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Sample records for reported complete genome

  1. Complete genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2001-04-01

    Seventy percent of the costs for genome sequencing Shewanella putrefaciens (oneidensis) were requested. These funds were expected to allow completion of the low-pass (5-fold) random sequencing and complete closure and annotation of the 200 kbp plasmid. Because of cost reduction that occurred during the period of this grant, these goals have been far exceeded. Currently, the S. putrefaciens genome is very nearly completely closed, even though the genome was significantly larger than expected and extremely repetitive. The entire genome sequence has been made BLAST searchable on the TIGR web page, and an extensive effort has been made to make data and analyses available to all researchers working on S. putrefaciens (oneidensis).

  2. First report of a complete genome sequence for a begomovirus infecting Jatropha gossypifolia in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmonds-Gordon, R N; Collins-Fairclough, A M; Stewart, C S; Roye, M E

    2014-10-01

    Jatropha gossypifolia is a weed that is commonly found with yellow mosaic symptoms growing along the roadside and in close proximity to cultivated crops in many farming communities in Jamaica. For the first time, the complete genome sequence of a new begomovirus, designated jatropha mosaic virus-[Jamaica:Spanish Town:2004] (JMV-[JM:ST:04]), was determined from field-infected J. gossypifolia in the western hemisphere. DNA-A nucleotide sequence comparisons showed closest identity (84 %) to two tobacco-infecting viruses from Cuba, tobacco mottle leaf curl virus-[Cuba:Sancti Spiritus:03] (TbMoLCV-[CU:SS:03]) and tobacco leaf curl Cuba virus-[Cuba:Taguasco:2005] (TbLCuCUV-[CU:Tag:05]), and two weed-infecting viruses from Cuba and Jamaica, Rhynchosia rugose golden mosaic virus-[Cuba:Camaguey:171:2009] (RhRGMV- [CU:Cam:171:09]) and Wissadula golden mosaic St. Thomas virus-[Jamaica:Albion:2005] (WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05]). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that JMV-[JM:ST:04] is most closely related to tobacco and tomato viruses from Cuba and WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05], a common malvaceous-weed-infecting virus from eastern Jamaica, and that it is distinct from begomoviruses infecting Jatropha species in India and Nigeria.

  3. One bacterial cell, one complete genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Woyke

    Full Text Available While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200-900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA. Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  4. One Bacterial Cell, One Complete Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woyke, Tanja; Tighe, Damon; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Clum, Alicia; Copeland, Alex; Schackwitz, Wendy; Lapidus, Alla; Wu, Dongying; McCutcheon, John P.; McDonald, Bradon R.; Moran, Nancy A.; Bristow, James; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2010-04-26

    While the bulk of the finished microbial genomes sequenced to date are derived from cultured bacterial and archaeal representatives, the vast majority of microorganisms elude current culturing attempts, severely limiting the ability to recover complete or even partial genomes from these environmental species. Single cell genomics is a novel culture-independent approach, which enables access to the genetic material of an individual cell. No single cell genome has to our knowledge been closed and finished to date. Here we report the completed genome from an uncultured single cell of Candidatus Sulcia muelleri DMIN. Digital PCR on single symbiont cells isolated from the bacteriome of the green sharpshooter Draeculacephala minerva bacteriome allowed us to assess that this bacteria is polyploid with genome copies ranging from approximately 200?900 per cell, making it a most suitable target for single cell finishing efforts. For single cell shotgun sequencing, an individual Sulcia cell was isolated and whole genome amplified by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Sanger-based finishing methods allowed us to close the genome. To verify the correctness of our single cell genome and exclude MDA-derived artifacts, we independently shotgun sequenced and assembled the Sulcia genome from pooled bacteriomes using a metagenomic approach, yielding a nearly identical genome. Four variations we detected appear to be genuine biological differences between the two samples. Comparison of the single cell genome with bacteriome metagenomic sequence data detected two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), indicating extremely low genetic diversity within a Sulcia population. This study demonstrates the power of single cell genomics to generate a complete, high quality, non-composite reference genome within an environmental sample, which can be used for population genetic analyzes.

  5. A first report and complete genome sequence of alfalfa enamovirus from Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    A full genome sequence of a viral pathogen, provisionally named alfalfa enamovirus 2 (AEV-2), was reconstructed from short reads obtained by Illumina RNA sequencing of alfalfa sample originating from Sudan. Ambiguous nucleotides in the resultant consensus assembly and identity of the predicted virus...

  6. Complete genome sequence of arracacha mottle virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orílio, Anelise F; Lucinda, Natalia; Dusi, André N; Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    Arracacha mottle virus (AMoV) is the only potyvirus reported to infect arracacha (Arracacia xanthorrhiza) in Brazil. Here, the complete genome sequence of an isolate of AMoV was determined to be 9,630 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly-A tail, and encoding a polyprotein of 3,135 amino acids and a putative P3N-PIPO protein. Its genomic organization is typical of a member of the genus Potyvirus, containing all conserved motifs. Its full genome sequence shared 56.2 % nucleotide identity with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and verbena virus Y, the most closely related viruses.

  7. eGenomics: Cataloguing Our Complete Genome Collection III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Field

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This meeting report summarizes the proceedings of the “eGenomics: Cataloguing our Complete Genome Collection III” workshop held September 11–13, 2006, at the National Institute for Environmental eScience (NIEeS, Cambridge, United Kingdom. This 3rd workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium was divided into two parts. The first half of the three-day workshop was dedicated to reviewing the genomic diversity of our current and future genome and metagenome collection, and exploring linkages to a series of existing projects through formal presentations. The second half was dedicated to strategic discussions. Outcomes of the workshop include a revised “Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence” (MIGS specification (v1.1, consensus on a variety of features to be added to the Genome Catalogue (GCat, agreement by several researchers to adopt MIGS for imminent genome publications, and an agreement by the EBI and NCBI to input their genome collections into GCat for the purpose of quantifying the amount of optional data already available (e.g., for geographic location coordinates and working towards a single, global list of all public genomes and metagenomes.

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of Ark shell Scapharca subcrenata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ya; Wu, Biao; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Yang, Ai-Guo; Ren, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Li-Qing; Dong, Chun-Guang; Tian, Ji-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Complete mitochondrial genome of Scapharca subcrenata was determined in this report. It is 48,161 bp in length, being the largest mitochondrial genome among reported shellfish at present. The entire mitochondrial genome consists of 57 genes including 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 41 transfer RNAs.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of Paramisgurnus dabryanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Luyi; Guo, Baoying; Chu, Zhangjie; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Paramisgurnus dabryanus was obtained by PCR base on 18 pairs of primers. Among the 18 primers, the 14 primers were from the previously published universal primers for Cyprinus carpio L. mitogenome amplification. The remaining 4 primers were designed on the basis of related species mtDNA sequences. The genome is 16,570 bp in length, including 2 ribosomal RNA genes. 13 proteins-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a non-coding control region, the gene composition and order of which was similar to most reported from other vertebrates. Sequence analysis showed that the overall base composition of Paramisgurnus dabryanus is T 27.3%, C 26.9%, A 28.5%, and G 17.4%. The sequence is a slight A + T bias of 55.8%, which is similar to other fishes. Mitochondrial genome is widely used in phylogenetic analysis, evolutionary genomics, species identification and related research of fish.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 8198

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qing-Qing; Hu, Hai-Jie; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Gu, Xiang-Chao; Zhou, Hao; Zhou, Wen-Juan; Ni, Xiao-Meng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the complete genome sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum CGMCC 8198, a novel probiotic strain isolated from fermented herbage. We have determined the complete genome sequence of strain L. plantarum CGMCC 8198, which consists of genes that are likely to be involved in dairy fermentation and that have probiotic qualities. PMID:28183756

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Strain Lunyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumley, Sarah; Horton, Daniel L; Marston, Denise A; Johnson, Nicholas; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2016-04-14

    Using next-generation sequencing technologies, the first complete genome sequence of Rift Valley fever virus strain Lunyo is reported here. Originally reported as an attenuated antigenic variant strain from Uganda, genomic sequence analysis shows that Lunyo clusters together with other Ugandan isolates.

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Fei; Li, Jiong-Tang; Sun, Xiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a member of the Poeciliidae family, is one of the most popular aquarium fish. Here, we reported the complete mitochondrial genome of P. reticulata. The genome is 16,570 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. The structure of non-coding control region was also analyzed. Comparing the mitochondrial genome of P. reticulata with its congener Xiphophorus maculatus revealed the high sequence similarity and the identical gene structure. The complete mitochondrial genome of the guppy would help study the evolution of Poeciliidae family.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Type Strain LMG 22219

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelkhair, Mohamed A.; Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the first complete genome sequence of LMG 22219 (=ON 86T = CCUG 49543T), the Staphylococcus pseudintermedius type strain isolated from feline lung tissue. This sequence information will facilitate phylogenetic comparisons of staphylococcal species and other bacteria at the genome level. PMID:28209834

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J;

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183(T) (= DSM 16839(T) = NCIMB 14029(T)), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-...

  15. Complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium bifidum S17.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhurina, D.; Zomer, A.L.; Gleinser, M.; Brancaccio, V.F.; Auchter, M.; Waidmann, M.S.; Westermann, C.; Sinderen, D. van; Riedel, C.U.

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report on the first completely annotated genome sequence of a Bifidobacterium bifidum strain. B. bifidum S17, isolated from feces of a breast-fed infant, was shown to strongly adhere to intestinal epithelial cells and has potent anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. The genome se

  16. Complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeromonas hydrophila occurs in freshwater environments and infects fish and mammals. In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of Aeromonas hydrophila AL06-06, which was isolated from diseased goldfish and is being used for comparative genomic studies with A. hydrophila strains causing ba...

  17. Strategies for complete plastid genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twyford, Alex D; Ness, Rob W

    2016-10-28

    Plastid sequencing is an essential tool in the study of plant evolution. This high-copy organelle is one of the most technically accessible regions of the genome, and its sequence conservation makes it a valuable region for comparative genome evolution, phylogenetic analysis and population studies. Here, we discuss recent innovations and approaches for de novo plastid assembly that harness genomic tools. We focus on technical developments including low-cost sequence library preparation approaches for genome skimming, enrichment via hybrid baits and methylation-sensitive capture, sequence platforms with higher read outputs and longer read lengths, and automated tools for assembly. These developments allow for a much more streamlined assembly than via conventional short-range PCR. Although newer methods make complete plastid sequencing possible for any land plant or green alga, there are still challenges for producing finished plastomes particularly from herbarium material or from structurally divergent plastids such as those of parasitic plants.

  18. Complete Genome of Bacillus subtilis Myophage Grass

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Stanton Y.; Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Perl, Abbey L.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive model organism. Here, we describe the complete genome of B. subtilus myophage Grass. Aside from genes encoding core proteins pertinent to the life cycle of the phage, Grass has several interesting features, including an FtsK/SpoIIIE protein.

  19. Complete Genome of Bacillus thuringiensis Myophage Spock

    OpenAIRE

    Maroun, Justin W.; Whitcher, Kelvin J.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a Gram-positive, sporulating soil microbe with valuable pesticide-producing properties. The study of bacteriophages of B. thuringiensis could provide new biotechnological tools for the use of this bacterium. Here, we present the complete annotated genome of Spock, a myophage of B. thuringiensis, and describe its features.

  20. Complete Genome of Bacillus megaterium Podophage Pookie

    OpenAIRE

    Ladzekpo, Tsonyake N.; DeCrescenzo, Andrew J.; Hernandez, Adriana C.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophage Pookie is a novel podophage, isolated from soil, which infects Bacillus megaterium. B. megaterium is an important host for large-scale recombinant protein production. Here, we present the complete genome of phage Pookie and describe its core features.

  1. Human genome. 1993 Program report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to update the Human Genome 1991-92 Program Report and provide new information on the DOE genome program to researchers, program managers, other government agencies, and the interested public. This FY 1993 supplement includes abstracts of 60 new or renewed projects and listings of 112 continuing and 28 completed projects. These two reports, taken together, present the most complete published view of the DOE Human Genome Program through FY 1993. Research is progressing rapidly toward 15-year goals of mapping and sequencing the DNA of each of the 24 different human chromosomes.

  2. Deployment Completion Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-24

    computer in its con- struction management effort. NMCE ONE enjoyed and fostered strong relations between the Seabees and the Fleet. * SUPLY: NMCB CNE’s...planning, & leadership present day to day on the projects was exhibited for the enbarka- tion. NMCB CNE maintained a strong Community Relations Program...DICMY LABR EX] EHM : 166 mandays(CAT 0115: 93, TRAINEE: 3, LOCAL: 70) 3. O OSITICH CF W= O : CAT 0115, TRAINEE, & LOAL 4. UIM’I OF PIOJIM: Completion

  3. Complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae phage JD001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Shen, Wenbin; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Haotian; Me, Rao; Wang, Yanchun; Zeng, Lingbin; Zhu, Yongzhang; Qin, Jinhong; He, Ping; Guo, Xiaokui

    2012-12-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, opportunistic pathogens that are among the eight most prevalent infectious agents in hospitals. The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of K. pneumoniae has became a public health problem globally. To develop an effective antimicrobial agent, we isolated a bacteriophage, named JD001, from seawater and sequenced its genome. Comparative genome analysis of phage JD001 with other K. pneumoniae bacteriophages revealed that phage JD001 has little similarity to previously published K. pneumoniae phages KP15, KP32, KP34, and phiKO2. Here we announce the complete genome sequence of JD001 and report major findings from the genomic analysis.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Emperor Penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiwu; Xia, Yan; Dang, Xiao; Chen, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    The emperor penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) is the largest living species of penguin. Herein, we first reported the complete mitochondrial genome of emperor penguin. The mitochondrial genome is a circular molecule of 17 301 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA, and one control region. To verify the accuracy and the utility of new determined mitogenome sequences, we constructed the species phylogenetic tree of emperor penguin together with 10 other closely species. This is the second complete mitochondrial genome of penguin, and this is going to be an important data to study mitochondrial evolution of birds.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Metriaclima zebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Song, Xiao-Lei; Chen, Ling-Yun; Li, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Cichlid fish from East Africa are remarkable for phenotypic and behavioral diversity on a backdrop of genomic similarity. Metriaclima zebra is a member of the Cichlidae family. Here, we reported the complete mitogenome sequence of M. zebra, which was 16 582 bp and contained 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on complete mitogenomes of M. zebra and 11 closely related Cichlidae species to approve the accuracy. The complete mitochondrial genome of the M. zebra would provide more information for the research of M. zebra and the evolution of Cichlidae family.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae YH43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae strain YH43, isolated from sweet potato. The genome consists of a single circular chromosome of 5,520,319 bp in length. It carries 8 copies of rRNA operons, 86 tRNA genes, 5,154 protein-coding genes, and the nif gene cluster for nitrogen fixation. PMID:27081127

  7. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Abies nephrolepis (Pinaceae: Abietoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Keun Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant chloroplast (cp genome has maintained a relatively conserved structure and gene content throughout evolution. Cp genome sequences have been used widely for resolving evolutionary and phylogenetic issues at various taxonomic levels of plants. Here, we report the complete cp genome of Abies nephrolepis. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is 121,336 base pairs (bp in length including a pair of short inverted repeat regions (IRa and IRb of 139 bp each separated by a small single copy (SSC region of 54,323 bp (SSC and a large single copy region of 66,735 bp (LSC. It contains 114 genes, 68 of which are protein coding genes, 35 tRNA and four rRNA genes, six open reading frames, and one pseudogene. Seventeen repeat units and 64 simple sequence repeats (SSR have been detected in A. nephrolepis cp genome. Large IR sequences locate in 42-kb inversion points (1186 bp. The A. nephrolepis cp genome is identical to Abies koreana’s which is closely related to taxa. Pairwise comparison between two cp genomes revealed 140 polymorphic sites in each. Complete cp genome sequence of A. nephrolepis has a significant potential to provide information on the evolutionary pattern of Abietoideae and valuable data for development of DNA markers for easy identification and classification.

  8. The complete chloroplast genomes of Cannabis sativa and Humulus lupulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Daniela; White, Kristin H; Keepers, Kyle G; Kane, Nolan C

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis and Humulus are sister genera comprising the entirety of the Cannabaceae sensu stricto, including C. sativa L. (marijuana, hemp), and H. lupulus L. (hops) as two economically important crops. These two plants have been used by humans for many purposes including as a fiber, food, medicine, or inebriant in the case of C. sativa, and as a flavoring component in beer brewing in the case of H. lupulus. In this study, we report the complete chloroplast genomes for two distinct hemp varieties of C. sativa, Italian "Carmagnola" and Russian "Dagestani", and one Czech variety of H. lupulus "Saazer". Both C. sativa genomes are 153 871 bp in length, while the H. lupulus genome is 153 751 bp. The genomes from the two C. sativa varieties differ in 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), while the H. lupulus genome differs in 1722 SNPs from both C. sativa cultivars.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Haliscomenobacter hydrossis type strain (OT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daligault, Hajnalka E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Verbarg, Susanne [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Haliscomenobacter hydrossis van Veen et al. 1973 is the type species of the genus Halisco- menobacter, which belongs to order 'Sphingobacteriales'. The species is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life, especially the so far genomically un- charted part of it, and because the organism grows in a thin, hardly visible hyaline sheath. Members of the species were isolated from fresh water of lakes and from ditch water. The genome of H. hydrossis is the first completed genome sequence reported from a member of the family 'Saprospiraceae'. The 8,771,651 bp long genome with its three plasmids of 92 kbp, 144 kbp and 164 kbp length contains 6,848 protein-coding and 60 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus Type 16

    OpenAIRE

    Luff, Jennifer; Mader, Michelle; Britton, Monica; Fass, Joseph; Rowland, Peter; Orr, Carolyn; Schlegel, Richard; Yuan, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are epitheliotropic, circular, double-stranded DNA viruses within the family Papillomaviridae that are associated with benign and malignant tumors in humans and animals. We report the complete genome sequence of canine papillomavirus type 16 identified within multiple pigmented cutaneous plaques and squamous cell carcinoma from an intact female Basenji dog.

  11. Complete genome sequence of the myxobacterium Sorangium cellulosum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneiker, S; Perlova, O; Kaiser, O

    2007-01-01

    The genus Sorangium synthesizes approximately half of the secondary metabolites isolated from myxobacteria, including the anti-cancer metabolite epothilone. We report the complete genome sequence of the model Sorangium strain S. cellulosum Soce56, which produces several natural products and has m...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Neisseria weaveri Strain NCTC13585

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria weaveri is a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity and an occasional opportunistic human pathogen which is associated with dog bite wounds. Here we report the first complete genomic sequence of the N. weaveri NCTC13585 (CCUG30381) strain, which was originally isolated from a patient with a canine bite wound. PMID:27563039

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Myophage Mater

    OpenAIRE

    Lancaster, Jacob C.; Hodde, Mary K.; Hernandez, Adriana C.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus megaterium is a ubiquitous, soil inhabiting Gram-positive bacterium that is a common model organism and is used in industrial applications for protein production. The following reports the complete sequencing and annotation of the genome of B. megaterium myophage Mater and describes the major features identified.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Zika Virus Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Prieto, Karla; Yasuda, Chadwick Y; Nagle, Elyse; Kasper, Matthew R; Reyes, Daniel; Vasilakis, Nikolaos; Heang, Vireak; Weaver, Scott C; Haddow, Andrew; Tesh, Robert B; Sovann, Ly; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-05-12

    Zika virus is an emerging human pathogen of great concern due to putative links to microcephaly and Guillain-Barre syndrome. Here, we report the complete genomes, including the 5' and 3' untranslated regions, of five Zika virus isolates, one from the Asian lineage and four from the African lineage.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico. PMID:27491989

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated from Semen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Victoria; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Dowall, Stuart D.; Pullan, Steven T.; Hewson, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogenic flavivirus currently circulating in numerous countries in South America, the Caribbean, and the Western Pacific Region. Using an unbiased metagenomic sequencing approach, we report here the first complete genome sequence of ZIKV isolated from a clinical semen sample. PMID:27738033

  17. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Dendrobium nobile from Northeastern India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameswaran, Sriram; Sundar, Durai

    2016-01-01

    The orchid species Dendrobium nobile belonging to the family Orchidaceae and genus Dendrobium (a vast genus that encompasses nearly 1,200 species) has an herbal medicinal history of about 2000 years in east and south Asian countries. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. nobile from northeastern India for the first time.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Zika Virus Isolated in Mexico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Peña-Alonso, Rocío; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-08-04

    Zika virus belongs to the genus Flavivirus, and its spread remains an international public health emergency. In this report, we describe the obtainment and molecular characterization of a complete viral genome through the direct metagenomic analysis from saliva from an autochthonous transmission case in Mexico.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence and Comparative Genomics of a Novel Myxobacterium Myxococcus hansupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav; Narwani, Tarun; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Myxobacteria, a group of Gram-negative aerobes, belong to the class δ-proteobacteria and order Myxococcales. Unlike anaerobic δ-proteobacteria, they exhibit several unusual physiogenomic properties like gliding motility, desiccation-resistant myxospores and large genomes with high coding density. Here we report a 9.5 Mbp complete genome of Myxococcus hansupus that encodes 7,753 proteins. Phylogenomic and genome-genome distance based analysis suggest that Myxococcus hansupus is a novel member of the genus Myxococcus. Comparative genome analysis with other members of the genus Myxococcus was performed to explore their genome diversity. The variation in number of unique proteins observed across different species is suggestive of diversity at the genus level while the overrepresentation of several Pfam families indicates the extent and mode of genome expansion as compared to non-Myxococcales δ-proteobacteria.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome and phylogeny of Pleistocene mammoth Mammuthus primigenius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny I Rogaev

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships between the extinct woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius, and the Asian (Elephas maximus and African savanna (Loxodonta africana elephants remain unresolved. Here, we report the sequence of the complete mitochondrial genome (16,842 base pairs of a woolly mammoth extracted from permafrost-preserved remains from the Pleistocene epoch--the oldest mitochondrial genome sequence determined to date. We demonstrate that well-preserved mitochondrial genome fragments, as long as approximately 1,600-1700 base pairs, can be retrieved from pre-Holocene remains of an extinct species. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the Elephantinae clade suggests that M. primigenius and E. maximus are sister species that diverged soon after their common ancestor split from the L. africana lineage. Low nucleotide diversity found between independently determined mitochondrial genomic sequences of woolly mammoths separated geographically and in time suggests that north-eastern Siberia was occupied by a relatively homogeneous population of M. primigenius throughout the late Pleistocene.

  1. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella aestivalis (Diptera: Nematocera: Dixidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Andrew G; Sivell, Duncan; Harbach, Ralph E

    2017-01-01

    Dixidae, meniscus midges, belong to the suborder Nematocera of the order Diptera. The family includes 197 known species classified in nine genera. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Dixella aestivalis (Meigen) from the United Kingdom is reported here, along with its annotation and comparison with the genome of an unidentified species of Dixella from China. The circular genome consists of 16 465 bp and has a gene content consisting of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes and a non-coding, A + T-rich, control region. The mitochondrial genome of D. aestivalis can be used to identify genetic markers for species identification, and will be valuable for resolving phylogenetic relationships within the genus, family Dixidae and suborder Nematocera.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, A Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Brettin, Thomas; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The species is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung infection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bufo raddei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenya; Zhang, Xingjie; Guo, Rui; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Bufo raddei is carried out in the present research using Illumina Hiseq 2500. The mitogenome is 17 602 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a D-loop region. The overall base composition of the H-strand is 29.15% for A, 26.09% for C, 15.16% for G, and 29.60% for T. The G + C content is 41.25%. Phylogenetic analyses of B. raddei and other 12 amphibian were carried out using Bayesian phylogenetic methods. The sequences of B. raddei were clustered in genus Bufo.

  4. A secondary dengue 4 infection in a traveler returning from Haiti confirmed by virus isolation, complete genome sequencing and neutralisation assay: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menard, Amelie; Ninove, Laetitia; Zandotti, Christine; Leparc-Goffart, Isabelle; Klitting, Raphaelle; Baronti, Cecile; Stein, Andreas; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Charrel, Rémi N

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the clinical and laboratory findings of a dengue 4 virus (DENV) secondary infection in a patient returning from Haiti to France. The diagnostic of acute DEN-4 virus infection was demonstrated by (i) the presence of DEN-4 RNA in two successive serum samples, (ii) the isolation of a DEN-4 virus in Vero cells and subsequent identification of subtype IIb through complete genome sequencing, (iii) the presence of dengue NS1 antigen, (iv) the seroconversion with detection of dengue IgM in the second serum while negative in the first serum. The diagnosis of secondary dengue episode was demonstrated by (i) the presence of dengue IgG in the early serum, and (ii) the demonstration that neutralising antibodies against DEN-3 were present at the acute stage of the disease. Next-generation sequencing has a primary role to play in phylogeographic studies including database sequences, sequences from imported cases, and sequences from autochthonous cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complete genome sequence of the European sheatfish virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavian, Carla; López-Bueno, Alberto; Fernández Somalo, María Pilar; Alcamí, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2012-06-01

    Viral diseases are an increasing threat to the thriving aquaculture industry worldwide. An emerging group of fish pathogens is formed by several ranaviruses, which have been isolated at different locations from freshwater and seawater fish species since 1985. We report the complete genome sequence of European sheatfish ranavirus (ESV), the first ranavirus isolated in Europe, which causes high mortality rates in infected sheatfish (Silurus glanis) and in other species. Analysis of the genome sequence shows that ESV belongs to the amphibian-like ranaviruses and is closely related to the epizootic hematopoietic necrosis virus (EHNV), a disease agent geographically confined to the Australian continent and notifiable to the World Organization for Animal Health.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA 122, a Nitrogen-Fixing Soybean Symbiont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Masayuki; Tsukui, Takahiro; Kaneko, Takakazu; Ohtsubo, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Shusei; Nagata, Yuji; Tsuda, Masataka; Mitsui, Hisayuki

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report the complete genome sequence of Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens USDA 122, a nitrogen-fixing soybean symbiont. The genome consists of a 9.1 Mb circular chromosome, and 8,551 coding sequences (CDSs) were predicted on the genome. The sequence will provide insight into the evolution of rhizobial genome, and the symbiotic compatibility with host plants. PMID:28254989

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Porcine Parvovirus 2 Recovered from Swine Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, M.; Franco, A. C.; Giongo, A.; Valdez, F. P.; Saddi, T. M.; Brito, W. M. E. D.; Roehe, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    A complete genomic sequence of porcine parvovirus 2 (PPV-2) was detected by viral metagenome analysis on swine sera. A phylogenetic analysis of this genome reveals that it is highly similar to previously reported North American PPV-2 genomes. The complete PPV-2 sequence is 5,426 nucleotides long. PMID:26823583

  8. Characterization of the complete chloroplast genome of the endangered species Carya sinensis (Juglandaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiheng Hu; Xi Chen; Xiaojia Feng; Keith E. Woeste; Peng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Carya sinensis (Chinese Hickory, beaked walnut, or beaked hickory) is an endangered species that needs urgent conservation action. Here, we reported the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence and the genomic features of the C. sinensis cp, which is the first complete cp genome of any member of Carya. The...

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of the gray mouse lemur, Microcebus murinus (Primates, Cheirogaleidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, Emilie; Crouau-Roy, Brigitte; Aujard, Fabienne; Holota, Hélène; Murienne, Jérôme

    2016-09-01

    We report the high-coverage complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the gray mouse lemur Microcebus murinus. The sequencing has been performed on an Illumina Hiseq 2500 platform, with a genome skimming strategy. The total length of this mitogenome is 16 963 bp, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 1 non-coding region (D-loop region). The genome organization, nucleotide composition and codon usage are similar to those reported from other primate's mitochondrial genomes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here will be useful for comparative genomics studies in primates.

  10. Whole Genome Fine Map of Rice Completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Rice is a staple crop for more than half of the world's population, and it was hoped that the availability of its genome sequence might enable scientists to develop more productive and environment friendly rice strains.Furthermore, the rice genome might provide the key to understanding the genetics of other major cereal crops,as all of them have much larger genomes.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the stomatopod crustacean Squilla mantis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook Charles E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mitochondrial genomes are physically separate from the much larger nuclear genomes and have proven useful both for phylogenetic studies and for understanding genome evolution. Within the phylum Arthropoda the subphylum Crustacea includes over 50,000 named species with immense variation in body plans and habitats, yet only 23 complete mitochondrial genomes are available from this subphylum. Results I describe here the complete mitochondrial genome of the crustacean Squilla mantis (Crustacea: Malacostraca: Stomatopoda. This 15994-nucleotide genome, the first described from a hoplocarid, contains the standard complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region that is found in most other metazoans. The gene order is identical to that considered ancestral for hexapods and crustaceans. The 70% AT base composition is within the range described for other arthropods. A single unusual feature of the genome is a 230 nucleotide non-coding region between a serine transfer RNA and the nad1 gene, which has no apparent function. I also compare gene order, nucleotide composition, and codon usage of the S. mantis genome and eight other malacostracan crustaceans. A translocation of the histidine transfer RNA gene is shared by three taxa in the order Decapoda, infraorder Brachyura; Callinectes sapidus, Portunus trituberculatus and Pseudocarcinus gigas. This translocation may be diagnostic for the Brachyura. For all nine taxa nucleotide composition is biased towards AT-richness, as expected for arthropods, and is within the range reported for other arthropods. Codon usage is biased, and much of this bias is probably due to the skew in nucleotide composition towards AT-richness. Conclusion The mitochondrial genome of Squilla mantis contains one unusual feature, a 230 base pair non-coding region has so far not been described in any other malacostracan. Comparisons with other

  12. Complete genome amplification of Equine influenza virus subtype 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sguazza, G. H.; Fuentealba, N. A.; Tizzano, Marco Antonio; Galosi, Cecilia Mónica; Pecoraro, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a method for rapid amplification of the complete genome of equine influenza virus subtype 2 (H3N8). A ThermoScriptTM reverse transcriptase instead of the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase or Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase was used. This enzyme has demonstrated higher thermal stability and is described as suitable to make long cDNA with a complex secondary structure. The product obtained by this method can be cloned, used in later...

  13. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Dendrobium nobile from Northeastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konhar, Ruchishree; Biswal, Devendra Kumar; Debnath, Manish; Parameswaran, Sriram; Sundar, Durai; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-10-06

    The orchid species Dendrobium nobile belonging to the family Orchidaceae and genus Dendrobium (a vast genus that encompasses nearly 1,200 species) has an herbal medicinal history of about 2000 years in east and south Asian countries. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. nobile from northeastern India for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Konhar et al.

  14. Complete genome amplification of Equine influenza virus subtype 2

    OpenAIRE

    Sguazza, G.H.; Fuentealba, N. A.; Tizzano, Marco Antonio; Galosi, Cecilia Mónica; M. R. Pecoraro

    2009-01-01

    This work reports a method for rapid amplification of the complete genome of equine influenza virus subtype 2 (H3N8). A ThermoScriptTM reverse transcriptase instead of the avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase or Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase was used. This enzyme has demonstrated higher thermal stability and is described as suitable to make long cDNA with a complex secondary structure. The product obtained by this method can be cloned, used in later...

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of the geophilomorph centipede Strigamia maritima.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E Robertson

    Full Text Available Strigamia maritima (Myriapoda; Chilopoda is a species from the soil-living order of geophilomorph centipedes. The Geophilomorpha is the most speciose order of centipedes with over a 1000 species described. They are notable for their large number of appendage bearing segments and are being used as a laboratory model to study the embryological process of segmentation within the myriapods. Using a scaffold derived from the recently published genome of Strigamia maritima that contained multiple mitochondrial protein-coding genes, here we report the complete mitochondrial genome of Strigamia, the first from any geophilomorph centipede. The mitochondrial genome of S. maritima is a circular molecule of 14,938 base pairs, within which we could identify the typical mitochondrial genome complement of 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Sequences resembling 16 of the 22 transfer RNA genes typical of metazoan mitochondrial genomes could be identified, many of which have clear deviations from the standard 'cloverleaf' secondary structures of tRNA. Phylogenetic trees derived from the concatenated alignment of protein-coding genes of S. maritima and >50 other metazoans were unable to resolve the Myriapoda as monophyletic, but did support a monophyletic group of chilopods: Strigamia was resolved as the sister group of the scolopendromorph Scolopocryptos sp. and these two (Geophilomorpha and Scolopendromorpha, along with the Lithobiomorpha, formed a monophyletic group the Pleurostigmomorpha. Gene order within the S. maritima mitochondrial genome is unique compared to any other arthropod or metazoan mitochondrial genome to which it has been compared. The highly unusual organisation of the mitochondrial genome of Strigamia maritima is in striking contrast with the conservatively evolving nuclear genome: sampling of more members of this order of centipedes will be required to see whether this unusual organization is typical of the Geophilomorpha or

  16. Complete Chloroplast Genome of Tanaecium tetragonolobum: The First Bignoniaceae Plastome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Gonçalves Nazareno

    Full Text Available Bignoniaceae is a Pantropical plant family that is especially abundant in the Neotropics. Members of the Bignoniaceae are diverse in many ecosystems and represent key components of the Tropical flora. Despite the ecological importance of the Bignoniaceae and all the efforts to reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, whole chloroplast genome information has not yet been reported for any members of the family. Here, we report the complete chloroplast genome sequence of Tanaecium tetragonolobum (Jacq. L.G. Lohmann, which was reconstructed using de novo and referenced-based assembly of single-end reads generated by shotgun sequencing of total genomic DNA in an Illumina platform. The gene order and organization of the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum exhibits the general structure of flowering plants, and is similar to other Lamiales chloroplast genomes. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum is a circular molecule of 153,776 base pairs (bp with a quadripartite structure containing two single copy regions, a large single copy region (LSC, 84,612 bp and a small single copy region (SSC, 17,586 bp separated by inverted repeat regions (IRs, 25,789 bp. In addition, the chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum has 38.3% GC content and includes 121 genes, of which 86 are protein-coding, 31 are transfer RNA, and four are ribosomal RNA. The chloroplast genome of T. tetragonolobum presents a total of 47 tandem repeats and 347 simple sequence repeats (SSRs with mononucleotides being the most common and di-, tri-, tetra-, and hexanucleotides occurring with less frequency. The results obtained here were compared to other chloroplast genomes of Lamiales available to date, providing new insight into the evolution of chloroplast genomes within Lamiales. Overall, the evolutionary rates of genes in Lamiales are lineage-, locus-, and region-specific, indicating that the evolutionary pattern of nucleotide substitution in chloroplast genomes of flowering

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of Hirudo nipponia (Annelida, Hirudinea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunling; Nie, Jing; Hou, Junjie; Xiao, Ling; Lv, Pan

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (14,414 bp) of the blood-feeding leech Hirudo nipponia, which was an important natural medicinal resource, was sequenced and characterized. The genome encodes 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. The content of A + T was 72.60% for H. nipponia (31.69% A, 40.91% T, 15.45% G and 11.95% C). All protein-coding genes started with ATN except for nad3 and nad5, which used GTG as start codon. Eight protein-coding genes stopped with termination codon TAA. Five protein-coding genes used incomplete stop codon TA or T. The A + T-rich region was located between tRNA-Arg and tRNA-His with a length of 83 bp. This is the first report about completely sequenced mitochondrial genome from the family Hirudinidae. The complete mitochondrial genomes of H. nipponia would be useful for the exploration of Hirudinea polygenetic relationships.

  18. The complete genome of the tospovirus Zucchini lethal chlorosis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R N; De Oliveira, A S; Leastro, M O; Blawid, R; Nagata, T; Resende, R O; Melo, F L

    2016-07-07

    Zucchini lethal chlorosis virus (ZLCV) causes significant losses in the production of cucurbits in Brazil. This virus belongs to the genus Tospovirus (family Bunyaviridae) and seems to be exclusively transmitted by Frankliniella zucchini (Thysanoptera). Tospoviruses have a tripartite and single-stranded RNA genome classified as S (Small), M (Medium) and L (Large) RNAS. Although ZLCV was identified as a member of the genus Tospovirus in 1999, its complete genome had not been sequenced until now. We sequenced the full-length genome of two ZLCV isolates named ZLCV-SP and ZLCV-DF. The phylogenetic analysis showed that ZLCV-SP and ZLCV-DF clustered with the previously reported isolate ZLCV-BR09. Their proteins were closely related, except the non-structural protein (NSm), which was highly divergent (approximately 90 % identity). All viral proteins clustered similarly in our phylogenetic analysis, excluding that these ZLCV isolates have originated from reassortment events of different tospovirus species. Here we report for the first time the complete genome of two ZLCV isolates that were found in the field infecting zucchini and cucumber.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Sus cebifrons (Sus, Suidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Tang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Yong-Gang; Bai, Ming-Jie; Tang, Yan-Xia

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Sus cebifrons (Visayan warty pig). The total length of the mitogenome was 16,475 bp, and its overall base composition was estimated to be 35.0% for A, 25.8% for T, 26.2% for C and 13.0% for G, indicating an A-T (60.8%)-rich feature in Sus cebifrons mitogenome. It contained the typical structure of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and a noncoding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of these genes was the same as that found in other pigs. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Sus cebifrons would provide new genetic resources for pig domestication study.

  20. Complete genome sequence Methanothermus fervidus type strain (V24ST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Djao, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Misra, Monica [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Eichinger, Konrad [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Methanothermus fervidus Stetter 1982 is the type strain of the genus Methanothermus. This hyperthermophilic genus is of a thought to be endemic in Icelandic hot springs. M. fervidus was not only the first characterized organism with a maximal growth temperature (97 C) close to the boiling point of water, but also the first archaeon in which a detailed functional analysis of its histone protein was reported and the first one in which the function of 2,3-cyclodiphosphoglycerate in thermoadaptation was characterized. Strain V24ST is of interest because of its very low substrate ranges, it grows only on H2 + CO2. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Methanothermaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 1,243,342 bp long genome with its 1,311 protein-coding and 50 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Recombination analysis based on the complete genome of bocavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shengxia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bocavirus include bovine parvovirus, minute virus of canine, porcine bocavirus, gorilla bocavirus, and Human bocaviruses 1-4 (HBoVs. Although recent reports showed that recombination happened in bocavirus, no systematical study investigated the recombination of bocavirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of bocavirus over the complete genomes available in GenBank. Results confirmed that recombination existed among bocavirus, including the likely inter-genotype recombination between HBoV1 and HBoV4, and intra-genotype recombination among HBoV2 variants. Moreover, it is the first report revealing the recombination that occurred between minute viruses of canine.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cephalothrix simula (Iwata) (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hai-Xia; Sundberg, Per; Norenburg, Jon L; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2009-08-01

    The first complete mitochondrial genome sequence for a nemertean, Cephalothrix simula, was determined by conventional and long PCR and sequencing with primer walking methods. This circular genome is 16,296 bp in size and encodes 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs) typically found in metazoans. All genes are encoded on H-strand except two tRNAs (trnT and trnP). It differs from those reported for other metazoans, but some gene junctions are shared with those of other protostomes. Structure of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is mostly concordant with the partial mitochondrial genome known for Cephalothrix rufifrons, but notable differences include three large indel events and transposition of 2 tRNAs. Nucleotide composition of the mitochondrial genome of C. simula is highly A+T biased. The compositional skew is strongly reflected in the codon-usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins. An AT-rich noncoding region with potential to form stem-loop structures may be involved in the initiation of replication or transcription. Gene adjacencies and phylogenetic analysis based on the 12 concatenated amino acid sequences (except atp8) of mitochondrial protein-coding genes show that the nemertean is close to the coelomate lophotrochozoans, rather than the acoelomate platyhelminths.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the fish pathogen Flavobacterium branchiophilum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchon, Marie; Barbier, Paul; Bernardet, Jean-François; Loux, Valentin; Vacherie, Benoit; Barbe, Valérie; Rocha, Eduardo P C; Duchaud, Eric

    2011-11-01

    Members of the genus Flavobacterium occur in a variety of ecological niches and represent an interesting diversity of lifestyles. Flavobacterium branchiophilum is the main causative agent of bacterial gill disease, a severe condition affecting various cultured freshwater fish species worldwide, in particular salmonids in Canada and Japan. We report here the complete genome sequence of strain FL-15 isolated from a diseased sheatfish (Silurus glanis) in Hungary. The analysis of the F. branchiophilum genome revealed putative mechanisms of pathogenicity strikingly different from those of the other, closely related fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum, including the first cholera-like toxin in a non-Proteobacteria and a wealth of adhesins. The comparison with available genomes of other Flavobacterium species revealed a small genome size, large differences in chromosome organization, and fewer rRNA and tRNA genes, in line with its more fastidious growth. In addition, horizontal gene transfer shaped the evolution of F. branchiophilum, as evidenced by its virulence factors, genomic islands, and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems. Further functional analysis should help in the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and in the development of rational diagnostic tools and control strategies in fish farms.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Huang Lang chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi-Fang; Liu, Li-Li; Fu, Chen-Xing; He, Shao-Ping; Li, Si; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Huang Lang chicken is the native breed of Hunan province in China. The complete mitochondrial (mt) genome sequence plays an important role in the accurate determination of phylogenetic relationships among metazoans. It is the first time that the complete mt genome sequence of the Huang Lang chicken was reported in this work, which was determined through the polymerase chain reaction-based method. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,786 bp, with the base composition of 30.25% for A, 23.71% for T, 32.53% for C and 13.51% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurs in the Huang Lang chicken. It contains the typical structure, including two ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The complete mt genome sequence of the Huang Lang chicken provided an important data for further study on the genetic mechanism.

  5. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Pseudobagrus truncatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-wei; Meng, Yan; Li, Zhong; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Gui-wei

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Pseudobagrus truncatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae) was determined. The complete mtDNA genome sequence of P. truncatus is 16,533 bp in size. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and one non-coding control region. The gene order and genes were the same as that found in other previously reported catfishes. The overall-based composition was 31.6% A, 26.7% T, 14.9% G and 26.8% C, with a high A + T content (58.3%). This complete mitogenome of P. truncatus provides a basic data for studies on species identification, molecular systematics and conservation genetics.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of a Giant Sea Perch Iridovirus in Kaohsiung, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a megalocytivirus strain, GSIV-K1, isolated from a farmed giant sea perch (Lates calcarifer) in Kaohsiung, Taiwan. GSIV-K1 causes mortality in farmed marine fish, including giant sea perch and groupers. The genome sequence is nearly identical to the genome of the orange-spotted grouper iridovirus. PMID:27125488

  7. Complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter africanus’ (Laf), strain ptsapsy, was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The Laf genome comprises 1,192,232 nucleotides, 34.5% GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S and 5S) ...

  8. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Yorkshire pig (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Yang, Hu; Ma, Haiming

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify the complete nucleotide sequence of mitochondrial genome in the Yorkshire pig. Sequence analysis indicates that the genome structure is in accordance with other pig breeds, and it contains 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and 1 control region (D-loop region). The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Yorkshire pig provides an important record set for further study on genetic mechanism.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Halanaerobium praevalens type strain (GSLT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kannan, K. Palani [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Halanaerobium praevalens Zeikus et al. 1984 is the type species of the genus Halanaero- bium, which in turn is the type genus of the family Halanaerobiaceae. The species is of inter- est because it is able to reduce a variety of nitro-substituted aromatic compounds at a high rate, and because of its ability to degrade organic pollutants. The strain is also of interest be- cause it functions as a hydrolytic bacterium, fermenting complex organic matter and produc- ing intermediary metabolites for other trophic groups such as sulfate-reducing and methano- genic bacteria. It is further reported as being involved in carbon removal in the Great Salt Lake, its source of isolation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a representative of the genus Halanaerobium and the second genome sequence from a type strain of the fami- ly Halanaerobiaceae. The 2,309,262 bp long genome with its 2,110 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella sp. (Diptera: Nematocera, Dixidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zehui; Li, Xuankun; Yang, Ding

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome of the family Dixidae is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dixella sp. is a circular molecule of 15,574 bp in length, containing all 37 genes including 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (srRNA and lrRNA), and a long control region. Its gene arrangement is conserved with the ancestral gene order of Drosophila yakuba, which is considered to exhibit the ground pattern of Hexapoda mitochondrial genome. Most PCGs start with standard ATN codons, while COI uses CCG, ND1 uses TTG and ND5 uses GTG as start codons. All PCGs terminate in the common stop codons TAA, except for COII and ND5 which end with a single thymine stop codon. There is a 703 bp of the control region, located between srRNA and tRNA(lle)-tRNA(Gln)-tRNA(Met) (IQM) cluster, without conserved blocks or long tandem repeats.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus," a Bacterium Associated with Citrus Huanglongbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Pietersen, Gerhard; Han, Cliff; Read, David Alan; Lou, Binghai; Gupta, Goutam; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2015-07-16

    We report here the complete genome sequence of "Candidatus Liberibacter africanus" strain PTSAPSY. The 1,192,232-bp genome with 34.5% G+C content comprises 1,017 open reading frames, 44 tRNAs, and three complete rRNAs in a circular chromosome. Copyright © 2015 Lin et al.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis; Galipienso, Luis

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h. PMID:28232427

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Subgenotype 1h Strain Isolated in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzucchi, Moira; Bertolotti, Luigi; Giammarioli, Monica; Casciari, Cristina; Rossi, Elisabetta; Rosati, Sergio; De Mia, Gian Mario

    2017-02-23

    We sequenced the complete genome of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain UM/126/07. It belongs to subgenotype 1h. The complete genome is composed of 12,196 nucleotides organized as one open reading frame encoding 3,898 amino acids. This is the first report of a full-length sequence of BVDV-1h.

  15. First Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Isolated from Febrile Patient Sera in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, S.; Carrera, J.; Pullan, S. T.; Lewandowski, K.; Paz, V.; Loman, N.; Quick, J.; Bonsall, D.; Powell, R.; Thézé, J.; Pybus, O. G.; Klenerman, P.; Eisenberg, J.; Coloma, J.; Carroll, M. W.; Trueba, G.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we present the complete genome sequences of two Zika virus (ZIKV) strains, EcEs062_16 and EcEs089_16, isolated from the sera of febrile patients in Esmeraldas City, in the northern coastal province of Esmeraldas, Ecuador, in April 2016. These are the first complete ZIKV genomes to be reported from Ecuador. PMID:28232448

  16. New complete genome sequences of human rhinoviruses shed light on their phylogeny and genomic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdobnov Evgeny M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (HRV, the most frequent cause of respiratory infections, include 99 different serotypes segregating into two species, A and B. Rhinoviruses share extensive genomic sequence similarity with enteroviruses and both are part of the picornavirus family. Nevertheless they differ significantly at the phenotypic level. The lack of HRV full-length genome sequences and the absence of analysis comparing picornaviruses at the whole genome level limit our knowledge of the genomic features supporting these differences. Results Here we report complete genome sequences of 12 HRV-A and HRV-B serotypes, more than doubling the current number of available HRV sequences. The whole-genome maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis suggests that HRV-B and human enteroviruses (HEV diverged from the last common ancestor after their separation from HRV-A. On the other hand, compared to HEV, HRV-B are more related to HRV-A in the capsid and 3B-C regions. We also identified the presence of a 2C cis-acting replication element (cre in HRV-B that is not present in HRV-A, and that had been previously characterized only in HEV. In contrast to HEV viruses, HRV-A and HRV-B share also markedly lower GC content along the whole genome length. Conclusion Our findings provide basis to speculate about both the biological similarities and the differences (e.g. tissue tropism, temperature adaptation or acid lability of these three groups of viruses.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of Oxya chinensis (Orthoptera, Acridoidea)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenyan Zhang; Yuan Huang

    2008-01-01

    The complete sequence of Oxya chinensis (O.chinensis) mitochondrial genome is reported here.It is 15,443 bp in length and contains 75.9% A+T.The protein-coding genes have a similar A+T content (75.2%).The initiation codon of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene in the mitochondrial genome of O.chinensis appears to be ATC,instead of the tetranucleotides that have been reported in Locusta migratoria (L.migratoria) mitochondrial genome.The sizes of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1319 and 850 bp,respectively.The transfer RNA genes have been modeled and showed strong resemblance to the dipteran transfer RNAs,and all anticodons are identical to those of dipteran.The A+T-rich region is 562 bp,shorter than that of other known Orthoptera insects.The six conserved domains were identified within the A+T-rich region by comparing its sequence with those of other grasshoppers.The result of phylogenetic analysis based on the dataset containing 12 concatenated protein sequences confirms the close relationship of O.chinensis with L.migratoria.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Sulfurospirillum deleyianum type strain (5175T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum deleyianum Schumacher et al. 1993 is the type species of the genus Sulfurospirillum. S. deleyianum is a model organism for studying sulfur reduction and dissimilatory nitrate reduction as energy source for growth. Also, it is a prominent model organism for studying the structural and functional characteristics of the cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the genus Sulfurospirillum. The 2,306,351 bp long genome with its 2291 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia; Nolan, Matt; Lang, Elke; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Goker, Markus; Spring, Stefan; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Lapidus, Alla

    2009-05-20

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the genus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobiaceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomicrobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Gordonia bronchialis type strain (3410T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Jando, Marlen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Gordonia bronchialis Tsukamura 1971 is the type species of the genus. G. bronchialis is a human-pathogenic organism that has been isolated from a large variety of human tissues. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of the family Gordoniaceae. The 5,290,012 bp long genome with its 4,944 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek marsh frog Pelophylax cretensis (Anura, Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Sebastian; Pabijan, Maciej; Osikowski, Artur; Szymura, Jacek M

    2016-05-01

    We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the Greek marsh frog Pelophylax cretensis, a water frog species endemic to the island of Crete. The genome sequence was 17,829 bp in size, and the gene order and contents were identical to those of previously reported mitochondrial genomes of other water frog species. This is the first complete mitogenome (i.e. including control region) described for western Palaearctic water frogs.

  2. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Pseudobagrus brevicaudatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-Wei; Meng, Yan; Li, Zhong; Zhang, Yan; Zou, Gui-wei

    2014-06-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudobagrus brevicaudatus (Siluriformes: Bagridae) was sequenced in this study. The total length of the mitogenome is 16,533 bp, with the base composition of 31.6% A, 26.8% T, 15.0%G, 26.6% C. The gene order and genes were the same as that found in other previously reported catfishes, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 non-coding control region. Except for ND6 gene and 8 tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes were encoded on the heavy strand. This complete mitogenome data provides the basis for taxonomic and conservation research of this and closely related species.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Dugesia japonica (Platyhelminthes; order Tricladida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Masato; Sakaizumi, Mitsuru

    2012-10-01

    We used two sequencing methods, namely long polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and primer walking, to determine the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Dugesia japonica and most of the mtDNA sequence of Dugesia ryukyuensis. The genome of D. japonica contained 36 genes including 12 of the 13 protein-coding genes characteristic of metazoan mitochondrial genomes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The genome of D. ryukyuensis contained 33 genes, including 12 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, and 19 transfer RNA genes. The gene order of the mitochondrial genome from the Dugesia species showed no clear homology with either the Neodermata or other free-living Rhabditophora. This indicates that the platyhelminths exhibit great variability in mitochondrial gene order. This is the first complete sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome of a free-living member of Rhabditophora, which will facilitate further studies on the population genetics and genomic evolution of the Platyhelminthes.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Cellulomonas flavigena type strain (134T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Foster, Brian [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sun, Hui [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena (Kellerman and McBeth 1912) Bergey et al. 1923 is the type species of the genus Cellulomonas of the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. Members of the genus Cellulomonas are of special interest for their ability to degrade cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly with regard to the use of biomass as an alternative energy source. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Cellulomonas, and next to the human pathogen Tropheryma whipplei the second complete genome sequence within the actinobacterial family Cellulomonadaceae. The 4,123,179 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,735 protein-coding and 53 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome of a wild Siberian tiger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujiao; Lu, Taofeng; Sun, Zhaohui; Guan, Weijun; Liu, Zhensheng; Teng, Liwei; Wang, Shuo; Ma, Yuehui

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) was sequenced, using muscle tissue obtained from a male wild tiger. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,996 bp. The genome structure of this tiger is in accordance with other Siberian tigers and it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 1 control region.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis Viscerotropic Strain N1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Ricardo W.; Sousa, Thiago J.; Rocha, Flávia; Pereira, Felipe L.; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Menezes, Nildo; Macedo, Eduardo S.; Moura-Costa, Lilia F.; Meyer, Roberto; Leal, Carlos A. G.; Figueiredo, Henrique C.; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-01-01

    We present the complete genome sequence of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis strain N1. The sequencing was performed with the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine system. The genome is a circular chromosome with 2,337,845 bp, a G+C content of 52.85%, and a total of 2,045 coding sequences, 12 rRNAs, 49 tRNAs, and 58 pseudogenes. PMID:26823597

  7. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain NIZO2877

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, M.E.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Joncour, P.; Hughes, S.; Gillet, B.; Kleerebezem, M; Siezen, R.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Leulier, F.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile bacterial species that is isolated mostly from foods. Here, we present the first genome sequence of L. plantarum strain NIZO2877 isolated from a hot dog in Vietnam. Its two contigs represent a nearly complete genome sequence.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter aerogenes KCTC 2190.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang Heum; Kim, Sewhan; Kim, Jae Young; Lee, Soojin; Um, Youngsoon; Oh, Min-Kyu; Kim, Young-Rok; Lee, Jinwon; Yang, Kap-Seok

    2012-05-01

    This is the first complete genome sequence of the Enterobacter aerogenes species. Here we present the genome sequence of E. aerogenes KCTC 2190, which contains 5,280,350 bp with a G + C content of 54.8 mol%, 4,912 protein-coding genes, and 109 structural RNAs.

  9. Utilization of complete chloroplast genomes for phylogenetic studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramlee, Shairul Izan Binti

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplast DNA sequence polymorphisms are a primary source of data in many plant phylogenetic studies. The chloroplast genome is relatively conserved in its evolution making it an ideal molecule to retain phylogenetic signals. The chloroplast genome is also largely, but not completely, free from ot

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Bacteriophage Smudge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Jessica L; Breslin, Eileen; Schuhmacher, Zachary; Himelright, Madison; Berluti, Cassandra; Boyd, Charles; Carson, Rachel; Del Gallo, Elle; Giessler, Caris; Gilliam, Benjamin; Heatherly, Catherine; Nevin, Julius; Nguyen, Bryan; Nguyen, Justin; Parada, Jocelyn; Sutterfield, Blake; Tukruni, Muruj; Temple, Louise

    2016-08-18

    Smudge, a bacteriophage enriched from soil using Bacillus thuringiensis DSM-350 as the host, had its complete genome sequenced. Smudge is a myovirus with a genome consisting of 292 genes and was identified as belonging to the C1 cluster of Bacillus phages.

  11. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain NIZO2877

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, M.E.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Joncour, P.; Hughes, S.; Gillet, B.; Kleerebezem, M; Siezen, R.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Leulier, F.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile bacterial species that is isolated mostly from foods. Here, we present the first genome sequence of L. plantarum strain NIZO2877 isolated from a hot dog in Vietnam. Its two contigs represent a nearly complete genome sequence.

  12. Complete Genome of Stachybotrys chartarum strain 51-11

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Complete genome sequence of the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum. Sequences can be used to identify genes, genetic pathways, gene clusters, genetic organization, etc....

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Mayaro Virus (Togaviridae, Alphavirus) Strain BeAr 20290 from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Mayaro virus strain BeAr 20290 isolated from Haemagogus mosquitoes in 1960. The sequence presented here includes all nonstructural and structural proteins and the 5'- and 3'-untranslated (UTR) regions.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Leech Symbiont Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Michael C.; Bomar, Lindsey; Graf, Joerg

    2015-01-01

    Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T was isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, and is the type species of a new genus within the Rikenellaceae. Here, we report the complete annotated genome sequence of this bacterium.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Leech Symbiont Mucinivorans hirudinis M3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael C; Bomar, Lindsey; Graf, Joerg

    2015-02-05

    Mucinivorans hirudinis M3(T) was isolated from the digestive tract of the medicinal leech, Hirudo verbana, and is the type species of a new genus within the Rikenellaceae. Here, we report the complete annotated genome sequence of this bacterium.

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Reference Strains 134 and 10536

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Burroughs, Mark; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Rowe, Lori; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine formulations and vaccination programs against whooping cough (pertussis) vary worldwide. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two divergent Bordetella pertussis reference strains used in the production of pertussis vaccines. PMID:27635001

  17. Complete Genome Sequences of Bordetella pertussis Vaccine Reference Strains 134 and 10536.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, Michael R; Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Burroughs, Mark; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Rowe, Lori; Tondella, M Lucia; Williams, Margaret M

    2016-09-15

    Vaccine formulations and vaccination programs against whooping cough (pertussis) vary worldwide. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two divergent Bordetella pertussis reference strains used in the production of pertussis vaccines.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-08-13

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the first published complete genome sequence of a phytopathogenic P. atrosepticum bacteriophage, and details provide important information for the development of biocontrol by advancing our understanding of phage-phytopathogen interactions.

  19. The complete chloroplast genome of the Dendrobium strongylanthum (Orchidaceae: Epidendroideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chen; Wang, Zhe-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Complete chloroplast genome sequence is very useful for studying the phylogenetic and evolution of species. In this study, the complete chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum was constructed from whole-genome Illumina sequencing data. The chloroplast genome is 153 058 bp in length with 37.6% GC content and consists of two inverted repeats (IRs) of 26 316 bp. The IR regions are separated by large single-copy region (LSC, 85 836 bp) and small single-copy (SSC, 14 590 bp) region. A total of 130 chloroplast genes were successfully annotated, including 84 protein coding genes, 38 tRNA genes, and eight rRNA genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the chloroplast genome of Dendrobium strongylanthum is related to that of the Dendrobium officinal.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium phlei Type Strain RIVM601174

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, A. M.

    2012-05-24

    Mycobacterium phlei is a rapidly growing nontuberculous Mycobacterium species that is typically nonpathogenic, with few reported cases of human disease. Here we report the whole genome sequence of M. phlei type strain RIVM601174.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans type strain (5575T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Schroder, Maren [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Gleim, Dorothea [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2009-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum acetoxidans Widdel and Pfennig 1977 was one of the first sulfate-reducing bacteria known to grow with acetate as sole energy and carbon source. It is able to oxidize substrates completely to carbon dioxide with sulfate as the electron acceptor, which is reduced to hydrogen sulfide. All available data about this species are based on strain 5575T, isolated from piggery waste in Germany. Here we describe the features of this organ-ism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a Desulfotomaculum species with validly published name. The 4,545,624 bp long single replicon genome with its 4370 protein-coding and 100 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Raman; Lee, Do-Hyung; Park, SeonJoo

    2016-05-01

    The complete chloroplast genome (cpDNA) sequence of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is an economically important traditional Chinese medicine was reported and characterized. The cpDNA of Dianthus superbus var. longicalycinus is 149,539 bp, with 36.3% GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 24,803 bp is separated by a large single-copy region (LSC, 82,805 bp) and a small single-copy region (SSC, 17,128 bp). It encodes 85 protein-coding genes, 36 tRNA genes and 8 rRNA genes. Of 129 individual genes, 13 genes encoded one intron and three genes have two introns.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Mesorhizobium opportunistum type strain WSM2075

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, Wayne [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Nandesena, Kemanthi [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; YatesIII, John R. [Scripps Research Institute, The, La Jolla, CA; Tiwari, Ravi [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; O' Hara, Graham [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Ninawi, Mohamed [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meenakshi, Uma [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Howieson, John [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia

    2013-01-01

    Mesorhizobium opportunistum strain WSM2075T was isolated inWestern Australia in 2000 from root nodules of the pasture legume Biserrula pelecinus that had beeninoculated with M. ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271. WSM2075T is an aerobic, motile, Gram negative, non-spore-forming rod that has gained the ability to nodulate B. pelecinus but is completely ineffective in N2 fixation with this host. This report reveals thegenome of M. opportunistum strain WSM2075T contains a chromosome ofsize 6,884,444 bp which encodes 6,685 protein-coding genes and 62 RNA-onlyencoding genes. This genome does not contain any plasmids but has a 455.7 kbgenomic island from Mesorhizobium ciceri bv. biserrulae WSM1271 that has been integrated into a phenylalanine-tRNA gene.

  4. The complete chloroplast genome of common walnut (Juglans regia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiheng ​Hu; Keith E. Woeste; Meng Dang; Tao Zhou; Xiaojia Feng; Guifang Zhao; Zhanlin Liu; Zhonghu Li; Peng. Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Common walnut (Juglans regia L.) is cultivated in temperate regions worldwide for its wood and nuts. The complete chloroplast genome of J. regia was sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. This is the first complete chloroplast sequence for the Juglandaceae, a family that includes numerous species of economic importance....

  5. Complete genome sequence of Sanguibacter keddieii type strain (ST-74T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanova, Natalia; Sikorski, Johannes; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D' haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos

    2009-05-20

    Sanguibacter keddieii is the type species of the genus Sanguibacter, the only described genus within the family of Sanguibacteraceae. Phylogenetically, this family is located in the neighbourhood of the genus Oerskovia and the family Cellulomonadaceae within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. The strain described in this report was isolated from blood of apparently healthy cows. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the family Sanguibacteraceae, and the 4,253,413 bp long single replicon genome with its 3735 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaolei; Chen, Lingyun; Chen, Xi; Jia, Huijue

    2016-09-01

    The Hoffmann's two-toed sloth (Choloepus hoffmanni), a member of Folivora suborder, is found in the rainforest canopy of South America. Both the Hoffmann's two-toed sloth and human belong to Eutheria subclass. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of C. hoffmanni is reported . The whole mitochondrial genome is 16 466 bp in length, including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. Comparison between the mitochondrial genome of the C. hoffmanni and that of its congener Choloepus didactylus revealed a high similarity in their gene sequences. We also constructed a phylogenetic tree on the complete mitochondrial genomes of these two species and other 14 closely related species to show their phylogenic relationship. To conclude, we analyzed the complete mitochondrial genome of C. hoffmanni and its phylogenic relationship with other related species, which would facilitate our understanding of the evolution of eutherian mitochondrial genome.

  7. Five Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences from Diospyros: Genome Organization and Comparative Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Fu

    Full Text Available Diospyros is the largest genus in Ebenaceae, comprising more than 500 species with remarkable economic value, especially Diospyros kaki Thunb., which has traditionally been an important food resource in China, Korea, and Japan. Complete chloroplast (cp genomes from D. kaki, D. lotus L., D. oleifera Cheng., D. glaucifolia Metc., and Diospyros 'Jinzaoshi' were sequenced using Illumina sequencing technology. This is the first cp genome reported in Ebenaceae. The cp genome sequences of Diospyros ranged from 157,300 to 157,784 bp in length, presenting a typical quadripartite structure with two inverted repeats each separated by one large and one small single-copy region. For each cp genome, 134 genes were annotated, including 80 protein-coding, 31 tRNA, and 4 rRNA unique genes. In all, 179 repeats and 283 single sequence repeats were identified. Four hypervariable regions, namely, intergenic region of trnQ_rps16, trnV_ndhC, and psbD_trnT, and intron of ndhA, were identified in the Diospyros genomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole cp genome, protein-coding, and intergenic and intron sequences indicated that D. oleifera is closely related to D. kaki and could be used as a model plant for future research on D. kaki; to our knowledge, this is proposed for the first time. Further, these analyses together with two large deletions (301 and 140 bp in the cp genome of D. 'Jinzaoshi', support its placement as a new species in Diospyros. Both maximum parsimony and likelihood analyses for 19 taxa indicated the basal position of Ericales in asterids and suggested that Ebenaceae is monophyletic in Ericales.

  8. Complete Genomes of Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, Two Phylogenetically Distinct Probiotics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khatri, Indu; Sharma, Shailza; Ramya, T N C; Subramanian, Srikrishna

    2016-01-01

    .... We report the complete genomes of two commercially available probiotics, Bacillus coagulans S-lac and Bacillus subtilis TO-A JPC, and compare them with the genomes of other Bacillus and Lactobacillus...

  9. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Watanabe, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-10-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476, Isolated from a Patient with Streptococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; WATANABE, Shinya; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-01-01

    Here, we report the completely annotated genome sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes M1 476 isolated from a patient with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) during pregnancy. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying STSS.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis 417, a Copper-Resistant Strain Isolated from Juglans regia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ulisses P; Gouran, Hossein; Nascimento, Rafael; Adaskaveg, James E; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of Xanthomonas arboricola pv. juglandis 417, a copper-resistant strain isolated from a blighted walnut fruit (Juglans regia L. cv. Chandler). The genome consists of a single chromosome (5,218 kb).

  12. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Simian Foamy Virus Isolate from a Cynomolgus Macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Koji; Ami, Yasushi; Suzaki, Yuriko

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete proviral genome sequence (DDBJ/ENA/GenBank accession no. LC094267) of a simian foamy virus, SFVmfa/Cy5061, isolated from a cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis). This proviral genome consists of 12,965 nucleotides and has five open reading frames, gag, pol, env, tas, and bet, as with other foamy viruses. PMID:27908992

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Field Isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium caprae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, José; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Vicente, Joaquín; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Manrique, Marina; Tobes, Raquel; López, Vladimir; Romero, Beatriz; Domínguez, Lucas; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramón; Gortazar, Christian

    2015-06-25

    Here we report the complete genome sequences of field isolates of Mycobacterium bovis and the related mycobacterial species, Mycobacterium caprae. The genomes of three M. bovis (MB1, MB3, MB4) and one M. caprae (MB2) field isolates with different virulence, prevalence, and host distribution phenotypes were sequenced.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Campylobacter jejuni YH001 from beef liver which contains a novel plasmid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni is an important foodborne pathogen that causes gastroenteritis in humans and is commonly found in poultry and meat products. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a Campylobacter jejuni strain recently isolated from retail beef liver. The genome size was 1,712,361 bp, ...

  15. Complete genome sequence of a recent panzootic virulent Newcastle disease virus from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete genome sequence of a new strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) (chicken/Pak/Lahore-611/2013) is reported. The strain was isolated from a vaccinated chicken flock in Pakistan in 2013 and has panzootic features. The genome is 15192 nucleotides in length and is classified as sub-genotype V...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus xylosus HKUOPL8, a Potential Opportunistic Pathogen of Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Angel Po Yee; Jiang, Jingwei; Tun, Hein Min; Mauroo, Nathalie France; Yuen, Chan San; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2014-07-24

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Staphylococcus xylosus strain HKUOPL8, isolated from giant panda feces. The whole genome sequence of this strain will provide an important framework for investigating the genes responsible for potential opportunistic infections with this species, as well as its survival in various environments. Copyright © 2014 Ma et al.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the plant pathogen Erwinia amylovora strain ATCC 49946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwinia amylovora causes the economically important disease fire blight that affects rosaceous plants, especially pear and apple. Here we report the complete genome sequence and annotation of strain ATCC 49946. The analysis of the sequence and its comparison with sequenced genomes of closely related...

  18. Complete genome sequence of the xylan-degrading subseafloor bacterium Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Atsushi; Hirose, Yuu; Misawa, Naomi; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Kishimoto, Noriaki; Kobayashi, Tohru

    2016-03-10

    Here we report the complete genome sequence of Microcella alkaliphila JAM-AC0309, which was newly isolated from the deep subseafloor core sediment from offshore of the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. An array of genes related to utilization of xylan in this bacterium was identified by whole genome analysis.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of an African Swine Fever Virus Isolate from Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, Claudia; Oggiano, Annalisa; Malmberg, Maja; Iscaro, Carmen; De Mia, Gian Mario; Belák, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Previous genetic characterization of African swine fever virus isolates from the Italian island of Sardinia, where the virus has been present since 1978, has largely been limited to a few selected genomic regions. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the isolate 47/Ss/08 collected during an outbreak in 2008. PMID:27856577

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of the Anaerobic Halophilic Alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophilus JW/NM-WN-LFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesbah, Noha [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Wiegel, Juergen [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2011-01-01

    The genome of the anaerobic halophilic alkalithermophile Natranaerobius thermophiles consists of one chromosome and two plasmids.The present study is the first to report the completely sequenced genome of polyextremophile and the harboring genes harboring genes associated with roles in regulation of intracellular osmotic pressure, pH homeostasis, and thermophilic stability.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Nakamurella multipartita type strain (Y-104).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tice, Hope; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Sims, David; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Detter, John C; Brettin, Thomas; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chen, Feng

    2010-03-30

    Nakamurella multipartita (Yoshimi et al. 1996) Tao et al. 2004 is the type species of the monospecific genus Nakamurella in the actinobacterial suborder Frankineae. The nonmotile, coccus-shaped strain was isolated from activated sludge acclimated with sugar-containing synthetic wastewater, and is capable of accumulating large amounts of polysaccharides in its cells. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Nakamurellaceae. The 6,060,298 bp long single replicon genome with its 5415 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Arcobacter nitrofigilis type strain (CIT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2010-01-01

    Arcobacter nitrofigilis (McClung et al. 1983) Vandamme et al. 1991 is the type species of the genus Arcobacter in the epsilonproteobacterial family Campylobacteraceae. The species was first described in 1983 as Campylobacter nitrofigilis [1] after its detection as a free-living, nitrogen-fixing Campylobacter species associated with Spartina alterniflora Loisel. roots [2]. It is of phylogenetic interest because of its lifestyle as a symbiotic organism in a marine environment in contrast to many other Arcobacter species which are associated with warm-blooded animals and tend to be pathogenic. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a type stain of the genus Arcobacter. The 3,192,235 bp genome with its 3,154 protein-coding and 70 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Halorhabdus utahensis type strain (AX-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain; Tindall, Brian J; Pomrenke, Helga; Göker, Markus; Lapidus, Alla; Nolan, Matt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Goodwin, Lynne; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-11-22

    Halorhabdus utahensis Wainø et al. 2000 is the type species of the genus, which is of phylogenetic interest because of its location on one of the deepest branches within the very extensive euryarchaeal family Halobacteriaceae. H. utahensis is a free-living, motile, rod shaped to pleomorphic, Gram-negative archaeon, which was originally isolated from a sediment sample collected from the southern arm of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA. When grown on appropriate media, H. utahensis can form polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB). Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the a member of halobacterial genus Halorhabdus, and the 3,116,795 bp long single replicon genome with its 3027 protein-coding and 48 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans type strain (ICPT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans (Clark and Norris 1996) is the sole and type species of the ge-nus, which until recently was the only genus within the actinobacterial family Acidimicrobia-ceae and in the order Acidomicrobiales. Rapid oxidation of iron pyrite during autotrophic growth in the absence of an enhanced CO2 concentration is characteristic for A. ferrooxidans. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the order Acidomi-crobiales, and the 2,158,157 bp long single replicon genome with its 2038 protein coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Complete genome sequence of "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muyzer, Gerard; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Lapidus, Alla; Clum, Alicia; Ivanova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; d'Haeseleer, Patrick; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-02-14

    "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7 is an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was found to predominate a full-scale bioreactor, removing sulfide from biogas. Here we report the complete genome sequence of strain HL-EbGr7 and its annotation. The genome was sequenced within the Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program, because of its relevance to the sustainable removal of sulfide from bio- and industrial waste gases.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 407 Cry-

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Liesegang, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that has been used widely as a biopesticide. Here, we report the genome sequence of strain 407 Cry-, which is used to study the genetic determinants of pathogenicity. The genome consists of a 5.5-Mb chromosome and nine plasmids, including a novel 502-kb megaplasmid.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Pediococcus pentosaceus Strain SL4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantoft, Shruti Harnal; Bielak, Eliza Maria; Seo, Jae-Gu;

    2013-01-01

    Pediococcus pentosaceus SL4 was isolated from a Korean fermented vegetable product, kimchi. We report here the whole-genome sequence (WGS) of P. pentosaceus SL4. The genome consists of a 1.79-Mb circular chromosome (G+C content of 37.3%) and seven distinct plasmids ranging in size from 4 kb to 50...

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of the medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqin Li

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is one of the well-known medicinal basidiomycetes worldwide. The mitochondrion, referred to as the second genome, is an organelle found in most eukaryotic cells and participates in critical cellular functions. Elucidating the structure and function of this genome is important to understand completely the genetic contents of G. lucidum. In this study, we assembled the mitochondrial genome of G. lucidum and analyzed the differential expressions of its encoded genes across three developmental stages. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 60,630 bp with a GC content of 26.67%. Genome annotation identified genes that encode 15 conserved proteins, 27 tRNAs, small and large rRNAs, four homing endonucleases, and two hypothetical proteins. Except for genes encoding trnW and two hypothetical proteins, all genes were located on the positive strand. For the repeat structure analysis, eight forward, two inverted, and three tandem repeats were detected. A pair of fragments with a total length around 5.5 kb was found in both the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, which suggests the possible transfer of DNA sequences between two genomes. RNA-Seq data for samples derived from three stages, namely, mycelia, primordia, and fruiting bodies, were mapped to the mitochondrial genome and qualified. The protein-coding genes were expressed higher in mycelia or primordial stages compared with those in the fruiting bodies. The rRNA abundances were significantly higher in all three stages. Two regions were transcribed but did not contain any identified protein or tRNA genes. Furthermore, three RNA-editing sites were detected. Genome synteny analysis showed that significant genome rearrangements occurred in the mitochondrial genomes. This study provides valuable information on the gene contents of the mitochondrial genome and their differential expressions at various developmental stages of G. lucidum. The results contribute to the

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of Iwatanemertes piperata (Nemertea: Heteronemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chun-Yang; Sun, Wen-Yan; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Iwatanemertes piperata (Nemertea: Heteronemertea) was determined. The genome, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 22 transfer RNA genes, is 16,382 bp in length and has a base composition of G (25.87%), A (21.53%), T (40.64%) and C (11.95%). The gene order is identical to other Heteronemertea mitogenomes published to date.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Phytopathogenic Pectobacterium atrosepticum Bacteriophage Peat1

    OpenAIRE

    Kalischuk, Melanie; Hachey, John; Kawchuk, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium atrosepticum is a common phytopathogen causing significant economic losses worldwide. To develop a biocontrol strategy for this blackleg pathogen of solanaceous plants, P. atrosepticum bacteriophage Peat1 was isolated and its genome completely sequenced. Interestingly, morphological and sequence analyses of the 45,633-bp genome revealed that phage Peat1 is a member of the family Podoviridae and most closely resembles the Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteriophage KP34. This is the fir...

  11. Genomic insights into methanotrophy: the complete genome sequence of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ward

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Methanotrophs are ubiquitous bacteria that can use the greenhouse gas methane as a sole carbon and energy source for growth, thus playing major roles in global carbon cycles, and in particular, substantially reducing emissions of biologically generated methane to the atmosphere. Despite their importance, and in contrast to organisms that play roles in other major parts of the carbon cycle such as photosynthesis, no genome-level studies have been published on the biology of methanotrophs. We report the first complete genome sequence to our knowledge from an obligate methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath, obtained by the shotgun sequencing approach. Analysis revealed a 3.3-Mb genome highly specialized for a methanotrophic lifestyle, including redundant pathways predicted to be involved in methanotrophy and duplicated genes for essential enzymes such as the methane monooxygenases. We used phylogenomic analysis, gene order information, and comparative analysis with the partially sequenced methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens to detect genes of unknown function likely to be involved in methanotrophy and methylotrophy. Genome analysis suggests the ability of M. capsulatus to scavenge copper (including a previously unreported nonribosomal peptide synthetase and to use copper in regulation of methanotrophy, but the exact regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. One of the most surprising outcomes of the project is evidence suggesting the existence of previously unsuspected metabolic flexibility in M. capsulatus, including an ability to grow on sugars, oxidize chemolithotrophic hydrogen and sulfur, and live under reduced oxygen tension, all of which have implications for methanotroph ecology. The availability of the complete genome of M. capsulatus (Bath deepens our understanding of methanotroph biology and its relationship to global carbon cycles. We have gained evidence for greater metabolic flexibility than was previously known, and for

  12. Complete genome sequence of Ferroglobus placidus AEDII12DO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Risso, Carla [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Holmes, Dawn [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lovley, Derek [University of Massachusetts, Amherst; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Ferroglobus placidus belongs to the order Archaeoglobales within the archaeal phylum Euryar- chaeota. Strain AEDII12DO is the type strain of the species and was isolated from a shallow marine hydrothermal system at Vulcano, Italy. It is a hyperthermophilic, anaerobic chemoli- thoautotroph, but it can also use a variety of aromatic compounds as electron donors. Here we describe the features of this organism together with the complete genome sequence and anno- tation. The 2,196,266 bp genome with its 2,567 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes was se- quenced as part of a DOE Joint Genome Institute Laboratory Sequencing Program (LSP) project.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus faecium strain TX16 and comparative genomic analysis of Enterococcus faecium genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Xiang

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterococci are among the leading causes of hospital-acquired infections in the United States and Europe, with Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium being the two most common species isolated from enterococcal infections. In the last decade, the proportion of enterococcal infections caused by E. faecium has steadily increased compared to other Enterococcus species. Although the underlying mechanism for the gradual replacement of E. faecalis by E. faecium in the hospital environment is not yet understood, many studies using genotyping and phylogenetic analysis have shown the emergence of a globally dispersed polyclonal subcluster of E. faecium strains in clinical environments. Systematic study of the molecular epidemiology and pathogenesis of E. faecium has been hindered by the lack of closed, complete E. faecium genomes that can be used as references. Results In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of the E. faecium strain TX16, also known as DO, which belongs to multilocus sequence type (ST 18, and was the first E. faecium strain ever sequenced. Whole genome comparison of the TX16 genome with 21 E. faecium draft genomes confirmed that most clinical, outbreak, and hospital-associated (HA strains (including STs 16, 17, 18, and 78, in addition to strains of non-hospital origin, group in the same clade (referred to as the HA clade and are evolutionally considerably more closely related to each other by phylogenetic and gene content similarity analyses than to isolates in the community-associated (CA clade with approximately a 3–4% average nucleotide sequence difference between the two clades at the core genome level. Our study also revealed that many genomic loci in the TX16 genome are unique to the HA clade. 380 ORFs in TX16 are HA-clade specific and antibiotic resistance genes are enriched in HA-clade strains. Mobile elements such as IS16 and transposons were also found almost exclusively in HA strains

  14. Complete genome sequence of Treponema succinifaciens type strain (6091T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Treponema succinifaciens Cwyk and Canale-Parola 1981 is of interest because this strictly anaerobic, apathogenic member of the genus Treponema oxidizes carbohydrates and couples the Embden-Meyerhof pathway via activity of a pyruvate-formate lyase to the production of acetyl-coenzyme A and formate. This feature separates this species from most other anaerob- ic spirochetes. The genome of T. succinifaciens 6091T is only the second completed and pub- lished type strain genome from the genus Treponema in the family Spirochaetaceae. The 2,897,425 bp long genome with one plasmid harbors 2,723 protein-coding and 63 RNA genes and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Complete genome sequence of a sapovirus from a child in Zhejiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaohong; Sun, Yi; Shang, Xiaochun; Gao, Jian; Zhao, Xueqin; Shuai, Huiqun; Zhang, Rui; Zhang, Yanjun

    2016-10-01

    Although Sapovirus (Caliciviridae) has been accepted as one of the causes of acute gastroenteritis worldwide, little is known about the genetic characteristics of the whole genome of sapoviruses in China, especially those that infect humans. Here we report the complete genome sequence of a sapovirus strain, Human/Zhejiang1/2015/China, obtained from a child with acute gastroenteritis in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Samples were collected and delivered to the CDC laboratories and were detected by RT-PCR. Sanger sequencing was used to obtain the full genome and molecular characterization of the genome was determined. A phylogenetic analysis of the genome was also performed. The results indicated that Human/Zhejiang1/2015/China belongs to Genogroup I. No recombination events were detected. This is the first complete sequence from a child to be reported in China. The sequence information is important for surveillance of this emerging gastrointestinal infection.

  16. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Liang, Hong-Wei; Zou, Gui-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the tetraploid Carassius auratus gibelio in this study. The genome sequence was 16,576 bp in length. The mitochondrial genome contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and 2 non-coding regions (control region and origin of light-strand replication). All genes were encoded on the heavy strain except for ND6 and eight tRNA genes. The overall base composition is 31.61% A, 25.81% T, 26.62% G, 15.96% C, with an A+T bias of 57.42%. The complete mitogenome data provides useful genetic markers for the studies on the molecular identification, population genetics, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics.

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Daweishan Mini chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ming-Li; Ding, Su-Ping; Ye, Shao-Hui; Wang, Chun-Guang; He, Bao-Li; Yuan, Zhi-Dong; Liu, Li-Li

    2016-01-01

    Daweishan Mini chicken is a valuable chicken breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken using PCR amplification, sequencing and assembling has been obtained for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,785 bp, with the base composition of 30.26% A, 23.73% T, 32.51% C, 13.51% G. It contained 37 genes (2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop region). The protein start codons are ATG, except for COX1 that begins with GTG. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Daweishan Mini chicken provides an important data set for further investigation on the phylogenetic relationships within Gallus gallus.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of Nanjiang Yellow goat (Capra hircus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijun; Meng, Xiangren; Zhang, Hao; Duan, Xiaoyue; Niu, Lili; Wang, Linjie; Li, Li; Zhang, Hongping; Wu, Hongda; Zhong, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Nanjiang Yellow goat (Capra hircus) is the first cultured mutton breed in China. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nanjiang Yellow goat has been identified for the first time. The total length of the mitochondrial genome was 16,639 bp, with the base composition of 33.54% A, 26.05% C, 13.11% G and 27.30% T. It contained 37 genes (22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 13 protein-coding genes) and a major non-coding control region (D-loop). Most of the genes have ATG initiation codons, whereas ND2, ND3 and ND5 start with ATA. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Nanjiang Yellow goat provides an important data set for further estimation on the phylogeographic structure of domestic goats.

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lophiogobius ocellicauda (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Xianqing; Jin, Xiaoxiao; Sun, Yuena

    2014-04-01

    Lophiogobius ocellicauda, which is a small demersal fish and inhabited brackish and freshwater environment of estuary, is a kind of forage fish of some predaceous economic fish. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome of L. ocellicauda was firstly determined. The genome is 16,663 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 2 main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). The complete mitochondrial genome base composition is 26.4% for T, 28.4% for C, 29.2% for A and 16.0% for G, with a slight A + T bias of 55.6%. Within the control region, the termination associated sequence, central and conserved sequence block domains were found.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Jonathan A; Farmer, Nicholas G; Cahill, Jesse L; Rasche, Eric S; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2015-10-08

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence. Copyright © 2015 Solis et al.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris MU14/1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-10-15

    Presented here is the first completely assembled genome sequence of Kocuria palustris, an actinobacterial species with broad ecological distribution. The single, circular chromosome of K. palustris MU14/1 comprises 2,854,447 bp, has a G+C content of 70.5%, and contains a deduced gene set of 2,521 coding sequences.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Kocuria palustris MU14/1

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Presented here is the first completely assembled genome sequence of Kocuria palustris, an actinobacterial species with broad ecological distribution. The single, circular chromosome of K. palustris MU14/1 comprises 2,854,447 bp, has a G+C content of 70.5%, and contains a deduced gene set of 2,521 coding sequences.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Plesiomonas shigelloides Type Strain NCTC10360

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Russell, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Plesiomonas shigelloides is a Gram-negative rod within the Enterobacteriaceae family. It is a gastrointestinal pathogen of increasing notoriety, often associated with diarrheal disease. P. shigelloides is waterborne, and infection is often linked to the consumption of seafood. Here, we describe the first complete genome for P. shigelloides type strain NCTC10360. PMID:27660796

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Siphophage Silence

    OpenAIRE

    Solis, Jonathan A.; Farmer, Nicholas G.; Cahill, Jesse L.; Rasche, Eric S.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Silence is a newly isolated siphophage that infects Bacillus megaterium, a soil bacterium that is used readily in research and commercial applications. A study of B. megaterium phage Silence will enhance our knowledge of the diversity of Bacillus phages. Here, we describe the complete genome sequence and annotated features of Silence.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus megaterium Myophage Moonbeam

    OpenAIRE

    Cadungog, Joshua N.; Khatemi, Brontee E.; Hernandez, Adriana C.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2015-01-01

    Moonbeam is a newly isolated myophage of Bacillus megaterium, a common Gram-positive bacterium that is routinely used for large-scale protein production. Bacteriophages have potential to be useful tools for industrial applications. Here, we describe the complete genome of Moonbeam and describe its features.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), from Guangzhou, China is presented. The circular mitogenome is 14,996 bp in length with an A+T content of 74.5%, and contains 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes ...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. 33047

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. ATCC 33047 (Anabaena CA), a filamentous, nitrogen-fixing marine cyanobacterium, which under salt stress conditions accumulates sucrose internally. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the understanding of cyanobacterial diversity. PMID:27516507

  8. Complete genome sequence of the alfalfa latent virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa latent virus (ALV) is a member of the carlavirus group and occurs symptomlessly in alfalfa (Medicago sativa). In the US it is prevalent in Nebraska and Wisconsin. The virus is recognized as a strain of Pea streak virus (PeSV) So far, no complete genomic sequence of PSV or ALV is availab...

  9. First Complete Genome Sequence of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Kristy

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haemophilus influenzae is an important human pathogen that primarily infects small children. In recent years, H. influenzae serotype a has emerged as a significant cause of invasive disease among indigenous populations. Here, we present the first complete whole-genome sequence of H. influenzae serotype a. PMID:28104664

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Putative Densovirus of the Asian Citrus Psyllid, Diaphorina citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Jared C; Nouri, Shahideh; Falk, Bryce W

    2016-07-28

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a putative densovirus of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Diaphorina citri densovirus (DcDNV) was originally identified through metagenomics, and here, we obtained the complete nucleotide sequence using PCR-based approaches. Phylogenetic analysis places DcDNV between viruses of the Ambidensovirus and Iteradensovirus genera.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracheirodon axelrodi (Characiformes:Characidae:Paracheirodon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songhao; Cui, Jun; Xu, Ru; Xu, Peng; Sun, Jinsheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracheirodon axelrodi was obtained by the traditional polymerase chain reaction method. The mitogenome was determined to be a 17,100 bp long circular molecule. It contains the typical complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs and 22 tRNAs. This is first report on the complete mitogenome sequence of P. axelrodi.

  12. Using Partial Genomic Fosmid Libraries for Sequencing CompleteOrganellar Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, Joel R.; Leebens-Mack, James H.; Arumuganathan, K.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Boore, Jeffrey L.; dePamphilis, Claude W.

    2005-08-26

    Organellar genome sequences provide numerous phylogenetic markers and yield insight into organellar function and molecular evolution. These genomes are much smaller in size than their nuclear counterparts; thus, their complete sequencing is much less expensive than total nuclear genome sequencing, making broader phylogenetic sampling feasible. However, for some organisms it is challenging to isolate plastid DNA for sequencing using standard methods. To overcome these difficulties, we constructed partial genomic libraries from total DNA preparations of two heterotrophic and two autotrophic angiosperm species using fosmid vectors. We then used macroarray screening to isolate clones containing large fragments of plastid DNA. A minimum tiling path of clones comprising the entire genome sequence of each plastid was selected, and these clones were shotgun-sequenced and assembled into complete genomes. Although this method worked well for both heterotrophic and autotrophic plants, nuclear genome size had a dramatic effect on the proportion of screened clones containing plastid DNA and, consequently, the overall number of clones that must be screened to ensure full plastid genome coverage. This technique makes it possible to determine complete plastid genome sequences for organisms that defy other available organellar genome sequencing methods, especially those for which limited amounts of tissue are available.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the Antarctic Halorubrum lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iain J; DasSarma, Priya; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Tice, Hope; Dalin, Eileen; Bruce, David C; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas S; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff S; Larimer, Frank; Hauser, Loren; Land, Miriam; Ivanova, Natalia; Richardson, Paul; Cavicchioli, Ricardo; DasSarma, Shiladitya; Woese, Carl R; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-01-01

    Halorubrum lacusprofundi is an extreme halophile within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain ACAM 34 was isolated from Deep Lake, Antarctica. H. lacusprofundi is of phylogenetic interest because it is distantly related to the haloarchaea that have previously been sequenced. It is also of interest because of its psychrotolerance. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. lacusprofundi type strain ACAM 34 and its annotation. This genome is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  14. Complete nucleotide sequence of the Cryptomeria japonica D. Don. chloroplast genome and comparative chloroplast genomics: diversified genomic structure of coniferous species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Tomonori; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kurita, Manabu; Kondo, Teiji; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent determination of complete chloroplast (cp) genomic sequences of various plant species has enabled numerous comparative analyses as well as advances in plant and genome evolutionary studies. In angiosperms, the complete cp genome sequences of about 70 species have been determined, whereas those of only three gymnosperm species, Cycas taitungensis, Pinus thunbergii, and Pinus koraiensis have been established. The lack of information regarding the gene content and genomic structure of gymnosperm cp genomes may severely hamper further progress of plant and cp genome evolutionary studies. To address this need, we report here the complete nucleotide sequence of the cp genome of Cryptomeria japonica, the first in the Cupressaceae sensu lato of gymnosperms, and provide a comparative analysis of their gene content and genomic structure that illustrates the unique genomic features of gymnosperms. Results The C. japonica cp genome is 131,810 bp in length, with 112 single copy genes and two duplicated (trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG) genes that give a total of 116 genes. Compared to other land plant cp genomes, the C. japonica cp has lost one of the relevant large inverted repeats (IRs) found in angiosperms, fern, liverwort, and gymnosperms, such as Cycas and Gingko, and additionally has completely lost its trnR-CCG, partially lost its trnT-GGU, and shows diversification of accD. The genomic structure of the C. japonica cp genome also differs significantly from those of other plant species. For example, we estimate that a minimum of 15 inversions would be required to transform the gene organization of the Pinus thunbergii cp genome into that of C. japonica. In the C. japonica cp genome, direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences are observed at the inversion and translocation endpoints, and these sequences may be associated with the genomic rearrangements. Conclusion The observed differences in genomic structure between C. japonica and other land plants, including

  15. Complete genome sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H; Fine, Daniel H; Kaplan, Jeffrey B; Planet, Paul J

    2009-07-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Aggregatibacter (Haemophilus) aphrophilus NJ8700▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bonaventura, Maria Pia; DeSalle, Rob; Pop, Mihai; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Figurski, David H.; Fine, Daniel H.; Kaplan, Jeffrey B.; Planet, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the finished and annotated genome sequence of Aggregatibacter aphrophilus strain NJ8700, a strain isolated from the oral flora of a healthy individual, and discuss characteristics that may affect its dual roles in human health and disease. This strain has a rough appearance, and its genome contains genes encoding a type VI secretion system and several factors that may participate in host colonization. PMID:19447908

  17. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Matt; Gronow, Sabine; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Sims, David; Meincke, Linda; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Brettin, Thomas; Han, Cliff; Detter, John C.; Ovchinikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Rohde, Manfred; Spröer, Cathrin; Göker, Markus; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Chain, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the type and sole species of the genus Streptobacillus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum Fusobacteria. The 'Leptotrichiaceae' have not been well characterized, genomically or taxonomically. S. moniliformis,is a Gram-negative, non-motile, pleomorphic bacterium and is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order Fusobacteriales and no more than the third sequence from the phylum Fusobacteria. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304670

  18. The complete chloroplast genome of Origanum vulgare L. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Brigitte; Novak, Johannes

    2013-10-10

    Oregano (Origanum vulgare L., Lamiaceae) is a medicinal and aromatic plant maybe best known for flavouring pizza. New applications e.g. as natural antioxidants for food are emerging due to the plants' high antibacterial and antioxidant activity. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome of Origanum vulgare (GenBank/EBML/DDBJ accession number: JX880022) consists of 151,935 bp and includes a pair of inverted repeats (IR) of 25,527 bp separated by one small and one large single copy region (SSC and LSC) of 17,745 and 83,136 bp, respectively. The genome with an overall GC content of 38% hosts 114 genes that covering 63% of the genome of which 8% were introns. The comparison of the Origanum cp genome with the cp genomes of two other core lamiales (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge and Sesamum indicum L.) revealed completely conserved protein-coding regions in the IR region but also in the LSC and SSC regions. Phylogenetic analysis of the lamiids based on 56 protein-coding genes give a hint at the basic structure of the Lamiales. However, further genomes will be necessary to clarify this taxonomically complicated order. The variability of the cp within the genus Origanum, studied exemplarily on 16 different chloroplast DNA regions, demonstrated that in 14 regions analyzed, the variability was extremely low (max. 0.7%), while only two regions showed a moderate variability of up to 2.3%. The cp genome of Origanum vulgare contains 27 perfect mononucleotide repeats (number of repeats>9) consisting exclusively of the nucleotides A or T. 34 perfect repeats (repeat lengths>1 and number of repeats>3) were found, of which 32 were di-, and 2 were trinucleotide repeats.

  19. OMA 2011: orthology inference among 1000 complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altenhoff, Adrian M; Schneider, Adrian; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    OMA (Orthologous MAtrix) is a database that identifies orthologs among publicly available, complete genomes. Initiated in 2004, the project is at its 11th release. It now includes 1000 genomes, making it one of the largest resources of its kind. Here, we describe recent developments in terms of species covered; the algorithmic pipeline--in particular regarding the treatment of alternative splicing, and new features of the web (OMA Browser) and programming interface (SOAP API). In the second part, we review the various representations provided by OMA and their typical applications. The database is publicly accessible at http://omabrowser.org.

  20. Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Eruca sativa Mill. (Garden Rocket)

    OpenAIRE

    Yankun Wang; Pu Chu; Qing Yang; Shengxin Chang; Jianmei Chen; Maolong Hu; Rongzhan Guan

    2014-01-01

    Eruca sativa (Cruciferae family) is an ancient crop of great economic and agronomic importance. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa was sequenced and annotated. The circular molecule is 247,696 bp long, with a G+C content of 45.07%, containing 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes, and 18 tRNA genes. The Eruca sativa mitochondrial genome may be divided into six master circles and four subgenomic molecules via three pairwise large repeats, resulting in a more dynamic st...

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of the ocellate river stingray (Potamotrygon motoro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hong-Mei; Mu, Xi-Dong; Wei, Min-Xia; Wang, Xue-Jie; Luo, Jian-Ren; Hu, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We determined the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Potamotrygon motoro from South American freshwater stingrays. The total length of P. motoro mitogenome is 17,448 bp, which consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and a control region, with the genome organization and gene order being identical to that of the typical vertebrate. The overall nucleotide composition is 32.3% A, 24.4% T, 30.5% C and 12.8% G. These data will provide useful molecular information for phylogenetic relationships within the family Potamotrygonidae species.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Elaphe bimaculata (Reptilia, Serpentes, Colubridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Geng, Zhang-Zhen; Yan, Peng; Wu, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese leopard snake (Elaphe bimaculata) is an endemic species to China. The complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial (mt) genome of E. bimaculata is determined in this study. The circle genome was 17,183 bp in length and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 duplicate control regions. Several peculiar features were observed in mitogenome of E. bimaculata, such as the translocation of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene and an incomplete copy for tRNA(Pro).

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of Sicyopterus japonicus (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Tzen-Yuh; Chen, I-Shiung; Lin, Hung-Du; Chang, Wen-Been; Ju, Yu-Min

    2013-06-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Sicyopterus japonicus (Perciformes, Gobiidae). This mitochondrial genome consists of 16,514 base pairs (bp), with 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and 1 non-coding control region (CR), also with the gene synteny identical to that of typical vertebrates. CR, of 843 bp in length, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows T 26.1%, C 28.7%, A 28.3%, and G 16.91%, with a slight AT bias of 54.4%.

  4. Complete coding sequences of the rabbitpox virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G; Chen, N; Roper, R L; Feng, Z; Hunter, A; Danila, M; Lefkowitz, E J; Buller, R M L; Upton, C

    2005-11-01

    Rabbitpox virus (RPXV) is highly virulent for rabbits and it has long been suspected to be a close relative of vaccinia virus. To explore these questions, the complete coding region of the rabbitpox virus genome was sequenced to permit comparison with sequenced strains of vaccinia virus and other orthopoxviruses. The genome of RPXV strain Utrecht (RPXV-UTR) is 197 731 nucleotides long, excluding the terminal hairpin structures at each end of the genome. The RPXV-UTR genome has 66.5 % A + T content, 184 putative functional genes and 12 fragmented ORF regions that are intact in other orthopoxviruses. The sequence of the RPXV-UTR genome reveals that two RPXV-UTR genes have orthologues in variola virus (VARV; the causative agent of smallpox), but not in vaccinia virus (VACV) strains. These genes are a zinc RING finger protein gene (RPXV-UTR-008) and an ankyrin repeat family protein gene (RPXV-UTR-180). A third gene, encoding a chemokine-binding protein (RPXV-UTR-001/184), is complete in VARV but functional only in some VACV strains. Examination of the evolutionary relationship between RPXV and other orthopoxviruses was carried out using the central 143 kb DNA sequence conserved among all completely sequenced orthopoxviruses and also the protein sequences of 49 gene products present in all completely sequenced chordopoxviruses. The results of these analyses both confirm that RPXV-UTR is most closely related to VACV and suggest that RPXV has not evolved directly from any of the sequenced VACV strains, since RPXV contains a 719 bp region not previously identified in any VACV.

  5. Enterobacter asburiae Strain L1: Complete Genome and Whole Genome Optical Mapping Analysis of a Quorum Sensing Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Yin Lau

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter asburiae L1 is a quorum sensing bacterium isolated from lettuce leaves. In this study, for the first time, the complete genome of E. asburiae L1 was sequenced using the single molecule real time sequencer (PacBio RSII and the whole genome sequence was verified by using optical genome mapping (OpGen technology. In our previous study, E. asburiae L1 has been reported to produce AHLs, suggesting the possibility of virulence factor regulation which is quorum sensing dependent. This evoked our interest to study the genome of this bacterium and here we present the complete genome of E. asburiae L1, which carries the virulence factor gene virK, the N-acyl homoserine lactone-based QS transcriptional regulator gene luxR and the N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene which we firstly named easI. The availability of the whole genome sequence of E. asburiae L1 will pave the way for the study of the QS-mediated gene expression in this bacterium. Hence, the importance and functions of these signaling molecules can be further studied in the hope of elucidating the mechanisms of QS-regulation in E. asburiae. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of both a complete genome sequence and the establishment of the molecular basis of QS properties of E. asburiae.

  6. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Gossypium hirsutum and Evolutionary Analysis of Higher Plant Mitochondrial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Aiguo; Geng, Jianing; Grover, Corrinne E.; Hu, Songnian; Hua, Jinping

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt) genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. Methodology/Principal Findings We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. Conclusion The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species. PMID:23940520

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gossypium hirsutum and evolutionary analysis of higher plant mitochondrial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria are the main manufacturers of cellular ATP in eukaryotes. The plant mitochondrial genome contains large number of foreign DNA and repeated sequences undergone frequently intramolecular recombination. Upland Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. is one of the main natural fiber crops and also an important oil-producing plant in the world. Sequencing of the cotton mitochondrial (mt genome could be helpful for the evolution research of plant mt genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We utilized 454 technology for sequencing and combined with Fosmid library of the Gossypium hirsutum mt genome screening and positive clones sequencing and conducted a series of evolutionary analysis on Cycas taitungensis and 24 angiosperms mt genomes. After data assembling and contigs joining, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of G. hirsutum was obtained. The completed G.hirsutum mt genome is 621,884 bp in length, and contained 68 genes, including 35 protein genes, four rRNA genes and 29 tRNA genes. Five gene clusters are found conserved in all plant mt genomes; one and four clusters are specifically conserved in monocots and dicots, respectively. Homologous sequences are distributed along the plant mt genomes and species closely related share the most homologous sequences. For species that have both mt and chloroplast genome sequences available, we checked the location of cp-like migration and found several fragments closely linked with mitochondrial genes. CONCLUSION: The G. hirsutum mt genome possesses most of the common characters of higher plant mt genomes. The existence of syntenic gene clusters, as well as the conservation of some intergenic sequences and genic content among the plant mt genomes suggest that evolution of mt genomes is consistent with plant taxonomy but independent among different species.

  8. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tianxing Liu; Xiaoxiao Jin; Rixin Wang; Tianjun Xu

    2013-12-01

    Odontamblyopus rubicundus is a species of gobiid fishes, inhabits muddy-bottomed coastal waters. In this paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. rubicundus is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is 17119 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a control region and an L-strand origin as in other teleosts. Most mitochondrial genes are encoded on H-strand except for ND6 and seven tRNA genes. Some overlaps occur in protein-coding genes and tRNAs ranging from 1 to 7 bp. The possibly nonfunctional L-strand origin folded into a typical stem-loop secondary structure and a conserved motif (5′-GCCGG-3′) was found at the base of the stem within the $tRNA^{Cys}$ gene. The TAS, CSB-2 and CSB-3 could be detected in the control region. However, in contrast to most of other fishes, the central conserved sequence block domain and the CSB-1 could not be recognized in O. rubicundus, which is consistent with Acanthogobius hasta (Gobiidae). In addition, phylogenetic analyses based on different sequences of species of Gobiidae and different methods showed that the classification of O. rubicundus into Odontamblyopus due to morphology is debatable.

  9. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianxing; Jin, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Rixin; Xu, Tianjun

    2013-12-01

    Odontamblyopus rubicundus is a species of gobiid fishes, inhabits muddy-bottomed coastal waters. In this paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. rubicundus is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is 17119 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, a control region and an L-strand origin as in other teleosts. Most mitochondrial genes are encoded on H-strand except for ND6 and seven tRNA genes. Some overlaps occur in protein-coding genes and tRNAs ranging from 1 to 7 bp. The possibly nonfunctional L-strand origin folded into a typical stem-loop secondary structure and a conserved motif (5'-GCCGG-3') was found at the base of the stem within the tRNACys gene. The TAS, CSB-2 and CSB-3 could be detected in the control region. However, in contrast to most of other fishes, the central conserved sequence block domain and the CSB-1 could not be recognized in O. rubicundus, which is consistent with Acanthogobius hasta (Gobiidae). In addition, phylogenetic analyses based on different sequences of species of Gobiidae and different methods showed that the classification of O. rubicundus into Odontamblyopus due to morphology is debatable.

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Scorpaenopsis cirrhosa (Scorpaeniformes: Scorpaenidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongjie; Wang, Daoru; Hu, Jing; Wang, Qian

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Scorpaenopsis cirrhosa has been sequenced. The mitochondrial genome is 16 966 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and 1 control region. The gene order and composition of S. cirrhosa mitochondrial genome was similar to that of most other vertebrates. The overall nucleotides base composition of the heavy strand is A (27.91%), G (17.71%), C (28.02%), and T (26.35%). With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The tRNA-Ser2 gene lacked DHC arm and could not fold into a typical clover-leaf secondary structure. Seen from the phylogenetic tree, S. cirrhosa, a stonefish and four rockfishes from the same order (Scorpaeniformes) clustered into one branch.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Synanceia verrucosa (Scorpaeniformes: Synanceiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Jun; Luo, Jian; Chen, Guohua

    2016-11-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Synanceia verrucosa has been sequenced. The mitochondrial genome is 16,506 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and one control region. The gene order and the composition of S. verrucosa mitochondrial genome were similar to that of most other vertebrates. The overall nucleotides base composition of the heavy strand is A (31.01%), G (15.06%), C (25.60%), and T (28.34%). With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand. The tRNA-Ser2 gene lacked DHC arm and could not fold into a typical clover-leaf secondary structure. Seen from the phylogenetic tree, a stonefish (S. verrucosa), two lionfishes, and eight rockfishes from the same order (Scorpaeniformes) clustered into one branch.

  12. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Dendrobium nobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenjin; Niu, Zhitao; Zhu, Shuying; Ye, Meirong; Ding, Xiaoyu

    2016-11-01

    The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Dendrobium nobile, an endangered and traditional Chinese medicine with important economic value, is presented in this article. The total genome size is 150,793 bp, containing a large single copy (LSC) region (84,939 bp) and a small single copy region (SSC) (13,310 bp) which were separated by two inverted repeat (IRs) regions (26,272 bp). The overall GC contents of the plastid genome were 38.8%. In total, 130 unique genes were annotated and they were consisted of 76 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNA genes and 4 rRNA genes. Fourteen genes contained one or two introns.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Piaractus brachypomus (Characiformes: Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanpu; Li, Shuisheng; Xie, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Yong; Zhu, Chunhua; Deng, Siping; Li, Guangli; Huang, Hai

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the Piaractus brachypomus is described in the present study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,561 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes and a control region. The P. brachypomus mitochondrial genome shows the similar gene order and composition with those of most other vertebrates. The nucleotide compositions of the light strand in descending order is 31.57% of A, 26.19% of C, 26.18% of T and 16.06% of G. With the exception of the NADH dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6) and eight tRNA genes, all other mitochondrial genes are encoded on the heavy strand.

  14. Characterization of the complete genome sequence of pike fry rhabdovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Lian; Liu, Hong; Liu, Zong-Xiao; He, Jun-Qiang; Gao, Long-Ying; Shi, Xiu-Jie; Jiang, Yu-Lin

    2009-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of pike fry rhabdovirus (PFRV), consisting of 11,097 nucleotides, was determined. The genome contains five genes, encoding the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), glycoprotein (G), and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L) protein in the order 3'-N-P-M-G-L-5'. 3' leader- and 5' trailer-sequences in the PFRV genome show inverse complementarity. The PFRV proteins share the highest homology to the proteins of spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV), ranging from 55.3 to 91.4%. Phylogenetic analysis of the five proteins showed that PFRV clusters with SVCV and is closely related to the mammalian vesiculoviruses, 903/87, STRV and SCRV.

  15. The complete chloroplast genome sequences of five Epimedium species: lights into phylogenetic and taxonomic analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanjun eZhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium L. is a phylogenetically and economically important genus in the family Berberidaceae. We here sequenced the complete chloroplast (cp genomes of four Epimedium species using Illumina sequencing technology via a combination of de novo and reference-guided assembly, which was also the first comprehensive cp genome analysis on Epimedium combining the cp genome sequence of E. koreanum previously reported. The five Epimedium cp genomes exhibited typical quadripartite and circular structure that was rather conserved in genomic structure and the synteny of gene order. However, these cp genomes presented obvious variations at the boundaries of the four regions because of the expansion and contraction of the inverted repeat (IR region and the single-copy (SC boundary regions. The trnQ-UUG duplication occurred in the five Epimedium cp genomes, which was not found in the other basal eudicotyledons. The rapidly evolving cp genome regions were detected among the five cp genomes, as well as the difference of simple sequence repeats (SSR and repeat sequence were identified. Phylogenetic relationships among the five Epimedium species based on their cp genomes showed accordance with the updated system of the genus on the whole, but reminded that the evolutionary relationships and the divisions of the genus need further investigation applying more evidences. The availability of these cp genomes provided valuable genetic information for accurately identifying species, taxonomy and phylogenetic resolution and evolution of Epimedium, and assist in exploration and utilization of Epimedium plants.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Streptobacillus moniliformis type strain (9901T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sproer, Cathrin [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2009-01-01

    Streptobacillus moniliformis Levaditi et al. 1925 is the sole and type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its isolated location in the sparsely populated and neither taxonomically nor genomically much accessed family 'Leptotrichiaceae' within the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. S. moniliformis, a Gram-negative, non-motile and pleomorphic bacterium, is the etiologic agent of rat bite fever and Haverhill fever. Strain 9901T, the type strain of the species, was isolated from a patient with rat bite fever. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is only the second completed genome sequence of the order 'Fusobacteriales' and no more than the third sequence from the phylum 'Fusobacteria'. The 1,662,578 bp long chromosome and the 10,702 bp plasmid with a total of 1511 protein-coding and 55 RNA genes are part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Schneider, Susan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2009-01-01

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from wa-ter-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6% (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respi-ratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxi-dized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mayilraj, Shanmugam [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2009-01-01

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Actinosynnema mirum type strain (101T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Mayilraj, Shanmugam; Chen, Feng; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chertkov, Olga; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Tindall, Brian; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Actinosynnema mirum Hasegawa et al. 1978 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its central phylogenetic location in the Actino-synnemataceae, a rapidly growing family within the actinobacterial suborder Pseudo-nocardineae. A. mirum is characterized by its motile spores borne on synnemata and as a producer of nocardicin antibiotics. It is capable of growing aerobically and under a moderate CO2 atmosphere. The strain is a Gram-positive, aerial and substrate mycelium producing bacterium, originally isolated from a grass blade collected from the Raritan River, New Jersey. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Actinosynnemataceae, and only the second sequence from the actinobacterial suborder Pseudonocardineae. The 8,248,144 bp long single replicon genome with its 7100 protein-coding and 77 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eimeria magna (Apicomplexa: Coccidia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Si-Qin; Cui, Ping; Fang, Su-Fang; Liu, Guo-Hua; Wang, Chun-Ren; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we determined the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence of Eimeria magna from rabbits for the first time, and compared its gene contents and genome organizations with that of seven Eimeria spp. from domestic chickens. The size of the complete mt genome sequence of E. magna is 6249 bp, which consists of 3 protein-coding genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3), 12 gene fragments for the large subunit (LSU) rRNA, and 7 gene fragments for the small subunit (SSU) rRNA, without transfer RNA genes, in accordance with that of Eimeria spp. from chickens. The putative direction of translation for three genes (cytb, cox1 and cox3) was the same as those of Eimeria species from domestic chickens. The content of A + T is 65.16% for E. magna mt genome (29.73% A, 35.43% T, 17.09 G and 17.75% C). The E. magna mt genome sequence provides novel mtDNA markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of Eimeria spp. and has implications for the molecular diagnosis and control of rabbit coccidiosis.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfomicrobium baculatum type strain (XT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Alex; Spring, Stefan; Goker, Markus; Schneider, Susanne; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C; Meincke, Linda; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Lucas, Susan

    2009-05-20

    Desulfomicrobium baculatum is the type species of the genus Desulfomicrobium, which is the type genus of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae. It is of phylogenetic interest because of the isolated location of the family Desulfomicrobiaceae within the order Desulfovibrionales. D. baculatum strain XT is a Gram-negative, motile, sulfate-reducing bacterium isolated from water-saturated manganese carbonate ore. It is strictly anaerobic and does not require NaCl for growth, although NaCl concentrations up to 6percent (w/v) are tolerated. The metabolism is respiratory or fermentative. In the presence of sulfate, pyruvate and lactate are incompletely oxidized to acetate and CO2. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the deltaproteobacterial family Desulfomicrobiaceae, and this 3,942,657 bp long single replicon genome with its 3494 protein-coding and 72 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  2. Complete genome sequence of human astrovirus genotype 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernet Guy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human astroviruses (HAstVs are one of the important causes of acute gastroenteritis in children. Currently, eight HAstV genotypes have been identified and all but two (HAstV-6 and HAstV-7 have been fully sequenced. We here sequenced and analyzed the complete genome of a HAstV-6 strain (192-BJ07, which was identified in Beijing, China. Results The genome of 192-BJ07 consists of 6745 nucleotides. The 192-BJ07 strain displays a 77.2-78.0% nucleotide sequence identity with other HAstV genotypes and exhibits amino acid sequence identities of 86.5-87.4%, 94.2-95.1%, and 65.5-74.8% in the ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 regions, respectively. Homological analysis of ORF2 shows that 192-BJ07 is 96.3% identical to the documented HAstV-6 strain. Further, phylogenetic analysis indicates that different genomic regions are likely undergoing different evolutionary and selective pressures. No recombination event was observed in HAstV-6 in this study. Conclusion The completely sequenced and characterized genome of HAstV-6 (192-BJ07 provides further insight into the genetics of astroviruses and aids in the surveillance and control of HAstV gastroenteritis.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of Liobagrus kingi (Teleostei, Siluriformes: Amblycipitidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiang-Yang; Li, Ying-Wen; Wang, Deng-Qiang; Tian, Hui-Wu; Xiong, Xing; Li, Shu-Hua; Chen, Da-Qing

    2013-08-01

    Liobagrus kingi is endemic to southwest China and listed as endangered species (IUCN 2012). Genetic diversity is necessary for conservation issue. In studying this, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. kingi has been obtained with PCR, which contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and a non-coding control region with the total length of 16,483 bp. The gene arrangement and composition are similar to that of other vertebrates. Most of the genes are encoded on heavy strand, except for eight tRNA and ND6 genes. Just like most other vertebrates, the against bias of G has a universality in different statistical results. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of L. kingi would contribute to better understand population genetics and protect its genetic diversity.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Pyrolobus fumarii type strain (1AT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolobus fumarii Bl chl et al. 1997 is the type species of the genus Pyrolobus, which be- longs to the crenarchaeal family Pyrodictiaceae. The species is a facultatively microaerophilic non-motile crenarchaeon. It is of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location in the tree of life and because it is a hyperthermophilic chemolithoautotroph known as the primary producer of organic matter at deep-sea hydrothermal vents. P. fumarii exhibits currently the highest optimal growth temperature of all life forms on earth (106 C). This is the first com- pleted genome sequence of a member of the genus Pyrolobus to be published and only the second genome sequence from a member of the family Pyrodictiaceae. Although Diversa Corporation announced the completion of sequencing of the P. fumarii genome on Septem- ber 25, 2001, this sequence was never released to the public. The 1,843,267 bp long genome with its 1,986 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Articulate Brachiopod Terebratal ia transversa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfenbein, Kevin G.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2001-07-01

    We have sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the articulate brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. The circular genome is 14,291 bp in size, relatively small compared to other published metazoan mtDNAs. The 37 genes commonly found in animal mtDNA are present; the size decrease is due to the truncation of several tRNA, rRNA, and protein genes, to some nucleotide overlaps, and to a paucity of non-coding nucleotides. Although the gene arrangement differs radically from those reported for other metazoans, some gene junctions are shared with two other articulate brachiopods, Laqueus rubellus and Terebratulina retusa. All genes in the T. transversa mtDNA, unlike those in most metazoan mtDNAs reported, are encoded by the same strand. The A+T content (59.1 percent) is low for a metazoan mtDNA, and there is a high propensity for homopolymer runs and a strong base-compositional strand bias. The coding strand is quite G+T-rich, a skew that is shared by the confamilial (laqueid) specie s L. rubellus, but opposite to that found in T. retusa, a cancellothyridid. These compositional skews are strongly reflected in the codon usage patterns and the amino acid compositions of the mitochondrial proteins, with markedly different usage observed between T. retusa and the two laqueids. This observation, plus the similarity of the laqueid non-coding regions to the reverse complement of the non-coding region of the cancellothyridid, suggest that an inversion that resulted in a reversal in the direction of first-strand replication has occurred in one of the two lineages. In addition to the presence of one non-coding region in T. transversa that is comparable to those in the other brachiopod mtDNAs, there are two others with the potential to form secondary structures; one or both of these may be involved in the process of transcript cleavage.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Tetrastemma olgarum (Nemertea: Hoplonemertea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Yan; Shen, Chun-Yang; Sun, Shi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Tetrastemma olgarum is sequenced. It is 14,580 bp in length and contains 37 genes typical for metazoan mitogenomes. The gene order is identical to that of the previously published Hoplonemertea mitogenomes. All genes are encoded on the heavy strand except for trnT and trnP. The coding strand is AT-rich, accounting for 69.2% of overall nucleotide composition.

  7. Complete mitochondrial genome of Esox reichertii (Amur pike).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The whole mitochondrial genome of Esox reichertii (fish) was first sequenced and characterized. It was determined to be 16,909 bp long, which contains the control region (CR), the origin of light-strand replication (OL), 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal genes and 13 protein-coding genes. Overall base composition of the complete mitochondrial DNA was 28.65% A, 28.67% T, 27.28% C and 15.41% G, with 57.32%AT.

  8. Characterization of complete mitochondrial genomes of indigenous Mayans in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Fuzuki; Wang, Li; Sugiyama, Saburo; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Granados, Julio; Gomez-Trejo, Celta; Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Ueda, Shintaroh

    2017-08-22

    The authors have previously published the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequences of two indigenous Mesoamerican populations, Mazahua (n = 25) and Zapotec (n = 88). This study determined the complete mitogenome sequences of nine unrelated individuals from the indigenous Maya population living in Mexico. Their mitogenome sequences could be classified into either of the haplogroups A2 and C1. Surprisingly, there were no mitogenome sequences (haplotypes) that the Maya, Mazahua, and Zapotec people share in common. This indicates that no genetic exchange, at least matrilineally, has occurred among them.

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium vaccae Type Strain ATCC 25954

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Y. S.

    2012-10-26

    Mycobacterium vaccae is a rapidly growing, nontuberculous Mycobacterium species that is generally not considered a human pathogen and is of major pharmaceutical interest as an immunotherapeutic agent. We report here the annotated genome sequence of the M. vaccae type strain, ATCC 25954.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Beijerinckia indica subsp. indica▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamas, Ivica; Dedysh, Svetlana N.; Liesack, Werner; Stott, Matthew B.; Alam, Maqsudul; Murrell, J. Colin; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Beijerinckia indica subsp. indica is an aerobic, acidophilic, exopolysaccharide-producing, N2-fixing soil bacterium. It is a generalist chemoorganotroph that is phylogenetically closely related to facultative and obligate methanotrophs of the genera Methylocella and Methylocapsa. Here we report the full genome sequence of this bacterium. PMID:20601475

  11. Complete Genomic Sequence of Issyk-Kul Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Barry; Marston, Denise A; Ellis, Richard J; Fooks, Anthony R; Hewson, Roger

    2015-07-02

    Issyk-Kul virus (ISKV) is an ungrouped virus tentatively assigned to the Bunyaviridae family and is associated with an acute febrile illness in several central Asian countries. Using next-generation sequencing technologies, we report here the full-genome sequence for this novel unclassified arboviral pathogen circulating in central Asia.

  12. Complete Genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis Siphophage CN1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongari, Rohit R.; Yao, Guichun W.; Chamakura, Karthik R.

    2013-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis is a Gram-positive actinomycete that is the causative agent of the potato disease ring rot. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis siphophage CN1A. CN1A is only the second fully sequenced Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis phage reported to date. Core and unique features of its genome are described. PMID:24309731

  13. Complete Genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis Siphophage CN1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongari, Rohit R; Yao, Guichun W; Chamakura, Karthik R; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F

    2013-12-05

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis is a Gram-positive actinomycete that is the causative agent of the potato disease ring rot. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis siphophage CN1A. CN1A is only the second fully sequenced Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis phage reported to date. Core and unique features of its genome are described.

  14. Complete Genome of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis Siphophage CN1A

    OpenAIRE

    Kongari, Rohit R.; Yao, Guichun W.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis is a Gram-positive actinomycete that is the causative agent of the potato disease ring rot. Here, we announce the complete genome sequence of the Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis siphophage CN1A. CN1A is only the second fully sequenced Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicusis phage reported to date. Core and unique features of its genome are described.

  15. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequences of Six Rehmannia Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyun Zeng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rehmannia is a non-parasitic genus in Orobanchaceae including six species mainly distributed in central and north China. Its phylogenetic position and infrageneric relationships remain uncertain due to potential hybridization and polyploidization. In this study, we sequenced and compared the complete chloroplast genomes of six Rehmannia species using Illumina sequencing technology to elucidate the interspecific variations. Rehmannia plastomes exhibited typical quadripartite and circular structures with good synteny of gene order. The complete genomes ranged from 153,622 bp to 154,055 bp in length, including 133 genes encoding 88 proteins, 37 tRNAs, and 8 rRNAs. Three genes (rpoA, rpoC2, accD have potentially experienced positive selection. Plastome size variation of Rehmannia was mainly ascribed to the expansion and contraction of the border regions between the inverted repeat (IR region and the single-copy (SC regions. Despite of the conserved structure in Rehmannia plastomes, sequence variations provide useful phylogenetic information. Phylogenetic trees of 23 Lamiales species reconstructed with the complete plastomes suggested that Rehmannia was monophyletic and sister to the clade of Lindenbergia and the parasitic taxa in Orobanchaceae. The interspecific relationships within Rehmannia were completely different with the previous studies. In future, population phylogenomic works based on plastomes are urgently needed to clarify the evolutionary history of Rehmannia.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica Strain S12, a Lignin-Degrading Bacterium Isolated from Forest Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wenying; Zhou, Yun; Jiang, Jingwei; Xu, Zhihui; Hou, Liyuan; Leung, Frederick Chi-Ching

    2015-03-19

    We report the complete genome sequence of Raoultella ornithinolytica strain S12, isolated from a soil sample collected from areas bordering rotten wood and wet soil on Mt. Zijin, Nanjing. The complete genome of this bacterium may contribute toward the discovery of efficient lignin-degrading pathways.

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  18. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  19. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jun; Song, Jingyuan; Gao, Huanhuan; Zhu, Yingjie; Xu, Jiang; Pang, Xiaohui; Yao, Hui; Sun, Chao; Li, Xian'en; Li, Chuyuan; Liu, Juyan; Xu, Haibin; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. The complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza, the first sequenced member of the Lamiaceae family, is reported here. The genome is 151,328 bp in length and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 82,695 bp) and small (SSC, 17,555 bp) single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,539 bp). It contains 114 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and four rRNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to the typical angiosperm cp genomes. Four forward, three inverted and seven tandem repeats were detected in the Salvia miltiorrhiza cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis among the 30 asterid cp genomes revealed that most SSRs are AT-rich, which contribute to the overall AT richness of these cp genomes. Additionally, fewer SSRs are distributed in the protein-coding sequences compared to the non-coding regions, indicating an uneven distribution of SSRs within the cp genomes. Entire cp genome comparison of Salvia miltiorrhiza and three other Lamiales cp genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity and a relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Sequence divergence analysis discovered the ten most divergent and ten most conserved genes as well as their length variation, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies in asterids. Our analysis also supports that both regional and functional constraints affect gene sequence evolution. Further, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between Salvia miltiorrhiza and Sesamum indicum. The complete cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza reported in this paper will facilitate population, phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this medicinal plant.

  20. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the medicinal plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qian

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is an important medicinal plant with great economic and medicinal value. The complete chloroplast (cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza, the first sequenced member of the Lamiaceae family, is reported here. The genome is 151,328 bp in length and exhibits a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 82,695 bp and small (SSC, 17,555 bp single-copy regions, separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 25,539 bp. It contains 114 unique genes, including 80 protein-coding genes, 30 tRNAs and four rRNAs. The genome structure, gene order, GC content and codon usage are similar to the typical angiosperm cp genomes. Four forward, three inverted and seven tandem repeats were detected in the Salvia miltiorrhiza cp genome. Simple sequence repeat (SSR analysis among the 30 asterid cp genomes revealed that most SSRs are AT-rich, which contribute to the overall AT richness of these cp genomes. Additionally, fewer SSRs are distributed in the protein-coding sequences compared to the non-coding regions, indicating an uneven distribution of SSRs within the cp genomes. Entire cp genome comparison of Salvia miltiorrhiza and three other Lamiales cp genomes showed a high degree of sequence similarity and a relatively high divergence of intergenic spacers. Sequence divergence analysis discovered the ten most divergent and ten most conserved genes as well as their length variation, which will be helpful for phylogenetic studies in asterids. Our analysis also supports that both regional and functional constraints affect gene sequence evolution. Further, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between Salvia miltiorrhiza and Sesamum indicum. The complete cp genome sequence of Salvia miltiorrhiza reported in this paper will facilitate population, phylogenetic and cp genetic engineering studies of this medicinal plant.

  1. Analysis of the complete Fischoederius elongatus (Paramphistomidae, Trematoda) mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Yunyang; Wang, Lixia; Feng, Hanli; Tan, Li; Lei, Weiqiang; Zhao, Pengfei; Hu, Min; Fang, Rui

    2015-05-20

    Fischoederius elongates is an important trematode of Paramphistomes in ruminants. Animals infected with F. elongates often don't show obvious symptoms, so it is easy to be ignored. However it can cause severe economic losses to the breeding industry. Knowledge of the mitochondrial genome of F. elongates can be used for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates is 14,120 bp in length and contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions (LNR and SNR). The gene arrangement of F. elongates is the same as other trematodes, such as Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum cervi. Phylogenetic analyses using concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes by Maximum-likelihood and Neighbor-joining analysis method showed that F. elongates was closely related to P. cervi. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates should provide information for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies for F. elongates and the family Paramphistomidae.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome of the freshwater sculpin Cottus koreanus (Scorpaeniformes, Cottidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Byeon, Hwa-Kun; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-10-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome was sequenced from the freshwater sculpin Cottus koreanus. The genome sequence was 16,560 bp in size, and the gene order and contents were identical with those of previously reported fish mitochondrial genomes. Of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 3 genes (CO2, ND4, Cytb) had incomplete stop codons. The base composition of C. koreanus mitogenome showed anti-G bias (13.94% and 12.73%) on the second and third positions of PCGs, respectively.

  3. Complete genome sequence of jacquemontia yellow vein virus, a novel begomovirus infecting Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2017-08-01

    Wild plants of the family Convolvulaceae are hosts for a few New World begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae). In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of a new begomovirus infecting the wild convolvulaceous plant Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela. The cloned bipartite genome showed the organization of typical New World begomoviruses and was found to be phylogenetically related to those of begomoviruses from Venezuela and other Caribbean countries. Several recombination events have been shown to have occurred involving genome fragment exchange with related begomoviruses infecting crops such as tomato and cucurbits and wild plants, including Jacquemontia sp. We propose the name jacquemontia yellow vein virus (JacYVV) for this new begomovirus.

  4. Complete genome sequence of a J subgroup avian leukosis virus isolated from local commercial broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongxin; Xue, Chunyi; Ji, Jun; Chang, Shuang; Shang, Huiqin; Zhang, Lingjun; Ma, Jingyun; Bi, Yingzuo; Xie, Qingmei

    2012-11-01

    Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) isolate GDKP1202 was isolated from a 50-day-old local yellow commercial broiler in the Guangdong province of China in 2012. Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the GDKP1202 isolate, which caused high mortality, serious growth suppression, thymic atrophy, and liver enlargement in commercial broilers. A novel potential binding site (5'-GGCACCTCC-3') for c-myb was identified in the GDKP1202 genome. These findings will provide additional insights into the molecular characteristics in the genomes and pathogenicity of ALV-J.

  5. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Zacco platypus (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueng, Yih-Tsong; Chen, Kun-Neng; Han, Chiao-Chuan; Cheng, Chung-Yao; Li, Yi-Min

    2015-04-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Zacco platypus (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae), which has broader distribution range and diverse genetic structure than other species under the genus Zacco, was first determined in this study. The mitochondrial genome is 16,612 base pairs (bp) in length, encoding 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and 1 non-coding control region. Its gene arrangement and translation direction were identical to those of other typical vertebrate. Control region (D-Loop), of 929 bp lengths long, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows T 27.02%, C 26.23%, A 28.94% and G 17.82%, with a slight AT bias of 55.95%.

  6. Complete mitochondrial DNA genome of Microphysogobio brevirostris (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-Yao; Wang, Jiang-Ping; Ho, Chuan-Wen; Cheng, Ju-Wen; Ueng, Yih-Tsong

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of Microphysogobio brevirostris (Cypriniformes, Cyprinidae), an endemic primary freshwater fish in Taiwan. This mitochondrial genome, consisting of 16,608 base pairs (bp), encoded 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a non-coding control region as those found in other vertebrates, with the gene synteny identical to that of typical vertebrates. Control region (D-Loop), of 929 bp lengths long, is located between tRNA(Pro) and tRNA(Phe). The overall base composition of the heavy strand shows T 26.28%, C 26.62%, A 30.26%, and G 16.85%, with a slight AT bias of 56.53%.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Virginia [University of Florida; Nong, Guang [University of Florida; St. John, Franz J. [US Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; Dickstein, Ellen [University of Florida; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Martin, Joel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Jones, Jeffrey B. [University of Florida; Ingram, Lonnie O. [University of Florida; Shanmugam, Keelnathan T. [University of Florida; Preston, James F. [University of Florida

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus sp. strain JDR-2, an aggressively xylanolytic bacterium isolated from sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) wood, is able to efficiently depolymerize, assimilate and metabolize 4-O-methylglucuronoxylan, the predominant structural component of hardwood hemicelluloses. A basis for this capability was first supported by the identification of genes and characterization of encoded enzymes and has been further defined by the sequencing and annotation of the complete genome, which we describe. In addition to genes implicated in the utilization of -1,4-xylan, genes have also been identified for the utilization of other hemicellulosic polysaccharides. The genome of Paenibacillus sp. JDR-2 contains 7,184,930 bp in a single replicon with 6,288 protein-coding and 122 RNA genes. Uniquely prominent are 874 genes encoding proteins involved in carbohydrate transport and metabolism. The prevalence and organization of these genes support a metabolic potential for bioprocessing of hemicellulose fractions derived from lignocellulosic resources.

  8. Complete genome sequence of arracacha virus B: a novel cheravirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, I P; Glover, R; Souza-Richards, R; Bennett, S; Hany, U; Boonham, N

    2013-04-01

    The complete genome sequences of RNA1 and RNA2 of the oca strain of the potato virus arracacha virus B were determined using next-generation sequencing. The RNA1 molecule is predicted to encode a 259-kDa polyprotein with homology to proteins of the cheraviruses apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) and cherry rasp leaf virus (CRLV). The RNA2 molecule is predicted to encode a 102-kDa polyprotein which also has homology to the corresponding protein of ALSV and, to a lesser degree, CRLV (30 % for RNA1, 24 % for RNA2). Detailed analysis of the genome sequence confirms that AVB is a distinct member of the genus Cheravirus.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ke; Sanseverino, John; Chauhan, Archana; Lucas, Susan; Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Chang, Y.J.; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Moser, Scott; Jegier, Patricia; Close, Dan; DeBruyn, Jennifer M.; Wang, Ying; Layton, Alice C.; Allen, Michael S.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T, an isolate belonging to genus Thauera, of the family Rhodocyclaceae and the class the Betaproteobacteria, has been characterized for its ability to produce abundant exopolysaccharide and degrade various aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. These properties, if fully understood at the genome-sequence level, can aid in environmental processing of organic matter in anaerobic cycles by short-circuiting a central anaerobic metabolite, acetate, from microbiological conversion to methane, a critical greenhouse gas. Strain MZ1T is the first strain from the genus Thauera with a completely sequenced genome. The 4,496,212 bp chromosome and 78,374 bp plasmid contain 4,071 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes, and were sequenced as part of the DOE Community Sequencing Program CSP_776774. PMID:23407619

  10. Complete genome sequence of Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanseverino, John [ORNL; Chauhan, Archana [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sims, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Moser, Scott [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Jegier, Patricia [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Close, Dan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Ying [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Allen, Michael S. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Sayler, Gary [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01

    Thauera aminoaromatica strain MZ1T, an isolate belonging to genus Thauera, of the family Rhodocyclaceae and the class the Betaproteobacteria, has been characterized for its ability to produce abundant exopolysaccharide and degrade various aromatic compounds with nitrate as an electron acceptor. These properties, if fully understood at the genome-sequence level, can aid in environmental processing of organic matter in anaerobic cycles by short-circuiting a central anaerobic metabolite, acetate, from microbiological conversion to methane, a criti-cal greenhouse gas. Strain MZ1T is the first strain from the genus Thauera with a completely sequenced genome. The 4,496,212 bp chromosome and 78,374 bp plasmid contain 4,071 protein-coding and 71 RNA genes, and were sequenced as part of the DOE Community Se-quencing Program CSP{_}776774.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Yu, Hai-Li; Li, Peng-Fei; You, Ping

    2015-01-01

    We have determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Lista haraldusalis Walker, 1859. The mitochondrial genome of L. haraldusalis is 15,213 bp in size with 81.5% A+T content. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an A+T-rich region. All PCGs start with ATN codon, except for COI, which begins with TTAG. Eleven PCGs stop with typical stop codon TAA and TAG. But ND6 and COII use incomplete stop codon T. All of the 22 tRNAs have the typical cloverleaf structure except for tRNASer(AGN) lacking of the dihydrouridine (DHU) stem. The conserved motif ATACTA, poly-T stretch, ATAGA, ATTTA and microsatellite-like (AT)11 were found in the intergenic region between tRNASer(UCN) and ND1 and the A+T-rich region of L. haraldusalis, respectively.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracymoriza distinctalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; You, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Paracymoriza distinctalis (Leech, 1889) has been determined in this article. The mitochondrial genome of P. distinctalis was 15,354 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and an A + T-rich region. All PCGs start with ATN codon, except for COI, which begins with CGA. Eleven PCGs stop with typical stop codon TAA. But ND5 and COII use incomplete stop codon T. All the 22 tRNAs have the typical clover-leaf structure except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN) lacking the dihydrouridine (DHU) stem. There were several conserved motifs in the intergenic region between tRNA(Ser)(UCN) and ND1 and the A + T-rich region of P. distinctalis.

  13. Complete mitochondrial genome organization of Tor tor (Hamilton, 1822).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Goel, Chirag; Kumari Sahoo, Prabhati; Singh, Atul K; Barat, Ashoktaru

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Tor tor, a threatened "Mahseer" was sequenced for the first time. The mitochondrial genome size determined to be 16,554 bp in length and consisted of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNA genes and a control region or displacement loop (D-Loop) region, resembling the typical organizational pattern of most of the teleost. The overall base composition found was A: 31.8%, T: 25%, G: 15.7% and C: 27.4%; A + T: 56.9% and G + C: 43.1%. The phylogenetic tree constructed using 11 other cyprinids' total mtDNA datasets confirmed the location of present species among mahseers. The total sequence data could support further study in molecular systematics, species identification, evolutionary and conservation genetics.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of the mudskipper Boleophthalmus boddarti (Perciformes, Gobiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Ting; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Li, Zhe; Chen, Wei; Chen, Shi Xi; Hong, Wan Shu

    2016-01-01

    The Boddart's goggle-eyed mudskipper, Boleophthalmus boddarti (Perciformes, Gobiidae) is an amphibious fish, inhabiting brackish waters of estuaries and builds burrows in soft mud along the intertidal zone. In this paper, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of B. boddarti was firstly determined. The circle genome (16,727 bp) comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes and 1 control region. The overall base composition of B. boddarti is 29.1% for C, 28.9% for A, 25.9% for T, and 16.0% for G, with a slight A + T bias of 54.8%. The termination-associated sequence, conserved sequence block domains, and a 131-bp tandem repeat were found in the control region. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of Empoasca vitis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ningning; Wang, Mengxin; Cui, Lin; Chen, Xuexin; Han, Baoyu

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Empoasca vitis was sequenced. The length of the mitogenome is 15,154 bp with 78.35% AT content (GenBank accession No. KJ815009). The genome encode 37 typical mitochondrial genes including 22 transfer RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and an A+T-rich region. The gene arrangement is similar to that of Drosophila yakuba, the presumed ancestral insect mitochondrial gene arrangement. Except for cox2 using GTG as start codon, other protein-coding genes (PCGs) share the start codons ATN. Usual termination codon TAA and incomplete stop codon T are using by 13 protein-coding genes. The A+T-rich region has a length of 977 bp with the AT content high to 88.95%.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of Drabescoides nuchalis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfei; Dai, Renhuai; Zhan, Hongping; Qu, Ling

    2016-09-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Drabescoides nuchalis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) was sequenced. It is 15 309 bp in length with 75.62% (A + T) content and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs, two ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding region (GenBank accession no. KR349344). Gene order is identical to that of the inferred ancestral insect genome. All PCGs start with an ATN codon and terminate with TAA except ND4, which has an incomplete stop codon (T). The anticodons are identical to those of Drosophila yakuba. The phylogenetic tree confirms D. nuchalis and two Cicadellidae species are clustered into a clade, and Cicadellidae is a monophyletic group and provides support for the sister relationship of leafhopper and treehopper.

  17. Complete genomes of Hairstreak butterflies, their speciation, and nucleo-mitochondrial incongruence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Qian; Shen, Jinhui; Borek, Dominika; Robbins, Robert K; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Grishin, Nick V

    2016-04-28

    Comparison of complete genomes of closely related species enables research on speciation and how phenotype is determined by genotype. Lepidoptera, an insect order of 150,000 species with diverse phenotypes, is well-suited for such comparative genomics studies if new genomes, which cover additional Lepidoptera families are acquired. We report a 729 Mbp genome assembly of the Calycopis cecrops, the first genome from the family Lycaenidae and the largest available Lepidoptera genome. As detritivore, Calycopis shows expansion in detoxification and digestion enzymes. We further obtained complete genomes of 8 Calycopis specimens: 3 C. cecrops and 5 C. isobeon, including a dry specimen stored in the museum for 30 years. The two species differ subtly in phenotype and cannot be differentiated by mitochondrial DNA. However, nuclear genomes revealed a deep split between them. Genes that can clearly separate the two species (speciation hotspots) mostly pertain to circadian clock, mating behavior, transcription regulation, development and cytoskeleton. The speciation hotspots and their function significantly overlap with those we previously found in Pterourus, suggesting common speciation mechanisms in these butterflies.

  18. Complete genomic sequence and an infectious BAC clone of feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, S H Sheldon; Niikura, Masahiro; Cheng, Hans H; Kruger, John M; Wise, Annabel G; Maes, Roger K

    2010-06-05

    Infection with feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1) is a major cause of upper respiratory and ocular diseases in Felidae. We report the first complete genomic sequence of FHV-1, as well as the construction and characterization of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone of FHV-1, which contains the entire FHV-1 genome and has the BAC vector inserted at the left end of U(L). Complete genomic sequences were derived from both the FHV-1 BAC clone and purified virion DNA. The FHV-1 genome is 135,797bp in size with an overall G+C content of 45%. A total of 78 open reading frames were predicted, encoding 74 distinct proteins. The gene arrangement is collinear with that of most sequenced varicelloviruses. The virus regenerated from the BAC was very similar to the parental C-27 strain in vitro in terms of plaque morphology and growth characteristics and highly virulent in cats in a preliminary in vivo study.

  19. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phy-lum Bacteroidetes . P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several en-zymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the fea-tures of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Brachybacterium faecium type strain (Schefferle 6-10T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla; Pukall, Rudiger; LaButti, Kurt; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D' haeseleer, Patrik; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, Jim; Eisen, Johnathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Brachybacterium faecium Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermabacteraceae, a rather isolated family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. B. faecium is known for its rod-coccus growth cycle and the ability to degrade uric acid. It grows aerobically or weakly anaerobically. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from poultry deep litter. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the actinobacterial family Dermabacteraceae, and the 3,614,992 bp long single replicon genome with its 3129 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  1. Isolation and complete genome sequencing of Mimivirus bombay, a Giant Virus in sewage of Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirvan Chatterjee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a new Mimiviridae family member, infecting Acanthamoeba castellanii, from sewage in Mumbai, India. The isolated virus has a particle size of about 435 nm and a 1,182,200-bp genome. A phylogeny based on the DNA polymerase sequence placed the isolate as a new member of the Mimiviridae family lineage A and was named as Mimivirus bombay. Extensive presence of Mimiviridae family members in different environmental niches, with remarkably similar genome size and genetic makeup, point towards an evolutionary advantage that needs to be further investigated. The complete genome sequence of Mimivirus bombay was deposited at GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number KU761889.

  2. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Lantang pig (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Mao-Liang; Liu, Zhen; Yang, An-Qi; Li, Zhi; Chen, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Lantang pig is a native breed of Guangzhou Province in China. It is the first time that the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Lantang pig is reported in this work, which is determined through the PCR-based method. The total length of the mitognome is 16,709 bp, which contains 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, 13 PCGs and 1 conntrol region (D-loop region, Table 1). The total base composition of Lantang pig mitochondrial genome is 34.69% for A, 26.18% for C, 25.82% for T and 13.31% for G, in the order A>C>T>G. The complete mitochondrial genome of Lantang pig provides an important data in genetic mechanism and the evolution genomes.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Pedobacter heparinus type strain (HIM 762-3T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Cliff; Spring, Stefan; Lapidus, Alla; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Copeland, Alex; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Nolan, Matt; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Saunders, Elizabeth; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Detter, John C.

    2009-05-20

    Pedobacter heparinus (Payza and Korn 1956) Steyn et al. 1998 comb. nov. is the type species of the rapidly growing genus Pedobacter within the family Sphingobacteriaceae of the phylum 'Bacteroidetes'. P. heparinus is of interest, because it was the first isolated strain shown to grow with heparin as sole carbon and nitrogen source and because it produces several enzymes involved in the degradation of mucopolysaccharides. All available data about this species are based on a sole strain that was isolated from dry soil. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report on a complete genome sequence of a member of the genus Pedobacter, and the 5,167,383 bp long single replicon genome with its 4287 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn Staats

    Full Text Available Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes, but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylogenetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  5. Genomic treasure troves: complete genome sequencing of herbarium and insect museum specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H J; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E; Bakker, Freek T

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22-82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4-97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2-71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more horizontal

  6. The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig (Sus Scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Yu; Xu, Dong; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Rongchang pig is one of the native breeds in Sichuan province in China. The total length of mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig is 16,710 bp, including 34.67% A, 26.18% C, 25.82% T and 13.33% G, and in the order A > C > T > G. Mitochondrial genome contains a major non-coding control region (D-Loop region), 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 22 transfer RNA genes. This is the first report of the complete mitochondrial genome sequence about Rongchang pig. The mitochondrial genome of Rongchang pig subsequently provides an important information in genetic mechanism and the evolution genomes.

  7. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Hoon; Kang, Sang-Ho; Ahn, Byung-Ohg; Kim, Chang-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp) genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC) content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC) region, a small single-copy (SSC) region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR) regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively) on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species. PMID:27187480

  8. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of the Hare’s Ear Root, Bupleurum falcatum: Its Molecular Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Ho Shin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Bupleurum falcatum, which belongs to the family Apiaceae, has long been applied for curative treatments, especially as a liver tonic, in herbal medicine. The chloroplast (cp genome has been an ideal model to perform the evolutionary and comparative studies because of its highly conserved features and simple structure. The Apiaceae family is taxonomically close to the Araliaceae family and there have been numerous complete chloroplast genome sequences reported in the Araliaceae family, while little is known about the Apiaceae family. In this study, the complete sequence of the B. falcatum chloroplast genome was obtained. The full-length of the cp genome is 155,989 nucleotides with a 37.66% overall guanine-cytosine (GC content and shows a quadripartite structure composed of three nomenclatural regions: a large single-copy (LSC region, a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of inverted repeat (IR regions. The genome occupancy is 85,912-bp, 17,517-bp, and 26,280-bp for LSC, SSC, and IR, respectively. B. falcatum was shown to contain 111 unique genes (78 for protein-coding, 29 for tRNAs, and four for rRNAs, respectively on its chloroplast genome. Genic comparison found that B. falcatum has no pseudogenes and has two gene losses, accD in the LSC and ycf15 in the IRs. A total of 55 unique tandem repeat sequences were detected in the B. falcatum cp genome. This report is the first to describe the complete chloroplast genome sequence in B. falcatum and will open up further avenues of research to understand the evolutionary panorama and the chloroplast genome conformation in related plant species.

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a phytophagous ladybird beetle, Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, G T; Firake, D M; Tay, W T; Azad Thakur, N S; Ngachan, S V

    2016-01-01

    Ladybird beetles are generally considered as agriculturally beneficial insects, but the ladybird beetles in the coleopteran subfamily Epilachninae are phytophagous and major plant feeding pest species which causes severe economic losses to cucurbitaceous and solanaceous crops. Henosepilachna pusillanima (Mulsant) is one of the important pest species of ladybird beetle. In this report, we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of H. pusillanima. For sequencing of the complete mitochondrial genome, we used the Ion Torrent sequencing platform. The complete circular mitochondrial genome of the H. pusillanima was determined to be 16,216 bp long. There were totally 13 protein coding genes, 22 transfer RNA, 2 ribosomal RNA and a control (A + T-rich) region estimated to be 1690 bp. The gene arrangement and orientations of assembled mitogenome were identical to the reported predatory ladybird beetle Coccinella septempunctata L. This is the first completely sequenced coleopteran mitochondrial genome from the beetle subfamily Epilachninae from India. Data generated in this study will benefit future comparative genomics studies for understanding the evolutionary relationships between predatory and phytophagous coccinellid beetles.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Variant CH/HNYF/2014

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Renfeng; Tian, Xiangqin; Qiao, Songlin; Guo, Junqing; Xie, Weitao; Zhang, Gaiping

    2015-01-01

    Sow’s milk is a potential route for the vertical transmission of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) from sow to suckling piglet. We report here the complete genome sequence of PEDV strain CH/HNYF/2014, which was isolated from milk samples. This information provides further understanding of the transmission mechanisms and genetic diversity of PEDV.

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Three Important Methicillin-Resistant Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Matthew C.; Bemis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We report the first complete genome sequences of three predominant clones (ST68, ST71, and ST84) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in North America. All strains were isolated from canine infections and have different SCCmec elements and antibiotic resistance gene patterns. PMID:27795289

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-11

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Thiostrepton-Producing Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Katsumi; Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2016-06-02

    Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255 produces thiostrepton, a thiopeptide class antibiotic. Here, we report the complete genome sequence for this strain, which contains a total of 8,032,664 bp, 7,452 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 72.3%.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Mayaro Virus (Togaviridae, Alphavirus) Strain BeAr 20290 from Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Espósito, Danillo Lucas Alves; da Fonseca, Benedito Antônio Lopes

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Mayaro virus strain BeAr 20290 isolated from Haemagogus mosquitoes in 1960. The sequence presented here includes all nonstructural and structural proteins and the 5′- and 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of the Xylose-Fermenting Candida intermedia Strains CBS 141442 and PYCC 4715.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Antonio D; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Soler, Lucile; Dainat, Jacques; Olsson, Lisbeth; Geijer, Cecilia

    2017-04-06

    Sustainable biofuel production from lignocellulosic materials requires efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the biomass, including xylose. Here, we report on the de novo genome assemblies of two strains of the xylose-fermenting yeast Candida intermedia: CBS 141442 and PYCC 4715. Copyright © 2017 Moreno et al.

  16. Complete genome sequence of the cellulase-producing bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis PF008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chungyun; Oh, Eom-Ji; Lee, Han-Beoyl; Kim, Byung-Yong; Oh, Chang-Sik

    2015-11-20

    The Gram-positive Actinobacterium Clavibacter michiganensis strain PF008 produces a cellulase of biotechnological interest, which is used for degradation of cellulose, a major component of plant cell walls. Here we report the complete genome sequence of this bacterium for better understanding of cellulase production and its virulence mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium Vibrio harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV])

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zheng; Hervey, W. Judson; Kim, Seongwon; Lin, Baochuan; Vora, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is a Gram-negative marine γ-proteobacterium that is known to be a formidable pathogen of aquatic animals and is a model organism for the study of bacterial bioluminescence and quorum sensing. In this report, we describe the complete genome sequence of the most studied strain of this species: V. harveyi ATCC 33843 (392 [MAV]).

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Seneca Valley Virus CH-01-2015 Identified in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiwen; Zhao, Xiaoya; Chen, Yanshan; He, Xiaoming; Zhang, Guanqun; Ma, Jingyun

    2016-01-21

    The complete genome sequence of Seneca Valley virus (SVV), a single-stranded RNA virus that causes porcine vesicular disease in China, has been sequenced and analyzed. This Chinese isolate shares 94.4 to 97.1% sequence identity to another 8 strains from Canada, Brazil, and the United States. This is the first report of SVV infecting swine in China.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma yeatsii Strain GM274B (ATCC 43094).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J; Kent, Bethany N; Foecking, Mark F

    2015-04-23

    Mycoplasma yeatsii is a goat mycoplasma species that, although an obligate parasite, accommodates this lifestyle as an inapparent commensalist. High-frequency transformation has also been reported for this species. The complete 895,051-bp genome sequence of strain GM274B has been determined, enabling an analysis of the features of this potential cloning host.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Podophage MPK7, Which Requires Type IV Pili for Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Hee-Won; Cho, You-Hee

    2013-10-10

    We report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa podophage MPK7. It displays synteny to the P. aeruginosa phages of the Phikmvlikevirus genus, which includes phiKMV and LKA1. MPK7 requires type IV pili (TFP) for infection, suggesting the role of functional TFP as the receptor for this phage genus.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Serotype k Streptococcus mutans Strain LJ23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Chihiro; Furukawa, Nayuta; Watanabe, Takayasu; Minegishi, Kana; Furukawa, Asuka; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Oshima, Kenshiro; Kurokawa, Ken; Hattori, Masahira; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Ooshima, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the major pathogen of dental caries and occasionally causes infective endocarditis. Here we report the complete genome sequence of serotype k S. mutans strain LJ23, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a Japanese patient. PMID:22535936

  2. Identification and complete genome sequence analysis of a genotype XIV Newcastle disease virus from Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first complete genome sequence of a strain of Newcastle disease virus from genotype XIV is reported here. Strain duck/Nigeria/NG-695/KG.LOM.11-16/2009 was isolated from an apparently healthy domestic duck from a live bird market in Kogi State, Nigeria, in 2009. This strain is classified as a m...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Fenitrothion-Degrading Burkholderia sp. Strain YI23

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Jong Sung; Choi, Beom Soon; Choi, Ah Young; Kim, Kyung Duk; Kim, Dong In; Choi, Ik Young; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia species are ubiquitous in soil environments. Many Burkholderia species isolated from various environments have the potential to biodegrade man-made chemicals. Burkholderia sp. strain YI23 was isolated from a golf course soil and identified as a fenitrothion-degrading bacterium. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence of Burkholderia sp. strain YI23.

  4. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Staphylococcus aureus Sequence Type 5 Isolates from California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hau, Samantha J.; Bayles, Darrell O.; Alt, David P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus causes a variety of human diseases ranging in severity. The pathogenicity of S. aureus can be partially attributed to the acquisition of mobile genetic elements. In this report, we provide two complete genome sequences from human clinical S. aureus isolates. PMID:28360167

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Strain of Cyanobacterium, Anabaena sp. 4-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Steven

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete nucleotide sequence of Anabaena sp. 4-3, an efficient producer of sucrose. It was isolated from salt flats near the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas. The genome may provide insight into the utilization of cyanobacteria as a source for biofuels. PMID:27540066

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-28

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea.

  7. Complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli strains 1303 and ECC-1470 isolated from bovine mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leimbach, Andreas; Poehlein, Anja; Witten, Anika; Scheutz, Flemming; Schukken, Ynte; Daniel, Rolf; Dobrindt, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the leading causative agent of acute bovine mastitis. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. coli O70:H32 strain 1303, isolated from an acute case of bovine mastitis, and E. coli Ont:Hnt strain ECC-1470, isolated from a persistent infection.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae CNCTC 10/84, a Hypervirulent Sequence Type 26 Strain

    OpenAIRE

    Hooven, Thomas A.; Randis, Tara M.; Daugherty, Sean C.; Narechania, Apurva; Planet, Paul J.; Tettelin, Hervé; Ratner, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus [GBS]) is a human pathogen with a propensity to cause neonatal infections. We report the complete genome sequence of GBS strain CNCTC 10/84, a hypervirulent clinical isolate frequently used to study GBS pathogenesis. Comparative analysis of this sequence may shed light on novel pathogenic mechanisms.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus HL-EbGr7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muyzer, G.; Sorokin, D.Y.; Mavromatis, K.; Lapidus, A.; Clum, A.; Ivanova, N.; Pati, A.; d' Haeseleer, P.; Woyke, T.; Kyrpides, N.C.

    2011-01-01

    "Thioalkalivibrio sulfidophilus" HL-EbGr7 is an obligately chemolithoautotrophic, haloalkaliphilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium (SOB) belonging to the Gammaproteobacteria. The strain was found to predominate a full-scale bioreactor, removing sulfide from biogas. Here we report the complete genome

  10. Complete genome sequence of the commensal Streptococcus salivarius strain JIM8777.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guédon, Eric; Delorme, Christine; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Loux, Valentin; Couloux, Arnaud; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Layec, Séverine; Galleron, Nathalie; Almeida, Mathieu; van de Guchte, Maarten; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is a prevalent species of the human oropharyngeal tract with an important role in oral ecology. Here, we report the complete 2.2-Mb genome sequence and annotation of strain JIM8777, which was recently isolated from the oral cavity of a healthy, dentate infant. Copyright © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri Strains Detroit-1 and Dallas 1E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Brian H.; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A.; Morrison, Shatavia S.; Mercante, Jeffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the complete genome sequences of two of the earliest known strains of Legionella pneumophila subsp. fraseri. Detroit-1 is serogroup 1 and was isolated from a lung biopsy specimen in 1977. Dallas 1E is serogroup 5 and was isolated in 1978 from a cooling tower. PMID:28153889

  12. Complete genome sequence of novel carbon monoxide oxidizing bacteria Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19, assembled de novo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainala, Satish Kumar; Seol, Eunhee; Park, Sunghoon

    2015-10-10

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Citrobacter amalonaticus Y19 isolated from an anaerobic digester. PacBio single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing was employed, resulting in a single scaffold of 5.58Mb. The sequence of a mega plasmid of 291Kb size is also presented.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Thiostrepton-Producing Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2016-01-01

    Streptomyces laurentii ATCC 31255 produces thiostrepton, a thiopeptide class antibiotic. Here, we report the complete genome sequence for this strain, which contains a total of 8,032,664 bp, 7,452 predicted coding sequences, and a G+C content of 72.3%. PMID:27257211

  14. Complete Whole-Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Java NCTC5706.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Mohammed-Abbas; Alexander, Sarah; Burnett, Edward; Deheer-Graham, Ana; Oliver, Karen; Holroyd, Nancy; Parkhill, Julian; Russell, Julie E

    2016-11-03

    Salmonellae are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence for Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Java strain NCTC5706. This strain is of historical significance, having been isolated in the pre-antibiotic era and was deposited into the National Collection of Type Cultures in 1939.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Different Bordetella sp. Isolates Causing Human Respiratory Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yanhui; Loparev, Vladimir; Batra, Dhwani; Bowden, Katherine E.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Davis, Jamie K.; Johnson, Taccara; Juieng, Phalasy; Miner, Christine E.; Rowe, Lori; Sheth, Mili; Tondella, M. Lucia; Williams, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    Species of the genus Bordetella associate with various animal hosts, frequently causing respiratory disease. Bordetella pertussis is the primary agent of whooping cough and other Bordetella species can cause similar cough illness. Here, we report four complete genome sequences from isolates of different Bordetella species recovered from human respiratory infections.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Japanese erwinia strain ejp617, a bacterial shoot blight pathogen of pear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Duck Hwan; Thapa, Shree Prasad; Choi, Beom-Soon; Kim, Won-Sik; Hur, Jang Hyun; Cho, Jun Mo; Lim, Jong-Sung; Choi, Ik-Young; Lim, Chun Keun

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Erwinia strain Ejp617 is a plant pathogen that causes bacterial shoot blight of pear in Japan. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain Ejp617 isolated from Nashi pears in Japan to provide further valuable insight among related Erwinia species.

  17. Prokaryotic Phylogeny Based on Complete Genomes Without Sequence Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bailin; Qi, Ji; Wang, Bin

    2003-04-01

    This is a brief review of a series of on-going work on bacterial phylogeny. We have proposed a new method to infer relatedness of prokaryotes from their complete genome data without using sequence alignment. It has led to results comparable with the bacteriologists' systematics as reflected in the latest 2001 edition of the Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology1. In what follows we only touch on the mathematical aspects of the method. The biological implications of our results will be published elsewhere.

  18. Complete mitochondrial genome of Rhinogobius giurinus (Perciformes: Gobiidae: Gobionellinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lingpeng; Yang, Xuefen; Ma, Zhihong; Yang, Ruibin

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we present the complete mitochondrial gene for the freshwater goby Rhinogobius giurinus. The genome is a circular molecule of 16,520 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes and 2 main non-coding regions (the control region and the origin of the light strand replication). The overall base composition of R. giurinus is 26.08% for T, 29.56% for C, 27.73% for A and 16.63% for G, with a slight A + T bias of 53.81%. It has the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of yellow meal worm(Tenebrio molitor)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Li-Na; Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2014-01-01

    The yellow meal worm(Tenebrio molitor L.) is an important resource insect typically used as animal feed additive. It is also widely used for biological research. The first complete mitochondrial genome of T. molitor was determined for the first time by long PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The results showed that the entire mitogenome of T. molitor was 15 785 bp long, with 72.35% A+T content [deposited in GenBank with accession number KF418153]. The gene order and orientation were...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium xenopi Type Strain RIVM700367

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, A. M.

    2012-05-24

    Mycobacterium xenopi is a slow-growing, thermophilic, water-related Mycobacterium species. Like other nontuberculous mycobacteria, M. xenopi more commonly infects humans with altered immune function, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. It is considered clinically relevant in a significant proportion of the patients from whom it is isolated. We report here the whole genome sequence of M. xenopi type strain RIVM700367.

  1. De novo assembly and characterization of the complete chloroplast genome of radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Young-Min; Chung, Won-Hyung; Mun, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Namshin; Yu, Hee-Ju

    2014-11-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an edible root vegetable crop that is cultivated worldwide and whose genome has been sequenced. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the radish cultivar WK10039 chloroplast (cp) genome, along with a de novo assembly strategy using whole genome shotgun sequence reads obtained by next generation sequencing. The radish cp genome is 153,368 bp in length and has a typical quadripartite structure, composed of a pair of inverted repeat regions (26,217 bp each), a large single copy region (83,170 bp), and a small single copy region (17,764 bp). The radish cp genome contains 87 predicted protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, and 8 rRNA genes. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of 91 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the radish cp genome. Phylogenetic analysis of 62 protein-coding gene sequences from the 17 cp genomes of the Brassicaceae family suggested that the radish cp genome is most closely related to the cp genomes of Brassica rapa and Brassicanapus. Comparisons with the B. rapa and B. napus cp genomes revealed highly divergent intergenic sequences and introns that can potentially be developed as diagnostic cp markers. Synonymous and nonsynonymous substitutions of cp genes suggested that nucleotide substitutions have occurred at similar rates in most genes. The complete sequence of the radish cp genome would serve as a valuable resource for the development of new molecular markers and the study of the phylogenetic relationships of Raphanus species in the Brassicaceae family.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2 from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Daudt

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2 from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8 and two late (L1 and L2 genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Deltapapillomavirus 4 (bovine papillomavirus 2) from a bovine papillomavirus lesion in Amazon Region, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudt, Cíntia; da Silva, Flavio RC; Cibulski, Samuel P; Weber, Matheus N; Mayer, Fabiana Q; Varela, Ana Paula M; Roehe, Paulo M; Canal, Cláudio W

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of bovine papillomavirus 2 (BPV2) from Brazilian Amazon Region was determined using multiple-primed rolling circle amplification followed by Illumina sequencing. The genome is 7,947 bp long, with 45.9% GC content. It encodes seven early (E1, E2,E4, E5, E6,E7, and E8) and two late (L1 and L2) genes. The complete genome of a BPV2 can help in future studies since this BPV type is highly reported worldwide although the lack of complete genome sequences available. PMID:27074259

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianing; Xu, Chang; Li, Jialian; Lei, Ying; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Yuan; Xu, Chongren; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Gonepteryx mahaguru (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) is 15,221 bp in length, containing 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA genes (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNA genes (LrRNA and SrRNA) and 1 non-coding A + T-rich region. The nucleotide composition is significantly biased toward A + T (80.9%). All PCGs are initiated by classical ATN codon, with the exception of COI, which begins with TTA codon. Nine PCGs harbor the complete stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND4 and ND5 stop with incomplete codons, single T or TA. All tRNAs can be folded into the typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN). The A + T content of AT-rich region is 95.2%, same to the highest one in the known species in Pieridae.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genome of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries (Baciuariophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao-Long; Cao, Min; Bi, Gui-Qi

    2016-07-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries belongs to Baciuariophyta, which can produce the neurotoxin known as domoic acid, a toxin that can cause amnesic shellfish poisoning in human beings. The research aspects mainly focus on its toxicity and diversity. However, there is no mitochondrial genome information about P. multiseries. The complete mitochondrial genome of P. multiseries was obtained through amplifying. The mitogenome is 46 283 bp in length with 31.04% GC content. It has a typical cyclic structure. The genome contains 37 protein-coding genes, including unidentified open reading frames, 23 tRNAs and 2rRNAs. Four group II introns were found in rps5, cob, cox1 and cox2. The co-linear analysis result exhibited existence of gene modules re-arrangements and inversions among P. multiseries, Synedra acus and Thalassiosira pseudonana. The gene contents comparison showed they have high similarities. Phylogeny results suggest P. multiseries has a close evolutionary relationship with T. pseudonana.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bao-Cai; Liu, Wei; Wei, Shu-Jun

    2013-02-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the codling moth Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) was determined. The genome is 15,253 bp long with 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes and an A+T-rich region. All genes are arranged in their conserved positions compared with the pupative ancestral arrangement of insects except for trnM, which was translocated to the upstream of the transfer RNA cluster trnI-trnQ as in all previously reported lepidopteran mitochondiral genomes. Seven portein-coding genes use ATG start codon and five use ATT. However, the cox1 gene uses the CGA start codon as it is found in all previous reported mitochondrial genomes of Lepidoptera. Nine protein-coding genes stop with termination codon TAA. Four protein-coding genes use incomplete stop codons TA or T. The A+T region is located between rrnS and trnM with a length of 331 bp.

  7. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae: Insights into Gene Arrangement and Genome Organization within the Family Aleyrodidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Pin-Wu; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Jun; Peng, Ping

    2016-11-07

    There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported whitefly mt genomes. The mt genome of A. camelliae is 15,188 bp long, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 21 tRNA genes and a putative control region (GenBank: KU761949). The tRNA gene, trnI, has not been observed in this genome. The mt genome has a unique gene order and shares most gene boundaries with Tetraleurodes acaciae. Nineteen of 21 tRNA genes have the conventional cloverleaf shaped secondary structure and two (trnS₁ and trnS₂) lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. Using ARWEN and homologous sequence alignment, we have identified five tRNA genes and revised the annotation for three whitefly mt genomes. This result suggests that most absent genes exist in the genomes and have not been identified, due to be lack of technology and inference sequence. The phylogenetic relationships among 11 whiteflies and Drosophila melanogaster were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Aleurocanthus camelliae and T. acaciae form a sister group, and all three Bemisia tabaci and two Bemisia afer strains gather together. These results are identical to the relationships inferred from gene order. We inferred that gene rearrangement plays an important role in the mt genome evolved from whiteflies.

  8. Complete sequencing of five araliaceae chloroplast genomes and the phylogenetic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ginseng family (Araliaceae includes a number of economically important plant species. Previously phylogenetic studies circumscribed three major clades within the core ginseng plant family, yet the internal relationships of each major group have been poorly resolved perhaps due to rapid radiation of these lineages. Recent studies have shown that phyogenomics based on chloroplast genomes provides a viable way to resolve complex relationships. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the complete nucleotide sequences of five Araliaceae chloroplast genomes using next-generation sequencing technology. The five chloroplast genomes are 156,333-156,459 bp in length including a pair of inverted repeats (25,551-26,108 bp separated by the large single-copy (86,028-86,566 bp and small single-copy (18,021-19,117 bp regions. Each chloroplast genome contains the same 114 unique genes consisting of 30 transfer RNA genes, four ribosomal RNA genes, and 80 protein coding genes. Gene size, content, and order, AT content, and IR/SC boundary structure are similar among all Araliaceae chloroplast genomes. A total of 140 repeats were identified in the five chloroplast genomes with palindromic repeat as the most common type. Phylogenomic analyses using parsimony, likelihood, and Bayesian inference based on the complete chloroplast genomes strongly supported the monophyly of the Asian Palmate group and the Aralia-Panax group. Furthermore, the relationships among the sampled taxa within the Asian Palmate group were well resolved. Twenty-six DNA markers with the percentage of variable sites higher than 5% were identified, which may be useful for phylogenetic studies of Araliaceae. CONCLUSION: The chloroplast genomes of Araliaceae are highly conserved in all aspects of genome features. The large-scale phylogenomic data based on the complete chloroplast DNA sequences is shown to be effective for the phylogenetic reconstruction of Araliaceae.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Weeksella virosa type strain (9751T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Elke [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kopitz, marcus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Weeksella virosa Holmes et al. 1987 is the sole member and type species of the genus Weeksella which belongs to the family Flavobacteriaceae of the phylum Bacteroidetes. Twenty-nine isolates, collected from clinical specimens provided the basis for the taxon description. While the species seems to be a saprophyte of the mucous membranes of healthy man and warm-blooded animals a causal relationship with disease has been reported in a few instances. Except for the ability to produce indole and to hydrolyze Tween and proteins such as casein and gelatin, this aerobic, non-motile, non-pigmented bacterial species is metabolically inert in most traditional biochemical tests. The 2,272,954 bp long genome with its 2,105 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes consists of one circular chromosome and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  10. The Complete Genome of a New Betabaculovirus from Clostera anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Feifei; Zhu, Zheng; Liu, Xiaoping; Hou, Dianhai; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Manli; Kou, Zheng; Wang, Hualin; Deng, Fei; Hu, Zhihong

    2015-01-01

    Clostera anastomosis (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae) is a defoliating forest insect pest. Clostera anastomosis granulovirus-B (ClasGV-B) belonging to the genus Betabaculovirus of family Baculoviridae has been used for biological control of the pest. Here we reported the full genome sequence of ClasGV-B and compared it to other previously sequenced baculoviruses. The circular double-stranded DNA genome is 107,439 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37.8% and contains 123 open reading frames (ORFs) representing 93% of the genome. ClasGV-B contains 37 baculovirus core genes, 25 lepidopteran baculovirus specific genes, 19 betabaculovirus specific genes, 39 other genes with homologues to baculoviruses and 3 ORFs unique to ClasGV-B. Hrs appear to be absent from the ClasGV-B genome, however, two non-hr repeats were found. Phylogenetic tree based on 37 core genes from 73 baculovirus genomes placed ClasGV-B in the clade b of betabaculoviruses and was most closely related to Erinnyis ello GV (ErelGV). The gene arrangement of ClasGV-B also shared the strongest collinearity with ErelGV but differed from Clostera anachoreta GV (ClanGV), Clostera anastomosis GV-A (ClasGV-A, previously also called CaLGV) and Epinotia aporema GV (EpapGV) with a 20 kb inversion. ClasGV-B genome contains three copies of polyhedron envelope protein gene (pep) and phylogenetic tree divides the PEPs of betabaculoviruses into three major clades: PEP-1, PEP-2 and PEP/P10. ClasGV-B also contains three homologues of P10 which all harbor an N-terminal coiled-coil domain and a C-terminal basic sequence. ClasGV-B encodes three fibroblast growth factor (FGF) homologues which are conserved in all sequenced betabaculoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis placed these three FGFs into different groups and suggested that the FGFs were evolved at the early stage of the betabaculovirus expansion. ClasGV-B is different from previously reported ClasGV-A and ClanGV isolated from Notodontidae in sequence and gene arrangement

  11. The Complete Genome of a New Betabaculovirus from Clostera anastomosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yin

    Full Text Available Clostera anastomosis (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae is a defoliating forest insect pest. Clostera anastomosis granulovirus-B (ClasGV-B belonging to the genus Betabaculovirus of family Baculoviridae has been used for biological control of the pest. Here we reported the full genome sequence of ClasGV-B and compared it to other previously sequenced baculoviruses. The circular double-stranded DNA genome is 107,439 bp in length, with a G+C content of 37.8% and contains 123 open reading frames (ORFs representing 93% of the genome. ClasGV-B contains 37 baculovirus core genes, 25 lepidopteran baculovirus specific genes, 19 betabaculovirus specific genes, 39 other genes with homologues to baculoviruses and 3 ORFs unique to ClasGV-B. Hrs appear to be absent from the ClasGV-B genome, however, two non-hr repeats were found. Phylogenetic tree based on 37 core genes from 73 baculovirus genomes placed ClasGV-B in the clade b of betabaculoviruses and was most closely related to Erinnyis ello GV (ErelGV. The gene arrangement of ClasGV-B also shared the strongest collinearity with ErelGV but differed from Clostera anachoreta GV (ClanGV, Clostera anastomosis GV-A (ClasGV-A, previously also called CaLGV and Epinotia aporema GV (EpapGV with a 20 kb inversion. ClasGV-B genome contains three copies of polyhedron envelope protein gene (pep and phylogenetic tree divides the PEPs of betabaculoviruses into three major clades: PEP-1, PEP-2 and PEP/P10. ClasGV-B also contains three homologues of P10 which all harbor an N-terminal coiled-coil domain and a C-terminal basic sequence. ClasGV-B encodes three fibroblast growth factor (FGF homologues which are conserved in all sequenced betabaculoviruses. Phylogenetic analysis placed these three FGFs into different groups and suggested that the FGFs were evolved at the early stage of the betabaculovirus expansion. ClasGV-B is different from previously reported ClasGV-A and ClanGV isolated from Notodontidae in sequence and gene

  12. Completion of Eight Gynostemma BL. (Cucurbitaceae Chloroplast Genomes: Characterization, Comparative Analysis, and Phylogenetic Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gynostemma BL., belonging to the family Cucurbitaceae, is a genus containing 17 creeping herbaceous species mainly distributed in East Asia. It can be divided into two subgenera based on different fruit morphology. Herein, we report eight complete chloroplast genome sequences of the genus Gynostemma, which were obtained by Illumina paired-end sequencing, assembly, and annotation. The length of the eight complete cp genomes ranged from 157,576 bp (G. pentaphyllum to 158,273 bp (G. laxiflorum. Each encoded 133 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, eight rRNA genes, and one pseudogene. The four types of repeated sequences had been discovered and indicated that the repeated structure for species in the Subgen. Triostellum was greater than that for species in the Subgen. Gynostemma. The percentage of variation of the eight cp genomes in different regions were calculated, which demonstrated that the coding and inverted repeats regions were highly conserved. Phylogenetic analysis based on Bayesian inference and maximum likelihood methods strongly supported the phylogenetic position of the genus Gynostemma as a member of family Cucurbitaceae. The phylogenetic relationships among the eight species were clearly resolved using the complete cp genome sequences in this study. It will also provide potential molecular markers and candidate DNA barcodes for future studies and enrich the valuable complete cp genome resources of Cucurbitaceae.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Five Bacteriophages That Infect Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollivar, David W; Bernardoni, Brooke; Bockman, Matthew R; Miller, Brenda M; Russell, Daniel A; Delesalle, Veronique A; Krukonis, Gregory P; Hatfull, Graham F; Cross, Madeline R; Szewczyk, Marlena M; Eppurath, Atul

    2016-05-26

    Five bacteriophages that infect the Rhodobacter capsulatus strain YW1 were isolated from stream water near Bloomington, Illinois, USA. Two distinct genome types are represented in the newly isolated bacteriophages. These genomes are different from other bacteriophage genomes previously described.

  14. The complete chloroplast genome sequences for four Amaranthus species (Amaranthaceae)1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Lindsay; Mangelson, Ryan; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Jellen, Eric N.; Maughan, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Premise of the study: The amaranth genus contains many important grain and weedy species. We further our understanding of the genus through the development of a complete reference chloroplast genome. Methods and Results: A high-quality Amaranthus hypochondriacus (Amaranthaceae) chloroplast genome assembly was developed using long-read technology. This reference genome was used to reconstruct the chloroplast genomes for two closely related grain species (A. cruentus and A. caudatus) and their putative progenitor (A. hybridus). The reference genome was 150,518 bp and possesses a circular structure of two inverted repeats (24,352 bp) separated by small (17,941 bp) and large (83,873 bp) single-copy regions; it encodes 111 genes, 72 for proteins. Relative to the reference chloroplast genome, an average of 210 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 122 insertion/deletion polymorphisms (indels) were identified across the analyzed genomes. Conclusions: This reference chloroplast genome, along with the reported simple sequence repeats, SNPs, and indels, is an invaluable genetic resource for studying the phylogeny and genetic diversity within the amaranth genus. PMID:27672525

  15. Complete genome sequence of an attenuated Sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138spar

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome of a sparfloxacin-resistant Streptococcus agalactiae vaccine strain 138spar is 1,838,126 bp in size. The genome has 1892 coding sequences and 82 RNAs. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipeline. The publishing of this genome will allo...

  16. Report of a complete second branchial fistula.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khan, Mohammad Habibullah

    2010-08-01

    We report a case of complete congenital branchial fistula with an internal opening near the tonsillar fossa. Cysts, fistulas, and sinuses of the second branchial cleft are the most common developmental anomalies arising from the branchial apparatus. In our case, a 43-year-old man presented with a several-year history of a discharging sinus from the right side of his neck, consistent with a branchial fistula. He underwent various investigations and finally was treated with a one-stage complete surgical excision of the fistula tract. We describe the general clinical presentation, investigations, and surgical outcome of this case.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ying-Nan; Xiao, Gui-Bao; Li, Jiong-Tang

    2016-11-01

    The Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens) is one of the popular aquarium fish. Serious attentions have been paid to the biodiversity of the fish. The mitochondrial genome of the Siamese fighting fish is reported to be 17 099 bp and includes 37 genes. The gene organization is similar to other fish mitogenomes. The control region is AT-rich and includes three tandem repeats. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that the fish is close to fish in the Macropodus genus. This mitogenome will assist in studying the mitochondrial variations and population structure in this fish and examine the evolutionary relationship among fish in the Osphronemidae family.

  18. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of a diatom alga Synedra acus and comparative analysis of diatom mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Galachyants, Yuri P; Mardanov, Andrey V; Beletsky, Alexey V; Petrova, Darya P; Sherbakova, Tatyana A; Zakharova, Yuliya R; Likhoshway, Yelena V; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Grachev, Mikhail A

    2010-06-01

    The first two mitochondrial genomes of marine diatoms were previously reported for the centric Thalassiosira pseudonana and the raphid pennate Phaeodactylum tricornutum. As part of a genomic project, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome of the freshwater araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus. This 46,657 bp mtDNA encodes 2 rRNAs, 24 tRNAs, and 33 proteins. The mtDNA of S. acus contains three group II introns, two inserted into the cox1 gene and containing ORFs, and one inserted into the rnl gene and lacking an ORF. The compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.9-kb-long intergenic region, which contains repeat sequences. Comparison of the three sequenced mtDNAs showed that these three genomes carry similar gene pools, but the positions of some genes are rearranged. Phylogenetic analysis performed with a fragment of the cox1 gene of diatoms and other heterokonts produced a tree that is similar to that derived from 18S RNA genes. The introns of mtDNA in the diatoms seem to be polyphyletic. This study demonstrates that pyrosequencing is an efficient method for complete sequencing of mitochondrial genomes from diatoms, and may soon give valuable information about the molecular phylogeny of this outstanding group of unicellular organisms.

  19. The complete genome sequence of Haloferax volcanii DS2, a model archaeon.

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    Amber L Hartman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Haloferax volcanii is an easily culturable moderate halophile that grows on simple defined media, is readily transformable, and has a relatively stable genome. This, in combination with its biochemical and genetic tractability, has made Hfx. volcanii a key model organism, not only for the study of halophilicity, but also for archaeal biology in general. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of Hfx. volcanii DS2, the type strain of this species. The genome contains a main 2.848 Mb chromosome, three smaller chromosomes pHV1, 3, 4 (85, 438, 636 kb, respectively and the pHV2 plasmid (6.4 kb. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The completed genome sequence, presented here, provides an invaluable tool for further in vivo and in vitro studies of Hfx. volcanii.

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diannan small-ear pig (Sus Scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Yu; Xu, Dong; Xiao, Ding-Fu; Ma, Hai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Diannan small-ear pig in Yunnan Province was firstly reported, which was determined through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The total length of mitochondrial genome of Diannan small-ear pig was 16720 bp, including 34.77% A, 26.18% C, 25.81% T and 13.24% G, and in the order A > C > T > G. Mitochondrial genome contained a major non-coding control region (D-Loop region), 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs) and 22 transfer RNA genes. The mitochondrial genome of Diannan small-ear pig provides an important data set for the study on genetic mechanism.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, A. Christine; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Nolan, Matt; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Tapia, Roxanne; Han, Cliff; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Yasawong, Montri; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie; Rohde, Manfred; Sikorski, Johannes; Göker, Markus; Detter, John C.; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The species is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung infection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21886861

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of Callerebia suroia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qinghui; Zhang, Wei; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Callerebia suroia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) was determined and analyzed in this paper. The circular genome is 15,208 bp long, including 37 typical mitochondrial genes and one non-coding AT-rich region. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) started with ATN, except for COI gene with CGA(R), which is often found in other butterflies; nine PCGs harbor the typical stop codon TAA, whereas COI, COII, ND5 and ND4 end with a single T. All tRNA genes display typical secondary clover-leaf structures, except for tRNA(Ser)(AGN), whose dihydrouridine (DHU) arm is replaced by a simple loop. The lrRNA and srRNA genes are 1,347 bp and 753 bp in length, with their AT contents of 84.4% and 85.4%, respectively. The 417 bp AT-rich region contains non repetitive sequences, but harbor several features common to the lepidopterans, including the motif ATAGA followed by a 19-bp poly-T stretch and a microsatellite-like (TA)8 element preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  3. Complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa Mill. (Garden rocket.

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    Yankun Wang

    Full Text Available Eruca sativa (Cruciferae family is an ancient crop of great economic and agronomic importance. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa was sequenced and annotated. The circular molecule is 247,696 bp long, with a G+C content of 45.07%, containing 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes, and 18 tRNA genes. The Eruca sativa mitochondrial genome may be divided into six master circles and four subgenomic molecules via three pairwise large repeats, resulting in a more dynamic structure of the Eruca sativa mtDNA compared with other cruciferous mitotypes. Comparison with the Brassica napus MtDNA revealed that most of the genes with known function are conserved between these two mitotypes except for the ccmFN2 and rrn18 genes, and 27 point mutations were scattered in the 14 protein-coding genes. Evolutionary relationships analysis suggested that Eruca sativa is more closely related to the Brassica species and to Raphanus sativus than to Arabidopsis thaliana.

  4. Complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa Mill. (Garden rocket).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yankun; Chu, Pu; Yang, Qing; Chang, Shengxin; Chen, Jianmei; Hu, Maolong; Guan, Rongzhan

    2014-01-01

    Eruca sativa (Cruciferae family) is an ancient crop of great economic and agronomic importance. Here, the complete mitochondrial genome of Eruca sativa was sequenced and annotated. The circular molecule is 247,696 bp long, with a G+C content of 45.07%, containing 33 protein-coding genes, three rRNA genes, and 18 tRNA genes. The Eruca sativa mitochondrial genome may be divided into six master circles and four subgenomic molecules via three pairwise large repeats, resulting in a more dynamic structure of the Eruca sativa mtDNA compared with other cruciferous mitotypes. Comparison with the Brassica napus MtDNA revealed that most of the genes with known function are conserved between these two mitotypes except for the ccmFN2 and rrn18 genes, and 27 point mutations were scattered in the 14 protein-coding genes. Evolutionary relationships analysis suggested that Eruca sativa is more closely related to the Brassica species and to Raphanus sativus than to Arabidopsis thaliana.

  5. Comparative analysis of complete plastid genomes from wild soybean (Glycine soja) and nine other Glycine species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Latif; Aaqil Khan, Muhammad; Muhammad Imran, Qari; Kang, Sang-Mo; Al-Hosni, Khdija; Jeong, Eun Ju; Lee, Ko Eun; Lee, In-Jung

    2017-01-01

    The plastid genomes of different plant species exhibit significant variation, thereby providing valuable markers for exploring evolutionary relationships and population genetics. Glycine soja (wild soybean) is recognized as the wild ancestor of cultivated soybean (G. max), representing a valuable genetic resource for soybean breeding programmes. In the present study, the complete plastid genome of G. soja was sequenced using Illumina paired-end sequencing and then compared it for the first time with previously reported plastid genome sequences from nine other Glycine species. The G. soja plastid genome was 152,224 bp in length and possessed a typical quadripartite structure, consisting of a pair of inverted repeats (IRa/IRb; 25,574 bp) separated by small (178,963 bp) and large (83,181 bp) single-copy regions, with a 51-kb inversion in the large single-copy region. The genome encoded 134 genes, including 87 protein-coding genes, eight ribosomal RNA genes, and 39 transfer RNA genes, and possessed 204 randomly distributed microsatellites, including 15 forward, 25 tandem, and 34 palindromic repeats. Whole-plastid genome comparisons revealed an overall high degree of sequence similarity between G. max and G. gracilis and some divergence in the intergenic spacers of other species. Greater numbers of indels and SNP substitutions were observed compared with G. cyrtoloba. The sequence of the accD gene from G. soja was highly divergent from those of the other species except for G. max and G. gracilis. Phylogenomic analyses of the complete plastid genomes and 76 shared genes yielded an identical topology and indicated that G. soja is closely related to G. max and G. gracilis. The complete G. soja genome sequenced in the present study is a valuable resource for investigating the population and evolutionary genetics of Glycine species and can be used to identify related species. PMID:28763486

  6. Complete mitochondrial genome of Naumann's thrush Turdus naumanni (Passeriformes: Turdidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Zhou, Lizhi; Liu, Gang; Gu, Changming

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial DNA of Naumann's thrush Turdus naumanni (Passeriformes: Turdidae) is 16,750 bp long with A + T contents of 52.79%. It has typical circular mitochondrial genomes that encode the complete set of 37 genes which are usually found in birds. All protein-coding genes use the standard mitochondrial initiation codon ATG, except for ND2 and COI start with GTG. TAN is the most frequent stop codon, and AGN and T- - are also occurred very common. All tRNAs possess the classic clover leaf secondary structure except for tRNA(Ser(AGN)) and tRNA(Lys(CUN)), which lack the "DHU" stem, only forming a simple loop.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Teresa [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Pratte, Brenda S. [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Zhong, Jinshun [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus bacteriophage φCbK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Gaël; Lambert, Christophe; Viollier, Patrick H

    2012-09-01

    φCbK is a B3 morphotype bacteriophage of the Siphoviridae family that infects Caulobacter crescentus, the preeminent model system for bacterial cell cycle studies. The last 4 decades of research with φCbK as a genetic and cytological tool to study the biology of the host warrant an investigation of the phage genome composition. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of φCbK and highlight unusual features that emerged from its annotation. The complete genome analysis of the φCbK phage provides new insight into its characteristics and potential interactions with its Caulobacter crescentus host, setting the stage for future functional studies with φCbK.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of European wild boar, Sus scrofa scrofa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Di; Yang, Xiao-Tian; Yang, En

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the European wild boar, Sus scrofa scrofa for the first time. The genome is found to be 16,770 bp in length and has a base composition of A (34.63%), G (13.38%), C (26.21%), and T (25.78%), indicating that the percentage of A + T (60.41%) was higher than G + C (39.59%). Similar to other pigs, it contains a typically conserved structure including 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). Most of the genes were located on the H-strand except for the ND6 gene and eight tRNA genes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence provided here would add a new genetic resource and new study on the evolution of the genus Sus.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Jacobin pigeon (Columba livia breed Jacobin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen-Xiao; Jia, Jin-Feng

    2015-06-01

    The Jacobin is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding that originated in Asia. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Jacobin pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,245 bp with the base composition of 30.18% for A, 23.98% for T, 31.88% for C, and 13.96% for G and an A-T (54.17 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region. The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Jacobin pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of the ice pigeon (Columba livia breed ice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; He, Wen-Xiao

    2015-02-01

    The ice pigeon is a breed of fancy pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of ice pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,236 bp with the base composition of 30.2% for A, 24.0% for T, 31.9% for C, and 13.9% for G and an A-T (54.2 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of ice pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Fancy Pigeon, Columba livia (Columbiformes: Columbidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; Xu, Ming-Ju; Wang, Cun-Lian; Xu, Tong; Wei, Dong; Liu, Bao-Jian; Wang, Guo-Hua

    2015-02-01

    The fancy pigeons are domesticated varieties of the rock pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of fancy pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,233 bp with the base composition of 30.1% for A, 24.0% for T, 31.9% for C, and 14.0% for G and an A-T (54.2 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of fancy pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  13. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Feral Rock Pigeon (Columba livia breed feral).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun-Hong; Liu, Fang; Wang, Li

    2014-10-01

    Abstract In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of feral rock pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,239 bp with the base composition of 30.3% for A, 24.0% for T, 31.9% for C, and 13.8% for G and an A-T (54.3 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of feral rock pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  14. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the king pigeon (Columba livia breed king).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Hua; He, Wen-Xiao; Xu, Tong

    2015-06-01

    The king pigeon is a breed of pigeon developed over many years of selective breeding primarily as a utility breed. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of king pigeon for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 17,221 bp with the base composition of 30.14% for A, 24.05% for T, 31.82% for C, and 13.99% for G and an A-T (54.22 %)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and one non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of pigeon. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of king pigeon would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bos taurus coreanae (Korean native cattle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi; Zhang, Yuan Qing; He, Dong Chang; Yang, Xiao Ming; Li, Bo; Wang, Dong Cai; Guang, Jin; Xu, Fang; Li, Jun Ya; Gao, Xue; Gao, Hui Jiang; Zhang, Lu Pei; Zhang, Xi Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Korean native cattle is one of the famous native breeds in Korean. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Korean native cattle for the first time. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,339 bp with the base composition of 33.4% for A, 27.2% for T, 26.0% for C, and 13.4% for G, and an A-T (60.6%)-rich feature was detected. It harbored 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). The arrangement of all genes was identical to the typical mitochondrial genomes of cattle. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Korean native cattle would serve as an important data set of the germplasm resources for further study.

  16. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Algerian honeybee, Apis mellifera intermissa (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Haddad, Nizar; Noureddine, Adjlane; Loucif-Ayad, Wahida; Wang, Yong-Zhi; Zhao, Ren-Bin; Zhang, Ai-Ling; Guan, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Xi; Niu, Hua

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Algerian honeybee, Apis mellifera intermissa, is analyzed for the first time. The results show that this genome is 16,336 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region (D-loop). The overall base composition is A (43.2%), C (9.8%), G (5.6%), and T (41.4%), so the percentage of A and T (84.6%) is considerably higher than that of G and C. All the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for four subunit genes (ND1, ND4, ND4L, and ND5), two rRNA genes (12S and 16S rRNA), and eight tRNA genes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here would be useful for further phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetic studies in A. m. intermissa.

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of the relict woody plant Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhui; Hao, Zhaodong; Xu, Haibin; Yang, Liming; Liu, Guangxin; Sheng, Yu; Zheng, Chen; Zheng, Weiwei; Cheng, Tielong; Shi, Jisen

    2015-01-01

    Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng is the only species in the genus Metasequoia Miki ex Hu et Cheng, which belongs to the Cupressaceae family. There were around 10 species in the Metasequoia genus, which were widely spread across the Northern Hemisphere during the Cretaceous of the Mesozoic and in the Cenozoic. M. glyptostroboides is the only remaining representative of this genus. Here, we report the complete chloroplast (cp) genome sequence and the cp genomic features of M. glyptostroboides. The M. glyptostroboides cp genome is 131,887 bp in length, with a total of 117 genes comprised of 82 protein-coding genes, 31 tRNA genes and four rRNA genes. In this genome, 11 forward repeats, nine palindromic repeats, and 15 tandem repeats were detected. A total of 188 perfect microsatellites were detected through simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis and these were distributed unevenly within the cp genome. Comparison of the cp genome structure and gene order to those of several other land plants indicated that a copy of the inverted repeat (IR) region, which was found to be IR region A (IRA), was lost in the M. glyptostroboides cp genome. The five most divergent and five most conserved genes were determined and further phylogenetic analysis was performed among plant species, especially for related species in conifers. Finally, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that M. glyptostroboides is a sister species to Cryptomeria japonica (L. F.) D. Don and to Taiwania cryptomerioides Hayata. The complete cp genome sequence information of M. glyptostroboides will be great helpful for further investigations of this endemic relict woody plant and for in-depth understanding of the evolutionary history of the coniferous cp genomes, especially for the position of M. glyptostroboides in plant systematics and evolution.

  18. Genomic Treasure Troves: Complete Genome Sequencing of Herbarium and Insect Museum Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Erkens, Roy H. J.; van de Vossenberg, Bart; Wieringa, Jan J.; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Stielow, Benjamin; Geml, József; Richardson, James E.; Bakker, Freek T.

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies because of both generally limited success of DNA extraction and the challenges associated with PCR-amplifying highly degraded DNA. In today's next-generation sequencing (NGS) world, opportunities and prospects for historical DNA have changed dramatically, as most NGS methods are actually designed for taking short fragmented DNA molecules as templates. Here we show that using a standard multiplex and paired-end Illumina sequencing approach, genome-scale sequence data can be generated reliably from dry-preserved plant, fungal and insect specimens collected up to 115 years ago, and with minimal destructive sampling. Using a reference-based assembly approach, we were able to produce the entire nuclear genome of a 43-year-old Arabidopsis thaliana (Brassicaceae) herbarium specimen with high and uniform sequence coverage. Nuclear genome sequences of three fungal specimens of 22–82 years of age (Agaricus bisporus, Laccaria bicolor, Pleurotus ostreatus) were generated with 81.4–97.9% exome coverage. Complete organellar genome sequences were assembled for all specimens. Using de novo assembly we retrieved between 16.2–71.0% of coding sequence regions, and hence remain somewhat cautious about prospects for de novo genome assembly from historical specimens. Non-target sequence contaminations were observed in 2 of our insect museum specimens. We anticipate that future museum genomics projects will perhaps not generate entire genome sequences in all cases (our specimens contained relatively small and low-complexity genomes), but at least generating vital comparative genomic data for testing (phylo)genetic, demographic and genetic hypotheses, that become increasingly more

  19. Analysis of the genomic homologous recombination in Theilovirus based on complete genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Maoli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At present, Theilovirus is considered to comprise four distinct serotypes, including Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, Thera virus, and Saffold virus. So far, there is no systematical study that investigated the genomic recombination of Theilovirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of Theilovirus over the complete genomes. Seven potentially significant recombination events were identified. However, according to the strains information and references related to the recombinants and their parental strains, four of the recombination events might happen non-naturally. These results will provide valuable hints for future research on evolution and antigenic variability of Theilovirus.

  20. Analysis of the genomic homologous recombination in Theilovirus based on complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangming; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yi, Maoli; Shao, Shihe; Zhang, Wen

    2011-09-17

    At present, Theilovirus is considered to comprise four distinct serotypes, including Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, Thera virus, and Saffold virus. So far, there is no systematical study that investigated the genomic recombination of Theilovirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of Theilovirus over the complete genomes. Seven potentially significant recombination events were identified. However, according to the strains information and references related to the recombinants and their parental strains, four of the recombination events might happen non-naturally. These results will provide valuable hints for future research on evolution and antigenic variability of Theilovirus.

  1. Complete mitochondrial genome of Zebra tilapia, Tilapia buttikoferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xi-Dong; Liu, Chao; Wang, Xue-Jie; Liu, Yi; Hu, Yin-Chang; Luo, Jian-Ren

    2016-01-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Tilapia buttikoferi, which was 16,577 bp in length with an A + T content of 53.0%, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNAs, 22 tRNAs and a complete control region. The gene arrangement was similar to that of typical fishes. The total base composition of the mitogenome was 25.6% T, 30.8% C, 27.4% A and 16.2% G. Of the 13 protein-coding genes, 12 genes start with an ATG codon, except for COX1 with GTG. Seven (ND1, ND2, COX1, ATPase8, ATPase6, ND4L and ND6) used TAA or AGA as the termination codon, whereas six (COX2, COX3, ND3, ND4, ND5 and cyt b) had incomplete stop codon T. Its control region was atypical in being short at 861 bp, and contained TACAT motif and one microsatellite-like region (TA)7. This mitogenome sequence data may be useful for phylogenetic and systematic analyses within the family Cichlaidae.

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence from an endangered Indian snake, Python molurus molurus (Serpentes, Pythonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Bhawna; Meganathan, P R; Haque, Ikramul

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of an endangered Indian snake, Python molurus molurus (Indian Rock Python). A typical snake mitochondrial (mt) genome of 17258 bp length comprising of 37 genes including the 13 protein coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes along with duplicate control regions is described herein. The P. molurus molurus mt. genome is relatively similar to other snake mt. genomes with respect to gene arrangement, composition, tRNA structures and skews of AT/GC bases. The nucleotide composition of the genome shows that there are more A-C % than T-G% on the positive strand as revealed by positive AT and CG skews. Comparison of individual protein coding genes, with other snake genomes suggests that ATP8 and NADH3 genes have high divergence rates. Codon usage analysis reveals a preference of NNC codons over NNG codons in the mt. genome of P. molurus. Also, the synonymous and non-synonymous substitution rates (ka/ks) suggest that most of the protein coding genes are under purifying selection pressure. The phylogenetic analyses involving the concatenated 13 protein coding genes of P. molurus molurus conformed to the previously established snake phylogeny.

  3. Integr8 and Genome Reviews: integrated views of complete genomes and proteomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersey, Paul; Bower, Lawrence; Morris, Lorna; Horne, Alan; Petryszak, Robert; Kanz, Carola; Kanapin, Alexander; Das, Ujjwal; Michoud, Karine; Phan, Isabelle; Gattiker, Alexandre; Kulikova, Tamara; Faruque, Nadeem; Duggan, Karyn; Mclaren, Peter; Reimholz, Britt; Duret, Laurent; Penel, Simon; Reuter, Ingmar; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    Integr8 is a new web portal for exploring the biology of organisms with completely deciphered genomes. For over 190 species, Integr8 provides access to general information, recent publications, and a detailed statistical overview of the genome and proteome of the organism. The preparation of this analysis is supported through Genome Reviews, a new database of bacterial and archaeal DNA sequences in which annotation has been upgraded (compared to the original submission) through the integration of data from many sources, including the EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database, the UniProt Knowledgebase, InterPro, CluSTr, GOA and HOGENOM. Integr8 also allows the users to customize their own interactive analysis, and to download both customized and prepared datasets for their own use. Integr8 is available at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/integr8.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Herbaspirillum hiltneri N3 (DSM 17495), Isolated from Surface-Sterilized Wheat Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saizaki, Paula M.; Coimbra, Nilson A. R.; Weiss, Vinicius A.; Faoro, Helisson; Sfeir, Michelle Z. T.; Baura, Valter A.; Monteiro, Rose A.; Chubatsu, Leda S.; Souza, Emanuel M.; Pedrosa, Fabio O.; Raittz, Roberto T.; Marchaukoski, Jeroniza N.

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Herbaspirillum hiltneri N3 (DSM 17495), a member of the genus Herbaspirillum of the Betaproteobacteria. The genome is contained in a single chromosome, and analysis revealed that N3 lacks the whole nitrogen fixation (nif) gene cluster, confirming its inability to fix nitrogen. PMID:26514770

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Triclosan- and Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strain B10W Isolated from Municipal Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuanqing; Nelson, Matthew; Cao, Guangxiang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the triclosan- and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain B10W, obtained from municipal wastewater in Hawaii. The bacterium has a 6.7-Mb genome, contains 6,391 coding sequences and 78 RNAs, with an average G+C content of 66.2 mol%. PMID:28104659

  6. Nearly Complete Genome Sequences of Two Mimivirus Strains Isolated from a Japanese Freshwater Pond and River Mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Tatsuya; Murono, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Mimiviridae family are large DNA viruses that infect Acanthamoeba cells. Here, we report the genome sequences of two new Mimiviridae family members, isolated from water samples from Shirakoma Pond and the mouth of the Arakawa River in Japan, with nearly complete genome sizes of 1,182,849 and 1,182,801 bp, respectively. PMID:27932662

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Rothia aeria Type Strain JCM 11412, Isolated from Air in the Russian Space Laboratory Mir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambu, Takayuki; Tsuzukibashi, Osamu; Uchibori, Satoshi; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Yamanaka, Takeshi; Maruyama, Hugo; Wang, Pao-Li; Mugita, Naho; Morioka, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kazuya; Komasa, Yutaka; Mashimo, Chiho

    2016-12-29

    Here, we present the complete genome sequence of Rothia aeria type strain JCM 11412, isolated from air in the Russian space laboratory Mir. Recently, there has been an increasing number of reports on infections caused by R. aeria The genomic information will enable researchers to identify the pathogenicity of this organism.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Novel Bacillus sp. Strain, FJAT-18017, Isolated from a Potato Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Hong; Wang, Jie-Ping; Che, Jian-Mei; Chen, Qian-Qian

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacillus sp. strain FJAT-18017 was isolated from a potato field in Xinjiang, China. This paper is the first report, to our knowledge, to demonstrate the fully sequenced and completely annotated genome of Bacillus sp. FJAT-18017. The genome size is 5,265,521 bp. The average G+C content was 42.42%. PMID:28104649

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of the Avian Paramyxovirus Serotype 5 Strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/TI/75

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiono, Takahiro; Matsuno, Keita; Tuchiya, Kotaro; Lin, Zhifeng; Okamatsu, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the avian paramyxovirus serotype 5 strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/TI/75, which was determined using the Illumina MiSeq platform. The determined sequence shares 97% homology and similar genetic features with the previously known genome sequence of avian paramyxovirus serotype 5 strain APMV-5/budgerigar/Japan/Kunitachi/74. PMID:27660785

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 29CaP Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases. We report here the complete genome sequence of H. pylori strain 29CaP, isolated from a Mexican patient with gastric cancer. The genomic data analysis revealed a cag-negative H. pylori strain that contains a prophage sequence. PMID:26769924

  11. Global genomic diversity of human papillomavirus 6 based on 724 isolates and 190 complete genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelen, Mateja M; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Burt, Felicity J; Chan, Paul K S; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L; Garland, Suzanne M; Giri, Adriana A; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N M; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Zidovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D; Poljak, Mario

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV6 variant lineages

  12. The complete mitochondrial genome of a spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus Russell (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Xing, Lu; Zhi-Teng, Chen; Wei-Wei, Yu; Yu-Zhou, Du

    2017-03-01

    We report the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of a spiraling whitefly, Aleurodicus dispersus (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). The 16 170 bp long genome consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 20 transfer RNAs, 2 ribosomal RNAs, and a control region. The A. dispersus mitogenome also includes a cytb-like non-coding region and shows several variations relative to the typical insect mitogenome. A phylogenetic tree has been constructed using the 13 protein-coding genes of 12 related species from Hemiptera. Our results would contribute to further study of phylogeny in Aleyrodidae and Hemiptera.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Enterobacter cloacae GGT036: a furfural tolerant soil bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Gyeongtaek; Um, Youngsoon; Park, Tai Hyun; Woo, Han Min

    2015-01-10

    Enterobacter cloacae is a facultative anaerobic bacterium to be an important cause of nosocomial infection. However, the isolated E. cloacae GGT036 showed higher furfural-tolerant cellular growth, compared to industrial relevant strains such as Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 isolated from Mt. Gwanak, Seoul, Republic of Korea. The genomic DNA sequence of E. cloacae GGT036 will provide valuable genetic resources for engineering of industrially relevant strains being tolerant to cellular inhibitors present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates.

  14. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Antarctic amphipod Gondogeneia antarctica (Crustacea, amphipod).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Chul; Cho, Jin; Lee, Jong Kyu; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Hyoungseok; Park, Hyun

    2012-02-01

    The complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of the Antarctic amphipod Gondogeneia antarctica was determined to be 18,424 bp in length, and to contain 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 tRNA genes, and large (rrnL) and small (rrnS) rRNA genes. Its total A+T content is 70.1%. The G. antarctica mitogenome is the largest known among those of crustaceans, due to the existence of two relatively large intergenic non-coding sequences. The PCG arrangement of G. antarctica is identical to that of the ancestral pancrustacean ground pattern, although the tRNA arrangement differs somewhat. The complete mitogenome sequences of 68 species of pancrustacea have been added to the NCBI database, only 4 of which represent complete mitogenome sequences from amphipods. This is the first report of a mitogenome sequence of an Antarctic amphipod, and provides insights into the evolution of crustacean mitochondrial genomes, particularly in amphipods.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus R1-1 Using PacBio Single-Molecule Real-Time Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, You; Samac, Deborah A; Glazebrook, Jane; Ishimaru, Carol A

    2015-05-07

    We report here the complete genome sequence of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus R1-1, isolated in Minnesota, USA. The R1-1 genome, generated by a de novo assembly of PacBio sequencing data, is the first complete genome sequence available for this subspecies. Copyright © 2015 Lu et al.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Potential Probiotic, Lactobacillus pentosus MP-10, Isolated from Fermented Aloreña Table Olives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Montoro, Beatriz; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Hidalgo Pestaña, Marina; Caballero Gómez, Natacha; Franz, Charles M. A. P.; Gálvez, Antonio; Benomar, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    We report here a 3,698,214-bp complete genome sequence of a potential probiotic Lactobacillus pentosus strain, MP-10, isolated from brines of naturally fermented Aloreña green table olives; it is considered the largest sequenced genome among lactobacilli to date. The annotated genome sequence revealed the presence of 3,558 open reading frames (ORFs) and 87 structural RNAs. PMID:27634988

  17. Complete mitochondrial genome of the rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens (Perciformes, Siganidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Dae-Ju; Kim, Ji-Young; Lee, Jung-A; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Park, Soo-Yeong; Jung, Yong-Hwan

    2007-08-01

    We determined the complete nucleotide sequence of the mitochondrial genome for the rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens (Perciformes, Siganidae). This mitochondrial genome, consisting of 16,491 base pairs (bp), included 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs, and a noncoding control region similar those found in other vertebrates; the gene order was identical to that of typical vertebrates. Most of the genes of S. fuscescens were encoded on the H-strand, while the ND6 and eight tRNA (Gln, Ala, Asn, Cys, Tyr, Ser [UCN], Glu, and Pro) genes were encoded on the L-strand. The reading frames of ATPase 8 and 6 and those of ND4L and ND4 overlapped by ten and seven nucleotides, respectively. All mitochondrial protein-coding genes began with an ATG start codon, except for CO1, which started with GTG. Open reading frames of S. fuscescens ended with TAA (ND1, CO1, ATPase 8, ND4L, ND5 and ND6), and the remainder had incomplete stop codons, either TA (ATPase 6 and CO3) or T (ND2, CO2, ND3, ND4, and Cytb). The origin of L-strand replication in S. fuscescens was located in a cluster of five tRNA genes (WANCY) and was 34 nucleotides in length. A major noncoding region between the tRNA-Pro and tRNA-Phe genes (828 bp) was considered to be the control region (D-loop). Within this sequence, we identified a conserved sequence block characteristic of this region. The rabbitfish was grouped with Siganus canaliculatus in most parsimony analyses, which showed 100% bootstrap support for their divergence. These findings are useful for inferring phylogenetic relationships and identification within the suborder Acanthuroidei.

  18. The complete genome sequence of shope (rabbit) fibroma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willer, D O; McFadden, G; Evans, D H

    1999-11-25

    We have determined the complete DNA sequence of the Leporipoxvirus Shope fibroma virus (SFV). The SFV genome spans 159.8 kb and encodes 165 putative genes of which 13 are duplicated in the 12.4-kb terminal inverted repeats. Although most SFV genes have homologs encoded by other Chordopoxvirinae, the SFV genome lacks a key gene required for the production of extracellular enveloped virus. SFV also encodes only the smaller ribonucleotide reductase subunit and has a limited nucleotide biosynthetic capacity. SFV preserves the Chordopoxvirinae gene order from S012L near the left end of the chromosome through to S142R (homologs of vaccinia F2L and B1R, respectively). The unique right end of SFV appears to be genetically unstable because when the sequence is compared with that of myxoma virus, five myxoma homologs have been deleted (C. Cameron, S. Hota-Mitchell, L. Chen, J. Barrett, J.-X. Cao, C. Macaulay, D. Willer, D. Evans, and G. McFadden, 1999, Virology 264, 298-318). Most other differences between these two Leporipoxviruses are located in the telomeres. Leporipoxviruses encode several genes not found in other poxviruses including four small hydrophobic proteins of unknown function (S023R, S119L, S125R, and S132L), an alpha 2, 3-sialyltransferase (S143R), a protein belonging to the Ig-like protein superfamily (S141R), and a protein resembling the DNA-binding domain of proteins belonging to the HIN-200 protein family S013L). SFV also encodes a type II DNA photolyase (S127L). Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus encodes a similar protein, but SFV is the first mammalian virus potentially capable of photoreactivating ultraviolet DNA damage.

  19. Parvovirus B19 1A complete genome from a fatal case in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane Costa Conteville

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Parvovirus B19 (B19V infects individuals worldwide and is associated with an ample range of pathologies and clinical manifestations. B19V is classified into three distinct genotypes, all identified in Brazil. Here, we report a complete sequence of a B19V genotype 1A that was obtained by high-throughput metagenomic sequencing. This genome provides information that will contribute to the studies on B19V epidemiology and evolution.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Rufibacter tibetensis strain 1351, a radiation-resistant bacterium from Tibet plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Yu, Can; Zhou, Mengzhou; Tang, Jingfeng; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhi; Li, Zhijun; Yao, Juan; Li, Pei; Zheng, Guobin; Chen, Xiong; Dai, Jun

    2015-12-20

    Rufibacter tibetensis strain 1351, isolated from the soil of the Tibet plateau of China, belongs to the family of Cytophagaceae. It is a red-pigmented, gram-negative, strictly aerobic and rod-shaped bacterium and shows resistance to UV radiation. Here, we report its complete genome sequence, which can help us find the key genes of the carotenoid biosynthesis and resistance to UV radiation.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Thermus thermophilus TMY, Isolated from a Geothermal Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhiro; Nagayoshi, Yuko; Ohshima, Toshihisa; Ogata, Seiya

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermus thermophilus TMY (JCM 10668) was isolated from silica scale formed at a geothermal power plant in Japan. Here, we report the complete genome sequence for this strain, which contains a chromosomal DNA of 2,121,526 bp with 2,500 predicted genes and a pTMY plasmid of 19,139 bp, with 28 predicted genes. PMID:28153912

  2. Complete genome sequences and phylogenetic analysis of Hepatitis B virus isolates from Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević Ivana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the genotype and subgenotype distribution of HBV isolates from Serbia has previously been reported, data about whole genome sequences from this area are scarce. This study included plasma samples from 5 chronically infected patients. Full genome amplification of the HBV isolates was performed by nested-PCR using 7 primer pairs, and the whole genome nucleotide sequences were obtained by direct sequencing. Two complete genome sequences belonged to D2 subgenotype (ayw3 HBsAg subtype, one to D1 (ayw2 and two to A2 (adw2. All 5 Serbian isolates clustered with sequences from the expected geographic regions and had nucleotide and coded protein length in accordance to their assigned genotypes, except for one HBeAg-negative isolate displaying G1896A mutation leading to a premature stop codon in the Pre-C region. The first complete genome sequences of HBV D1, D2 and A2 subgenotypes from Serbian patients showed characteristics similar to the nucleotide sequences of HBV isolates from other European and Middle East countries. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175073

  3. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia D.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Göker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Prévot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project. PMID:21304645

  4. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gronow, Sabine [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Pr vot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically not yet charted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic (CO2-requiring) organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15%), here only in the presence of 5% CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome se-quence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  5. Safety assessment of Staphylococcus phages of the family Myoviridae based on complete genome sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zelin; Guo, Xiaokui; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qingtian; Zhu, Yongzhang; Zeng, Lingbing; Tang, Rong; Li, Li

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus phages of the Myoviridae family have a wide host range and potential applications in phage therapy. In this report, safety assessments of these phages were conducted based on their complete genome sequences. The complete genomes of Staphylococcus phages of the Myoviridae family were analyzed, and the Open Reading Frame (ORFs) were compared with a pool of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes using the BLAST algorithm. In addition, the lifestyle of the phages (virulent or temperate) was also confirmed using PHACTS. The results showed that all phages were lytic and did not contain resistance or virulence genes based on bioinformatic analyses, excluding the possibility that they could be vectors for the dissemination of these undesirable genes. These findings suggest that the phages are safe at the genome level. The SceD-like transglycosylase, which is a biomarker for vancomycin-intermediate strains, was widely distributed in the phage genomes. Approximately 70% of the ORFs encoded in the phage genomes have unknown functions; therefore, their roles in the antibiotic resistance and virulence of Staphylococcus aureus are still unknown and require consideration before use in phage therapy. PMID:28117392

  6. Complete genome sequence of Capnocytophaga ochracea type strain (VPI 2845T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Gronow, Sabine; Saunders, Elizabeth; Land, Miriam; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice1, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Bristow, James; Goker, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2009-05-20

    Capnocytophaga ochracea (Prevot et al. 1956) Leadbetter et al. 1982 is the type species of the genus Capnocytophaga. It is of interest because of its location in the Flavobacteriaceae, a genomically yet uncharted family within the order Flavobacteriales. The species grows as fusiform to rod shaped cells which tend to form clumps and are able to move by gliding. C. ochracea is known as a capnophilic organism with the ability to grow under anaerobic as well as under aerobic conditions (oxygen concentration larger than 15percent), here only in the presence of 5percent CO2. Strain VPI 2845T, the type strain of the species, is portrayed in this report as a gliding, Gram-negative bacterium, originally isolated from a human oral cavity. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence from the flavobacterial genus Capnocytophaga, and the 2,612,925 bp long single replicon genome with its 2193 protein-coding and 59 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Complete genome sequence analysis of goatpox virus isolated from China shows high variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chi, Xuelin; Li, Wei; Hao, Wenbo; Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Yifan; Rock, Daniel L; Luo, Shuhong; Wang, Shihua

    2014-09-17

    Goatpox virus (GTPV), a member of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family, is the causative agent of variolo caprina (goatpox). GTPV can cause significant economic losses of domestic ruminants in endemic regions and can threaten breeding stocks. In this study, we report on the compilation of the complete genomic sequence of an isolated GTPV field strain FZ (GTPV_FZ). The 150,194bp GTPV genome consists of a central coding region bounded by two identical 2301bp inverted terminal repeats and contains 151 putative genes. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the apparent genetic relationships among Capripoxviruses are close, but sufficient genomic variants in the field isolate strain FZ have been identified to distinguish it from other GTPV strains and other Capripoxvirus species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the p32 and complete GTPV genome can be used to differentiate SPPVs, GTPVs and LSDVs. These data may contribute to the epidemiological study of the Chinese capripoxvirus and help to develop more specific detection methods to distinguish GTPVs, SPPVs and LSDVs.

  8. Complete genome sequence of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P isolated from disease Nile tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome of a virulent Streptococcus agalactiae strain 138P is 1838701 bp in size, containing 1831 genes. The genome has 1593 coding sequences, 152 pseudo genes, 16 rRNAs, 69 tRNAs, and 1 non-coding RNA. The annotation of the genome is added by the NCBI Prokaryotic Genome Annotation Pipel...

  9. The complete genome sequence of the Arcobacter butzleri cattle isolate 7h1h

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcobacter butzleri strain 7h1h was isolated in the UK from a clinically healthy dairy cow. The genome of this isolate was sequenced to completion. Here we present the annotation and analysis of the completed 7h1h genome, as well as comparison of this genome to the existing A. butzleri RM4018 and ED...

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Gan, Shanshan; Zuo, Ni; Chen, Chunhui; Wang, Ying; Hao, Jiasheng

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Triphysa phryne (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae: Satyrinae) was determined in this study. The mitogenome is 15,143 bp in length, containing 37 typical animal mitochondrial genes: 13 putative protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 ribosomal RNAs, 22 transfer RNAs and a non-coding AT-rich region. Its gene content and order are identical to those of other lepidopteran mitogenomes. All protein-coding genes (PCGs) are initiated by ATN codons, except for COI gene which uses CGA as its start codon. Nine PCGs terminate in the common stop TAA, whereas the COI, COII, ND5 and ND4 genes end with single T. All tRNA genes showed typical secondary cloverleaf structures except for the tRNA(Ser)(AGN), which has a simple loop with the absence of its DHU stem. The 316 bp AT-rich region contains several features common to the other lepidopterans, such as the motif ATAGA followed by an 19-bp poly-T stretch and two microsatellite-like (TA)8(AT) and (TA)4 elements preceded by the ATTTA motif.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Na; Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2014-11-18

    The yellow meal worm (Tenebrio molitor L.) is an important resource insect typically used as animal feed additive. It is also widely used for biological research. The first complete mitochondrial genome of T. molitor was determined for the first time by long PCR and conserved primer walking approaches. The results showed that the entire mitogenome of T. molitor was 15 785 bp long, with 72.35% A+T content [deposited in GenBank with accession number KF418153]. The gene order and orientation were the same as the most common type suggested as ancestral for insects. Two protein-coding genes used atypical start codons (CTA in ND2 and AAT in COX1), and the remaining 11 protein-coding genes started with a typical insect initiation codon ATN. All tRNAs showed standard clover-leaf structure, except for tRNA(Ser) (AGN), which lacked a dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. The newly added T. molitor mitogenome could provide information for future studies on yellow meal worm.

  12. The complete chloroplast genome of Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum using Illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendar, Sebastin; Na, Young-Wang; Lee, Jung-Ro; Shim, Donghwan; Ma, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Sok-Young; Chung, Jong-Wook

    2015-07-20

    Chloroplast (cp) genome sequences provide a valuable source for DNA barcoding. Molecular phylogenetic studies have concentrated on DNA sequencing of conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and more difficult to implement when gene organization differs among species. Here we report the complete re-sequencing of the cp genome of Capsicum pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) using the Illumina platform. The total length of the cp genome is 156,817 bp with a 37.7% overall GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 50,284 bp were separated by a small single copy (SSC; 18,948 bp) and a large single copy (LSC; 87,446 bp). The number of cp genes in C. annuum var. glabriusculum is the same as that in other Capsicum species. Variations in the lengths of LSC; SSC and IR regions were the main contributors to the size variation in the cp genome of this species. A total of 125 simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 48 insertions or deletions variants were found by sequence alignment of Capsicum cp genome. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Capsicum and other higher plants.

  13. Complete Sequence and Analysis of Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera) Mitochondrial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Lin, Qiang; Zhao, Yuhui; Zeng, Jingyao; Alamer, Ali; Alanazi, Ibrahim O; Alawad, Abdullah O; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important crops in tropics, serving as an important source of food, drink, fuel, medicine, and construction material. Here we report an assembly of the coconut (C. nucifera, Oman local Tall cultivar) mitochondrial (mt) genome based on next-generation sequencing data. This genome, 678,653bp in length and 45.5% in GC content, encodes 72 proteins, 9 pseudogenes, 23 tRNAs, and 3 ribosomal RNAs. Within the assembly, we find that the chloroplast (cp) derived regions account for 5.07% of the total assembly length, including 13 proteins, 2 pseudogenes, and 11 tRNAs. The mt genome has a relatively large fraction of repeat content (17.26%), including both forward (tandem) and inverted (palindromic) repeats. Sequence variation analysis shows that the Ti/Tv ratio of the mt genome is lower as compared to that of the nuclear genome and neutral expectation. By combining public RNA-Seq data for coconut, we identify 734 RNA editing sites supported by at least two datasets. In summary, our data provides the second complete mt genome sequence in the family Arecaceae, essential for further investigations on mitochondrial biology of seed plants.

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome of Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum Using Illumina Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastin Raveendar

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplast (cp genome sequences provide a valuable source for DNA barcoding. Molecular phylogenetic studies have concentrated on DNA sequencing of conserved gene loci. However, this approach is time consuming and more difficult to implement when gene organization differs among species. Here we report the complete re-sequencing of the cp genome of Capsicum pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum using the Illumina platform. The total length of the cp genome is 156,817 bp with a 37.7% overall GC content. A pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 50,284 bp were separated by a small single copy (SSC; 18,948 bp and a large single copy (LSC; 87,446 bp. The number of cp genes in C. annuum var. glabriusculum is the same as that in other Capsicum species. Variations in the lengths of LSC; SSC and IR regions were the main contributors to the size variation in the cp genome of this species. A total of 125 simple sequence repeat (SSR and 48 insertions or deletions variants were found by sequence alignment of Capsicum cp genome. These findings provide a foundation for further investigation of cp genome evolution in Capsicum and other higher plants.

  15. Complete Sequence and Analysis of Coconut Palm (Cocos nucifera) Mitochondrial Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhui; Zeng, Jingyao; Alamer, Ali; Alanazi, Ibrahim O.; Alawad, Abdullah O.; Al-Sadi, Abdullah M.; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.), a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important crops in tropics, serving as an important source of food, drink, fuel, medicine, and construction material. Here we report an assembly of the coconut (C. nucifera, Oman local Tall cultivar) mitochondrial (mt) genome based on next-generation sequencing data. This genome, 678,653bp in length and 45.5% in GC content, encodes 72 proteins, 9 pseudogenes, 23 tRNAs, and 3 ribosomal RNAs. Within the assembly, we find that the chloroplast (cp) derived regions account for 5.07% of the total assembly length, including 13 proteins, 2 pseudogenes, and 11 tRNAs. The mt genome has a relatively large fraction of repeat content (17.26%), including both forward (tandem) and inverted (palindromic) repeats. Sequence variation analysis shows that the Ti/Tv ratio of the mt genome is lower as compared to that of the nuclear genome and neutral expectation. By combining public RNA-Seq data for coconut, we identify 734 RNA editing sites supported by at least two datasets. In summary, our data provides the second complete mt genome sequence in the family Arecaceae, essential for further investigations on mitochondrial biology of seed plants. PMID:27736909

  16. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of American bird pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-chun; Gao, Cheng-wen; Gao, Li-zhi

    2016-01-01

    The complete chloroplast genome sequence of American bird pepper (Capsicum annuum var. glabriusculum) is reported and characterized in this study. The genome size is 156,612 bp, containing a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 25,776 bp separated by a large single-copy region of 87,213 bp and a small single-copy region of 17,851 bp. The chloroplast genome harbors 130 known genes, including 89 protein-coding genes, 8 ribosomal RNA genes, and 37 tRNA genes. A total of 18 of these genes are duplicated in the inverted repeat regions, 16 genes contain 1 intron, and 2 genes and one ycf have 2 introns.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Nitratifractor salsuginis type strain (E9I37-1T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Zeytun, Ahmet [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hammon, Nancy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2011-01-01

    Nitratifractor salsuginis Nakagawa et al. 2005 is the type species of the genus Nitratifractor, a member of the family Nautiliaceae. The species is of interest because of its high capacity for nitrate reduction via conversion to N2 through respiration, which is a key compound in plant nutrition. The strain is also of interest because it represents the first mesophilic and faculta- tively anaerobic member of the Epsilonproteobacteria reported to grow on molecular hydro- gen. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Nitratifractor and the second sequence from the family Nautiliaceae. The 2,101,285 bp long genome with its 2,121 protein-coding and 54 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Tsukamurella paurometabola type strain (no. 33T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munk, Christine [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2011-01-01

    Tsukamurella paurometabola corrig. (Steinhaus 1941) Collins et al. 1988 is the type species of the genus Tsukamurella, which is the type genus to the family Tsukamurellaceae. The spe- cies is not only of interest because of its isolated phylogenetic location, but also because it is a human opportunistic pathogen with some strains of the species reported to cause lung in- fection, lethal meningitis, and necrotizing tenosynovitis. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus Tsukamurella and the first genome sequence of a member of the family Tsukamurellaceae. The 4,479,724 bp long genome contains a 99,806 bp long plasmid and a total of 4,335 protein-coding and 56 RNA genes, and is a part of the Ge- nomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Complete chloroplast genome sequence of a major invasive species, crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora is one of the most hazardous invasive plant species, which causes serious economic losses and environmental damages worldwide. However, the sequence resource and genome information of A. adenophora are rather limited, making phylogenetic identification and evolutionary studies very difficult. Here, we report the complete sequence of the A. adenophora chloroplast (cp genome based on Illumina sequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The A. adenophora cp genome is 150, 689 bp in length including a small single-copy (SSC region of 18, 358 bp and a large single-copy (LSC region of 84, 815 bp separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs of 23, 755 bp. The genome contains 130 unique genes and 18 duplicated in the IR regions, with the gene content and organization similar to other Asteraceae cp genomes. Comparative analysis identified five DNA regions (ndhD-ccsA, psbI-trnS, ndhF-ycf1, ndhI-ndhG and atpA-trnR containing parsimony-informative characters higher than 2%, which may be potential informative markers for barcoding and phylogenetic analysis. Repeat structure, codon usage and contraction of the IR were also investigated to reveal the pattern of evolution. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between A. adenophora and Guizotia abyssinica and supported a monophyly of the Asterales. CONCLUSION: We have assembled and analyzed the chloroplast genome of A. adenophora in this study, which was the first sequenced plastome in the Eupatorieae tribe. The complete chloroplast genome information is useful for plant phylogenetic and evolutionary studies within this invasive species and also within the Asteraceae family.

  20. Complete genome sequences of two begomoviruses infecting weeds in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The complete sequences of isolates of two new bipartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) found infecting weeds in Venezuela are provided. The names proposed for these new begomoviruses are "Datura leaf distortion virus" (DLDV), isolated from a Datura stramonium L. (family Solanaceae) plant, and "Dalechampia chlorotic mosaic virus" (DCMV), isolated from infected Dalechampia sp. (family Euphorbiaceae) and Boerhavia diffusa L. (family Nyctaginaceae) plants. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these new begomoviruses segregated in two distinct clades of New World begomoviruses. To our knowledge, this is the first record of a begomovirus infecting Dalechampia sp. plants. Also, this is the first report of a begomovirus infecting Boerhavia spp. and Datura spp. in Venezuela.

  1. Complete genome sequence of the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimer Frank W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroflexus aurantiacus is a thermophilic filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP bacterium, and can grow phototrophically under anaerobic conditions or chemotrophically under aerobic and dark conditions. According to 16S rRNA analysis, Chloroflexi species are the earliest branching bacteria capable of photosynthesis, and Cfl. aurantiacus has been long regarded as a key organism to resolve the obscurity of the origin and early evolution of photosynthesis. Cfl. aurantiacus contains a chimeric photosystem that comprises some characters of green sulfur bacteria and purple photosynthetic bacteria, and also has some unique electron transport proteins compared to other photosynthetic bacteria. Methods The complete genomic sequence of Cfl. aurantiacus has been determined, analyzed and compared to the genomes of other photosynthetic bacteria. Results Abundant genomic evidence suggests that there have been numerous gene adaptations/replacements in Cfl. aurantiacus to facilitate life under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions, including duplicate genes and gene clusters for the alternative complex III (ACIII, auracyanin and NADH:quinone oxidoreductase; and several aerobic/anaerobic enzyme pairs in central carbon metabolism and tetrapyrroles and nucleic acids biosynthesis. Overall, genomic information is consistent with a high tolerance for oxygen that has been reported in the growth of Cfl. aurantiacus. Genes for the chimeric photosystem, photosynthetic electron transport chain, the 3-hydroxypropionate autotrophic carbon fixation cycle, CO2-anaplerotic pathways, glyoxylate cycle, and sulfur reduction pathway are present. The central carbon metabolism and sulfur assimilation pathways in Cfl. aurantiacus are discussed. Some features of the Cfl. aurantiacus genome are compared with those of the Roseiflexus castenholzii genome. Roseiflexus castenholzii is a recently characterized FAP bacterium and phylogenetically closely related to Cfl

  2. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Yi; Matzke, Antonius J M; Matzke, Marjori

    2013-01-01

    Coconut, a member of the palm family (Arecaceae), is one of the most economically important trees used by mankind. Despite its diverse morphology, coconut is recognized taxonomically as only a single species (Cocos nucifera L.). There are two major coconut varieties, tall and dwarf, the latter of which displays traits resulting from selection by humans. We report here the complete chloroplast (cp) genome of a dwarf coconut plant, and describe the gene content and organization, inverted repeat fluctuations, repeated sequence structure, and occurrence of RNA editing. Phylogenetic relationships of monocots were inferred based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes. Potential nodes for events of gene duplication and pseudogenization related to inverted repeat fluctuation were mapped onto the tree using parsimony criteria. We compare our findings with those from other palm species for which complete cp genome sequences are available.

  3. The complete mitochondrial genome of the Xuefeng black-boned chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li-Li; Xie, Hong-Bing; Yang, Yong-Sheng; Yu, Qi-Fang; He, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Xuefeng black-boned chicken is one of the famous native breeds in China. In this work, we reported the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xuefeng black-boned chicken for the first time, which was determined through PCR-based method. The total length of the mitogenome was 16,783 bp, with the base composition of 30.24% for A, 23.72% for T, 32.52% for C, 13.53% for G, in the order C > A > T > G feature occurring in the Xuefeng black-boned chicken. It contained the typical structure, including 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 non-coding control region (D-loop region). It was similar to the gene arrangement in Silky chicken. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the Xuefeng black-boned chicken provided an important data for further study on the genetic mechanism.

  4. Complete sequence and comparative analysis of the chloroplast genome of coconut palm (Cocos nucifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Yi Huang

    Full Text Available Coconut, a member of the palm family (Arecaceae, is one of the most economically important trees used by mankind. Despite its diverse morphology, coconut is recognized taxonomically as only a single species (Cocos nucifera L.. There are two major coconut varieties, tall and dwarf, the latter of which displays traits resulting from selection by humans. We report here the complete chloroplast (cp genome of a dwarf coconut plant, and describe the gene content and organization, inverted repeat fluctuations, repeated sequence structure, and occurrence of RNA editing. Phylogenetic relationships of monocots were inferred based on 47 chloroplast protein-coding genes. Potential nodes for events of gene duplication and pseudogenization related to inverted repeat fluctuation were mapped onto the tree using parsimony criteria. We compare our findings with those from other palm species for which complete cp genome sequences are available.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genomes of Opisthoplatia orientalis and Blaptica dubia (Blattodea: Blaberidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoxuan; Ma, Guangyin; Cui, Ying; Dong, Pengzhi; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiumei

    2017-01-01

    The first complete mitochondrial genome in Blaberidae has been reported in this research. Opisthoplatia orientalis (Blaberidae, Epilamprinae) known as ground cockroach with golden edge is distributed in East and South Asia and widely used for thrombolytic therapy in China. Meanwhile, Blaptica dubia (Blaberidae, Blaberinae) has been adopted as feeder insect for various kinds of pets all over the world. In the present study, we investigated the complete mitochondrial genome of O. orientalis and B. dubia, and the mitogenome is 18 724  and 17 340 bp in length, respectively. The circular molecule consists of 13 protein coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a non-coding control region, with an AT content of 75.7% for O. orientalis and 72.8% for B. dubia. A preliminary phylogenetic analysis has been carried out with 11 related species and the status of these two species is further confirmed.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-04

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

  7. The complete genome sequence and comparative genome analysis of the high pathogenicity Yersinia enterocolitica strain 8081.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Thomson

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The human enteropathogen, Yersinia enterocolitica, is a significant link in the range of Yersinia pathologies extending from mild gastroenteritis to bubonic plague. Comparison at the genomic level is a key step in our understanding of the genetic basis for this pathogenicity spectrum. Here we report the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (serotype 0:8; biotype 1B and extensive microarray data relating to the genetic diversity of the Y. enterocolitica species. Our analysis reveals that the genome of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 is a patchwork of horizontally acquired genetic loci, including a plasticity zone of 199 kb containing an extraordinarily high density of virulence genes. Microarray analysis has provided insights into species-specific Y. enterocolitica gene functions and the intraspecies differences between the high, low, and nonpathogenic Y. enterocolitica biotypes. Through comparative genome sequence analysis we provide new information on the evolution of the Yersinia. We identify numerous loci that represent ancestral clusters of genes potentially important in enteric survival and pathogenesis, which have been lost or are in the process of being lost, in the other sequenced Yersinia lineages. Our analysis also highlights large metabolic operons in Y. enterocolitica that are absent in the related enteropathogen, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, indicating major differences in niche and nutrients used within the mammalian gut. These include clusters directing, the production of hydrogenases, tetrathionate respiration, cobalamin synthesis, and propanediol utilisation. Along with ancestral gene clusters, the genome of Y. enterocolitica has revealed species-specific and enteropathogen-specific loci. This has provided important insights into the pathology of this bacterium and, more broadly, into the evolution of the genus. Moreover, wider investigations looking at the patterns of gene loss and gain in the Yersinia have highlighted common

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Fei; Wang, Qiang; Zhao, Jian-ning

    2016-01-01

    The entire mitochondrial genome of this Asian lion (Panthera leo goojratensis) was 17,183 bp in length, gene composition and arrangement conformed to other lions, which contained the typical structure of 22 tRNAs, 2 rRNAs, 13 protein-coding genes and a non-coding region. The characteristic of the mitochondrial genome was analyzed in detail.

  9. The complete mitochondrial genome of human parasitic roundworm, Ascaris lumbricoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yung Chul; Kim, Won; Park, Joong-Ki

    2011-08-01

    The genome length of the Ascaris lumbricoides, human parasitic roundworm, is 14,281 bp with a nucleotide composition of 22.1% A, 49.8% T, 7.8% C, and 20.3% G. The genome consists of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 rRNA genes, 22 tRNA genes, and 1 control region.

  10. Complete sequence of the first chimera genome constructed by cloning the whole genome of Synechocystis strain PCC6803 into the Bacillus subtilis 168 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Shiwa, Yuh; Itaya, Mitsuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2012-12-01

    Genome synthesis of existing or designed genomes is made feasible by the first successful cloning of a cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803, in Gram-positive, endospore-forming Bacillus subtilis. Whole-genome sequence analysis of the isolate and parental B. subtilis strains provides clues for identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 2 complete bacterial genomes in one cell.

  11. A 100%-complete sequence reveals unusually simple genomic features in the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshida Yamato

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All previously reported eukaryotic nuclear genome sequences have been incomplete, especially in highly repeated units and chromosomal ends. Because repetitive DNA is important for many aspects of biology, complete chromosomal structures are fundamental for understanding eukaryotic cells. Our earlier, nearly complete genome sequence of the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae revealed several unique features, including just three ribosomal DNA copies, very few introns, and a small total number of genes. However, because the exact structures of certain functionally important repeated elements remained ambiguous, that sequence was not complete. Obviously, those ambiguities needed to be resolved before the unique features of the C. merolae genome could be summarized, and the ambiguities could only be resolved by completing the sequence. Therefore, we aimed to complete all previous gaps and sequence all remaining chromosomal ends, and now report the first nuclear-genome sequence for any eukaryote that is 100% complete. Results Our present complete sequence consists of 16546747 nucleotides covering 100% of the 20 linear chromosomes from telomere to telomere, representing the simple and unique chromosomal structures of the eukaryotic cell. We have unambiguously established that the C. merolae genome contains the smallest known histone-gene cluster, a unique telomeric repeat for all chromosomal ends, and an extremely low number of transposons. Conclusion By virtue of these attributes and others that we had discovered previously, C. merolae appears to have the simplest nuclear genome of the non-symbiotic eukaryotes. These unusually simple genomic features in the 100% complete genome sequence of C. merolae are extremely useful for further studies of eukaryotic cells.

  12. A 100%-complete sequence reveals unusually simple genomic features in the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Takano, Hiroyoshi; Misumi, Osami; Terasawa, Kimihiro; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Maruyama, Shinichiro; Nishida, Keiji; Yagisawa, Fumi; Yoshida, Yamato; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Takio, Susumu; Tamura, Katsunori; Chung, Sung Jin; Nakamura, Soichi; Kuroiwa, Haruko; Tanaka, Kan; Sato, Naoki; Kuroiwa, Tsuneyoshi

    2007-01-01

    Background All previously reported eukaryotic nuclear genome sequences have been incomplete, especially in highly repeated units and chromosomal ends. Because repetitive DNA is important for many aspects of biology, complete chromosomal structures are fundamental for understanding eukaryotic cells. Our earlier, nearly complete genome sequence of the hot-spring red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae revealed several unique features, including just three ribosomal DNA copies, very few introns, and a small total number of genes. However, because the exact structures of certain functionally important repeated elements remained ambiguous, that sequence was not complete. Obviously, those ambiguities needed to be resolved before the unique features of the C. merolae genome could be summarized, and the ambiguities could only be resolved by completing the sequence. Therefore, we aimed to complete all previous gaps and sequence all remaining chromosomal ends, and now report the first nuclear-genome sequence for any eukaryote that is 100% complete. Results Our present complete sequence consists of 16546747 nucleotides covering 100% of the 20 linear chromosomes from telomere to telomere, representing the simple and unique chromosomal structures of the eukaryotic cell. We have unambiguously established that the C. merolae genome contains the smallest known histone-gene cluster, a unique telomeric repeat for all chromosomal ends, and an extremely low number of transposons. Conclusion By virtue of these attributes and others that we had discovered previously, C. merolae appears to have the simplest nuclear genome of the non-symbiotic eukaryotes. These unusually simple genomic features in the 100% complete genome sequence of C. merolae are extremely useful for further studies of eukaryotic cells. PMID:17623057

  13. Complete Plastid Genome Sequence of the Brown Alga Undaria pinnatifida.

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    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available In this study, we fully sequenced the circular plastid genome of a brown alga, Undaria pinnatifida. The genome is 130,383 base pairs (bp in size; it contains a large single-copy (LSC, 76,598 bp and a small single-copy region (SSC, 42,977 bp, separated by two inverted repeats (IRa and IRb: 5,404 bp. The genome contains 139 protein-coding, 28 tRNA, and 6 rRNA genes; none of these genes contains introns. Organization and gene contents of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome were similar to those of Saccharina japonica. There is a co-linear relationship between the plastid genome of U. pinnatifida and that of three previously sequenced large brown algal species. Phylogenetic analyses of 43 taxa based on 23 plastid protein-coding genes grouped all plastids into a red or green lineage. In the large brown algae branch, U. pinnatifida and S. japonica formed a sister clade with much closer relationship to Ectocarpus siliculosus than to Fucus vesiculosus. For the first time, the start codon ATT was identified in the plastid genome of large brown algae, in the atpA gene of U. pinnatifida. In addition, we found a gene-length change induced by a 3-bp repetitive DNA in ycf35 and ilvB genes of the U. pinnatifida plastid genome.

  14. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome of a porcine sapovirus from Chinese swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shixing; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Quan; Huang, Fen; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Jianguo; Cui, Li; Yang, Zhibiao; Hua, Xiuguo

    2009-12-06

    Porcine sapovirus was first identified in the United States in 1980, hitherto, several Asian countries have detected this virus. In 2008, the first outbreak of gastroenteritis in piglets caused by porcine sapovirus in China was reported. The complete genome of the identified SaV strain Ch-sw-sav1 was sequenced and analyzed to provide gene profile for this outbreak. The whole genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was amplified by RT-PCR and was sequenced. Sequence alignment of the complete genome or RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene was done. 3' end of ORF2 with 21-nt nucleotide insertion was further analyzed using software. Sequence analysis indicated that the genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was 7541 nucleotide long with two ORFs, excluding the 17 nucleotides ploy (A) at the 3' end. Phylogenetic analysis based on part of RdRp gene of this strain showed that it was classified into subgroup GIII. Sequence alignment indicated that there was an inserted 21-nt long nucleotide sequence at the 3' end of ORF2. The insertion showed high antigenicity index comparing to other regions in ORF2. Ch-sw-sav1 shared similar genetic profile with an American PEC strain except the 21-nt nucleotide at the 3' end of ORF2. The insert sequence shared high identity with part gene of Sus scrofa clone RP44-484M10.

  15. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome of a porcine sapovirus from Chinese swine

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    Cui Li

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine sapovirus was first identified in the United States in 1980, hitherto, several Asian countries have detected this virus. In 2008, the first outbreak of gastroenteritis in piglets caused by porcine sapovirus in China was reported. The complete genome of the identified SaV strain Ch-sw-sav1 was sequenced and analyzed to provide gene profile for this outbreak. Methods The whole genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was amplified by RT-PCR and was sequenced. Sequence alignment of the complete genome or RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp gene was done. 3' end of ORF2 with 21-nt nucleotide insertion was further analyzed using software. Results Sequence analysis indicated that the genome of Ch-sw-sav1 was 7541 nucleotide long with two ORFs, excluding the 17 nucleotides ploy (A at the 3' end. Phylogenetic analysis based on part of RdRp gene of this strain showed that it was classified into subgroup GIII. Sequence alignment indicated that there was an inserted 21-nt long nucleotide sequence at the 3' end of ORF2. The insertion showed high antigenicity index comparing to other regions in ORF2. Conclusion Ch-sw-sav1 shared similar genetic profile with an American PEC strain except the 21-nt nucleotide at the 3' end of ORF2. The insert sequence shared high identity with part gene of Sus scrofa clone RP44-484M10.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Kytococcus sedentarius type strain (strain 541T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, David; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Nolan, Matt; Chen, Feng; Lucas, Susan; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; D' haeseleer, Patrick; Chain, Patrick; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Schneider, Susanne; Goker, Markus; Pukall, Rudiger; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Kytococcus sedentarius (ZoBell and Upham 1944) Stackebrandt et al. 1995 is the type strain of the species, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its location in the Dermacoccaceae, a poorly studied family within the actinobacterial suborder Micrococcineae. K. sedentarius is known for the production of oligoketide antibiotics as well as for its role as an opportunistic pathogen causing valve endocarditis, hemorrhagic pneumonia, and pitted keratolysis. It is strictly aerobic and can only grow when several amino acids are provided in the medium. The strain described in this report is a free-living, nonmotile, Gram-positive bacterium, originally isolated from a marine environment. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Dermacoccaceae and the 2,785,024 bp long single replicon genome with its 2639 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes is part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  17. Complete genome sequence of the Medicago microsymbiont Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae strain WSM419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeve, Wayne [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); O' Hara, Graham [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Ardley, Julie [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Nandesena, Kemanthi [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Brau, Lambert [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Tiwari, Ravi [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Kiss, Hajnalka [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Gollagher, Margaret [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Yates, Ron [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Dilworth, Michael [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia; Howieson, John [Murdoch University, Perth, Australia

    2010-01-01

    Ensifer (Sinorhizobium) medicae is an effective nitrogen fixing microsymbiont of a diverse range of annual Medicago (medic) species. Strain WSM419 is an aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, Gram-negative rod isolated from a M. murex root nodule collected in Sardinia, Italy in 1981. WSM419 was manufactured commercially in Australia as an inoculant for annual medics during 1985 to 1993 due to its nitrogen fixation, saprophytic competence and acid tolerance properties. Here we describe the basic features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. This is the first report of a complete genome sequence for a microsymbiont of the group of annual medic species adapted to acid soils. We reveal that its genome size is 6,817,576 bp encoding 6,518 protein-coding genes and 81 RNA only encoding genes. The genome contains a chromosome of size 3,781,904 bp and 3 plasmids of size 1,570,951 bp, 1,245,408 bp and 219,313 bp. The smallest plasmid is a feature unique to this medic microsymbiont.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain AS12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neupane, Saraswoti [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Finlay, Roger D. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Alstrom, Sadhna [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hogberg, Nils [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden

    2012-01-01

    A plant associated member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Serratia plymuthica strain AS12 was isolated from rapeseed roots. It is of scientific interest due to its plant growth promoting and plant pathogen inhibiting ability. The genome of S. plymuthica AS12 comprises a 5,443,009 bp long circular chromosome, which consists of 4,952 protein-coding genes, 87 tRNA genes and 7 rRNA operons. This genome was sequenced within the 2010 DOE-JGI Community Sequencing Program (CSP2010) as part of the project entitled 'Genomics of four rapeseed plant growth promoting bacteria with antagonistic effect on plant pathogens'.

  19. Complete genome of a dengue virus serotype 4 strain from Amazonas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Valdinete Alves do; Souza, Victor Costa de; Naveca, Felipe Gomes

    2016-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infections represent a significant concern for public health worldwide, being considered as the most prevalent arthropod-borne virus regarding the number of reported cases. In this study, we report the complete genome sequencing of a DENV serotype 4 isolate, genotype II, obtained in the city of Manaus, directly from the serum sample, applying Ion Torrent sequencing technology. The use of a massive sequencing technology allowed the detection of two variable sites, one in the coding region for the viral envelope protein and the other in the nonstructural 1 coding region within viral populations.

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome sequencing reveals novel haplotypes in a Polynesian population.

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    Miles Benton

    Full Text Available The high risk of metabolic disease traits in Polynesians may be partly explained by elevated prevalence of genetic variants involved in energy metabolism. The genetics of Polynesian populations has been shaped by island hoping migration events which have possibly favoured thrifty genes. The aim of this study was to sequence the mitochondrial genome in a group of Maoris in an effort to characterise genome variation in this Polynesian population for use in future disease association studies. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genomes of 20 non-admixed Maori subjects using Affymetrix technology. DNA diversity analyses showed the Maori group exhibited reduced mitochondrial genome diversity compared to other worldwide populations, which is consistent with historical bottleneck and founder effects. Global phylogenetic analysis positioned these Maori subjects specifically within mitochondrial haplogroup--B4a1a1. Interestingly, we identified several novel variants that collectively form new and unique Maori motifs--B4a1a1c, B4a1a1a3 and B4a1a1a5. Compared to ancestral populations we observed an increased frequency of non-synonymous coding variants of several mitochondrial genes in the Maori group, which may be a result of positive selection and/or genetic drift effects. In conclusion, this study reports the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence data for a Maori population. Overall, these new data reveal novel mitochondrial genome signatures in this Polynesian population and enhance the phylogenetic picture of maternal ancestry in Oceania. The increased frequency of several mitochondrial coding variants makes them good candidates for future studies aimed at assessment of metabolic disease risk in Polynesian populations.

  1. Unravelling the Complete Genome of Archangium gephyra DSM 2261T and Evolutionary Insights into Myxobacterial Chitinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    Family Cystobacteraceae is a group of eubacteria within order Myxococcales and class Deltaproteobacteria that includes more than 20 species belonging to 6 genera, that is, Angiococcus, Archangium, Cystobacter, Hyalangium, Melittangium, and Stigmatella. Earlier these members have been classified based on chitin degrading efficiency such as Cystobacter fuscus and Stigmatella aurantiaca, which are efficient chitin degraders, C. violaceus a partial chitin degrader and Archangium gephyra a chitin nondegrader. Here we report the 12.5 Mbp complete genome of A. gephyra DSM 2261T and compare it with four available genomes within the family Cystobacteraceae. Phylogeny and DNA–DNA hybridization studies reveal that A. gephyra is closest to Angiococcus disciformis, C. violaceus and C. ferrugineus, which are partial chitin degraders of the family Cystobacteraceae. Homology studies reveal the conservation of approximately half of the proteins in these genomes, with about 15% unique proteins in each genome. The total carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZome) analysis reveals the presence of one GH18 chitinase in the A. gephyra genome whereas eight copies are present in C. fuscus and S. aurantiaca. Evolutionary studies of myxobacterial GH18 chitinases reveal that most of them are likely related to Terrabacteria and Proteobacteria whereas the Archangium GH18 homolog shares maximum similarity with those of chitin nondegrading Acidobacteria. PMID:28379546

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Fish Pathogen Flavobacterium branchiophilum▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchon, Marie; Barbier, Paul; Bernardet, Jean-François; Loux, Valentin; Vacherie, Benoit; Barbe, Valérie; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Duchaud, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Members of the genus Flavobacterium occur in a variety of ecological niches and represent an interesting diversity of lifestyles. Flavobacterium branchiophilum is the main causative agent of bacterial gill disease, a severe condition affecting various cultured freshwater fish species worldwide, in particular salmonids in Canada and Japan. We report here the complete genome sequence of strain FL-15 isolated from a diseased sheatfish (Silurus glanis) in Hungary. The analysis of the F. branchiophilum genome revealed putative mechanisms of pathogenicity strikingly different from those of the other, closely related fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum, including the first cholera-like toxin in a non-Proteobacteria and a wealth of adhesins. The comparison with available genomes of other Flavobacterium species revealed a small genome size, large differences in chromosome organization, and fewer rRNA and tRNA genes, in line with its more fastidious growth. In addition, horizontal gene transfer shaped the evolution of F. branchiophilum, as evidenced by its virulence factors, genomic islands, and CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) systems. Further functional analysis should help in the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and in the development of rational diagnostic tools and control strategies in fish farms. PMID:21926215

  3. The complete plastid genome sequence of Bomarea edulis (Alstroemeriaceae: Liliales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Sung; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Yoon, Chang Young; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2016-05-01

    Bomarea, a member of the family Alstroemeriaceae, is distributed from Chile to Mexico and includes approximately 120 species. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies have clarified the monophyly of the family within the order Liliales and the sister relationship with the family Colchicaceae. At this time, five plastid genomes of Liliales have been analyzed at the familial level. To examine plastid genome variation at the generic level, we sequenced the plastid genome of Bomarea edulis, which is the most widely distributed species in the genus, and compared it with Alstroemeria aurea. The plastid genome sequence of B. edulis was 154,925 bp in length with a similar structure as A. aurea, excluding the IR-LSC junction. Ycf68 and infA were pseudogenes caused by frameshift mutations, and the ycf15 gene was deleted, similar to A. aurea.

  4. Safety assessment of Bifidobacterium longum J DM301 based on complete genome sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Wei; Zhuo-Yang Zhang; Chang Liu; Xiao-Kui Guo; Pradeep K Malakar

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To assess the safety of Bifidobacterium longum (B.longum) JDM301 based on complete genome sequences. METHODS: The complete genome sequences of JDM301 were determined using the GS 20 system. Putative virulence factors, putative antibiotic resistance genes and genes encoding enzymes responsible for harmful metabolites were identified by blast with virulence factors database, antibiotic resistance genes database and genes associated with harmful metabolites in previous reports. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 16 common antimicrobial agents was evaluated by E-test. RESULTS: JDM301 was shown to contain 36 genes associated with antibiotic resistance, 5 enzymes related to harmful metabolites and 162 nonspecific virulence factors mainly associated with transcriptional regulation, adhesion, sugar and amino acid transport. B. longum JDM301 was intrinsically resistant tocipro ciprofloxacin,amikacin, gentamicin and streptomycin and susceptible to vancomycin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, ampicillin, cefotaxime, rifampicin, imipenemandtrimethoprim and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazol. JDM301.JDM301 was moderately resistant to bacitracin, while an earlier study showed that bifidobacteria were susceptible to this antibiotic. A tetracycline resistance gene with the risk of transfer was found in JDM301, which needs to be experimentally validated. CONCLUSION: The safety assessment of JDM301 using information derived from complete bacterial genome will contribute to a wider and deeper insight into the safety of probiotic bacteria.

  5. The complete mitochondrial genomes for three Toxocara species of human and animal health significance

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    Wu Xiang-Yun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studying mitochondrial (mt genomics has important implications for various fundamental areas, including mt biochemistry, physiology and molecular biology. In addition, mt genome sequences have provided useful markers for investigating population genetic structures, systematics and phylogenetics of organisms. Toxocara canis, Toxocara cati and Toxocara malaysiensis cause significant health problems in animals and humans. Although they are of importance in human and animal health, no information on the mt genomes for any of Toxocara species is available. Results The sizes of the entire mt genome are 14,322 bp for T. canis, 14029 bp for T. cati and 14266 bp for T. malaysiensis, respectively. These circular genomes are amongst the largest reported to date for all secernentean nematodes. Their relatively large sizes relate mainly to an increased length in the AT-rich region. The mt genomes of the three Toxocara species all encode 12 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs and 22 transfer RNA genes, but lack the ATP synthetase subunit 8 gene, which is consistent with all other species of Nematode studied to date, with the exception of Trichinella spiralis. All genes are transcribed in the same direction and have a nucleotide composition high in A and T, but low in G and C. The contents of A+T of the complete genomes are 68.57% for T. canis, 69.95% for T. cati and 68.86% for T. malaysiensis, among which the A+T for T. canis is the lowest among all nematodes studied to date. The AT bias had a significant effect on both the codon usage pattern and amino acid composition of proteins. The mt genome structures for three Toxocara species, including genes and non-coding regions, are in the same order as for Ascaris suum and Anisakis simplex, but differ from Ancylostoma duodenale, Necator americanus and Caenorhabditis elegans only in the location of the AT-rich region, whereas there are substantial differences when compared with Onchocerca volvulus

  6. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L..

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    Meng Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L., a member of Arecaceae family, is one of the three major economically important woody palms--the two other palms being oil palm and coconut tree--and its fruit is a staple food among Middle East and North African nations, as well as many other tropical and subtropical regions. Here we report a complete sequence of the data palm chloroplast (cp genome based on pyrosequencing. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: After extracting 369,022 cp sequencing reads from our whole-genome-shotgun data, we put together an assembly and validated it with intensive PCR-based verification, coupled with PCR product sequencing. The date palm cp genome is 158,462 bp in length and has a typical quadripartite structure of the large (LSC, 86,198 bp and small single-copy (SSC, 17,712 bp regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs, 27,276 bp. Similar to what has been found among most angiosperms, the date palm cp genome harbors 112 unique genes and 19 duplicated fragments in the IR regions. The junctions between LSC/IRs and SSC/IRs show different features of sequence expansion in evolution. We identified 78 SNPs as major intravarietal polymorphisms within the population of a specific cp genome, most of which were located in genes with vital functions. Based on RNA-sequencing data, we also found 18 polycistronic transcription units and three highly expression-biased genes--atpF, trnA-UGC, and rrn23. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike most monocots, date palm has a typical cp genome similar to that of tobacco--with little rearrangement and gene loss or gain. High-throughput sequencing technology facilitates the identification of intravarietal variations in cp genomes among different cultivars. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of cp genes provides clues for uncovering regulatory mechanisms of transcription and translation in chloroplasts.

  7. The complete mitochondrial genome of a basal teleost, the Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus, Osteoglossidae

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    Yue Gen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA-derived sequences have become popular markers for evolutionary studies, as their comparison may yield significant insights into the evolution of both the organisms and their genomes. From the more than 24,000 teleost species, only 254 complete mtDNA sequences are available (GenBank status on 06 Sep 2006. In this paper, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Asian arowana, a basal bonytongue fish species, which belongs to the order of Osteoglossiformes. Results The complete mitochondrial genomic sequence (mtDNA of Asian arowana (Scleropages formosus was determined by using shotgun sequencing method. The length of Asian arowana mtDNA is ca. 16,650 bp (its variation is due to polymorphic repeats in the control region, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA and 2 rRNA genes. Twelve of the thirteen protein coding genes were found to be encoded by the heavy strand in the order typically observed for vertebrate mitochondrial genomes, whereas only nad6 was located on the light strand. An interesting feature of Asian arowana mitogenome is that two different repeat arrays were identified in the control region: a 37 bp tandem repeat at the 5' end and an AT-type dinucleotide microsatellite at the 3' end. Both repeats show polymorphism among the six individuals tested; moreover the former one is present in the mitochondrial genomes of several other teleost groups. The TACAT motif described earlier only from mammals and lungfish was found in the tandem repeat of several osteoglossid and eel species. Phylogenetic analysis of fish species representing Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii taxa has shown that the Asian arowana is located near the baseline of the teleost tree, confirming its status among the ancestral teleost lineages. Conclusion The mitogenome of Asian arowana is very similar to the typical vertebrate mitochondrial genome in terms of gene arrangements, codon usage and base composition

  8. Complete genome sequence of avian paramyxovirus (APMV serotype 5 completes the analysis of nine APMV serotypes and reveals the longest APMV genome.

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    Arthur S Samuel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Avian paramyxoviruses (APMV consist of nine known serotypes. The genomes of representatives of all APMV serotypes except APMV type 5 have recently been fully sequenced. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the APMV-5 prototype strain budgerigar/Kunitachi/74. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: APMV-5 Kunitachi virus is unusual in that it lacks a virion hemagglutinin and does not grow in the allantoic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs. However, the virus grew in the amniotic cavity of embryonated chicken eggs and in twelve different established cell lines and two primary cell cultures. The genome is 17,262 nucleotides (nt long, which is the longest among members of genus Avulavirus, and encodes six non-overlapping genes in the order of 3'N-P/V/W-M-F-HN-L-5' with intergenic regions of 4-57 nt. The genome length follows the 'rule of six' and contains a 55-nt leader sequence at the 3'end and a 552 nt trailer sequence at the 5' end. The phosphoprotein (P gene contains a conserved RNA editing site and is predicted to encode P, V, and W proteins. The cleavage site of the F protein (G-K-R-K-K-R downward arrowF conforms to the cleavage site motif of the ubiquitous cellular protease furin. Consistent with this, exogenous protease was not required for virus replication in vitro. However, the intracerebral pathogenicity index of APMV-5 strain Kunitachi in one-day-old chicks was found to be zero, indicating that the virus is avirulent for chickens despite the presence of a polybasic F cleavage site. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the APVM-5 genome and proteins versus those of the other APMV serotypes showed that APMV-5 is more closely related to APMV-6 than to the other APMVs. Furthermore, these comparisons provided evidence of extensive genome-wide divergence that supports the classification of the APMVs into nine separate serotypes. The structure of the F cleavage site does not appear to be a

  9. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes ellioti (Primates: Hominidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Hua; Wang, Yin-Hua; Tang, Ming-Gui; Chai, Hai-Xia; Xuan, Xing-Wei; Guo, Wei-Yan; Yang, Mu; Pu, Jian-Yi

    2016-05-01

    Chimpanzees are especially suited to teach us about ourselves, both in terms of their similarities and differences with human, and such important similarities and differences have also been noted for the incidence and severity of several major human diseases. In the present work, we report the entire mitochondrial genome of the Nigeria-Cameroon chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes ellioti) for the first time. Results shows that this mitogenome is 16,559 bp long and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 putative non-coding region (D-loop region). The genomic organization and gene order are the same as other Chimpanzees. The whole nucleotide base composition is 31.1% of A, 30.7% of C, 12.9% G, and 25.3% T, with a slight A+T bias of 56.4%. Most of the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and 8 tRNA genes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here provides useful genetic information for P. t. ellioti, and will further contribute to the comparative genomics studies in primates.

  10. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniel N; Elbourne, Liam D H; Hassan, Karl A; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Tetu, Sasha G; Brown, Melissa H; Shah, Bhumika S; Peleg, Anton Y; Mabbutt, Bridget C; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  11. The complete mitochondrial genome of white-tufted-ear marmoset, Callithrix jacchus (Primates: Callitrichinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Jing-Yu; Wang, Hai-Feng; Yang, Ming-Ying; Liu, Qi-Ying; Ding, Ming-Xia

    2016-05-01

    The white-tufted-ear marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate that inhabits the coastal rainforests of eastern Brazil. In the present work, we report the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of white-tufted-ear marmoset for the first time. The total length of this mitogenome is 16,499 bp long, containing 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 non-coding region (D-loop region). The gene organization and arrangement is identical to typical vertebrates. The overall base composition is 32.75% of A, 26.95% of T, 26.91% C, and 13.39% G, with a slight A + T bias of 59.7%. All the genes are encoded on H-strand, except for the ND6 subunit gene and 8 tRNA genes. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence reported here will be useful for comparative genomics studies in primates.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5T (=DSM 16299T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizobacterium for bacterial biofertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Jung, Byung Kwon; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2015-01-10

    Pseudomonas rhizosphaerae IH5(T) (=DSM 16299(T)), isolated from the rhizospheric soil of grass growing in Spain, has been reported as a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas harboring insoluble phosphorus solubilizing activity. To understanding the multifunctional biofertilizer better, we report the complete genome sequence of P. rhizosphaerae IH5(T). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus from Lanzhou, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Chuanfeng; Fu, Shengfang; Zhou, Xv; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A complete genome of human respiratory syncytial virus was sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the full-length human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) genome sequence belongs to gene type NA1. We sequenced the genome in order to create the full-length cDNA infectious clone and develop vaccines against HRSV.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Achromobacter xylosoxidans MN001, a Cystic Fibrosis Airway Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalamenti, Jonathan P; Hunter, Ryan C

    2015-08-20

    The genome of Achromobacter xylosoxidans MN001, a strain isolated from sputum derived from an adult cystic fibrosis patient, was sequenced using combined single-molecule real-time and Illumina sequencing. Assembly of the complete genome resulted in a 5,876,039-bp chromosome, representing the smallest A. xylosoxidans genome sequenced to date.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Achromobacter xylosoxidans MN001, a Cystic Fibrosis Airway Isolate

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The genome of Achromobacter xylosoxidans MN001, a strain isolated from sputum derived from an adult cystic fibrosis patient, was sequenced using combined single-molecule real-time and Illumina sequencing. Assembly of the complete genome resulted in a 5,876,039-bp chromosome, representing the smallest A. xylosoxidans genome sequenced to date.

  16. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales, L.; Noel, B.; Porcel, B.; Marcet-Houben, M.; Hullo, M.F.; Sacerdot, C.; Tekaia, F.; Leh-Louis, V.; Despons, L.; Khanna, V.; Aury, J.M.; Barbe, V.; Couloux, A.; Labadie, K.; Pelletier, E.; Souciet, J.L.; Boekhout, T.; Gabaldon, T.; Wincker, P.; Dujon, B.

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics, but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid type strain

  17. Complete DNA sequence of Kuraishia capsulata illustrates novel genomic features among budding yeasts (Saccharomycotina)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales, L.; Noel, B.; Porcel, B.; Marcet-Houben, M.; Hullo, M.F.; Sacerdot, C.; Tekaia, F.; Leh-Louis, V.; Despons, L.; Khanna, V.; Aury, J.M.; Barbe, V.; Couloux, A.; Labadie, K.; Pelletier, E.; Souciet, J.L.; Boekhout, T.; Gabaldon, T.; Wincker, P.; Dujon, B.

    2013-01-01

    The numerous yeast genome sequences presently available provide a rich source of information for functional as well as evolutionary genomics, but unequally cover the large phylogenetic diversity of extant yeasts. We present here the complete sequence of the nuclear genome of the haploid type strain

  18. Genomic Treasure Troves: Complet Genome Sequencing of Herbarium and Insect Museum Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, M.; Erkens, R.H.J.; Vossenberg, van de B.; Wieringa, J.J.; Kraaijeveld, K.; Stielow, B.; Geml, J.; Richardson, J.E.; Bakker, F.T.

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies

  19. Genomic Treasure Troves: Complet Genome Sequencing of Herbarium and Insect Museum Specimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, M.; Erkens, R.H.J.; Vossenberg, van de B.; Wieringa, J.J.; Kraaijeveld, K.; Stielow, B.; Geml, J.; Richardson, J.E.; Bakker, F.T.

    2013-01-01

    Unlocking the vast genomic diversity stored in natural history collections would create unprecedented opportunities for genome-scale evolutionary, phylogenetic, domestication and population genomic studies. Many researchers have been discouraged from using historical specimens in molecular studies b

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of Channa argus, Channa maculata and hybrid snakehead fish [Channa maculata (♀) × Channa argus (♂)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shu-Ren; Ma, Ke-Yi; Xing, Zhi-Jun; Xie, Nan; Wang, Yu-Xi; Wang, Qun; Li, Jia-Le

    2013-06-01

    We sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of Channa argus, Channa maculata and their hybrid [C. maculata (♀) and C. argus (♂)]. All the three mitochondrial genomes contained the typical complement of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), 2 ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and 1 control region. The entire mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule of C. maculata was 16,559 bp long while the complete mtDNA molecule of C. argus and hybrid snakehead fish was 16,558 bp long. This is the first report on the complete mitogenome sequence of C. maculata and hybrid snakehead fish.

  1. The complete genome of Enterovirus 71 China strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Fan

    2001-01-01

    [1]Jin Qi, Medical Molecular Virology (in Chinese), Beijing: Science Press, 2001.[2]McMinn, P., Stratov, I., Dowse, G., Enterovirus 71 outbreak in Western Australia associated with acute flaccid paralysis, Preliminary report, Commun. Dis. Intell., 1999, 23(7): 199.[3]Ho, M., Chen, E. R., Hsu, K. H. et al., An epidemic of Enterovirus 71 infection in Taiwan, The New England Journal of Medicine, 1999, 341(13): 929.[4]He Yaqing, Yang Fan, Li Chengliang et al., Identification of EV71 isolates from hand, foot and mouth disease cases in ShenZhen, Chinese Journal of Experimental and Clinical Virology (in Chinese), 1999, 1: 112.[5]Landry, M. L., Fonseca, S. N. S., Cohen, S. et al., Fatal enterovirus type 71 infection: rapid detection and diagnostic pitfalls, Pediatr. Infect. Dis. J., 1995, 14: 1095.[6]Brown, B. A., Pallansch, M. A., Complete nucleotide sequence of enterovirus 71 is distinct from poliovirus, Virus Res., 1995, 39: 195.[7]Brown, B. A., Oberste, M. S., Alexander, J. P. Jr., Molecular epidemiology and evolution of Enterovirus 71 strains isolated from 1970 to 1998, J. Virol., 1999, 73(12): 9969.[8]Ishimaru,Y., Nakano,S., Yamaoda,K.et al.,Outbreaks of hand,foot,and mouth disease by Enterovirus 71,Arch.Dis.Child.,1980,55:583.

  2. The complete mitochondrial genome of the grooved carpet shell, Ruditapes decussatus (Bivalvia, Veneridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Ghiselli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the large number of animal complete mitochondrial genomes currently available in public databases, knowledge about mitochondrial genomics in invertebrates is uneven. This paper reports, for the first time, the complete mitochondrial genome of the grooved carpet shell, Ruditapes decussatus, also known as the European clam. Ruditapes decussatus is morphologically and ecologically similar to the Manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum, which has been recently introduced for aquaculture in the very same habitats of Ruditapes decussatus, and that is replacing the native species. Currently the production of the European clam is almost insignificant, nonetheless it is considered a high value product, and therefore it is an economically important species, especially in Portugal, Spain and Italy. In this work we: (i assembled Ruditapes decussatus mitochondrial genome from RNA-Seq data, and validated it by Sanger sequencing; (ii analyzed and characterized the Ruditapes decussatus mitochondrial genome, comparing its features with those of other venerid bivalves; (iii assessed mitochondrial sequence polymorphism (SP and copy number variation (CNV of tandem repeats across 26 samples. Despite using high-throughput approaches we did not find evidence for the presence of two sex-linked mitochondrial genomes, typical of the doubly uniparental inheritance of mitochondria, a phenomenon known in ∼100 bivalve species. According to our analyses, Ruditapes decussatus is more genetically similar to species of the Genus Paphia than to the congeneric Ruditapes philippinarum, a finding that bolsters the already-proposed need of a taxonomic revision. We also found a quite low genetic variability across the examined samples, with few SPs and little variability of the sequences flanking the control region (Largest Unassigned Regions (LURs. Strikingly, although we found low nucleotide variability along the entire mitochondrial genome, we observed high levels of length

  3. Isolation, identification, and complete genome sequence of a bovine adenovirus type 3 from cattle in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yuan-Mao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine adenovirus type 3 (BAV-3 belongs to the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae and is involved in respiratory and enteric infections of calves. The isolation of BAV-3 has not been reported prior to this study in China. In 2009, there were many cases in cattle showing similar clinical signs to BAV-3 infection and a virus strain, showing cytopathic effect in Madin-Darby bovine kidney cells, was isolated from a bovine nasal swab collected from feedlot cattle in Heilongjiang Province, China. The isolate was confirmed as a bovine adenovirus type 3 by PCR and immunofluorescence assay, and named as HLJ0955. So far only the complete genome sequence of prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain has been reported. In order to further characterize the Chinese isolate HLJ0955, the complete genome sequence of HLJ0955 was determined. Results The size of the genome of the Chinese isolate HLJ0955 is 34,132 nucleotides in length with a G+C content of 53.6%. The coding sequences for gene regions of HLJ0955 isolate were similar to the prototype of BAV-3 WBR-1 strain, with 80.0-98.6% nucleotide and 87.5-98.8% amino acid identities. The genome of HLJ0955 strain contains 16 regions and four deletions in inverted terminal repeats, E1B region and E4 region, respectively. The complete genome and DNA binding protein gene based phylogenetic analysis with other adenoviruses were performed and the results showed that HLJ0955 isolate belonged to BAV-3 and clustered within the Mastadenovirus genus of the family Adenoviridae. Conclusions This is the first study to report the isolation and molecular characterization of BAV-3 from cattle in China. The phylogenetic analysis performed in this study supported the use of the DNA binding protein gene of adenovirus as an appropriate subgenomic target for the classification of different genuses of the family Adenoviridae on the molecular basis. Meanwhile, a large-scale pathogen and serological epidemiological

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale is a naturally attenuated subtype that has been used as a vaccine for a century. We sequenced the genome of this organism and compared it to those of virulent senso stricto A. marginale strains. The comparison markedly narrows the number of outer membrane protein ...

  5. Complete genome sequence of a new maize-associated cytorhabdovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new 11,877 nt cytorhabdovirus sequence with 6 open reading frames has been identified in a maize sample. It shares 50 and 51% genome-wide nucleotide sequence identity with northern cereal mosaic cytorhabdovirus (NCMV) and barley yellow striate mosaic cytorhabdovirus (BYSMV), respectively....

  6. Complete genome sequence of Rhodospirillum rubrum type strain (S1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, A Christine; Copeland, Alex; Lucas, Susan; Lapidus, Alla; Del Rio, Tijana Glavina; Barry, Kerrie; Detter, John C; Hammon, Nancy; Israni, Sanjay; Pitluck, Sam; Brettin, Thomas; Bruce, David; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Gilna, Paul; Schmutz, Jeremy; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Kyrpides, Nikos C; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Richardson, Paul; Rohde, Manfred; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Zhang, Yaoping; Roberts, Gary P; Reslewic, Susan; Schwartz, David C

    2011-07-01

    Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch 1887) Molisch 1907 is the type species of the genus Rhodospirillum, which is the type genus of the family Rhodospirillaceae in the class Alphaproteobacteria. The species is of special interest because it is an anoxygenic phototroph that produces extracellular elemental sulfur (instead of oxygen) while harvesting light. It contains one of the most simple photosynthetic systems currently known, lacking light harvesting complex 2. Strain S1(T) can grow on carbon monoxide as sole energy source. With currently over 1,750 PubMed entries, R. rubrum is one of the most intensively studied microbial species, in particular for physiological and genetic studies. Next to R. centenum strain SW, the genome sequence of strain S1(T) is only the second genome of a member of the genus Rhodospirillum to be published, but the first type strain genome from the genus. The 4,352,825 bp long chromosome and 53,732 bp plasmid with a total of 3,850 protein-coding and 83 RNA genes were sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program DOEM 2002.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of the Haloalkaliphilic, Hydrogen Producing Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Begemann, Matthew B [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Samual [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans is an alkaliphilic bacterium capable of biohydrogen production at pH 11 and 7% (w/v) salt. We present the 2.6 Mb genome sequence to provide insights into its physiology and potential for bioenergy applications.

  8. Complete genome sequence of chinese strain of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ strain (Las) Guangxi-1(GX-1) was obtained by an Illumina HiSeq 2000. The GX-1 genome comprises 1,268,237 nucleotides, 36.5 % GC content, 1,141 predicted coding sequences, 44 tRNAs, 3 complete copies of ribosomal RNA genes (16S, 23S ...

  9. Complete Genome Sequencing of Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus 1, Subgenotypes 1n and 1o.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Asuka; Tateishi, Kentaro; Shinohara, Minami; Naoi, Yuki; Shiokawa, Mai; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Shirai, Junsuke; Nagai, Makoto

    2016-02-18

    To gain further insight into the genomic features of bovine viral diarrhea virus 1 (BVDV-1) subgenotypes, we sequenced the complete genome of BVDV-1n Shitara/02/06 and BVDV-1o IS26NCP/01. The complete genome of Shitara/02/06 and IS26NCP/01 shared 77.7 to 79.3% and 78.0 to 85.7% sequence identities with other BVDV-1 subgenotype strains, respectively.

  10. Homology differences between complete Sacbrood virus genomes from infected Apis mellifera and Apis cerana honeybees in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Yoo, Mi Sun; Kim, Young-Ha; Kim, Nam-Hee; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Jung, Ha-Na; Thao, Le Thi Bich; Lee, Hee-Soo; Kang, Seung-Won

    2016-04-01

    Sacbrood virus (SBV) represents a serious threat to the health of managed honeybees. We determined four complete SBV genomic sequences (AmSBV-Kor1, AmSBV-Kor2, AcSBV-Kor3, and AcSBV-Kor4) isolated from Apis mellifera and Apis cerana in various regions of South Korea. A phylogenetic tree was constructed from the complete genomic sequences of these Korean SBVs (KSBVs) and 21 previously reported SBV sequences from other countries. Three KSBVs (not AmSBV-Kor1) clustered with previously reported Korean genomes, but separately from SBV genomes from other countries. The KSBVs shared 90-98 % identity, and 89-97 % identity with the genomes from other countries. AmSBV-Kor1 was least similar (~90 % identity) to the other KSBVs, and was most similar to previously reported strains AmSBV-Kor21 (97 %) and AmSBV-UK (93 %). Phylogenetic analysis of the partial VP1 region sequences indicated that SBVs clustered by host species and country of origin. The KSBVs were aligned with nine previously reported complete SBV genomes and compared. The KSBVs were most different from the other genomes at the end of the 5' untranslated region and in the entire open reading frame. A SimPlot graph of the VP1 region confirmed its high variability, especially between the SBVs infecting A. mellifera and A. cerana. In this genomic region, SBVs from A. mellifera species contain an extra continuous 51-nucleotide sequence relative to the SBVs from A. cerana. This genomic diversity may reflect the adaptation of SBV to specific hosts, viral cross-infections, and the spatial distances separating the KSBVs from other SBVs.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Akkermansia glycaniphila Strain PytT, a Mucin-Degrading Specialist of the Reticulated Python Gut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwerkerk, Janneke P.; Schaap, Peter J.; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Belzer, Clara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Akkermansia glycaniphila is a novel Akkermansia species that was isolated from the intestine of the reticulated python and shares the capacity to degrade mucin with the human strain Akkermansia muciniphila MucT. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of strain PytT of 3,074,121 bp. The genomic analysis reveals genes for mucin degradation and aerobic respiration. PMID:28057747

  12. Complete mitochondrial genome of the furry lobster Palinurellus wieneckii (De Man, 1881) (Decapoda, Achelata, Palinuridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chien-Hui; Liu, Yuan; Cui, Zhaoxia; Chan, Tin-Yam

    2014-08-01

    Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) for the rare lobster genus Palinurellus (species P. wieneckii) is reported for the first time. The genus Palinurellus is peculiar looking and was previously considered to belong to a distinct family Synaxidae. However, recent molecular phylogenetic analyses based on partial sequences of various genes showed that Synaxidae is an invalid family and Palinurellus should be placed inside Palinuridae. The complete mitogenome of P. wieneckii is compared to the genetic structures with six other Achelata species with mitogenome sequence reported. The gene order of P. wieneckii is identical to the other Achelata lobsters, but with lower A + T content (63.6% versus 64.5-67.5%). Sequence nucleotide dissimilarity of P. wieneckii is considerably higher (37.7-40.3%) than amongst the five Palinuridae s.s. species (17.1-32.9%), and approximate to the range between Palinuridae s.s. and Scyllaridae (39.1-40.4%).

  13. The complete genome sequence of Thermoproteus tenax: a physiologically versatile member of the Crenarchaeota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Siebers

    Full Text Available Here, we report on the complete genome sequence of the hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax (strain Kra1, DSM 2078(T a type strain of the crenarchaeotal order Thermoproteales. Its circular 1.84-megabase genome harbors no extrachromosomal elements and 2,051 open reading frames are identified, covering 90.6% of the complete sequence, which represents a high coding density. Derived from the gene content, T. tenax is a representative member of the Crenarchaeota. The organism is strictly anaerobic and sulfur-dependent with optimal growth at 86°C and pH 5.6. One particular feature is the great metabolic versatility, which is not accompanied by a distinct increase of genome size or information density as compared to other Crenarchaeota. T. tenax is able to grow chemolithoautotrophically (CO₂/H₂ as well as chemoorganoheterotrophically in presence of various organic substrates. All pathways for synthesizing the 20 proteinogenic amino acids are present. In addition, two presumably complete gene sets for NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I were identified in the genome and there is evidence that either NADH or reduced ferredoxin might serve as electron donor. Beside the typical archaeal A₀A₁-ATP synthase, a membrane-bound pyrophosphatase is found, which might contribute to energy conservation. Surprisingly, all genes required for dissimilatory sulfate reduction are present, which is confirmed by growth experiments. Mentionable is furthermore, the presence of two proteins (ParA family ATPase, actin-like protein that might be involved in cell division in Thermoproteales, where the ESCRT system is absent, and of genes involved in genetic competence (DprA, ComF that is so far unique within Archaea.

  14. Complete genome of biodegradable plastics-decomposing Roseateles depolymerans KCTC 42856(T) (=61A(T)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Heon; Choe, Hanna; Kim, Song-Gun; Park, Doo-Sang; Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Byung Kwon; Kim, Kyung Mo

    2016-02-20

    Roseateles depolymerans is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped, flagellated, obligately aerobic, photosynthetic bacterium that was isolated from the Hanamuro River, Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. Here, we report the complete genome of R. depolymerans KCTC 42856(T) (=61A(T)=DSM 11813(T)=CCUG 48747(T)=NCIMB 13588(T)), which consists of 5,681,722bp (G+C content of 66.57%) with a single chromosome, 4,773 protein-coding genes, 57 tRNAs and 4 rRNA operons. Several genes related to degradation of aliphatic and aromatic polymers were detected in the genome that help explain how the strain mediates decomposition of biodegradable plastics into fragments which are then assimilated and subsequently metabolized by microbial cells.

  15. Complete mitochondrial genome of an enigmatic dragonfly, Epiophlebia superstes (Odonata, Epiophlebiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jo-Fan; Chen, Ming-Yu; Chaw, Shu-Miaw; Morii, Yuta; Yoshimura, Mayumi; Sota, Teiji; Lin, Chung-Ping

    2015-01-01

    This study reported the 15,435 bp-long complete mitochondrial genome of the relict Epiophlebia superstes (Odonata, Epiophlebiidae), an enigmatic dragonfly of the paraphyletic 'Anisozygoptera' possessing characteristics similar to members of both extant odonate suborders, the Zygoptera and the Anisoptera. This mitogenome comprises the common set of 37 genes and an A + T-rich control region, and has a gene arrangement identical to those of all available odonates. The genome contains three non-coding inter-genic spacers (s1-s3), which occurs in all of other known odonates, but it lacks the inter-genic spacer s5 typically found in the Anisoptera. This result suggests that E. superstes possesses a mitogenmic organization more closely related to that of the Zygoptera than that of the Anizoptera.

  16. Genotype-Specific Genomic Markers Associated with Primary Hepatomas, Based on Complete Genomic Sequencing of Hepatitis B Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sung, Joseph J. Y.; Tsui, Stephen K. W.; Tse, Chi-Hang; Ng, Eddie Y. T.; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Lee, Kin-Hong; Mok, Tony S. K.; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Au, Thomas C. C.; Tsoi, Kelvin K. F.; Locarnini, Stephen; Chan, Henry L. Y.

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to identify genomic markers in hepatitis B virus (HBV) that are associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development by comparing the complete genomic sequences of HBVs among patients with HCC and those without. One hundred patients with HBV-related HCC and 100 age-matched HBV-infected non-HCC patients (controls) were studied. HBV DNA from serum was directly sequenced to study the whole viral genome. Data mining and rule learning were employed to develop diagnostic algorithms. ...

  17. Complete genome sequence of Saccharothrix espanaensis DSM 44229T and comparison to the other completely sequenced Pseudonocardiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strobel Tina

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Saccharothrix is a representative of the family Pseudonocardiaceae, known to include producer strains of a wide variety of potent antibiotics. Saccharothrix espanaensis produces both saccharomicins A and B of the promising new class of heptadecaglycoside antibiotics, active against both bacteria and yeast. Results To better assess its capabilities, the complete genome sequence of S. espanaensis was established. With a size of 9,360,653 bp, coding for 8,501 genes, it stands alongside other Pseudonocardiaceae with large genomes. Besides a predicted core genome of 810 genes shared in the family, S. espanaensis has a large number of accessory genes: 2,967 singletons when compared to the family, of which 1,292 have no clear orthologs in the RefSeq database. The genome analysis revealed the presence of 26 biosynthetic gene clusters potentially encoding secondary metabolites. Among them, the cluster coding for the saccharomicins could be identified. Conclusion S. espanaensis is the first completely sequenced species of the genus Saccharothrix. The genome discloses the cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of the saccharomicins, the largest oligosaccharide antibiotic currently identified. Moreover, the genome revealed 25 additional putative secondary metabolite gene clusters further suggesting the strain’s potential for natural product synthesis.

  18. The First Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequences for Stomatopod Crustaceans: Implications for Phylogeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swinstrom, Kirsten; Caldwell, Roy; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-09-07

    We report the first complete mitochondrial genome sequences of stomatopods and compare their features to each other and to those of other crustaceans. Phylogenetic analyses of the concatenated mitochondrial protein-coding sequences were used to explore relationships within the Stomatopoda, within the malacostracan crustaceans, and among crustaceans and insects. Although these analyses support the monophyly of both Malacostraca and, within it, Stomatopoda, it also confirms the view of a paraphyletic Crustacea, with Malacostraca being more closely related to insects than to the branchiopod crustaceans.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  20. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the common bean anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Alzate, Juan; Yepes, Mauricio Salazar; Marín, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is the causal agent of anthracnose in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), one of the most limiting factors for this crop in South and Central America. In this work, the mitochondrial sequence of a Colombian isolate of C. lindemuthianum obtained from a common bean plant (var. Cargamanto) with anthracnose symptoms is presented. The mtDNA codes for 13 proteins of the respiratory chain, 1 ribosomal protein, 2 homing endonucleases, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 28 tRNAs. This is the first report of a complete mtDNA genome sequence from C. lindemuthianum.

  1. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a

  2. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Urechis caupo, a representative of the phylum Echiura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boore Jeffrey L

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondria contain small genomes that are physically separate from those of nuclei. Their comparison serves as a model system for understanding the processes of genome evolution. Although hundreds of these genome sequences have been reported, the taxonomic sampling is highly biased toward vertebrates and arthropods, with many whole phyla remaining unstudied. This is the first description of a complete mitochondrial genome sequence of a representative of the phylum Echiura, that of the fat innkeeper worm, Urechis caupo. Results This mtDNA is 15,113 nts in length and 62% A+T. It contains the 37 genes that are typical for animal mtDNAs in an arrangement somewhat similar to that of annelid worms. All genes are encoded by the same DNA strand which is rich in A and C relative to the opposite strand. Codons ending with the dinucleotide GG are more frequent than would be expected from apparent mutational biases. The largest non-coding region is only 282 nts long, is 71% A+T, and has potential for secondary structures. Conclusions Urechis caupo mtDNA shares many features with those of the few studied annelids, including the common usage of ATG start codons, unusual among animal mtDNAs, as well as gene arrangements, tRNA structures, and codon usage biases.

  3. Complete genome sequence of a variant of maize-associated totivirus from Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Quinto, Robert A; Espinoza-Lozano, Rodrigo F; Mora-Pinargote, Carlos A; Quito-Avila, Diego F

    2016-11-30

    The complete genomic sequence of a variant of the recently reported maize-associated totivirus (MATV) from China was obtained from commercial maize in Ecuador. The genome of MATV-Ec (Ecuador) (4,998 bp) is considerably longer than that of MATV-Ch (China) (3,956 bp), the main difference due to a ≈ 1-kb-long capsid-protein-encoding fragment that is completely absent from the Chinese genome. Sequence alignments between MATV-Ec and MATV-Ch showed an overall identity of 82% at the nucleotide level, whereas at the amino acid level, the viruses exhibited 95% and 94% identity for the putative capsid protein and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the viral RdRp domain indicated that MATV-Ec and MATV-Ch share a common ancestor with other plant-associated totiviruses, with Panax notoginseng virus A as the closest relative. MATV-Ec was detected in 46% (n = 80) of maize plants tested in this study, but not in endophytic fungi isolated from plants positive for the virus.

  4. Identification and complete genome characterization of a novel picornavirus in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Ákos; Nemes, Csaba; Pankovics, Péter; Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Delwart, Eric; Reuter, Gábor

    2012-10-01

    Members of the family Picornaviridae are important pathogens of humans and animals, although compared with the thousands of known bird species (>10 000), only a few (n = 11) picornaviruses have been identified from avian sources. This study reports the metagenomic detection and complete genome characterization of a novel turkey picornavirus from faecal samples collected from eight turkey farms in Hungary. Using RT-PCR, both healthy (two of three) and affected (seven of eight) commercial turkeys with enteric and/or stunting syndrome were shown to be shedding viruses in seven (88 %) of the eight farms. The viral genome sequence (turkey/M176/2011/HUN; GenBank accession no. JQ691613) shows a high degree of amino acid sequence identity (96 %) to the partial P3 genome region of a picornavirus reported recently in turkey and chickens from the USA and probably belongs to the same species. In the P1 and P2 regions, turkey/M176/2011/HUN is related most closely to, but distinct from, the kobuviruses and turdivirus 1. Complete genome analysis revealed the presence of characteristic picornaviral amino acid motifs, a potential type II-like 5' UTR internal ribosome entry site (first identified among avian-origin picornaviruses) and a conserved, 48 nt long 'barbell-like' structure found at the 3' UTR of turkey/M176/2011/HUN and members of the picornavirus genera Avihepatovirus and Kobuvirus. The general presence of turkey picornavirus - a novel picornavirus species - in faecal samples from healthy and affected turkeys in Hungary and in the USA suggests the worldwide occurrence and endemic circulation of this virus in turkey farms. Further studies are needed to investigate the aetiological role and pathogenic potential of this picornavirus in food animals.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Ryun Kwak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L. are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, Sweet potato virus C (SPVC, Sweet potato virus G (SPVG, Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2, and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV, have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95% incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88% nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses.

  6. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongwu Zhang

    Full Text Available The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp and mitochondrial (mt genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147 with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65 with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage.

  7. The complete chloroplast and mitochondrial genome sequences of Boea hygrometrica: insights into the evolution of plant organellar genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwu; Fang, Yongjun; Wang, Xumin; Deng, Xin; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the chloroplast (cp) and mitochondrial (mt) genomes of resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica (Bh, Gesneriaceae) have been determined with the lengths of 153,493 bp and 510,519 bp, respectively. The smaller chloroplast genome contains more genes (147) with a 72% coding sequence, and the larger mitochondrial genome have less genes (65) with a coding faction of 12%. Similar to other seed plants, the Bh cp genome has a typical quadripartite organization with a conserved gene in each region. The Bh mt genome has three recombinant sequence repeats of 222 bp, 843 bp, and 1474 bp in length, which divide the genome into a single master circle (MC) and four isomeric molecules. Compared to other angiosperms, one remarkable feature of the Bh mt genome is the frequent transfer of genetic material from the cp genome during recent Bh evolution. We also analyzed organellar genome evolution in general regarding genome features as well as compositional dynamics of sequence and gene structure/organization, providing clues for the understanding of the evolution of organellar genomes in plants. The cp-derived sequences including tRNAs found in angiosperm mt genomes support the conclusion that frequent gene transfer events may have begun early in the land plant lineage.

  8. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Amy S; Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P; Cantor, Michael N; Hua, Susan X; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L

    2014-06-15

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755(T) is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755(T) reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species.

  9. The complete genome sequence of Clostridium indolis DSM 755T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschine, Susan; Huntemann, Marcel; Han, James; Chen, Amy; Kyrpides, Nikos; Markowitz, Victor; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Schaumberg, Andrew; Pati, Amrita; Stamatis, Dimitrios; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Lobos, Elizabeth; Goodwin, Lynne; Nordberg, Henrik P.; Cantor, Michael N.; Hua, Susan X.; Woyke, Tanja; Blanchard, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium indolis DSM 755T is a bacterium commonly found in soils and the feces of birds and mammals. Despite its prevalence, little is known about the ecology or physiology of this species. However, close relatives, C. saccharolyticum and C. hathewayi, have demonstrated interesting metabolic potentials related to plant degradation and human health. The genome of C. indolis DSM 755T reveals an abundance of genes in functional groups associated with the transport and utilization of carbohydrates, as well as citrate, lactate, and aromatics. Ecologically relevant gene clusters related to nitrogen fixation and a unique type of bacterial microcompartment, the CoAT BMC, are also detected. Our genome analysis suggests hypotheses to be tested in future culture based work to better understand the physiology of this poorly described species. PMID:25197485

  10. Rolling circle amplification of complete nematode mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sha; Hyman, Bradley C

    2005-06-01

    To enable investigation of nematode mitochondrial DNA evolution, methodology has been developed to amplify intact nematode mitochondrial genomes in preparative yields using a rolling circle replication strategy. Successful reactions were generated from whole cell template DNA prepared by alkaline lysis of the rhabditid nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and a mermithid nematode, Thaumamermis cosgrovei. These taxa, representing the two major nematode classes Chromodorea and Enoplea, maintain mitochondrial genomes of 13.8 kb and 20.0 kb, respectively. Efficient amplifications were conducted on template DNA isolated from individual or pooled nematodes that were alive or stored at -80 degrees C. Unexpectedly, these experiments revealed that multiple T. cosgrovei mitochondrial DNA haplotypes are maintained in our local population. Rolling circle amplification products can be used as templates for standard PCR reactions with specific primers that target mitochondrial genes or for direct DNA sequencing.

  11. Complete genome analysis of Ketogulonigenium sp.WB0104

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ketogulonigenium sp. may convert L-sorbose into 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, the vitamin C precursor. The genome of Ketogulonigenium sp. WB0104 consists of a circular 2765030 bp chromosome with 61.69% G+C content and two circular plasmids of 267968 and 242707 bp. The genome contains 2727 open reading frames (ORFs). The systems of replication, transcription, translation, carbohydrate and energy metabolism are intact, but the repair system is incomplete. About 640 predicted ORFs have been found to encode transporter proteins, which account for about one fourth of total predicted ORFs, noticeably higher than other documented bacteria. This may be due to the fact that WB0104 adapts to soil circumstance.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lynd, Lee R [Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium clariflavum is a Cluster III Clostridium within the family Clostridiaceae isolated from thermophilic anaerobic sludge (Shiratori et al, 2009). This species is of interest because of its similarity to the model cellulolytic organism Clostridium thermocellum and for the ability of environmental isolates to break down cellulose and hemicellulose. Here we describe features of the 4,897,678 bp long genome and its annotation, consisting of 4,131 proteincoding and 98 RNA genes, for the type strain DSM 19732.

  13. Complete genome sequences of three strains of coxsackievirus a7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Koskinen, Satu; Karelehto, Eveliina; Sittig, Eleonora; Roivainen, Merja; Hyypiä, Timo; Susi, Petri

    2013-04-11

    Genomes of three strains (Parker, USSR, and 275/58) of coxsackievirus A7 (CV-A7) were amplified by the long reverse transcription (RT)-PCR method and sequenced. While the sequences of Parker and USSR were identical, the similarities of 275/58 to the CV-A7 reference sequence, accession no. AY421765, were 82.6% and 96.2% for nucleotides and amino acids, respectively.

  14. A Pan-HIV Strategy for Complete Genome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Michael G; Yamaguchi, Julie; Alessandri-Gradt, Elodie; Tell, Robert W; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Brennan, Catherine A

    2016-04-01

    Molecular surveillance is essential to monitor HIV diversity and track emerging strains. We have developed a universal library preparation method (HIV-SMART [i.e.,switchingmechanismat 5' end ofRNAtranscript]) for next-generation sequencing that harnesses the specificity of HIV-directed priming to enable full genome characterization of all HIV-1 groups (M, N, O, and P) and HIV-2. Broad application of the HIV-SMART approach was demonstrated using a panel of diverse cell-cultured virus isolates. HIV-1 non-subtype B-infected clinical specimens from Cameroon were then used to optimize the protocol to sequence directly from plasma. When multiplexing 8 or more libraries per MiSeq run, full genome coverage at a median ∼2,000× depth was routinely obtained for either sample type. The method reproducibly generated the same consensus sequence, consistently identified viral sequence heterogeneity present in specimens, and at viral loads of ≤4.5 log copies/ml yielded sufficient coverage to permit strain classification. HIV-SMART provides an unparalleled opportunity to identify diverse HIV strains in patient specimens and to determine phylogenetic classification based on the entire viral genome. Easily adapted to sequence any RNA virus, this technology illustrates the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for viral characterization and surveillance.

  15. A Pan-HIV Strategy for Complete Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Julie; Alessandri-Gradt, Elodie; Tell, Robert W.; Brennan, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular surveillance is essential to monitor HIV diversity and track emerging strains. We have developed a universal library preparation method (HIV-SMART [i.e., switching mechanism at 5′ end of RNA transcript]) for next-generation sequencing that harnesses the specificity of HIV-directed priming to enable full genome characterization of all HIV-1 groups (M, N, O, and P) and HIV-2. Broad application of the HIV-SMART approach was demonstrated using a panel of diverse cell-cultured virus isolates. HIV-1 non-subtype B-infected clinical specimens from Cameroon were then used to optimize the protocol to sequence directly from plasma. When multiplexing 8 or more libraries per MiSeq run, full genome coverage at a median ∼2,000× depth was routinely obtained for either sample type. The method reproducibly generated the same consensus sequence, consistently identified viral sequence heterogeneity present in specimens, and at viral loads of ≤4.5 log copies/ml yielded sufficient coverage to permit strain classification. HIV-SMART provides an unparalleled opportunity to identify diverse HIV strains in patient specimens and to determine phylogenetic classification based on the entire viral genome. Easily adapted to sequence any RNA virus, this technology illustrates the utility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) for viral characterization and surveillance. PMID:26699702

  16. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 陈润生; 王永雄

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and ar-chaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacte-ria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variat

  17. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and archaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacteria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variations in some operons across different organisms within each domain, and these variations are informative on the evolutionary relations among the organisms. This method provides a new potential for studying the origin and evolution of old species.

  18. The first complete genome sequences of the acI lineage, the most abundant freshwater Actinobacteria, obtained by whole-genome-amplification of dilution-to-extinction cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ilnam; Kim, Suhyun; Islam, Md. Rashedul; Cho, Jang-Cheon

    2017-01-01

    The acI lineage of the phylum Actinobacteria is the most abundant bacterial group in most freshwater lakes. However, due to difficulties in laboratory cultivation, only two mixed cultures and some incomplete single-amplified or metagenome-derived genomes have been reported for the lineage. Here, we report the initial cultivation and complete genome sequences of four novel strains of the acI lineage from the tribes acI-A1, -A4, -A7, and -C1. The acI strains, initially isolated by dilution-to-extinction culturing, eventually failed to be maintained as axenic cultures. However, the first complete genomes of the acI lineage were successfully obtained from these initial cultures through whole genome amplification applied to more than hundreds of cultured acI cells. The genome sequences exhibited features of genome streamlining and showed that the strains are aerobic chemoheterotrophs sharing central metabolic pathways, with some differences among tribes that may underlie niche diversification within the acI lineage. Actinorhodopsin was found in all strains, but retinal biosynthesis was complete in only A1 and A4 tribes. PMID:28186143

  19. Complete genome sequence of Anaerococcus prevotii type strain (PC1T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaButti, Kurt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Steenblock, Katja [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Anaerococcus prevotii (Foubert and Douglas 1948) Ezaki et al. 2001 is the type species of the genus, and is of phylogenetic interest because of its arguable assignment to the provisionally arranged family Peptostreptococcaceae . A. prevotii is an obligate anaerobic coccus, usually arranged in clumps or tetrads. The strain, whose genome is described here, was originally isolated from human plasma; other strains of the species were also isolated from clinical specimen. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the genus. Next to Finegoldia magna, A. prevotii is only the second species from the family Peptostreptococcaceae for which a complete genome sequence is described. The 1,998,633 bp long genome (chromosome and one plasmid) with its 1852 protein-coding and 61 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  20. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Delia antiqua and Its Implications in Dipteran Phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nai-Xin Zhang

    Full Text Available Delia antiqua is a major underground agricultural pest widely distributed in Asia, Europe and North America. In this study, we sequenced and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of this species, which is the first report of complete mitochondrial genome in the family Anthomyiidae. This genome is a double-stranded circular molecule with a length of 16,141 bp and an A+T content of 78.5%. It contains 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs and a non-coding A+T rich region or control region. The mitochondrial genome of Delia antiqua presents a clear bias in nucleotide composition with a positive AT-skew and a negative GC-skew. All of the 13 protein-coding genes use ATN as an initiation codon except for the COI gene that starts with ATCA. Most protein-coding genes have complete termination codons but COII and ND5 that have the incomplete termination codon T. This bias is reflected in both codon usage and amino acid composition. The protein-coding genes in the D. antiqua mitochondrial genome prefer to use the codon UUA (Leu. All of the tRNAs have the typical clover-leaf structure, except for tRNASer(AGN that does not contain the dihydrouridine (DHU arm like in many other insects. There are 7 mismatches with U-U in the tRNAs. The location and structure of the two rRNAs are conservative and stable when compared with other insects. The control region between 12S rRNA and tRNAIle has the highest A+T content of 93.7% in the D. antiqua mitochondrial genome. The control region includes three kinds of special regions, two highly conserved poly-T stretches, a (TAn stretch and several G(AnT structures considered important elements related to replication and transcription. The nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes are used to construct the phylogenetics of 26 representative Dipteran species. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses suggest a closer relationship of D. antiqua in Anthomyiidae with Calliphoridae

  1. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Delia antiqua and Its Implications in Dipteran Phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nai-Xin; Yu, Guo; Li, Ting-Jing; He, Qi-Yi; Zhou, Yong; Si, Feng-Ling; Ren, Shuang; Chen, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Delia antiqua is a major underground agricultural pest widely distributed in Asia, Europe and North America. In this study, we sequenced and annotated the complete mitochondrial genome of this species, which is the first report of complete mitochondrial genome in the family Anthomyiidae. This genome is a double-stranded circular molecule with a length of 16,141 bp and an A+T content of 78.5%. It contains 37 genes (13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNAs and 2 rRNAs) and a non-coding A+T rich region or control region. The mitochondrial genome of Delia antiqua presents a clear bias in nucleotide composition with a positive AT-skew and a negative GC-skew. All of the 13 protein-coding genes use ATN as an initiation codon except for the COI gene that starts with ATCA. Most protein-coding genes have complete termination codons but COII and ND5 that have the incomplete termination codon T. This bias is reflected in both codon usage and amino acid composition. The protein-coding genes in the D. antiqua mitochondrial genome prefer to use the codon UUA (Leu). All of the tRNAs have the typical clover-leaf structure, except for tRNASer(AGN) that does not contain the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm like in many other insects. There are 7 mismatches with U-U in the tRNAs. The location and structure of the two rRNAs are conservative and stable when compared with other insects. The control region between 12S rRNA and tRNAIle has the highest A+T content of 93.7% in the D. antiqua mitochondrial genome. The control region includes three kinds of special regions, two highly conserved poly-T stretches, a (TA)n stretch and several G(A)nT structures considered important elements related to replication and transcription. The nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes are used to construct the phylogenetics of 26 representative Dipteran species. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses suggest a closer relationship of D. antiqua in Anthomyiidae with Calliphoridae, Calliphoridae is a

  2. Complete genome sequence of Archaeoglobus profundus type strain (AV18T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    von Jan, Mathias [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Feng [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Eichinger, Konrad [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Huber, Harald [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Wirth, Reinhard [Universitat Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Archaeoglobus profundus (Burggraf et al. 1990) is a hyperthermophilic archaeon in the euryarchaeal class Archaeoglobi, which is currently represented by six validly named species and two taxonomically challenged 'Geoglobus' strains, all belonging to the same family Archaeoglobaceae. All members were isolated from marine hydrothermal habitats and are obligate anaerobes. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the second completed genome sequence of a member of the class Archaeoglobi. The 1,563,423 bp genome with its 1,858 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain FORC_008, a foodborne pathogen from a flounder fish in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suyeon; Chung, Han Young; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Lim, Jong Gyu; Kim, Se Keun; Ku, Hye-Jin; Kim, You-Tae; Kim, Heebal; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon; Choi, Sang Ho

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative, motile, nonspore-forming pathogen that causes foodborne illness associated with the consumption of contaminated seafoods. Although many cases of foodborne outbreaks caused by V. parahaemolyticus have been reported, the genomes of only five strains have been completely sequenced and analyzed using bioinformatics. In order to characterize overall virulence factors and pathogenesis of V. parahaemolyticus associated with foodborne outbreak in South Korea, a new strain FORC_008 was isolated from flounder fish and its genome was completely sequenced. The genomic analysis revealed that the genome of FORC_008 consists of two circular DNA chromosomes of 3266 132 bp (chromosome I) and 1772 036 bp (chromosome II) with a GC content of 45.36% and 45.53%, respectively. The entire genome contains 4494 predicted open reading frames, 129 tRNAs and 31 rRNA genes. While the strain FORC_008 does not have genes encoding thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH), its genome encodes many other virulence factors including hemolysins, pathogenesis-associated secretion systems and iron acquisition systems, suggesting that it may be a potential pathogen. This report provides an extended understanding on V. parahaemolyticus in genomic level and would be helpful for rapid detection, epidemiological investigation and prevention of foodborne outbreak in South Korea.

  4. The complete genome of Enterovirus 71 China strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Five overlapping clones covering the full genome of Enterovirus71 China strain SHZH98 were obtained and then the sequences were determined by the chain termination method. It showed that the full length of EV71 SHZH98 genome (not including Poly A tail) is 7408 bp. There are some diversities on the lengths and sequences of 5′ UTR and 3′ UTR between SHZH98 and the other EV71 strains. In P1 capsid region, which is closely associated with viral immunogenicity, EV71 strain SHZH98 shares the highest homology with Taiwan strains; but in P2 and P3 non-structural gene regions there are higher identities with Coxsakievirus A16 and EV71 strains MS, BrCr than with Taiwan strains. Phylogenetic tree constructed by structural gene region indicates that China strain SHZH98 has a closer relationship with Taiwan strains, however, in the non-coding region it has a closer relationship with Coxsakievirus A16, EV71 strains MS and BrCr. EV71 China strain was analyzed at the molecular level. The results will contribute to the basic study on enteroviruses and the EV71 prevention in China.

  5. Phylogeny and evolution of Cervidae based on complete mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W-Q; Zhang, M-H

    2012-03-14

    Mitochondrial DNA sequences can be used to estimate phylogenetic relationships among animal taxa and for molecular phylogenetic evolution analysis. With the development of sequencing technology, more and more mitochondrial sequences have been made available in public databases, including whole mitochondrial DNA sequences. These data have been used for phylogenetic analysis of animal species, and for studies of evolutionary processes. We made phylogenetic analyses of 19 species of Cervidae, with Bos taurus as the outgroup. We used neighbor joining, maximum likelihood, maximum parsimony, and Bayesian inference methods on whole mitochondrial genome sequences. The consensus phylogenetic trees supported monophyly of the family Cervidae; it was divided into two subfamilies, Plesiometacarpalia and Telemetacarpalia, and four tribes, Cervinae, Muntiacinae, Hydropotinae, and Odocoileinae. The divergence times in these families were estimated by phylogenetic analysis using the Bayesian method with a relaxed molecular clock method; the results were consistent with those of previous studies. We concluded that the evolutionary structure of the family Cervidae can be reconstructed by phylogenetic analysis based on whole mitochondrial genomes; this method could be used broadly in phylogenetic evolutionary analysis of animal taxa.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1, a Gramicidin S- and d-Phenylalanyl-l-Propyl Diketopiperazine-Deficient Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Faizah N.; Luptakova, Lenka; Rateb, Mostafa E.; Woodward, Steve

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the Aneurinibacillus migulanus E1 mutant deficient in gramicidin S (GS) and d-phenylalanyl-l-propyl diketopiperazine (DKP) formation. The genome consists of a circular chromosome (6,301,904 bp, 43.20% G+C content) without any plasmid. The complete genome sequence enables further investigation of the biosynthetic mechanism and the biological function of gramicidin S. PMID:26679577

  7. The Complete Sequence of the Mitochondrial Genome of the Chamberednautilus (Mollusca: Cephalopoda)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Background: Mitochondria contain small genomes that arephysically separate from those of nuclei. Their comparison serves as amodel system for understanding the processes of genome evolution.Although complete mitochondrial genome sequences have been reported formore than 600 animals, the taxonomic sampling is highly biased towardvertebrates and arthropods, leaving much of the diversity yetuncharacterized. Results: The mitochondrial genome of a cephalopodmollusk, the Chambered Nautilus, is 16,258 nts in length and 59.5 percentA+T, both values that are typical of animal mitochondrial genomes. Itcontains the 37 genes that are typical for animal mtDNAs, with 15 on oneDNA strand and 22 on the other. The arrangement of these genes can bederived from that of the distantly related Katharina tunicata (Mollusca:Polyplacophora) by a switch in position of two large blocks of genes andtranspositions of four tRNA genes. There is strong skew in thedistribution of nucleotides between the two strands. There are an unusualnumber of non-coding regions and their function, if any, is not known;however, several of these demark abrupt shifts in nucleotide skew,suggesting that they may play roles in transcription and/or replication.One of the non-coding regions contains multiple repeats of a tRNA-likesequence. Some of the tRNA genes appear to overlap on the same strand,but this could be resolved if the polycistron were cleaved at thebeginning of the downstream gene, followed by polyadenylation of theproduct of the upstream gene to form a fully paired structure.Conclusions: Nautilus sp. mtDNA contains an expected gene content thathas experienced few rearrangements since the evolutionary split betweencephalopods and polyplacophorans. It contains an unusual number ofnon-coding regions, especially considering that these otherwise often aregenerated by the same processes that produce gene rearrangements. Thisappears to be yet another case where polyadenylation of mitochondrialtRNAs restores

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Thermus aquaticus Y51MC23.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip J Brumm

    Full Text Available Thermus aquaticus Y51MC23 was isolated from a boiling spring in the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. Remarkably, this T. aquaticus strain is able to grow anaerobically and produces multiple morphological forms. Y51MC23 is a Gram-negative, rod-shaped organism that grows well between 50°C and 80°C with maximum growth rate at 65°C to 70°C. Growth studies suggest that Y51MC23 primarily scavenges protein from the environment, supported by the high number of secreted and intracellular proteases and peptidases as well as transporter systems for amino acids and peptides. The genome was assembled de novo using a 350 bp fragment library (paired end sequencing and an 8 kb long span mate pair library. A closed and finished genome was obtained consisting of a single chromosome of 2.15 Mb and four plasmids of 11, 14, 70, and 79 kb. Unlike other Thermus species, functions usually found on megaplasmids were identified on the chromosome. The Y51MC23 genome contains two full and two partial prophage as well as numerous CRISPR loci. The high identity and synteny between Y51MC23 prophage 2 and that of Thermus sp. 2.9 is interesting, given the 8,800 km separation of the two hot springs from which they were isolated. The anaerobic lifestyle of Y51MC23 is complex, with multiple morphologies present in cultures. The use of fluorescence microscopy reveals new details about these unusual morphological features, including the presence of multiple types of large and small spheres, often forming a confluent layer of spheres. Many of the spheres appear to be formed not from cell envelope or outer membrane components as previously believed, but from a remodeled peptidoglycan cell wall. These complex morphological forms may serve multiple functions in the survival of the organism, including food and nucleic acid storage as well as colony attachment and organization.

  9. Genetic dissection of complete genomes of Type 2 PRRS viruses isolated in Denmark over a period of 15 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Brar, Manreetpal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) was first detected in Europe in 1996 co-incident with the introduction of a live attenuated vaccine. Since then, only limited ORF5 and ORF7 sequences of Type 2 PRRS viruses have been reported throughout Europe. In the present study......, the genetic and antigenic diversity of 11 complete genomes and 49 ORF5 and 55 ORF7 nucleotide sequences obtained from 57 viruses in Denmark from 2003 to 2012 were examined. The genetic identity of the 11 complete genomes to the vaccine strain (Ingelvac PRRS MLV) ranged between 93.6 and 99.6% while the 49 ORF5...

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Ehrlichia mineirensis, a Novel Organism Closely Related to Ehrlichia canis with a New Host Association

    OpenAIRE

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Zweygarth, Erich; Broniszweska, Marzena; Passos,Lygia M.F.; Ribeiro,Múcio Flávio Barbosa; Manrique, Marina; Tobes,Raquel; de la Fuente, José

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequencing of Ehrlichia mineirensis, an Ehrlichia organism that was isolated from the hemolymph of Rhipicephalus microplus–engorged females. E. mineirensis is the best characterized Ehrlichia isolate from a novel cattle-related clade closely related to the monocytotropic pathogen E. canis.

  11. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of Mayaro Virus Imported from the Amazon Basin to São Paulo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Mânlio Tasso Oliveira; Vedovello, Danila; Estofolete, Cassia; Malossi, Camila Dantas; Araújo, João Pessoa; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2015-11-25

    Mayaro (MAYV) is a neglected arbovirus from the tropical Americas. Here, we report the complete genome of an MAYV isolate from a patient returning from the Amazon basin and complaining of arthralgia, high fever, and headache, who was attended at an emergency service of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state, Brazil.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020, a thermophilic sporeformer associated with a dairy-processing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020 from a milk processing plant and report the complete genome of a dairy plant isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 3.75 Mb.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020, a Thermophilic Sporeformer Associated with a Dairy-Processing Environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020 from a milk processing plant and report the complete genome of a dairy plant isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 3.75 Mb.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii Strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582), an Efficient Producer of Bacterial Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Sarah; Mehta, Kalpa; Brown, R Malcolm

    2016-08-11

    This study reports the release of the complete nucleotide sequence of Gluconacetobacter hansenii strain NQ5 (ATCC 53582). This strain was isolated by R. Malcolm Brown, Jr. in a sugar mill in North Queensland, Australia, and is an efficient producer of bacterial cellulose. The elucidation of the genome will contribute to the study of the molecular mechanisms necessary for cellulose biosynthesis.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of an Ebola Virus Isolate Imported from Sierra Leone to Germany Determined by Circle Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengel, Jan Philipp; Lissin, Artur; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Schultze, Tilman; Mannala, Gopala Krishna; Schudt, Gordian; Kann, Gerrit; Wolf, Timo; Eickmann, Markus; Becker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    We report here a complete genome sequence of Ebola virus Makona from a nonfatal patient sample that originated in Sierra Leone during the last Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa (species Zaire ebolavirus) using a highly accurate circle sequencing (Cir-seq) method.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020, a thermophilic sporeformer associated with a dairy-processing environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Caspers, M.P.; Abee, T.; Siezen, R.J.; Kort, R.

    2012-01-01

    Thermophilic spore-forming bacteria are a common cause of contamination in dairy products. We isolated the thermophilic strain Geobacillus thermoglucosidans TNO-09.020 from a milk processing plant and report the complete genome of a dairy plant isolate consisting of a single chromosome of 3.75 Mb. ©

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Strain NM2010, Which Was Isolated from a Sheep in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-hui; HUANG Hai-bi; CHENG Chen; WANG Ren-chao; ZHENG Jia-qi; HAO Yong-qing; ZHANG Wen-guang

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, a kind of mycoplasma bacteria, commonly infects the respiratory tract causing respiratory disease in sheep and goats worldwide. Here, the complete genome sequence of M. ovipneumoniae strain NM2010 isolated from a sheep in China was reported for the ifrst time.

  19. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Chikungunya Virus Strain Isolated from a Patient Diagnosed with Dengue Virus Infection in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Han Ming; Rohani, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a chikungunya virus coinfection strain isolated from a dengue virus serotype 2-infected patient in Malaysia. This coinfection strain was determined to be of the Asian genotype and contains a novel insertion in the nsP3 gene. PMID:27563048

  20. Complete Genome Sequences of Chikungunya Virus Strains Isolated in Mexico: First Detection of Imported and Autochthonous Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Vázquez-Pichardo, Mauricio; Núñez-León, Alma; Torres-Rodríguez, María de la Luz; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Ruíz-Matus, Cuitláhuac; Kuri-Morales, Pablo; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus, an alphavirus of the Togaviridae family, is responsible for acute polyarthralgia epidemics. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two chikungunya virus strains, InDRE04 and InDRE51, identified in the Mexican states of Jalisco and Chiapas in 2014. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both strains belong to the Asian genotype. PMID:25953170

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827, a Food-Borne Pathogen Causing Deaths in Neonates ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis, an opportunistic food-borne pathogen, which is known as a rare but important cause of life-threatening neonatal infections. Among all proteins of C. turicensis, 223 have been annotated as virulence- and disease-related proteins.

  2. Complete genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis LMG 23827, a food-borne pathogen causing deaths in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Roger; Lehner, Angelika; Tischler, Patrick; Rattei, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report the complete and annotated genome sequence of Cronobacter turicensis, an opportunistic food-borne pathogen, which is known as a rare but important cause of life-threatening neonatal infections. Among all proteins of C. turicensis, 223 have been annotated as virulence- and disease-related proteins.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Francisella endociliophora Strain FSC1006, Isolated from a Laboratory Culture of the Marine Ciliate Euplotes raikovi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjödin, Andreas; Öhrman, Caroline; Bäckman, Stina; Lärkeryd, Adrian; Granberg, Malin; Lundmark, Eva; Karlsson, Edvin; Nilsson, Elin; Vallesi, Adriana; Tellgren-Roth, Christian; Stenberg, Per

    2014-01-01

    A strain of Francisella endociliophora was isolated from a laboratory culture of the marine ciliate Euplotes raikovi. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the bacterial strain FSC1006 (Francisella Strain Collection, Swedish Defence Research Agency, Umeå, Sweden). PMID:25428973

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of an American Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroup J Isolate That Causes Hemangiomas and Myeloid Leukosis

    OpenAIRE

    Malhotra, Sanandan; Justice, James; De Lee, Nathan; Li, Yingying; Zavala, Guillermo; Ruano, Miguel; Morgan, Robin; Beemon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) isolate PDRC-59831, which causes myeloid leukosis and hemangiomas in chickens. This is an American ALV-J isolate, which was found in a 38-week-old broiler breeder chicken on a farm in Georgia in 2007.

  5. Complete genome sequence of an Edwardsiella piscicida-like species recovered from tilapia in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardsiella piscicida-like sp. is a Gram-negative, facultative anaerobe that causes disease in some fish species. In this report we present the complete and annotated genome of isolate LADL05-105, recovered from cultured tilapia reared in Louisiana, which contains a chromosome of 4,142,037 bp and n...

  6. Complete genome sequence for two genotype A2 small ruminant lentiviruses from infected U.S. sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two distinct subgroups of genotype A2 SRLVs have been identified in the U.S. that infect sheep in association with their transmembrane protein 154 (TMEM154) diplotypes. Here, we report the first two complete genome sequences for SRLV strains infecting U.S. sheep belonging to genotype A2, subgroups 1...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Pontibacter akesuensis Strain AKS 1T, Which Exhibits Robust Nutrient Metabolism in Harsh Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; He, Kaiyong; Jiang, Yongzhong; Shen, Jiate

    2016-01-01

    Pontibacter akesuensis strain AKS 1T was found in Akesu, Xinjiang Province, China, and exhibits the extraordinary ability to metabolize various substrates and is resistant to solar radiation. To gain insight into the bacterial genetic determinants for this adaptability, we report the complete genome sequence of strain AKS 1T.

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus pyogenes emm14 JS95, a Necrotizing Fasciitis Strain Isolated in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Jacqueline L. Y.; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the Streptococcus pyogenes emm14 strain JS95, isolated from a patient with necrotizing fasciitis. The streptococcal invasion locus (sil), the first quorum-sensing system characterized in S. pyogenes, was identified in this strain. PMID:28302774

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-02-04

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides. Copyright © 2016 Mignolet et al.

  10. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a human commensal bacterium highly prevalent in the digestive tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular

  11. Complete genome sequence of Streptococcus salivarius HSISS4, a human commensal bacterium highly prevalent in the digestive tract

    OpenAIRE

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence ofStreptococcus salivariusHSISS4, a Human Commensal Bacterium Highly Prevalent in the Digestive Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Mignolet, Johann; Fontaine, Laetitia; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Hols, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The human commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius plays a major role in the equilibrium of microbial communities of the digestive tract. Here, we report the first complete genome sequence of a Streptococcus salivarius strain isolated from the small intestine, namely, HSISS4. Its circular chromosome comprises 1,903 coding sequences and 2,100,988 nucleotides.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolated from a Rock Dove (Columba livia) in the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Kseniya S; Sivay, Mariya V; Glushchenko, Alexandra V; Alkhovsky, Sergey V; Shchetinin, Alexey M; Shchelkanov, Michail Y; Shestopalov, Alexander M

    2015-01-29

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolate, NDV/Altai/pigeon/770/2011, isolated from a rock dove in the Russian Federation. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, this strain was clustered into genotype VIb class II.

  14. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurococcus fermentans, a hyperthermophilic cellulolytic crenarchaeon isolated from a freshwater hot spring in Kamchatka, Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanti, Dwi; Johnson, Eric F; Rodriguez, Jason R; Anderson, Iain; Perevalova, Anna A; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lucas, Susan; Han, James; Lapidus, Alla; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Peters, Lin; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren; Gopalan, Venkat; Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M; Atomi, Haruyuki; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta A; Woyke, Tanja; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup

    2012-10-01

    Desulfurococcus fermentans is the first known cellulolytic archaeon. This hyperthermophilic and strictly anaerobic crenarchaeon produces hydrogen from fermentation of various carbohydrates and peptides without inhibition by accumulating hydrogen. The complete genome sequence reported here suggested that D. fermentans employs membrane-bound hydrogenases and novel glycohydrolases for hydrogen production from cellulose.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Desulfurococcus fermentans, a Hyperthermophilic Cellulolytic Crenarchaeon Isolated from a Freshwater Hot Spring in Kamchatka, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susanti, Dwi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Johnson, Eric F [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Rodriquez, Jason [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Perevalova, Anna [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Peters, Lin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Gopapan, Venkay [Ohio State University; Chan, Patricia [University of California, Santa Cruz; Atomi, Haruyuki [Kyoto University, Japan; Bonch-Osmolovskaya, Elizaveta [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech)

    2012-01-01

    Desulfurococcus fermentans is the first known cellulolytic archaeon. This hyperthermophilic and strictly anaerobic crenarchaeon produces hydrogen from fermentation of various carbohydrates and peptides without inhibition by accumulating hydrogen. The complete genome sequence reported here suggested that D. fermentans employs membrane-bound hydrogenases and novel glycohydrolases for hydrogen production from cellulose.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Influenza Virus H9N2 Associated with a Fatal Outbreak among Chickens in Dubai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Siu-Ying; Joseph, Sunitha; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Chen, Honglin; Patteril, Nissy Annie Gerogy; Elizabeth, Shyna K; Muhammed, Rubeena; Baskar, Vijay; Lau, Susanna K P; Kinne, Joerg; Wernery, Ulrich; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-08-18

    We report the complete genome sequence of influenza virus H9N2 associated with a fatal outbreak among chickens in Dubai. All segments are clustered with avian H9N2 viruses circulating in the Middle East but distinct from those in southeast Asia. It is not a reassortant virus or transmitted from other regions.

  17. First Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype III Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolated from a Stillborn Piglet in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desingu, P. A.; Ray, Pradeep K.; John, Jeny K.; Das, T.; Dubal, Z. B.; Rajak, K. K.; Singh, R. K.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report here the first complete genome of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype III strain JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014, isolated from stillborn piglets in India. It shares 99% identity with strain JaOArS982 and a few other strains from Japan. PMID:28104663

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a New Enterococcus faecalis Bacteriophage, vB_EfaS_IME197

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Xing, Shaozhen; Zhang, Xianglilan; Pei, Guangqian; An, Xiaoping; Mi, Zhiqiang; Huang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We report here the whole-genome sequence of a new Enterococcus faecalis phage, vB_EfaS_IME197, which has a linear double-stranded DNA genome of 41,307 bp with 34% G+C content. We describe the main features of the genome of vB_EfaS_IME197. PMID:27634987

  19. Complete chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and chloroplast genome evolution in Saxifragales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpan Dong

    Full Text Available Comparative chloroplast genome analyses are mostly carried out at lower taxonomic levels, such as the family and genus levels. At higher taxonomic levels, chloroplast genomes are generally used to reconstruct phylogenies. However, little attention has been paid to chloroplast genome evolution within orders. Here, we present the chloroplast genome of Sedum sarmentosum and take advantage of several available (or elucidated chloroplast genomes to examine the evolution of chloroplast genomes in Saxifragales. The chloroplast genome of S. sarmentosum is 150,448 bp long and includes 82,212 bp of a large single-copy (LSC region, 16.670 bp of a small single-copy (SSC region, and a pair of 25,783 bp sequences of inverted repeats (IRs.The genome contains 131 unique genes, 18 of which are duplicated within the IRs. Based on a comparative analysis of chloroplast genomes from four representative Saxifragales families, we observed two gene losses and two pseudogenes in Paeonia obovata, and the loss of an intron was detected in the rps16 gene of Penthorum chinense. Comparisons among the 72 common protein-coding genes confirmed that the chloroplast genomes of S. sarmentosum and Paeonia obovata exhibit accelerated sequence evolution. Furthermore, a strong correlation was observed between the rates of genome evolution and genome size. The detected genome size variations are predominantly caused by the length of intergenic spacers, rather than losses of genes and introns, gene pseudogenization or IR expansion or contraction. The genome sizes of these species are negatively correlated with nucleotide substitution rates. Species with shorter duration of the life cycle tend to exhibit shorter chloroplast genomes than those with longer life cycles.

  20. LHC Report: The shutdown work nearing completion

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The work planned for the LHC injector chain during the winter shutdown is nearing completion. The PS Booster (PSB) and PS will be closed to access next week, and the control of machine access will be transferred to the CERN Control Centre in preparation for the resumption of machine operation. Hardware tests are being performed in all the machines.   Tests are under way in the LHC tunnel. The technical teams are putting the finishing touches to the work planned for the winter shutdown. At the Linac2, the PS Booster and the PS, work will be completed next week and hardware tests will be carried out soon after. POPS, the new powering system for the PS, will be commissioned for the first time in the coming days after the necessary preliminary tests have been carried out. At the SPS, various magnets have been replaced over recent weeks and the performance tests on the main power supply and other hardware tests will be able to start shortly. After that, the machine will be ready for operation with b...

  1. Complete genome sequence of Desulfurispirillum indicum strain S5(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bini, Elisabetta; Rauschenbach, Ines; Narasingarao, Priya; Starovoytov, Valentin; Hauser, Lauren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Land, Miriam; Bruce, David; Detter, Chris; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Shunsheng; Held, Brittany; Tapia, Roxanne; Copeland, Alex; Ivanova, Natalia; Mikhailova, Natalia; Nolan, Matt; Pati, Amrita; Pennacchio, Len; Pitluck, Sam; Woyke, Tanja; Häggblom, Max

    2011-12-31

    Desulfurispirillum indicum strain S5(T) is a strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from river sediment in Chennai, India. D. indicum belongs to the deep branching phylum of Chrysiogenetes, which currently only includes three other cultured species. Strain S5(T) is the type strain of the species and it is capable of growth using selenate, selenite, arsenate, nitrate or nitrite as terminal electron acceptors. The 2,928,377 bp genome encodes 2,619 proteins and 49 RNA genes, and the information gained from its sequence will be relevant to the elucidation of microbially-mediated transformations of arsenic and selenium, in addition to deepening our knowledge of the underrepresented phylum of Chrysiogenetes.

  2. Complete Genomic Sequence of Bacteriophage Felix O1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Kropinski

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage O1 is a Myoviridae A1 group member used historically for identifying Salmonella. Sequencing revealed a single, linear, 86,155-base-pair genome with 39% average G+C content, 131 open reading frames, and 22 tRNAs. Closest protein homologs occur in Erwinia amylovora phage φEa21-4 and Escherichia coli phage wV8. Proteomic analysis indentified structural proteins: Gp23, Gp36 (major tail protein, Gp49, Gp53, Gp54, Gp55, Gp57, Gp58 (major capsid protein, Gp59, Gp63, Gp64, Gp67, Gp68, Gp69, Gp73, Gp74 and Gp77 (tail fiber. Based on phage-host codon differences, 7 tRNAs could affect translation rate during infection. Introns, holin-lysin cassettes, bacterial toxin homologs and host RNA polymerase-modifying genes were absent.

  3. Complete genome sequence of a novel calicivirus from a goose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qinfeng; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dan; Zhang, Dabing

    2014-09-01

    A novel goose calicivirus (GoCV) was sequenced. The 8013-nt-long genome was organized into two open reading frames that were in the same frame and separated by 3 nucleotides. This feature is similar to what has been observed in turkey calicivirus (TuCV). Comparison of GoCV with other caliciviruses showed that it shared the highest amino acid sequence identities of 62, 38, and 52% in the nonstructural protein, VP1, and VP2, respectively, with TuCV. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequences of nonstructural protein and VP1 demonstrated that GoCV was most closely related to but distinct from TuCV. Thus, GoCV was identified as a novel member in the proposed genus Nacovirus.

  4. The complete mitochondrial genome of Bemisia afer (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua-Ling; Xiao, Na; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Colvin, John; Liu, Shu-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The length of the Bemisia afer (Priesner & Hosny) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) is 14,968 bp and consists of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), 21 transfer RNAs (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNAs and 1 control region. Apart from one serine transfer RNA gene (tRNA-Ser) which is absent, the synteny is consistent with the mitogenomes of other whitefly species. The overall base composition of the heavy strand for A, G, T and C is 28.96, 18.97, 36.7 and 15.37%, respectively, with a slight AT bias. Two rare codons (GTG and TTG) are employed as start codons by some PCGs. B. afer is a group of cryptic species. This first mitogenome cloned from African cassava B. afer, therefore, both enrich the whitefly molecular resource and will aid the sequencing of the other species' mitogenomes. It will contribute significantly to resolving the systematics of the B. afer complex.

  5. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  6. ER-12-1 completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

    1996-12-01

    The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

  7. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel N Farrugia

    Full Text Available Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships among amphisbaenian reptiles based on complete mitochondrial genomic sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macey, J. Robert; Papenfuss, Theodore J.; Kuehl, Jennifer V.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-19

    Complete mitochondrial genomic sequences are reported from 12 members in the four families of the reptile group Amphisbaenia. Analysis of 11,946 aligned nucleotide positions (5,797 informative) produces a robust phylogenetic hypothesis. The family Rhineuridae is basal and Bipedidae is the sister taxon to the Amphisbaenidae plus Trogonophidae. Amphisbaenian reptiles are surprisingly old, predating the breakup of Pangaea 200 million years before present, because successive basal taxa (Rhineuridae and Bipedidae) are situated in tectonic regions of Laurasia and nested taxa (Amphisbaenidae and Trogonophidae) are found in Gondwanan regions. Thorough sampling within the Bipedidae shows that it is not tectonic movement of Baja California away from the Mexican mainland that is primary in isolating Bipes species, but rather that primary vicariance occurred between northern and southern groups. Amphisbaenian families show parallel reduction in number of limbs and Bipes species exhibit parallel reduction in number of digits. A measure is developed for comparing the phylogenetic information content of various genes. A synapomorphic trait defining the Bipedidae is a shift from the typical vertebrate mitochondrial gene arrangement to the derived state of trnE and nad6. In addition, a tandem duplication of trnT and trnP is observed in B. biporus with a pattern of pseudogene formation that varies among populations. The first case of convergent rearrangement of the mitochondrial genome among animals demonstrated by complete genomic sequences is reported. Relative to most vertebrates, the Rhineuridae has the block nad6, trnE switched in order with cob, trnT, trnP, as they are in birds.

  9. The Complete DNA Sequence of the Mitochondrial Genome of a ``living Fossil,'' the Coelacanth (Latimeria Chalumnae)

    OpenAIRE

    Zardoya, Rafael; Meyer, Axel

    1997-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the 16,407-bp mitochondrial genome of the coelacanth (Latirneria chalumnae) was determined. Thec oelacanth mitochondrial genome orderi s identical to the consensus vertebrate gene order which is also found in all ray-finned fishes, the lungfish, and most tetrapods. Base composition and codon usage also conform to typical vertebrate patterns. The entire mitochondrial genome was PCR-amplified with 24 sets of primers that are expected to amplify homologous reg...

  10. Complete genome sequence of Enterococcus durans KLDS6.0930, a strain with probiotic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Li, Bailiang; Du, Jincheng; Yu, Shangfu; Li, Wan; Evivie, Smith Etareri; Guo, Lidong; Ding, Xiuyun; Xu, Min; Huo, Guicheng

    2016-01-10

    Enterococcus durans KLDS6.0930 strain was originally isolated from traditional naturally fermented cream in Inner Mongolia of China. The complete genome sequence of E. durans KLDS6.0930 was carried out using the PacBio RSII platform. The genome contains a circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. Genome sequencing information provides the genetic basis for bioinformatics analysis of bile salt and acid tolerance, cell adhesion, and molecular mechanisms responsible for lipid metabolism.

  11. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Wild Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanze; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Hongcheng; Yang, Yong; Duan, Yubao; Zhou, Zhengyan; Zhang, Minghai

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome (mt DNA) of Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides) was sequenced, using muscle tissue obtained from a male Amur moose. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,305 bp. The genome structure of Amur moose is similar to other moose and it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 1 control region.

  12. The complete genome sequence of Chlorobium tepidum TLS, a photosynthetic, anaerobic, green-sulfur bacterium

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The complete genome of the green-sulfur eubacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS was determined to be a single circular chromosome of 2,154,946 bp. This represents the first genome sequence from the phylum Chlorobia, whose members perform anoxygenic photosynthesis by the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle. Genome comparisons have identified genes in C. tepidum that are highly conserved among photosynthetic species. Many of these have no assigned function and may play novel role...

  13. Complete genome sequence of the actinobacterium Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) producing (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stegmann, Evi; Albersmeier, Andreas; Spohn, Marius

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) which was identified as the producer of (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid during a screening for phospholipase C inhibitors. The genome of A. japonica MG417-CF17T consists of two replicons: the chro......We report the complete genome sequence of Amycolatopsis japonica MG417-CF17T (=DSM 44213T) which was identified as the producer of (S,S)-N,N′-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid during a screening for phospholipase C inhibitors. The genome of A. japonica MG417-CF17T consists of two replicons...

  14. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were

  15. Complete Genomic Sequence of a Chinese Isolate of Duck Hepatitis Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The complete genomic sequence of Duck hepatitis virus 1 (DHV-1) ZJ-V isolate was sequenced and determined to be 7 691 nucleotides (nt) in length with a 5'-terminal un-translated region (UTR) of 626 nt and a 3'-terminal UTR of 315 nt (not including the poly(A) tail). One large open reading frame (ORF) was found within the genome (nt 627 to 7 373) coding for a polypeptide of 2 249amino acids. Our data also showed that the poly (A) tail of DHV-1 has at least 22 A's. Sequence comparison revealed significant homology (from 91.9% to 95.7%) between the protein sequences of the virus in the Picornaviridae family, its genome showed some unique characteristics. DHV-1 contains 3copies of the 2A gene and only 1 copy of the 3B gene, and its 3'-NCR is longer than those of other picornaviruses. Phylogenetic analysis to do sequence homology based on the VP1 protein sequences showed that the ZJ-V isolate shares high sequence homology with the reported DHV-1 isolates (from 92.9% to 99.2%), indicating that DHV-1 is genetically stable.

  16. Complete plastid genome sequence of goosegrass (Eleusine indica) and comparison with other Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Hall, Nathan; McElroy, J Scott; Lowe, Elijah K; Goertzen, Leslie R

    2017-02-05

    Eleusine indica, also known as goosegrass, is a serious weed in at least 42 countries. In this paper we report the complete plastid genome sequence of goosegrass obtained by de novo assembly of paired-end and mate-paired reads generated by Illumina sequencing of total genomic DNA. The goosegrass plastome is a circular molecule of 135,151bp in length, consisting of two single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 20,919 bases. The large (LSC) and the small (SSC) single-copy regions span 80,667 bases and 12,646 bases, respectively. The plastome of goosegrass has 38.19% GC content and includes 108 unique genes, of which 76 are protein-coding, 28 are transfer RNA, and 4 are ribosomal RNA. The goosegrass plastome sequence was compared to eight other species of Poaceae. Although generally conserved with respect to Poaceae, this genomic resource will be useful for evolutionary studies within this weed species and the genus Eleusine. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus oceanisediminis 2691, a reservoir of heavy-metal resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Hyun Ju; Lee, Dong-Woo; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-12-01

    Ocean sediments are commonly subject to the pollution of various heavy metals. Intracellular heavy metal concentrations in marine microorganisms should be kept within allowable concentrations. Here, we report redundant heavy metal resistance related genes encoding heavy metal-sensing transcriptional regulators (i.e. cadC), heavy metal efflux pumps, and detoxifying enzymes in the complete genome sequence of Bacillus oceanisediminis 2691. By comparing CadC sequences of strain 2691 with those from other bacterial genomes, we demonstrated that each cadC gene located in the chromosome or plasmid of 2691 cells are similar to those of various near or distant microbes, which might shed light on evolutionary trajectories of redundant heavy metal resistance genes. In application aspects, these diverse heavy metal sensing genes can be harnessed as synthetic biological parts, modules, and devices for the development of heavy metal-specific biosensors. Heavy metal bioremediation technologies or platform cells can be also developed based on the marine genomic information of heavy metal resistance and/or detoxification genes in a bacterial isolate from ocean sediments.

  18. LS1 Report: Preparatory phase complete

    CERN Multimedia

    Katy Foraz

    2013-01-01

    The preparatory phase in the LHC which includes electrical and leak test is now completed. The field is now free for consolidation, upgrade and maintenance activities.   Three magnets have been replaced in sector 7-8 and a special intervention team is now connecting new magnets that have been installed. Two magnets of sector 1-2 will be exchanged this week. The R2E project is progressing well: the power converters are being removed at points 1 and 7, while the protection works required prior to any civil engineering works commencing are almost finished at point 5. Moreover, many other activities are taking place in LHC, including the consolidation of the cryo line, and the maintenance of radio-frequency systems and cabling. The activities in the injector complex are also in full gear. Sixteen magnets at the SPS are being exchanged, and the pick-up tank of AD is now back in place. Meanwhile, the PS cranes are being exchanged and the old PS ventilation system is being replaced. The interconnecti...

  19. The Complete Genome Sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis AlHakam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challacombe, Jean F.; Altherr, Michael R.; Xie, Gary; Bhotika,Smriti S.; Brown, Nancy; Bruce, David; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell,Mary L.; Chen, Jin; Chertkov, Olga; Cleland, Cathy; Dimitrijevic, Mira; Doggett, Norman A.; Fawcett, John J.; Glavina, Tijana; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Green, Lance D.; Han, Cliff S.; Hill, Karen K.; Hitchcock, Penny; Jackson, Paul J.; Keim, Paul; Kewalramani, Avinash Ramesh; Longmire, Jon; Lucas, Susan; Malfatti, Stephanie; Martinez, Diego; McMurry, Kim; Meincke, Linda J.; Misra, Monica; Moseman, Bernice L.; Mundt, Mark; Munk,A. Christine; Okinaka, Richard T.; Parson-Quintana, B.; Reilly, LeePhilip; Richardson, Paul; Robinson, Donna L.; Rubin, Eddy; Saunders,Elizabeth; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson,Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Ticknor, Lawrence O.; Wills, Patti L.; Gilna, Paul; Brettin, Thomas S.

    2007-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is an insect pathogen that is widelyused as a biopesticide (3). Here we report the finished, annotated genomesequence of B. thuringiensis Al Hakam, which was collected in Iraq by theUnited Nations Special Commission (2).

  20. The complete mitochondrial genome of the armored catfish, Hypostomus plecostomus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shikai; Zhang, Jiaren; Yao, Jun; Liu, Zhanjiang

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the armored catfish, Hypostomus plecostomus, was determined by next generation sequencing of genomic DNA without prior sample processing or primer design. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the entire mitochondrial genome sequence with length of 16,523 bp. The H. plecostomus mitochondrial genome is consisted of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 rRNA genes, and 1 control region, showing typical circular molecule structure of mitochondrial genome as in other vertebrates. The whole genome base composition was estimated to be 31.8% A, 27.0% T, 14.6% G, and 26.6% C, with A/T bias of 58.8%. This work provided the H. plecostomus mitochondrial genome sequence which should be valuable for species identification, phylogenetic analysis and conservation genetics studies in catfishes.

  1. The complete genome sequence and analysis of the human pathogen Campylobacter lari

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, WG; Wang, G; Binnewies, Tim Terence

    2008-01-01

    Campylobacter lari is a member of the epsilon subdivision of the Proteobacteria and is part of the thermotolerant Campylobacter group, a clade that includes the human pathogen C. jejuni. Here we present the complete genome sequence of the human clinical isolate, C. lari RM2100. The genome of strain...... RM2100 is approximately 1.53 Mb and includes the 46 kb megaplasmid pCL2100. Also present within the strain RM2100 genome is a 36 kb putative prophage, termed CLIE1, which is similar to CJIE4, a putative prophage present within the C. jejuni RM1221 genome. Nearly all (90%) of the gene content...... in strain RM2100 is similar to genes present in the genomes of other characterized thermotolerant campylobacters. However, several genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and energy metabolism, identified previously in other Campylobacter genomes, are absent from the C. lari RM2100 genome. Therefore, C...

  2. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus subtilis SG6 antagonistic against Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yueju; Sangare, Lancine; Wang, Yao; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-20

    Bacillus subtilis SG6 exhibited a high antifungal effect on the mycelium growth, sporulation and DON production of F. graminearum and significantly reduced disease incidence, Fusarium head blight (FHB) index and DON in the field. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of B. subtilis SG6, providing insights into the genomic basis of its effects and facilitating its application in FHB control.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of the Novel Temperate Clostridium difficile Phage phiCDIF1296T

    OpenAIRE

    Wittmann, Johannes; Riedel, Thomas; Bunk, Boyke; Spröer, Cathrin; Gronow, Sabine; Overmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile contains many integrated and extrachromosomal genetic elements. In this study, we determined, annotated, and analyzed the complete genome of the C. difficile bacteriophage phiCDIF1296T using single-molecule real-time sequencing technology. To our knowledge, this represents the largest genome (131 kb) of a temperate C. difficile phage recognized so far.

  4. Biological characterization and complete genomic sequence of Carrot thin leaf virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host range of a cilantro isolate of Carrot thin leaf virus (CTLV-Cs) was determined to include 15 plant species. The virus was also transmitted to 9 of 11 tested apiaceous species by aphids. Complete genomic sequences of CTLV-Cs and a carrot isolate of CTLV were determined. Their genomic sequenc...

  5. Complete genome sequence of thermophilic Bacillus smithii type strain DSM 4216T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosma, Elleke Fenna; Koehorst, Jasper J.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.

    2016-01-01

    determined the complete genomic sequence of the B. smithii type strain DSM 4216T, which consists of a 3,368,778 bp chromosome (GenBank accession number CP012024.1) and a 12,514 bp plasmid (GenBank accession number CP012025.1), together encoding 3880 genes. Genome annotation via RAST was complemented...

  6. Complete genome sequence of a new tobamovirus naturally infecting tomatoes in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genomic sequence of a new tobamovirus in tomato was determined through deep sequencing and assembly of small RNAs, thenvalidated through Sanger sequencing of the overlapping RT-PCR products and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Based on the genomic sequence identity (85%) to kn...

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of a Newcastle Disease Virus Isolate from an Outbreak in Central India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Polakshee; Morla, Sudhir; Kaore, Megha; Kurkure, Nitin Vasantrao

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strain NDV/Chicken/Nagpur/01/12 was isolated from vaccinated chicken farms in India during outbreaks in 2012. The genome is 15,192 nucleotides in length and is classified as genotype VII in class II. PMID:25593257

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of the Porcine Isolate Enterococcus faecalis D32

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zischka, Melanie; Kuenne, Carsten; Blom, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    The complete and annotated genome sequence of Enterococcus faecalis D32, a commensal strain isolated from a Danish pig, suggests putative adaptation to the porcine host and absence of distinct virulence-associated traits....

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Genotype 2.2 Strain Bergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 2.2 classical swine fever virus strain Bergen has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from persistently infected domestic pigs in the Netherlands and is characterized to be of low virulence....

  10. Normalization of Complete Genome Characteristics: Application to Evolution from Primitive Organisms to Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorimachi, Kenji; Okayasu, Teiji; Ohhira, Shuji

    2015-04-01

    Normalized nucleotide and amino acid contents of complete genome sequences can be visualized as radar charts. The shapes of these charts depict the characteristics of an organism's genome. The normalized values calculated from the genome sequence theoretically exclude experimental errors. Further, because normalization is independent of both target size and kind, this procedure is applicable not only to single genes but also to whole genomes, which consist of a huge number of different genes. In this review, we discuss the applications of the normalization of the nucleotide and predicted amino acid contents of complete genomes to the investigation of genome structure and to evolutionary research from primitive organisms to Homo sapiens. Some of the results could never have been obtained from the analysis of individual nucleotide or amino acid sequences but were revealed only after the normalization of nucleotide and amino acid contents was applied to genome research. The discovery that genome structure was homogeneous was obtained only after normalization methods were applied to the nucleotide or predicted amino acid contents of genome sequences. Normalization procedures are also applicable to evolutionary research. Thus, normalization of the contents of whole genomes is a useful procedure that can help to characterize organisms.

  11. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    While initially a virtual institute, the driving force behind the creation of the DOE Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California in the Fall of 1999 was the Department of Energy's commitment to sequencing the human genome. With the publication in 2004 of a trio of manuscripts describing the finished 'DOE Human Chromosomes', the Institute successfully completed its human genome mission. In the time between the creation of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and completion of the Human Genome Project, sequencing and its role in biology spread to fields extending far beyond what could be imagined when the Human Genome Project first began. Accordingly, the targets of the DOE JGI's sequencing activities changed, moving from a single human genome to the genomes of large numbers of microbes, plants, and other organisms, and the community of users of DOE JGI data similarly expanded and diversified. Transitioning into operating as a user facility, the DOE JGI modeled itself after other DOE user facilities, such as synchrotron light sources and supercomputer facilities, empowering the science of large numbers of investigators working in areas of relevance to energy and the environment. The JGI's approach to being a user facility is based on the concept that by focusing state-of-the-art sequencing and analysis capabilities on the best peer-reviewed ideas drawn from a broad community of scientists, the DOE JGI will effectively encourage creative approaches to DOE mission areas and produce important science. This clearly has occurred, only partially reflected in the fact that the DOE JGI has played a major role in more than 45 papers published in just the past three years alone in Nature and Science. The involvement of a large and engaged community of users working on important problems has helped maximize the impact of JGI science. A seismic technological change is presently underway at the JGI. The Sanger capillary

  12. DOE Joint Genome Institute 2008 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, David

    2009-03-12

    While initially a virtual institute, the driving force behind the creation of the DOE Joint Genome Institute in Walnut Creek, California in the Fall of 1999 was the Department of Energy's commitment to sequencing the human genome. With the publication in 2004 of a trio of manuscripts describing the finished 'DOE Human Chromosomes', the Institute successfully completed its human genome mission. In the time between the creation of the Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI) and completion of the Human Genome Project, sequencing and its role in biology spread to fields extending far beyond what could be imagined when the Human Genome Project first began. Accordingly, the targets of the DOE JGI's sequencing activities changed, moving from a single human genome to the genomes of large numbers of microbes, plants, and other organisms, and the community of users of DOE JGI data similarly expanded and diversified. Transitioning into operating as a user facility, the DOE JGI modeled itself after other DOE user facilities, such as synchrotron light sources and supercomputer facilities, empowering the science of large numbers of investigators working in areas of relevance to energy and the environment. The JGI's approach to being a user facility is based on the concept that by focusing state-of-the-art sequencing and analysis capabilities on the best peer-reviewed ideas drawn from a broad community of scientists, the DOE JGI will effectively encourage creative approaches to DOE mission areas and produce important science. This clearly has occurred, only partially reflected in the fact that the DOE JGI has played a major role in more than 45 papers published in just the past three years alone in Nature and Science. The involvement of a large and engaged community of users working on important problems has helped maximize the impact of JGI science. A seismic technological change is presently underway at the JGI. The Sanger capillary

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus isolated from Viciafaba

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪平; 薛朝阳; 陈青; 戚益军; 李德葆

    2000-01-01

    Based on reported TMV-U1 sequence, primers were designed and fragments covering the entire genome of TMV broad bean strain (TMV-B) were obtained with RT-PCR. These fragments were cloned and sequenced and the 5’ and 3’ end sequences of genome were confirmed with RACE. The complete sequence of TMV-B comprises 6 395 nucleotides (nt) and four open reading frames, which correspond to 126 ku (1 116 amino acids), 183 ku (1 616 amino acids), 30 ku (268 amino acids) and 17.5 ku proteins (159 amino acids). The complete nucleotide sequence of TMV-B is 99.4% identical to that of TMV-U1. The two virus isolates share the same sequence of 5’, 3’ non-coding region and 17.5 K ORF, and 6, 1 and 3 amino acid changes are found in 126 K protein, 54 K protein and 30 K protein, respectively. The possible mechanism on the infection of TMV-B in Vicia faba is discussed.

  14. The complete mitochondrial genome of the golden snapper Lutjanus johnii (Perciformes: Lutjanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillebois, Laura; Crook, David; Saunders, Thor; Ovenden, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    We describe the complete mitochondrial genome of the golden snapper Lutjanus johnii. It was assembled from approximately 1.4 million reads produced by Ion Torrent next generation sequencing. The complete genome was 16,596 bp in length consisting of 13 protein-coding regions, 22 tRNA, 12S and 16S rRNA as well as two non-coding regions. The A+T base content (52.8%) is similar to other teleosts.

  15. The complete mitochondrial genome of Corydoras nattereri (Callichthyidae: Corydoradinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. Moreira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The complete mitogenome of Corydoras nattereri , a species of mailed catfishes from southeastern Brazil, was reconstructed using next-generation sequencing techniques. The mitogenome was assembled using mitochondrial transcripts from the liver transcriptomes of three individuals, and produced a circular DNA sequence of 16,557 nucleotides encoding 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes and two noncoding control regions (D-loop, OrigL. Phylogeographic analysis of closely related sequences of Cytochrome Oxydase C subunit I (COI demonstrates high diversity among morphologically similar populations of C. nattereri . Corydoras nattereri is nested within a complex of populations currently assigned to C. paleatus and C. ehrhardti . Analysis of mitogenome structure demonstrated that an insertion of 21 nucleotides between the ATPase subunit-6 and COIII genes may represent a phylogenetically informative character associated with the evolution of the Corydoradinae.

  16. Complete genome sequences and comparative genome analysis of Lactobacillus plantarum strain 5-2 isolated from fermented soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Jian; Wang, Rui; Gong, Fu-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Feng; Zheng, Hua-Jun; Luo, Yi-Yong; Li, Xiao-Ran

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is an important probiotic and is mostly isolated from fermented foods. We sequenced the genome of L. plantarum strain 5-2, which was derived from fermented soybean isolated from Yunnan province, China. The strain was determined to contain 3114 genes. Fourteen complete insertion sequence (IS) elements were found in 5-2 chromosome. There were 24 DNA replication proteins and 76 DNA repair proteins in the 5-2 genome. Consistent with the classification of L. plantarum as a facultative heterofermentative lactobacillus, the 5-2 genome encodes key enzymes required for the EMP (Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas) and phosphoketolase (PK) pathways. Several components of the secretion machinery are found in the 5-2 genome, which was compared with L. plantarum ST-III, JDM1 and WCFS1. Most of the specific proteins in the four genomes appeared to be related to their prophage elements.

  17. Complete mitochondrial genomes reveal neolithic expansion into Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaomei Fu

    Full Text Available The Neolithic transition from hunting and gathering to farming and cattle breeding marks one of the most drastic cultural changes in European prehistory. Short stretches of ancient mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA from skeletons of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers as well as early Neolithic farmers support the demic diffusion model where a migration of early farmers from the Near East and a replacement of pre-Neolithic hunter-gatherers are largely responsible for cultural innovation and changes in subsistence strategies during the Neolithic revolution in Europe. In order to test if a signal of population expansion is still present in modern European mitochondrial DNA, we analyzed a comprehensive dataset of 1,151 complete mtDNAs from present-day Europeans. Relying upon ancient DNA data from previous investigations, we identified mtDNA haplogroups that are typical for early farmers and hunter-gatherers, namely H and U respectively. Bayesian skyline coalescence estimates were then used on subsets of complete mtDNAs from modern populations to look for signals of past population expansions. Our analyses revealed a population expansion between 15,000 and 10,000 years before present (YBP in mtDNAs typical for hunters and gatherers, with a decline between 10,000 and 5,000 YBP. These corresponded to an analogous population increase approximately 9,000 YBP for mtDNAs typical of early farmers. The observed changes over time suggest that the spread of agriculture in Europe involved the expansion of farming populations into Europe followed by the eventual assimilation of resident hunter-gatherers. Our data show that contemporary mtDNA datasets can be used to study ancient population history if only limited ancient genetic data is available.

  18. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  19. Complete Decoding and Reporting of Aviation Routine Weather Reports (METARs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Man-Cheung Max

    2014-01-01

    Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) provides surface weather information at and around observation stations, including airport terminals. These weather observations are used by pilots for flight planning and by air traffic service providers for managing departure and arrival flights. The METARs are also an important source of weather data for Air Traffic Management (ATM) analysts and researchers at NASA and elsewhere. These researchers use METAR to correlate severe weather events with local or national air traffic actions that restrict air traffic, as one example. A METAR is made up of multiple groups of coded text, each with a specific standard coding format. These groups of coded text are located in two sections of a report: Body and Remarks. The coded text groups in a U.S. METAR are intended to follow the coding standards set by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). However, manual data entry and edits made by a human report observer may result in coded text elements that do not follow the standards, especially in the Remarks section. And contrary to the standards, some significant weather observations are noted only in the Remarks section and not in the Body section of the reports. While human readers can infer the intended meaning of non-standard coding of weather conditions, doing so with a computer program is far more challenging. However such programmatic pre-processing is necessary to enable efficient and faster database query when researchers need to perform any significant historical weather analysis. Therefore, to support such analysis, a computer algorithm was developed to identify groups of coded text anywhere in a report and to perform subsequent decoding in software. The algorithm considers common deviations from the standards and data entry mistakes made by observers. The implemented software code was tested to decode 12 million reports and the decoding process was able to completely interpret 99.93 of the reports. This

  20. Analyses of the complete genome and gene expression of chloroplast of sweet potato [Ipomoea batata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression.