maturational milestones (e.g., eye opening & incisor eruption), and biobehavioral development (e.g., negative geotaxis & surface righting). Pups exposed in utero to 12,000ppm or 8000ppm toluene weighed significantly less than the non-exposed control pups beginning at PN4 and PN12 (respectively) until PN21. Toluene resulted in significant increases in an index of poor perinatal outcome, specifically a composite of malformations, defined "runting" and neonatal death. No significant delays were observed in reaching maturational milestones. The results reveal that brief, repeated, prenatal exposure to high concentrations of toluene can cause growth retardation and malformations in rats. A comparison of the present, conservative results with findings in previous studies implies that binge patterns of toluene exposure in pregnant rats modeling human solvent abuse can result in developmental and morphological deficits in offspring. These results do not exclude the possibility that maternal toxicity as well as teratogenic effects of toluene may contribute to outcomes. The results suggest that abuse of inhaled organic solvents like toluene may result in similar early developmental outcomes in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A milestone in the doubled haploid pathway of cassava: a milestone in the doubled haploid pathway of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz): cellular and molecular assessment of anther-derived structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, P I P; Ordoñez, C A; Lopez-Lavalle, L A Becerra; Dedicova, B

    2014-01-01

    This study was aimed at inducing androgenesis in cultured anthers of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) to develop a protocol for the production of doubled haploids. Microspore reprogramming was induced in cassava by cold or heat stress of anthers. Since the anthers contain both haploid microspores and diploid somatic cells, it was essential to verify the origin of anther-derived calli. The origin of anther-derived calli was assessed by morphological screening followed by histological analysis and flow cytometry (FCM). Additionally, simple sequence repeat (SSR) and amplified fragmented length polymorphism (AFLP) assays were used for the molecular identification of the microspore-derived calli. The study clearly demonstrated the feasibility of producing microspore-derived calli using heat- or cold-pretreated anthers. Histological studies revealed reprogramming of the developmental pathway of microspores by symmetrical division of the nucleus. Flow cytometry analysis revealed different ploidy level cell types including haploids, which confirmed their origin from the microspores. The SSR and AFLP marker assays independently confirmed the histological and FCM results of a haploid origin of the calli at the DNA level. The presence of multicellular microspores in the in vitro system indicated a switch of developmental program, which constitutes a crucial step in the design of protocols for the regeneration of microspore-derived embryos and plants. This is the first detailed report of calli, embryos, and abnormal shoots originated from the haploid cells in cassava, leading to the development of a protocol for the production of doubled haploid plants in cassava.

  11. Developmental disorders of vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaburda, Albert M; Duchaine, Bradley C

    2003-08-01

    This review of developmental disorders of vision focuses on only a few of the many disorders that disrupt visual development. Given the enormity of the human visual system in the primate brain and complexity of visual development, however, there are likely hundreds or thousands of types of disorders affecting high-level vision. The rapid progress seen in developmental dyslexia and WMS demonstrates the possibilities and difficulties inherent in researching such disorders, and the authors hope that similar progress will be made for congenital prosopagnosia and other disorders in the near future.

  12. Development of ATC Tower Systems: Electronic Flight Strip System at LKPR and the Implementation of TAXI Milestone to SUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Černý

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the Electronic Flight Strip System used at Václav Havel Airport Prague and presents the results of an analysis of the clearance input from ATCOs. The outcomes indicate that various clearances are frequently issued together in a common time frame, usually depending on the traffic flow structure. The focus then moves towards the implementation of the TAXI milestone into the Start-Up Manager. The used statistic methods indicate that the amount of TTOT recalculations after AOBT decreases, but not significantly. However, the accuracy of TTOT after TAXI clearance is considerably better. The mean and most common deviation of ATOT from TTOT after the implementation of TAXI milestone is -1 minute. The results are challenged and confirmed by a further analysis of the TTOT-ATOT difference regarding individual stand/RWY pairs. The results may be used to adjust the assumed taxi times.

  13. Working Memory and Developmental Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lucy A.; Botting, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Children with developmental language impairments (DLI) are often reported to show difficulties with working memory. This review describes the four components of the well-established working memory model, and considers whether there is convincing evidence for difficulties within each component in children with DLI. The emphasis is on the most…

  14. Working Memory and Developmental Language Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lucy A.; Botting, Nicola

    2017-01-01

    Children with developmental language impairments (DLI) are often reported to show difficulties with working memory. This review describes the four components of the well-established working memory model, and considers whether there is convincing evidence for difficulties within each component in children with DLI. The emphasis is on the most…

  15. Síndrome de gerstmann de desenvolvimento associada a neoplasia cerebelar: relato de um caso e revisão da literatura Developmental Gerstmann syndrome associated with cerebellar neoplasm: a case report with review of litterature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lineu César Werneck

    1975-03-01

    Full Text Available É relatado um caso de síndrome de Gerstmann de Desenvolvimento, que apresentava acalculia, agrafía, confusão direita-esquerda, agnosia de dedos e apraxia construcional, em um menino de 7 anos. O tratamento inicial com metilfenidato determinou bons resultados no que concerne à hiperatividade, à atenção e à apraxia construcional. Durante o curso clínico, o paciente apresentou sintomatologia cerebelar, hipertensão intracraniana, tendo sido feita intervenção cirúrgica na fossa posterior, sendo excisado um meduloblastoma de cerebelo. O autor acredita que é esta a primeira descrição na literatura da concomitância da síndrome de Gerstmann de Desenvolvimento e neoplasia de fossa posterior. São feitos comentários focalizando cada um dos aspectos clínicos, fatores etiológicos e topográficos.A Developmental Gerstmann syndrome in a 7 years-old-boy with hyperactivity, short attention span, acalculia, agraphia, right-left confusion, finger agnosia and constructional apraxia is reported. An initial trial with methylphenidate was done with good improvement regarding hyperactivity, attention span and constructional apraxia. In the clinical course developed a cerebellar syndrome and intracranial hypertension. Surgical exploration of the cerebellum discovered a medulloblastoma. The author believes that this is the first described association of Developmental Gerstmann syndrome and cerebellar neoplasia. The clinical findings, the etiology and the topography of the Gerstmann syndrome are discussed.

  16. Isolating the Role of Psychological Dysfunction in Smoking Cessation Failure: Relations of Personality and Psychopathology to Attaining Smoking Cessation Milestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Adam M.; Japuntich, Sandra J.; Piper, Megan E.; Jorenby, Douglas E.; Schlam, Tanya R.; Baker, Timothy B.

    2012-01-01

    Research exploring psychological dysfunction as a predictor of smoking cessation success may be limited by nonoptimal predictor variables (i.e., categorical psychodiagnostic measures vs. continuous personality-based manifestations of dysfunction) and imprecise outcomes (i.e., summative point prevalence abstinence vs. constituent cessation milestone measures). Accordingly, this study evaluated the unique and overlapping relations of broad-spectrum personality traits (positive emotionality, negative emotionality, and constraint) and past-year psychopathology (anxiety, mood, and substance use disorder) to point prevalence abstinence and three smoking cessation milestones: (1) initiating abstinence; (2) first lapse; and (3) transition from lapse to relapse. Participants were daily smokers (N=1365) enrolled in a smoking cessation treatment study. In single predictor regression models, each manifestation of internalizing dysfunction (lower positive emotionality, higher negative emotionality, and anxiety and mood disorder) predicted failure at one or more cessation milestone. In simultaneous predictor models, lower positive and higher negative emotionality significantly predicted failure to achieve milestones after controlling for psychopathology. Psychopathology did not predict any outcome when controlling for personality. Negative emotionality showed the most robust and consistent effects, significantly predicting failure to initiate abstinence, earlier lapse, and lower point prevalence abstinence rates. Substance use disorder and constraint did not predict cessation outcomes, and no single variable predicted lapse-to-relapse transition. These findings suggest that personality-related manifestations of internalizing dysfunction are more accurate markers of affective sources of relapse risk than mood and anxiety disorders. Further, individuals with high trait negative emotionality may require intensive intervention to promote the initiation and early maintenance of

  17. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  18. Self-Report Measures of the Home Learning Environment in Large Scale Research: Measurement Properties and Associations with Key Developmental Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Frank; Nguyen, Cuc; Cloney, Daniel S.; Tayler, Collette; Adams, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    Favourable home learning environments (HLEs) support children's literacy, numeracy and social development. In large-scale research, HLE is typically measured by self-report survey, but there is little consistency between studies and many different items and latent constructs are observed. Little is known about the stability of these items and…

  19. Subjective Mental Health, Peer Relations, Family, and School Environment in Adolescents with Intellectual Developmental Disorder: A First Report of a New Questionnaire Administered on Tablet PCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Petra; Johnels, Jakob Åsberg; Thorson, Maria; Broberg, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored the subjective mental health of adolescents with intellectual disabilities, while proxy ratings indicate an overrepresentation of mental health problems. The present study reports on the design and an initial empirical evaluation of the Well-being in Special Education Questionnaire (WellSEQ). Questions, response scales,…

  20. Developmental paediatric anaesthetic pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Tom Giedsing

    2015-01-01

    Safe and effective drug therapy in neonates, infants and children require detailed knowledge about the ontogeny of drug disposition and action as well how these interact with genetics and co-morbidity of children. Recent advances in developmental pharmacology in children follow the increased...

  1. Learning Developmental Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, James M.; Weintraub, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    This article describes an educational intervention designed to promote the ability and willingness of MBA students to lead through coaching. MBA leadership students are trained to serve as coaches for undergraduate business students in a developmental assessment center. In this compelling context, their main source of influence is the ability to…

  2. Arguments from Developmental Order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind - getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged 'philosophy of development.'

  3. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...

  4. Developmental Purposes of Commercial Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Practical Pointers, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Listed are 45 table, target, manipulative, active, and creative games with such developmental purposes as associative learning, tactile discrimination, and visual motor integration. Information includes the name of the item, distributor, price, description, and developmental purpose. (JYC)

  5. Screening of Developmental Problem, Day care Centers, Sari, 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kosaryan, M.D.

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: There has not been enough attention towards the domains of development in pediatrics,so there are many deficiencies in monitoring the achievement of developmental milestones in our country.One of the important ways for the improvement of this problem is to use screening method. PEDS questionnaire is one of the screening tools for development. The aim of this study was to investigate about parents' evaluation of developmental status for their children.Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study. The population included infants and children under the age of 6 in day care centers of Sari. Sampling method was clustering. The tool for data collection was PEDS questionnaire (Parents' Evaluation of Developmental Status which consisted of 38 questions about demographic data and medical history of children as well as parents' concern about different developmental domains along with ''Yes'' , ''No'' and ''little'' answers. The data were analysed using SPSS11 software. Chi square and Wilcoxon were used. P<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Out of 829 questionnaires, 736 were returned (88.7%. The Sample age was 4.23 ± 1.32 gl . Fifty percent of participants were male. By average, in each developmental domains, 3.2% of parents had major concern and 9.5% had partial concern. The most common domains of concern were communication with others (6.4%, behavior (6.1%, speaking (4.3%, preschool and school education (3.1%, children's understanding (2.5%, the self care (2.1%, the use of fingers (1.4%, the use of legs and arms (1.1%. Parents' concern had a significant relationship with parent's education, residence and history of illness in children (P<0.05. Out of 23.4% of the infants and children who had later returned to the diagnosis center, 80% had behavioral disorder, 87.6% had speech disorder and 16.6% had hearing impairment..Conclusion: A considerable percentage of parents was concerned about developmental

  6. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-C-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, W.I., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-26

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-C-103. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  7. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-BX-104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-BX-104. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  8. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-AN-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-15

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-AN-107. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  9. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-SY-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conner, J.M., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-11

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in tank 241-SY-103. This report supports the requirements of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44 09.

  10. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-B-106

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mccain, D.J.

    1996-09-23

    This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-B-106. This report supports the requirements of Tri- Party Agreement Milestone M-44-09.

  11. Adults with developmental dyslexia show selective impairments in time-based and self-initiated prospective memory: Self-report and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Spark, James H; Zięcik, Adam P; Sterling, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Prospective memory (PM; memory for delayed intentions) would seem to be impaired in dyslexia but evidence is currently limited in scope. There is a need, therefore, firstly, to explore PM under controlled conditions using a broader range of PM tasks than used previously and, secondly, to determine whether objectively measured and self-reported PM problems can be found in the same individuals with dyslexia. The responses of 30 adults with dyslexia were compared with those of 30 IQ-matched adults without dyslexia on a self-report and a clinical measure of PM. Dyslexia-related deficits were shown on the clinical measure overall and, more particularly, when PM responses had to be made to cues based on time rather than environmental events. Adults with dyslexia were also more likely to forget to carry out an intention under naturalistic conditions 24h later. On the self-report questionnaire, the group with dyslexia reported significantly more frequent problems with PM overall, despite using more techniques to aid their memory. In particular, problems were identified with longer-term PM tasks and PM which had to be self-initiated. Dyslexia-related PM deficits were found under both laboratory and everyday conditions in the same participants; the first time that this has been demonstrated. These findings support previous experimental research which has highlighted dyslexia-related deficits in PM when the enacting of intentions is based on time cues and/or has to be self-initiated rather than being in prompted by environmental events. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Vilnius eastern partnership summit: milestone in EU-Russia relations – not just for Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havlik Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Vilnius Eastern Partnership Summit on 28-29th November 2013 represents a milestone in EU relations not just with respect to the six Eastern Partnership countries (EaP Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova and particularly Ukraine, but also with the EU’s ‘strategic partner’ Russia. The turbulence and numerous speculations regarding expectations about the signature of the EU-Ukraine Association Agreement (comprising a Deep and Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement - AA/DCFTA, as well as progress in initialling similar future agreements with Georgia and Moldova, have been escalating before the summit. The association agreementswould bring EaP signatory countries closer to the EU not really closer to EU membership, but closer to the application of various EU norms and standards (takeover of the ‘acquis communautaire’ and - significantly - out of the Russian orbit, for the beginning at least symbolically. The last minute postponement of the EU-Ukraine AA/DCFTA signature announced by Ukraine’s government just one week before the summit represents a serious setback for the EU. Though the EU has no ‘Plan B’ and was stunned after Ukraine’s announcement, life will continue after the summit and new initiatives will have to be started. What are the relevant issues and challenges and what is at stake? This note attempts to evaluate the consequences (economic and otherwise of alternate decisions following the Vilnius Eastern Partnership Summit, reviews some of the disputed arguments and discusses selected relevant economic issues.

  13. Milestones in plant sulfur research on sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke eBloem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Until the 1970´s of the last century sulfur (S was mainly regarded as a pollutant being the main contributor of acid rain, causing forest dieback in central Europe. When Clean Air Acts came into force at the start of the 1980´s SO2 contaminations in the air were consequently reduced within the next years. S changed from an unwanted pollutant into a lacking plant nutrient in agriculture since agricultural fields were no longer fertilized indirectly by industrial pollution. S deficiency was first noticed in Brassica crops that display an especially high S demand because of its content of S-containing secondary metabolites, the glucosinolates. In Scotland, where S depositions decreased even faster than in continental Europe, an increasing disease incidence with Pyrenopeziza brassicae was observed in oilseed rape in the beginning 1990´s and the concept of sulfur-induced-resistance (SIR was developed after a relationship between the S status and the disease incidence was uncovered. Since then a lot of research was carried out to unravel the background of SIR in the metabolism of agricultural crops and to identify metabolites, enzymes and reactions, which are potentially activated by the S metabolism to combat fungal pathogens. The S status of the crop is affecting many different plant features such as color and scent of flowers, pigments in leaves, metabolite concentrations and the release of gaseous S compounds which are directly influencing the desirability of a crop for a variety of different organisms from microorganisms, over insects and slugs to the point of grazing animals.The present paper is an attempt to sum up the knowledge about the effect of the S nutritional status of agricultural crops on parameters that are directly related to their health status and by this to SIR. Milestones in SIR research are compiled, open questions are addressed and future projections were developed.

  14. Regulations of enzymes in animals: effects of developmental processes, cancer and radiation. Progress report XI, 1 May 1976--30 April 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, W.E.

    1977-06-01

    Two outstandingly successful studies were among those outlined in the proposal last year. They are the first and last topics summarized in this progress report: the first evidence that the chemical composition of human tumors can probably be predicted on the basis of our previous studies in the rat, and the elucidation of the function of the arginine-proline pathway, its importance in fetal and tumor tissues, and its regulation. The variety of other studies are summarized under headings somewhat different from those used in the original proposal, in order to denote more clearly what was actually found, but all proposed topics have been studied to some extent.

  15. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  16. Milestones for Selection Characterization and Analysis of the Performance of a Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel and HIh-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, Robert P.

    2015-02-01

    This report presents a concise history in tabular form of events leading up to site identification in 1978, site selection in 1987, subsequent characterization, and ongoing analysis throu gh 2009 of the performance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high - level radi oactive waste at Yucca Mou ntain in southern Nevada. The tabulated events generally occurred in five periods: (1) commitment to mined geologic disposal and identification of sites; (2) site selection and analysis, based on regional geologic characterization through literature and an alogous data; (3) feasibility analysis demonstrating calculation procedures and importance of system components, based on rough measures of performance using surface exploration, waste process knowledge, and general laboratory experiments; (4) suitability analysis demonstrating viability of disposal system, based on environment - specific laboratory experiments, in - situ experiments, and underground disposal system characterization; and (5) compliance analysis, based on completed site - specific characterization . The current sixth period beyond 2010 represents a new effort to set waste management policy in the United States. Because the relationship is important to understanding the evolution of the Yucca Mountain Project , the tabulation also shows the interaction between the policy realm and technical realm using four broad categories of events : (a ) R egulatory requirements and related federal policy in laws and court decisions, (c ) Presidential and agency directives, (c) technical milestones of implemen ting institutions, and (d ) critiques of the Yucca Mountai n P roject and pertinent national and world events related to nuclear energy and radioactive waste. Preface The historical progression of technical milestones for the Yucca Mountain Project was originally developed for 10 journal articles in a special issue of Reliability Engineering System Safe ty on the performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain

  17. Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PeBenito, R; Fisch, C B; Fisch, M L

    1988-09-01

    The tetrad of finger agnosia, dysgraphia, dyscalculia, and right-left disorientation make up Gerstmann's syndrome. The tetrad has been infrequently described in children with learning disability and has been called developmental Gerstmann's syndrome (DGS). Developmental Gerstmann's syndrome may occur in brain-damaged and apparently normal children. Five children in whom DGS occurred in association with brain abnormalities underwent long-term observation, which indicated persistence of the deficits. The identification of these cases suggests that DGS may not be as rare as previously thought and may often be unrecognized. Testing for the Gerstmann elements in learning-disabled children may identify otherwise undiagnosed cases of DGS and should be routinely employed in the neurologic examination. Until appropriate teaching methods for DGS are found, "bypassing" the deficits and utilizing the child's strengths, plus counseling, seem to offer an effective treatment approach.

  18. Right hemisphere reading in a case of developmental deep dyslexia

    OpenAIRE

    Funnell, Elaine; Pitchford, Nicola; de Haan, Bianca; Morgan, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The right hemisphere hypothesis of deep dyslexia has received support from functional imaging studies of acquired deep dyslexia following damage to the left cerebral hemisphere, but no imaging studies of cases of developmental deep dyslexia, in which brain damage is not suspected, have been reported. In this paper, we report the first evidence of right hyperactivation in an adult case of developmental deep dyslexia. Hyperactivation was observed in the right inferior frontal cortex during fMRI...

  19. Developmental Partial Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Duteil, Nastassia Pouradier; Rossi, Francesco; Boscain, Ugo; Piccoli, Benedetto

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of Developmental Partial Differential Equation (DPDE), which consists of a Partial Differential Equation (PDE) on a time-varying manifold with complete coupling between the PDE and the manifold's evolution. In other words, the manifold's evolution depends on the solution to the PDE, and vice versa the differential operator of the PDE depends on the manifold's geometry. DPDE is used to study a diffusion equation with source on a growing surface whose gro...

  20. NIDCAP and developmental care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Haumont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal mortality in very low birth weight infants has dramatically decreased during the last decades. However, 15-25% of these infants will show neurodevelopmental impairment later on. The aim of implementing early developmental care (EDC, emerged as a new field in neonatology, is to create an intervention program designed to provide support for optimal neurobehavioral development during this highly vulnerable period of brain growth. The theoretical framework, which underlies the approach, is supported by research in different scientific fields, including neuroscience, psychology, medicine and nursing. EDC utilizes a range of medical and nursing interventions that aim to decrease the stress of preterm neonates in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. The Neonatal Individualized Developmental Care Assessment Program (NIDCAP is an integrated and holistic form of family-centered developmental care. Changing the traditional NICU towards an EDC-NICU includes training nursing and medical staff, investing in their quality and most importantly keeping parents in proximity to the infants. The new challenge of modern neonatology is to restore the mother-infant dyad applying “couplet care” starting at birth until discharge. Most of the European NICUs apply some elements of EDC, but it is more consistent in northern Europe. The development of NIDCAP training centers in Europe demonstrates the evolution of care. It is likely that future research and intervention programs will optimize our practices. Developmental care could prove to be an important recent step in improving outcome in extremely preterm neonates. Proceedings of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · The last ten years, the next ten years in Neonatology Guest Editors: Vassilios Fanos, Michele Mussap, Gavino Faa, Apostolos Papageorgiou

  1. Developmental dyslexia and vision

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Patrick Quercia,1 Léonard Feiss,2 Carine Michel31Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, France; 3University of Burgundy, Dijon, INSERM U1093, Cognition, Action et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Dijon, FranceAbstract: Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combin...

  2. Evolutionary developmental psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Ashley C; Bjorklund, David F

    2010-02-01

    The field of evolutionary developmental psychology can potentially broaden the horizons of mainstream evolutionary psychology by combining the principles of Darwinian evolution by natural selection with the study of human development, focusing on the epigenetic effects that occur between humans and their environment in a way that attempts to explain how evolved psychological mechanisms become expressed in the phenotypes of adults. An evolutionary developmental perspective includes an appreciation of comparative research and we, among others, argue that contrasting the cognition of humans with that of nonhuman primates can provide a framework with which to understand how human cognitive abilities and intelligence evolved. Furthermore, we argue that several aspects of childhood (e.g., play and immature cognition) serve both as deferred adaptations as well as imparting immediate benefits. Intense selection pressure was surely exerted on childhood over human evolutionary history and, as a result, neglecting to consider the early developmental period of children when studying their later adulthood produces an incomplete picture of the evolved adaptations expressed through human behavior and cognition.

  3. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs.

  4. Cerebellar toxoplasmosis in HIV/AIDS infant: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibebuike, Kaunda; Mantanga, Leo; Emereole, Obioma; Ndolo, Patrice; Kajee, Afsana; Gopal, Rasik; Pather, Sugeshnee

    2012-12-01

    Cerebellar mass lesion is an uncommon presentation of toxoplasmosis. The authors report one rare case in an 11-month-old HIV/AIDS female infant who presented with deterioration in her developmental milestones. CT scan revealed a ring-enhancing mass lesion in the right cerebellar hemisphere with secondary obstructive hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted prior to posterior fossa decompression and biopsy of the lesion. The specimens obtained were divided into two. One specimen was sent for histological diagnosis immediately after surgery while the second specimen was preserved until the release of the histology report. The initial histopathology report indicated a neoplastic process. Immunohistochemical stains were attempted but interpreted with difficulty due to severe tissue necrosis. After waiting for close to 6 weeks without a definite histological diagnosis, the preserved second specimen was sent for histological analysis as a fresh specimen, and reported a diagnosis of toxoplasmosis. This case presented diagnostic challenges to the authors whose radiological impressions of either a neoplastic lesion or a tuberculoma (based on our local neuroepidemiology) were reinforced by intraoperative findings highly suggestive of tuberculoma but which contrasted with the histological report, first as a neoplastic lesion and later toxoplasmosis. Although cerebellar toxoplasmosis is a rare complication of HIV/AIDS, this case report shows that toxoplasmosis should not be overlooked as a differential diagnosis of ring-enhancing cerebellar masses in HIV/AIDS patients irrespective of the patient's age and the absence of constitutional symptoms of toxoplasmosis.

  5. Treatment planning: A key milestone to prevent treatment dropout in adolescents with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrosiers, Lyne; Saint-Jean, Micheline; Breton, Jean-Jacques

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to gain a broader appreciation of processes involved in treatment dropout in adolescents with borderline personality disorder (BPD). A constructivist grounded theory was chosen using a multiple-case research design with three embedded levels of analysis (adolescent, parent, and care setting). Theoretical sampling and the different stages of analysis specific to grounded theory were performed according to the iterative process of constant comparative analysis. Twelve cases were examined (nine dropouts among adolescents with BPD and for the purpose of falsification, one dropout of suicidal adolescent without BPD and two completed treatments among adolescents with BPD). To document the cases, three groups of informants were recruited (adolescents, parents, and therapists involved in the treatment) and 34 interviews were conducted. Psychological characteristics, perception of mental illness and mental health care, and help-seeking context were the specific treatment dropout vulnerabilities identified in adolescents with BPD and in their parents. However, their disengagement became an issue only when care-setting response--including mitigation of accessibility problems, adaptation of services to needs of adolescents with BPD, preparation for treatment, and concern for clinicians' disposition to treat--was ill-suited to these treatment dropout vulnerabilities. Treatment planning proves to be a key milestone to properly engage adolescents with BPD and their parent. Systematic assessment of treatment dropout vulnerabilities before the intervention plan is laid out could foster better-suited responses of the care setting thus decreasing the incidence of treatment discontinuation in adolescents with BPD. Treatment dropout vulnerabilities specific to adolescents with BPD and their parents can be detected before the beginning of treatment. Premature treatment termination may be prevented if the care setting considers these vulnerabilities at treatment

  6. Planning for Pre-Exascale Platform Environment (Fiscal Year 2015 Level 2 Milestone 5216)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springmeyer, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lang, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Noe, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This Plan for ASC Pre-Exascale Platform Environments document constitutes the deliverable for the fiscal year 2015 (FY15) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program Level 2 milestone Planning for Pre-Exascale Platform Environment. It acknowledges and quantifies challenges and recognized gaps for moving the ASC Program towards effective use of exascale platforms and recommends strategies to address these gaps. This document also presents an update to the concerns, strategies, and plans presented in the FY08 predecessor document that dealt with the upcoming (at the time) petascale high performance computing (HPC) platforms. With the looming push towards exascale systems, a review of the earlier document was appropriate in light of the myriad architectural choices currently under consideration. The ASC Program believes the platforms to be fielded in the 2020s will be fundamentally different systems that stress ASC’s ability to modify codes to take full advantage of new or unique features. In addition, the scale of components will increase the difficulty of maintaining an errorfree system, thus driving new approaches to resilience and error detection/correction. The code revamps of the past, from serial- to vector-centric code to distributed memory to threaded implementations, will be revisited as codes adapt to a new message passing interface (MPI) plus “x” or more advanced and dynamic programming models based on architectural specifics. Development efforts are already underway in some cases, and more difficult or uncertain aspects of the new architectures will require research and analysis that may inform future directions for program choices. In addition, the potential diversity of system architectures may require parallel if not duplicative efforts to analyze and modify environments, codes, subsystems, libraries, debugging tools, and performance analysis techniques as well as exploring new monitoring methodologies. It is difficult if not impossible to

  7. The association of 2-year-old training milestones with career length and racing success in a sample of Thoroughbred horses in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J C; Rogers, C W; Firth, E C

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that exercise early in life has a positive effect on musculoskeletal health. At present, there is little whole population research investigating the effect of racing as 2-year-olds on future racing career. To investigate the association between attaining training milestones as 2-year-olds with length of career and racing success in Thoroughbred horses in New Zealand. Retrospective data were obtained of the 2001/02-born Thoroughbred foal crop. The 3 training milestones were: registered with a trainer, trialled and raced. The association of the training milestones with career length was measured using the outcomes: number of race starts and number of years raced, in a Cox regression model. Logistic regression models analysed the association of the training milestones with the outcomes: won or placed in a race. Linear regression was performed to assess the association of training milestones with total career earnings. Of 4683 horses in the population; 3152 horses were registered with a trainer, 2661 horses trialled and 2109 horses raced. Horses that raced as 2-year-olds had significantly (Prace starts than those first raced as 3-year-olds or older, this was also true when the 2-year-old year data were omitted. Horses that raced as 2-year-olds had significantly (Pracing. Horses registered with a trainer, trialled or raced as 2-year-olds were more likely to have won or been placed in a race than those that achieved the milestones as 3-year-olds or older. Horses that first trialled and raced as 2-year-olds had greater total earnings than those that first trialled or raced at a later age. Two-year-old training milestones had a strong association with positive racing career outcomes. Horses in training or racing as 2-year-olds may have better musculoskeletal health throughout life than horses that are first in training or racing at a later age. © 2012 EVJ Ltd.

  8. Milestones for Selection, Characterization, and Analysis of the Performance of a Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechard, Robert P.

    2014-02-01

    This report presents a concise history in tabular form of events leading up to site identification in 1978, site selection in 1987, subsequent characterization, and ongoing analysis through 2008 of the performance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain in southern Nevada. The tabulated events generally occurred in five periods: (1) commitment to mined geologic disposal and identification of sites; (2) site selection and analysis, based on regional geologic characterization through literature and analogous data; (3) feasibility analysis demonstrating calculation procedures and importance of system components, based on rough measures of performance using surface exploration, waste process knowledge, and general laboratory experiments; (4) suitability analysis demonstrating viability of disposal system, based on environment-specific laboratory experiments, in-situ experiments, and underground disposal system characterization; and (5) compliance analysis, based on completed site-specific characterization. Because the relationship is important to understanding the evolution of the Yucca Mountain Project, the tabulation also shows the interaction between four broad categories of political bodies and government agencies/institutions: (a) technical milestones of the implementing institutions, (b) development of the regulatory requirements and related federal policy in laws and court decisions, (c) Presidential and agency directives and decisions, and (d) critiques of the Yucca Mountain Project and pertinent national and world events related to nuclear energy and radioactive waste.

  9. Developmental programing of thirst and sodium appetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecawi, Andre S; Macchione, Ana F; Nuñez, Paula; Perillan, Carmen; Reis, Luis C; Vivas, Laura; Arguelles, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Thirst and sodium appetite are the sensations responsible for the motivated behaviors of water and salt intake, respectively, and both are essential responses for the maintenance of hydromineral homeostasis in animals. These sensations and their related behaviors develop very early in the postnatal period in animals. Many studies have demonstrated several pre- and postnatal stimuli that are responsible for the developmental programing of thirst and sodium appetite and, consequently, the pattern of water and salt intake in adulthood in need-free or need-induced conditions. The literature systematically reports the involvement of dietary changes, hydromineral and cardiovascular challenges, renin-angiotensin system and steroid hormone disturbances, and lifestyle in these developmental factors. Therefore, this review will address how pre- and postnatal challenges can program lifelong thirst and sodium appetite in animals and humans, as well as which neuroendocrine substrates are involved. In addition, the possible epigenetic molecular mechanisms responsible for the developmental programing of drinking behavior, the clinical implications of hydromineral disturbances during pre- and postnatal periods, and the developmental origins of adult hydromineral behavior will be discussed.

  10. A genetic basis for intraspecific differences in developmental timing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tills, Oliver; Rundle, Simon D; Salinger, Moritz; Haun, Timm; Pfenninger, Markus; Spicer, John I

    2011-01-01

    Heterochrony, altered developmental timing between ancestors and their descendents, has been proposed as a pervasive evolutionary feature and recent analytical approaches have confirmed its existence as an evolutionary pattern. Yet, the mechanistic basis for heterochrony remains unclear and, in particular, whether intraspecific variation in the timing of developmental events generates, or has the potential to generate, future between-species differences. Here we make a key step in linking heterochrony at the inter- and intraspecific level by reporting an association between interindividual variation in both the absolute and relative timing (position within the sequence of developmental events) of key embryonic developmental events and genetic distance for the pond snail, Radix balthica. We report significant differences in the genetic distance of individuals exhibiting different levels of dissimilarity in their absolute and relative timing of developmental events such as spinning activity, eyespot formation, heart ontogeny, and hatching. This relationship between genetic and developmental dissimilarity is consistent with there being a genetic basis for variation in developmental timing and so suggests that intraspecific heterochrony could provide the raw material for natural selection to produce speciation.

  11. Developmental profile of speech-language and communicative functions in an individual with the preserved speech variant of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B; Vollmann, Ralf; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Green, Vanessa A; van der Meer, Larah; Wolin, Thomas; Einspieler, Christa

    2014-08-01

    We assessed various aspects of speech-language and communicative functions of an individual with the preserved speech variant of Rett syndrome (RTT) to describe her developmental profile over a period of 11 years. For this study, we incorporated the following data resources and methods to assess speech-language and communicative functions during pre-, peri- and post-regressional development: retrospective video analyses, medical history data, parental checklists and diaries, standardized tests on vocabulary and grammar, spontaneous speech samples and picture stories to elicit narrative competences. Despite achieving speech-language milestones, atypical behaviours were present at all times. We observed a unique developmental speech-language trajectory (including the RTT typical regression) affecting all linguistic and socio-communicative sub-domains in the receptive as well as the expressive modality. Future research should take into consideration a potentially considerable discordance between formal and functional language use by interpreting communicative acts on a more cautionary note.

  12. Rett Syndrome: A Longitudinal Developmental Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Norman; Veydt, Nicole

    1990-01-01

    The clinical course of development of a 14-year-old girl with Rett Syndrome is outlined. Results indicated a general stagnation in gross and fine motor skills, self-help skills, communication, and cognition, beginning at approximately 15 months. No skills progressed beyond the 2-year level despite several years of intensive intervention.…

  13. A sensorimotor approach to the training of manual actions in children with developmental coordination disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snapp-Childs, Winona; Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P

    2013-02-01

    Developmental coordination disorder affects a relatively large proportion (5%-6%) of the childhood population. Severity of the disorder varies but there is a great need for therapeutic intervention. We propose a method for the training of manual actions in children with developmental coordination disorder. Our solution is achieved by applying haptic virtual reality technology to attack the difficulties that children with developmental coordination disorder evidence. Our results show that children with developmental coordination disorder are able to learn complex motor skills if proper training methods are employed. These findings conflict with reports of impaired motor learning in developmental coordination disorder because of underactivation of cerebellar and parietal networks.

  14. Constructivist developmental theory is needed in developmental neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsalidou, Marie; Pascual-Leone, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Neuroscience techniques provide an open window previously unavailable to the origin of thoughts and actions in children. Developmental cognitive neuroscience is booming, and knowledge from human brain mapping is finding its way into education and pediatric practice. Promises of application in developmental cognitive neuroscience rests however on better theory-guided data interpretation. Massive amounts of neuroimaging data from children are being processed, yet published studies often do not frame their work within developmental models—in detriment, we believe, to progress in this field. Here we describe some core challenges in interpreting the data from developmental cognitive neuroscience, and advocate the use of constructivist developmental theories of human cognition with a neuroscience interpretation.

  15. Baclofen Withdrawal Presenting as Irritability in a Developmentally Delayed Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Anthoney Lim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Irritability in children has a broad differential diagnosis, ranging from benign processes to lifethreatening emergencies. In children with comorbid conditions and developmental delay, the diagnostic process becomes more challenging. This case report describes a developmentally delayed 14-year-old boy who presented with pain and crying caused by a malfunction of a surgically implanted baclofen pump. We describe recommendations concerning the diagnostic evaluation, medical management, and surgical repair.

  16. Physical and Mental Health of Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Caçola

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by poor motor proficiency that interferes with an individual’s activities of daily living. These problems in motor coordination are prevalent despite children’s intelligence levels. Common symptoms include marked delays in achieving motor milestones and clumsiness, typically associated with poor balance, coordination, and especially handwriting skills. Currently, DCD is said to impact about 2-7% of school-age children. More importantly, DCD is considered to be one of the major health problems among school-aged children worldwide, with unique consequences to physical and mental health. Because these children and adolescents often experience difficulties participating in typical childhood activities (e.g., riding a bike, they tend be more sedentary, more overweight/obese, at a higher risk for coronary vascular disease, and have lower cardiorespiratory and physical fitness than their typically developing peers. From another perspective, the motor difficulties have also been linked to an increased risk for mental health issues, such as higher anxiety and depression. The understanding of the health consequences associated with DCD offers practical applications for the understanding of the mechanisms and intervention protocols that can improve the consequences of this condition. In this review, I will explore such consequences and provide evidence for the implementation of interventions that focus on improving physical and mental health in this population.

  17. [Developmental Placement.] Collected Research References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Gail

    Drawing on information and references in the ERIC system, this literature review describes research related to a child's developmental placement. The issues examined include school entrance age; predictive validity, reliability, and features of Gesell School Readiness Assessment; retention; and the effectiveness of developmental placement. A…

  18. Developmental Math: What's the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cafarella, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental mathematics has been under the radar within higher education for some time. The reality is that there are many proven best practices in developmental math. Unfortunately, there are many obstacles that prevent student success. Moreover, the high rates of attrition and failure have led state legislators and college administrators to…

  19. Developmentally Appropriate Peace Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewsader, Joellen; Myers-Walls, Judith A.

    2017-01-01

    Peace education has been offered to children for decades, but those curricula have been only minimally guided by children's developmental stages and needs. In this article, the authors apply their research on children's developmental understanding of peace along with peace education principles and Vygotsky's sociocultural theory to present…

  20. Developmental programming of happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Louis A; Fortier, Paz; Lahat, Ayelet; Tang, Alva; Mathewson, Karen J; Saigal, Saroj; Boyle, Michael H; Van Lieshout, Ryan J

    2017-09-01

    Being born at an extremely low birth weight (ELBW; programming hypotheses. Interfacing prenatal programming and differential susceptibility hypotheses, we tested whether individuals with ELBW in different childhood rearing environments showed different attention biases to positive and negative facial emotions in adulthood. Using the oldest known, prospectively followed cohort of ELBW survivors, we found that relative to normal birth weight controls (NBW; >2,500 grams), ELBW survivors displayed the highest and lowest attention bias to happy faces at age 30-35, depending on whether their total family income at age 8 was relatively low (environmental match) or high (environmental mismatch), respectively. This bias to happy faces was associated with a reduced likelihood of emotional problems. Findings suggest that differential susceptibility to positive emotions may be prenatally programmed, with effects lasting into adulthood. We discuss implications for integrating prenatal programming and differential susceptibility hypotheses, and the developmental origins of postnatal plasticity and resilience. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A Milestone of Aeromedical Research Contributions to Civil Aviation Safety: The 1000th Report in the CARI/OAM Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    of crash dieting , and of blood donations in conjunction with simulated altitude exposures. Vision: A Major Research Issue Studies from the research...attitudes and of perceived stress. Data obtained included ambulatory electrocardiograms (ECGs), urine samples analyzed for 17- ketogenic steroids...ratios for potential development of radiation-induced cancers continue to be calculated to assure travelers and flight crews of the safety of air

  2. Compare optimized performance results for packaged RTU using all alternative refrigerants FY17 1st Quarter Milestone Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Bo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abdelaziz, Omar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Elatar, Ahmed F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Based on the laboratory investigation in FY16, for R-22 and R-410A alternative low GWP refrigerants in two baseline rooftop air conditioners (RTU), we used the DOE/ORNL Heat Pump Design Model to model the two RTUs and calibrated the models against the experimental data. Using the calibrated equipment models, we compared the compressor efficiencies, heat exchanger performances. An efficiency-based compressor mapping method was developed, which is able to predict compressor performances of the alternative low GWP refrigerants accurately. Extensive model-based optimizations were conducted to provide a fair comparison between all the low GWP candidates by selecting their preferred configurations at the same cooling capacity and compressor efficiencies.

  3. Milestone report: The simulation of radiation driven gas diffusion in UO2 at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Michael William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Burr, Patrick A [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia); Rushton, Michael J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Grimes, Robin W [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Turbull, James Anthony [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Below 1000 K it is thought that fission gas diffusion in nuclear fuel during irradiation occurs through atomic mixing due to radiation damage. This is an important process for nuclear reactor performance as it affects fission gas release, particularly from the periphery of the pellet where such temperatures are normal. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of Xe and Kr diffusion due to irradiation. Thermal spikes and cascades have been used to study the electronic stopping and ballistic phases of damage respectively. Our results predict that O and Kr exhibit the greatest diffusivity and U the least, while Xe lies in between. It is concluded that the ballistic phase does not sufficiently account for the experimentally observed diffusion. Preliminary thermal spike calculations indicate that the electronic stopping phase generates greater fission gas displacement than the ballistic phase, although further calculation must be carried out to confirm this. A good description of the system by the empirical potentials is important over the very wide temperatures induced during thermal spike and damage cascade simulations. This has motivated the development of a parameter set for gas-actinide and gas-oxygen interactions that is complementary for use with a recent many-body potential set. A comprehensive set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Xe and Kr incorporation at a number of sites in CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2. These structures were used to fit a potential, which was used to generate molecular dynamics (MD) configurations incorporating Xe and Kr at 300 K, 1500 K, 3000 K and 5000 K. Subsequent matching to the forces predicted by DFT for these MD configurations was used to refine the potential set. This fitting approach ensured weighted fitting to configurations that are thermodynamically significant over a broad temperature range, while avoiding computationally expensive DFT-MD calculations. The resultant gas potentials were validated against DFT binding energies and are suitable for simulating combinations of Xe and Kr in solid solutions of CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2, providing a powerful tool for the atomistic simulation of conventional nuclear reactor fuel UO2 as well as advanced MOX fuels.

  4. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    Phase II of a 5-phase overall compressed air energy storage (CAES) development program was performed to characterize and explore potential CAES sites and to prepare a research and development plan. This volume for Phase II activities contains an evaluation of the suitability of seven selected sites to undergo field drilling and air injection testing; a bibliography; results of a literature search on the effects of air injection of aquifer-caprock well systems; reservoir data for the sites; cost estimates; and predicted potential risks from a CAES plant. (LCL)

  5. Milestone report - M4FT-14OR0302102b - Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Surry-2 Fuel Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Sharon M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chattin, Marc Rhea [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giaquinto, Joseph M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    To design and operate future reprocessing plants in a safe and environmentally compliant manner, the amount and form of tritium in the used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be understood and quantified.To gain a better understanding of how tritium in cladding will behave during processing, scoping tests are being performed to determine the tritium content in the cladding pre- and post-tritium pretreatment. A sample of Surry-2 pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding was heated to 1100–1200°C to oxidize the zirconium and release all of the tritium in the cladding sample. The tritium content was measured to be ~240 µCi/g. Cladding samples were heated to 500ºC, which is within the temperature range (480 - 600ºC) expected for standard air tritium pretreatment systems, and to a slightly higher temperature (700ºC) to determine the impact of tritium pretreatment on tritium release from the cladding. Heating at 500°C for 24 hr removes ~0.2% of the tritium from the cladding, and heating at 700°C for 24 hr removes ~9%. Thus, a significant fraction of the tritium remains bound in the cladding and must be considered in operations involving cladding recycle.

  6. Milestone report: The simulation of radiation driven gas diffusion in UO2 at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Michael William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Burr, Patrick A [Univ. of New South Wales (Australia); Rushton, Michael J. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Grimes, Robin W [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Turbull, James Anthony [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom); Stanek, Christopher Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Andersson, Anders David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    Below 1000 K it is thought that fission gas diffusion in nuclear fuel during irradiation occurs through atomic mixing due to radiation damage. This is an important process for nuclear reactor performance as it affects fission gas release, particularly from the periphery of the pellet where such temperatures are normal. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of Xe and Kr diffusion due to irradiation. Thermal spikes and cascades have been used to study the electronic stopping and ballistic phases of damage, respectively. Our results predict that O and Kr exhibit the greatest diffusivity and U the least, while Xe lies in between. It is concluded that the ballistic phase does not sufficiently account for the experimentally observed diffusion. Preliminary thermal spike calculations indicate that the electronic stopping phase generates greater fission gas displacement than the ballistic phase, although further calculation must be carried out to confirm this. A good description of the system by the empirical potentials is important over the very wide temperatures induced during thermal spike and damage cascade simulations. This has motivated the development of a parameter set for gas-actinide and gas-oxygen interactions that is complementary for use with a recent many-body potential set. A comprehensive set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Xe and Kr incorporation at a number of sites in CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2. These structures were used to fit a potential, which was used to generate molecular dynamics (MD) configurations incorporating Xe and Kr at 300 K, 1500 K, 3000 K and 5000 K. Subsequent matching to the forces predicted by DFT for these MD configurations was used to refine the potential set. This fitting approach ensured weighted fitting to configurations that are thermodynamically significant over a broad temperature range, while avoiding computationally expensive DFT-MD calculations. The resultant gas potentials were validated against DFT binding energies and are suitable for simulating combinations of Xe and Kr in solid solutions of CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2, providing a powerful tool for the atomistic simulation of conventional nuclear reactor fuel UO2 as well as advanced MOX fuels.

  7. Milestone Report - M4FT-14OR0312022 - Co-absorption studies - Design system complete/test plan complete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Spencer, Barry B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this test plan is to describe research that will determine the effectiveness of silver mordenite and molecular sieve beds to remove iodine and water (tritium) from off-gas streams arising from used nuclear fuel recycling processes, and to demonstrate that the iodine and water can be recovered separately from one another.

  8. Sleep as a mirror of developmental transitions in infancy: the case of crawling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scher, Anat; Cohen, Dina

    2015-03-01

    The associations between the onset of crawling and changes in sleep were examined in 28 infants who were followed from 5 to 11 months-of-age. Motor development and sleep (actigraphy) were assessed at 2- to 3-week intervals. Along with the overall improvement in sleep consolidation, periods of increased long wake episodes were also manifested; the rise in sleep disruption was temporally linked to crawling onset. The results of the study highlight the dynamic interrelations between domains of development, indicate that emerging motor skills may involve periods of disrupted sleep, and point to the moderating effect of age. Clarifying the factors involved in the interplay between developmental milestones and sleep remains a challenge for future research.

  9. Early developmental delay in children with autism: A study from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabameri, Elahe; Sotoodeh, Mohammad Saber

    2015-05-01

    Early diagnosis is appropriate and important for developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder. In many less developed countries, unfortunately, diagnosis of this disorder is delayed. The aim of the present study is to determine whether this disorder can be screened using simple strategies such as comparison of the age of acquisition of motor skills. For this purpose, 124 children with autism were chosen to enter the study, and their parents were asked to retrospectively specify the age of achieving milestones of sitting without support, standing alone and walking alone. Information obtained from the parents was compared with World Health Organization standards. Results indicate that participants (male and female) have significantly delayed age of acquisition of all three skills. Based on this result, it can be suggested that existing standards, as a simple means with low cost and easy availability, can be used for early screening of the disease at a younger age so that treatment can be provided more quickly.

  10. The "where" and "what" in developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henik, Avishai; Rubinsten, Orly; Ashkenazi, Sarit

    2011-08-01

    Developmental dyscalculia (DD) is a congenital deficit that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills. Individuals with DD have problems learning standard number facts and procedures. Estimates of the prevalence rate of DD are similar to those of developmental dyslexia. Recent reports and discussions suggest that those with DD suffer from specific deficits (e.g., subitizing, comparative judgment). Accordingly, DD has been described as a domain-specific disorder that involves particular brain areas (e.g., intra-parietal sulcus). However, we and others have found that DD is characterized by additional deficiencies and may be affected by domain-general (e.g., attention) factors. Hence "pure DD" might be rather rare and not as pure as one would think. We suggest that the heterogeneity of symptoms that commonly characterize learning disabilities needs to be taken into account in future research and treatment.

  11. Petro-States - Predatory or Developmental?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-10-01

    Political attention is increasing on the glaring contradiction in most oil-rich countries between natural abundance and economic and social misery. How can it be that oil is not a blessing, but becomes a curse? Although drawing on economic analysis (Dutch disease), the analytical framework established in this report on Angola and Azerbaijan pays special attention to political and institutional factors and concentrates on the role of the state. Selected variables that are likely to decide whether the petro-states become ''predatory'' or ''developmental'' are studied for both countries. The analysis indicates a danger that oil resources will continue to trickle away instead of trickling down to the benefit of the broader Angolan and Azerbaijani population. Concerted action by international oil companies and the Bretton Woods institutions provides the best hope of moving the present political leadership in Angola and Azerbaijan into a developmental direction. (author)

  12. ACER 2013-2014 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Australian Council for Educational Research, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) is one of the world's leading educational research centres. ACER's mission is to create and promote research-based knowledge, products and services that can be used to improve learning across the life span. This annual report describes ACER's milestones and accomplishments for the 2013-2014…

  13. PHELIX Crenulation 2 and 3 Flash Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousculp, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oro, David Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griego, Jeffrey Randall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patten, Austin Randall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Neukirch, Levi Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reinovsky, Robert Emil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Turchi, Peter John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bradley, III, Joseph Thomas [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reass, William Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fierro, Franklin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Saunders, Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mariam, Fesseha Gebre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Freeman, Matthew Stouten [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cheng, Baolian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tang, Zhaowen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-05-16

    This report documents the execution of the PHELIX driven Crenulation 2 and 3 at LANSCE proton radiography experiments in FY17 in support of the LANL Science Campaign-1 L2 Milestone (#5721). It should be noted that LANL Science Campaign 3 also supports the PHELIX at pRad efforts.

  14. Methylmercury and brain development: imprecision and underestimation of developmental neurotoxicity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Herz, Katherine T

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury is now recognized as an important developmental neurotoxicant, though this insight developed slowly over many decades. Developmental neurotoxicity was first reported in a Swedish case report in 1952, and from a serious outbreak in Minamata, Japan, a few years later. Whereas the infant...

  15. Attentional networks in developmental dyscalculia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henik Avishai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very little is known about attention deficits in developmental dyscalculia, hence, this study was designed to provide the missing information. We examined attention abilities of participants suffering from developmental dyscalculia using the attention networks test - interactions. This test was designed to examine three different attention networks--executive function, orienting and alerting--and the interactions between them. Methods Fourteen university students that were diagnosed as suffering from developmental dyscalculia--intelligence and reading abilities in the normal range and no indication of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder--and 14 matched controls were tested using the attention networks test - interactions. All participants were given preliminary tests to measure mathematical abilities, reading, attention and intelligence. Results The results revealed deficits in the alerting network--a larger alerting effect--and in the executive function networks--a larger congruity effect in developmental dyscalculia participants. The interaction between the alerting and executive function networks was also modulated by group. In addition, developmental dyscalculia participants were slower to respond in the non-cued conditions. Conclusions These results imply specific attentional deficits in pure developmental dyscalculia. Namely, those with developmental dyscalculia seem to be deficient in the executive function and alertness networks. They suffer from difficulty in recruiting attention, in addition to the deficits in numerical processing.

  16. Developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahryar Noordin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH is a spectrum of anatomical abnormalities of the hip joint in which the femoral head has an abnormal relationship with the acetabulum. Most studies report an incidence of 1 to 34 cases per 1,000 live births and differences could be due to different diagnostic methods and timing of evaluation. Risk factors include first born status, female sex, positive family history, breech presentation and oligohydramnios. Clinical presentations of DDH depend on the age of the child. Newborns present with hip instability, infants have limited hip abduction on examination, and older children and adolescents present with limping, joint pain, and/or osteoarthritis. Repeated, careful examination of all infants from birth and throughout the first year of life until the child begins walking is important to prevent late cases. Provocative testing includes the Barlow and Ortolani maneuvers. Other signs, such as shorting of the femur with hips and knees flexed (Galeazzi sign, asymmetry of the thigh or gluteal folds, and discrepancy of leg lengths are potential clues. Treatment depends on age at presentation and outcomes are much better when the child is treated early, particularly during the first six months of life.

  17. AIDS and Persons with Developmental Disabilities: The Legal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennert, Sharon; And Others

    This report provides lawyers and service providers with legal information and analysis about issues affecting persons with developmental disabilities and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The report reviews relevant medical facts, discusses federal and state laws which define the rights and responsibilities of disabled individuals and…

  18. Developmental dyslexia and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Patrick; Feiss, Léonard; Michel, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combined with an inability to manipulate language sounds and the grapheme-phoneme conversion is widely acknowledged. Numerous scientific studies have also documented the presence of eye movement anomalies and deficits of perception of low contrast, low spatial frequency, and high frequency temporal visual information in dyslexics. Anomalies of visual attention with short visual attention spans have also been demonstrated in a large number of cases. Spatial orientation is also affected in dyslexics who manifest a preference for spatial attention to the right. This asymmetry may be so pronounced that it leads to a veritable neglect of space on the left side. The evaluation of treatments proposed to dyslexics whether speech or oriented towards the visual anomalies remains fragmentary. The advent of new explanatory theories, notably cerebellar, magnocellular, or proprioceptive, is an incentive for ophthalmologists to enter the world of multimodal cognition given the importance of the eye's visual input.

  19. Developmental dyslexia and vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quercia P

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Quercia,1 Léonard Feiss,2 Carine Michel31Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France; 2Office of Ophthalmology, Beaune, France; 3University of Burgundy, Dijon, INSERM U1093, Cognition, Action et Plasticité Sensorimotrice, Dijon, FranceAbstract: Developmental dyslexia affects almost 10% of school-aged children and represents a significant public health problem. Its etiology is unknown. The consistent presence of phonological difficulties combined with an inability to manipulate language sounds and the grapheme–phoneme conversion is widely acknowledged. Numerous scientific studies have also documented the presence of eye movement anomalies and deficits of perception of low contrast, low spatial frequency, and high frequency temporal visual information in dyslexics. Anomalies of visual attention with short visual attention spans have also been demonstrated in a large number of cases. Spatial orientation is also affected in dyslexics who manifest a preference for spatial attention to the right. This asymmetry may be so pronounced that it leads to a veritable neglect of space on the left side. The evaluation of treatments proposed to dyslexics whether speech or oriented towards the visual anomalies remains fragmentary. The advent of new explanatory theories, notably cerebellar, magnocellular, or proprioceptive, is an incentive for ophthalmologists to enter the world of multimodal cognition given the importance of the eye's visual input.Keywords: reading, ocular motility, dyslexia, neglect, spatial representation

  20. Fired up or burned out? How developmental challenge differentially impacts leader behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Stephen H; Colbert, Amy E; Choi, Daejeong

    2014-07-01

    Leadership development research has largely drawn on experiential and enactive learning theories to explore the positive effects of developmental challenge on leaders. In contrast, we examined potential positive and negative effects of developmental challenge (i.e., challenging job assignments) on leader behavior through an alternative theoretical lens--transactional stress theory. We predicted, on one hand, that developmental challenge may be associated with higher leader engagement and transformational leadership behavior; however, developmental challenge also has the potential to be associated with higher leader emotional exhaustion and laissez-faire leadership behavior. We further proposed that leadership self-efficacy (LSE) moderates these potential effects of developmental challenge and helps explain why leaders react either positively or negatively to developmental challenge. We tested our hypotheses in a sample of 153 leaders and 631 direct reports at a Fortune 500 company. Findings supported positive relationships among developmental challenge, leader engagement, and transformational leadership. However, we also found support for significant relationships among developmental challenge, emotional exhaustion, and laissez-faire leadership. Additionally, leaders lower in LSE were more likely to encounter the negative effects of developmental challenge by experiencing increased emotional exhaustion and displaying laissez-faire leadership behaviors. Our study contributes to theory and practice by elucidating a "dark side" of developmental challenge, identifying LSE as a moderator of the negative effects of developmental challenge, identifying antecedents of transformational and laissez-faire leadership behaviors, and investigating demands and stress in leadership roles.

  1. Exploration as a Mediator of the Relation between the Attainment of Motor Milestones and the Development of Spatial Cognition and Spatial Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudgenoeg-Paz, Ora; Leseman, Paul P. M.; Volman, M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The embodied-cognition approach views cognition and language as grounded in daily sensorimotor child-environment interactions. Therefore, the attainment of motor milestones is expected to play a role in cognitive-linguistic development. Early attainment of unsupported sitting and independent walking indeed predict better spatial cognition and…

  2. Exploration as a Mediator of the Relation between the Attainment of Motor Milestones and the Development of Spatial Cognition and Spatial Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudgenoeg-Paz, Ora; Leseman, Paul P. M.; Volman, M. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The embodied-cognition approach views cognition and language as grounded in daily sensorimotor child-environment interactions. Therefore, the attainment of motor milestones is expected to play a role in cognitive-linguistic development. Early attainment of unsupported sitting and independent walking indeed predict better spatial cognition and…

  3. Global grid for Big Bang research reaches milestone One major test remains as grid project prepares to go live next year

    CERN Multimedia

    Weiss, Todd R

    2006-01-01

    "A huge 100,000-PC grid-computing network being built to help research the origin of the universe passed the third of four major tests recently when it reached a data-transfer milestone, with up to 1GB/sec. of physics data sent over the global grid"(1.5 page)

  4. Ntp technical report on toxicity, reproductive, and developmental studies of 60-Hz magnetic fields, administered by whole body exposure to F344/N rats, Sprague-Dawley rats, and B6C3F1 mice. Toxicity report series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorman, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Electric and magnetic fields are associated with the production, transmission, and use of electricity; thus the potential for human exposure is high. These electric and magnetic fields are predominantly of low frequency (60 Hz) and generally of low intensity. The prevailing view among physicists is that exposure to these low-frequency, low-intensity fields does not pose a health hazard. However, this view has been challenged by reports linking magnetic field exposure to the development of leukemia and other cancers. Because multiple epidemiologic studies suggested a potential for increased cancer rates with increasing exposure, and because of public concern, the effects of 60-Hz magnetic field exposure were examined in F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice in 8-week full-body-exposure studies. Animals were evaluated for hematology and clinical chemistry (rats only) parameters, pineal gland hormone concentrations, and histopathology. Additional studies were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats to examine teratologic and reproductive effects of magnetic field exposure.

  5. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    the known causes for this rise in prevalence. In 2006, we did a systematic review and identified five industrial chemicals as developmental neurotoxicants: lead, methylmercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, arsenic, and toluene. Since 2006, epidemiological studies have documented six additional developmental...... neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...... chemicals should not be presumed to be safe to brain development, and chemicals in existing use and all new chemicals must therefore be tested for developmental neurotoxicity. To coordinate these efforts and to accelerate translation of science into prevention, we propose the urgent formation of a new...

  6. PREVALENCE AND EFFECT OF DEVELOPMENTAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    among children might even be higher, as medical and educational systems frequently fail to identify this ... A gender difference also occurs with regard to DCD. ..... developmental and physical disabilities, consecutively taught at the Movement ...

  7. Predictive Modeling of Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of alternative methods in conjunction with traditional in vivo developmental toxicity testing has the potential to (1) reduce cost and increase throughput of testing the chemical universe, (2) prioritize chemicals for further targeted toxicity testing and risk assessment,...

  8. Neurobehavioural effects of developmental toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Landrigan, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    neurotoxicants-manganese, fluoride, chlorpyrifos, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, tetrachloroethylene, and the polybrominated diphenyl ethers. We postulate that even more neurotoxicants remain undiscovered. To control the pandemic of developmental neurotoxicity, we propose a global prevention strategy. Untested...

  9. Qualitative methodology in developmental psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demuth, Carolin; Mey, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative methodology presently is gaining increasing recognition in developmental psychology. Although the founders of developmental psychology to a large extent already used qualitative procedures, the field was long dominated by a (post) positivistic quantitative paradigm. The increasing...... recognition of the sociocultural embeddedness of human development, and of the importance to study individuals’ subjective experience, however, calls for adequate methodological procedures that allow for the study of processes of transformation across the life span. The wide range of established procedures...

  10. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

  11. Developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Liu, Han-Xiao; Yan, Hui-Yi; Wu, Dong-Mei; Ping, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological and experimental animal studies show that suboptimal environments in fetal and neonatal life exert a profound influence on physiological function and risk of diseases in adult life. The concepts of the 'developmental programming' and Developmental Origins of Health and Diseases (DOHaD) have become well accepted and have been applied across almost all fields of medicine. Adverse intrauterine environments may have programming effects on the crucial functions of the immune system during critical periods of fetal development, which can permanently alter the immune function of offspring. Immune dysfunction may in turn lead offspring to be susceptible to inflammatory and immune diseases in adulthood. These facts suggest that inflammatory and immune disorders might have developmental origins. In recent years, inflammatory and immune disorders have become a growing health problem worldwide. However, there is no systematic report in the literature on the developmental origins of inflammatory and immune diseases and the potential mechanisms involved. Here, we review the impacts of adverse intrauterine environments on the immune function in offspring. This review shows the results from human and different animal species and highlights the underlying mechanisms, including damaged development of cells in the thymus, helper T cell 1/helper T cell 2 balance disturbance, abnormal epigenetic modification, effects of maternal glucocorticoid overexposure on fetal lymphocytes and effects of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis on the immune system. Although the phenomena have already been clearly implicated in epidemiologic and experimental studies, new studies investigating the mechanisms of these effects may provide new avenues for exploiting these pathways for disease prevention.

  12. From alcohol initiation to tolerance to problems: Discordant twin modeling of a developmental process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Arielle R; Slutske, Wendy S; Lynskey, Michael T; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2017-08-01

    The current study examined a stage-based alcohol use trajectory model to test for potential causal effects of earlier drinking milestones on later drinking milestones in a combined sample of two cohorts of Australian monozygotic and same-sex dizygotic twins (N = 7,398, age M = 30.46, SD = 2.61, 61% male, 56% monozygotic twins). Ages of drinking, drunkenness, regular drinking, tolerance, first nontolerance alcohol use disorder symptom, and alcohol use disorder symptom onsets were assessed retrospectively. Ages of milestone attainment (i.e., age-of-onset) and time between milestones (i.e., time-to-event) were examined via frailty models within a multilevel discordant twin design. For age-of-onset models, earlier ages of onset of antecedent drinking milestones increased hazards for earlier ages of onset for more proximal subsequent drinking milestones. For the time-to-event models, however, earlier ages of onset for the "starting" milestone decreased risk for a shorter time period between the starting and the "ending" milestone. Earlier age of onset of intermediate milestones between starting and ending drinking milestones had the opposite effect, increasing risk for a shorter time period between the starting and ending milestones. These results are consistent with a causal effect of an earlier age of drinking milestone onset on temporally proximal subsequent drinking milestones.

  13. Neonatal diabetes mellitus due to pancreatic agenesis and pervasive developmental disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannattasio Alessandro

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies suggested a link between type 1 diabetes mellitus and pervasive developmental disorder. Moreover, permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus due to pancreatic agenesis can be associated with neurological deficit involving cerebellar functions, but no association with pervasive developmental disorder has been described so far. Clinical and neuropsychological evaluation of a child with pancreatic agenesis, mental retardation and pervasive developmental disorder is reported.

  14. Developmental dyslexia and implicit learning in childhood: evidence using the artificial grammar learning paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlidou, Elpis V.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis explores implicit learning in children with developmental dyslexia. While specific cognitive abilities such as phonology and memory have been extensively explored in developmental dyslexia more global, fundamental abilities are rarely studied. A literature review is reported, which indicates that there is a gap in the study of more generic abilities highlighting at the same time, the need of investigating developmental dyslexia in the kind of contemporary context th...

  15. Measurement setup at light source operational: Milestone M4.3

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Francis

    2016-01-01

    The design of the experimental setup for the measurements of the FCC-hh beam screen prototype to be installed at the ANKA lightsource has been completed and the alignment strategy and procedure has been validated by the CERN and KIT teams. In this report, a complete description of the setup and the program of measurements under different operation conditions is presented.

  16. [Developmental amnesia in the premature infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouron, V; Hays, S; Gonzalez-Monge, S

    2010-02-01

    All types of memory disorders have been observed in children, although these reports are rare. Developmental amnesia selectively involves episodic daily life memory while semantic learning is respected and general intelligence is not affected. Daily life is severely disturbed by this cognitive disorder usually occurring after hypoxic ischemic injury with bilateral hippocampal atrophy on MRI. Memory disorders are underdiagnosed in at-risk patients and rarely reported. We report on a former small-for-gestational-age preterm infant with no obvious hypoxic event during perinatal life. The follow-up was normal until elementary school. He had to spend 2 years in 1st grade and exhibited some behavioral troubles. At the age of 9, he was suspected of suffering from dyspraxia and was referred to a pediatrics rehabilitation center. IQ and neuropsychological tests were administered and showed selective autobiographical memory impairment defining developmental amnesia. Despite a typical clinical presentation, brain MRI was normal, including the hippocampal area. This observation underlines the need for a prolonged follow-up until school age to assess the outcome of preterm infants. Otherwise, the evaluation will be limited to motor impairment. Particular attention should be paid to memory during the follow-up to avoid misdiagnoses and to plan and adapt these children's educational strategies. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Síndromes disexecutivas do desenvolvimento e adquiridas na prática clínica: três relatos de caso Developmental and acquired dysexecutive syndromes in clinical practice: three case-reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Borges

    2010-01-01

    functions (EFs deficits where despite having normal IQ, all subjects' exhibit significant functional and social impairment. The first case describes a young woman who suffered a TBI and her complaints relates to difficulties in memory for new material, apathy, less persistency and initiative. The second case is about a middle-age woman facing problems since kindergarten and with unsuccessful treatments and no formal diagnosis. In this case, collateral report suggests the presence of planning difficulties, some antisocial behavior, delay gratification aversion, poor activation and time estimation deficits. The last case refers to a middle-age man, evaluated after a severe TBI following a car accident. He presented some behavioral changes, such as disinhibition, lack of persistency and inattentive deficits that occur in a more severe level than presented during his childhood, despite having normal performance in tests of EFs. The evaluation of (developmental or acquired EF deficits might be extremely important for providing adequate therapeutic approach in order to decrease related impairments in everyday activities.

  18. Predicting Cost Growth Using Programs Reviews and Milestones for DoD Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    expand to cover additional weapon system platforms. Methodology Since 1969 , MDAPs are required to submit Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs...Packard Initiatives in 1969 (Arena et al, 2006). From studies using program information from SARs, Arena et al. (2006) identify the three most...Pensacola, FL, January 2014. Porter, Gene, Brian Gladstone , C. Vance Gordon, Nicholas Karvonides, R. Royce Kneece, Jr., Jay Mandelbaum, William D

  19. Holistic face training enhances face processing in developmental prosopagnosia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGutis, Joseph; Cohan, Sarah; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Prosopagnosia has largely been regarded as an untreatable disorder. However, recent case studies using cognitive training have shown that it is possible to enhance face recognition abilities in individuals with developmental prosopagnosia. Our goal was to determine if this approach could be effective in a larger population of developmental prosopagnosics. We trained 24 developmental prosopagnosics using a 3-week online face-training program targeting holistic face processing. Twelve subjects with developmental prosopagnosia were assessed before and after training, and the other 12 were assessed before and after a waiting period, they then performed the training, and were then assessed again. The assessments included measures of front-view face discrimination, face discrimination with view-point changes, measures of holistic face processing, and a 5-day diary to quantify potential real-world improvements. Compared with the waiting period, developmental prosopagnosics showed moderate but significant overall training-related improvements on measures of front-view face discrimination. Those who reached the more difficult levels of training ('better' trainees) showed the strongest improvements in front-view face discrimination and showed significantly increased holistic face processing to the point of being similar to that of unimpaired control subjects. Despite challenges in characterizing developmental prosopagnosics' everyday face recognition and potential biases in self-report, results also showed modest but consistent self-reported diary improvements. In summary, we demonstrate that by using cognitive training that targets holistic processing, it is possible to enhance face perception across a group of developmental prosopagnosics and further suggest that those who improved the most on the training task received the greatest benefits.

  20. [From Nebuchadnezzar to the randomized controlled trial--milestones in the development of clinical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbaum, Menachem; Lysy, Joseph; Gropp, Cornelius

    2011-08-01

    The first clinical experiment is described in the bible: The prophet Daniel is reported being nourished during ten days by seeds and water only, in order to check if his physical state would deteriorate as a result of this minimal nutrition. In the 15th century, French surgeon Ambroise Parí experimented with a mixture of turpentine, egg protein and rose oil to treat combat wounds, which is thought to be the first clinical study to be reported. In the 19th century British scientist James Lind designed the first controlled prospective study with parallel groups, proving that ingesting citrus fruit prevents scurvy. A short time afterwards British scientist John Haygarth was the first to use a placebo drug in a clinical study. Important work on placebo was conducted by the American scientists Austin Flint and later by Henry K. Beecher, who showed that placebo itself has biological properties. The importance of comparative studies was first understood by French psychologist CLaude Bernard. He is considered the founder of the modern scientific method based on observation, analysis of data and examination of hypotheses. Bernard's work was based on the work of fellow Frenchman Pierre Charles Alexandre Louis, who is justly considered a founding father of modern epidemiology, and who was the first to use statistics in clinical experiments. Random distributions in clinical studies were reported even before this time, for instance in the work of the Flemish physician Johannes Baptista van Helmont. Danish Nobel prize winner Johannes Fibiger pioneered the use of selection bias in his work with diphtheria serum.