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Sample records for repolarization abnormalities evidence

  1. Cardiac Repolarization Abnormalities and Potential Evidence for Loss of Cardiac Sodium Currents on ECGs of Patients with Chagas' Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, T. T.; Medina, R.; Jugo, D.; Nunez, T. J.; Borrego, A.; Arellano, E.; Arenare, B.; DePalma, J. L.; Greco, E. C.; Starc, V.

    2007-01-01

    were not significantly different between groups. Patients with Chagas heart disease have increased cardiac repolarization abnormalities, especially by advanced ECG. Moreover, as a group, they have decreased uncorrected JT and QT interval durations and increased filtered QRS interval durations (versus age/gender-matched controls), all suggesting a potential loss of cardiac sodium channel function that might be mediated, in part, by cardiac autonomic damage. Overall findings support Brugada et al's recent hypothesis that the pathway leading to sudden death may often be similar in Chagas' disease and Brugada syndrome i.e., damage to the sodium channel (infectious/immunologic/autonomic in Chagas' genetic in Brugada) with consequent loss of sodium currents may facilitate a phase II-reentry based arrhythmic substrate for ventricular fibrillation in both conditions. In general, JT interval-related results have been underreported in the Chagas literature.

  2. Quantitative analysis of T-wave morphology increases confidence in drug-induced cardiac repolarization abnormalities: evidence from the investigational IKr inhibitor Lu 35-138

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Matz, Jørgen; Christensen, Ellen B;

    2009-01-01

    to determine a combined measure of repolarization morphology (morphology combination score [MCS]), based on asymmetry, flatness, and notching. Replicate measurements were used to determine reliable change and study power for both measures. Lu 35-138 increased the QTc interval with corresponding changes in T...... was 93%. As a covariate to the assessment of QT interval liability, MCS offered important additive information to the effect of Lu 35-138 on cardiac repolarization....

  3. Role of abnormal repolarization in the mechanism of cardiac arrhythmia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchiy, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    impulse conduction. This review outlines the electrical activity of ventricular myocytes in normal conditions and cardiac disease, describes classical electrophysiological mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmia, and provides an update on repolarization-related surrogates currently used to assess arrhythmic...... propensity, including spatial dispersion of repolarization, activation-repolarization coupling, electrical restitution, TRIaD (triangulation, reverse use dependence, instability, and dispersion), and the electromechanical window. This is followed by a discussion of the mechanisms that account...

  4. Assessing common classification methods for the identification of abnormal repolarization using indicators of T-wave morphology and QT interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shakibfar, Saeed; Graff, Claus; Ehlers, Lars Holger;

    2012-01-01

    volunteers and LQT2 carriers were used to train classification algorithms using measures of T-wave morphology and QTc. The ability to correctly classify a third group of test subjects before and after receiving d,l-sotalol was evaluated using classification rules derived from training. As a single......Various parameters based on QTc and T-wave morphology have been shown to be useful discriminators for drug induced I(Kr)-blocking. Using different classification methods this study compares the potential of these two features for identifying abnormal repolarization on the ECG. A group of healthy...

  5. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... are typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... with QTcF, p ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure has...

  6. Post-Pacing Abnormal Repolarization in Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia Associated with a Mutation in the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor Gene (RyR2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nof, Eyal; Belhassen, Bernard; Arad, Michael; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Antzelevitch, Charles; Rosso, Raphael; Fogelman, Rami; Luria, David; Eli-Ani, Dalia; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Viskin, Sami; Eldar, Michael; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Glikson, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an arrhythmogenic disease for which electrophysiological studies (EPS) have shown to be of limited value. Objective We present a CPVT family in which marked post-pacing repolarization abnormalities during EPS were the only consistent phenotypic manifestation of RyR2 mutation carriers. Methods The study was prompted by the observation of transient marked QT prolongation preceding initiation of ventricular fibrillation during atrial fibrillation in a boy with a family history of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Family members underwent exercise and pharmacologic ECG testing with epinephrine, adenosine and flecainide. Non-invasive clinical tests were normal in 10 patients evaluated, except for both epinephrine and exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in 1. EPS included bursts of ventricular pacing and programmed ventricular extrastimulation reproducing short-long sequences. Genetic screening involved direct sequencing of genes involved in LQTS as well as RyR2. Results Six patients demonstrated a marked increase in QT interval only in the first beat after cessation of ventricular pacing and/or extrastimulation. All 6 patients were found to have a heterozygous missense mutation (M4109R) in RyR2. Two of them, presenting with aborted SCD also had a second missense mutation (I406T- RyR2). Four family members without RyR2 mutations did not display prominent post-pacing QT changes. Conclusions M4109R- RyR2 is associated with a high incidence of SCD. The contribution of I406T to the clinical phenotype is unclear. In contrast to exercise testing, marked post-pacing repolarization changes in a single beat accurately predicted carriers of M4109R- RyR2 in this family. PMID:21699856

  7. Tachycardia-dependent augmentation of "notched J waves" in a general patient population without ventricular fibrillation or cardiac arrest: not a repolarization but a depolarization abnormality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Yoshifusa; Sato, Masahito; Kitazawa, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Yoshiyasu; Takatsuki, Seiji; Oda, Eiji; Okabe, Masaaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    J waves can be observed in individuals of the general population, but electrocardiographic characteristics are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the J-wave dynamicity in a general patient population. The responses of J waves (>0.1 mV above the isoelectric line in 2 contiguous leads) to varying RR intervals were analyzed. Patients with aborted sudden cardiac death, documented ventricular fibrillation, or a family history of sudden cardiac death were excluded. The J-wave amplitude was measured at baseline, in beats with short RR intervals in conducted atrial premature beats (APBs) or atrial stimulation during the electrophysiology study, and in the beats next to APBs with prolonged RR intervals. Mainly notched J waves were identified in 94 of 701 (24.5%) general patients (13.4%), and APBs were present in 23 of 94 (24.5%) patients. The mean baseline amplitude of J waves was 0.20 ± 0.06 mV at the baseline RR interval of 853 ± 152 ms, 0.25 ± 0.11 mV at the RR interval in the conducted APB of 545 ± 133 ms (P = .0018), and 0.19 ± 0.08 mV at the RR interval of 1146 ± 314 ms (P = .3102). The clinical characteristics were not different between patients with and without tachycardia-dependent augmentation of J waves. Augmentation of J waves was confirmed by the electrophysiology study: 0.28 ± 0.12 mV vs 0.42 ± 0.11 mV at baseline and in the beats of atrial stimulation, respectively (P = .0001). However, no bradycardia-dependent augmentation (>0.05 mV) was observed. Such tachycardia-dependent augmentation can represent depolarization abnormality rather than repolarization abnormality. J waves in a general patient population were augmented at shorter RR intervals, but not at prolonged RR intervals. Mechanistically, conduction delay is most likely responsible for this. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cardiac action potential repolarization re-visited: early repolarization shows all-or-none behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenor, Beatriz; Cardona, Karen; Saiz, Javier; Noble, Denis; Giles, Wayne

    2017-08-17

    In healthy mammalian hearts the action potential (AP) waveform initiates and modulates each contraction, or heartbeat. As a result, action potential height and duration are key physiological variables. In addition, rate-dependent changes in ventricular action potential duration (APD), and variations in APD at a fixed heart rate, are both reliable biomarkers of electrophysiological stability. Present guidelines for the likelihood that candidate drugs will increase arrhythmias rely on small changes in APD and Q-T intervals as criteria for Safety Pharmacology decisions. However, both of these measurements correspond to the final repolarization of the AP. Emerging clinical evidence also draws attention to the early repolarization phase of the action potential (and the J wave of the ECG) as a biomarker for arrhythmogenesis. Here we provide mechanistic background to this Early Repolarization Syndrome by summarizing the evidence that both the initial depolarization and repolarization phases of the cardiac action potential can exhibit distinct time- and voltage-dependent thresholds; and demonstrating that both can show regenerative all-or-none behaviour. An important consequence of this is that not all of the dynamics of action potential repolarization in human ventricle can be captured by data from single myocytes when these results are expressed as 'repolarization reserve'. For example, the complex pattern of cell-to-cell current flow that is responsible for AP conduction (propagation) within the mammalian myocardium can change APD and the Q-T interval of the electrocardiogram as well as alter APD stability, and modulate responsiveness to pharmacological agents (such as Class III anti-arrhythmic drugs). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular/genetic determinants of repolarization and their modification by environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, M R; Cohen, I S

    2006-01-01

    Although a variety of factors, inherited or environmental, can influence expression of ion channel proteins to impact on repolarization, that environment can affect genetic determinants of repolarization for intervals of varying duration is a concept that is not as generally appreciated as it should be. In the following pages we review the molecular/genetic determinants of cardiac repolarization and summarize how pathologic events and environmental intrusions can affect these determinants. Understanding the chains of events involved should yield insights into both the causes and potential avenues of treatment for abnormalities of repolarization.

  10. Early Repolarization Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Sacher

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrocardiographic pattern of early repolarization (ER is common, with a particularly high prevalence reported amongst athletes and adolescents. It has long been associated with benign outcome [1-3]. Recently, an association between inferolateral ER pattern and sudden cardiac death (SCD has been established by different groups [4-7]. Population-based studies have also reported an increased mortality rate among patients with inferolateral ER pattern compared to controls [7-9]. To bring back together these differences, it is important to focus on the definition of ER pattern used in these different studies as well as the population included. The definition of ER pattern associated with sudden cardiac death was the presence of J point elevation more than or equal to 0.1mV in at least 2 contiguous inferior and/or lateral leads of a standard 12-lead ECG and not ST elevation as it was often the case in the studies with benign outcome. Any study dealing with ER should clearly indicate the definition used. Otherwise it cannot be interpreted. Talking about definition, ER syndrome is an ER pattern (as defined above associated with symptoms (syncope or aborted SCD and/or familial history of SCD as mentioned in the last HRS/EHRA/APHRS Expert Consensus Statement on the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Inherited Primary Arrhythmia Syndromes [10]. It is important to recognise that having only an ER pattern is not a disease.

  11. ECG phenomena: pseudopreexcitation and repolarization disturbances resembling ST-elevation myocardial infarction caused by an intraatrial rhabdomyoma in a newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Christian; Gebauer, Roman Antonin

    2014-01-01

    As is known from other reports, a rhabdomyoma or tumor metastasis may alter intracardiac electrical conduction, producing electrical phenomena like pseudopreexcitation or repolarization disturbances resembling ST-elevation myocardial infarction or Brugada's syndrome. We present a newborn with a giant atrial rhabdomyoma and additionally multiple ventricular rhabdomyomas. He presented with several electrocardiogram (ECG) phenomena due to tumor-caused atrial depolarization and repolarization disturbances. Except from the cardiac tumors, the physical status was within normal range. Initial ECG showed a rapid atrial tachycardia with a ventricular rate of 230 bpm, which was terminated by electrical cardioversion. Afterwards, the ECG showed atrial rhythm with frequent atrial premature contractions and deformation of the PR interval with large, broad P waves and loss of discret PR segment, imposing as pseudopreexcitation. The following QRS complex was normal, with seemingly abnormal ventricular repolarization resembeling ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The atrial tumor was resected with consequent vast atrial reconstruction using patch plastic. The ventricular tumors were left without manipulation. After surgery, pseudopreexcitation and repolarization abnormalities vanished entirely and an alternans between sinus rhythm and ectopic atrial rhythm was present. These phenomena were supposably caused by isolated atrial depolarization disturbances due to tumor-caused heterogenous endocardial activation. The seemingly abnormal ventricular repolarization is probably due to repolarization of the atrial mass, superimposed on the ventricular repolarization. Recognizably, the QRS complex before and after surgical resection of the rhabdomyoma is identical, underlining the atrial origin of the repolarization abnormalities before surgery.

  12. Quinidine elicits proarrhythmic changes in ventricular repolarization and refractoriness in guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2013-04-01

    Quinidine is a class Ia Na(+) channel blocker that prolongs cardiac repolarization owing to the inhibition of I(Kr), the rapid component of the delayed rectifier current. Although quinidine may induce proarrhythmia, the contributing mechanisms remain incompletely understood. This study examined whether quinidine may set proarrhythmic substrate by inducing spatiotemporal abnormalities in repolarization and refractoriness. The monophasic action potential duration (APD), effective refractory periods (ERPs), and volume-conducted electrocardiograms (ECGs) were assessed in perfused guinea-pig hearts. Quinidine was found to produce the reverse rate-dependent prolongation of ventricular repolarization, which contributed to increased steepness of APD restitution. Throughout the epicardium, quinidine elicited a greater APD increase in the left ventricular chamber compared with the right ventricle, thereby enhancing spatial repolarization heterogeneities. Quinidine prolonged APD to a greater extent than ERP, thus extending the vulnerable window for ventricular re-excitation. This change was attributed to increased triangulation of epicardial action potential because of greater APD lengthening at 90% repolarization than at 30% repolarization. Over the transmural plane, quinidine evoked a greater ERP prolongation at endocardium than epicardium and increased dispersion of refractoriness. Premature ectopic beats and monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 50% of quinidine-treated heart preparations. In summary, abnormal changes in repolarization and refractoriness contribute greatly to proarrhythmic substrate upon quinidine infusion.

  13. ECG-Based Measurements of Drug-induced Repolarization Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer Ahmed

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore the proporti......The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the abnormal repolarization both in the cellular and the surface ECG along with their relationship. It has been identified that the certain morphological changes of the monophasic action potential are predictor of TdP arrhythmia. Therefore...... the proportional changes of the surface ECG which corresponds to the arrhythmia-triggering MAP morphology is warranted to increase the confidence of determining cardiotoxicity of drugs....

  14. Repolarization reserve, arrhythmia and new drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Repolarization-related lethal arrhythmias have led to the concept of “repolarization reserve”, which may help elucidate the relationship between K+ currents and other components of repolarization. Pharmacological manipulation as well as congenital and cardiac disease may affect repolarization and alter the repolarization reserve, leading to the development of arrhythmias. Pharmacological enhancement of outward currents or suppression of inward currents has been shown to be of therapeutic value. A number of newly found selective ion channel inhibitors or agonists have been investigated for their ability to enhance repolarization reserve and decrease the incidence of arrhythmia. In this paper we review the development, potential mechanisms, clinical application, and pharmacological significance of repolarization reserve in order to better understand, predict and prevent unexplained adverse cardiac events.

  15. Procainamide and lidocaine produce dissimilar changes in ventricular repolarization and arrhythmogenicity in guinea-pig.

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    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Procainamide is class Ia Na(+) channel blocker that may prolong ventricular repolarization secondary to inhibition of IK r , the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current. In contrast to selective IN a blockers such as lidocaine, procainamide was shown to produce arrhythmogenic effects in the clinical setting. This study examined whether pro-arrhythmic responses to procainamide may be accounted for by drug-induced repolarization abnormalities including impaired electrical restitution kinetics, spatial gradients in action potential duration (APD), and activation-to-repolarization coupling. In perfused guinea-pig hearts, procainamide was found to prolong the QT interval on ECG and left ventricular (LV) epicardial monophasic APD, increased the maximum slope of electrical restitution, enhanced transepicardial APD variability, and eliminated the inverse correlation between the local APD and activation time values determined at distinct epicardial recording sites prior to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine had no effect on electrical restitution, the degree of transepicardial repolarization heterogeneities, and activation-to-repolarization coupling. Spontaneous episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 57% of procainamide-treated heart preparations. No arrhythmia was induced by lidocaine. In summary, this study suggests that abnormal changes in repolarization may contribute to pro-arrhythmic effects of procainamide.

  16. The Conditions for Initiating "All-or-Nothing" Repolarization in Cardiac Muscle

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    Noble, D.; Hall, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Solutions have been computed for the point polarization of an infinite cable-like membrane obeying the equations used to reproduce the Purkinje fiber action potential (Noble, 1960, 1962a) in order to determine the conditions for initiating all-or-nothing repolarization during the action potential plateau. It was found that all-or-nothing repolarization would not be obtainable during the first half of the action potential in spite of the fact that the membrane current-voltage relations contain regions of negative conductance. At the point at which the all-or-nothing response is first obtained, the computed threshold is large and repolarization almost back to the resting potential would be required in order to initiate the response. The results are discussed in relation to the experimental evidence at present available on repolarization in heart muscle. PMID:19431326

  17. Ventricular repolarization measures for arrhythmic risk stratification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Monitillo; Marta Leone; Caterina Rizzo; Andrea Passantino; Massimo Iacoviello

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular repolarization is a complex electrical phenomenon which represents a crucial stage in electrical cardiac activity. It is expressed on the surface electrocardiogram by the interval between the start of the QRS complex and the end of the T wave or U wave(QT). Several physiological, pathological and iatrogenic factors can influence ventricular repolarization. It has been demonstrated that small perturbations in this process can be a potential trigger of malignant arrhythmias, therefore the analysis of ventricular repolarization represents an interesting tool to implement risk stratification of arrhythmic events in different clinical settings. The aim of this review is to critically revise the traditional methods of static analysis of ventricular repolarization as well as those for dynamic evaluation, their prognostic significance and the possible application in daily clinical practice.

  18. Abnormal Audit Fees and Audit Opinion–Further Evidence from China’s Capital Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zanchun Xie; Chun Cai; Jianming Ye

    2010-01-01

    The existing literature on audit opinion shopping provides inconsistent evidence on whether such shopping has any association with abnormal audit fees. In this paper, we hypothesize that firms engage in audit opinion shopping and pay an abnormal audit fee only when their degree of accounting quality is low. To examine the issue, we group firms on the basis of their change in return on assets(ROA), and show that abnormal audit fees improve audit opinions only among firms that engage local auditors and have a low degree of ROA, but report a large increase in ROA, especially when the ROA change is the result of abnormal accruals. We find no association between abnormal audit fees and audit opinion improvement for other firms.

  19. Right ventricular arrhythmogenesis in failing human heart: the role of conduction and repolarization remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Qing; Janks, Deborah L.; Holzem, Katherine M.; Lang, Di; Onal, Birce; Ambrosi, Christina M.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Wang, I-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Increased dispersion of repolarization has been suggested to underlie increased arrhythmogenesis in human heart failure (HF). However, no detailed repolarization mapping data were available to support the presence of increased dispersion of repolarization in failing human heart. In the present study, we aimed to determine the existence of enhanced repolarization dispersion in the right ventricular (RV) endocardium from failing human heart and examine its association with arrhythmia inducibility. RV free wall preparations were dissected from five failing and five nonfailing human hearts, cannulated and coronary perfused. RV endocardium was optically mapped from an ∼6.3 × 6.3 cm2 field of view. Action potential duration (APD), dispersion of APD, and conduction velocity (CV) were quantified for basic cycle lengths (BCL) ranging from 2,000 ms to the functional refractory period. We found that RV APD was significantly prolonged within the failing group compared with the nonfailing group (560 ± 44 vs. 448 ± 39 ms, at BCL = 2,000 ms, P < 0.05). Dispersion of APD was increased in three failing hearts (161 ± 5 vs. 86 ± 19 ms, at BCL = 2,000 ms). APD alternans were induced by rapid pacing in these same three failing hearts. CV was significantly reduced in the failing group compared with the nonfailing group (81 ± 11 vs. 98 ± 8 cm/s, at BCL = 2,000 ms). Arrhythmias could be induced in two failing hearts exhibiting an abnormally steep CV restitution and increased dispersion of repolarization due to APD alternans. Dispersion of repolarization is enhanced across the RV endocardium in the failing human heart. This dispersion, together with APD alternans and abnormal CV restitution, could be responsible for the arrhythmia susceptibility in human HF. PMID:23042951

  20. Visuospatial Processing in Children with Autism: No Evidence for (Training-Resistant) Abnormalities

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    Chabani, Ellahe; Hommel, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have been assumed to show evidence of abnormal visuospatial processing, which has been attributed to a failure to integrate local features into coherent global Gestalts and/or to a bias towards local processing. As the available data are based on baseline performance only, which does not provide…

  1. Further evidence for a non-random chromosomal abnormality in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.; Golomb, H.M.; Vardiman, J.; Fukahara, S.; Dougherty, C.; Potter, D.

    1977-01-01

    We have previously reported on two patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) who had what appeared to be a deletion of chromosome No. 17. We now describe a third patient with APL. All three patients had a structural rearrangement involving No. 15 and No. 17. Our current interpretation of the chromosomal abnormality is that it is a reciprocal translocation, t (15; 17) (q22; q21). Evidence that this is a consistent rearrangement associated with APL comes not only from our three patients, but also from two other published cases of APL, studied with banding, who also had an identical abnormality.

  2. Abnormal placentation: evidence-based diagnosis and management of placenta previa, placenta accreta, and vasa previa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Kiran Prabhaker; Belogolovkin, Victoria; Yankowitz, Jerome; Spinnato, Joseph A

    2012-08-01

    Placenta previa, placenta accreta, and vasa previa cause significant maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. With the increasing incidence of both cesarean delivery and pregnancies using assisted reproductive technology, these 3 conditions are becoming more common. Advances in grayscale and Doppler ultrasound have facilitated prenatal diagnosis of abnormal placentation to allow the development of multidisciplinary management plans to achieve the best outcomes for mother and baby. We present a comprehensive review of the literature on abnormal placentation including an evidence-based approach to diagnosis and management.

  3. Effects of Na+ channel blockers on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-03-01

    Antiarrhythmic agents which belong to class Ia (quinidine) and Ic (flecainide) reportedly increase propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmia, whereas class Ib agents (lidocaine and mexiletine) are recognized as safe antiarrhythmics. Clinically, tachyarrhythmia is often initiated by a premature ectopic beat, which increases spatial nonuniformities in ventricular conduction and repolarization thus facilitating reentry. This study examined if electrical derangements evoked by premature excitation may be accentuated by flecainide and quinidine, but unchanged by lidocaine and mexiletine, which would explain the difference in their safety profile. In perfused guinea pig hearts, a premature excitation evoked over late repolarization phase was associated with prolonged epicardial activation time, reduced monophasic action potential duration (APD), and increased transepicardial dispersion of the activation time and APD. Flecainide and quinidine increased conduction slowing evoked by extrasystolic stimulation, prolonged APD, and accentuated spatial heterogeneities in ventricular conduction and repolarization associated with premature excitation. Spontaneous episodes of nonsustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 50% of heart preparations exposed to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine and mexiletine had no effect on extrasystolic stimulation-evoked changes in ventricular conduction and repolarization or arrhythmic susceptibility. These findings suggest that flecainide and quinidine may promote arrhythmia by exaggerating electrophysiological abnormalities evoked by ectopic beats.

  4. Abnormal functional brain asymmetry in depression: evidence of biologic commonality between major depression and dysthymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Gerard E; Stewart, Jonathan W; Hellerstein, David; Alvarenga, Jorge E; Alschuler, Daniel; McGrath, Patrick J

    2012-04-30

    Prior studies have found abnormalities of functional brain asymmetry in patients having a major depressive disorder (MDD). This study aimed to replicate findings of reduced right hemisphere advantage for perceiving dichotic complex tones in depressed patients, and to determine whether patients having "pure" dysthymia show the same abnormality of perceptual asymmetry as MDD. It also examined gender differences in lateralization, and the extent to which abnormalities of perceptual asymmetry in depressed patients are dependent on gender. Unmedicated patients having either a MDD (n=96) or "pure" dysthymic disorder (n=42) and healthy controls (n=114) were tested on dichotic fused-words and complex-tone tests. Patient and control groups differed in right hemisphere advantage for complex tones, but not left hemisphere advantage for words. Reduced right hemisphere advantage for tones was equally present in MDD and dysthymia, but was more evident among depressed men than depressed women. Also, healthy men had greater hemispheric asymmetry than healthy women for both words and tones, whereas this gender difference was not seen for depressed patients. Dysthymia and MDD share a common abnormality of hemispheric asymmetry for dichotic listening.

  5. Early repolarization syndrome: A cause of sudden cardiac death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdi; Ali; Nida; Butt; Azeem; S; Sheikh

    2015-01-01

    Early repolarization syndrome(ERS), demonstrated as J-point elevation on an electrocardiograph, was formerly thought to be a benign entity, but the recent studies have demonstrated that it can be linked to a considerable risk of life- threatening arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death(SCD). Early repolarization characteristics associated with SCD include high-amplitude J-point elevation, horizontal and/or downslopping ST segments, and inferior and/or lateral leads location. The prevalence of ERS varies between 3% and 24%, depending on age, sex and J-point elevation(0.05 m V vs 0.1 m V) being the main determinants.ERS patients are sporadic and they are at a higher risk of having recurrent cardiac events. Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator implantation and isoproterenol are the suggested therapies in this set of patients. On the other hand, asymptomatic patients with ERS are common and have a better prognosis. The risk stratification in asymptomatic patients with ERS still remains a grey area. This review provides an outline of the up-to-date evidence associated with ERS and the risk of life- threatening arrhythmias. Further prospective studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms of ventricular arrhythmogenesis in patients with ERS.

  6. Electrophysiological evidence for abnormal preparatory states and inhibitory processing in adult ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandeis Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder that starts in childhood and frequently persists in adults. Several theories postulate deficits in ADHD that have effects across many executive functions or in more narrowly defined aspects, such as response inhibition. Electrophysiological studies on children, however, indicate that ADHD is not associated with a core deficit of response inhibition, as abnormal inhibitory processing is typically preceded or accompanied by other processing deficits. It is not yet known if this pattern of abnormal processing is evident in adult ADHD. Methods The objective of this paper was to investigate event-related potential indices of preparatory states and subsequent response inhibition processing in adults with ADHD. Two cued continuous performance tasks were presented to 21 adults meeting current criteria for adult ADHD and combined type ADHD in childhood, and 20 controls. Results The ADHD group exhibited significantly weaker orienting attention to cues, cognitive preparation processes and inhibitory processing. In addition, we observed a strong correlation between the resources allocated to orienting to cues and the strength of the subsequent response strength control processes, suggesting that orienting deficits partly predict and determine response control deficits in ADHD. Conclusions These findings closely resemble those previously found in children with ADHD, which indicate that there is not a core response inhibition deficit in ADHD. These findings therefore suggest the possibility of developmental stability into adulthood of the underlying abnormal processes in ADHD.

  7. Working memory encoding and maintenance deficits in schizophrenia: neural evidence for activation and deactivation abnormalities.

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    Anticevic, Alan; Repovs, Grega; Barch, Deanna M

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence implicates working memory (WM) as a core deficit in schizophrenia (SCZ), purportedly due to primary deficits in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex functioning. Recent findings suggest that SCZ is also associated with abnormalities in suppression of certain regions during cognitive engagement--namely the default mode system--that may further contribute to WM pathology. However, no study has systematically examined activation and suppression abnormalities across both encoding and maintenance phases of WM in SCZ. Twenty-eight patients and 24 demographically matched healthy subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3T while performing a delayed match-to-sample WM task. Groups were accuracy matched to rule out performance effects. Encoding load was identical across subjects to facilitate comparisons across WM phases. We examined activation differences using an assumed model approach at the whole-brain level and within meta-analytically defined WM areas. Despite matched performance, we found regions showing less recruitment during encoding and maintenance for SCZ subjects. Furthermore, we identified 2 areas closely matching the default system, which SCZ subjects failed to deactivate across WM phases. Lastly, activation in prefrontal regions predicted the degree of deactivation for healthy but not SCZ subjects. Current results replicate and extend prefrontal recruitment abnormalities across WM phases in SCZ. Results also indicate deactivation abnormalities across WM phases, possibly due to inefficient prefrontal recruitment. Such regional deactivation may be critical for suppressing sources of interference during WM trace formation. Thus, deactivation deficits may constitute an additional source of impairments, which needs to be further characterized for a complete understanding of WM pathology in SCZ.

  8. Increased recombination frequency showing evidence of loss of interference is associated with abnormal testicular histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmuza, Susannah; Ling, Ling

    2003-04-01

    Nondisjunction leading to aneuploid gametes has been linked genetically to both increases and decreases in recombination frequency on the aneuploid chromosome. In the present study, we present physical evidence of increased frequency of recombination nodules as measured by Mut-S-like homologue-1 (MLH1) foci on pachytene chromosomes from sterile male mice homozygous for a mutation in the protein phosphatase 1cgamma (PP1cgamma) gene. The pattern of elevated recombination frequency in PP1cgamma mutant spermatocytes is consistent with a loss of interference. Previous studies demonstrated: (1) spermiogenesis is impaired starting at step 8 with a severe reduction in elongating and condensed spermatids; (2) spermatids and sperm exhibit elevated rates of DNA fragmentation; and (3) haploid gametes exhibit elevated levels of aneuploidy. Morphometric analysis of developing testes revealed that the first wave of meiosis proceeds at a normal rate in mutant testes, a surprising result given that the PP1 inhibitor okadaic acid has been shown to accelerate progression of spermatocytes from pachytene to the first meiotic division (MI). Evidence of abnormal testicular histopathology is apparent at 3 weeks, before the appearance of haploid gametes, eliminating the possibility that the mutant phenotype is caused by the presence of abnormal spermatids, but coincident with the appearance of the first set of mid to late pachytene spermatocytes. These observations lead us to conclude that the PP1cgamma mutation causes a complex phenotype, including subtle adverse effects on meiosis, possibly mediated by defective signaling between germ cells and Sertoli cells.

  9. Impact of hypokalemia on electromechanical window, excitation wavelength and repolarization gradients in guinea-pig and rabbit hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-01-01

    Normal hearts exhibit a positive time difference between the end of ventricular contraction and the end of QT interval, which is referred to as the electromechanical (EM) window. Drug-induced prolongation of repolarization may lead to the negative EM window, which was proposed to be a novel proarrhythmic marker. This study examined whether abnormal changes in the EM window may account for arrhythmogenic effects produced by hypokalemia. Left ventricular pressure, electrocardiogram, and epicardial monophasic action potentials were recorded in perfused hearts from guinea-pig and rabbit. Hypokalemia (2.5 mM K(+)) was found to prolong repolarization, reduce the EM window, and promote tachyarrhythmia. Nevertheless, during both regular pacing and extrasystolic excitation, the increased QT interval invariably remained shorter than the duration of mechanical systole, thus yielding positive EM window values. Hypokalemia-induced arrhythmogenicity was associated with slowed ventricular conduction, and shortened effective refractory periods, which translated to a reduced excitation wavelength index. Hypokalemia also evoked non-uniform prolongation of action potential duration in distinct epicardial regions, which resulted in increased spatial variability in the repolarization time. These findings suggest that arrhythmogenic effects of hypokalemia are not accounted for by the negative EM window, and are rather attributed to abnormal changes in ventricular conduction times, refractoriness, excitation wavelength, and spatial repolarization gradients.

  10. Impact of hypokalemia on electromechanical window, excitation wavelength and repolarization gradients in guinea-pig and rabbit hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg E Osadchii

    Full Text Available Normal hearts exhibit a positive time difference between the end of ventricular contraction and the end of QT interval, which is referred to as the electromechanical (EM window. Drug-induced prolongation of repolarization may lead to the negative EM window, which was proposed to be a novel proarrhythmic marker. This study examined whether abnormal changes in the EM window may account for arrhythmogenic effects produced by hypokalemia. Left ventricular pressure, electrocardiogram, and epicardial monophasic action potentials were recorded in perfused hearts from guinea-pig and rabbit. Hypokalemia (2.5 mM K(+ was found to prolong repolarization, reduce the EM window, and promote tachyarrhythmia. Nevertheless, during both regular pacing and extrasystolic excitation, the increased QT interval invariably remained shorter than the duration of mechanical systole, thus yielding positive EM window values. Hypokalemia-induced arrhythmogenicity was associated with slowed ventricular conduction, and shortened effective refractory periods, which translated to a reduced excitation wavelength index. Hypokalemia also evoked non-uniform prolongation of action potential duration in distinct epicardial regions, which resulted in increased spatial variability in the repolarization time. These findings suggest that arrhythmogenic effects of hypokalemia are not accounted for by the negative EM window, and are rather attributed to abnormal changes in ventricular conduction times, refractoriness, excitation wavelength, and spatial repolarization gradients.

  11. Evidence for Abnormal Fetal Middle Cerebral Artery Values in Addict Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadi Fard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: Addiction is a risk factor for perinatal morbidity and mortality, although the pre-cise mechanism is unknown. They may alter oxygen delivery to the fetus. The middle cerebral artery (MCA pulsatility index (PI is a sensitive parameter for detection of blood flow redistribution or centrali-zation. The aim of this study was to determine whether addiction, without smoking, is associated with changes in the PI of the MCA and the umbilical artery (UA."nPatients and Methods: The PI of the MCA and UA were determined prospectively in 212 consecutive addict and pregnant women with singleton pregnan-cies (study group and in 212 matched pregnant women without addiction (control group. The con-trol group was matched for maternal age, gravidity, parity and gestational age at examination. Patients with fetal structural or chromosomal anomalies, dia-betes mellitus, and smokers were excluded. A PI be-low the 5th percentile for the MCA was considered abnormal. "nResults: The rate of abnormal MCA PI was signifi-cantly higher in the study group than control group: 33.3% vs. 6.3%, respectively, (p < 0.0001. "nConclusions: Our observations provide evidence of cerebral blood flow redistribution in fetuses with ad-dicted mothers.

  12. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Cagirci, Goksel; Atak, Ramazan; Balbay, Yucel; Demir, Ahmet Duran; Aydogdu, Sinan

    2010-09-01

    Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise. A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed. Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P heart rate increment (heart rate decrement (heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively. Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  13. Early repolarization electrocardiography pattern with unexplained syncope during training in a young black African non-elite athlete: an accidental finding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Aimé; Ditah, Ivo; Amara, Walid; Hamdaoui, Brahim; Frank, Robert; Le Heuzey, Jean-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Until recently it was generally thought that early repolarization is benign. But a recent article in the NEJM (Haissaguerre et al.) suggests that some persons with early repolarization may be at risk of life-threatening ventricular tachyarrhythmia. Unexplained syncope or sudden death occurs mostly during sleep. However, some cases of cardiac arrest during exertion have been reported. We report the case of a 39 year-old black African male with early repolarization pattern on electrocardiogram who regularly experienced dizziness (and one episode of transient loss of consciousness) exclusively while exercising. Detailed examination was normal. Under quinidine therapy, he experienced no further episodes. Increasingly reported cases of cardiac arrest in Africans, and significant prevalence of early repolarization in this population, have to be taken into account since the Haissaguerre et al. report. Further evidence of the lethal consequences of this syndrome are needed, bearing in mind that diagnostic tools for life-threatening arrhythmias are often scarce in sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. Heart rate profile during exercise in patients with early repolarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Serkan Cay; Goksel Cagirci; Ramazan Atak; Yucel Balbay; Ahmet Duran Demir; Sinan Aydogdu

    2010-01-01

    Background Both early repolarization and altered heart rate profile are associated with sudden death. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate an association between early repolarization and heart rate profile during exercise.Methods A total of 84 subjects were included in the study. Comparable 44 subjects with early repolarization and 40 subjects with normal electrocardiogram underwent exercise stress testing. Resting heart rate, maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and decrement were analyzed.Results Both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics including resting heart rate. Maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrment of the subjects in early repolarization group had significantly decreased maximum heart rate, heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to control group (all P<0.05). The lower heart rate increment (<106 beats/min) and heart rate decrement (<95 beats/min) were significantly associated with the presence of early repolarization. After adjustment for age and sex, the multiple-adjusted OR of the risk of presence of early repolarization was 2.98 (95% CI 1.21-7.34) (P=0.018) and 7.73 (95% CI 2.84-21.03) (P <0.001) for the lower heart rate increment and heart rate decrement compared to higher levels, respectively.Conclusions Subjects with early repolarization have altered heart rate profile during exercise compared to control subjects. This can be related to sudden death.

  15. The effects of efficiency on abnormal return: Evidence from banking industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Tayer Farahani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency plays essential role for improving the performance of banking industry. In this paper, we present an empirical investigation to study the effect of efficiency on abnormal return. The proposed study collects the necessary information from official statements as well as historical data over the period 2009-2013 reported on Tehran Stock Exchange to examine the relationship between efficiency and abnormal return. Using regression analysis, the study has determined a meaningful, positive but weak relationship between abnormal return and efficiency. However, the study does not find any meaningful relationship between bank size and abnormal return.

  16. Archaerhodopsin voltage imaging: synaptic calcium and BK channels stabilize action potential repolarization at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin J; Davis, Graeme W

    2014-10-29

    The strength and dynamics of synaptic transmission are determined, in part, by the presynaptic action potential (AP) waveform at the nerve terminal. The ion channels that shape the synaptic AP waveform remain essentially unknown for all but a few large synapses amenable to electrophysiological interrogation. The Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a powerful system for studying synaptic biology, but it is not amenable to presynaptic electrophysiology. Here, we demonstrate that Archaerhodopsin can be used to quantitatively image AP waveforms at the Drosophila NMJ without disrupting baseline synaptic transmission or neuromuscular development. It is established that Shaker mutations cause a dramatic increase in neurotransmitter release, suggesting that Shaker is predominantly responsible for AP repolarization. Here we demonstrate that this effect is caused by a concomitant loss of both Shaker and slowpoke (slo) channel activity because of the low extracellular calcium concentrations (0.2-0.5 mM) used typically to assess synaptic transmission in Shaker. In contrast, at physiological extracellular calcium (1.5 mM), the role of Shaker during AP repolarization is limited. We then provide evidence that calcium influx through synaptic CaV2.1 channels and subsequent recruitment of Slo channel activity is important, in concert with Shaker, to ensure proper AP repolarization. Finally, we show that Slo assumes a dominant repolarizing role during repetitive nerve stimulation. During repetitive stimulation, Slo effectively compensates for Shaker channel inactivation, stabilizing AP repolarization and limiting neurotransmitter release. Thus, we have defined an essential role for Slo channels during synaptic AP repolarization and have revised our understanding of Shaker channels at this model synapse.

  17. Major rapid weight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel-Larsen, Esben; Iepsen, Eva Winning; Lundgren, Julie

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Obesity is associated with increased all-cause mortality, but weight loss may not decrease cardiovascular events. In fact, very low calorie diets have been linked to arrhythmias and sudden death. The QT interval is the standard marker for cardiac repolarization, but T-wave morphology...... analysis has been suggested as a more sensitive method to identify changes in cardiac repolarization. We examined the effect of a major and rapid weight loss on T-wave morphology. METHODS AND RESULTS: Twenty-six individuals had electrocardiograms (ECG) taken before and after eight weeks of weight loss......A1c (pweight loss induces changes in cardiac repolarization. Monitoring of MCS during calorie restriction makes it possible to detect repolarization changes with higher discriminative power than the QT-interval during major rapid weight...

  18. Delayed ventricular repolarization as an anti-arrhythmic principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1985-11-01

    Depolarization of cardiac muscle is achieved by 'fast inward current' through channels which are inactivated within about 1 ms. When the cells are repolarized the process of inactivation of fast channels is rapidly reversed. The class 1 anti-arrhythmic drugs delay the disappearance of inactivation until long after repolarization is complete. In theory, it should be possible to produce a similar extension of refractory period by delaying the repolarization itself. Quinidine and disopyramide caused minor delays of repolarization, but both were primarily class 1 agents, and in addition had undesirable anticholinergic activity. Amiodarone, already in use for many years as an antianginal drug, prolonged action potential duration (APD) and was shown to have an anti-arrhythmic action in rabbits, dogs and man. Although prolongation of APD lengthens QT, a long QT may be caused by phenomena other than prolonged APD, such as heterogeneity of sympathetic drive. Association of long QT with arrhythmia does not, therefore, invalidate the principle that homogeneously prolonged APD should be anti-arrhythmic. In practice, amiodarone, bretylium, sotalol, thyroidectomy, and long-term beta-blockade prolong APD, and are associated with low incidence of arrhythmia. Many mechanisms controlling cardiac repolarization have been proposed, but how repolarization is delayed by individual agents is not fully elucidated.

  19. Evidence for metabolic abnormalities in the muscles of patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Niermann, K J; Olsen, N

    2000-04-01

    Widespread muscle pain, fatigue, and weakness are defining characteristics of patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The aim of this review is to summarize recent investigations of muscle abnormalities in FM, which can be classified as structural, metabolic, or functional in nature. Histologic muscle abnormalities of membranes, mitochondria, and fiber type have been well described at both the light microscopic and ultrastructural levels. These structural abnormalities often correlate with biochemical abnormalities, defective energy production, and the resultant dysfunction of FM muscles. The observed abnormalities in FM muscles are consistent with neurologic findings and disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Functional changes in FM muscles are assessed most directly by strength and endurance measurements, but pain and psychologic factors may interfere with accurate assessments. To compensate for diminished effort, the decreased efficiency of the work performance by patients with FM can be verified from P-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) data by calculation of the work/energy-cost ratio for various tasks. In the disease course, muscle abnormalities may be elicited by intrinsic changes within the muscle tissue itself and/or extrinsic neurologic and endocrine factors. The accurate assignment of intrinsic or extrinsic factors has been substantially clarified by a recent surge of experimental findings. Irrespective of the multifaceted causes of muscle dysfunction and pain, an in-depth understanding of the muscle defects may provide ideas for characterization of the underlying pathogenesis and development of new therapeutic approaches for fibromyalgia syndrome.

  20. Slowed EEG rhythmicity in patients with chronic pancreatitis: evidence of abnormal cerebral pain processing?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olesen, S.S.; Hansen, T.M.; Graversen, C.; Steimle, K.; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.; Drewes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Intractable pain usually dominates the clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis (CP). Slowing of electroencephalogram (EEG) rhythmicity has been associated with abnormal cortical pain processing in other chronic pain disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the sp

  1. Faulty cardiac repolarization reserve in alternating hemiplegia of childhood broadens the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Fatima; Avbersek, Andreja; Vavassori, Rosaria; Fons, Carmen; Campistol, Jaume; Stagnaro, Michela; De Grandis, Elisa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rosewich, Hendrik; Gianotta, Melania; Zucca, Claudio; Ragona, Francesca; Granata, Tiziana; Nardocci, Nardo; Mikati, Mohamed; Helseth, Ashley R; Boelman, Cyrus; Minassian, Berge A; Johns, Sophia; Garry, Sarah I; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Gourfinkel-An, Isabelle; Carrilho, Ines; Aylett, Sarah E; Parton, Matthew; Hanna, Michael G; Houlden, Henry; Neville, Brian; Kurian, Manju A; Novy, Jan; Sander, Josemir W; Lambiase, Pier D; Behr, Elijah R; Schyns, Tsveta; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Cross, J Helen; Kaski, Juan P; Sisodiya, Sanjay M

    2015-10-01

    Alternating hemiplegia of childhood is a rare disorder caused by de novo mutations in the ATP1A3 gene, expressed in neurons and cardiomyocytes. As affected individuals may survive into adulthood, we use the term 'alternating hemiplegia'. The disorder is characterized by early-onset, recurrent, often alternating, hemiplegic episodes; seizures and non-paroxysmal neurological features also occur. Dysautonomia may occur during hemiplegia or in isolation. Premature mortality can occur in this patient group and is not fully explained. Preventable cardiorespiratory arrest from underlying cardiac dysrhythmia may be a cause. We analysed ECG recordings of 52 patients with alternating hemiplegia from nine countries: all had whole-exome, whole-genome, or direct Sanger sequencing of ATP1A3. Data on autonomic dysfunction, cardiac symptoms, medication, and family history of cardiac disease or sudden death were collected. All had 12-lead electrocardiogram recordings available for cardiac axis, cardiac interval, repolarization pattern, and J-point analysis. Where available, historical and prolonged single-lead electrocardiogram recordings during electrocardiogram-videotelemetry were analysed. Half the cohort (26/52) had resting 12-lead electrocardiogram abnormalities: 25/26 had repolarization (T wave) abnormalities. These abnormalities were significantly more common in people with alternating hemiplegia than in an age-matched disease control group of 52 people with epilepsy. The average corrected QT interval was significantly shorter in people with alternating hemiplegia than in the disease control group. J wave or J-point changes were seen in six people with alternating hemiplegia. Over half the affected cohort (28/52) had intraventricular conduction delay, or incomplete right bundle branch block, a much higher proportion than in the normal population or disease control cohort (P = 0.0164). Abnormalities in alternating hemiplegia were more common in those ≥16 years old, compared

  2. A study on relationship between abnormal accruals and future profitability: Evidence from Tehran Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khodaei Valahzaghard

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to study the relationship between future profitability and abnormal accruals on selected firms from Tehran Stock Exchange (TSE. The study selects 223 firms from TSE market over the period 2007-2011. Using the regression analysis, the study shows there was no meaningful relationship between abnormal earnings and future profitability when the level of significance is five percent. There are also seven sub-hypotheses associated with the proposed study of this paper. The results indicate that while there were no meaningful relationship between firm size, ratio of book value to equity, capital expenditure, earnings quality, earning forecasted error and book value leverage on one side and future earnings, the study confirms a significance relationship between market leverage and future earnings.

  3. Circadian rhythms in depression and recovery: evidence for blunted amplitude as the main chronobiological abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souêtre, E; Salvati, E; Belugou, J L; Pringuey, D; Candito, M; Krebs, B; Ardisson, J L; Darcourt, G

    1989-06-01

    Circadian rhythms of body temperature, plasma cortisol, norepinephrine (NE), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and melatonin were compared in 16 endogenously depressed, 15 recovered (after 3 weeks of anti-depressant treatment), and 16 normal subjects. The depressed patients showed clear circadian rhythm abnormalities, consisting mainly in amplitude reduction. This amplitude reduction was significantly correlated with the patients' Hamilton depression scores. Normal circadian profiles were restored after recovery when amplitude, in particular, was increased. Features of the circadian rhythms observed in remission may be associated with antidepressant drug effects, whereas those observed in depression resemble the circadian rhythms observed in normal subjects living under conditions of temporal isolation and those of blind subjects. Our findings suggest that depression may be related both to a weakening of the coupling processes between internal pacemakers and to an abnormal sensitivity to environmental information.

  4. Evidence of increased chromosomal abnormalities in French Polynesian thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Violot, D.; M' kacher, R.; Dossou, J. [UPRES, Laboratory of Radiosensitivity and Radiocarcinogenesis (France); Adjadj, E.; Vathaire, F. de [INSERM, Laboratory of Cancer Epidemiology (France); Parmentier, C. [UPRES, Laboratory of Radiosensitivity and Radiocarcinogenesis (France); Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Villejuif (France)

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in thyroid cancer patients before and after radioactive iodine administration in order to assess cytogenetic particularity in Polynesian thyroid cancer patients. Chromosomal abnormalities were studied in 30 Polynesian patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, prior to and 4 days after{sup 131}I administration. Unstable chromosomal abnormalities were counted in peripheral blood lymphocytes using a conventional cytogenetic method. Peripheral blood was irradiated in vitro at different doses (0.5, 1 and 2 Gy) in order to establish the dose-response of the lymphocytes. Control groups were composed of 50 European thyroid cancer patients before and after first administration of{sup 131}I, and of ten European healthy donors. In addition, in vitro irradiation assays were performed at different doses (0.5, 1 and 2 Gy). The relative risk of spontaneous dicentrics before any radiation treatment was 2.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.1) times higher among Polynesian thyroid patients than among European thyroid cancer patients. After in vitro irradiation, the rise in frequency of dicentrics was similar in the Polynesian thyroid cancer group and the European thyroid patients and healthy donors. Four days after administration of 3.7 GBq{sup 131}I, the relative risk for a dicentric per cell was 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.5) times higher in Polynesian than in European patients. This can be explained by higher{sup 131}I retention in Polynesian compared with European patients. The results obtained revealed an increased frequency of cytogenetic abnormalities in Polynesian thyroid cancer patients compared with European control patients. These preliminary findings are compatible with possible previous environmental aggression and therefore imply a need for further investigations on larger series including, in particular, French Polynesian healthy donors. In addition to French Polynesians, Maori and Hawaiian control groups could be

  5. Abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence: evidence from a voxelwise degree centrality analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoping; Guo, Linghong; Dai, Xi-Jian; Wang, Qinglai; Zhu, Wenzhong; Miao, Xinjun; Gong, Honghan

    2017-01-01

    To explore the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence using voxelwise degree centrality analysis approach, and their relationships with clinical features. Twenty-four male alcohol dependence subjects free of medicine (mean age, 50.21±9.62 years) and 24 age- and education-matched male healthy controls (mean age, 50.29±8.92 years) were recruited. The alcohol use disorders identification test and the severity of alcohol dependence questionnaire (SADQ) were administered to assess the severity of alcohol craving. Voxelwise degree centrality approach was used to assess the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs features in alcohol dependence. Simple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationships between the clinical features and abnormal intrinsic functional hubs. Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependence subjects exhibited significantly different degree centrality values in widespread left lateralization brain areas, including higher degree centrality values in the left precentral gyrus (BA 6), right hippocampus (BA 35, 36), and left orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11) and lower degree centrality values in the left cerebellum posterior lobe, bilateral secondary visual network (BA 18), and left precuneus (BA 7, 19). SADQ revealed a negative linear correlation with the degree centrality value in the left precentral gyrus (R(2)=0.296, P=0.006). The specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs appear to be disrupted by alcohol intoxication, which implicates at least three principal neural systems: including cerebellar, executive control, and visual cortex, which may further affect the normal motor behavior such as an explicit type of impaired driving behavior. These findings expand our understanding of the functional characteristics of alcohol dependence and may provide a new insight into the understanding of the dysfunction and pathophysiology of alcohol dependence.

  6. An evidence-based approach to medicinal plants for the treatment of sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvilzadeh, M; Hajimahmoodi, M; Toliyat, T; Karimi, M; Rahimi, R

    2016-10-01

    Infertility is defined as inability of a sexually active couple to conceive after 1 year of regular intercourse without contraception. Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility. The aim of this study was to review medicinal plants that proposed to improve sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine. For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, GoogleScholar and Cochrane library were explored for medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine for sperm abnormalities to obtain studies giving any evidence for their efficacy and pharmacological mechanisms related to male infertility. Data were collected for the years 1966 to March 2015. For some of them, including Chlorophytum borivilianum, Crocus sativus, Nigella sativa, Sesamum indicum, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Withania somnifera, more reliable evidence was found. The mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of medicinal plants in sperm abnormalities are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and venotonic activity as well as containing precursors for sperm production and increasing blood testosterone level. Various phytochemical categories including saponins, phytosterols, carotenoids, oxygenated volatile compounds, phenolic compounds and alkaloids seem to be responsible for these beneficial effects. Further studies are recommended for obtaining more conclusive results about the efficacy and safety of the mentioned medicinal plants.

  7. Preliminary Evidence of White Matter Abnormality in the Uncinate Fasciculus in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, K. Luan; Orlichenko, Anton; Boyd, Erin; Angstadt, Mike; Coccaro, Emil F.; Liberzon, Israel; Arfanakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Background Individuals with generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) exhibit exaggerated amygdala reactivity to aversive social stimuli. These findings could be explained by microstructural abnormalities in white matter (WM) tracts that connect the amygdala and prefrontal cortex, which is known to modulate the amygdala’s response to threat. The goal of this study was to investigate brain frontal WM abnormalities by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in patients with social anxiety disorder. Method A Turboprop DTI sequence was used to acquire diffusion tensor images in thirty patients with GSAD and thirty matched healthy controls. Fractional anisotropy, an index of axonal organization, within WM was quantified in individual subjects and an automated voxel-based, whole-brain method was used to analyze group differences. Results Compared to healthy controls, patients had significantly lower fractional anisotropy localized to the right uncinate fasciculus WM near the orbitofrontal cortex. There were no areas of higher fractional anisotropy in patients than controls. Conclusions These findings point to an abnormality in the uncinate fasciculus, the major WM tract connecting the frontal cortex to the amygdala and other limbic temporal regions, in GSAD which could underlie the aberrant amygdala-prefrontal interactions resulting in dysfunctional social threat processing in this illness. PMID:19362707

  8. Cardiac Repolarization Changes in the Children with Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozgar, Hamid; Saleh, Fazl; Farhani, Nahal; Rafiei, Mohammad; Inaloo, Soroor; Asadipooya, Ali-Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Objective Breath-holding spells are known as benign attacks, frequencies of which decrease by the development of the autonomic nervous system. The present study aims to compare the electrocardiographic repolarization in children with breath-holding spells. Methods In this study, QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, T peak to T end dispersion, and P wave dispersion of the twelve-lead surface electrocardiography of fifty children who had breath-holding spells were measured and compared with normal children from April 2011 to August 2012. Findings Forty-four (88%) patients had cyanotic spells, while 6 (12%) had pallid spells. QTc dispersion was increased in the patients with breath-holding spells (148.2±33.1) compared to the healthy children (132±27.3) and the difference was statically significant (P = 0.01). Meanwhile, no statistically significant differences were observed between the patients and the control subjects regarding the other parameters (P > 0.05). Conclusion QTc dispersion was significantly increased in the patients with breath-holding spells compared to normal children and this is a sign of cardiac repolarization abnormality as well as the increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia in patients with breath-holding spells. PMID:24910749

  9. Abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence: evidence from a voxelwise degree centrality analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo X

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoping Luo,1,2 Linghong Guo,1 Xi-Jian Dai,3 Qinglai Wang,2 Wenzhong Zhu,2 Xinjun Miao,2 Honghan Gong1 1Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nangchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Wenzhou Chinese Medicine Hospital, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs in alcohol dependence using voxelwise degree centrality analysis approach, and their relationships with clinical features.Materials and methods: Twenty-four male alcohol dependence subjects free of medicine (mean age, 50.21±9.62 years and 24 age- and education-matched male healthy controls (mean age, 50.29±8.92 years were recruited. The alcohol use disorders identification test and the severity of alcohol dependence questionnaire (SADQ were administered to assess the severity of alcohol craving. Voxelwise degree centrality approach was used to assess the abnormal intrinsic functional hubs features in alcohol dependence. Simple linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationships between the clinical features and abnormal intrinsic functional hubs.Results: Compared with healthy controls, alcohol dependence subjects exhibited significantly different degree centrality values in widespread left lateralization brain areas, including higher degree centrality values in the left precentral gyrus (BA 6, right hippocampus (BA 35, 36, and left orbitofrontal cortex (BA 11 and lower degree centrality values in the left cerebellum posterior lobe, bilateral secondary visual network (BA 18, and left precuneus (BA 7, 19. SADQ revealed a negative linear correlation with the degree centrality value in the left precentral gyrus (R2=0.296, P=0.006.Conclusion: The specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs appear

  10. Repolarization features as detectable from electrograms and electrocardiograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterom, A. van

    2013-01-01

    This contribution discusses the feasibility of extracting the major features of repolarization: its spatio-temporal behaviour, and how much of its global or local behaviour might be deduced from signals that can be observed experimentally. The analysis presented is based on source-volume-conductor c

  11. Ventricular repolarization in a rat model of global heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krandycheva, Valeria; Kharin, Sergey; Strelkova, Marina; Shumikhin, Konstantin; Sobolev, Aleksey; Shmakov, Dmitry

    2013-07-01

    Isoproterenol in high doses induces infarction-like myocardial damage and structural and functional remodelling of the ventricular myocardium. The purpose of the present study was to investigate ventricular repolarization in a rat model of isoproterenol-induced heart failure. Isoproterenol was administered twice to female Wistar rats (170 mg/kg, s.c., 24 h apart). Four weeks after the injections, cardiac output was measured and unipolar epicardial ventricular electrograms were recorded in situ. Activation-recovery intervals were calculated to assess repolarization. Histological examination of the heart ventricles was also performed. Heart failure in rats treated with isoproterenol was indicated by myocardial histopathological damage and reduced cardiac output. In rats with heart failure, the regional differences in activation-recovery interval prolongation over the ventricular epicardium resulted in increasing heterogeneity in the activation-recovery interval distribution and increasing repolarization heterogeneity of the ventricular subepicardium. Myocardial damage and haemodynamic changes in heart failure induced by isoproterenol were accompanied by significant changes in ventricular repolarization, which were not associated with myocardial hypertrophy.

  12. Probing cardiac repolarization reserve in drug safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalos, L.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive prolongation of cardiac repolarization, manifested as QT prolongation on ECG, is common unwanted side effect of many drugs and drug candidates. Prolongation of QT interval may lead to life threatening cardiac arrhythmia – Torsade de Point (TdP). Number of drugs was withdrawn from the marke

  13. Abnormal early brain responses during visual search are evident in schizophrenia but not bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanMeerten, Nicolaas J; Dubke, Rachel E; Stanwyck, John J; Kang, Seung Suk; Sponheim, Scott R

    2016-01-01

    People with schizophrenia show deficits in processing visual stimuli but neural abnormalities underlying the deficits are unclear and it is unknown whether such functional brain abnormalities are present in other severe mental disorders or in individuals who carry genetic liability for schizophrenia. To better characterize brain responses underlying visual search deficits and test their specificity to schizophrenia we gathered behavioral and electrophysiological responses during visual search (i.e., Span of Apprehension [SOA] task) from 38 people with schizophrenia, 31 people with bipolar disorder, 58 biological relatives of people with schizophrenia, 37 biological relatives of people with bipolar disorder, and 65 non-psychiatric control participants. Through subtracting neural responses associated with purely sensory aspects of the stimuli we found that people with schizophrenia exhibited reduced early posterior task-related neural responses (i.e., Span Endogenous Negativity [SEN]) while other groups showed normative responses. People with schizophrenia exhibited longer reaction times than controls during visual search but nearly identical accuracy. Those individuals with schizophrenia who had larger SENs performed more efficiently (i.e., shorter reaction times) on the SOA task suggesting that modulation of early visual cortical responses facilitated their visual search. People with schizophrenia also exhibited a diminished P300 response compared to other groups. Unaffected first-degree relatives of people with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia showed an amplified N1 response over posterior brain regions in comparison to other groups. Diminished early posterior brain responses are associated with impaired visual search in schizophrenia and appear to be specifically associated with the neuropathology of schizophrenia. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Circadian abnormalities in mouse models of Smith-Magenis syndrome: evidence for involvement of RAI1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacaria, Melanie; Gu, Wenli; Lupski, James R

    2013-07-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM 182290) is a genomic disorder characterized by multiple congenital anomalies, intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, and disordered sleep resulting from an ~3.7 Mb deletion copy number variant (CNV) on chromosome 17p11.2 or from point mutations in the gene RAI1. The reciprocal duplication of this region results in another genomic disorder, Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS; OMIM 610883), characterized by autism, intellectual disability, and congenital anomalies. We previously used chromosome-engineering and gene targeting to generate mouse models for PTLS (Dp(11)17/+), and SMS due to either deletion CNV or gene knock-out (Df(11)17-2/+ and Rai1(+/-) , respectively) and we observed phenotypes in these mouse models consistent with their associated human syndromes. To investigate the contribution of individual genes to the circadian phenotypes observed in SMS, we now report the analysis of free-running period lengths in Rai1(+/-) and Df(11)17-2/+ mice, as well as in mice deficient for another known circadian gene mapping within the commonly deleted/duplicated region, Dexras1, and we compare these results to those previously observed in Dp(11)17/+ mice. Reduced free-running period lengths were seen in Df(11)17-2/+, Rai1(+/-) , and Dexras1(-/-) , but not Dexras1(+/-) mice, suggesting that Rai1 may be the primary gene underlying the circadian defects in SMS. However, we cannot rule out the possibility that cis effects between multiple haploinsufficient genes in the SMS critical interval (e.g., RAI1 and DEXRAS1) either exacerbate the circadian phenotypes observed in SMS patients with deletions or increase their penetrance in certain environments. This study also confirms a previous report of abnormal circadian function in Dexras1(-/-) mice.

  15. The effects of sotalol on ventricular repolarization during exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian; WANG Jia-nan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Although after pacing animal and human studies have demonstrated a rate-dependent effect of sotalol on ventricular repolarization, there is little information on the effects of sotalol on ventricular repolarization during exercise. This study attempted to show the effects of sotalol on ventricular repolarization during physiological exercise. Methods: Thirty-one healthy volunteers (18 males, 13 females) were enrolled in the study. Each performed a maximal treadmill exercise test according to the Bruce protocol after random treatment with sotalol, propranolol and placebo. Results: Sotalol significantly prolonged QTc(corrected QT) and JTc (corrected JT) intervals at rest compared with propranolol (QTc 324.86 ms vs 305.21 ms, P<0.001; JTc245.04 ms vs 224.17 ms, P<0.001) and placebo (QTc 324.86 ms vs 314.06 ms, P<0.01; JTc 245.04 ms vs. 232.69 ms, P<0.001).The JTc percent reduction increased progressively with each stage of exercise and correlated positively with exercise heart rate(r=0.148, P<0.01). The JTc percent reduction correlation with exercise heart rate did not exist with either propranolol or placebo.Conclusions: These results imply that with sotalol ventricular repolarization is progressively shortened after exercise. Thus the specific class Ⅲ antiarrhythmic activity of sotalol, present as delay of ventricular repolarization, may be attenuated during exercise.Such findings may imply the need to consider other antiarrythmic therapy during periods of stress-induced tachycardia.

  16. Abnormal dynamics of activation of object use information in apraxia: evidence from eyetracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Iin; Mirman, Daniel; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2014-07-01

    Action representations associated with object use may be incidentally activated during visual object processing, and the time course of such activations may be influenced by lexical-semantic context (e.g., Lee, Middleton, Mirman, Kalénine, & Buxbaum (2012). Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 39(1), 257-270). In this study we used the "visual world" eye-tracking paradigm to examine whether a deficit in producing skilled object-use actions (apraxia) is associated with abnormalities in incidental activation of action information, and assessed the neuroanatomical substrates of any such deficits. Twenty left hemisphere stroke patients, ten of whom were apraxic, performed a task requiring identification of a named object in a visual display containing manipulation-related and unrelated distractor objects. Manipulation relationships among objects were not relevant to the identification task. Objects were cued with neutral ("S/he saw the…."), or action-relevant ("S/he used the….") sentences. Non-apraxic participants looked at use-related non-target objects significantly more than at unrelated non-target objects when cued both by neutral and action-relevant sentences, indicating that action information is incidentally activated. In contrast, apraxic participants showed delayed activation of manipulation-based action information during object identification when cued by neutral sentences. The magnitude of delayed activation in the neutral sentence condition was reliably predicted by lower scores on a test of gesture production to viewed objects, as well as by lesion loci in the inferior parietal and posterior temporal lobes. However, when cued by a sentence containing an action verb, apraxic participants showed fixation patterns that were statistically indistinguishable from non-apraxic controls. In support of grounded theories of cognition, these results suggest that apraxia and temporal-parietal lesions may be associated with

  17. Smaller intracranial volume in prodromal Huntington's disease: evidence for abnormal neurodevelopment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopoulos, Peggy C.; Aylward, Elizabeth H.; Ross, Christopher A.; Mills, James A.; Langbehn, Douglas R.; Johnson, Hans J.; Magnotta, Vincent A.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Beglinger, Leigh J.; Nance, Martha A.; Barker, Roger A.

    2011-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is an autosomal dominant brain disease. Although conceptualized as a neurodegenerative disease of the striatum, a growing number of studies challenge this classic concept of Huntington’s disease aetiology. Intracranial volume is the tissue and fluid within the calvarium and is a representation of the maximal brain growth obtained during development. The current study reports intracranial volume obtained from an magnetic resonance imaging brain scan in a sample of subjects (n = 707) who have undergone presymptomatic gene testing. Participants who are gene-expanded but not yet manifesting the disease (prodromal Huntington’s disease) are compared with subjects who are non-gene expanded. The prodromal males had significantly smaller intracranial volume measures with a mean volume that was 4% lower compared with controls. Although the prodromal females had smaller intracranial volume measures compared with their controls, this was not significant. The current findings suggest that mutant huntingtin can cause abnormal development, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of Huntington’s disease. PMID:20923788

  18. Abnormal error monitoring in math-anxious individuals: evidence from error-related brain potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena; Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Colomé, Angels

    2013-01-01

    This study used event-related brain potentials to investigate whether math anxiety is related to abnormal error monitoring processing. Seventeen high math-anxious (HMA) and seventeen low math-anxious (LMA) individuals were presented with a numerical and a classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of trait or state anxiety. We found enhanced error-related negativity (ERN) in the HMA group when subjects committed an error on the numerical Stroop task, but not on the classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of the correct-related negativity component (CRN), the error positivity component (Pe), classical behavioral measures or post-error measures. The amplitude of the ERN was negatively related to participants' math anxiety scores, showing a more negative amplitude as the score increased. Moreover, using standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA) we found greater activation of the insula in errors on a numerical task as compared to errors in a non-numerical task only for the HMA group. The results were interpreted according to the motivational significance theory of the ERN.

  19. Abnormal error monitoring in math-anxious individuals: evidence from error-related brain potentials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Suárez-Pellicioni

    Full Text Available This study used event-related brain potentials to investigate whether math anxiety is related to abnormal error monitoring processing. Seventeen high math-anxious (HMA and seventeen low math-anxious (LMA individuals were presented with a numerical and a classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of trait or state anxiety. We found enhanced error-related negativity (ERN in the HMA group when subjects committed an error on the numerical Stroop task, but not on the classical Stroop task. Groups did not differ in terms of the correct-related negativity component (CRN, the error positivity component (Pe, classical behavioral measures or post-error measures. The amplitude of the ERN was negatively related to participants' math anxiety scores, showing a more negative amplitude as the score increased. Moreover, using standardized low resolution electromagnetic tomography (sLORETA we found greater activation of the insula in errors on a numerical task as compared to errors in a non-numerical task only for the HMA group. The results were interpreted according to the motivational significance theory of the ERN.

  20. Evidence of hypothalamic-pituitary thyroid abnormalities in children with end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, T; Zantleifer, D; Balzaretti, M; Granillo, E; Fainstein-Day, P; Ramirez, J; Ruiz, S; Gutman, R; Ferraris, J

    1991-06-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease may have abnormalities of growth and of gonadal and thyroid hormones, so we attempted to determine the mechanisms that may be involved in the altered thyroid function. We evaluated serum thyroid hormone levels, their changes immediately after hemodialysis, the serum thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) response to thyrotropin releasing hormone, and the circadian pattern of serum TSH in nine children with end-stage renal disease who were between 7 1/2 years and 17 years 1 month of age. Seven patients had been receiving hemodialysis for a median of 3.3 years; the other two were receiving continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Four patients had low serum total thyroxine (T4) values, and all nine had low free T4 values. Mean concentrations of total T4, free T4, and total triiodothyronine (T3), which were significantly less than normal before hemodialysis, returned to normal levels immediately after dialysis. Postdialysis thyroid hormone increases did not correlate with the decrease in weight or the increase in hematocrit observed immediately after dialysis. All but one patient had basal TSH levels within the normal range. Three patients had a deficient TSH response to thyrotropin releasing hormone, and the TSH response was prolonged in all of them. The mean (+/- SD) nocturnal TSH surge was 50 +/- 68%. Five of the eight patients studied had a nocturnal TSH surge below the normal range (95% confidence limits 47% to 300%). Serum free T4 values correlated with the TSH nocturnal surge (r, 0.73; p less than 0.05). Our findings support the hypothesis that some patients with end-stage renal disease have central hypothyroidism.

  1. Evidence for a role of orexin/hypocretin system in vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilei Pan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Vestibular damage can induce locomotor abnormalities in both animals and humans. Rodents with bilateral vestibular loss showed vestibular deficits syndrome such as circling, opisthotonus as well as locomotor and exploratory hyperactivity. Previous studies have investigated the changes in the dopamine system after vestibular loss, but the results are inconsistent and inconclusive. Numerous evidences indicate that the orexin system is implicated in central motor control. We hypothesized that orexin may be potentially involved in vestibular loss-induced motor disorders. In this study, we examined the effects of arsanilate- or 3, 3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN-induced vestibular lesion (AVL or IVL on the orexin-A (OXA labeling in rat hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. The vestibular lesion-induced locomotor abnormalities were recorded and verified using a histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 (20 mg/kg, i.p.. The effects of the orexin receptor type 1 antagonist SB334867 (16 μg, i.c.v. on these behavior responses were also investigated. At 72 h post-AVL and IVL, animals exhibited vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity in the home cages. These responses were significantly alleviated by JNJ7777120 which also eliminated AVL-induced increases in exploratory behavior in an open field. The numbers of OXA-labeled neurons in the hypothalamus were significantly increased in the AVL animals at 72 h post-AVL and in the IVL animals at 24, 48 and 72 h post-IVL. SB334867 significantly attenuated the vestibular deficit syndrome and locomotor hyperactivity at 72 h post-AVL and IVL. It also decreased exploratory behavior in the AVL animals. These results suggested that the alteration of OXA expression might contribute to locomotor abnormalities after acute vestibular lesion. The orexin receptors might be the potential therapeutic targets for vestibular disorders.

  2. Lesson Twenty-two The early repolarization variant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁端; 王劲

    2007-01-01

    @@ The ST-segment elevation seen in apparently healthy and asymptomatic persons,the so-called early repolarization variant (ERPV)1.Hiss et al reported that 91% of 6014 healthy men in the US Air Force who were between 16 and 58 years old had an ST-segment elevation of 0.1 to 0.3 mV in one or more precordial leads2.The elevation was most common and marked in lead V2.

  3. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and cardiac arrhythmias in structural brain lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Kyritsis, Athanassios P; Kosmidou, Maria; Giannopoulos, Sotirios

    2013-07-31

    Cardiac arrhythmias and electrocardiographic abnormalities are frequently observed after acute cerebrovascular events. The precise mechanism that leads to the development of these arrhythmias is still uncertain, though increasing evidence suggests that it is mainly due to autonomic nervous system dysregulation. In massive brain lesions sympathetic predominance and parasympathetic withdrawal during the first 72 h are associated with the occurrence of severe secondary complications in the first week. Right insular cortex lesions are also related with sympathetic overactivation and with a higher incidence of electrocardiographic abnormalities, mostly QT prolongation, in patients with ischemic stroke. Additionally, female sex and hypokalemia are independent risk factors for severe prolongation of the QT interval which subsequently results in malignant arrhythmias and poor outcome. The prognostic value of repolarization changes commonly seen after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, such as ST segment, T wave, and U wave abnormalities, still remains controversial. In patients with traumatic brain injury both intracranial hypertension and cerebral hypoperfusion correlate with low heart rate variability and increased mortality. Given that there are no firm guidelines for the prevention or treatment of the arrhythmias that appear after cerebral incidents this review aims to highlight important issues on this topic. Selected patients with the aforementioned risk factors could benefit from electrocardiographic monitoring, reassessment of the medications that prolong QTc interval, and administration of antiadrenergic agents. Further research is required in order to validate these assumptions and to establish specific therapeutic strategies.

  4. Prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortex abnormalities in Tourette Syndrome: evidence from voxel-based morphometry and magnetization transfer imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dengler Reinhard

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pathophysiological evidence suggests an involvement of fronto-striatal circuits in Tourette syndrome (TS. To identify TS related abnormalities in gray and white matter we used optimized voxel-based morphometry (VBM and magnetization transfer imaging (MTI which are more sensitive to tissue alterations than conventional MRI and provide a quantitative measure of macrostructural integrity. Methods Volumetric high-resolution anatomical T1-weighted MRI and MTI were acquired in 19 adult, unmedicated male TS patients without co-morbidities and 20 age- and sex-matched controls on a 1.5 Tesla neuro-optimized GE scanner. Images were pre-processed and analyzed using an optimized version of VBM in SPM2. Results Using VBM, TS patients showed significant decreases in gray matter volumes in prefrontal areas, the anterior cingulate gyrus, sensorimotor areas, left caudate nucleus and left postcentral gyrus. Decreases in white matter volumes were detected in the right inferior frontal gyrus, the left superior frontal gyrus and the anterior corpus callosum. Increases were found in the left middle frontal gyrus and left sensorimotor areas. In MTI, white matter reductions were seen in the right medial frontal gyrus, the inferior frontal gyrus bilaterally and the right cingulate gyrus. Tic severity was negatively correlated with orbitofrontal structures, the right cingulate gyrus and parts of the parietal-temporal-occipital association cortex bilaterally. Conclusion Our MRI in vivo neuropathological findings using two sensitive and unbiased techniques support the hypothesis that alterations in frontostriatal circuitries underlie TS pathology. We suggest that anomalous frontal lobe association and projection fiber bundles cause disinhibition of the cingulate gyrus and abnormal basal ganglia function.

  5. LIPID ABNORMALITIES IN SUCCINATE SEMIALDEHYDE DEHYDROGENASE (Aldh5a1−/−) DEFICIENT MOUSE BRAIN PROVIDE ADDITIONAL EVIDENCE FOR MYELIN ALTERATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Barcelo-Coblijn, G.; Murphy, E.J.; Mills, K.; Winchester, B; Jakobs, C.; Snead, O.C.; Gibson, K. M.

    2007-01-01

    Lipid abnormalities in succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (aldh5a1-/-) deficient mouse brain provide additional evidence for myelin alterations correspondence: Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 412 692 7608; fax: +1 412 692 7816. (Gibson, K.M.) (Gibson, K.M.) Department of Pharmacology - Physiology--> , and Therapeutics--> , School of Medicine and Health Sciences--> , University of North Dakota--...

  6. Abnormalities of the QT interval in primary disorders of autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, A. M.; Lang, C. C.; Roden, D. M.; Robertson, D.; Wood, A. J.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental evidence shows that activation of the autonomic nervous system influences ventricular repolarization and, therefore, the QT interval on the ECG. To test the hypothesis that the QT interval is abnormal in autonomic dysfunction, we examined ECGs in patients with severe primary autonomic failure and in patients with congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) deficiency who are unable to synthesize norepinephrine and epinephrine. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Maximal QT and rate-corrected QT (QTc) intervals and adjusted QTc dispersion [(maximal QTc - minimum QTc on 12 lead ECG)/square root of the number of leads measured] were determined in blinded fashion from ECGs of 67 patients with primary autonomic failure (36 patients with multiple system atrophy [MSA], and 31 patients with pure autonomic failure [PAF]) and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. ECGs of 5 patients with congenital DbetaH deficiency and 6 age- and sex-matched controls were also analyzed. RESULTS: Patients with MSA and PAF had significantly prolonged maximum QTc intervals (492+/-58 ms(1/2) and 502+/-61 ms(1/2) [mean +/- SD]), respectively, compared with controls (450+/-18 ms(1/2), P parasympathetic and sympathetic failure have abnormally prolonged QT interval and increased QT dispersion. However, QT interval in patients with congenital DbetaH deficiency was not significantly different from controls. It is possible, therefore, that QT abnormalities in patients with primary autonomic failure are not solely caused by lesions of the sympathetic nervous system, and that the parasympathetic nervous system is likely to have a modulatory role in ventricular repolarization.

  7. Diurnal modulation and sources of variation affecting ventricular repolarization in Warmblood horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip Juul; Moeller, Sine B; Flethøj, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Irregularities in cardiac repolarization are known to predispose for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in humans. The QT interval is a quantitative measurement of repolarization, and clinically, the QTc (QT interval corrected for heart rate) and Tpeak to Tend intervals (TpTe) are u...

  8. Evaluation of repolarization dynamics using the QT-RR regression line slope and intercept relationship during 24-h Holter ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiki, Akira; Yoshioka, Ryozo; Sakabe, Masao

    2015-03-01

    QT-RR linear regression consists of two parameters, slope and intercept, and the aim of this study was to evaluate repolarization dynamics using the QT-RR linear regression slope and intercept relationship during 24-h Holter ECG. This study included 466 healthy subjects (54.6 ± 14.6 years; 200 men and 266 women) and 17 patients with ventricular arrhythmias, consisted of 10 patients with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) and 7 patients with torsades de pointes (TDP). QT and RR intervals were measured from ECG waves based on a 15-s averaged ECG during 24-h Holter recording using an automatic QT analyzing system. The QT interval dependence on the RR interval was analyzed using a linear regression line for each subject ([QT] = A[RR] + B; where A is the slope and B is the y-intercept). The slope of the QT-RR regression line in healthy subjects was significantly greater in women than in men (0.185 ± 0.036 vs. 0.161 ± 0.033, p Holter ECG may become a simple useful marker for abnormality of ventricular repolarization dynamics.

  9. Myocyte repolarization modulates myocardial function in aging dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Andrea; Signore, Sergio; Qanud, Khaled; Borghetti, Giulia; Meo, Marianna; Cannata, Antonio; Zhou, Yu; Wybieralska, Ewa; Luciani, Marco; Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Zhang, Eric; Matsuda, Alex; Webster, Andrew; Cimini, Maria; Kertowidjojo, Elizabeth; D'Alessandro, David A; Wunimenghe, Oriyanhan; Michler, Robert E; Royer, Christopher; Goichberg, Polina; Leri, Annarosa; Barrett, Edward G; Anversa, Piero; Hintze, Thomas H; Rota, Marcello

    2016-04-01

    Studies of myocardial aging are complex and the mechanisms involved in the deterioration of ventricular performance and decreased functional reserve of the old heart remain to be properly defined. We have studied a colony of beagle dogs from 3 to 14 yr of age kept under a highly regulated environment to define the effects of aging on the myocardium. Ventricular, myocardial, and myocyte function, together with anatomical and structural properties of the organ and cardiomyocytes, were evaluated. Ventricular hypertrophy was not observed with aging and the structural composition of the myocardium was modestly affected. Alterations in the myocyte compartment were identified in aged dogs, and these factors negatively interfere with the contractile reserve typical of the young heart. The duration of the action potential is prolonged in old cardiomyocytes contributing to the slower electrical recovery of the myocardium. Also, the remodeled repolarization of cardiomyocytes with aging provides inotropic support to the senescent muscle but compromises its contractile reserve, rendering the old heart ineffective under conditions of high hemodynamic demand. The defects in the electrical and mechanical properties of cardiomyocytes with aging suggest that this cell population is an important determinant of the cardiac senescent phenotype. Collectively, the delayed electrical repolarization of aging cardiomyocytes may be viewed as a critical variable of the aging myopathy and its propensity to evolve into ventricular decompensation under stressful conditions.

  10. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension. Repolarization abnormalities elicited by rapid lowering of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepi, M; Alimento, M; Maltagliati, A; Guazzi, M D

    1988-01-01

    In hypertension, coronary flow is augmented and oxygen balance is adequate despite an increase in coronary resistance. For the maintenance of flow in the presence of and after regression of ventricular hypertrophy, the ratio of pressure and ventricular mass must remain normal. Coronary reserve would be altered if treatment normalized pressure but not ventricular mass or if pressure were lowered too fast. We investigated 42 patients with primary hypertension. In 28 (Group I) left ventricular mass index (by ultrasound) was within the mean value +2 SD (96 + 38 g/m2) of 145 controls and exceeded these values in the remaining 14 patients (Group 2). The diastolic pressure was lowered rapidly to between 85 and 90 mm Hg with two potent vasodilators, nifedipine (sublingually) and nitroprusside, while a 12-lead electrocardiogram was recorded continuously. During both tests, seven patients in Group 2 (responders) showed inversion of normal T waves, in lead I, aVL, and V3-6. These changes waxed and waned in parallel with the pressure fall and recovery and were not attributable to alterations in adrenergic tone, conduction disturbances, variations, or group differences in the QRS axis, QTc interval, heart rate, left ventricular fractional shortening, wall stress, rate of dimension increase in early diastole, or isovolumic relaxation. A "steal phenomenon'' or passive collapse in compliant coronary lesions during vasodilatation seems unlikely; in fact, patients were free from coronary symptoms, and the electrocardiographic alterations occurred only in seven patients in Group 2, who had a greater left ventricular mass index and required a larger pressure drop to return the diastolic pressure to normal.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The T-peak–T-end Interval as a Marker of Repolarization Abnormality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhuiyan, Tanveer A.; Graff, Claus; Kanters, Jørgen K.;

    2015-01-01

    a significant increase of both TpTe and QT from baseline is apparent with QT-prolonging drugs, the TpTe/QT ratio remained the same at baseline and after drug administration, thus indicating that prolongation of TpTe is just a fractional part of total QT prolongation. In the presence of notched or flattened T......-waves, the uncertainty associated with measurement of the TpTe interval increases. The errors in TpTe for individual subjects may be substantial, thus complicating the use of TpTe for follow-up of individuals. CONCLUSIONS: The duration of the QT interval and TpTe are closely related. Drugs appear to prolong the Tp...

  12. Thorough QT study of the effect of fesoterodine on cardiac repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, B; Wood, N; Sachse, R; Gandelman, K

    2010-05-01

    Fesoterodine 4 mg and 8 mg once daily are indicated for the treatment of overactive bladder. A thorough QT study was conducted to investigate the effects of fesoterodine on cardiac repolarization. In this parallel-group study, subjects were randomly assigned to receive double-blind fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 28 mg, or placebo or open-label moxifloxacin 400 mg (positive control) for 3 days. Electrocardiograms (ECGs) were obtained on Days -1 (baseline), 1, and 3. The primary analysis was the time-averaged changes from baseline for Fridericia's-corrected QT interval (QTcF) on Day 3. Among 261 subjects randomized to fesoterodine 4 mg (n = 64), fesoterodine 28 mg (n = 68), placebo (n = 65), or moxifloxacin 400 mg (n = 64), 256 completed the trial. The least squares mean changes in QTcF from baseline were 21.1, 20.5, 18.5, and 31.3 ms (maximum), and -5.1, -4.2, -5.2, and 7.6 ms (time-averaged at Day 3) for placebo, fesoterodine 4 mg, fesoterodine 28 mg, and moxifloxacin, respectively. The lower limit of the 95% confidence interval exceeded 5 ms for moxifloxacin. The results indicate that fesoterodine is not associated with QTc prolongation or other ECG abnormalities at either therapeutic or supratherapeutic doses.

  13. Profile of the cardiac repolarization in cervical spinal cord injury subjects performing physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Magalhães

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare rest QT interval and QTcorrected intervals of electrocardiogram in trained men with and without cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI and investigate cardiac electrocardiogram parameters in trained men with CSCI submitted to maximal effort test. Thirty men were separated into three groups: Control without CSCI (CON, 25.3 ± 4.1 yrs, strength training: 3 days week-1; aerobic training 1day week-1; n = 10, high volume exercise (30.5 ± 4.3 yrs, 3 day week-1 rugby specific exercises, 60min. day-1; n = 12 and moderate volume of exercise (33.7 ± 5.9 yrs, 2 days week-1 specific rugby exercises, 60 min. day-1; n = 8 with incomplete CSCI (C5-C7 cervical vertrebae more than 12 months. Electrocardiogram was recorded in rest, during and after effort test. QT interval was significantly reduced (p = 0.001 in the high volume exercise group compared to control. Corrected QT interval showed no difference between moderate vs. high volume exercise group (p > 0.05. No changes were observed in QT, corrected QT, PR and QRS intervals of electrocardiogram between rest and post effort (p > 0.05. Thus, effort test does not change electrocardiogram parameters in CSCI subjects. High volume of week exercise promotes abnormalities in cardiac repolarization compared to a moderate training program.

  14. [Effect of the heart electric stimulation on repolarization of fish and amphibian ventricular myocardium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarov, Ia É; Kibler, N A; Vaĭshnoraĭte, M A; Tsvetkova, A S; Kharin, S N; Vitiazev, V A; Shmakov, D N

    2013-01-01

    By the method of synchronous multielectrode cartography (24-unipolar leads), distribution of durations and time of end of repolarization were studied on ventricular epicardium of pikes (Esox lucius) and frogs (Rana esculenta) and in ventricular intramural layers of toads (Bufo bufo) at the ectopic heart excitation. The time of arrival of the excitation wave and of the end of repolarization in each lead was determined from the minimum of time derivative of potential at the period of the QRS complex and by minimum of the T wave, respectively. It has been established that at the ventricle electrostimulation, alongside with deceleration and a change of sequence of the myocardium activation, there occurs redistribution of local repolarization durations: in areas of late activation the repolarization being longer than in zones of early activation (p < 0.05). At stimulation, the apicobasal gradient of repolarization is predominantly changed due to electrophysiological processes in the apical areas. In all studied species. at ectopical excitation of the heart ventricle the sequence of its repolarization repeats the depolarization sequence due to delay of activation (in fish) and redistribution of repolarization durations (in amphibians).

  15. Evaluation of ventricular repolarization in pregnant women with intrahepatic cholestasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirbas, Ozgur; Biberoglu, Ebru Hacer; Kirbas, Ayse; Daglar, Korkut; Kurmus, Ozge; Danisman, Nuri; Biberoglu, Kutay

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids can induce arrhythmia by altering cardiomyocyte contractility or electrical conduction. The aim of this study was to investigate, by means of QT dispersion parameter detected by simple standard electrocardiogram (ECG), ventricular repolarization changes in pregnant women with and without intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). In this case-control study including 75 pregnant women with cholestasis and 35 healthy, uncomplicated pregnancy cases, electrocardiographic QT interval durations and QT dispersion (QT-disp) parameters, corrected for the patients' heart rate using the Hodges formula, were investigated. Maximum corrected QT interval values were significantly higher in the severe ICP group than in the control group (p cholestasis when compared to the normal ones. This simple ECG parameter can be used to screen high-risk women, in order to better target counseling regarding lifestyle modifications and to conduct closer follow up and management of women with a history of ICP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex Difference in the Repolarization Currents of Rabbit Ventricular Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Yanfei; LIU Nian; ZHOU Qiang; LI Yang; WANG Lin

    2005-01-01

    Summary: The current difference between male and female rabbit ventricular myocytes was investigated for elucidating the mechanism of longer QT interval and higher incidence of drug-associated torsade de pointes in female rabbits than in male rabbits. Whole cell patch clamp technique was used to record APD, Ito, IK,tail, IK1 and ICa,L of myocytes from left ventricular apex. There was no difference in the membrane capacitance between male and female rabbit myocytes. APD90 was longer in female rabbits (560.4±26.5 ms, n=15) than in male ones (489.0±20.7 ms, n=14), P0.05). The lower IK,tail of female rabbit myocytes may contribute to the longer repolarization and the higher incidence of drug-associated torsade de pointes.

  17. Early repolarization as a predictor of premature ventricular beats.

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    Matoshvili, Z T; Petriashvili, Sh G; Archadze, A T; Azaladze, I G

    2015-02-01

    Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common ECG variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as terminal QRS slurring (the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal QRS complex) associated with concave upward ST-segment elevation and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads. Aim of this observational study was to compare number of premature ventricular beats in the different groups of patients with early repolarization. The result of this observational study shows that there are: 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in 41-74 year subgroup VS 19-40 year subgroup; 1,31 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in male subgroup VS female subgroup (But this difference is not statistically significant, because t=1,49, p=0,141); 2,85 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS ERP without CAD subgroup; 1,74 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS ERP without HF subgroup; 1,81 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in CAD+ERP subgroup VS CAD without ERP subgroup; 1,58 fold higher number of premature ventricular beats in HF+ERP subgroup VS HF without ERP subgroup; So, CAD+ERP is very arrhythmogenic condition, after this is HF+ERP, Then Age. This study shows that ERP independently increase number of PVB in different groups (CAD, HF). This is principally new and very important result. Also the number of patients is enough to make this conclusion.

  18. Some theoretical results on the observability of repolarization heterogeneity on surface ECG.

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    Mainardi, Luca; Sassi, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Assessing repolarization heterogeneity (RH) from surface ECG recording is an open issue in modern electrocardiography, despite the fact that several indexes measured on the T-wave have been proposed and tested. To understand how RH occurring at myocite level is reflected on T-wave shapes, in this paper we propose a mathematical framework that combines a simple statistical model of cardiac repolarization times with the dominant T-wave formalism. Within this framework we compare different T-wave features such as T-wave amplitude, T-wave amplitude variability or QT intervals and we describe mathematically how they are linked to the spatial and temporal components of repolarization heterogeneity.

  19. Evidence for Specificity of ERP Abnormalities during Response Inhibition in ADHD Children: A Comparison with Reading Disorder Children without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotti, Mario; Pliszka, Steven R.; Higgins, Kellie; Perez, Ricardo, III; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Executive function and working memory deficits are not only present in ADHD, but also in reading disorder (RD). Here, high-density ERPs were recorded during the Stop Signal Task in 53 children and adolescents: An ADHD-combined type group, a group with RD, and a healthy control group. The ADHD-C group displayed unique abnormalities of the frontal…

  20. Utility of hERG assays as surrogate markers of delayed cardiac repolarization and QT safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, Gary A; Su, Zhi; Martin, Ruth L; Cox, Bryan F

    2006-01-01

    HERG (human-ether-a-go-go-related gene) encodes for a cardiac potassium channel that plays a critical role in defining ventricular repolarization. Noncardiovascular drugs associated with a rare but potentially lethal ventricular arrhythmia (Torsades de Pointes) have been linked to delayed cardiac repolarization and block of hERG current. This brief overview will discuss the role of hERG current in cardiac electrophysiology, its involvement in drug-induced delayed repolarization, and approaches used to define drug effects on hERG current. In addition, examples of hERG blocking drugs acting differently (i.e., overt and covert hERG blockade due to multichannel block) together with the utility and limitations of hERG assays as tools to predict the risk of delayed repolarization and proarrhythmia are discussed.

  1. The early repolarization variant--an electrocardiographic enigma with both QRS and J-STT anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boineau, John P

    2007-01-01

    A detailed description of the electrocardiogram of the early repolarization variant, including its most common morphological variations is presented. Included is a recently identified anomaly of the QRS complex, which has not previously been reported. Ventricular activation data is presented to explain the unique QRS changes. A comparison with Wolff-Parkinson-White (preexcitation) reveals certain similarities related to a premature completion of depolarization in early repolarization variant.

  2. Abnormal orbicularis oculi reflex response in sleep apnea secondary to acromegaly. Evidence of pontomedullary dysfunction in sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadoth, N; Bechar, M; Seggev, J; Kushnir, M; Gilai, A

    1988-02-01

    Severe sleep apnea was present in a patient with upper airway obstruction due to acromegaly. The study of orbicularis oculi reflex responses (OORR) disclosed a marked prolongation of the late response prior to tracheostomy. Following the surgical relief of upper airway obstruction, sleep apnea disappeared, and the latency of the late response of the OORR was dramatically reduced but failed to normalize. The OORR and especially its late response were normal in a patient with acromegaly who did not experience sleep apnea. In two patients with sleep apnea, but without acromegaly, the late responses of the OORR were abnormal. It is suggested that the presence of abnormal OORR in sleep apnea may reflect a basic defect in pontomedullary control of respiration during sleep.

  3. Convergent evidence from multimodal imaging reveals amygdala abnormalities in schizophrenic patients and their first-degree relatives.

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    Lin Tian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Shared neuropathological features between schizophrenic patients and their first-degree relatives have potential as indicators of genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia. We sought to explore genetic influences on brain morphology and function in schizophrenic patients and their relatives. METHODS: Using a multimodal imaging strategy, we studied 33 schizophrenic patients, 55 of their unaffected parents, 30 healthy controls for patients, and 29 healthy controls for parents with voxel-based morphometry of structural MRI scans and functional connectivity analysis of resting-state functional MRI data. RESULTS: Schizophrenic patients showed widespread gray matter reductions in the bilateral frontal cortices, bilateral insulae, bilateral occipital cortices, left amygdala and right thalamus, whereas their parents showed more localized reductions in the left amygdala, left thalamus and right orbitofrontal cortex. Patients and their parents shared gray matter loss in the left amygdala. Further investigation of the resting-state functional connectivity of the amygdala in the patients showed abnormal functional connectivity with the bilateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral precunei, bilateral dorsolateral frontal cortices and right insula. Their parents showed slightly less, but similar changes in the pattern in the amygdala connectivity. Co-occurrences of abnormal connectivity of the left amygdala with the left orbitofrontal cortex, right dorsolateral frontal cortex and right precuneus were observed in schizophrenic patients and their parents. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest a potential genetic influence on structural and functional abnormalities of the amygdala in schizophrenia. Such information could help future efforts to identify the endophenotypes that characterize the complex disorder of schizophrenia.

  4. Role of the late sodium current in rate-dependent repolarization of the canine ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Yang, Lin; Yang, Zhao; Zheng, Xiao

    2013-12-31

    Late sodium current I(NaL) is an inward current participating in maintaining the plateau of the action potential. So far its role in the repolarization of canine hearts is not well known. In this paper, by taking advantage of a computer simulation method, we developed a one-dimensional transmural tissue to study the impacts of I(NaL) on rate-dependent repolarization and its ionic basis in the canine ventricle. An OpenMP parallel algorithm was performed on a four-core personal computer to accelerate the simulation. The results demonstrated that action potential durations of midmyocytes showed greater rate dependence than the endo- and epi-myocytes. When the pacing rate was reduced, repolarization of the tissue was prolonged while the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was enlarged. The enhancement of I(NaL) further amplified this rate-dependent repolarization and TDR meanwhile increased the risk of arrhythmogenesis. I(NaL) was found highly sensitive to the pacing rate by calculating its kinetics. The study suggested that I(NaL) played an important role in the rate-dependent repolarization of the canine ventricle. Selective blockade of I(NaL) could have clinical benefits, especially for such pathological conditions with enhanced I(NaL) as long QT 3 syndrome and heart failure.

  5. The Association between Myocardial Iron Load and Ventricular Repolarization Parameters in Asymptomatic Beta-Thalassemia Patients

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    Mehmet Kayrak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated impaired ventricular repolarization in patients with β-TM. However, the effect of iron overload with cardiac T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI on cardiac repolarization remains unclear yet. We aimed to examine relationship between repolarization parameters and iron loading using cardiac T2* MRI in asymptomatic β-TM patients. Twenty-two β-TM patients and 22 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were enrolled to the study. From the 12-lead surface electrocardiography, regional and transmyocardial repolarization parameters were evaluated manually by two experienced cardiologists. All patients were also undergone MRI for cardiac T2* evaluation. Cardiac T2* score <20 msec was considered as iron overload status. Of the QT parameters, QT duration, corrected QT interval, and QT peak duration were significantly longer in the β-TM group compared to the healthy controls. Tp−Te and Tp−Te dispersions were also significantly prolonged in β-TM group compared to healthy controls. (Tp-Te/QT was similar between groups. There was no correlation between repolarization parameters and cardiac T2* MRI values. In conclusion, although repolarization parameters were prolonged in asymptomatic β-TM patients compared with control, we could not find any relation between ECG findings and cardiac iron load.

  6. Evidence for fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity white matter abnormalities in the internal capsule and cingulum in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Christine; Fouché, Jean-Paul; du Plessis, Stefan; Spottiswoode, Bruce; Seedat, Soraya; (Psych), MMed; Fineberg, Naomi; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Stein, Dan J.

    2012-01-01

    Background There is evidence to suggest that obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD) is associated with structural abnormalities in cortico–striato–thalamic circuits, yet the extent of white matter abnormalities is not well established. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter integrity in specific regions of interest (ROIs) in patients with OCD. Methods Patients with OCD and sex-, age- and IQ-matched healthy controls underwent DTI. The primary objective was to explore whether patients with OCD had white matter abnormalities in the anterior limb of the internal capsule (ALIC), the uncinate fasciculus, the genu of the corpus callosum and the cingulum. The secondary objective was to evaluate the relation between fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in these ROIs and other clinical variables (including age at onset of OCD, OCD severity and levels of depressive and anxiety symptomatology) in patients with OCD. Results There were 15 patients and 17 controls enrolled in our study. Compared with healthy controls, patients with OCD showed increased fractional anisotropy in bilateral regions of the ALIC adjacent to the body of the caudate, as well as decreased fractional anisotropy in the right anterior limb near the head of the caudate. Patients also had decreased mean diffusivity in the body of the right cingulum and the left anterior cingulum compared with controls. Correlational analyses revealed significant associations of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity in select circuits with OCD, depression and anxiety severity scores. Limitations Inclusion of patients with OCD receiving pharmacotherapy may have been a limitation. In addition, the patients were heterogeneous in terms of their obsessive–compulsive symptom profiles; we did not distinguish between different obsessive–compulsive symptom dimensions. Conclusion The study results provide further evidence for OCD-related white matter abnormalities in the ALIC and

  7. Determinants of beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration in the canine ventricular myocyte: a computational analysis.

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    Jordi Heijman

    Full Text Available Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization duration (BVR is an intrinsic characteristic of cardiac function and a better marker of proarrhythmia than repolarization prolongation alone. The ionic mechanisms underlying baseline BVR in physiological conditions, its rate dependence, and the factors contributing to increased BVR in pathologies remain incompletely understood. Here, we employed computer modeling to provide novel insights into the subcellular mechanisms of BVR under physiological conditions and during simulated drug-induced repolarization prolongation, mimicking long-QT syndromes type 1, 2, and 3. We developed stochastic implementations of 13 major ionic currents and fluxes in a model of canine ventricular-myocyte electrophysiology. Combined stochastic gating of these components resulted in short- and long-term variability, consistent with experimental data from isolated canine ventricular myocytes. The model indicated that the magnitude of stochastic fluctuations is rate dependent due to the rate dependence of action-potential (AP duration (APD. This process (the "active" component and the intrinsic nonlinear relationship between membrane current and APD ("intrinsic component" contribute to the rate dependence of BVR. We identified a major role in physiological BVR for stochastic gating of the persistent Na(+ current (INa and rapidly activating delayed-rectifier K(+ current (IKr. Inhibition of IKr or augmentation of INa significantly increased BVR, whereas subsequent β-adrenergic receptor stimulation reduced it, similar to experimental findings in isolated myocytes. In contrast, β-adrenergic stimulation increased BVR in simulated long-QT syndrome type 1. In addition to stochastic channel gating, AP morphology, APD, and beat-to-beat variations in Ca(2+ were found to modulate single-cell BVR. Cell-to-cell coupling decreased BVR and this was more pronounced when a model cell with increased BVR was coupled to a model cell with normal BVR

  8. Abnormal thallium kinetics in postoperative coarctation of the aorta: evidence for diffuse hypertension-induced vascular pathology

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    Kimball, B.P.; Shurvell, B.L.; Mildenberger, R.R.; Houle, S.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1986-03-01

    After operative correction of congenital coarctation of the aorta, patients continue to have excess cardiovascular mortality, including manifestations of ischemic heart disease. Previous morphologic studies support the concept of direct hypertensive vascular injury in these patients. To determine whether abnormalities of myocardial perfusion were present in an asymptomatic group of patients with coarctation repair, 18 men and 9 women with a mean age of 26 years (range 19 to 41) were studied between 2 and 25 years after operative correction. Stress electrocardiography and quantitative thallium imaging by a circumferential profile technique were used. These patients were compared with a normal group, statistically defined as having a less than 1% prevalence of significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The postoperative coarctation group demonstrated a reduction in global thallium redistribution in each view analyzed. As compared with findings in the control subjects, thallium washout in the anterior view (41.9 versus 48.6%, p = 0.02) and left anterior oblique projection (40.5 versus 48.2%, p = 0.007) was significantly diminished. Although the postoperative coarctation group had a lower thallium redistribution rate in the lateral view (41.4 versus 46.3%, p = 0.09) this difference did not reach statistical significance because of the intrinsic variability of this projection. Plots of the median percent thallium washout revealed independence from circumferential profile angle, indicating global abnormalities in perfusion. No correlation between clinical variables and thallium kinetics could be established, suggesting marked individual variability in the development of this vascular lesion. The observation of abnormal thallium kinetics in patients with coarctation repair may have consequences for long-term follow-up and therapy.

  9. Cyclical Modulation of Human Ventricular Repolarization by Respiration

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    Ben eHanson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory modulation of autonomic input to the sinus node results in cyclical modulation of heart rate, known as respiratory sinus arrhythmia. We hypothesized that the respiratory cycle may also exert cyclical modulation on ventricular repolarization, which may be separately measurable using local endocardial recordings.Methods and Results: The study included 16 subjects with normal ventricles undergoing routine clinical electrophysiological procedures for supraventricular arrhythmias. Unipolar electrograms were recorded from 10 right and 10 left ventricular endocardial sites. Breathing was voluntarily regulated at 5 fixed frequencies (6, 9, 12, 15 and 30 breaths per minute and heart rate was clamped by RV pacing. Activation-recovery intervals (ARI: a surrogate for APD exhibited significant (p<0.025 cyclical variation at the respiratory frequency in all subjects; ARI shortened with inspiration and lengthened with expiration. Peak-to-peak ARI variation ranged from 0-26 ms; the spatial pattern varied with subject. Arterial blood pressure also oscillated at the respiratory frequency (p<0.025 and lagged behind respiration by between 1.5 s and 0.65s from slowest to fastest breathing rates respectively. Systolic oscillation amplitude was significantly greater than diastolic (14±5 vs. 8±4 mmHg ± SD, p<0.001. Conclusions: Observations in humans with healthy ventricles using multiple left and right ventricular endocardial recordings showed that ARI (APD varied cyclically with respiration.

  10. Rosuvastatin blocks hERG current and prolongs cardiac repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Isabelle; Vigneault, Patrick; Drolet, Benoît; Turgeon, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    Blocking of the potassium current I(Kr) [human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG)] is generally associated with an increased risk of long QT syndrome (LQTS). The 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, rosuvastatin, is a methanesulfonamide derivative, which shows structural similarities with several I(Kr) blockers. Hence, we assessed the effects of rosuvastatin on cardiac repolarization by using in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models. Patch clamp experiments on hERG-transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells established the potency of rosuvastatin to block hERG [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50) ) = 195 nM]. We showed in isolated guinea pig hearts that 195 nM rosuvastatin prolonged (basic cycle length of 250 ms; p cancer resistance protein (BCRP), multidrug resistance gene (MDR1)] and influx [organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 2B1] transporters involved in the disposition and cardiac distribution of the drug. Genetic polymorphisms observed for BCRP, MDR1, and OATP2B1, and IC(50) determined for hERG blocking lead us to propose that some patients may be at risk of rosuvastatin-induced LQTS.

  11. Concomitant fractional anisotropy and volumetric abnormalities in temporal lobe epilepsy: cross-sectional evidence for progressive neurologic injury.

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    Simon S Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and associated hippocampal sclerosis (TLEhs there are brain abnormalities extending beyond the presumed epileptogenic zone as revealed separately in conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies. However, little is known about the relation between macroscopic atrophy (revealed by volumetric MRI and microstructural degeneration (inferred by DTI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For 62 patients with unilateral TLEhs and 68 healthy controls, we determined volumes and mean fractional anisotropy (FA of ipsilateral and contralateral brain structures from T1-weighted and DTI data, respectively. We report significant volume atrophy and FA alterations of temporal lobe, subcortical and callosal regions, which were more diffuse and bilateral in patients with left TLEhs relative to right TLEhs. We observed significant relationships between volume loss and mean FA, particularly of the thalamus and putamen bilaterally. When corrected for age, duration of epilepsy was significantly correlated with FA loss of an anatomically plausible route - including ipsilateral parahippocampal gyrus and temporal lobe white matter, the thalamus bilaterally, and posterior regions of the corpus callosum that contain temporal lobe fibres - that may be suggestive of progressive brain degeneration in response to recurrent seizures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Chronic TLEhs is associated with interrelated DTI-derived and volume-derived brain degenerative abnormalities that are influenced by the duration of the disorder and the side of seizure onset. This work confirms previously contradictory findings by employing multi-modal imaging techniques in parallel in a large sample of patients.

  12. Weak responses to auditory feedback perturbation during articulation in persons who stutter: evidence for abnormal auditory-motor transformation.

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    Shanqing Cai

    Full Text Available Previous empirical observations have led researchers to propose that auditory feedback (the auditory perception of self-produced sounds when speaking functions abnormally in the speech motor systems of persons who stutter (PWS. Researchers have theorized that an important neural basis of stuttering is the aberrant integration of auditory information into incipient speech motor commands. Because of the circumstantial support for these hypotheses and the differences and contradictions between them, there is a need for carefully designed experiments that directly examine auditory-motor integration during speech production in PWS. In the current study, we used real-time manipulation of auditory feedback to directly investigate whether the speech motor system of PWS utilizes auditory feedback abnormally during articulation and to characterize potential deficits of this auditory-motor integration. Twenty-one PWS and 18 fluent control participants were recruited. Using a short-latency formant-perturbation system, we examined participants' compensatory responses to unanticipated perturbation of auditory feedback of the first formant frequency during the production of the monophthong [ε]. The PWS showed compensatory responses that were qualitatively similar to the controls' and had close-to-normal latencies (∼150 ms, but the magnitudes of their responses were substantially and significantly smaller than those of the control participants (by 47% on average, p<0.05. Measurements of auditory acuity indicate that the weaker-than-normal compensatory responses in PWS were not attributable to a deficit in low-level auditory processing. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that stuttering is associated with functional defects in the inverse models responsible for the transformation from the domain of auditory targets and auditory error information into the domain of speech motor commands.

  13. Abnormal Intrinsic Functional Hubs in Severe Male Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Evidence from a Voxel-Wise Degree Centrality Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Gong, Honghan; Zhang, Wei; Zeng, Xianjun; Ye, Chenglong; Nie, Si; Chen, Liting; Peng, Dechang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been associated with changes in brain structure and regional function in certain brain areas. However, the functional features of network organization in the whole brain remain largely uncertain. The purpose of this study was to identify the OSA-related spatial centrality distribution of the whole brain functional network and to investigate the potential altered intrinsic functional hubs. Methods Forty male patients with newly confirmed severe OSA on polysomnography, and well-matched good sleepers, participated in this study. All participants underwent a resting-state functional MRI scan and clinical and cognitive evaluation. Voxel-wise degree centrality (DC) was measured across the whole brain, and group difference in DC was compared. The relationship between the abnormal DC value and clinical variables was assessed using a linear correlation analysis. Results Remarkably similar spatial distributions of the functional hubs (high DC) were found in both groups. However, OSA patients exhibited a pattern of significantly reduced regional DC in the left middle occipital gyrus, posterior cingulate cortex, left superior frontal gyrus, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule, and DC was increased in the right orbital frontal cortex, bilateral cerebellum posterior lobes, and bilateral lentiform nucleus, including the putamen, extending to the hippocampus, and the inferior temporal gyrus, which overlapped with the functional hubs. Furthermore, a linear correlation analysis revealed that the DC value in the posterior cingulate cortex and left superior frontal gyrus were positively correlated with Montreal cognitive assessment scores, The DC value in the left middle occipital gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal lobule were negatively correlated with apnea-hypopnea index and arousal index in OSA patients. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OSA patients exhibited specific abnormal intrinsic functional hubs including relatively

  14. Ionic mechanisms limiting cardiac repolarization reserve in humans compared to dogs.

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    Jost, Norbert; Virág, László; Comtois, Philippe; Ordög, Balázs; Szuts, Viktória; Seprényi, György; Bitay, Miklós; Kohajda, Zsófia; Koncz, István; Nagy, Norbert; Szél, Tamás; Magyar, János; Kovács, Mária; Puskás, László G; Lengyel, Csaba; Wettwer, Erich; Ravens, Ursula; Nánási, Péter P; Papp, Julius Gy; Varró, András; Nattel, Stanley

    2013-09-01

    The species-specific determinants of repolarization are poorly understood. This study compared the contribution of various currents to cardiac repolarization in canine and human ventricle. Conventional microelectrode, whole-cell patch-clamp, molecular biological and mathematical modelling techniques were used. Selective IKr block (50-100 nmol l(-1) dofetilide) lengthened AP duration at 90% of repolarization (APD90) >3-fold more in human than dog, suggesting smaller repolarization reserve in humans. Selective IK1 block (10 μmol l(-1) BaCl2) and IKs block (1 μmol l(-1) HMR-1556) increased APD90 more in canine than human right ventricular papillary muscle. Ion current measurements in isolated cardiomyocytes showed that IK1 and IKs densities were 3- and 4.5-fold larger in dogs than humans, respectively. IKr density and kinetics were similar in human versus dog. ICa and Ito were respectively ~30% larger and ~29% smaller in human, and Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange current was comparable. Cardiac mRNA levels for the main IK1 ion channel subunit Kir2.1 and the IKs accessory subunit minK were significantly lower, but mRNA expression of ERG and KvLQT1 (IKr and IKs α-subunits) were not significantly different, in human versus dog. Immunostaining suggested lower Kir2.1 and minK, and higher KvLQT1 protein expression in human versus canine cardiomyocytes. IK1 and IKs inhibition increased the APD-prolonging effect of IKr block more in dog (by 56% and 49%, respectively) than human (34 and 16%), indicating that both currents contribute to increased repolarization reserve in the dog. A mathematical model incorporating observed human-canine ion current differences confirmed the role of IK1 and IKs in repolarization reserve differences. Thus, humans show greater repolarization-delaying effects of IKr block than dogs, because of lower repolarization reserve contributions from IK1 and IKs, emphasizing species-specific determinants of repolarization and the limitations of animal models for

  15. An estimate of the dispersion of repolarization times based on a biophysical model of the ECG.

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    Sassi, Roberto; Mainardi, Luca T

    2011-12-01

    Temporal heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization is a key quantity for the development of ventricular reentrant arrhythmia. In this paper, we introduce the V-index, a novel ECG-based estimator of the standard deviation of ventricular myocytes' repolarization times s(ϑ). Differently from other ECG metrics of repolarization heterogeneity, the V-index was derived from the analysis of a biophysical model of the ECG, where repolarization is described by the dominant T-wave (DTW) paradigm. The model explains the shape of T-waves in each lead as a projection of a main waveform (the DTW) and its derivatives weighted by scalars, the lead factors. A mathematical formula is derived to link the heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization s(ϑ) and the V-index. The formula was verified using synthetic 12-lead ECGs generated with a direct electrophysiological model for increasing values of s(ϑ) (in the range 20-70 ms). A linear relationship between the V-index and s(ϑ) was observed, V ≈ 0.675 s(ϑ) + 1.8 ms (R(2) = 0.9992). Finally, 68 ECGs from the E-OTH-12-0068-010 database of the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse were analyzed. The V-index coherently increased after sotalol administration, a drug known to have QT-prolonging potential (p < 0.001).

  16. Measurement of thrombocytopoiesis in W/W mice with evidence for an abnormality of sulfate metabolism. [Sulfur 35; Selenium 75

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    Threatte, G.A.; Ebbe, S.; Phalen, E.

    1981-09-01

    Mice of the W/W/sup v/ genotype have an hereditary macrocytic anemia resulting from a diminished proliferative capacity of hemopoietic precursor cells. Platelet production was studied because W/W/sup v/ mice maintain a normal number of circulating platelets that are of methionine and calculating the percentage of the injected dose incorporated by platelets, the platelet production rate of W/W/sup v/ mice was found to be equivalent to the production rate of their +/+ littermates. Using NA/sub 2//sup 35/SO/sub 4/, however, the platelet production rate, as measured by the same isotope incorporation method, was nearly twice the rate of the normal littermates. The increase in /sup 35/S incorporation appeared to be explained by a greater availability of isotope in the W/W/sup v/ as evidenced by the higher plasma levels of /sup 35/S that were concurrently found. This suggests that the W/W/sup v/ mouse has an aberrant metabolism of inorganic sulfate probably unrelated to platelet production. These results also demonstrate how failure to take plasma radioactivity levels into account can lead to conflicting and probably erroneous conclusions in animals with an inherent or induced metabolic abnormality.

  17. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with dispersion of ventricular repolarization in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Corona-Villalobos, Celia P; Pozios, Iraklis; Gonzales, Jorge; Soleimanifard, Yalda; Sivalokanathan, Sanjay; Montoya-Cerrillo, Diego; Vakrou, Styliani; Kamel, Ihab; Mormontoy-Laurel, Wilfredo; Dolores-Cerna, Ketty; Suarez, Jacsel; Perez-Melo, Sergio; Bluemke, David A; Abraham, Theodore P; Zimmerman, Stefan L; Abraham, M Roselle

    2017-06-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by myocyte hypertrophy, disarray, fibrosis, and increased risk for ventricular arrhythmias. Increased QT dispersion has been reported in patients with HCM, but the underlying mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. In this study, we examined the relationship between diffuse interstitial fibrosis, replacement fibrosis, QTc dispersion and ventricular arrhythmias in patients with HCM. We hypothesized that fibrosis would slow impulse propagation and increase dispersion of ventricular repolarization, resulting in increased QTc dispersion on surface electrocardiogram (ECG) and ventricular arrhythmias. ECG and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) image analyses were performed retrospectively in 112 patients with a clinical diagnosis of HCM. Replacement fibrosis was assessed by measuring late gadolinium (Gd) enhancement (LGE), using a semi-automated threshold technique. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis was assessed by measuring T1 relaxation times after Gd administration, using the Look-Locker sequence. QTc dispersion was measured digitally in the septal/anterior (V1-V4), inferior (II, III, and aVF), and lateral (I, aVL, V5, and V6) lead groups on surface ECG. All patients had evidence of asymmetric septal hypertrophy. LGE was evident in 70 (63%) patients; the median T1 relaxation time was 411±38 ms. An inverse correlation was observed between T1 relaxation time and QTc dispersion in leads V1-V4 (pdispersion in leads V1-V4 (odds ratio, 1.011 [1.004-1.0178, p=0.003). We found no correlation between presence and percentage of LGE and QTc dispersion. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis is associated with increased dispersion of ventricular repolarization in leads, reflecting electrical activity in the hypertrophied septum. Interstitial fibrosis combined with ion channel/gap junction remodeling in the septum could lead to inhomogeneity of ventricular refractoriness, resulting in increased QTc dispersion in leads V1-V4.

  18. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daníel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dörr, Marcus; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stéphanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Åsa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; Ehret, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W.H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Polašek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Hólm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobbo, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbel, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kälsch, Hagen; Nöthen, Markus M.; consortium, HRGEN; den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Prucha, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardai, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Fabiola Del, Greco M.; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C.M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Leach, Irene Mateo; Navis, Gerjan; van den Berg, Maarten P.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orrú, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R.P.; Völker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundström, Johan; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kähönen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiechl, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gasparini, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimäki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; van Duijn, Cornelia; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Kari; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kääb, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal Mendelian Long QT Syndrome (LQTS). Using a genome-wide association and replication study in up to 100,000 individuals we identified 35 common variant QT interval loci, that collectively explain ∼8-10% of QT variation and highlight the importance of calcium regulation in myocardial repolarization. Rare variant analysis of 6 novel QT loci in 298 unrelated LQTS probands identified coding variants not found in controls but of uncertain causality and therefore requiring validation. Several newly identified loci encode for proteins that physically interact with other recognized repolarization proteins. Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies novel candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS,and SCD. PMID:24952745

  19. Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmurai Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization in Intact Canine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 王琳; 陆再英

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine was investigated. By using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, monophasic action potentials (MAPs) of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid)and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall in 12 open-chest dogs. MAPD90 and transmural dispersion of repolarization among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the EAD before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. The results showed that the MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo before autonomic nervous stimulation were 278±11 ms,316± 16 ms and 270± 12 ms respectively, the MAPD90of Mid was significantly longer than that of Epi or Endo (P<0.01). MAPD90 of Epi, Mid and Endo were shortened by 19±4 ms, 45±6 ms,18± 3 ms respectively during sympathetic stimulation. Compared with that of the control, the transmural dispersion of repolarization during sympathetic stimulation was shortened from 44 ± 4 ms to 15±3 ms (P<0. 01), but early afterdepolarizations were elicited in the Mid of 5 dogs (41 0%)during sympathetic stimulation. Parasympathetic stimulation did not significantly affect the MAPD90 in the three layers. It is concluded that there is the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in intact canine. Sympathetic stimulation can reduce transmural dispersion of repolarization, but it can produce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid. Parasympathetic stimulation does not significantly affect the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization.

  20. Calcium-activated potassium current modulates ventricular repolarization in chronic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid M Bonilla

    Full Text Available The role of I(KCa in cardiac repolarization remains controversial and varies across species. The relevance of the current as a therapeutic target is therefore undefined. We examined the cellular electrophysiologic effects of I(KCa blockade in controls, chronic heart failure (HF and HF with sustained atrial fibrillation. We used perforated patch action potential recordings to maintain intrinsic calcium cycling. The I(KCa blocker (apamin 100 nM was used to examine the role of the current in atrial and ventricular myocytes. A canine tachypacing induced model of HF (1 and 4 months, n = 5 per group was used, and compared to a group of 4 month HF with 6 weeks of superimposed atrial fibrillation (n = 7. A group of age-matched canine controls were used (n = 8. Human atrial and ventricular myocytes were isolated from explanted end-stage failing hearts which were obtained from transplant recipients, and studied in parallel. Atrial myocyte action potentials were unchanged by I(KCa blockade in all of the groups studied. I(KCa blockade did not affect ventricular myocyte repolarization in controls. HF caused prolongation of ventricular myocyte action potential repolarization. I(KCa blockade caused further prolongation of ventricular repolarization in HF and also caused repolarization instability and early afterdepolarizations. SK2 and SK3 expression in the atria and SK3 in the ventricle were increased in canine heart failure. We conclude that during HF, I(KCa blockade in ventricular myocytes results in cellular arrhythmias. Furthermore, our data suggest an important role for I(KCa in the maintenance of ventricular repolarization stability during chronic heart failure. Our findings suggest that novel antiarrhythmic therapies should have safety and efficacy evaluated in both atria and ventricles.

  1. Evidence of floods on the Potomac River from anatomical abnormalities in the wood of flood-plain trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanosky, Thomas M.

    1983-01-01

    Ash trees along the Potomac River flood plain near Washington, D.C., were studied to determine changes in wood anatomy related to flood damage, and anomalous growth was compared to flood records for April 15 to August 31, 1930-79. Collectively, anatomical evidence was detected for 33 of the 34 growing-season floods during the study period. Evidence of 12 floods prior to 1930 was also noted, including catastrophic ones in 1889 and 1924. Trees damaged after the transition from earlywood to latewood growth typically formed ' flood rings ' of enlarged vessels within the latewood zone. Trees damaged near the beginning of the growth year developed flood rings within, or contiguous with, the earlywood. Both patterns are assumed to have developed when flood-damaged trees produced a second crop of leaves. Trees damaged by high-magnitude floods developed well formed flood rings along the entire height and around the entire circumference of the stem. Small floods were generally associated wtih diffuse or discontinuous anomalies restricted to stem apices. Frequency of flood rings was positively related to flood magnitude, and time of flood generation during the tree-growth season was estimated from the radial position of anomalous growth relative to annual ring width. Reconstructing tree heights in a year of flood-ring formation gives a minimum stage estimate along local stream reaches. Some trees provided evidence of numerous floods. Those with the greatest number of flood rings grew on frequently flooded surfaces subject to flood-flow velocities of at least 1 m/s, and more typically greater than 2 m/s. Tree size, more than age, was related to flood-ring formation. Trees kept small by frequent flood damage had more flood rings than taller trees of comparable age. (USGS)

  2. Increased short-term variability of repolarization predicts d-sotalol-induced torsades de pointes in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Verduyn, S Cora; Stengl, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Identification of patients at risk for drug-induced torsades de pointes arrhythmia (TdP) is difficult. Increased temporal lability of repolarization has been suggested as being valuable to predict proarrhythmia. The predictive value of different repolarization parameters, including beat-to-beat v...

  3. Meiotic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Sudden cardiac death in dogs with remodeled hearts is associated with larger beat-to-beat variability of repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Truin, Michiel; van Opstal, Jurren M

    2005-01-01

    Increased proarrhythmia in dogs with chronic AV block (AVB) has been explained by ventricular remodeling causing a decrease in repolarization reserve. Beat-to-beat variability of repolarization (BVR) has been suggested to reflect repolarization reserve, in which high variability represents...... diminished reserve and larger propensity for repolarization-dependent ventricular arrhythmia. A subset of chronic AVB dogs (10%) suffers sudden cardiac death (SCD). With the assumption that repolarization defects constitute a potentially lethal proarrhythmic substrate, we hypothesized that BVR in SCD dogs...... are larger than in matched control chronic AVB dogs. From a population of 200 chronic AVB dogs, initially two groups were chosen retrospectively: 8 dogs that died suddenly (SCD) and 8 control dogs. Control dogs had a longer lifespan after AVB (10 to 18 weeks) than SCD dogs (5 to 10 weeks). All dogs had...

  5. Dementia revealed: novel chromosome 6 locus for late-onset Alzheimer disease provides genetic evidence for folate-pathway abnormalities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Naj

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS of late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD have consistently observed strong evidence of association with polymorphisms in APOE. However, until recently, variants at few other loci with statistically significant associations have replicated across studies. The present study combines data on 483,399 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from a previously reported GWAS of 492 LOAD cases and 496 controls and from an independent set of 439 LOAD cases and 608 controls to strengthen power to identify novel genetic association signals. Associations exceeding the experiment-wide significance threshold (alpha=1.03x10(-7 were replicated in an additional 1,338 cases and 2,003 controls. As expected, these analyses unequivocally confirmed APOE's risk effect (rs2075650, P=1.9x10(-36. Additionally, the SNP rs11754661 at 151.2 Mb of chromosome 6q25.1 in the gene MTHFD1L (which encodes the methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NADP+ dependent 1-like protein was significantly associated with LOAD (P=4.70x10(-8; Bonferroni-corrected P=0.022. Subsequent genotyping of SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (r2>0.8 with rs11754661 identified statistically significant associations in multiple SNPs (rs803424, P=0.016; rs2073067, P=0.03; rs2072064, P=0.035, reducing the likelihood of association due to genotyping error. In the replication case-control set, we observed an association of rs11754661 in the same direction as the previous association at P=0.002 (P=1.90x10(-10 in combined analysis of discovery and replication sets, with associations of similar statistical significance at several adjacent SNPs (rs17349743, P=0.005; rs803422, P=0.004. In summary, we observed and replicated a novel statistically significant association in MTHFD1L, a gene involved in the tetrahydrofolate synthesis pathway. This finding is noteworthy, as MTHFD1L may play a role in the generation of methionine from homocysteine and influence homocysteine

  6. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; Van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dorr, Marcus; Miiller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stephanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Asa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; EhreT, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer Zu; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Poagek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Holm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobboll, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbe, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kalsch, Hagen; Nothen, Markus M.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pruchal, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; Van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardail, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orru, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Volker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Arnlov, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundstrom, Johan; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kahonen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, I. T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiech, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gaspariniin, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Miihleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimaki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Karl; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kaab, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  7. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Pulit (Sara); L. Crotti (Lia); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Munroe (Patricia); T.T. Koopmann (Tamara); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); E. Rossin (Elizabeth); M. Morley (Michael); X. Wang (Xinchen); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Lundby (Alicia); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y. Bradford (Yuki); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); M. Dörr (Marcus); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.M. Lahtinen (Annukka); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); G.D. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D.S. Evans (Daniel); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); D. Waggott (Daryl); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L. Eisele (Lewin); D. Ellinghaus (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); P. Navarro (Pau); S. Ulivi (Shelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Tester (David); S. Chatel (Stéphanie); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); M. Kumari (Meena); R. Morris (Richard); A.T. Naluai (Asa); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Kluttig (Alexander); B. Strohmer (Bernhard); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); M. Torres (Maria); M. Knoflach (Michael); J.A. Hubacek (Jaroslav A.); K. Slowikowski (Kamil); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.D. Kumar (Runjun); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.S. Bader (Joel); G.B. Ehret (Georg); H. Huang (Hailiang); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J.B. Strait (James); P.W. Macfarlane (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Caulfield (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); F. Kronenberg (Florian); J. Willeit (Johann); J.G. Smith (J. Gustav); K.H. Greiser (Karin Halina); H.M. Zu Schwabedissen (Henriette Meyer); K. Werdan (Karl); C. Carella (Cintia); L. Zelante (Leopoldo); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Kolcic (Ivana); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Griffin (Maura); M.J. Daly (Mark); D.O. Arnar (David); H. Hólm (Hilma); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.C. Denny (Joshua); D.M. Roden (Dan); R.L. Zuvich (Rebecca); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); M.G. Larson (Martin); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); X. Yin (Xiaoyan); M. Bobbo (Marco); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Iorio (Annamaria); G. Sinagra (Gianfranco); A. Carracedo (Angel); S.R. Cummings (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Jula (Antti); K.K. Kontula (Kimmo); A. Marjamaa (Annukka); L. Oikarinen (Lasse); M. Perola (Markus); K. Porthan (Kimmo); R. Erbel (Raimund); P. Hoffmann (Per); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); H. Kälsch (Hagen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. den Hoed (Marcel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.S. Thelle (Dag); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Meitinger (Thomas); S. Perz (Siegfried); A. Peters (Annette); H. Prucha (Hanna); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); P.A. van der Vleuten (Pieter); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); E. Martens (Eimo); A. Bardai (Abdennasser); N. Hofman (Nynke); A.A.M. Wilde (Arthur); E.R. Behr (Elijah ); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); J.R. Giudicessi (John); A. Medeiros-Domingo (Argelia); J. Barc (Julien); F. Kyndt (Florence); V. Probst (Vincent); A. Ghidoni (Alice); R. Insolia (Roberto); R.M. Hamilton (Robert); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); J. Brandimarto (Jeffrey); K. Margulies (Kenneth); C.E. Moravec (Christine); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); J.R. O'Connell (Jeffery); W.K. Lee (Wai); G.C.M. Watt (Graham); H. Campbell (Harry); S.H. Wild (Sarah); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour); N. Frey (Norbert); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M. Kellis (Manolis); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.A. Kors (Jan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Kedenko (Lyudmyla); C. Lamina (Claudia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); E. Lakatta (Edward); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Orrù (Marco); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); M.R.P. Markus (Marcello R. P.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); L. Lind (Lars); J. Sundstrom (Johan); A.C. Syvanen; M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mononen (Kari); O. Raitakari (Olli); J. Viikari (Jorma); V. Adamkova (Vera); S. Kiechl (Stefan); M.-J. Brion (Maria); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J. Haerting (Johannes); A. Dominiczak (Anna); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); P.H. Whincup (Peter); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.-J. Schott (Jean-Jacques); C.R. Bezzina (Connie); E. Ingelsson (Erik); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Franke (Andre); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); A. Parsa (Afshin); Y. Liu (Yongmei); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.S. Siscovick (David); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S.B. Felix (Stephan); S. Sanna (Serena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); L.A. Boyer (Laurie); T.P. Cappola (Thomas); J.V. Olsen (Jesper); P. Lage (Pedro); P.J. Schwartz (Peter); S. Kääb (Stefan); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); M. Ackerman (Margaret); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (L

  8. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia and hypoxaemia in healthy males: impact of renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: Activity in the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) may influence the susceptibility to cardiac arrhythmia. To study the effect of basal RAS activity on cardiac repolarization during myocardial stress induced by hypoglycaemia or hypoxaemia in healthy humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten subjects...

  9. Cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia in type 1 diabetes: impact of basal renin-angiotensin system activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Andersen, Rikke; Høi-Hansen, Thomas; Larroude, Charlotte Ellen;

    2008-01-01

    activity affects cardiac repolarization during hypoglycaemia, thereby potentially carrying prognostic information on risk of the 'dead-in-bed syndrome'. METHODS AND RESULTS: Nine subjects with high RAS activity and nine subjects with low RAS activity were subjected to single-blinded placebo...

  10. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Pulit (Sara); L. Crotti (Lia); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Munroe (Patricia); T.T. Koopmann (Tamara); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); E. Rossin (Elizabeth); M. Morley (Michael); X. Wang (Xinchen); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Lundby (Alicia); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y. Bradford (Yuki); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); M. Dörr (Marcus); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.M. Lahtinen (Annukka); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); G.D. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D.S. Evans (Daniel); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); D. Waggott (Daryl); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L. Eisele (Lewin); D. Ellinghaus (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); P. Navarro (Pau); S. Ulivi (Shelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Tester (David); S. Chatel (Stéphanie); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); M. Kumari (Meena); R. Morris (Richard); A.T. Naluai (Asa); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Kluttig (Alexander); B. Strohmer (Bernhard); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); M. Torres (Maria); M. Knoflach (Michael); J.A. Hubacek (Jaroslav A.); K. Slowikowski (Kamil); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.D. Kumar (Runjun); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.S. Bader (Joel); G.B. Ehret (Georg); H. Huang (Hailiang); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J.B. Strait (James); P.W. Macfarlane (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Caulfield (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); F. Kronenberg (Florian); J. Willeit (Johann); J.G. Smith (J. Gustav); K.H. Greiser (Karin Halina); H.M. Zu Schwabedissen (Henriette Meyer); K. Werdan (Karl); C. Carella (Cintia); L. Zelante (Leopoldo); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Kolcic (Ivana); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Griffin (Maura); M.J. Daly (Mark); D.O. Arnar (David); H. Hólm (Hilma); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.C. Denny (Joshua); D.M. Roden (Dan); R.L. Zuvich (Rebecca); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); M.G. Larson (Martin); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); X. Yin (Xiaoyan); M. Bobbo (Marco); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Iorio (Annamaria); G. Sinagra (Gianfranco); A. Carracedo (Angel); S.R. Cummings (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Jula (Antti); K.K. Kontula (Kimmo); A. Marjamaa (Annukka); L. Oikarinen (Lasse); M. Perola (Markus); K. Porthan (Kimmo); R. Erbel (Raimund); P. Hoffmann (Per); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); H. Kälsch (Hagen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. den Hoed (Marcel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.S. Thelle (Dag); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Meitinger (Thomas); S. Perz (Siegfried); A. Peters (Annette); H. Prucha (Hanna); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); P.A. van der Vleuten (Pieter); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); E. Martens (Eimo); A. Bardai (Abdennasser); N. Hofman (Nynke); A.A.M. Wilde (Arthur); E.R. Behr (Elijah ); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); J.R. Giudicessi (John); A. Medeiros-Domingo (Argelia); J. Barc (Julien); F. Kyndt (Florence); V. Probst (Vincent); A. Ghidoni (Alice); R. Insolia (Roberto); R.M. Hamilton (Robert); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); J. Brandimarto (Jeffrey); K. Margulies (Kenneth); C.E. Moravec (Christine); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); J.R. O'Connell (Jeffery); W.K. Lee (Wai); G.C.M. Watt (Graham); H. Campbell (Harry); S.H. Wild (Sarah); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour); N. Frey (Norbert); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M. Kellis (Manolis); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.A. Kors (Jan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Kedenko (Lyudmyla); C. Lamina (Claudia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); E. Lakatta (Edward); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Orrù (Marco); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); M.R.P. Markus (Marcello R. P.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); L. Lind (Lars); J. Sundstrom (Johan); A.C. Syvanen; M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mononen (Kari); O. Raitakari (Olli); J. Viikari (Jorma); V. Adamkova (Vera); S. Kiechl (Stefan); M.-J. Brion (Maria); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J. Haerting (Johannes); A. Dominiczak (Anna); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); P.H. Whincup (Peter); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.-J. Schott (Jean-Jacques); C.R. Bezzina (Connie); E. Ingelsson (Erik); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Franke (Andre)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome

  11. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; Van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dorr, Marcus; Miiller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stephanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Asa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; EhreT, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer Zu; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Poagek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Holm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobboll, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbe, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kalsch, Hagen; Nothen, Markus M.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pruchal, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; Van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardail, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orru, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Volker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Arnlov, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundstrom, Johan; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kahonen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, I. T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiech, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gaspariniin, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Miihleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimaki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Karl; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kaab, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  12. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Arking (Dan); S.L. Pulit (Sara); L. Crotti (Lia); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Munroe (Patricia); T.T. Koopmann (Tamara); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); E. Rossin (Elizabeth); M. Morley (Michael); X. Wang (Xinchen); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); A. Lundby (Alicia); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); P.A. Noseworthy (Peter); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); Y. Bradford (Yuki); K.V. Tarasov (Kirill); M. Dörr (Marcus); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); A.M. Lahtinen (Annukka); I.M. Nolte (Ilja); G.D. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); S.J. Newhouse (Stephen); D.S. Evans (Daniel); W.S. Post (Wendy S.); D. Waggott (Daryl); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); L. Eisele (Lewin); D. Ellinghaus (David); C. Hayward (Caroline); P. Navarro (Pau); S. Ulivi (Shelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Tester (David); S. Chatel (Stéphanie); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); M. Kumari (Meena); R. Morris (Richard); A.T. Naluai (Asa); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Kluttig (Alexander); B. Strohmer (Bernhard); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); M. Torres (Maria); M. Knoflach (Michael); J.A. Hubacek (Jaroslav A.); K. Slowikowski (Kamil); S. Raychaudhuri (Soumya); R.D. Kumar (Runjun); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.S. Bader (Joel); G.B. Ehret (Georg); H. Huang (Hailiang); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); J.B. Strait (James); P.W. Macfarlane (Peter); M.J. Brown (Morris); M. Caulfield (Mark); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); F. Kronenberg (Florian); J. Willeit (Johann); J.G. Smith (J. Gustav); K.H. Greiser (Karin Halina); H.M. Zu Schwabedissen (Henriette Meyer); K. Werdan (Karl); C. Carella (Cintia); L. Zelante (Leopoldo); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); I. Kolcic (Ivana); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.F. Wright (Alan); M. Griffin (Maura); M.J. Daly (Mark); D.O. Arnar (David); H. Hólm (Hilma); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); J.C. Denny (Joshua); D.M. Roden (Dan); R.L. Zuvich (Rebecca); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.S. Plump (Andrew); M.G. Larson (Martin); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher); X. Yin (Xiaoyan); M. Bobbo (Marco); P. d' Adamo (Pio); A. Iorio (Annamaria); G. Sinagra (Gianfranco); A. Carracedo (Angel); S.R. Cummings (Steven); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Jula (Antti); K.K. Kontula (Kimmo); A. Marjamaa (Annukka); L. Oikarinen (Lasse); M. Perola (Markus); K. Porthan (Kimmo); R. Erbel (Raimund); P. Hoffmann (Per); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); H. Kälsch (Hagen); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); M. den Hoed (Marcel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); D.S. Thelle (Dag); C. Gieger (Christian); T. Meitinger (Thomas); S. Perz (Siegfried); A. Peters (Annette); H. Prucha (Hanna); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); P.A. van der Vleuten (Pieter); B.M. Beckmann (Britt); E. Martens (Eimo); A. Bardai (Abdennasser); N. Hofman (Nynke); A.A.M. Wilde (Arthur); E.R. Behr (Elijah ); C. Dalageorgou (Chrysoula); J.R. Giudicessi (John); A. Medeiros-Domingo (Argelia); J. Barc (Julien); F. Kyndt (Florence); V. Probst (Vincent); A. Ghidoni (Alice); R. Insolia (Roberto); R.M. Hamilton (Robert); S.W. Scherer (Stephen); J. Brandimarto (Jeffrey); K. Margulies (Kenneth); C.E. Moravec (Christine); F. Del Greco M (Fabiola); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); J.R. O'Connell (Jeffery); W.K. Lee (Wai); G.C.M. Watt (Graham); H. Campbell (Harry); S.H. Wild (Sarah); N.E. El Mokhtari (Nour); N. Frey (Norbert); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); G. Navis (Gerjan); M.P. van den Berg (Maarten); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); M. Kellis (Manolis); B.P. Krijthe (Bouwe); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); J.A. Kors (Jan); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Kedenko (Lyudmyla); C. Lamina (Claudia); B.A. Oostra (Ben); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); E. Lakatta (Edward); A. Mulas (Antonella); M. Orrù (Marco); D. Schlessinger (David); M. Uda (Manuela); M.R.P. Markus (Marcello R. P.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Snieder (Harold); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J. Ärnlöv (Johan); L. Lind (Lars); J. Sundstrom (Johan); A.C. Syvanen; M. Kivimaki (Mika); M. Kähönen (Mika); K. Mononen (Kari); O. Raitakari (Olli); J. Viikari (Jorma); V. Adamkova (Vera); S. Kiechl (Stefan); M.-J. Brion (Maria); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); J. Haerting (Johannes); A. Dominiczak (Anna); F. Nyberg (Fredrik); P.H. Whincup (Peter); A. Hingorani (Aroon); J.-J. Schott (Jean-Jacques); C.R. Bezzina (Connie); E. Ingelsson (Erik); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); P. Gasparini (Paolo); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Franke (Andre); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A.D. Paterson (Andrew); A. Parsa (Afshin); Y. Liu (Yongmei); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); D.S. Siscovick (David); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); Y. Jamshidi (Yalda); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S.B. Felix (Stephan); S. Sanna (Serena); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); L.A. Boyer (Laurie); T.P. Cappola (Thomas); J.V. Olsen (Jesper); P. Lage (Pedro); P.J. Schwartz (Peter); S. Kääb (Stefan); A. Chakravarti (Aravinda); M. Ackerman (Margaret); A. Pfeufer (Arne); P.I.W. de Bakker (Paul); C. Newton-Cheh (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (L

  13. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arking, Dan E.; Pulit, Sara L.; Crotti, Lia; Van der Harst, Pim; Munroe, Patricia B.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Morley, Michael; Wang, Xinchen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lundby, Alicia; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Bradford, Yuki; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Dorr, Marcus; Miiller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lahtinen, Annukka M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Bis, Joshua C.; Isaacs, Aaron; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Evans, Daniel S.; Post, Wendy S.; Waggott, Daryl; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hicks, Andrew A.; Eisele, Lewin; Ellinghaus, David; Hayward, Caroline; Navarro, Pau; Ulivi, Sheila; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tester, David J.; Chatel, Stephanie; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Naluai, Asa T.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Kluttig, Alexander; Strohmer, Bernhard; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Torres, Maria; Knoflach, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Slowikowski, Kamil; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Kumar, Runjun D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bader, Joel S.; EhreT, Georg; Huang, Hailiang; Kao, W. H. Linda; Strait, James B.; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Brown, Morris; Caulfield, Mark J.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kronenberg, Florian; Willeit, Johann; Smith, J. Gustav; Greiser, Karin H.; Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer Zu; Werdan, Karl; Carella, Massimo; Zelante, Leopoldo; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kolcic, Ivana; Poagek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Griffin, Maura; Daly, Mark J.; Arnar, David O.; Holm, Hilma; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S.; Larson, Martin G.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bobboll, Marco; D'Adamo, Adamo P.; Iorio, Annamaria; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Carracedo, Angel; Cummings, Steven R.; Nalls, Michael A.; Jula, Antti; Kontula, Kimmo K.; Marjamaa, Annukka; Oikarinen, Lasse; Perola, Markus; Porthan, Kimmo; Erbe, Raimund; Hoffmann, Per; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kalsch, Hagen; Nothen, Markus M.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Thelle, Dag S.; Gieger, Christian; Meitinger, Thomas; Perz, Siegfried; Peters, Annette; Pruchal, Hanna; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; De Boer, Rudolf A.; Franke, Lude; Van der Vleuten, Pieter A.; Beckmann, Britt Maria; Martens, Eimo; Bardail, Abdennasser; Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Behr, Elijah R.; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Giudicessi, John R.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Barc, Julien; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Ghidoni, Alice; Insolia, Roberto; Hamilton, Robert M.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Margulies, Kenneth; Moravec, Christine E.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Fuchsberger, Christian; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Wai K.; Watt, Graham C. M.; Campbell, Harry; Wild, Sarah H.; El Mokhtari, Nour E.; Frey, Norbert; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Mateo Leach, Irene; Navis, Gerjan; Van den Berg, Maarten P.; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Kellis, Manolis; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Kors, Jan A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Lamina, Claudia; Oostra, Ben A.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Mulas, Antonella; Orru, Marco; Schlessinger, David; Uda, Manuela; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Volker, Uwe; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Arnlov, Johan; Lind, Lars; Sundstrom, Johan; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Kivimaki, Mika; Kahonen, Mika; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, I. T.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Adamkova, Vera; Kiech, Stefan; Brion, Maria; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haerting, Johannes; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Whincup, Peter H.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Bezzina, Connie R.; Ingelsson, Erik; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gaspariniin, Paolo; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Franke, Andre; Miihleisen, Thomas W.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Lehtimaki, Terho J.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Parsa, Afshin; Liu, Yongmei; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Siscovick, David S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Jamshidi, Yalda; Salomaa, Veikko; Felix, Stephan B.; Sanna, Serena; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Stefansson, Karl; Boyer, Laurie A.; Cappola, Thomas P.; Olsen, Jesper V.; Lage, Kasper; Schwartz, Peter J.; Kaab, Stefan; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Ackerman, Michael J.; Pfeufer, Arne; De Bakker, Paul I. W.; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Using

  14. The contribution of ventricular apicobasal and transmural repolarization patterns to the development of the T wave body surface potentials in frogs (Rana temporaria) and pike (Esox lucius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaykshnorayte, Marina A; Azarov, Jan E; Tsvetkova, Alena S; Vityazev, Vladimir A; Ovechkin, Alexey O; Shmakov, Dmitry N

    2011-05-01

    The study aimed at the simultaneous determination of the transmural and apicobasal differences in the repolarization timing and the comparison of the contributions of these two repolarization gradients to the development of the body surface T wave potentials in animals with the single heart ventricle (fishes and amphibians). Unipolar potentials were measured on the body surface, epicardium and in the intramural (subepicardial, Epi; midmyocardial; and subendocardial, Endo) ventricular layers of 9 pike and 8 frogs. Activation times, repolarization times and activation-recovery intervals were determined. A transmural gradient in repolarization durations in frogs (Endo>Epi, Ppike that produces a repolarization sequence from Endo to Epi (Endopike and frogs.

  15. Na/K pump regulation of cardiac repolarization: insights from a systems biology approach

    KAUST Repository

    Bueno-Orovio, Alfonso

    2013-05-15

    The sodium-potassium pump is widely recognized as the principal mechanism for active ion transport across the cellular membrane of cardiac tissue, being responsible for the creation and maintenance of the transarcolemmal sodium and potassium gradients, crucial for cardiac cell electrophysiology. Importantly, sodium-potassium pump activity is impaired in a number of major diseased conditions, including ischemia and heart failure. However, its subtle ways of action on cardiac electrophysiology, both directly through its electrogenic nature and indirectly via the regulation of cell homeostasis, make it hard to predict the electrophysiological consequences of reduced sodium-potassium pump activity in cardiac repolarization. In this review, we discuss how recent studies adopting the systems biology approach, through the integration of experimental and modeling methodologies, have identified the sodium-potassium pump as one of the most important ionic mechanisms in regulating key properties of cardiac repolarization and its rate dependence, from subcellular to whole organ levels. These include the role of the pump in the biphasic modulation of cellular repolarization and refractoriness, the rate control of intracellular sodium and calcium dynamics and therefore of the adaptation of repolarization to changes in heart rate, as well as its importance in regulating pro-arrhythmic substrates through modulation of dispersion of repolarization and restitution. Theoretical findings are consistent across a variety of cell types and species including human, and widely in agreement with experimental findings. The novel insights and hypotheses on the role of the pump in cardiac electrophysiology obtained through this integrative approach could eventually lead to novel therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  16. Leukocyte abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabig, T G

    1980-07-01

    Certain qualitative abnormalities in neutrophils and blood monocytes are associated with frequent, severe, and recurrent bacterial infections leading to fatal sepsis, while other qualitative defects demonstrated in vitro may have few or no clinical sequelae. These qualitative defects are discussed in terms of the specific functions of locomotion, phagocytosis, degranulation, and bacterial killing.

  17. Action potential repolarization and a fast after-hyperpolarization in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, J F

    1987-04-01

    1. The repolarization of the action potential, and a fast after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) were studied in CA1 pyramidal cells (n = 76) in rat hippocampal slices (28-37 degrees C). Single spikes were elicited by brief (1-3 ms) current pulses, at membrane potentials close to rest (-60 to -70 mV). 2. Each action potential was followed by four after-potentials: (a) the fast a.h.p., lasting 2-5 ms; (b) an after-depolarization; (c) a medium a.h.p., (50-100 ms); and (d) a slow a.h.p. (1-2 s). Both the fast a.h.p. and the slow a.h.p. (but not the medium a.h.p.) were inhibited by Ca2+-free medium or Ca2+-channel blockers (Co2+, Mn2+ or Cd2+); but tetraethylammonium (TEA; 0.5-2 nM) blocked only the fast a.h.p., and noradrenaline (2-5 microM) only the slow a.h.p. This suggests that two Ca2+-activated K+ currents were involved: a fast, TEA-sensitive one (IC) underlying the fast a.h.p., and a slow noradrenaline-sensitive one (IAHP) underlying the slow a.h.p. 3. Like the fast a.h.p., spike repolarization seems to depend on a Ca2+-dependent K+ current of the fast, TEA-sensitive kind (IC). The repolarization was slowed by Ca2+-free medium, Co2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, or TEA, but not by noradrenaline. Charybdotoxin (CTX; 30 nM), a scorpion toxin which blocks the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel in muscle, had a similar effect to TEA. The effects of TEA and Cd2+ (or Mn2+) showed mutual occlusion. Raising the external K+ concentration reduced the fast a.h.p. and slowed the spike repolarization, whereas Cl- loading of the cell was ineffective. 4. The transient K+ current, IA, seems also to contribute to spike repolarization, because: (a) 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 0.1 mM), which blocks IA, slowed the spike repolarization; (b) depolarizing pre-pulses, which inactivate IA, had a similar effect; (c) hyperpolarizing pre-pulses speeded up the spike repolarization; (d) the effects of 4-AP and pre-pulses persisted during Ca2+ blockade (like IA); and (e) depolarizing pre-pulses reduced the

  18. Chronic Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Treatment Variably Affects Cellular Repolarization in a Healed Post-MI Arrhythmia Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla, Ingrid M.; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Vargas-Pinto, Pedro; Baine, Stephen H.; Sridhar, Arun; Li, Chun; Billman, George E.; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last 40 years omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to be anti-arrhythmic or pro-arrhythmic depending on the method and duration of administration and model studied. We previously reported that omega-3 PUFAs do not confer anti-arrhythmic properties and are pro-arrhythmic in canine model of sudden cardiac death (SCD). Here, we evaluated the effects of chronic omega-3 PUFA treatment in post-MI animals susceptible (VF+) or resistant (VF−) to ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods: Perforated patch clamp techniques were used to measure cardiomyocyte action potential durations (APD) at 50 and 90% repolarization and short term variability of repolarization. The early repolarizing transient outward potassium current Ito was also studied. Results: Omega-3 PUFAs prolonged the action potential in VF− myocytes at both 50 and 90% repolarization. Short term variability of repolarization was increased in both untreated and treated VF− myocytes vs. controls. Ito was unaffected by omega-3 PUFA treatment. Omega-3 PUFA treatment attenuated the action potential prolongation in VF+ myocytes, but did not return repolarization to control values. Conclusions: Omega-3 PUFAs do not confer anti-arrhythmic properties in the setting of healed myocardial infarction in a canine model of SCD. In canines previously resistant to ventricular fibrillation (VF−), omega-3 PUFA treatment prolonged the action potential in VF− myocytes, and may contribute to pro-arrhythmic responses. PMID:27378936

  19. Low-dose carvedilol reduces transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-hua ZHONG; Xiao-pan CHEN; Mei-ling YUN; Wei-jing LI; Yan-fang CHEN; Zhen YAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the effects of carvedilol on the transmural heterogeneity of ven-tricular repolarization in rabbits with congestive heart failure (CHF). Methods:Rabbits were randomly divided into 3 groups: control, CHF and carvedilol treated CHF group. Monophasic action potential duration (MAPD) in the 3 myocardial layers was simultaneously recorded. Results: All the rabbits in the CHF group had signs of severe CHF. Compared with the control group, the mean blood pressure and cardiac output were significantly decreased, while peripheral resis-tance was significantly increased in the CHF group. This proved that the CHF model was successful created with adriamycin in this study. Compared to the control group, the ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) was remarkably decreased and all MAPD of the 3 myocardial layers were extended in rabbits with CHF. However, the extension of MAPD in the midmyocardium was more obvious. The transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) was significantly increased in CHF.Low-dose carvedilol (0.25 mg/kg, twice daily) had no effects on ventricular remodeling. Treatment with low-dose carvedilol significantly increased VFT. Al-though the MAPD of the 3 myocardial layers were further prolonged in the carvedilol treated CHF group, the prolongation of MAPD in the midmyocardium was shorter than those in the epicardium and endocardium. Treatment with low-dose carvedilol significantly decreased TDR in CHF. Conclusion: In the present study, the trans-mural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization increased in the rabbits with CHF. Low-dose carvedilol decreased the transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in CHF, which may be related to its direct electrophysiological pro-perty rather than its effect on ventricular remodeling.

  20. Effects of hypokalemia on transmural dispersion of ventricular repolarization in left ventricular myocardium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang-Hua Zhong; Shi-Juan Lu; Mo-Shui Chen; Zi-Bin Chen; Liu Wang; Ping-Sheng Wu

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe effects of hypokalemia on transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in left ventricular myocardium of rabbit, and explore the role of hypokalemia in malignant ventricular arrhythmia (MVA). Methods: A total of 20 rabbits were randomly divided into control group and hypokalemic group. Isolated hearts in the control group were simply perfused with modified Tyrode's solution, and were perfused with hypokalemic Tyrode's solution in hypokalemic group. Ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT), 90% monophasic action potential repolarization duration (APD90) of subepicardial, midmyocardial and subendocardial myocardium, transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and Cx43 protein expression in three layers of myocardium were measured in both groups. Results: VFT in the control group and the hypokalemic group were (13.40±2.95) V, and (7.00±1.49) V, respectively. There was a significant difference between two groups (P<0.01). APD90 of three myocardial layers in the hypokalemic group were significantly prolonged than those in the control group (P<0.01). APD90 in the hypokalemic group and the control group were (38.10±10.29) ms and (23.70±5.68) ms, and TDR were (52.90±14.55) ms and (36.10±12.44) ms, respectively. APD90 and TDR in the hypokalemic group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05), and the increase in APD90 of midmyocardium was more significant in the hypokalemic group. Cx43 protein expression of all three myocardial layers were decreased significantly in the hypokalemic group (P<0.01), and Cx43 was significantly increased (P<0.05). Reduction of Cx43 protein expression was more significant in the midmyocardium. Conclusions: Hypokalemic can increase transmural heterogeneity of Cx43 expression and repolarization in left ventricular myocardium of rabbit, and decrease VFT and can induce MVA more easily.

  1. A dual potassium channel activator improves repolarization reserve and normalizes ventricular action potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calloe, Kirstine; Di Diego, José M; Hansen, Rie Schultz

    2016-01-01

    in cultured canine cardiac myocytes and determined whether a dual K(+) current activator can normalize K(+) currents and restore action potential (AP) configuration. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ventricular myocytes were isolated and cultured for up to 48h. Current and voltage clamp recordings were made using patch...... of EADs. Our results suggest a potential benefit of K(+) current activators under conditions of reduced repolarization reserve including heart failure....

  2. Genetic association study of QT interval highlights role for calcium signaling pathways in myocardial repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arking, Dan E; Pulit, Sara L; Crotti, Lia

    2014-01-01

    The QT interval, an electrocardiographic measure reflecting myocardial repolarization, is a heritable trait. QT prolongation is a risk factor for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death (SCD) and could indicate the presence of the potentially lethal mendelian long-QT syndrome (LQTS). Usi....... Our integration of common variant association, expression and orthogonal protein-protein interaction screens provides new insights into cardiac electrophysiology and identifies new candidate genes for ventricular arrhythmias, LQTS and SCD. © 2014 Nature America, Inc....

  3. Glucose ingestion causes cardiac repolarization disturbances in type 1 long QT syndrome patients and healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyltén-Cavallius, Louise; Iepsen, Eva W; Christiansen, Michael

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: QTc and MCS increased in both groups. MCS remained elevated until 150 minutes after glucose ingestion, and the maximal change from baseline was larger among KCNQ1 LQTS patients compared with control subjects (0.28 ± 0.27 vs 0.15 ± 0.13; P ... by ingestion of 75-g glucose caused cardiac repolarization disturbances that were more severe in KCNQ1 LQTS patients compared with control subjects....

  4. Kv3.1 uses a timely resurgent K(+) current to secure action potential repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labro, Alain J; Priest, Michael F; Lacroix, Jérôme J; Snyders, Dirk J; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2015-12-17

    High-frequency action potential (AP) transmission is essential for rapid information processing in the central nervous system. Voltage-dependent Kv3 channels play an important role in this process thanks to their high activation threshold and fast closure kinetics, which reduce the neuron's refractory period. However, premature Kv3 channel closure leads to incomplete membrane repolarization, preventing sustainable AP propagation. Here, we demonstrate that Kv3.1b channels solve this problem by producing resurgent K(+) currents during repolarization, thus ensuring enough repolarizing power to terminate each AP. Unlike previously described resurgent Na(+) and K(+) currents, Kv3.1b's resurgent current does not originate from recovery of channel block or inactivation but results from a unique combination of steep voltage-dependent gating kinetics and ultra-fast voltage-sensor relaxation. These distinct properties are readily transferrable onto an orthologue Kv channel by transplanting the voltage-sensor's S3-S4 loop, providing molecular insights into the mechanism by which Kv3 channels contribute to high-frequency AP transmission.

  5. The evaluation of a new marker of transmyocardial repolarization parameters in ischemic stroke patients; T peak-T end (T p-e), T p-e/QTc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emektar, Emine; Çorbacıoğlu, Şeref Kerem; Korucu, Osman; Ramadan, Selma; Uzunosmanoğlu, Hüseyin; Kan, Eda; Çevik, Yunsur

    2017-06-01

    The cardiovascular manifestations of acute ischemic stroke have been well known. Several electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities have been reported in patients following acute stroke, including QT interval prolongation, ST segment deviation and T-wave changes. This study aimed to investigate the changes in transmyocardial repolarization parameters, in ischemic stroke patients. The study is a prospective, blind, and controlled clinical study. The patients without cardiac disease who received ischemic stroke diagnoses were included in the study. ECG was received from the patients in the first hour and 72 h. The P, QT, T p-e, T p-e dispersion, and the T p-e/QT ratio were calculated. Moreover, fifty-five stroke patients and 35 control subjects were included to the study. All dispersion values and T p-e/QTc ratio in patients group were higher than those of control group (p p-e/QTc ratio in ECGs on third day than ECGs on first day (p p-e dispersions values in patients who have insular lobe involvement were higher than those of patients who do not have insular lobe involvement (p P d, QTd, QTcd and new repolarization markers T p-e and T p-e/QTc, during first 24 and 72 h in acute stroke patients without cardiovascular disease compared with the control group. The physicians should be aware about ventricular dysrhythmias in patients with ischemic stroke and these patients closely observed with cardiac monitoring, especially within first 24 h, and especially patients with insular lobe involvement.

  6. Lenalidomide for the Treatment of Low- or Intermediate-1-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Associated with Deletion 5q Cytogenetic Abnormality: An Evidence Review of the NICE Submission from Celgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blommestein, Hedwig M; Armstrong, Nigel; Ryder, Steve; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Noake, Caro; Riemsma, Rob; Kleijnen, Jos; Severens, Johan L; Al, Maiwenn J

    2016-01-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of lenalidomide (Celgene) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for treating adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormality, as part of the Institute's single technology appraisal (STA) process. Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd (KSR), in collaboration with Erasmus University Rotterdam, was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This paper describes the company's submission, the ERG review, and the NICE's subsequent decisions. The ERG reviewed the evidence for clinical and cost effectiveness of the technology, as submitted by the manufacturer to the NICE. The ERG searched for relevant additional evidence and validated the manufacturer's decision analytic model to examine the robustness of the cost-effectiveness results. Clinical effectiveness was obtained from a three-arm, European, randomized, phase III trial among red blood cell (RBC) transfusion-dependent patients with low-/intermediate-1-risk del5q31 MDS. The primary endpoint was RBC independence for ≥26 weeks, and was reached by a higher proportion of patients in the lenalidomide 10 and 5 mg groups compared with placebo (56.1 and 42.6 vs 5.9 %, respectively; both p < 0.001). The option of dose adjustments after 16 weeks due to dose-limiting toxicities or lack of response made long-term effectiveness estimates unreliable, e.g. overall survival (OS). The de novo model of the manufacturer included a Markov state-transition cost-utility model implemented in Microsoft Excel. The base-case incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of the manufacturer was £56,965. The ERG assessment indicated that the modeling structure represented the course of the disease; however, a few errors were identified and some of the input parameters were challenged. In response to the appraisal documentation, the company revised the economic model

  7. Anti- or profibrillatory effects of Na+ channel blockade depend on the site of application relative to gradients in repolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Coronel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sodium channel blockers are associated with arrhythmic sudden death, although they are considered antiarrhythmic agents. The mechanism of these opposing effects is unknown. Methods. We used a model of induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF based on selective perfusion of the vascular beds of isolated porcine hearts (n=8. One bed was perfused with sotalol (220 µM, the adjacent bed with pinacidil (80 µM, leading to repolarization heterogeneity (late repolarization in the sotalol-, early in the pinacidil-area. Premature stimulation from the area with the short action potential was performed. Epicardial activation/repolarization mapping was done. Results. In 3 of the 8 hearts VF was inducible prior to infusion of flecainide. In those hearts the Fibrillation Factor (FF, the interval between the last activation of the premature beat (S2 in the late repolarizing (sotalol domain and the earliest S2 repolarization in the early repolarizing (pinacidil domain, was significantly shorter than in the hearts without VF (33+/-22 vs 93+/-11 ms, m+/-SEM, p<0.05. In the 3 hearts with VF flecainide was infused in the pinacidil domain after defibrillation. This led to shortening of the line of block, local delay of S2 activation and repolarization, an increase in FF and failure to induce VF. In the 5 hearts without VF, flecainide was subsequently infused in the sotalol domain. This led to a local delay of S2 activation, a shortening of FF (by 47+/- 3 ms and successful induction of VF in 3 hearts. In the 2 remaining hearts FF did not decrease enough (maximally 13 ms to allow reentry. Conclusions Sodium channel blockade applied to myocardium with a short refractory period is antifibrillatory whereas sodium channel blockade of myocardium with a long refractory period is profibrillatory. Our study provides a mechanistic basis for pro- and anti-arrhythmic effects of sodium channel blockers in the absence of structural heart disease.

  8. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity detected by magnetocardiography correlates with cardiac iron overload and adverse cardiac events in beta-thalassemia major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-An Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with transfusion-dependent beta-thalassemia major (TM are at risk for myocardial iron overload and cardiac complications. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity is known to be elevated in patients with certain cardiac diseases, but little is known in TM patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate spatial repolarization heterogeneity in patients with TM, and to investigate the relationships between spatial repolarization heterogeneity, cardiac iron load, and adverse cardiac events. METHODS AND RESULTS: Fifty patients with TM and 55 control subjects received 64-channel magnetocardiography (MCG to determine spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which was evaluated by a smoothness index of QTc (SI-QTc, a standard deviation of QTc (SD-QTc, and a QTc dispersion. Left ventricular function and myocardial T2* values were assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance. Patients with TM had significantly greater SI-QTc, SD-QTc, and QTc dispersion compared to the control subjects (all p values<0.001. Spatial repolarization heterogeneity was even more pronounced in patients with significant iron overload (T2*<20 ms, n = 20 compared to those with normal T2* (all p values<0.001. Loge cardiac T2* correlated with SI-QTc (r = -0.609, p<0.001, SD-QTc (r = -0.572, p<0.001, and QTc dispersion (r = -0.622, p<0.001, while all these indices had no relationship with measurements of the left ventricular geometry or function. At the time of study, 10 patients had either heart failure or arrhythmia. All 3 indices of repolarization heterogeneity were related to the presence of adverse cardiac events, with areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (ranged between 0.79 and 0.86, similar to that of cardiac T2*. CONCLUSIONS: Multichannel MCG demonstrated that patients with TM had increased spatial repolarization heterogeneity, which is related to myocardial iron load and adverse cardiac events.

  9. Temporal complexity of repolarization and mortality in patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkiomaki, Juha S; Couderc, Jean-Philippe; Daubert, James P; Zareba, Wojciech

    2003-10-01

    Increased repolarization variability has been observed in various cardiac conditions. However, data on its relation to heart rate variability and on its value in predicting adverse outcomes in high risk patients are limited. Forty-seven patients with decreased left ventricular function and ICDs had high resolution 10-minute ECG recordings and were followed for 781 +/- 258 days (mean +/- SD) on average. The interval from the R peak to the T wave peak with maximum amplitude (RTmax) and from the R peak to the T wave offset (RToff) were determined automatically on a beat-to-beat basis. Temporal beat-to-beat RTmax and RToff variability were analyzed using traditional summary statistics, a complexity measure (approximate entropy [ApEn]), and the short-term scaling exponent (alpha1). Eight (17%) patients died and 16 (34%) patients experienced death/appropriate ICD shock during follow-up. RTmax-ApEn was significantly higher in patients who died compared with patients who survived (1.24 +/- 0.13 vs 1.01 +/- 0.21, respectively, P=0.008). When RTmax-ApEn was tested together with the alpha1 of the RR intervals, occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias before ICD implantation, and beta-blockers usage in the Cox regression analysis, it still independently predicted mortality; hazard ratio=3.36 (1.28-8.83, 95% CI, P=0.014) for every 0.10-increase in RTmax-ApEn. None of the repolarization variability parameters independently predicted death/appropriate ICD shocks. Increased temporal complexity of repolarization (RTmax-ApEn) independently predicts mortality in ICD patients.

  10. Double pharmacological challenge on repolarization opens new avenues for drug safety research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard

    2007-01-01

    pointes (TdP) arrhythmia. Both the pharmaceutical industry and the regulatory bodies are neglecting the available proarrhythmia models. In vitro studies have suggested that combined pharmacological hits on repolarization will produce a superior substrate for in vivo proarrhythmia, compared to the single......-drug assessment. By using consecutive pharmacological challenges, a simple model is proposed, in which combinatorial pharmacology is employed to provoke TdP in the conscious dog. The pharmaceutical industry interested in evaluating the proarrhythmic potential of their present and future drugs now has a simple...

  11. Autism Spectrum Disorder as Early Neurodevelopmental Disorder: Evidence from the Brain Imaging Abnormalities in 2-3 Years Old Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhou; Qiu, Ting; Ke, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Xiang; Xiao, Ting; Liang, Fengjing; Zou, Bing; Huang, Haiqing; Fang, Hui; Chu, Kangkang; Zhang, Jiuping; Liu, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental condition that occurs within the first 3 years of life, which is marked by social skills and communication deficits along with stereotyped repetitive behavior. Although great efforts have been made to clarify the underlying neuroanatomical abnormalities and brain-behavior relationships…

  12. Pharmacological inhibition of I-K1 by PA-6 in isolated rat hearts affects ventricular repolarization and refractoriness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A.; Carstensen, Helena; Skibsbye, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK1) conducted through Kir2.X channels contribute to repolarization of the cardiac action potential and to stabilization of the resting membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the recently discovered IK1 inhibitor PA......-6 on action potential repolarization and refractoriness in isolated rat hearts. Transiently transfected HEK-293 cells expressing IK1 were voltage-clamped with ramp protocols. Langendorff-perfused heart experiments were performed on male Sprague–Dawley rats, effective refractory period, Wenckebach...... experiments, PA-6 prolonged the ventricular action potential duration at 90% repolarization (from 41.8 6.5 msec to 72.6 21.1 msec, 74% compared to baseline, P

  13. Electrocardiogram Abnormalities and Coronary Calcification in Postmenopausal Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel Bots

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: An electrocardiogram (ECG can provide information on subclinical myocardial damage. The presence,and more importantly, the quantity of coronary artery calcification (CAC, relates well with the overall severity of the atherosclerotic process. A strong relation has been demonstrated between coronary calcium burden and the incidence of myocardial infarction, a relation independent of age. The aim of this study was to assess the relation of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and ECG abnormalities with CAC.Methods: The study population comprised 566 postmenopausal women selected from a population-based cohort study.Information on LVH and repolarization abnormalities (T-axis and QRS-T angle was obtained using electrocardiography.Modular ECG Analysis System (MEANS was used to assess ECG abnormalities. The women underwent a multi detectorrow computed tomography (MDCT scan (Philips Mx 8000 IDT 16 to assess CAC. The Agatston score was used to quantifyCAC; scores greater than zero were considered as the presence of coronary calcium. Logistic regression was used to assessthe relation of ECG abnormality with coronary calcification.Results: LVH was found in 2.7% (n = 15 of the women. The prevalence of T-axis abnormality was 6% (n = 34, whereas 8.5% (n = 48 had a QRS-T angle abnormality. CAC was found in 62% of the women. Compared to women with a normal T-axis, women with borderline or abnormal T-axes were 3.8 fold more likely to have CAC (95% CI: 1.4-10.2. Similarly,compared to women with a normal QRS-T angle, in women with borderline or abnormal QRS-T angle, CAC was 2.0 fold more likely to be present (95% CI: 1.0-4.1.Conclusion: Among women with ECG abnormalities reflecting subclinical ischemia, CAC is commonly found and may in part explain the increased coronary heart disease risk associated with these ECG abnormalities.

  14. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    OpenAIRE

    P. Usharani; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; BAJAJ, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); ...

  15. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  16. Gender and the relationship between ventricular repolarization and cardiac cycle length during 24-h Holter recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramba-Badiale, M; Locati, E H; Martinelli, A; Courville, J; Schwartz, P J

    1997-06-01

    There are gender-related differences in the QT interval measured from standard ECG tracings. However, these observations are based on a limited number of beats recorded in resting conditions. Computerized Holter techniques enable ventricular repolarization and its relationship with cardiac cycle length to be analysed long term. Previous studies used only the initial portion of the QT interval to the T wave apex (QTa) to measure ventricular repolarization; however, QTa may underestimate the total QT duration (QTe). The aims of this study were to verify whether QTa and QTe had similar rate-dependence in normal subjects and whether gender-related QTe differences observed in the resting ECG were also present in the long-term QT intervalcycle length relationship. Twenty-four hour Holter recordings were obtained in 40 healthy young subjects. 20 females and 20 males (mean age 28 +/- 9 and 26 +/- 5 years, respectively ns). Two-channel ECG digitized signals were processed using new automatic QT analysis software (Ela Medical), which converted the 24-h recordings into 2880 30-s templates. It also measured the QT apex (QTa) QT end (QTe) and the RR interval (ms) of each template, and computed the slopes of the linear regressions of QTe and QTa values plotted against the corresponding RR interval (QTe/RR and QTa/RR). Females had a shorter RR interval than males (803 +/- 129 vs 877 +/- 86 ms. P = 0.037), with longer mean QTc (420 +/- 17 vs 400 +/- 200 ms. P = 0.0005). In both genders. QTa/RR slopes were steeper than QTe/RR slopes (P = 0.0001). Both QTa/RR and QTe/RR slopes were steeper in females than in males (QTa/RR 0.20 +/- 0.04 vs 0.16 +/- 0.03, P = 0.001; QTe/RR 0.16 +/- 0.04 vs 0.13 +/- 0.03, P = 0.027). Of note, QTa and QTe at fixed long cycle lengths (1000 ms) were longer in women than in men (QTa1000 330 +/- 20 vs 309 +/- 18 ms: P = 0.002; QTe1000 410 +/- 17 vs 389 +/- 19 ms: P = 0.002), while they did not differ at fixed short cycle lengths (600 ms). This study

  17. Evident?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plant, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind......Quality assurance and evidence in career guidance in Europe are often seen as self-evident approaches, but particular interests lie behind...

  18. Ventricular repolarization time, location of pacing stimulus and current pulse amplitude conspire to determine arrhythmogenicity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speerschneider, T; Grubb, Søren Jahn; Olesen, S P;

    2016-01-01

    AIM: In this study, we investigate the impact of altered action potential durations (APD) on ventricular repolarization time and proarrhythmia in mice with and without genetic deletion of the K(+) -channel-interacting protein 2 (KChIP2(-/-) and WT respectively). Moreover, we examine...

  19. Comparison of QT dispersion during atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm in the same patients, at normal and prolonged ventricular repolarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houltz, B; Darpo, B; Swedberg, K; Blomstrom, P; Crijns, HJGM; Jensen, SM; Svernhage, E; Edvardsson, N

    Aims Drug-induced increase in QT dispersion has been associated with increased risk of ventricular proarrhythmia. The aim of the present study was to compare QT dispersion during atrial fibrillation and sinus rhythm in the same patients at normal and prolonged ventricular repolarization. Methods and

  20. Diffuse interstitial fibrosis assessed by cardiac magnetic resonance is associated with dispersion of ventricular repolarization in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hurtado-de-Mendoza, MD

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Diffuse interstitial fibrosis is associated with increased dispersion of ventricular repolarization in leads, reflecting electrical activity in the hypertrophied septum. Interstitial fibrosis combined with ion channel/gap junction remodeling in the septum could lead to inhomogeneity of ventricular refractoriness, resulting in increased QTc dispersion in leads V1–V4.

  1. Covariate analysis of QTc and T-wave morphology: new possibilities in the evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Struijk, Johannes J.; Matz, J;

    2010-01-01

    This study adds the dimension of a T-wave morphology composite score (MCS) to the QTc interval-based evaluation of drugs that affect cardiac repolarization. Electrocardiographic recordings from 62 subjects on placebo and 400 mg moxifloxacin were compared with those from 21 subjects on 160 and 320...

  2. Attenuated ventricular β-adrenergic response and reduced repolarization reserve in a rabbit model of chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob Dahl; Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Bentzen, Bo Hjorth

    2012-01-01

    mortality but profound structural, functional, and electrical remodeling and compare with nonpaced controls. Pacing increased heart weight/body weight ratio and decreased left ventricular fractional shortening in tachypaced only. Electrocardiogram recordings during sinus rhythm revealed QTc prolongation...... remodeling but very low mortality. Isokalemic and hyperkalemic responses indicate downregulation of functional IKs. Increased short-term variability during hypokalemia unmasks a reduced repolarization reserve....

  3. Local Left Ventricular Epicardial J Waves and Late Potentials in Brugada Syndrome Patients with Inferolateral Early Repolarization Pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masamichi; Morita, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Koji; Wada, Tadashi; Murakami, Masato; Nishii, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru; Kusano, Kengo F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern

  4. Local Left Ventricular Epicardial J Waves and Late Potentials in Brugada Syndrome Patients with Inferolateral Early Repolarization Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Satoshi; Tanaka, Masamichi; Morita, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Koji; Wada, Tadashi; Murakami, Masato; Nishii, Nobuhiro; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Ito, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru; Kusano, Kengo F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is characterized by J-point or ST-segment elevation on electrocardiograms (ECGs) and increased risk of ventricular fibrillation (VF). In BrS, epicardial depolarization abnormality with delayed potential on the right ventricular outflow tract is reportedly the predominant mechanism underlying VF. Yet VF occurrence is also associated with early repolarization (ER) pattern in the inferolateral ECG leads, which may represent the inferior and/or left lateral ventricular myocardium. The aim of this study was to examine epicardial electrograms recorded directly at the left ventricle (LV) in BrS patients after VF episodes. Methods: In 12 BrS patients who had experienced VF episodes and 17 control subjects, a multipolar catheter was introduced into the left lateral coronary vein for unipolar and bipolar electrogram recordings at the LV epicardium. Both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG were observed in three BrS patients and six control subjects. Results: In the epicardium, prominent J waves were detected using unipolar recording, and potentials after the QRS complex were detected using bipolar recording in three of the 12 BrS patients. These three patients also showed both inferior and lateral ER patterns on ECG. Neither prominent J waves nor potentials after the QRS complex were recorded at the endocardium of the LV in any of these three patients; nor were they seen at the epicardium in any of the control subjects. These features were accentuated on pilsicainide administration (n = 2) but diminished on constant atrial pacing (n = 3) and isoproterenol administration (n = 1). The J waves observed through unipolar recording coincided with the potentials after QRS complex observed through bipolar recording and with the inferolateral ER patterns on ECG. Conclusions: We recorded prominent J waves in unipolar electrogram and potentials after QRS complex in bipolar electrogram at the LV epicardium in BrS patients with global ER pattern

  5. Minimizing repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk in drug development and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Attila S; Nattel, Stanley

    2010-03-26

    Proarrhythmia, the development of new or worse arrhythmias in response to drug therapy, is a major limitation to the development and use of new drugs. There are different types of drug-induced proarrhythmia, including long-QT syndrome (LQTS), short-QT syndrome and proarrhythmia related to Na+-channel blockade/conduction impairment. By far the most important form of proarrhythmia at present is drug-induced LQTS and its associated characteristic tachyarrhythmia, torsades de pointes (TdP). TdP arises when cellular action potentials (APs) are excessively prolonged, leading to arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations, especially early afterdepolarizations (EADs), which trigger complex re-entry in a substrate involving increased transmural dispersion of repolarization. In vitro screening, increasingly involving high-throughput assays, is used to assess potential candidate molecules and eliminate potentially problematic structures at an early stage of development. The most commonly used screening assays assess drug block of the K+ current carried by human ether-à-go-go (hERG) subunits, corresponding to the rapid delayed-rectifier K+ channel, the overwhelmingly most common target of TdP-inducing drugs. In addition, the effects of drugs on AP duration or the in vivo equivalent, QT interval, are often assessed in animal models. Methods available for repolarization-related proarrhythmic risk assessment include in vitro (Langendorff-perfused rabbit or guinea pig hearts) and in vivo models (such as alpha-adrenoceptor-stimulated rabbits, rabbits with reduced repolarization reserve due to block of slow delayed-rectifier current, animals with chronic atrioventricular block or animals with cardiac remodelling caused by congestive heart failure). In silico modelling may be helpful for molecular design of non-hERG blocking candidates and for optimization of compound selection (at the molecular and pharmacological profile levels). Finally, clinical evaluation of effects on

  6. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ095 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Uterine Bleeding • What is a normal menstrual cycle? • When is bleeding abnormal? • At what ages is abnormal bleeding more ...

  7. A Principal Component Regression Approach for Estimating Ventricular Repolarization Duration Variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi A. Karjalainen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular repolarization duration (VRD is affected by heart rate and autonomic control, and thus VRD varies in time in a similar way as heart rate. VRD variability is commonly assessed by determining the time differences between successive R- and T-waves, that is, RT intervals. Traditional methods for RT interval detection necessitate the detection of either T-wave apexes or offsets. In this paper, we propose a principal-component-regression- (PCR- based method for estimating RT variability. The main benefit of the method is that it does not necessitate T-wave detection. The proposed method is compared with traditional RT interval measures, and as a result, it is observed to estimate RT variability accurately and to be less sensitive to noise than the traditional methods. As a specific application, the method is applied to exercise electrocardiogram (ECG recordings.

  8. Clinical frontiers in electrocardiographic early repolarization syndrome: does a good guy turn bad now?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingpeng Liu; Ashok Shah; Frédéric Sacher; Nicolas Derval; Amir S. Jadidi; Mélèze Hocini; Michel Haissaguerre

    2010-01-01

    @@ Early repolarization pattern (ERP) is a common electrocardiographic (ECG) variant, characterized by J point elevation manifested either as QRS slurring (at the transition from the QRS segment to the ST segment) or notching (a positive deflection inscribed on terminal S wave), ST-segment elevation with upper concavity and prominent T waves in at least two contiguous leads.1,2 The prevalence of ERP in normal population varies from 1 % to 13%, depending on the age (predominant in young adults), the race (highest amongst black population), and the criterion for J point elevation (0.05 mV vs. 0.1 mV).3-7 In addition, higher incidence of ERP exists in males, athletes and individuals with high vagal tone or selective loss of sympathetic tone (e.g. spinal cord injury).8

  9. Flecainide attenuates rate adaptation of ventricular repolarization in guinea-pig heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osadchii, Oleg E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Flecainide is class Ic antiarrhythmic agent that was found to increase the risk of sudden cardiac death. Arrhythmic responses to flecainide could be precipitated by exercise, suggesting a role played by inappropriate rate adaptation of ventricular repolarization. This study therefore...... examined flecainide effect on adaptation of the QT interval and ventricular action potential duration (APD) to abrupt reductions of the cardiac cycle length. DESIGN: ECG and ventricular epicardial and endocardial monophasic APD were recorded in isolated, perfused guinea-pig heart preparations upon...... a sustained cardiac acceleration (rapid pacing for 30 s), and following a single perturbation of the cycle length evoked by extrasystolic stimulation. RESULTS: Sustained increase in heart rate was associated with progressive bi-exponential shortening of the QT interval and APD. Flecainide prolonged...

  10. White matter abnormalities in young males with antisocial personality disorder Evidence from voxel-based morphometry-diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daxing Wu; Ying Zhao; Jian Liao; Huifang Yin; Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Voxel-based morphometry-diffeomorphic anatomical registration using exponentiated lie algebra analysis was used to investigate the structural characteristics of white matter in young males with antisocial personality disorder (APD) and healthy controls without APD. The results revealed that APD subjects, relative to healthy subjects, exhibited increased white matter volume in the bilateral prefrontal lobe, right insula, precentral gyrus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, right precuneus, right middle occipital lobe, right parahippocampal gyrus and bilateral cingulate, and decreased volume in the middle temporal cortex and right cerebellum. The white matter volume in the medial frontal gyrus was significantly correlated with antisocial type scores on the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire in APD subjects. These experimental findings indicate that white matter abnormalities in several brain areas may contribute to antisocial behaviors in APD subjects.

  11. Prevention of Pazopanib-Induced Prolonged Cardiac Repolarization and Proarrhythmic Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulay Akman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pazopanib (PZP may induce prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic effects, similarly to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Objectives: To demonstrate PZP-induced prolonged cardiac repolarization and proarrhythmic electrophysiological effects and to investigate possible preventive effects of metoprolol and diltiazem on ECG changes (prolonged QT in an experimental rat model. Methods: Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley adult male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 6. The first group (normal group received 4 mL of tap water and the other groups received 100 mg/kg of PZP (Votrient® tablet perorally, via orogastric tubes. After 3 hours, the following solutions were intraperitoneally administered to the animals: physiological saline solution (SP, to the normal group and to the second group (control-PZP+SP group; 1 mg/kg metoprolol (Beloc, Ampule, AstraZeneca, to the third group (PZP+metoprolol group; and 1mg/kg diltiazem (Diltiazem, Mustafa Nevzat, to the fourth group (PZP+diltiazem group. One hour after, and under anesthesia, QTc was calculated by recording ECG on lead I. Results: The mean QTc interval values were as follows: normal group, 99.93 ± 3.62 ms; control-PZP+SP group, 131.23 ± 12.21 ms; PZP+metoprolol group, 89.36 ± 3.61 ms; and PZP+diltiazem group, 88.86 ± 4.04 ms. Both PZP+metoprolol and PZP+diltiazem groups had significantly shorter QTc intervals compared to the control-PZP+SP group (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Both metoprolol and diltiazem prevented PZP-induced QT interval prolongation. These drugs may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for the prolonged QTc interval associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor use.

  12. Prognostic Value of a New Marker of Ventricular Repolarization in Cirrhotic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Angelo Antunes; Barbosa, Paulo Roberto Benchimol; Ferreira, Alinne Gimenez; Reis, Camila Aparecida de Souza Segrégio; Terra, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background There is still debate about the relationship between changes in ventricular repolarization on the surface electrocardiogram and cirrhosis severity. Objective To study the relationship between variables related to ventricular repolarization and the clinical severity of the cirrhotic disease. Methods We selected 79 individuals with hepatic cirrhosis, classified according to the Child-Pugh-Turcotte criteria (Child A, B, and C). We measured the QT and corrected QT (QTc) intervals, and the interval between the peak and the end of the T wave (TpTe), and we identified their minimum, maximum, and mean values in the 12-lead electrocardiogram. We also calculated the dispersion of the QT (DQT) and QTc (DQTc) intervals. Results In 12 months of clinical follow-up, nine subjects underwent hepatic transplantation (Child A: 0 [0%]; Child B: 6 [23.1%]; Child C: 3 [18.8%]; p = 0.04) and 12 died (Child A: 3 [12.0%]; Child B: 4 [15.4%]; Child C: 5 [31.3%]; p = 0.002). No significant differences were observed between the cirrhotic groups related to the minimum, maximum, and mean values for the QT, QTc, TpTe, DQT, and DQTc intervals. A minimum TpTe interval ≤ 50 ms was a predictor for the composite endpoints of death or liver transplantation with a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 57% (p = 0.005). In the Cox multivariate analysis, the Child groups and a minimum TpTe of ≤ 50 ms were independent predictors of the composite endpoints. Conclusion The intervals QT, QTc, DQT, DQTc, and TpTe have similar distributions between different severity stages in cirrhotic disease. The TpTe interval proved to be a prognostic marker in subjects with cirrhosis, regardless of disease severity (NCT01433848).

  13. Neuroimaging evidence of major morpho-anatomical and functional abnormalities in the BTBR T+TF/J mouse model of autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Dodero

    Full Text Available BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR mice display prominent behavioural deficits analogous to the defining symptoms of autism, a feature that has prompted a widespread use of the model in preclinical autism research. Because neuro-behavioural traits are described with respect to reference populations, multiple investigators have examined and described the behaviour of BTBR mice against that exhibited by C57BL/6J (B6, a mouse line characterised by high sociability and low self-grooming. In an attempt to probe the translational relevance of this comparison for autism research, we used Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI to map in both strain multiple morpho-anatomical and functional neuroimaging readouts that have been extensively used in patient populations. Diffusion tensor tractography confirmed previous reports of callosal agenesis and lack of hippocampal commissure in BTBR mice, and revealed a concomitant rostro-caudal reorganisation of major cortical white matter bundles. Intact inter-hemispheric tracts were found in the anterior commissure, ventro-medial thalamus, and in a strain-specific white matter formation located above the third ventricle. BTBR also exhibited decreased fronto-cortical, occipital and thalamic gray matter volume and widespread reductions in cortical thickness with respect to control B6 mice. Foci of increased gray matter volume and thickness were observed in the medial prefrontal and insular cortex. Mapping of resting-state brain activity using cerebral blood volume weighted fMRI revealed reduced cortico-thalamic function together with foci of increased activity in the hypothalamus and dorsal hippocampus of BTBR mice. Collectively, our results show pronounced functional and structural abnormalities in the brain of BTBR mice with respect to control B6 mice. The large and widespread white and gray matter abnormalities observed do not appear to be representative of the neuroanatomical alterations typically observed in autistic patients. The

  14. A review of fronto-striatal and fronto-cortical brain abnormalities in children and adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and new evidence for dysfunction in adults with ADHD during motivation and attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillo, Ana; Halari, Rozmin; Smith, Anna; Taylor, Eric; Rubia, Katya

    2012-02-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has long been associated with abnormalities in frontal brain regions. In this paper we review the current structural and functional imaging evidence for abnormalities in children and adults with ADHD in fronto-striatal, fronto-parieto-temporal, fronto-cerebellar and fronto-limbic regions and networks. While the imaging studies in children with ADHD are more numerous and consistent, an increasing number of studies suggests that these structural and functional abnormalities in fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical networks persist into adulthood, despite a relative symptomatic improvement in the adult form of the disorder. We furthermore present new data that support the notion of a persistence of neurofunctional deficits in adults with ADHD during attention and motivation functions. We show that a group of medication-naïve young adults with ADHD behaviours who were followed up 20 years from a childhood ADHD diagnosis show dysfunctions in lateral fronto-striato-parietal regions relative to controls during sustained attention, as well as in ventromedial orbitofrontal regions during reward, suggesting dysfunctions in cognitive-attentional as well as motivational neural networks. The lateral fronto-striatal deficit findings, furthermore, were strikingly similar to those we have previously observed in children with ADHD during the same task, reinforcing the notion of persistence of fronto-striatal dysfunctions in adult ADHD. The ventromedial orbitofrontal deficits, however, were associated with comorbid conduct disorder (CD), highlighting the potential confound of comorbid antisocial conditions on paralimbic brain deficits in ADHD. Our review supported by the new data therefore suggest that both adult and childhood ADHD are associated with brain abnormalities in fronto-cortical and fronto-subcortical systems that mediate the control of cognition and motivation. The brain deficits in ADHD therefore appear to be multi

  15. International Conference on Harmonisation; guidance on S7B Nonclinical Evaluation of the Potential for Delayed Ventricular Repolarization (QT Interval Prolongation) by Human Pharmaceuticals; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-20

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "S7B Nonclinical Evaluation of the Potential for Delayed Ventricular Repolarization (QT Interval Prolongation) by Human Pharmaceuticals." The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance describes a nonclinical testing strategy for assessing the potential of a test substance to delay ventricular repolarization and includes information concerning nonclinical assays and an integrated risk assessment. The guidance is intended to facilitate the nonclinical assessment of the effects of pharmaceuticals on ventricular repolarization and proarrhythmic risk.

  16. Lenalidomide for the Treatment of Low- or Intermediate-1-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes Associated with Deletion 5q Cytogenetic Abnormality: An Evidence Review of the NICE Submission from Celgene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.M. Sluimer-Blommestein (Hedwig); N. Armstrong (Nigel); S. Ryder; S. Deshpande (Sohan); G. Worthy (Gill); C. Noake; R. Riemsma; J. Kleijnen (Jos); J.L. Severens (Hans); M.J. Al (Maiwenn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of lenalidomide (Celgene) to submit evidence of the clinical and cost effectiveness of the drug for treating adults with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) associated with deletion 5q cytogenetic abnormali

  17. Characterization of three abnormal factor IX variants (Bm Lake Elsinore, Long Beach, and Los Angeles) of hemophilia-B. Evidence for defects affecting the latent catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usharani, P; Warn-Cramer, B J; Kasper, C K; Bajaj, S P

    1985-01-01

    Abnormal factor IX variant proteins were isolated from the plasmas of three unrelated severe hemophilia-B families that had been previously shown to contain functionally impaired molecules immunologically similar to normal factor IX. The families studied were: (1) a patient with markedly prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Bm Lake Elsinore (IXBmLE); (b) three patients (brothers) with moderately prolonged ox brain prothrombin time, designated factor IX Long Beach (IXLB); and (c) a patient with normal ox brain prothrombin time designated factor IX Los Angeles (IXLA). Each variant molecule comigrates with normal factor IX (IXN) both in the sodium dodecyl sulfate and in the nondenaturing alkaline gel electrophoresis. All three variant proteins are indistinguishable from IXN in their amino acid compositions, isoelectric points, carbohydrate distributions and number of gamma-carboxyglutamic acid residues. Each variant protein undergoes a similar pattern of cleavage by factor XIa/Ca2+ and by factor VIIa/Ca2+/tissue factor, and is activated at a rate similar to that observed for IXN. All of the three variant proteins also react with an anti-IXN monoclonal antibody that interferes with the binding of activated IXN(IXaN) to thrombin-treated factor VIIIC. However, in contrast to IXaN, the cleaved IXBmLE has negligible activity (approximately 0.2%), and cleaved forms of IXLA and IXLB have significantly reduced activity (approximately 5-6%) in binding to antithrombin-III/heparin, and in activating factor VII (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) or factor X (plus Ca2+ and phospholipid) +/- factor VIII. These data, taken together, strongly indicate that the defect in these three variant proteins resides near or within the latent catalytic site. This results in virtually a complete loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXBmLE molecule and approximately 95% loss of catalytic activity of the cleaved IXLA and IXLB molecules.

  18. Conduction abnormalities and ventricular arrhythmogenesis: The roles of sodium channels and gap junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Tse

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular arrhythmias arise from disruptions in the normal orderly sequence of electrical activation and recovery of the heart. They can be categorized into disorders affecting predominantly cellular depolarization or repolarization, or those involving action potential (AP conduction. This article briefly discusses the factors causing conduction abnormalities in the form of unidirectional conduction block and reduced conduction velocity (CV. It then examines the roles that sodium channels and gap junctions play in AP conduction. Finally, it synthesizes experimental results to illustrate molecular mechanisms of how abnormalities in these proteins contribute to such conduction abnormalities and hence ventricular arrhythmogenesis, in acquired pathologies such as acute ischaemia and heart failure, as well as inherited arrhythmic syndromes.

  19. Prevalence of Brugada-type ECG pattern and early ventricular repolarization pattern in Tunisian athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouali S

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sana Ouali1, Helmi Ben Salem1, Sami Hammas1, Elyes Neffeti1, Fahmi Remedi1, Abdallah Mahdhaoui2, Essia Boughzela1, Rafik Mankai31Department of Cardiology, Sahloul Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia; 2Department of Cardiology, Farhat Hached, Sousse, Tunisia; 3Central Sports Medicine Centre of El Menzah, TunisiaIntroduction: No data regarding the prevalence of the Brugada-type electrocardiogram (ECG pattern and the early ventricular repolarization pattern (ERP in the North African population were available. The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of Brugada-type ECG pattern and ERP in Tunisia and to evaluate ECG descriptors of ventricular repolarization in a population of athletes.Methods: Over a 2-year period, resting 12-lead ECG recordings were analyzed from athletes (n = 540; 348 males; age 18.3 ± 2.4 years. Brugada-type ECG pattern was defined as Type 1, 2, or 3, and ERP was characterized by an elevation of the J point in the inferior and/or lateral leads. The population was divided into three groups of athletes: ERP group; Brugada-type ECG pattern group; and control group, with neither ERP nor Brugada ECG pattern. Clinical and electrocardiographic parameters were compared among the study groups.Results: Nine subjects (1.66% had a Brugada-type ECG pattern. None of them had the coved-type, 3 (0.6% had the Type 2, and 6 (1.1% had the Type 3. All subjects were asymptomatic. A Brugada-type ECG pattern was observed in seven males. No female had the Type 2 Brugada ECG pattern. ECG parameters were similar among Brugada-type ECG pattern and control athletes. ERP (119 subjects, 22% was obtained in 98 males. Heart rate was lower, the QRS duration shorter and QT and Tpeak–Tend intervals were longer in ERP than control groups.Conclusion: The results indicate that the frequency of the Brugada-type ECG pattern and ERP were respectively 1.66% and 22.00% in athletes, being more prevalent in males. The ERP group experienced shorter QRS duration and

  20. Two components of delayed rectifier K+ current in heart:molecular basis,functional diversity,and contribution to repolarization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-hua CHENG; Itsuo KODAMA

    2004-01-01

    Delayed rectifier K+ current (IK) is the major outward current responsible for ventricular repolarization. Two components of IK (IKr and IKs) have been identified in many mammalian species including humans. IKr. plays a pivotal role in normal ventricular repolarization. A prolongation of action potential duration (APD) under a variety of conditions would favor the activation of IKs so that to prevent excessive repolarization delay causing early afterdepolarization. The pore-forming α subunits of IKr and IKs are composed of HERG (KCNH2) and KvLQT l (KCNQ l), respectively. KvLQT l is associated with a function-altering β subunit, minK to form IKs. HERG may be associated with minK (KCNE1) and/or minK-related protein (MiRP1) to form IKr, but the issue remains to be established. IKs is enhanced, whereas IKr is usually attenuated by β-adrenergic stimulation via cyclic adenosine 31,51-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A-dependent pathways. There exist regional differences in the density of IKr and IKs transmurally (endo-epicardial) and along the apico-basal axis, contributing to the spatial heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization. A decrease of IKr or IKs by mutations in either HERG, KvLQTl, or KCNE family results in inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS) with high risk for Torsades de pointes (TdP)-type polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. As to the pharmacological treatment and prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias, selectively block of IKs is expected to be more beneficial than selectively block of IKr in terms of homogeneous prolongation of refractoriness at high heart rates especially in diseased hearts including myocardial ischemia.

  1. The Effects of Female Sex Hormones on Ventricular Premature Beats and Repolarization Parameters in Physiological Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Yiginer, Omer; Uz, Omer; Kucuk, Ugur; Degirmencioglu, Gokhan; Isilak, Zafer; Uzun, Mehmet; Davulcu, Ezgi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of gender difference on cardiac electrophysiology have been well studied. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of estradiol and progesteron changes occuring in physiological menstrual cycle on ventricular premature beats (VPBs) and cardiac repolarization parameters. Women of reproductive age with VPBs were included into the study group and healthy women were recruited as the control group. During the menstruation period, a 12-lead electrocardiography, blood samples, and 24-hour rhythm Holter were applied to the study group. Similarly, all tests were repeated in the estimated ovulation period (12-14 days before menstruation) by all cases. The study group consisted of 20 women patients with VPB, and the control group of 18 healthy women. While the number of VPB in the menstruation period was 210 beats/day (interquartile range [IQR]: 1,144), it decreased to 86 beats/day (IQR: 251) in the ovulation period with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Average heart rate in the menstruation period was 81.4 ± 10 beats/min and it significantly increased to 84.6 ± 8 beats/min in the ovulation period (P < 0.05). There were no differences in cardiac repolarization parameters in both menstruation and ovulation periods between the study and control groups. Comparing the menstruation and the ovulation periods, J-Tpeak interval, which reflects early repolarization, was shorter in the ovulation period (193 ± 27.7 ms and 201.1 ± 28.6 ms, respectively; P < 0.05). Other repolarization parameters did not show any significant difference. VPB frequency decreases with estradiol peak in the ovulation period. This suggests that estrogen may have protective effects against ventricular arrhythmias. ©2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... first few months of a normal pregnancy. Some birth control pills or the intrauterine device (IUD) can also cause ... this type can significantly reduce abnormal bleeding. Like birth control pills, sometimes IUDs can actually cause abnormal bleeding. Tell ...

  3. Urine - abnormal color

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003139.htm Urine - abnormal color To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The usual color of urine is straw-yellow. Abnormally colored urine ...

  4. Arrhythmogenic remodelling of activation and repolarization in the failing human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzem, Katherine M; Efimov, Igor R

    2012-11-01

    Heart failure is a major cause of disability and death worldwide, and approximately half of heart failure-related deaths are sudden and presumably due to ventricular arrhythmias. Patients with heart failure have been shown to be at 6- to 9-fold increased risk of sudden cardiac death compared to the general population. (AHA. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2003 Update. Heart and Stroke Facts. Dallas, TX: American Heart Association; 2002) Thus, electrophysiological remodelling associated with heart failure is a leading cause of disease mortality and has been a major investigational focus examined using many animal models of heart failure. While these studies have provided an important foundation for understanding the arrhythmogenic pathophysiology of heart failure, the need for corroborating studies conducted on human heart tissue has been increasingly recognized. Many human heart studies of conduction and repolarization remodelling have now been published and shed some light on important, potentially arrhythmogenic, changes in human heart failure. These studies are being conducted at multiple experimental scales from isolated cells to whole-tissue preparations and have provided insight into regulatory mechanisms such as decreased protein expression, alternative mRNA splicing of ion channel genes, and defective cellular trafficking. Further investigations of heart failure in the human myocardium will be essential for determining possible therapeutic targets to prevent arrhythmia in heart failure and for facilitating the translation of basic research findings to the clinical realm.

  5. A class of Monte-Carlo-based statistical algorithms for efficient detection of repolarization alternans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravanian, Shahriar; Kanu, Uche B; Christini, David J

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is an electrophysiologic condition identified by a beat-to-beat fluctuation in action potential waveform. It has been mechanistically linked to instances of T-wave alternans, a clinically defined ECG alternation in T-wave morphology, and associated with the onset of cardiac reentry and sudden cardiac death. Many alternans detection algorithms have been proposed in the past, but the majority have been designed specifically for use with T-wave alternans. Action potential duration (APD) signals obtained from experiments (especially those derived from optical mapping) possess unique characteristics, which requires the development and use of a more appropriate alternans detection method. In this paper, we present a new class of algorithms, based on the Monte Carlo method, for the detection and quantitative measurement of alternans. Specifically, we derive a set of algorithms (one an analytical and more efficient version of the other) and compare its performance with the standard spectral method and the generalized likelihood ratio test algorithm using synthetic APD sequences and optical mapping data obtained from an alternans control experiment. We demonstrate the benefits of the new algorithm in the presence of Gaussian and Laplacian noise and frame-shift errors. The proposed algorithms are well suited for experimental applications, and furthermore, have low complexity and are implementable using fixed-point arithmetic, enabling potential use with implantable cardiac devices.

  6. T-wave alternans in LQTS: repolarization-rate dynamics from digital 12-lead Holter data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeier, K; Aslan, I; Hilbel, T; Eberle, T; Ulmer, H E; Lux, R L

    2001-01-01

    T-wave alternans (TWA) is a harbinger of ventricular vulnerability and an important prognostic indicator for torsade de pointes and likely sudden death in patients with LQTS. We analyzed the occurrence of TWA in 18 patients with LQTS (7 males, 11 females, ages ranging from 6 months to 32 years--median 8.4 years). Analysis was performed with software to investigate dynamics of cycle length mediated repolarization changes. Digital Holter ECG analysis revealed macroscopic, true TWA in 3 of 18 patients. TWA showed a variable morphological expression. One patient had continuous changes of T wave polarity, but not on a periodic beat-to-beat basis. Onsets of macroscopic TWA were preceded by long/short cycle length sequences and tachycardic rates above 130 to 140 bpm. Impact of ventricular premature beats on TWA onset was insignificant. Two of the identified patients with TWA had sudden cardiac death during follow-up (one refused PM therapy). At present, TWA cannot be detected automatically from Holter ECGs and therefore may be missed, despite the potential danger for the individuals. The observation that predominantly high beat rates and not beat rate changes, per se, triggered episodes of TWA renders difficult general therapeutic recommendations for the identified patients at risk.

  7. Early repolarization with horizontal ST segment may be associated with aborted sudden cardiac arrest: a retrospective case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risk stratification of the early repolarization pattern (ERP is needed to identify malignant early repolarization. J-point elevation with a horizontal ST segment was recently suggested as a malignant feature of the ERP. In this study, the prevalence of the ERP with a horizontal ST segment was examined among survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA without structural heart disease to evaluate the value of ST-segment morphology in risk stratification of the ERP. Methods We reviewed the data of 83 survivors of SCA who were admitted from August 2005 to August 2010. Among them, 25 subjects without structural heart disease were included. The control group comprised 60 healthy subjects who visited our health promotion center; all control subjects were matched for age, sex, and underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, hypertension. Early repolarization was defined as an elevation of the J point of at least 0.1 mV above the baseline in at least two continuous inferior or lateral leads that manifested as QRS slurring or notching. An ST-segment pattern of Results The SCA group included 17 men (64% with a mean age of 49.7 ± 14.5 years. The corrected QTc was not significantly different between the SCA and control groups (432.7 ± 37.96 vs. 420.4 ± 26.3, respectively; p = 0.089. The prevalence of ERP was not statistically different between the SCA and control groups (5/25, 20% vs. 4/60, 6.7%, respectively; p = 0.116. The prevalence of early repolarization with a horizontal ST segment was more frequent in the SCA than in the control group (20% vs. 3.3%, respectively; p = 0.021. Four SCA subjects (16% and one control subject (1.7% had a J-point elevation of >2 mm (p = 0.025. Four SCA subjects (16% and one (1.7% control subject had an ERP in the inferior lead (p = 0.025. Conclusion The prevalence of ERP with a horizontal ST segment was higher in patients with aborted SCA than in matched controls. This result suggests that ST morphology has

  8. Calcium-activated potassium conductances contribute to action potential repolarization at the soma but not the dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poolos, N P; Johnston, D

    1999-07-01

    Evidence is accumulating that voltage-gated channels are distributed nonuniformly throughout neurons and that this nonuniformity underlies regional differences in excitability within the single neuron. Previous reports have shown that Ca2+, Na+, A-type K+, and hyperpolarization-activated, mixed cation conductances have varying distributions in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, with significantly different densities in the apical dendrites compared with the soma. Another important channel mediates the large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ current (IC), which is responsible in part for repolarization of the action potential (AP) and generation of the afterhyperpolarization that follows the AP recorded at the soma. We have investigated whether this current is activated by APs retrogradely propagating in the dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons using whole-cell dendritic patch-clamp recording techniques. We found no IC activation by back-propagating APs in distal dendritic recordings. Dendritic APs activated IC only in the proximal dendrites, and this activation decayed within the first 100-150 micrometer of distance from the soma. The decay of IC in the proximal dendrites occurred despite AP amplitude, plus presumably AP-induced Ca2+ influx, that was comparable with that at the soma. Thus we conclude that IC activation by action potentials is nonuniform in the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, which may represent a further example of regional differences in neuronal excitability that are determined by the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels in dendrites.

  9. Leptin decreases heart rate associated with increased ventricular repolarization via its receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Huang, Jianying; Hileman, Stan; Martin, Karen H; Hull, Robert; Davis, Mary; Yu, Han-Gang

    2015-11-15

    Leptin has been proposed to modulate cardiac electrical properties via β-adrenergic receptor activation. The presence of leptin receptors and adipocytes in myocardium raised a question as to whether leptin can directly modulate cardiac electrical properties such as heart rate and QT interval via its receptor. In this work, the role of local direct actions of leptin on heart rate and ventricular repolarization was investigated. We identified the protein expression of leptin receptors at cell surface of sinus node, atrial, and ventricular myocytes isolated from rat heart. Leptin at low doses (0.1-30 μg/kg) decreased resting heart rate; at high doses (150-300 μg/kg), leptin induced a biphasic effect (decrease and then increase) on heart rate. In the presence of high-dose propranolol (30 mg/kg), high-dose leptin only reduced heart rate and sometimes caused sinus pauses and ventricular tachycardia. The leptin-induced inhibition of resting heart rate was fully reversed by leptin antagonist. Leptin also increased heart rate-corrected QT interval (QTc), and leptin antagonist did not. In isolated ventricular myocytes, leptin (0.03-0.3 μg/ml) reversibly increased the action potential duration. These results supported our hypothesis that in addition to indirect pathway via sympathetic tone, leptin can directly decrease heart rate and increase QT interval via its receptor independent of β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. During inhibition of β-adrenergic receptor activity, high concentration of leptin in myocardium can cause deep bradycardia, prolonged QT interval, and ventricular arrhythmias.

  10. Evaluation of the effect on cardiac repolarization (QTc interval) of oncologic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganroth, J

    2007-01-01

    The 12-lead electrocardiograph (ECG) is the standard safety measurement used in clinical trials to identify drug-induced cardiac adverse effects. Drug-induced prolongation of the QTc interval (the measure of cardiac repolarization change), when excessive and in conjunction with the right risk factors, can degenerate into a polymorphic ventricular tachycardia called torsades de pointes and has become a new focus for new drug development. The assessment of an ECG in clinical practice using machine-defined QTc duration is intrinsically unreliable. Current regulatory concepts have focused on the need for measuring ECG intervals using manual techniques using digital processing in a central ECG laboratory. The QT interval is subject to a large degree of spontaneous variability requiring attention to basic clinical trial design issues such as sample size (use as large a cohort as possible), frequency of measurements taken (at least three to six ECGs at baseline and at many time points on therapy with pharmacokinetic samples if possible), and their accuracy. Since most oncologic products are cytotoxic, a Thorough or Dedicated ECG Trial cannot be conducted and in the usual trail, especially in phase I, all changes seen on the ECG will be attributed to the new oncology drug. For most nononcologic drugs, there is regulatory guidance on how much an effect on QTc duration might be related to the risk of cardiac toxicity. For oncology products, the central tendency magnitude and proportion of outliers needs to be well defined to construct a label if the risk-benefit analysis leads to marketing approval. Clinical cardiac findings such as syncope, ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and other cardiac effects will be important in this analysis.

  11. Variants of Brugada Syndrome and Early Repolarization Syndrome: An Expanded Concept of J-Wave Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hwan; Nam, Gi-Byoung; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Choi, Hyung Oh; Choi, Kee-Joon; Joung, Boyoung; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Kim, Sung Soon; Park, Seung-Jung; On, Young Keun; Kim, June Soo; Oh, Il-Young; Choi, Eue-Keun; Oh, Seil; Choi, Yun-Shik; Choi, Jong Il; Park, Sang Weon; Kim, Young-Hoon; Oh, Yong-Seog; Lee, Man Young; Lim, Hong Euy; Lee, Young-Soo; Cho, Yongkeun; Kim, Jun; Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Lee, Dong-Il; Cho, Dae Kyoung; Kim, You-Ho

    2017-02-01

    The role of J-waves in the pathogenesis of ventricular fibrillation (VF) occurring in structurally normal hearts is important. We evaluated 127 patients who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) for Brugada syndrome (BS, n = 53), early repolarization syndrome (ERS, n = 24), and patients with unknown or deferred diagnosis (n = 50). Electrocardiography (ECG), clinical characteristics, and ICD data were analyzed. J-waves were found in 27/50 patients with VF of unknown/deferred diagnosis. The J-waves were reminiscent of those seen in BS or ERS, and this subgroup of patients was termed variants of ERS and BS (VEB). In 12 VEB patients, the J/ST/T-wave morphology was coved, although amplitudes were J/ST/T-waves were present in the right precordial leads. In the remaining 23 patients, no J-waves were identified. VEB patients exhibited clinical characteristics similar to those of BS and ERS patients. Phenotypic transition and overlap were observed among patients with BS, ERS, and VEB. Twelve patients with BS had background inferolateral ER, while five ERS patients showed prominent right precordial J-waves. Patients with this transient phenotype overlap showed a significantly lower shock-free survival than the rest of the study patients. VEB patients demonstrate ECG phenotype similar to but distinct from those of BS and ERS. The spectral nature of J-wave morphology/distribution and phenotypic transition/overlap suggest a common pathophysiologic background in patients with VEB, BS, and ERS. Prognostic implication of these ECG variations requires further investigation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. MiRNA-1/133a clusters regulate adrenergic control of cardiac repolarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Besser

    Full Text Available The electrical properties of the heart are primarily determined by the activity of ion channels and the activity of these molecules is permanently modulated and adjusted to the physiological needs by adrenergic signaling. miRNAs are known to control the expression of many proteins and to fulfill distinct functions in the mammalian heart, though the in vivo effects of miRNAs on the electrical activity of the heart are poorly characterized. The miRNAs miR-1 and miR-133a are the most abundant miRNAs of the heart and are expressed from two miR-1/133a genomic clusters. Genetic modulation of miR-1/133a cluster expression without concomitant severe disturbance of general cardiomyocyte physiology revealed that these miRNA clusters govern cardiac muscle repolarization. Reduction of miR-1/133a dosage induced a longQT phenotype in mice especially at low heart rates. Longer action potentials in cardiomyocytes are caused by modulation of the impact of β-adrenergic signaling on the activity of the depolarizing L-type calcium channel. Pharmacological intervention to attenuate β-adrenergic signaling or L-type calcium channel activity in vivo abrogated the longQT phenotype that is caused by modulation of miR-1/133a activity. Thus, we identify the miR-1/133a miRNA clusters to be important to prevent a longQT-phenotype in the mammalian heart.

  13. An activation-repolarization time metric to predict localized regions of high susceptibility to re-entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, Nicholas; Bishop, Martin J.; Hanson, Ben; Coronel, Ruben; Opthof, Tobias; Bourkens, Bastiaan; Walton, Richard; Efimov, Igor; Bostock, Julian; Hill, Yolanda; Rinaldi, Christopher A; Razavi, Reza; Gill, Jaswinder; Taggart, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background Initiation of re-entrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) involves complex interactions between activation and repolarization wavefronts. Recent experimental work has identified the time interval between S2 repolarization proximal to a line of functional block and the activation at the adjacent distal side, as a critical determinant of re-entry. Objective We hypothesized: (1) an algorithm could be developed which would generate a spatial map of this interval (designated the “re-entry vulnerability index”-RVI); (2) that this would accurately identify a pathway of re-entry as well as rotor formation in animal experiments and in a computational model; and, (3) that it would be possible to generate an RVI map in humans during routine clinical procedures and co-register with anatomical and electrophysiological features. Methods and Results An algorithm was developed which sampled all points on a multielectrode grid and calculated RVI between all pairs of electrodes within a given radius. The algorithm successfully identified the spatial region with increased susceptibility to re-entry in an established Langendorff pig heart model and the site of re-entry and rotor formation in an optically mapped sheep heart model and corresponding computational simulations. The feasibility of RVI mapping was evaluated during a clinical procedure by co-registering with the anatomy and physiology in a patient undergoing a VT ablation. Conclusions We developed an algorithm to calculate a re-entry vulnerability index from intervals between local repolarization and activation times at all adjacent points over a multielectrode grid. The algorithm accurately identified the region of re-entry in two animal models of functional re-entry. The possibility of clinical application was demonstrated in a patient with VT. PMID:25863160

  14. A major role for calcium-dependent potassium current in action potential repolarization in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancrazio, J J; Johnson, P A; Lynch, C

    1994-12-30

    To determine the extent which Ca dependent K current (IKCa) contributes during an action potential (AP), bovine chromaffin cells were voltage-clamped using a pre-recorded AP as the command voltage waveform. Based on (1) differential sensitivity of IKCa and Ca-independent K current (IK) to tetraethylammonium; (2) measurements of AP currents under conditions where Ca activation of IKCa had been abolished; and (3) blockade by charybdotoxin, IKCa comprised 70-90% of the outward K current during AP repolarization. In addition, observations are made concerning the form of AP-evoked Ca current.

  15. CHROMOSOME ABNORMALITIES IN INFERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smogavec

    2009-08-01

    Conclusions Chromosomal analysis is an important method in diagnostic procedures of infertility, because chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions. Sex chromosome aneuploidies are highly correlated to infertility of females and males.

  16. Hereditary urea cycle abnormality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vitro so the specific genetic cause is known. Teamwork between parents, the affected child, and doctors can help prevent severe illness. Alternative Names Abnormality of the urea cycle - hereditary; Urea cycle - hereditary abnormality Images Male urinary system Urea cycle References Lichter-Konecki ...

  17. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pablo-Fernández, Eduardo; Breen, David P; Bouloux, Pierre M; Barker, Roger A; Foltynie, Thomas; Warner, Thomas T

    2017-02-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities are common in Parkinson's disease (PD) and include disruption of melatonin secretion, disturbances of glucose, insulin resistance and bone metabolism, and body weight changes. They have been associated with multiple non-motor symptoms in PD and have important clinical consequences, including therapeutics. Some of the underlying mechanisms have been implicated in the pathogenesis of PD and represent promising targets for the development of disease biomarkers and neuroprotective therapies. In this systems-based review, we describe clinically relevant neuroendocrine abnormalities in Parkinson's disease to highlight their role in overall phenotype. We discuss pathophysiological mechanisms, clinical implications, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions based on the current evidence. We also review recent advances in the field, focusing on the potential targets for development of neuroprotective drugs in Parkinson's disease and suggest future areas for research.

  18. Preliminary evidence for association of genetic variants in pri-miR-34b/c and abnormal miR-34c expression with attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Martínez, I; Sánchez-Mora, C; Pagerols, M; Richarte, V; Corrales, M; Fadeuilhe, C; Cormand, B; Casas, M; Ramos-Quiroga, J A; Ribasés, M

    2016-08-30

    Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairment to sustain attention and inability to control impulses and activity level. The etiology of ADHD is complex, with an estimated heritability of 70-80%. Under the hypothesis that alterations in the processing or target binding of microRNAs (miRNAs) may result in functional alterations predisposing to ADHD, we explored whether common polymorphisms potentially affecting miRNA-mediated regulation are involved in this psychiatric disorder. We performed a comprehensive association study focused on 134 miRNAs in 754 ADHD subjects and 766 controls and found association between the miR-34b/c locus and ADHD. Subsequently, we provided preliminary evidence for overexpression of the miR-34c-3p mature form in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of ADHD subjects. Next, we tested the effect on gene expression of single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the ADHD-associated region and found that rs4938923 in the promoter of the pri-miR-34b/c tags cis expression quantitative trait loci for both miR-34b and miR-34c and has an impact on the expression levels of 681 transcripts in trans, including genes previously associated with ADHD. This gene set was enriched for miR-34b/c binding sites, functional categories related to the central nervous system, such as axon guidance or neuron differentiation, and serotonin biosynthesis and signaling canonical pathways. Our results provide preliminary evidence for the contribution to ADHD of a functional variant in the pri-miR-34b/c promoter, possibly through dysregulation of the expression of mature forms of miR-34b and miR-34c and some target genes. These data highlight the importance of abnormal miRNA function as a potential epigenetic mechanism contributing to ADHD.

  19. Longitudinal changes in intracardiac repolarization lability in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash eGuduru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background─While it is known that elevated baseline intracardiac repolarization lability is associated with the risk of fast ventricular tachycardia (FVT /ventricular fibrillation (VF, the effect of its longitudinal changes on the risk of FVT/VF is unknown. Methods and Results─Near-field (NF right ventricular (RV intracardiac electrograms (EGMs were recorded every 3-6 months at rest in 248 patients with structural heart disease (mean age 61.2±13.3; 185[75%] male; 162[65.3%] ischemic cardiomyopathy and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D [201 (81% primary prevention]. Intracardiac beat-to-beat QT variability index (QTVINF was measured on NF RV EGM. During the first study phase (median 18 months, participants made on average 2.4 visits. Then remote follow-up was continued for an additional median period of 3 years. Average QTVINF did not change during the first year after ICD implantation (-0.342±0.603 at baseline vs. -0.262±0.552 at 6 months vs. -0.334±0.603 at 12 months; however, it decreased thereafter (-0.510±0.603 at 18 months; P=0.042. Adjusted population-averaged GEE model showed that the odds of developing FVT/VF increased by 75% for each 1 unit increase in QTVINF. (OR 1.75 [95%CI 1.05-2.92]; P=0.031. However, individual patient–specific QTVINF trends (increasing, decreasing, flat varied from patient to patient. For a given patient, the odds of developing FVT/VF were not associated with increasing or decreasing QTVINF over time (OR 1.27; [95%CI 0.05–30.10]; P = 0.881.Conclusion─While on average the odds of FVT/VF increased with an increase in QTVINF, patient-specific longitudinal trends in QTVINF did not affect the odds of FVT/VF.

  20. Supratherapeutic dose evaluation and effect of lesinurad on cardiac repolarization: a thorough QT/QTc study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Z

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zancong Shen,1 Michael Gillen,2 Kathy Tieu,1 Mai Nguyen,1 Erin Harmon,1 David M Wilson,1 Bradley Kerr,1 Caroline A Lee1 1Ardea Biosciences, Inc., San Diego, CA, 2AstraZeneca LP, Gaithersburg, MD, USA Introduction: Lesinurad is a selective uric acid reabsorption inhibitor approved in the United States and Europe for treatment of gout in combination with a xanthine oxidase inhibitor. A maximum tolerated dose study was conducted to determine the lesinurad supratherapeutic dose, followed by a thorough QTc study to characterize the effect of lesinurad on cardiac repolarization.Methods: The maximum tolerated dose study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-ascending dose study that enrolled 35 healthy men and women. Lesinurad plasma exposure (maximum observed plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration versus time curve was determined at doses of 800 mg, 1,200 mg, and 1,600 mg. The thorough QTc study was a double-blind, four-period, placebo-controlled crossover study with 54 healthy men and women who received single doses of lesinurad 1,600 mg (supratherapeutic dose, lesinurad 400 mg, moxifloxacin 400 mg, and placebo in randomized sequence. Digital 12-lead electrocardiograms were recorded at eleven time points over 24 hours in each treatment period. QT intervals were corrected for heart rate using an individual-specific correction factor (QTcI.Results: The upper bound of the one-sided 95% confidence interval for time-matched, placebo-subtracted, baseline-adjusted QTcI intervals (ΔΔQTcI was <10 ms for both the lesinurad 400 mg and 1,600 mg doses. ΔΔQTcI was independent of lesinurad concentrations. No QTcI thresholds >480 ms or QTcI increases >30 ms were observed. Moxifloxacin mean QTcI intervals were >5 ms, and the lower bounds of the 90% confidence interval were >5 ms at 2 hours, 3 hours, and 4 hours, confirming assay sensitivity.Conclusion: Lesinurad, at supratherapeutic doses, does not

  1. Effect of Lidocaine and Amiodarone on Transmural Heterogeneityricular Repolarization in Isolated Rabbit Hearts Model of Sustained Global Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Binquan; PU Jun; LIU Nian; YU Ronghui; RUAN Yanfei; LI Yang; WANG Lin

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of of lidocaine and amiodarone on the transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in isolated rabbit hearts model of sustained global ischemia and to explore the mechanisms underlying the antiarrhythmic activity of lidocaine and amiodarone, rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, ischemia group, lidocaine group and amiodarone group. By the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of recorded across the left ventricular free wall in rabbit hearts perfused transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and arrhythmic induced by ischemia. Our results showed that TDR of three myocardial layers in ischemia group were significantly lengthened after ischemia. TDR was increased from 17.5±3.9 ms to 31.2±4.6 ms at the time that concided with the onset of sustained ventricle arrhythmic. Amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia, and no significant difference was found at other ischemia time points. 5 cases had ventriclar arrhythmia in ischemia group (62.5 %), but no case in lidocaine group (P<0.01) and only 1 case in amiodarone group had ventrilar arrhythmia (P< 0.01). No significant difference was found between amiodarone group and lidocaine group. It is concluded that TDR of of three myocardial layers increases significantly at ischemia and it is closely associated with development of ventricular arrhythmia, and amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia and has no effects at other ischemia time points.

  2. Different mechanisms underlying the repolarization of narrow and wide action potentials in pyramidal cells and interneurons of cat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Zhang, J J; Hu, G Y; Wu, C P

    1996-07-01

    Two different types of action potentials were observed among the pyramidal cells and interneurons in cat motor cortex: the narrow action potentials and the wide action potentials. These two types of action potentials had similar rising phases (528.8 +/- 77.0 vs 553.1 +/- 71.8 mV/ms for the maximal rising rate), but differed in spike duration (0.44 +/- 0.09 vs 1.40 +/- 0.39 ms) and amplitude (57.31 +/- 8.22 vs 72.52 +/- 8.31 mV), implying that the ionic currents contributing to repolarization of these action potentials are different. Here we address this issue by pharmacological manipulation and using voltage-clamp technique in slices of cat motor cortex. Raising extracellular K+ concentration (from 3 mM to 10 mM), applying a low dose of 4-aminopyridine (2-200 microM) or administering a low concentration of tetraethylammonium (0.2-1.0 mM) each not only broadened the narrow action potentials, but also increased their amplitudes. In contrast, high K+ medium or low dose of tetraethylammonium only broadened the wide action potentials, leaving their amplitudes unaffected, and 4-aminopyridine had only a slight broadening effect on the wide spikes. These results implied that K+ currents were involved in the repolarization of both types of action potentials, and that the K+ currents in the narrow action potentials seemed to activate much earlier than those in the wide spikes. This early activated K+ current may counteract the rapid sodium current, yielding the extremely brief duration and small amplitude of the narrow spikes. The sensitivity of the narrow spikes to 4-aminopyridine may not be mainly attributed to blockade of the classical A current (IA), because depolarizing the membrane potential to inactivate IA did not reproduce the effects of 4-aminopyridine. Blockade of Ca2+ influx slowed the last two-thirds repolarization of the wide action potentials. On the contrary, the narrow action potentials were not affected by Ca(2+)-current blockers, but if they were first

  3. Abnormal menstrual periods (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have a variety of causes, such as endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial polyps, uterine fibroids, and abnormal thyroid or ... the endometrium becomes unusually thick it is called endometrial ... Hyperplasia may cause profuse or extended menstrual bleeding.

  4. "Jeopardy" in Abnormal Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keutzer, Carolin S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the use of the board game, Jeopardy, in a college level abnormal psychology course. Finds increased student interaction and improved application of information. Reports generally favorable student evaluation of the technique. (CFR)

  5. Chromosomal Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of fragile X syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS, and other cytogenetic abnormalities among 100 children (64 boys with combined type ADHD and normal intelligence was assessed at the NIMH and Georgetown University Medical Center.

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  7. Abnormal protein aggregationand neurodegenerativediseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Abnormal protein aggregation or amyloid is the major cause ofmany neurodegenerative disorders. The present review focuses on the correlation between sequence and structure features of proteins related to the diseases and abnormal protein aggregation. Recent progress has improved our knowledge on understand-ing the mechanism of amyloid formation. We suggest a nucleation model for ordered protein aggregation, which can also explain pathogenesis mechanisms of these neurodegenerative diseases in vivo.

  8. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  9. Modulation of regional dispersion of repolarization and T-peak to T-end interval by the right and left stellate ganglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseghi, Marmar; Yamakawa, Kentaro; Sinha, Arjun; So, Eileen L.; Zhou, Wei; Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Lux, Robert L.; Laks, Michael; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2013-01-01

    Left stellate or right stellate ganglion stimulation (LGSG or RSGS, respectively) is associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias; however, the electrophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. We assessed 1) regional dispersion of myocardial repolarization during RSGS and LSGS and 2) regional electrophysiological mechanisms underlying T-wave changes, including T-peak to T-end (Tp-e) interval, which are associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmia/ventricular fibrillation. In 10 pigs, a 56-electrode sock was placed around the heart, and both stellate ganglia were exposed. Unipolar electrograms, to asses activation recovery interval (ARI) and repolarization time (RT), and 12-lead ECG were recorded before and during RSGS and LSGS. Both LSGS and RSGS increased dispersion of repolarization; with LSGS, the greatest regional dispersion occurred on the left ventricular (LV) anterior wall and LV apex, whereas with RSGS, the greatest regional dispersion occurred on the right ventricular posterior wall. Baseline, LSGS, and RSGS dispersion correlated with Tp-e. The increase in RT dispersion, which was due to an increase in ARI dispersion, correlated with the increase in Tp-e intervals (R2 = 0.92 LSGS; and R2 = 0.96 RSGS). During LSGS, the ARIs and RTs on the lateral and posterior walls were shorter than the anterior LV wall (P dispersion of repolarization. PMID:23893168

  10. Abnormal Returns and Contrarian Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Dall'Agnol

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that strategies which are long on portfolios of looser stocks and short on portfolios of winner stocks generate abnormal returns in Brazil. This type of evidence for the US stock market was interpreted by The Bondt and Thaler (1985 as reflecting systematic evaluation mistakes caused by investors overreaction to news related to the firm performance. We found evidence of contrarian strategies profitability for horizons from 3 months to 3 years in a sample of stock returns from BOVESPA and SOMA from 1986 to 2000. The strategies are more profitable for shorter horizons. Therefore, there was no trace of the momentum effect found by Jagadeesh and Titman (1993 for the same horizons with US data. There are remaing unexplained positive returns for contrarian strategies after accounting for risk, size, and liquidity. We also found that the strategy profitability is reduced after the Real Plan, which suggests that the Brazilian stock market became more efficient after inflation stabilization.

  11. Pharmacological inhibition of I-K1 by PA-6 in isolated rat hearts affects ventricular repolarization and refractoriness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A.; Carstensen, Helena; Skibsbye, Lasse;

    2016-01-01

    .1 14.7 msec, 67%, P ventricular fibrillation was observed in two of six hearts. Neither atrial ERP nor duration of atrial fibrillation was altered following PA-6 application. The results show that pharmacological inhibition...... cycle length, and ventricular effective refractory period were determined following 200 nmol/L PA-6 perfusion. 200 nmol/L PA-6 resulted in a significant timelatency in drug effect on the IK1 current expressed in HEK-293 cells, giving rise to a maximal effect at 20 min. In the Langendorff-perfused heart...... experiments, PA-6 prolonged the ventricular action potential duration at 90% repolarization (from 41.8 6.5 msec to 72.6 21.1 msec, 74% compared to baseline, P ventricular effective refractory period compared to baseline (from 34.8 4.6 msec to 58...

  12. [Hair shaft abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itin, P H; Düggelin, M

    2002-05-01

    Hair shaft disorders may lead to brittleness and uncombable hair. In general the hair feels dry and lusterless. Hair shaft abnormalities may occur as localized or generalized disorders. Genetic predisposition or exogenous factors are able to produce and maintain hair shaft abnormalities. In addition to an extensive history and physical examination the most important diagnostic examination to analyze a hair shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair shaft disorders.

  13. Resilient RTN fast spiking in Kv3.1 null mice suggests redundancy in the action potential repolarization mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello, Darrell M; Ho, Chi Shun; Joho, Rolf H; Huguenard, John R

    2002-03-01

    Fast spiking (FS), GABAergic neurons of the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) are capable of firing high-frequency trains of brief action potentials, with little adaptation. Studies in recombinant systems have shown that high-voltage-activated K(+) channels containing the Kv3.1 and/or Kv3.2 subunits display biophysical properties that may contribute to the FS phenotype. Given that RTN expresses high levels of Kv3.1, with little or no Kv3.2, we tested whether this subunit was required for the fast action potential repolarization mechanism essential to the FS phenotype. Single- and multiple-action potentials were recorded using whole-cell current clamp in RTN neurons from brain slices of wild-type and Kv3.1-deficient mice. At 23 degrees C, action potentials recorded from homozygous Kv3.1 deficient mice (Kv3.1(-/-)) compared with their wild-type (Kv3.1(+/+)) counterparts had reduced amplitudes (-6%) and fast after-hyperpolarizations (-16%). At 34 degrees C, action potentials in Kv3.1(-/-) mice had increased duration (21%) due to a reduced rate of repolarization (-30%) when compared with wild-type controls. Action potential trains in Kv3.1(-/-) were associated with a significantly greater spike decrement and broadening and a diminished firing frequency versus injected current relationship (F/I) at 34 degrees C. There was no change in either spike count or maximum instantaneous frequency during low-threshold Ca(2+) bursts in Kv3.1(-/-) RTN neurons at either temperature tested. Our findings show that Kv3.1 is not solely responsible for fast spikes or high-frequency firing in RTN neurons. This suggests genetic redundancy in the system, possibly in the form of other Kv3 members, which may suffice to maintain the FS phenotype in RTN neurons in the absence of Kv3.1.

  14. A study on stability analysis of atrial repolarization variability using ARX model in sinus rhythm and atrial tachycardia ECGs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaraman, J; Uma, G; Langley, P; Umapathy, M; Venkatesan, S; Palanikumar, G

    2016-12-01

    The interaction between the PTa and PP interval dynamics from the surface ECG is seldom explained. Mathematical modeling of these intervals is of interest in finding the relationship between the heart rate and repolarization variability. The goal of this paper is to assess the bounded input bounded output (BIBO) stability in PTa interval (PTaI) dynamics using autoregressive exogenous (ARX) model and to investigate the reason for causing instability in the atrial repolarization process. Twenty-five male subjects in normal sinus rhythm (NSR) and ten male subjects experiencing atrial tachycardia (AT) were included in this study. Five minute long, modified limb lead (MLL) ECGs were recorded with an EDAN SE-1010 PC ECG system. The number of minute ECGs with unstable segments (Nus) and the frequency of premature activation (PA) (i.e. atrial activation) were counted for each ECG recording and compared between AT and NSR subjects. The instability in PTaI dynamics was quantified by measuring the numbers of unstable segments in ECG data for each subject. The unstable segments in the PTaI dynamics were associated with the frequency of PA. The presence of PA is not the only factor causing the instability in PTaI dynamics in NSR subjects, and it is found that the cause of instability is mainly due to the heart rate variability (HRV). The ARX model showed better prediction of PTa interval dynamics in both groups. The frequency of PA is significantly higher in AT patients than NSR subjects. A more complex model is needed to better identify and characterize healthy heart dynamics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence of Allergic Reactions and Cardiopulmonary Impairments among Traders Operating from Foodstuff Warehouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbosionu, Viola; Ibeneme, Georgian; Ezuma, Amarachi; Ettu, Theresa; Nwankwo, Joseph; Limaye, Dnyanesh; Nna, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Foodstuff traders operating from warehouses (FTFW) are potentially exposed to dangerous rodenticides/pesticides that may have adverse effects on cardiopulmonary function. Methods. Fifty consenting male foodstuff traders, comprising 15 traders (21–63 years) operating outside warehouses and 35 FTFW (20–64 years), were randomly recruited at Ogbete Market, Enugu, in a cross-sectional observational study of spirometric and electrocardiographic parameters. Seventeen FTFW (21–57 years) participated in focus group discussions. Qualitative and quantitative data were analysed thematically and with independent t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient at p 0.05) with a significantly prolonged (p < 0.05) QTc interval. Conclusion. Allergic response was evident in the FTFW. Significant decrease in FVC may negatively impact lung flow rates and explains the marginal decrease in FEF25–75, which implies a relative limitation in airflow of peripheral/distal airways and elastic recoil of the lungs. This is consistent with obstructive pulmonary disease; a significant decrease in FEF75–85/FEV1 supports this conclusion. Significant decrease in FEF200–1200 indicates abnormalities in the large airways/larynx just as significantly prolonged ventricular repolarization suggests cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:28116288

  16. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Farida El-Baz

    2015-06-19

    Jun 19, 2015 ... Received 19 April 2015; accepted 11 May 2015 ... Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Child Psychiatry Clinic, ... Males are affected more than females, only one case had ... communication, repetitive behavior, abnormal movement ... course, age, sex and consanguinity of the patients.

  17. Cortical Abnormalities in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Grey-matter abnormalities at the cortical surface and regional brain size were mapped by high-resolution MRI and surface-based, computational image analytical techniques in a group of 27 children and adolescents with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and 46 controls, matched by age and sex, at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  18. Neurological abnormalities predict disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of neurological abnormalities and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions in predicting global functional decline in a cohort of initially independent-living elderly subjects. The Leukoaraiosis And DISability (LADIS) Study, involving 11 European centres, was primarily aimed...

  19. Lacrimal system abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B D

    1994-03-01

    This report outlines several of the more important abnormalities of the lacrimal system in infants and young children. Although rare, alacrima can be a very difficult clinical problem to treat. The most common cause of alacrima is the Riley-Day syndrome. Nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a very common anomaly in children. The clinical appearance and treatment of this disorder are discussed.

  20. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovitz, G D; Seeherunvong, T

    1998-04-01

    Gonadal differentiation involves a complex interplay of developmental pathways. The sex determining region Y (SRY) gene plays a key role in testis determination, but its interaction with other genes is less well understood. Abnormalities of gonadal differentiation result in a range of clinical problems. 46,XY complete gonadal dysgenesis is defined by an absence of testis determination. Subjects have female external genitalia and come to clinical attention because of delayed puberty. Individuals with 46,XY partial gonadal dysgenesis usually present in the newborn period for the valuation of ambiguous genitalia. Gonadal histology always shows an abnormality of seminiferous tubule formation. A diagnosis of 46,XY true hermaphroditism is made if the gonads contain well-formed testicular and ovarian elements. Despite the pivotal role of the SRY gene in testis development, mutations of SRY are unusual in subjects with a 46,XY karyotype and abnormal gonadal development. 46,XX maleness is defined by testis determination in an individual with a 46,XX karyotype. Most affected individuals have a phenotype similar to that of Klinefelter syndrome. In contrast, subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism usually present with ambiguous genitalia. The majority of subjects with 46,XX maleness have Y sequences including SRY in genomic DNA. However, only rare subjects with 46,XX true hermaphroditism have translocated sequences encoding SRY. Mosaicism and chimaerism involving the Y chromosome can also be associated with abnormal gonadal development. However, the vast majority of subjects with 45,X/46,XY mosaicism have normal testes and normal male external genitalia.

  1. Brugada syndrome and right ventricle morphofunctional abnormalities on echocardiography in young male with family anamnesis of sudden cardiac death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Robert; Makarovic, Sandra; Makarovic, Zorin; Bilic-Curcic, Ines

    2014-03-01

    First presented by Brugada and Brugada in 1992, Brugada Syndrome (BrS) is a primary electrical disease of the heart that causes sudden cardiac death or life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This disease is hereditary autosomic dominant transmitted and genetically determined. The syndrome has been linked to mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding for the a-subunit of the sodium channel. Electrocardiogram (ECG) abnormalities indicating Brugada syndrome, include repolarization and depolarization abnormalities in the absence of identifiable structural cardiac abnormalities or other conditions or agents known to lead to ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads (V1-V3). Intravenous administration of sodium channel blocking drugs may modify the ECG pattern. Ajmaline, flecainide, procainamide and propafenone exaggerate the ST-segment elevation or unmask it when it is initially absent. An implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is the only proven effective device treatment for the disease. Although BrS is primary electrical disease, some authors have suggested the presence of morphological and functional abnormalities mainly located in the right ventricle (RV), notably in the outflow tract (RVOT). In this short report we will present a young male, with predisposition and positive family history of sudden cardiac death, with complete diagnostic procedure including propafenon testing unmasking Brugada syndrome. An echosonography revealed dilated apical right ventricle, suggesting BrS is not only electrical disorder, but may include morphofunctional abnormalities, described in previous reports. In addition, we reviewed the possible connection between Brugada syndrome and morphological abnormalities in RV.

  2. Liver abnormalities in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Than, Nwe Ni; Neuberger, James

    2013-08-01

    Abnormalities of liver function (notably rise in alkaline phosphatase and fall in serum albumin) are common in normal pregnancy, whereas rise in serum bilirubin and aminotransferase suggest either exacerbation of underlying pre-existing liver disease, liver disease related to pregnancy or liver disease unrelated to pregnancy. Pregnant women appear to have a worse outcome when infected with Hepatitis E virus. Liver diseases associated with pregnancy include abnormalities associated hyperemesis gravidarum, acute fatty liver disease, pre-eclampsia, cholestasis of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. Prompt investigation and diagnosis is important in ensuring a successful maternal and foetal outcome. In general, prompt delivery is the treatment of choice for acute fatty liver, pre-eclampsia and HELLP syndrome and ursodeoxycholic acid is used for cholestasis of pregnancy although it is not licenced for this indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Nitrofurantoin and congenital abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeizel, A.E.; Rockenbauer, M.; Sørensen, Henrik Toft;

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study human teratogenic potential of oral nitrofurantoin treatment during pregnancy. Materials and Methods: Pair analysis of cases with congenital abnormalities and matched population controls in the population-based dataset of the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital...... or fetuses with Down’s syndrome (patient controls), 23 (2.8%) pregnant women were treated with nitrofurantoin. The above differences between population controls and cases may be connected with recall bias, because the case-control pair analysis did not indicate a teratogenic potential of nitrofurantoin use...... during the second and the third months of gestation, i.e. in the critical period for major congenital abnormalities. Conclusion: Treatment with nitrofurantoin during pregnancy does not present detectable teratogenic risk to the fetus....

  4. Temporal abnormalities in children with developmental dyscalculia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, Carmelo Mario; Rappo, Gaetano; Pepi, Annamaria; Pavan, Andrea; Martino, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Recent imaging studies have associated Developmental dyscalculia (DD) to structural and functional alterations corresponding Parietal and the Prefrontal cortex (PFC). Since these areas were shown also to be involved in timing abilities, we hypothesized that time processing is abnormal in DD. We compared time processing abilities between 10 children with pure DD (8 years old) and 11 age-matched healthy children. Results show that the DD group underestimated duration of a sub-second scale when asked to perform a time comparison task. The timing abnormality observed in our DD participants is consistent with evidence of a shared fronto-parietal neural network for representing time and quantity.

  5. Abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzil, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    So-called abnormal pressures, subsurface fluid pressures significantly higher or lower than hydrostatic, have excited speculation about their origin since subsurface exploration first encountered them. Two distinct conceptual models for abnormal pressures have gained currency among earth scientists. The static model sees abnormal pressures generally as relict features preserved by a virtual absence of fluid flow over geologic time. The hydrodynamic model instead envisions abnormal pressures as phenomena in which flow usually plays an important role. This paper develops the theoretical framework for abnormal pressures as hydrodynamic phenomena, shows that it explains the manifold occurrences of abnormal pressures, and examines the implications of this approach. -from Author

  6. [Molecular abnormalities in lymphomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsol, G

    2010-11-01

    Numerous molecular abnormalities have been described in lymphomas. They are of diagnostic and prognostic value and are taken into account for the WHO classification of these tumors. They also shed some light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in lymphomas. Overall, four types of molecular abnormalities are involved: mutations, translocations, amplifications and deletions of tumor suppressor genes. Several techniques are available to detect these molecular anomalies: conventional cytogenetic analysis, multicolor FISH, CGH array or gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. In some lymphomas, genetic abnormalities are responsible for the expression of an abnormal protein (e.g. tyrosine-kinase, transcription factor) detectable by immunohistochemistry. In the present review, molecular abnormalities observed in the most frequent B, T or NK cell lymphomas are discussed. In the broad spectrum of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas microarray analysis shows mostly two subgroups of tumors, one with gene expression signature corresponding to germinal center B-cell-like (GCB: CD10+, BCL6 [B-Cell Lymphoma 6]+, centerine+, MUM1-) and a subgroup expressing an activated B-cell-like signature (ABC: CD10-, BCL6-, centerine-, MUM1+). Among other B-cell lymphomas with well characterized molecular abnormalies are follicular lymphoma (BCL2 deregulation), MALT lymphoma (Mucosa Associated Lymphoid Tissue) [API2-MALT1 (mucosa-associated-lymphoid-tissue-lymphoma-translocation-gene1) fusion protein or deregulation BCL10, MALT1, FOXP1. MALT1 transcription factors], mantle cell lymphoma (cycline D1 [CCND1] overexpression) and Burkitt lymphoma (c-Myc expression). Except for ALK (anaplastic lymphoma kinase)-positive anaplastic large cell lymphoma, well characterized molecular anomalies are rare in lymphomas developed from T or NK cells. Peripheral T cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are a heterogeneous group of tumors with frequent but not recurrent molecular abnormalities

  7. Abnormal Spatial Asymmetry of Selective Attention in ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Edgar; Mattingley, Jason B.; Huang-Pollock, Cynthia; English, Therese; Hester, Robert; Vance, Alasdair; Bellgrove, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Evidence for a selective attention abnormality in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been hard to identify using conventional methods from cognitive science. This study tested whether the presence of selective attention abnormalities in ADHD may vary as a function of perceptual load and target…

  8. Feeling Abnormal: Simulation of Deviancy in Abnormal and Exceptionality Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernald, Charles D.

    1980-01-01

    Describes activity in which student in abnormal psychology and psychology of exceptional children classes personally experience being judged abnormal. The experience allows the students to remember relevant research, become sensitized to the feelings of individuals classified as deviant, and use caution in classifying individuals as abnormal.…

  9. Comparison of tegaserod (HTF 919) and its main human metabolite with cisapride and erythromycin on cardiac repolarization in the isolated rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drici, M D; Ebert, S N; Wang, W X; Rodriguez, I; Liu, X K; Whitfield, B H; Woosley, R L

    1999-07-01

    Tegaserod (HTF 919) is a new drug being developed for gastrointestinal motility disorders. Because other gastrointestinal prokinetic agents, such as cisapride and erythromycin, cause slowing of cardiac repolarization and have been implicated in the development of the potentially fatal ventricular arrhythmia, torsades de pointes, a study was initiated to determine whether tegaserod and its main human metabolite adversely influence cardiac repolarization. By using isolated Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts, we show that QT intervals remain unchanged at concentrations of tegaserod from 0.5 to 10 microM. It was not until the tegaserod concentration was increased to 50 microM (roughly 500-5,000 times more concentrated than those typically found in human plasma after administration of recommended clinical dosages), that a small, but significant increase in the QT interval (12+/-4%; p 70%, respectively; p < 0.01; n = 4). Erythromycin also caused significant lengthening of QT intervals (11+/-2%; p < 0.001; n = 4), although 100 microM concentrations of this drug were required to achieve this effect. These results demonstrate that both cisapride and erythromycin can slow cardiac repolarization at therapeutic doses and that tegaserod's lack of QT prolongation at therapeutic doses suggests that it has the potential to be a safer alternative to cisapride as a gastrointestinal prokinetic agent.

  10. Russia: An Abnormal Country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Rosefielde

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrei Shleifer and Daniel Treisman recently rendered a summary verdict on the post Soviet Russian transition experience finding that the Federation had become a normal country with the west's assistance, and predicting that it would liberalize and develop further like other successful nations of its type. This essay demonstrates that they are mistaken on the first count, and are likely to be wrong on the second too. It shows factually, and on the norms elaborated by Pareto, Arrow and Bergson that Russia is an abnormal political economy unlikely to democratize, westernize or embrace free enterprise any time soon

  11. Abnormal ionization in sonoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Juan; An, Yu

    2015-04-01

    Sonoluminescence is a complex phenomenon, the mechanism of which remains unclear. The present study reveals that an abnormal ionization process is likely to be present in the sonoluminescing bubble. To fit the experimental data of previous studies, we assume that the ionization energies of the molecules and atoms in the bubble decrease as the gas density increases and that the decrease of the ionization energy reaches about 60%-70% as the bubble flashes, which is difficult to explain by using previous models. Project supported by the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120002110031) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11334005).

  12. High-threshold, Kv3-like potassium currents in magnocellular neurosecretory neurons and their role in spike repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Talent; Teruyama, Ryoichi; Armstrong, William E

    2004-11-01

    We identified Kv3-like high-threshold K+ currents in hypothalamic supraoptic neurons using whole cell recordings in hypothalamic slices and in acutely dissociated neurons. Tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive currents (Kv3-like channels. In slices, tests with 0.01-0.7 mM TEA produced an IC50 of 200-300 nM for both fast and persistent currents. The fast transient current was similar to currents associated with the expression of Kv3.4 subunits, given that it was sensitive to BDS-I (100 nM). The persistent TEA-sensitive current appeared similar to those attributed to Kv3.1/3.2 subunits. Although qualitatively similar, oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (VP) neurons in slices differed in the stronger presence of persistent current in VP neurons. In both cell types, the IC50 for TEA-induced spike broadening was similar to that observed for current suppression in voltage clamp. However, TEA had a greater effect on the spike width of VP neurons than of OT neurons. Immunochemical studies revealed a stronger expression of the Kv3.1b alpha-subunit in VP neurons, which may be related to the greater importance of this current type in VP spike repolarization. Because OT and VP neurons are not considered fast firing, but do exhibit frequency- and calcium-dependent spike broadening, Kv3-like currents may be important for maintaining spike width and calcium influx within acceptable limits during repetitive firing.

  13. Kv3.4 subunits enhance the repolarizing efficiency of Kv3.1 channels in fast-spiking neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Gytis; Tkatch, Tatiana; Nagata, Keiichi; Yeh, Jay Z; Surmeier, D James

    2003-03-01

    Neurons with the capacity to discharge at high rates--'fast-spiking' (FS) neurons--are critical participants in central motor and sensory circuits. It is widely accepted that K+ channels with Kv3.1 or Kv3.2 subunits underlie fast, delayed-rectifier (DR) currents that endow neurons with this FS ability. Expression of these subunits in heterologous systems, however, yields channels that open at more depolarized potentials than do native Kv3 family channels, suggesting that they differ. One possibility is that native channels incorporate a subunit that modifies gating. Molecular, electrophysiological and pharmacological studies reported here suggest that a splice variant of the Kv3.4 subunit coassembles with Kv3.1 subunits in rat brain FS neurons. Coassembly enhances the spike repolarizing efficiency of the channels, thereby reducing spike duration and enabling higher repetitive spike rates. These results suggest that manipulation of K3.4 subunit expression could be a useful means of controlling the dynamic range of FS neurons.

  14. An Electromechanical Left Ventricular Wedge Model to Study the Effects of Deformation on Repolarization during Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heart failure is a major and costly problem in public health, which, in certain cases, may lead to death. The failing heart undergo a series of electrical and structural changes that provide the underlying basis for disturbances like arrhythmias. Computer models of coupled electrical and mechanical activities of the heart can be used to advance our understanding of the complex feedback mechanisms involved. In this context, there is a lack of studies that consider heart failure remodeling using strongly coupled electromechanics. We present a strongly coupled electromechanical model to study the effects of deformation on a human left ventricle wedge considering normal and hypertrophic heart failure conditions. We demonstrate through a series of simulations that when a strongly coupled electromechanical model is used, deformation results in the thickening of the ventricular wall that in turn increases transmural dispersion of repolarization. These effects were analyzed in both normal and failing heart conditions. We also present transmural electrograms obtained from these simulations. Our results suggest that the waveform of electrograms, particularly the T-wave, is influenced by cardiac contraction on both normal and pathological conditions.

  15. Somatic membrane potential and Kv1 channels control spike repolarization in cortical axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Amanda J; Yu, Yuguo; Popovic, Marko; Zecevic, Dejan; McCormick, David A

    2011-10-26

    The shape of action potentials invading presynaptic terminals, which can vary significantly from spike waveforms recorded at the soma, may critically influence the probability of synaptic neurotransmitter release. Revealing the conductances that determine spike shape in presynaptic boutons is important for understanding how changes in the electrochemical context in which a spike is generated, such as subthreshold depolarization spreading from the soma, can modulate synaptic strength. Utilizing recent improvements in the signal-to-noise ratio of voltage-sensitive dye imaging in mouse brain slices, we demonstrate that intracortical axon collaterals and en passant presynaptic terminals of layer 5 pyramidal cells exhibit a high density of Kv1 subunit-containing ion channels, which generate a slowly inactivating K(+) current critically important for spike repolarization in these compartments. Blockade of the current by low doses of 4-aminopyridine or α-dendrotoxin dramatically slows the falling phase of action potentials in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons. Furthermore, subthreshold depolarization of the soma broadened action potentials in collaterals bearing presynaptic boutons, an effect abolished by blocking Kv1 channels with α-dendrotoxin. These results indicate that action potential-induced synaptic transmission may operate through a mix of analog-digital transmission owing to the properties of Kv1 channels in axon collaterals and presynaptic boutons.

  16. Role of gap junction channel in the development of beat-to-beat action potential repolarization variability and arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magyar, Janos; Banyasz, Tamas; Szentandrassy, Norbert; Kistamas, Kornel; Nanasi, Peter P; Satin, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The short-term beat-to-beat variability of cardiac action potential duration (SBVR) occurs as a random alteration of the ventricular repolarization duration. SBVR has been suggested to be more predictive of the development of lethal arrhythmias than the action potential prolongation or QT prolongation of ECG alone. The mechanism underlying SBVR is not completely understood but it is known that SBVR depends on stochastic ion channel gating, intracellular calcium handling and intercellular coupling. Coupling of single cardiomyocytes significantly decreases the beat-to-beat changes in action potential duration (APD) due to the electrotonic current flow between neighboring cells. The magnitude of this electrotonic current depends on the intercellular gap junction resistance. Reduced gap junction resistance causes greater electrotonic current flow between cells, and reduces SBVR. Myocardial ischaemia (MI) is known to affect gap junction channel protein expression and function. MI increases gap junction resistance that leads to slow conduction, APD and refractory period dispersion, and an increase in SBVR. Ultimately, development of reentry arrhythmias and fibrillation are associated post-MI. Antiarrhythmic drugs have proarrhythmic side effects requiring alternative approaches. A novel idea is to target gap junction channels. Specifically, the use of gap junction channel enhancers and inhibitors may help to reveal the precise role of gap junctions in the development of arrhythmias. Since cell-to-cell coupling is represented in SBVR, this parameter can be used to monitor the degree of coupling of myocardium.

  17. Uniform Action Potential Repolarization within the Sarcolemma of In Situ Ventricular Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Bu, Guixue; Adams, Heather; Berbari, Edward J.; Rubart, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have speculated, based on indirect evidence, that the action potential at the transverse (t)-tubules is longer than at the surface membrane in mammalian ventricular cardiomyocytes. To date, no technique has enabled recording of electrical activity selectively at the t-tubules to directly examine this hypothesis. We used confocal line-scan imaging in conjunction with the fast response voltage-sensitive dyes ANNINE-6 and ANNINE-6plus to resolve action potential-related changes ...

  18. A Rare Stapes Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Kanona

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to increase awareness of rare presentations, diagnostic difficulties alongside management of conductive hearing loss and ossicular abnormalities. We report the case of a 13-year-old female reporting progressive left-sided hearing loss and high resolution computed tomography was initially reported as normal. Exploratory tympanotomy revealed an absent stapedius tendon and lack of connection between the stapes superstructure and footplate. The footplate was fixed. Stapedotomy and stapes prosthesis insertion resulted in closure of the air-bone gap by 50 dB. A review of world literature was performed using MedLine. Middle ear ossicular discontinuity can result in significant conductive hearing loss. This can be managed effectively with surgery to help restore hearing. However, some patients may not be suitable or decline surgical intervention and can be managed safely conservatively.

  19. Impact of dosing regimen of custirsen, an antisense oligonucleotide, on safety, tolerability and cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich-Guilatt, Laura; Elgart, Anna; Erisson, Lavi; Willsie, Sandra K; Tessler, Shoshi; Barnett-Griness, Ofra; Pande, Amitkumar; Spiegelstein, Ofer

    2015-09-01

    Custirsen (OGX-011/TV-1011), a second-generation antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) that reduces clusterin production, is under investigation with chemotherapy in patients with solid tumours. Custirsen is associated with constitutional symptoms (CS) that may interfere with clinical pharmacology investigations, such as QT interval studies. Experience with other ASOs suggests NSAID premedication may ameliorate CS, but we observed suboptimal outcomes in healthy subjects given custirsen and NSAIDs. We sought to establish a custirsen regimen for future clinical pharmacology studies in healthy subjects. Subjects received custirsen (640 mg intravenously over 120 min) with dexamethasone premedication or increasing doses (320, 480, 640 mg over 6 days) of custirsen with dexamethasone premedication, then one full custirsen dose without premedication on day 8. Incidence/severity of adverse events (AEs) and extensive electrocardiogram readings were evaluated. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated. AEs included CS, elevated transaminases and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) that were predominantly grade 1/2. Administration of increasing custirsen doses and dexamethasone premedication reduced the incidence of CS associated with full dose custirsen. Transaminase elevation showed a dose-dependent effect (0% at days 2, 4, 27% at day 6) with the highest custirsen doses. Increasing doses of custirsen may have mitigated the severity but not incidence of aPTT prolongation. Neither regimen was associated with cardiac repolarization changes in QT values or concentration-effect analyses. The custirsen pharmacokinetic profile was consistent with previous experience. Escalation of custirsen dose combined with dexamethasone premedication reduced CS associated with full dose custirsen and should be considered in future clinical pharmacology studies of custirsen. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. Biochemical abnormalities in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Beatrice Letizia; Leon, Eyby; Calhoun, Amy; Lowichik, Amy; Pasquali, Marzia; Longo, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a multisystem mitochondrial disorder characterized by bone marrow failure and pancreatic insufficiency. Children who survive the severe bone marrow dysfunction in childhood develop Kearns-Sayre syndrome later in life. Here we report on four new cases with this condition and define their biochemical abnormalities. Three out of four patients presented with failure to thrive, with most of them having normal development and head size. All patients had evidence of bone marrow involvement that spontaneously improved in three out of four patients. Unique findings in our patients were acute pancreatitis (one out of four), renal Fanconi syndrome (present in all patients, but symptomatic only in one), and an unusual organic aciduria with 3-hydroxyisobutyric aciduria in one patient. Biochemical analysis indicated low levels of plasma citrulline and arginine, despite low-normal ammonia levels. Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between each intermediate of the urea cycle and the next, except between ornithine and citrulline. This suggested that the reaction catalyzed by ornithine transcarbamylase (that converts ornithine to citrulline) might not be very efficient in patients with Pearson syndrome. In view of low-normal ammonia levels, we hypothesize that ammonia and carbamylphosphate could be diverted from the urea cycle to the synthesis of nucleotides in patients with Pearson syndrome and possibly other mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Autoshaping of abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckner, C W; Wilcox, L M; Maisto, S A; Blanton, R L

    1980-09-01

    Three experimentally naive abnormal children were exposed to a terminal operant contingency, i.e., reinforcement was delivered only if the children pressed a panel during intervals when it was lighted. Despite the absence of both successive approximation and manual shaping, it was found that each child began to respond discriminatively within a small number of trials. These data replicated previous animal studies concerned with the phenomena of autoshaping and signal-controlled responding. It was also found, however, that one type of autoshaping, the classical conditioning procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on the discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted procedure, had a powerful suppressive effect on discriminative responding. An experimental analysis that consisted of intrasubject reversal an multiple baseline designs established the internal validity of the findings. The finding of rapid acquisition of signal-controlled responding obtained with the initial procedure is suggessted to have practical significance. The disruptive effects of the classical form of autoshaping are discussed in terms of negative behavioral contrast.

  2. Communication and abnormal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crown, S

    1979-01-01

    In this paper the similarities between normal and abnormal behaviour are emphasized and selected aspects of communication, normal and aberrant, between persons are explored. Communication in a social system may be verbal or non-verbal: one person's actions cause a response in another person. This response may be cognitive, behavioural or physiological. Communication may be approached through the individual, the social situation or social interaction. Psychoanalysis approaches the individual in terms of the coded communications of psychoneurotic symptoms or psychotic behaviour; the humanist-existential approach is concerned more with emotional expression. Both approaches emphasize the development of individual identity. The interaction between persons and their social background is stressed. Relevant are sociological concepts such as illness behaviour, stigma, labelling, institutionalization and compliance. Two approaches to social interactions are considered: the gamesplaying metaphor, e.g. back pain as a psychosocial manipulation--the 'pain game'; and the 'spiral of reciprocal perspectives' which emphasizes the interactional complexities of social perceptions. Communicatory aspects of psychological treatments are noted: learning a particular metaphor such as 'resolution' of the problem (psychotherapy), learning more 'rewarding' behaviour (learning theory) or learning authenticity or self-actualization (humanist-existential).

  3. Abnormally dark or light skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperpigmentation; Hypopigmentation; Skin - abnormally light or dark ... Normal skin contains cells called melanocytes. These cells produce melanin , the substance that gives skin its color. Skin with ...

  4. Parsing abnormal grain growth in specialty aluminas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Abigail Kremer

    multivariate statistical tool called canonical correlation analysis was adopted to seek out relationships between a set of input variables and the abnormal character values. The input variables include the MgO, CaO, Na 2O, and SiO2 contents, the ratio of MgO:(CaO+SiO2), and the annealing time and temperature. The analysis was applied to 33 different samples and showed that the composition ratio and MgO content were the strongest processing variables. These variables are most closely related to the correlation between grain size and aspect ratio, the average magnitude of abnormality, and the variance in grain size. The physical implications of these relationships are explored for a number of samples with different abnormal grain growth behaviors. Several of the samples contained a beta"-alumina phase that is shown to have a dampening effect on abnormal grain growth. TEM investigation provides evidence that there is a grain boundary complexion with a different composition and structure than the second phase. A series of samples are compared after annealing for different times and are shown to have very different behaviors as a result of the second phase competing with complexions for control over the microstructure.

  5. Epigenetic repolarization of T lymphocytes from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients using 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Jason A; Powers, John J; Gao, Yang; Mariusso, Luis F; Sotomayor, Eduardo M; Pinilla-Ibarz, Javier A

    2011-09-01

    T cell immune dysfunction has an important role in the profound immune suppression that characterizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Improper polarization of T cells has been proposed as one of the mechanism involved. Mounting data implicates chromatin regulation, namely promoter methylation, in the plasticity of naïve human T cells. Recent in vitro evidence indicates that this plasticity may be phenotypically altered by using methylation inhibitors which are approved for clinical use in certain types of cancer. These results beg the question: can the ineffective polarization of T lymphocytes in the context of CLL be effectively modulated using methylation inhibitors in a sustainable therapeutic fashion? To answer this question our laboratory has studied the effects of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5A2) in helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes from healthy donors and CLL patients in well characterized molecular and epigenetic signaling pathways involved in effective polarization. Moreover, we sought to investigate the consequences of methylation inhibitor treatment on lymphocyte survival, activation intensity, and naïve cell polarization. Our data indicates that 5A2 treatment can depolarize Th2 cells to effectively secrete interferon gamma, signal via T-bet, and achieve demethylation of critical Th1 specific promoters. Moreover, we demonstrate that 5A2 can force Th1 polarization of naïve T cells despite a strong IL-4 stimuli and a lack of IL-12. In conclusion our data seeks to define a modality in which improper or ineffective T cell polarization can be altered by 5AZA and could be incorporated in future therapeutic interventions.

  6. Experimentally-Based Computational Investigation into Beat-To-Beat Variability in Ventricular Repolarization and Its Response to Ionic Current Inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Pueyo

    Full Text Available Beat-to-beat variability in repolarization (BVR has been proposed as an arrhythmic risk marker for disease and pharmacological action. The mechanisms are unclear but BVR is thought to be a cell level manifestation of ion channel stochasticity, modulated by cell-to-cell differences in ionic conductances. In this study, we describe the construction of an experimentally-calibrated set of stochastic cardiac cell models that captures both BVR and cell-to-cell differences in BVR displayed in isolated canine action potential measurements using pharmacological agents. Simulated and experimental ranges of BVR are compared in control and under pharmacological inhibition, and the key ionic currents determining BVR under physiological and pharmacological conditions are identified. Results show that the 4-aminopyridine-sensitive transient outward potassium current, Ito1, is a fundamental driver of BVR in control and upon complete inhibition of the slow delayed rectifier potassium current, IKs. In contrast, IKs and the L-type calcium current, ICaL, become the major contributors to BVR upon inhibition of the fast delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr. This highlights both IKs and Ito1 as key contributors to repolarization reserve. Partial correlation analysis identifies the distribution of Ito1 channel numbers as an important independent determinant of the magnitude of BVR and drug-induced change in BVR in control and under pharmacological inhibition of ionic currents. Distributions in the number of IKs and ICaL channels only become independent determinants of the magnitude of BVR upon complete inhibition of IKr. These findings provide quantitative insights into the ionic causes of BVR as a marker for repolarization reserve, both under control condition and pharmacological inhibition.

  7. Systemic abnormalities in liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami Minemura; Kazuto Tajiri; Yukihiro Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Systemic abnormalities often occur in patients with liver disease. In particular, cardiopulmonary or renal diseases accompanied by advanced liver disease can be serious and may determine the quality of life and prognosis of patients. Therefore, both hepatologists and non-hepatologists should pay attention to such abnormalities in the management of patients with liver diseases.

  8. Effect of NIP-142 on potassium channel alpha-subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3, and mouse atrial repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hikaru; Namekata, Iyuki; Hamaguchi, Shogo; Kawamura, Taro; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yoshio; Iida-Tanaka, Naoko; Takahara, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Effects of NIP-142, a benzopyran compound which terminates experimental atrial arrhythmia, on potassium channel alpha-subunits and mouse atrial repolarization were examined. NIP-142 concentration-dependently blocked the outward current through potassium channel alpha subunits Kv1.5, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 expressed in Xenopus oocytes. In isolated mouse atrial myocardia, NIP-142 prolonged the action potential duration and effective refractory period, and increased the contractile force. These results suggest that NIP-142 blocks the potassium channels underlying the transient and sustained outward currents, which may contribute to its antiarrhythmic activity.

  9. Kv2 Channel Regulation of Action Potential Repolarization and Firing Patterns in Superior Cervical Ganglion Neurons and Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Pin W.; Bean, Bruce P.

    2014-01-01

    Kv2 family “delayed-rectifier” potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and ...

  10. Molecular genetic and functional association of Brugada and early repolarization syndromes with S422L missense mutation in KCNJ8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Martínez, Hector; Hu, Dan; Ferrer, Tania; Onetti, Carlos G; Wu, Yuesheng; Burashnikov, Elena; Boyle, Madalene; Surman, Tyler; Urrutia, Janire; Veltmann, Christian; Schimpf, Rainer; Borggrefe, Martin; Wolpert, Christian; Ibrahim, Bassiema B; Sánchez-Chapula, José Antonio; Winters, Stephen; Haïssaguerre, Michel; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2012-04-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium cardiac channels consist of inward-rectifying channel subunits Kir6.1 or Kir6.2 (encoded by KCNJ8 or KCNJ11) and the sulfonylurea receptor subunits SUR2A (encoded by ABCC9). To examine the association of mutations in KCNJ8 with Brugada syndrome (BrS) and early repolarization syndrome (ERS) and to elucidate the mechanism underlying the gain of function of ATP-sensitive potassium channel current. Direct sequencing of KCNJ8 and other candidate genes was performed on 204 BrS and ERS probands and family members. Whole-cell and inside-out patch-clamp methods were used to study mutated channels expressed in TSA201 cells. The same missense mutation, p.Ser422Leu (c.1265C>T) in KCNJ8, was identified in 3 BrS and 1 ERS probands but was absent in 430 alleles from ethnically matched healthy controls. Additional genetic variants included CACNB2b-D601E. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies showed a 2-fold gain of function of glibenclamide-sensitive ATP-sensitive potassium channel current when KCNJ8-S422L was coexpressed with SUR2A-wild type. Inside-out patch-clamp evaluation yielded a significantly greater half maximal inhibitory concentration for ATP in the mutant channels (785.5 ± 2 vs 38.4 ± 3 μM; n = 5; P <.01), pointing to incomplete closing of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels under normoxic conditions. Patients with a CACNB2b-D601E polymorphism displayed longer QT/corrected QT intervals, likely owing to their effect to induce an increase in L-type calcium channel current (I(Ca-L)). Our results support the hypothesis that KCNJ8 is a susceptibility gene for BrS and ERS and point to S422L as a possible hotspot mutation. Our findings suggest that the S422L-induced gain of function in ATP-sensitive potassium channel current is due to reduced sensitivity to intracellular ATP. Copyright © 2012 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Renal abnormalities in ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samia, Barbouch; Hazgui, Faiçal; Abdelghani, Khaoula Ben; Hamida, Fethi Ben; Goucha, Rym; Hedri, Hafedh; Taarit, Chokri Ben; Maiz, Hedi Ben; Kheder, Adel

    2012-07-01

    We will study the epidemiologic, clinical, biological, therapeutic, prognostic characteristics and predictive factors of development of nephropathy in ankylosing spondylitis patients. We retrospectively reviewed the medical record of 32 cases with renal involvement among 212 cases of ankylosing spondylitis followed in our service during the period spread out between 1978 and 2006. The renal involvement occurred in all patients a mean of 12 years after the clinical onset of the rheumatic disease. Thirty-two patients presented one or more signs of renal involvement: microscopic hematuria in 22 patients, proteinuria in 23 patients, nephrotic syndrome in 11 patients and decreased renal function in 24 patients (75%). Secondary renal amyloidosis (13 patients), which corresponds to a prevalence of 6,1% and tubulointerstitial nephropathy (7 patients) were the most common cause of renal involvement in ankylosing spondylitis followed by IgA nephropathy (4 patients). Seventeen patients evolved to the end stage renal disease after an average time of 29.8 ± 46 months. The average follow-up of the patients was 4,4 years. By comparing the 32 patients presenting a SPA and renal disease to 88 with SPA and without nephropathy, we detected the predictive factors of occurred of nephropathy: tobacco, intense inflammatory syndrome, sacroileite stage 3 or 4 and presence of column bamboo. The finding of 75% of the patients presented a renal failure at the time of the diagnosis of renal involvement suggests that evidence of renal abnormality involvement should be actively sought in this disease. Copyright © 2011 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. 自闭症儿童面孔加工的异常:来自眼动的证据%Abnormal Face Processing in Children with Autism: Evidence from Eye Movements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金丽; 陈顺森

    2011-01-01

    To explore face processing of children in children with autism, 11 autistic children matched to 11 typically developing children were required to look at a range of images with human face, while eye movement were recorded. The results showed that there were no significant difference in the time to detect the faces between autism and control group; participants with autism spend less time on faces and eyes; and there were no significant difference in first fixation duration time between autism and control group. It is suggest that the way of autism to capture the face and the retentive of visual attention is abnormal; autism rather avoid the human faces and eyes forwardly than passively ignore the faces and eye contact.%为了探讨自闭症儿童面孔加工的特点,选取5-11岁自闭症儿童,正常儿童各11名,让他们观看人类面孔,运用眼动追踪技术记录其对面孔的视觉加工过程.结果表明,自闭症儿童觉察到面孔所用时间与正常儿童相近,对面孔观察时间以及眼睛注视次数均少于正常儿童,但两组对面孔及其特征区的首次注视时间没有差异.说明白闭症儿童面孔捕获的方式和视觉注意保持存在异常;主动回避面孔眼睛区域而非被动忽视面孔以及目光接触.

  13. Imaging findings of sternal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franquet, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Gimenez, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Alegret, X. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Sanchis, E. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital de Sant Pau, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); Rivas, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Hospital Vall d`Hebron, Universidad Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    1997-05-01

    Radiographic findings in the sternal abnormalities are often nonspecific, showing appearances from a localized benign lesion to an aggressive lesion as seen with infections and malignant neoplasms. A specific diagnosis of sternal abnormalities can be suggested on the basis of CT and MR characteristics. Familiarity with the presentation and variable appearance of sternal abnormalities may aid the radiologist is suggesting a specific diagnosis. We present among others characteristic radiographic findings of hemangioma, chondrosarcoma, hydatid disease, and SAPHO syndrome. In those cases in which findings are not specific, cross-sectional imaging modalities may help the clinician in their management. (orig.)

  14. Endocrine abnormalities in dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Progress has been made in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of hormone action and its effects on the cardiac tissue. There is evidence from observational studies that patients with postpartum cardiomyopathy improve after inhibition of release of prolactin from the pituitary by bromocriptine. This has renewed interest in the role of hormones in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy, especially in women. We intended to assess the hormonal changes in female patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods: Twenty female patients aged 20-40 years old (mean age 29 ΁ 5.6 years with a diagnosis of idiopathic DCMP with left ventricular ejection fraction [EF] <35% and a stable clinical course in the last 3 months were included in the study. All the patients were in New York Heart Association (NYHA Class II or III. All the patients underwent clinical evaluation followed by blood sampling for hormonal analysis. Blood was taken after overnight fasting and analyzed for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH, T3, T4, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, prolactin, insulin, parathyroid hormone (PTH, and 25 (OH Vitamin D. The results were compared with twenty age and sex matched controls. Results: The mean EF of the twenty patients was 24.4 ΁ 5.3% and duration of symptoms was 29.1 ΁ 24 months. Insulin growth factor 1 levels were significantly lower than normal. Fifty percent of the patients had levels lower than normal, but there was no correlation of IGF-I with NYHA class and EF. Testing of the thyroid hormones revealed that TSH levels were similar between patient and controls though 40% of the patients had elevated TSH levels. Of these patients, 5% (1 had hypothyroid. In addition to this, 10% (2 had isolated low T3, suggestive of the low T3 syndrome. None of the thyroid abnormalities showed a correlation with NYHA class or EF. All other hormone concentrations were comparable in both groups. Conclusion: In this cohort of female

  15. Presynaptic Ca2+-activated K+ channels in glutamatergic hippocampal terminals and their role in spike repolarization and regulation of transmitter release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, H; Shao, L R; Chavoshy, S; Gu, N; Trieb, M; Behrens, R; Laake, P; Pongs, O; Knaus, H G; Ottersen, O P; Storm, J F

    2001-12-15

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK, also called Maxi-K or Slo channels) are widespread in the vertebrate nervous system, but their functional roles in synaptic transmission in the mammalian brain are largely unknown. By combining electrophysiology and immunogold cytochemistry, we demonstrate the existence of functional BK channels in presynaptic terminals in the hippocampus and compare their functional roles in somata and terminals of CA3 pyramidal cells. Double-labeling immunogold analysis with BK channel and glutamate receptor antibodies indicated that BK channels are targeted to the presynaptic membrane facing the synaptic cleft in terminals of Schaffer collaterals in stratum radiatum. Whole-cell, intracellular, and field-potential recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells showed that the presynaptic BK channels are activated by calcium influx and can contribute to repolarization of the presynaptic action potential (AP) and negative feedback control of Ca(2+) influx and transmitter release. This was observed in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 40-100 microm), which broadened the presynaptic compound action potential. In contrast, the presynaptic BK channels did not contribute significantly to regulation of action potentials or transmitter release under basal experimental conditions, i.e., without 4-AP, even at high stimulation frequencies. This is unlike the situation in the parent cell bodies (CA3 pyramidal cells), where BK channels contribute strongly to action potential repolarization. These results indicate that the functional role of BK channels depends on their subcellular localization.

  16. Relationship between Ambient Fine Particles and Ventricular Repolarization Changes and Heart Rate Variability of Elderly People with Heart Disease in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Mei Mei; JIA Yu Ping; LI Guo Xing; LIU Li Qun; MO Yun Zheng; JIN Xiao Bin; PAN Xiao Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of particulate matters less than 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) on heart repolarization/depolarization and heart rate variability (HRV). Methods We conducted a panel study for elderly subjects with heart disease in Beijing from 2007 to 2008. PM2.5 was measured at a fixed station for 20 h continuously each day while electrocardiogram (ECG) indexes of 42 subjects were also recorded repeatedly. Meteorological data was obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System. A mixed linear regression model was used to estimate the associations between PM2.5 and the ECG indexes. The model was adjusted for age, body mass index, sex, day of the week and meteorology. Results Significant adverse effects of PM2.5 on ECG indexes reflecting HRV were observed statistically and the strongest effect of PM2.5 on HRV was on lag 1 day in our study. However, there were no associations between PM2.5 and ECG indexes reflecting heart repolarization/depolarization. Additionally, the effects of PM2.5 on subjects with hypertension were larger than on the subjects without hypertension. Conclusion This study showed ambient PM2.5 could affect cardiac autonomic function of the elderly people with heart disease, and subjects with hypertension appeared to be more susceptive to the autonomic dysfunction induced by PM2.5.

  17. Effects of acute intravenous administration of pentamidine, a typical hERG-trafficking inhibitor, on the cardiac repolarization process of halothane-anesthetized dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hirofumi; Nakamura, Yuji; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Nagayama, Yukitoshi; Hoshiai, Kiyotaka; Mitsumori, Yoshitaka; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2009-08-01

    Although acute treatment of pentamidine does not directly modify any ionic channel function in the heart at clinically relevant concentrations, its continuous exposure can prolong QT interval. Recent in vitro studies have indicated that hERG trafficking inhibition may play an important role in the onset of pentamidine-induced long QT syndrome. In this study, we examined acute in vivo electropharmacological effects of pentamidine using the halothane-anesthetized canine model (n = 5). The clinically relevant total dose of 4 mg/kg of pentamidine (namely, 1 mg/kg, i.v. over 10 min followed by 3 mg/kg, i.v. over 10 min with a pause of 20 min) decreased the mean blood pressure, ventricular contraction, preload to the left ventricle, and peripheral vascular resistance. Pentamidine also enhanced the atrioventricular conduction in parallel with its cardiohemodynamic actions, but it gradually prolonged both the ventricular repolarization period and effective refractory period, whereas no significant change was detected in the intraventricular conduction. Thus, acute administration of a clinically relevant dose of pentamidine can suppress cardiac function and vascular tone with reflex-mediated increase of sympathetic activity, whereas it may delay the repolarization process, suggesting that inhibition of potassium-channel trafficking might be induced more acutely in vivo than those previously expected in vitro.

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Umbilical Cord Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. These tests may include a detailed ultrasound, amniocentesis (to check for chromosomal abnormalities) and in some ... the provider may recommend additional tests, such as amniocentesis and a detailed ultrasound, to diagnose or rule ...

  19. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernyhough, Paul; Calcutt, Nigel A

    2010-02-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The central impact of both alterations of Ca2+ signalling at the plasma membrane and also intracellular Ca2+ handling on sensory neurone function is discussed and related to abnormal endoplasmic reticulum performance. We also present new data highlighting sub-optimal axonal Ca2+ signalling in diabetic neuropathy and discuss the putative role for this abnormality in the induction of axonal degeneration in peripheral neuropathies. The accumulating evidence implicating Ca2+ dysregulation in both painful and degenerative neuropathies, along with recent advances in understanding of regional variations in Ca2+ channel and pump structures, makes modulation of neuronal Ca2+ handling an increasingly viable approach for therapeutic interventions against the painful and degenerative aspects of many peripheral neuropathies.

  20. Binocular combination in abnormal binocular vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jian; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M

    2013-02-08

    We investigated suprathreshold binocular combination in humans with abnormal binocular visual experience early in life. In the first experiment we presented the two eyes with equal but opposite phase shifted sine waves and measured the perceived phase of the cyclopean sine wave. Normal observers have balanced vision between the two eyes when the two eyes' images have equal contrast (i.e., both eyes contribute equally to the perceived image and perceived phase = 0°). However, in observers with strabismus and/or amblyopia, balanced vision requires a higher contrast image in the nondominant eye (NDE) than the dominant eye (DE). This asymmetry between the two eyes is larger than predicted from the contrast sensitivities or monocular perceived contrast of the two eyes and is dependent on contrast and spatial frequency: more asymmetric with higher contrast and/or spatial frequency. Our results also revealed a surprising NDE-to-DE enhancement in some of our abnormal observers. This enhancement is not evident in normal vision because it is normally masked by interocular suppression. However, in these abnormal observers the NDE-to-DE suppression was weak or absent. In the second experiment, we used the identical stimuli to measure the perceived contrast of a cyclopean grating by matching the binocular combined contrast to a standard contrast presented to the DE. These measures provide strong constraints for model fitting. We found asymmetric interocular interactions in binocular contrast perception, which was dependent on both contrast and spatial frequency in the same way as in phase perception. By introducing asymmetric parameters to the modified Ding-Sperling model including interocular contrast gain enhancement, we succeeded in accounting for both binocular combined phase and contrast simultaneously. Adding binocular contrast gain control to the modified Ding-Sperling model enabled us to predict the results of dichoptic and binocular contrast discrimination experiments

  1. Memetics clarification of abnormal behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Biological medicine is hard to fully and scientifically explain the etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors; while, researches on philosophy and psychology (including memetics) are beneficial to better understand and explain etiological factor and pathogenesis of abnormal behaviors. At present, the theory of philosophy and psychology is to investigate the entity of abnormal behavior based on the views of memetics.METHODS: Abnormal behavior was researched in this study based on three aspects, including instinctive behavior disorder, poorly social-adapted behavior disorder and mental or body disease associated behavior disorder. Most main viewpoints of memetics were derived from "The Meme Machine", which was written by Susan Blackmore. When questions about abnormal behaviors induced by mental and psychological diseases and conduct disorder of teenagers were discussed, some researching achievements which were summarized by authors previously were added in this study, such as aggressive behaviors, pathologically aggressive behaviors, etc.RESULTS: The abnormal behaviors mainly referred to a part of people's substandard behaviors which were not according with the realistic social environment, culture background and the pathologic behaviors resulted from people's various psychological diseases. According to the theory of "meme", it demonstrated that the relevant behavioral obstacles of various psychological diseases, for example, the unusual behavior of schizophrenia, were caused, because the old meme was destroyed thoroughly but the new meme was unable to establish; psychoneurosis and personality disorder were resulted in hard establishment of meme; the behavioral obstacles which were ill-adapted to society, for example, various additional and homosexual behaviors, were because of the selfish replications and imitations of "additional meme" and "homosexual meme"; various instinct behavioral and congenital intelligent obstacles were not significance

  2. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  3. Thyroid abnormality in perimenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanna Byna

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: AUB is a common but complicated clinical presentation and occurs in 15-20% of women between menarche to menopause and significantly affects the women's health. Women with thyroid dysfunction often have menstrual irregularities, infertility and increased morbidity during pregnancy. The objective of present study is to find the correlation between thyroid disorders and AUB in perimenopausal women attending gynecology OPD. Methods: In the present study, fifty five patients with AUB were included and were evaluated for the cause including thyroid abnormality. Thyroid function tests were done in all patients. Results: Among 55 patients, 12 patients were diagnosed as hypothyroidism and 7 as hyperthyroidism, women with AUB 36 (65.4% were euthyroid. Among 19 women with thyroid abnormality, heavy menstrual bleeding was seen in 8 (42% women, 6 (31.57% had polymenorrhagia, 5 (26.31% had oligomenorrhoea. The frequent menstrual abnormality in women with hypothyroidism (12 women was heavy menstrual bleeding in 5 (41.6% women, 3 (25% had oligomennorhoea, 4 (33.3% had polymenorrhagia. Out of 7 women with hyperthyroidism, 2 (28.57% had oligomenorrhoea, 3 (42.8% had heavy menstrual bleeding, 2 (28.57% had polymenorrhagia. In a total of 55 patients with AUB, 11 (20% had structural abnormalities in uterus and ovaries. 5 (9% had adenomyosis, 3 (5.4% had ovarian cysts, 3 (5.4% had fibroids. Conclusions: It is important to screen all women for thyroid abnormality who are presenting with AUB especially with non-structural causes of AUB. Correction of thyroid abnormalities also relieves AUB. This will avoid unnecessary hormonal treatment and surgery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(11.000: 3250-3253

  4. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Variations in uterine bleeding, termed abnormal uterine bleeding, occur commonly among women and often are physiologic in nature with no significant consequences. However, abnormal uterine bleeding can cause significant distress to women or may signify an underlying pathologic condition. Most women experience variations in menstrual and perimenstrual bleeding in their lifetimes; therefore, the ability of the midwife to differentiate between normal and abnormal bleeding is a key diagnostic skill. A comprehensive history and use of the PALM-COEIN classification system will provide clear guidelines for clinical management, evidence-based treatment, and an individualized plan of care. The purpose of this Clinical Bulletin is to define and describe classifications of abnormal uterine bleeding, review updated terminology, and identify methods of assessment and treatment using a woman-centered approach.

  5. The significance of ultrastructural abnormalities of human cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, B; Bull, T B; Makey, A R; Rawbone, R

    1981-12-01

    The electronmicroscopic structure of cilia was studied from the inferior turbinate of the nose in 22 adults, and in 84 biopsies from the bronchial tree of 40 adults. The incidence of compound cilia and abnormal microtubular structures was assessed. There were significant variations in the incidence of abnormalities in different parts of the airways and even within different areas of the same electronmicroscopic section. The focal nature of differences in structure of cilia indicate that abnormalities found in a single biopsy do not necessarily reflect a generalized change in the bronchial tree. Thus, such a finding should not be used as evidence that the abnormalities of cilia are the cause of decrease in mucociliary clearance or that they play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchiectasis and sinusitis.

  6. Unsupervised abnormality detection using saliency and Retinex based color enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeba, Farah; Mohammed, Shahed K; Bui, Francis M; Wahid, Khan A

    2016-08-01

    An efficient and automated abnormality detection method can significantly reduce the burden of screening of the enormous visual information resulting from capsule endoscopic procedure. As a pre-processing stage, color enhancement could be useful to improve the image quality and the detection performance. Therefore, in this paper, we have proposed a two-stage automated abnormality detection algorithm. In the first stage, an adaptive color enhancement method based on Retinex theory is applied on the endoscopic images. In the second stage, an efficient salient region detection algorithm is applied to detect the clinically significant regions. The proposed algorithm is applied on a dataset containing images with diverse pathologies. The algorithm can successfully detect a significant percentage of the abnormal regions. From our experiment, it was evident that color enhancement method improves the performance of abnormality detection. The proposed algorithm can achieve a sensitivity of 97.33% and specificity of 79%, higher than state-of-the-art performance.

  7. Kidney transplantation in abnormal bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi K Mishra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural urologic abnormalities resulting in dysfunctional lower urinary tract leading to end stage renal disease may constitute 15% patients in the adult population and up to 20-30% in the pediatric population. A patient with an abnormal bladder, who is approaching end stage renal disease, needs careful evaluation of the lower urinary tract to plan the most satisfactory technical approach to the transplant procedure. Past experience of different authors can give an insight into the management and outcome of these patients. This review revisits the current literature available on transplantation in abnormal bladder and summarizes the clinical approach towards handling this group of difficult transplant patients. We add on our experience as we discuss the various issues. The outcome of renal transplant in abnormal bladder is not adversely affected when done in a reconstructed bladder. Correct preoperative evaluation, certain technical modification during transplant and postoperative care is mandatory to avoid complications. Knowledge of the abnormal bladder should allow successful transplantation with good outcome.

  8. Abnormal insulin levels and vertigo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, C A

    1981-10-01

    Fifty patients with unexplained vertigo (36) or lightheadedness (14) are evaluated, all of whom had abnormal ENGs and normal audiograms. Five hour insulin glucose tolerance tests were performance on all patients, with insulin levels being obtained fasting and at one-half, one, two, and three hours. The results of this investigation were remarkable. Borderline or abnormal insulin levels were discovered in 82% of patients; 90% were found to have either an abnormal glucose tolerance test or at least borderline insulin levels. The response to treatment in these dizzy patients was also startling, with appropriate low carbohydrate diets improving the patient's symptoms in 90% of cases. It is, therefore, apparent that the earliest identification of carbohydrate imbalance with an insulin glucose tolerance test is extremely important in the work-up of the dizzy patients.

  9. Drug-induced Inhibition and Trafficking Disruption of ion Channels: Pathogenesis of QT Abnormalities and Drug-induced Fatal Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Luigi X

    2016-01-01

    Risk of severe and fatal ventricular arrhythmias, presenting as Torsade de Pointes (TdP), is increased in congenital and acquired forms of long QT syndromes (LQTS). Drug-induced inhibition of K+ currents, IKs, IKr, IK1, and/or Ito, delay repolarization, prolong QT, and increase the risk of TdP. Drug-induced interference with IKr is the most common cause of acquired LQTS/TdP. Multiple drugs bind to KNCH2-hERG-K+ channels affecting IKr, including antiarrythmics, antibiotics, antivirals, azole-antifungals, antimalarials, anticancer, antiemetics, prokinetics, antipsychotics, and antidepressants. Azithromycin has been recently added to this list. In addition to direct channel inhibition, some drugs interfere with the traffic of channels from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell membrane, decreasing mature channel membrane density; e.g., pentamidine, geldalamicin, arsenic trioxide, digoxin, and probucol. Other drugs, such as ketoconazole, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, citalopram, escitalopram, donepezil, tamoxifen, endoxifen, atazanavir, and roxitromycin, induce both direct channel inhibition and impaired channel trafficking. Although many drugs prolong the QT interval, TdP is a rare event. The following conditions increase the risk of drug-induced TdP: a) Disease states/electrolyte levels (heart failure, structural cardiac disease, bradycardia, hypokalemia); b) Pharmacogenomic variables (presence of congenital LQTS, subclinical ion-channel mutations, history of or having a relative with history of drug-induced long QT/TdP); c) Pharmacodynamic and kinetic factors (high doses, women, elderly, metabolism inhibitors, combining two or more QT prolonging drugs, drugs that prolong the QT and increase QT dispersion, and drugs with multiple actions on ion channels). Because most of these conditions are preventable, careful evaluation of risk factors and increased knowledge of drug use associated with repolarization abnormalities are strongly recommended.

  10. Kv2 channel regulation of action potential repolarization and firing patterns in superior cervical ganglion neurons and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pin W; Bean, Bruce P

    2014-04-02

    Kv2 family "delayed-rectifier" potassium channels are widely expressed in mammalian neurons. Kv2 channels activate relatively slowly and their contribution to action potential repolarization under physiological conditions has been unclear. We explored the function of Kv2 channels using a Kv2-selective blocker, Guangxitoxin-1E (GxTX-1E). Using acutely isolated neurons, mixed voltage-clamp and current-clamp experiments were done at 37°C to study the physiological kinetics of channel gating and action potentials. In both rat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons and mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E produced near-saturating block of a component of current typically constituting ∼60-80% of the total delayed-rectifier current. GxTX-1E also reduced A-type potassium current (IA), but much more weakly. In SCG neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes and voltage clamp experiments using action potential waveforms showed that Kv2 channels carry ∼55% of the total outward current during action potential repolarization despite activating relatively late in the spike. In CA1 neurons, 100 nm GxTX-1E broadened spikes evoked from -70 mV, but not -80 mV, likely reflecting a greater role of Kv2 when other potassium channels were partially inactivated at -70 mV. In both CA1 and SCG neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels produced dramatic depolarization of interspike voltages during repetitive firing. In CA1 neurons and some SCG neurons, this was associated with increased initial firing frequency. In all neurons, inhibition of Kv2 channels depressed maintained firing because neurons entered depolarization block more readily. Therefore, Kv2 channels can either decrease or increase neuronal excitability depending on the time scale of excitation.

  11. Cardiac abnormalities after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilt, I.A.C. van der

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage(aSAH) is a devastating neurological disease. During the course of the aSAH several neurological and medical complications may occur. Cardiac abnormalities after aSAH are observed often and resemble stress cardiomyopathy or Tako-tsubo cardiomyopathy(Broken Heart Syn

  12. Congenital abnormalities in methylmercury poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilani, S.H.

    1975-04-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the teratogenic potential of methylmercury on chick embryogenesis. Methylmercuric chloride was dissolved in sodium bicarbonate (0.2%) and administered to the chick embryos at doses ranging from 0.0009 to 0.010 mg per egg. The injections were made at days 2 and 3 on incubation (Groups A and B). All the embryos including controls were examined on the 7th day of incubation. Methylmercury poisoning was observed to be both embryolethal and teratogenic. Within the two groups, embryolethality was higher in Group A. The following congenital abnormalities were observed: exencephaly, shortened and twisted limbs, microphthalmia, shortened and twisted neck, beak abnormalities, everted viscera, reduced body size and hemorrhage all over the body. Exencephaly and limb abnormalities were very common. No differences in the incidence and types of gross abnormalities within both the groups (A and B) were noted. The incidence of malformations among the controls was low. The results of present investigation show that methylmercury poisoning is both embryolethal and teratogenic to early chick embryogenesis. (auth)

  13. Mechanisms and consequences of paternally transmitted chromosomal abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Wyrobek, A J

    2005-04-05

    Paternally transmitted chromosomal damage has been associated with pregnancy loss, developmental and morphological defects, infant mortality, infertility, and genetic diseases in the offspring including cancer. There is epidemiological evidence linking paternal exposure to occupational or environmental agents with an increased risk of abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also a large body of literature on germ cell mutagenesis in rodents showing that treatment of male germ cells with mutagens has dramatic consequences on reproduction producing effects such as those observed in human epidemiological studies. However, we know very little about the etiology, transmission and early embryonic consequences of paternally-derived chromosomal abnormalities. The available evidence suggests that: (1) there are distinct patterns of germ cell-stage differences in the sensitivity of induction of transmissible genetic damage with male postmeiotic cells being the most sensitive; (2) cytogenetic abnormalities at first metaphase after fertilization are critical intermediates between paternal exposure and abnormal reproductive outcomes; and, (3) there are maternally susceptibility factors that may have profound effects on the amount of sperm DNA damage that is converted into chromosomal aberrations in the zygote and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes.

  14. Nail abnormalities in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, C; Cribier, B; Sibilia, J; Kuntz, J L; Grosshans, E

    1997-12-01

    Many nail abnormalities have traditionally been described in association with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but their specificity has never been assessed in a controlled study. Our purpose was to evaluate the frequency and the specificity of nail changes associated with RA in a case-controlled study including 50 patients suffering from RA and 50 controls. For each patient, a general skin examination was performed and the 20 nails were examined. The nail features were noted and classified. A chi 2 test or a Fisher test was used to compare the two groups. The only nail abnormalities significantly associated with RA were longitudinal ridging on nine or 10 finger nails (29 patients in the RA group vs. three in the controls, chi 2: P nail (24 patients vs. 10, chi 2: P nail changes were noticed but were not frequent enough to be significant. The presence of longitudinal ridging on the finger nails was significantly associated with RA.

  15. Mastoid abnormalities in Down syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.B.J.; Yousefzadeh, D.K.; Roizen, N.J.

    1989-06-01

    Hearing loss and otitis media are commonly associated with Down syndrome. Hypoplasia of the mastoids is seen in many affected children and sclerosis of mastoid bones is not uncommon in Down syndrome. Awareness and early recognition of mastoid abnormality may lead to appropriate and timely therapy, thereby preserving the child's hearing or compensating for hearing loss; factors which are important for learning and maximum development.

  16. Computed tomography of thymic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnyder, P.; Candardjis, G.

    1987-05-01

    Computed tomographic examinations of 38 patients with surgically and histologically proven diagnosis were reviewed. Twenty subjects (52%) had an invasive thymoma and 16% an hyperplastic thymus. Myasthenia gravis was present in 6 cases (16%) of thymic abnormalities, four (10,5%) with invasive thymoma and two (5%) with thymic hyperplasia. Graves' disease was also present in one case of thymic hyperplasia. We emphasize the contribution of CT to the diagnosis and the prognosis.

  17. Global white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia: A multisite diffusion tensor imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J.H. White (Tonya)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Emerging evidence implicates white matter (WM) abnormalities in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, there is considerable heterogeneity in the presentation of WM abnormalities in the existing studies. The object of this study was to evaluate WM integrity in a large

  18. Low-set ears and pinna abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low-set ears; Microtia; "Lop" ear; Pinna abnormalities; Genetic defect-pinna; Congenital defect-pinna ... conditions: Abnormal folds or location of the pinna Low-set ears No opening to the ear canal ...

  19. Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Relationship among sera lipoprotein abnormalities in healthy individuals with background of diabetic sibling. ... As the prevalence of lipoprotein abnormalities in adolescents is increasing dramatically, the identification of ... Article Metrics.

  20. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ187 GYNECOLOGIC PROBLEMS Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results • What is cervical cancer screening? • What causes abnormal cervical cancer screening test results? • ...

  1. [Phenomenology of abnormal body perceptions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M L

    1983-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problematic nature of the phenomenological grasping of the consciousness of the body and its pathological modifications. The reasoning is oriented by the doctrine of Husserl of the so-called sentiments as the fundamentals of the experience of the own body. This basic approach does not only seem to be basically for a psychology of the consciousness of the body, but also to give the theoretical-conceptual structure for a great number of psychopathological modifications. Subsequent to a criticism of the conventional use of the term 'hallucination of the body' we attempt to chart elements of a scheme of the abnormal consciousness of the body.

  2. Foot abnormalities of wild birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, C.M.; Locke, L.N.; Clark, G.M.

    1962-01-01

    The various foot abnormalities that occur in birds, including pox, scaly-leg, bumble-foot, ergotism and freezing are reviewed. In addition, our findings at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center include pox from dove, mockingbird, cowbird, grackle and several species of sparrows. Scaly-leg has been particularly prevalent on icterids. Bumble foot has been observed in a whistling swan and in a group of captive woodcock. Ergotism is reported from a series of captive Canada geese from North Dakota. Several drug treatments recommended by others are presented.

  3. Hematological abnormalities in adult patients with Down's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McLean, S

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding hematological abnormalities in adults with Down\\'s syndrome (DS). AIMS: We aimed to characterize hematological abnormalities in adult patients with DS and determine their long-term significance. METHODS: We retrospectively studied a cohort of nine DS patients referred to the adult hematology service in our institution between May 2001 and April 2008. Data collected were: full blood count (FBC), comorbidities, investigations performed, duration of follow-up and outcome to most recent follow-up. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 26 months (9-71). Of the nine patients, two had myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) at presentation. Of these, one progressed, with increasing marrow failure, and requiring support with transfusions and gCSF. The remaining eight patients, with a variety of hematological abnormalities including leukopenia, macrocytosis, and thrombocytopenia, had persistently abnormal FBCs. However there was no evidence of progression, and no patient has evolved to acute myeloid leukemia (AML). CONCLUSIONS: MDS is a complication of DS and may require supportive therapy. However, minor hematological abnormalities are common in adult DS patients, and may not signify underlying marrow disease.

  4. Antiepileptic drug regimens and major congenital abnormalities in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrén, E B; van Duijn, C M; Christiaens, G C; Hofman, A; Lindhout, D

    1999-11-01

    To assess the risk of major congenital abnormalities associated with specific antiepileptic drug regimens, a large retrospective cohort study was performed. The study comprised 1,411 children born between 1972 and 1992 in four provinces in The Netherlands who were born to mothers with epilepsy and using antiepileptic drugs during the first trimester of pregnancy, and 2,000 nonepileptic matched controls. We found significantly increased risks of major congenital abnormalities for carbamazepine and valproate monotherapy, with evidence for a significant dose-response relationship for valproate. The risk of major congenital abnormalities was nonsignificantly increased for phenobarbital monotherapy when caffeine comedication was excluded, but a significant increase in risk was found when caffeine was included. Phenytoin monotherapy was not associated with an increased risk of major congenital abnormalities. Regarding polytherapy regimens, increased risks were found for several antiepileptic drug combinations. Clonazepam, in combination with other antiepileptic drugs, showed a significantly increased relative risk. Furthermore, there were significantly increased relative risks for the combination of carbamazepine and valproate and the combination of phenobarbital and caffeine with other antiepileptic drugs. This study shows that most antiepileptic drug regimens were associated with an increased risk of major congenital abnormalities in the offspring, in particular valproate (dose-response relationship) and carbamazepine monotherapy, benzodiazepines in polytherapy, and caffeine comedication in combinations with phenobarbital.

  5. On Regularity of Abnormal Subriemannian Geodesics

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Kanghai

    2012-01-01

    We prove the smoothness of abnormal minimizers of subriemannian manifolds of step 3 with a nilpotent basis. We prove that rank 2 Carnot groups of step 4 admit no strictly abnormal minimizers. For any subriemannian manifolds of step less than 7, we show all abnormal minimizers have no corner type singularities, which partly generalize the main result of Leonardi-Monti.

  6. Abnormal visuomotor processing in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siân E. Robson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtle disturbances of visual and motor function are known features of schizophrenia and can greatly impact quality of life; however, few studies investigate these abnormalities using simple visuomotor stimuli. In healthy people, electrophysiological data show that beta band oscillations in sensorimotor cortex decrease during movement execution (event-related beta desynchronisation (ERBD, then increase above baseline for a short time after the movement (post-movement beta rebound (PMBR; whilst in visual cortex, gamma oscillations are increased throughout stimulus presentation. In this study, we used a self-paced visuomotor paradigm and magnetoencephalography (MEG to contrast these responses in patients with schizophrenia and control volunteers. We found significant reductions in the peak-to-peak change in amplitude from ERBD to PMBR in schizophrenia compared with controls. This effect was strongest in patients who made fewer movements, whereas beta was not modulated by movement in controls. There was no significant difference in the amplitude of visual gamma between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that clear abnormalities in basic sensorimotor processing in schizophrenia can be observed using a very simple MEG paradigm.

  7. Chromosomal phenotypes and submicroscopic abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devriendt Koen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The finding, during the last decade, that several common, clinically delineated syndromes are caused by submicroscopic deletions or, more rarely, by duplications, has provided a powerful tool in the annotation of the human genome. Since most microdeletion/microduplication syndromes are defined by a common deleted/duplicated region, abnormal dosage of genes located within these regions can explain the phenotypic similarities among individuals with a specific syndrome. As such, they provide a unique resource towards the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes such as congenital heart defects, mental and growth retardation and abnormal behaviour. In addition, the study of phenotypic differences in individuals with the same microdeletion syndrome may also become a treasury for the identification of modifying factors for complex phenotypes. The molecular analysis of these chromosomal anomalies has led to a growing understanding of their mechanisms of origin. Novel tools to uncover additional submicroscopic chromosomal anomalies at a higher resolution and higher speed, as well as the novel tools at hand for deciphering the modifying factors and epistatic interactors, are 'on the doorstep' and will, besides their obvious diagnostic role, play a pivotal role in the genetic dissection of complex phenotypes.

  8. IQGAP and mitotic exit network (MEN) proteins are required for cytokinesis and re-polarization of the actin cytoskeleton in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Mark; Xiong, Yulan; Boyne, James R; Wright, Daniel J; Munro, Ewen; Price, Clive

    2006-11-01

    In budding yeast the final stages of the cell division cycle, cytokinesis and cell separation, are distinct events that require to be coupled, both together and with mitotic exit. Here we demonstrate that mutations in genes of the mitotic exit network (MEN) prevent cell separation and are synthetically lethal in combination with both cytokinesis and septation defective mutations. Analysis of the synthetic lethal phenotypes reveals that Iqg1p functions in combination with the MEN components, Tem1p, Cdc15p Dbf20p and Dbf2p to govern the re-polarization of the actin cytoskeleton to either side of the bud neck. In addition phosphorylation of the conserved PCH protein, Hof1p, is dependent upon these activities and requires actin ring assembly. Recruitment of Dbf2p to the bud neck is dependent upon actin ring assembly and correlates with Hof1p phosphorylation. Failure to phosphorylate Hof1p results in the increased stability of the protein and its persistence at the bud neck. These data establish a mechanistic dependency of cell separation upon an intermediate step requiring actomyosin ring assembly.

  9. Experimental Study of the Effect of Autonomic Nervous System on the Transmural Dispersion of Ventricular Repolarization under Acute Myocardial Ischemia in Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张存泰; 徐大文; 李泱; 刘念; 钟江华; 王琳; 陆再英

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The effect of the autonomic nerves on the transmural dispersion of ventricular repolariza tion (TDR) under acute myocardial ischemia in intact canine was investigated. Using the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of the epicardium (Epi), midmyocardium (Mid) and endocardium (Endo) were recorded simultaneously by specially designed plunge-needle electrodes at the left ventricular free wall under acute myocardial ischemia in 12 open-chest dogs.MAPD90 and TDR among three myocardial layers as well as the incidence of the early afterdepolar ization (EAD) before autonomic nervous stimulation and during autonomic nervous stimulation were compared. It was found that 10 min after acute myocardial I~hemia, TDR was increased from 55±8.ms to 86± 15 ms during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01). The TDR (53± 9 ms) during parasympathetic stimulation was not significantly different from that of the control (55±8 ms) (P>0.05). The EAD was elicited in the Mid of 2 dogs (16 %) 10 min after acute myocardial ischemia,but the EAD were elicited in the Mid of 7 dogs (58 %) during sympathetic stimulation (P<0. 01).It was concluded that: (1) Sympathetic stimulation can increase the transmural dispersion of repolari zation and induce early afterdepolarizations in the Mid under acute myocardial ischemia, which pro-vide the opportunity for the ventricular arrhythmia developing; (2) Parasympathetic stimulation has no significant effect on the transmural dispersion of repolarization under myocardial ischemia.

  10. The Effects of Nicorandil and Nifekalant, Which Were Injected into the Pericardial Space, for Transmural Dispersion of Repolarization in the Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Ito, MD

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some studies have reported that transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR is involved in the onset of ventricular arrhythmia. We investigated the effects of nicorandil (NIC and nifekalant (NIF injected into the pericardial space, on TDR and T waves in the pig. Methods and Results: We injected NIC 4 or 8 mg and NIF 50 or 100 mg at intervals into the pericardial space for eleven pigs. The effects of these drugs were investigated on the effective refractory period (ERP between the endocardial and epicardial myocardial cells, as well as on QT time, QT peak-end (QTcpe as an index of TDR, and T waveforms, respectively. QTcpe increased from 91 ± 21 to 116 ± 19 msec, 2.8 min after injection of NIC (p < 0.01, although corrected QT (QTc interval did not changed. But 5.5 min after injection, QTc decreased while QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude significantly increased, and epicardium ERP decreased. When NIF was injected, TDR decreased from 55 ± 10 msec to 44 ± 8 msec (p < 0.01 although QTc did not change. In a later phase, QTc increased (p < 0.01 and QTcpe recovered. T wave amplitude rapidly decreased and became negative. Conclusion: Injected into the pericardial space, NIC and NIF brought about certain changes in ERP, QT and T waveform. Furthermore, NIC increased TDR while NIF decreased TDR.

  11. CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH RECURRENT MISCARRIAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mierla

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are involved in the etiology of recurrent spontaneous pregnancy loss and sub-fertility. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and contribution of chromosomal abnormalities in recurrent miscarriages. The results obtained and literature review are helpful in understanding the importance of cytogenetics analysis of female infertility. To investigate the distribution of chromosomal abnormalities in the Romanian population with recurrent miscarriage, karyotype analysis by G-banding was performed from peripheral blood in 967 women infertility. Results: Chromosomal abnormalities were found to 79 women (8,17%. The percentage of chromosomal abnormalities in the studied population correlates with the data in the literature. Chromosomal abnormalities could play the important role in etiology of infertility and are more frequently detected in this group of patients compared to general population. In the infertile couples balanced chromosomal abnormalities are the main cause of spontaneous abortions.

  12. The prospective role of abnormal methyl metabolism in cadmium toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Poirier, Lionel A; Vlasova, Tatyana I

    2002-01-01

    Several lines of evidence point to the probable role of abnormal methylation processes in the toxicology of metals and other xenobiotics. The spectrum of toxic effects exhibited by such metals as Ni, As, and Cd, as well as by Zn deficiency, often resemble those seen in animals chronically fed methyl-deficient diets. These metal-associated pathologies include cancer, atherosclerosis, birth defects, neurological disturbances, and pancreatic lesions. In addition, each of the above agents has bee...

  13. Treatments for Biomedical Abnormalities Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Eugene Frye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies point to the effectiveness of novel treatments that address physiological abnormalities associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. This is significant because safe and effective treatments for ASD remain limited. These physiological abnormalities as well as studies addressing treatments of these abnormalities are reviewed in this article. Treatments commonly used to treat mitochondrial disease have been found to improve both core and associated ASD symptoms. Double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have investigated L-carnitine and a multivitamin containing B vitamins, antioxidants, vitamin E, and coenzyme Q10 while non-blinded studies have investigated ubiquinol. Controlled and uncontrolled studies using folinic acid, a reduced form of folate, have reported marked improvements in core and associated ASD symptoms in some children with ASD and folate related pathways abnormities. Treatments that could address redox metabolism abnormalities include methylcobalamin with and without folinic acid in open-label studies and vitamin C and N-acetyl-L-cysteine in double-blind, placebo-controlled studies. These studies have reported improved core and associated symptoms with these treatments. Lastly, both open-label and double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have reported improvement in core and associated ASD symptoms with tetrahydrobiopterin. Overall, these treatments were generally well tolerated without significant adverse effects for most children, although we review the reported adverse effects in detail. This review provides evidence for potential safe and effective treatments for core and associated symptoms of ASD that target underlying known physiological abnormalities associated with ASD. Further research is needed to define subgroups of children with ASD in which these treatments may be most effective as well as confirm their efficacy in double-blind, placebo-controlled, large-scale multicenter studies.

  14. Salivary abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, S.; Poshva, C. [Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Although abnormal saliva is a well documented finding in PWS, little is known about the saliva in these individuals. We have recently undertaken a study to characterize the salivary composition from PW patients and to see if there is any correlation with their underlying molecular diagnosis (deletion vs. disomy). We have collected whole saliva on 3 patients; 2 had normal high-resolution karyotype analysis (Cases 1 & 3) and 1 had a deletion of 15q11q13 (Case 3). For all parameters, Case 3`s values were notably different from those of his unaffected sibling. The salivary flow rates and concentrations for all 3 PW patients are similar and are significantly different from normal controls (mean {plus_minus} SE) (p<0.05). Although this data is from only 3 PW patients, it provides valuable information. First, decreased flow appears to be due to an effect of PWS and not medications since Cases 2 & 3 are not on any medications. Second, decreased flow appears to be present in younger as well as older individuals. Third, deviations from normal in the salivary composition are evident. It is possible that these alterations are concentration effects relative to a decrease in flow rate. We are currently obtaining saliva from more PW individuals to see if these alterations are present in all PW patients and whether they can be applied as a screening test.

  15. Semen abnormalities with SSRI antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of widespread use, the adverse effect profile of "selective" serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants has still not been fully elucidated. Studies in male animals have shown delayed sexual development and reduced fertility. Three prospective cohort studies conducted in over one hundred patients exposed to an SSRI for periods ranging from 5 weeks to 24 months found altered semen param-eters after as little as 3 months of exposure: reduced sperm concentration, reduced sperm motility, a higher percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, and increased levels of sperm DNA fragmentation. One clinical trial showed growth retardation in children considered depressed who were exposed to SSRls. SSRls may have endocrine disrupting properties. Dapoxetine is a short-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is chemically related to fluoxetine and marketed in the European Union for men complaining of premature ejaculation. But the corresponding European summary of product characteristics does not mention any effects on fertility. In practice, based on the data available as of mid-2014, the effects of SSRI exposure on male fertility are unclear. However, it is a risk that should be taken into account and pointed out to male patients who would like to father a child or who are experiencing fertility problems.

  16. Hemostatic abnormalities in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendal YALÇIN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 44 patients with liver cirrhosis were investigated for hemostatic parameters. Patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatorenal syndrome and cholestatic liver diseases were excluded. Patients were classified by Child-Pugh criterion and according to this 4 patients were in Class A, 20 in Class B and 20 in C. Regarding to these results, it was aimed to investigate the haematological disturbances in liver cirrhotic patients.In the result there was a correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time, serum iron, ferritin, transferrin, haptoglobin and Child-Pugh classification. Besides there was no correlation between prothrombin time, factor 8 and 9, protein C and S, anti-thrombin 3, fibrinogen, fibrin degradation products, serum iron binding capacity, hemoglobin, leukocyte, mean corpuscular volume and Child-Pugh classification.There were significant difference, in terms of AST, ferritin, haptoglobulin, sex and presence of ascites between groups (p0.05. In the summary, we have found correlation between hemostatic abnormalities and disease activity and clinical prognosis in patients with liver cirrhosis which is important in the management of these patients. This is also important for identification of liver transplant candidiates earlier.

  17. Association of MTHFR Polymorphisms and Chromosomal Abnormalities in Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thivaratana Sinthuwiwat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in MTHFR gene might explain the interindividual differences in the reduction of DNA repaired and the increase of chromosome breakage and damage. Nowadays, chromosomal rearrangement is recognized as a major cause of lymphoid malignancies. In addition, the association of MTHFR polymorphisms with aneuploidy was found in several studies, making the MTHFR gene as a good candidate for leukemia etiology. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the common sequence variation, 677C>T and 1298A>C in the MTHFR gene of 350 fixed cell specimens archived after chromosome analysis. The distribution of the MTHFR polymorphisms frequency was compared in leukemic patients with structural chromosome abnormality and chromosome aneuploidy, as well as in those with no evidence of chromosome abnormalities. We observed a significant decrease in the distribution of T allele in 677C>T polymorphisms among patients with chromosomal abnormalities including both structural aberration and aneuploidy. The same significance result also found in patients with structural aberration when compare with the normal karyotype patients. Suggesting that polymorphism in the MTHFR gene was involved in chromosome abnormalities of leukemia. However, further investigation on the correlation with the specific types of chromosomal aberrations is needed.

  18. Gray matter volumetric abnormalities associated with the onset of psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wi Hoon eJung

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with psychosis display structural brain abnormalities in multiple brain regions. The disorder is characterized by a putative prodromal period called ultra-high-risk (UHR status, which precedes the onset of full-blown psychotic symptoms. Recent studies on psychosis have focused on this period. Neuroimaging studies of UHR individuals for psychosis have revealed that the structural brain changes observed during the established phases of the disorder are already evident prior to the onset of the illness. Moreover, certain brain regions show extremely dynamic changes during the transition to psychosis. These neurobiological features may be used as prognostic and predictive biomarkers for psychosis. With advances in neuroimaging techniques, neuroimaging studies focusing on gray matter abnormalities provide new insights into the pathophysiology of psychosis, as well as new treatment strategies. Some of these novel approaches involve antioxidants administration, because it is suggested that this treatment may delay the progression of UHR to a full-blown psychosis and prevent progressive structural changes. The present review includes an update on the most recent developments in early intervention strategies for psychosis and potential therapeutic treatments for schizophrenia. First, we provide the basic knowledge of the brain regions associated with structural abnormalities in individuals at UHR. Next, we discuss the feasibility on the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI-biomarkers in clinical practice. Then, we describe potential etiopathological mechanisms underlying structural brain abnormalities in prodromal psychosis. Finally, we discuss the potentials and limitations related to neuroimaging studies in individuals at UHR.

  19. Abnormalities in eelpout Zoarces viviparus upon chemical exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brande-Lavridsen, Nanna; Korsgaard, Bodil; Dahllöf, Ingela; Strand, Jakob; Tairova, Zhanna; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2013-12-01

    Elevated frequencies of abnormal embryos in female eelpout Zoarces viviparus have been demonstrated in Danish, Swedish and German monitoring programmes at certain geographic locations with high levels of anthropogenic input. Pollutants present in areas with high malformation frequencies were selected and tested in a controlled laboratory experiment for their potential to induce abnormalities among eelpout embryos upon injection into pregnant eelpout. Tributyltin, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin, pyrene, nonylphenol, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromophenylether and heptadecafluorooctanesulfonic acid were tested, either individually or combined. Generally, the chemicals were transferred to eggs and/or embryos. Some of the exposures increased the proportion of broods with more than 10% abnormal or 5% malformed embryos, although the average percentages of abnormal development were not affected. Spinal, cranial and eye deformities were evident, similarly to what is seen in nature. Some of the exposures resulted in increased percentages of females with as well a low reproductive capacity as embryos with a low condition index.

  20. Kv4 potassium channel subunits control action potential repolarization and frequency-dependent broadening in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyun; Wei, Dong-Sheng; Hoffman, Dax A

    2005-11-15

    A-type potassium channels regulate neuronal firing frequency and the back-propagation of action potentials (APs) into dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Recent molecular cloning studies have found several families of voltage-gated K(+) channel genes expressed in the mammalian brain. At present, information regarding the relationship between the protein products of these genes and the various neuronal functions performed by voltage-gated K(+) channels is lacking. Here we used a combination of molecular, electrophysiological and imaging techniques to show that one such gene, Kv4.2, controls AP half-width, frequency-dependent AP broadening and dendritic action potential propagation. Using a modified Sindbis virus, we expressed either the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-tagged Kv4.2 or an EGFP-tagged dominant negative mutant of Kv4.2 (Kv4.2g(W362F)) in CA1 pyramidal neurones of organotypic slice cultures. Neurones expressing Kv4.2g(W362F) displayed broader action potentials with an increase in frequency-dependent AP broadening during a train compared with control neurones. In addition, Ca(2)(+) imaging of Kv4.2g(W362F) expressing dendrites revealed enhanced AP back-propagation compared to control neurones. Conversely, neurones expressing an increased A-type current through overexpression of Kv4.2 displayed narrower APs with less frequency dependent broadening and decreased dendritic propagation. These results point to Kv4.2 as the major contributor to the A-current in hippocampal CA1 neurones and suggest a prominent role for Kv4.2 in regulating AP shape and dendritic signalling. As Ca(2)(+) influx occurs primarily during AP repolarization, Kv4.2 activity can regulate cellular processes involving Ca(2)(+)-dependent second messenger cascades such as gene expression and synaptic plasticity.

  1. 早期复极综合征与特发性室颤及猝死%Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden death associated with early repolarization syndrome.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈漠水

    2011-01-01

    Early repolarization syndrome (ERS) is a well-recognized idiopathic electrocardiographic phenomenon characterized by prominent J wave and a positive large T wave and ST-segment elevation, concave to the top, predominantly in left precordial (V3~V6 ) leads. It was generally thought that ERS is benign, but recently a growing number of case reports indicate that in some instances, ERS repeatedly induces idiopathic ventricular fibrillation which causes sudden death, suggesting that ERS is associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden death.However, the mechanism of its arrhythmogenic potential still remains unknown. Therefore, patients with ERS who have chest pain, unexplained syncope or other symptoms and at high risks of family history of sudden death should be automatically transferred implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) to improve the prognosis. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning ERS associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden death.%早期复极综合征(ERS)是一种以心电图上表现为J波增大或J点抬高,胸前导联V3-V6弓背向下的ST段抬高和高大而直立的T波的特征性的心电改变,通常认为是一种正常心电图的良性变异,但近来报道早期复极综合征在一些情况下可诱发特发性心室颤动,导致猝死,机制尚未明确.对于有胸痛、晕厥等症状或(和)猝死家族史等的高危ERS患者,应植入型心脏自动转律除颤器(ICD)以改善预后.

  2. Effects of prulifloxacin on cardiac repolarization in healthy subjects: a randomized, crossover, double-blind versus placebo, moxifloxacin-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosignoli, Maria Teresa; Di Loreto, Giorgio; Dionisio, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Prulifloxacin, a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, is quantitatively transformed after oral administration into ulifloxacin, the active metabolite. On the basis of preclinical data suggesting that prulifloxacin is not likely to prolong the QT interval, a trial to assess the potential effects of prulifloxacin on QT and corrected QT (QTc) interval in humans was performed. Fifty-two healthy subjects were randomized into three groups to receive prulifloxacin 600 mg, moxifloxacin 400mg and placebo once daily for 5 days, using a crossover, double-blind versus placebo, moxifloxacin-controlled study. At baseline and days 1 and 5, three 12-lead digital ECGs were recorded before and up to 24 hours after dosing at nine predefined timepoints. Blood samples were also collected at each treatment timepoint. ECG data were analysed in a blinded manner by a centralized laboratory using skilled readers. QT values were corrected for heart rate using an individual correction method (QTcI) as the primary variable, and Fridericia's method as reference. In forty-eight subjects who completed the study, compared with placebo, prulifloxacin had no relevant effect on cardiac repolarization, with the largest mean QTcI increase being 3.97 ms (one-sided 95% CI 0.01, 7.93), whereas moxifloxacin demonstrated the expected positive effect (maximum mean QTcI increase of 12.0 ms, one-sided 95% CI 8.66, 15.34), thus demonstrating the good sensitivity of the study. A statistically significant correlation between QTcI changes and plasma concentrations was found for moxifloxacin but not for ulifloxacin. Prulifloxacin at steady state after therapeutic doses has no significant effects on the QTc interval and thus should prove to have no cardiac liability.

  3. Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Radek; Hansen, Nellie I; Pinar, Halit; Willinger, Marian; Reddy, Uma M; Parker, Corette B; Silver, Robert M; Dudley, Donald J; Stoll, Barbara J; Saade, George R; Koch, Matthew A; Hogue, Carol; Varner, Michael W; Conway, Deborah L; Coustan, Donald; Goldenberg, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, stillbirth is one of the leading causes of death. Altered fetal growth and placental abnormalities are the strongest and most prevalent known risk factors for stillbirth. The aim of this study was to identify patterns of association between placental abnormalities, fetal growth, and stillbirth. Population-based case-control study of all stillbirths and a representative sample of live births in 59 hospitals in 5 geographic areas in the U.S. Fetal growth abnormalities were categorized as small (90th percentile) for gestational age at death (stillbirth) or delivery (live birth) using a published algorithm. Placental examination by perinatal pathologists was performed using a standardized protocol. Data were weighted to account for the sampling design. Among 319 singleton stillbirths and 1119 singleton live births at ≥24 weeks at death or delivery respectively, 25 placental findings were investigated. Fifteen findings were significantly associated with stillbirth. Ten of the 15 were also associated with fetal growth abnormalities (single umbilical artery; velamentous insertion; terminal villous immaturity; retroplacental hematoma; parenchymal infarction; intraparenchymal thrombus; avascular villi; placental edema; placental weight; ratio birth weight/placental weight) while 5 of the 15 associated with stillbirth were not associated with fetal growth abnormalities (acute chorioamnionitis of placental membranes; acute chorioamionitis of chorionic plate; chorionic plate vascular degenerative changes; perivillous, intervillous fibrin, fibrinoid deposition; fetal vascular thrombi in the chorionic plate). Five patterns were observed: placental findings associated with (1) stillbirth but not fetal growth abnormalities; (2) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths only; (3) fetal growth abnormalities in live births only; (4) fetal growth abnormalities in stillbirths and live births in a similar manner; (5) a different pattern of fetal growth abnormalities in

  4. Platelet enzyme abnormalities in leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate platelet enzyme activity in cases of leukemia. Materials and Methods: Platelet enzymes glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, pyruvate kinase (PK and hexokinase (HK were studied in 47 patients of acute and chronic leukemia patients, 16 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML(13 relapse, three in remission, 12 patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL (five in relapse, seven in remission, 19 patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. Results: The platelet G6PD activity was significantly low in cases of AML, ALL and also in CML. G6PD activity was normalized during AML remission. G6PD activity, although persistently low during ALL remission, increased significantly to near-normal during remission (P < 0.05 as compared with relapse (P < 0.01. Platelet PK activity was high during AML relapse (P < 0.05, which was normalized during remission. Platelet HK however was found to be decreased during all remission (P < 0.05. There was a significant positive correlation between G6PD and PK in cases of AML (P < 0.001 but not in ALL and CML. G6PD activity did not correlate with HK activity in any of the leukemic groups. A significant positive correlation was however seen between PK and HK activity in cases of ALL remission (P < 0.01 and CML (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Both red cell and platelet enzymes were studied in 36 leukemic patients and there was no statistically significant correlation between red cell and platelet enzymes. Platelet enzyme defect in leukemias suggests the inherent abnormality in megakaryopoiesis and would explain the functional platelet defects in leukemias.

  5. Abnormal Raman spectral phenomenon of silicon nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Raman spectra of two one-dimensional silicon nanowire samples with different excitation wavelengths were measured and an abnormal phenomenon was discovered that the Raman spectral features change with the wavelengths of excitation. Closer analysis of the crystalline structure of samples and the changes in Raman spectral features showed that the abnormal behavior is the result of resonance Raman scattering selection effect.

  6. An Abnormal Vibrational Mode of Torsion Pendulum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵亮; 涂英; 顾邦明; 胡忠坤; 罗俊

    2003-01-01

    In the experiment for the determination of the gravitational constant G, we found an abnormal vibrational mode of the torsion pendulum. The abnormal mode disappeared as a magnetic damper was introduced to the torsion pendulum system. Our experimental results also show that the magnetic damper can be used to suppress the high frequency vibrational noises to torsion pendulums effectively.

  7. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the correlations between nail abnormalities and various clinical parameters. Methods This study included 100 vitiligo patients and 100 healthy subjects. Full medical histories were collected from the subjects, who underwent thorough general and nail examinations. All nail changes were noted. In the event of clinical suspicion of a fungal infection, additional mycological investigations were performed. Results Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in the patients (78%) than in the controls (55%) (p=0.001). Longitudinal ridging was the most common finding (42%), followed by (in descending order): leukonychia, an absent lunula, onycholysis, nail bed pallor, onychomycosis, splinter hemorrhage and nail plate thinning. The frequency of longitudinal ridging was significantly higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001). Conclusions Nail abnormalities were more prevalent in vitiligo patients than in controls. Systematic examination of the nails in such patients is useful because nail abnormalities are frequent. However, the causes of such abnormalities require further study. Longitudinal ridging and leukonychia were the most common abnormalities observed in this study. PMID:27579738

  8. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  9. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  10. Neurodynamics of abnormalities in cerebral metabolism and structure in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, J L

    1993-01-01

    Much evidence points to the importance of intrauterine events in the etiology of schizophrenia and suggests a complex interplay between dysfunctional and intact neurons in the pathophysiology of the disorder. This article contrasts what is known of the topographies of metabolic and structural brain abnormalities in schizophrenia at differing stages of the illness. From these contrasts, a schema is elaborated by which subtle neurodevelopmental perturbation in early to middle gestation might give rise to functional and structural abnormalities that ultimately release the diagnostic symptoms of schizophrenia. An interaction between those mechanisms mediating the expression of psychosis and the initially subtle stages of normal aging is posited to act on the substrate of a brain that is already developmentally compromised. Such a process might masquerade as "progression" in the absence of any active disease directly attributable to the original etiological event.

  11. Abnormalities of the Exocrine Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Battaglia, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is considered a pancreatic beta cell-specific disease that results in absolute insulin deficiency. Nevertheless, clinical studies from 1940 onwards showed that patients with T1D had an abnormal exocrine pancreas due to the presence of subclinical exocrine insufficiency and acinar atrophy. Exocrine abnormalities are an important, and mostly neglected, characteristic associated with T1D. It is however still unclear whether the exocrine dysfunction in T1D is a primary damage caused by the same pathogenic event that led to beta cell destruction or secondary to beta cell loss. In this review, we collect evidence supporting the hypothesis that T1D is a combined endocrine-exocrine disease in which the loss of functional beta cell mass is most clinically apparent. PMID:26318606

  12. Cortical thickness abnormalities associated with dyslexia, independent of remediation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yizhou; Koyama, Maki S; Milham, Michael P; Castellanos, F Xavier; Quinn, Brian T; Pardoe, Heath; Wang, Xiuyuan; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas; Blackmon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in cortical structure are commonly observed in children with dyslexia in key regions of the "reading network." Whether alteration in cortical features reflects pathology inherent to dyslexia or environmental influence (e.g., impoverished reading experience) remains unclear. To address this question, we compared MRI-derived metrics of cortical thickness (CT), surface area (SA), gray matter volume (GMV), and their lateralization across three different groups of children with a historical diagnosis of dyslexia, who varied in current reading level. We compared three dyslexia subgroups with: (1) persistent reading and spelling impairment; (2) remediated reading impairment (normal reading scores), and (3) remediated reading and spelling impairments (normal reading and spelling scores); and a control group of (4) typically developing children. All groups were matched for age, gender, handedness, and IQ. We hypothesized that the dyslexia group would show cortical abnormalities in regions of the reading network relative to controls, irrespective of remediation status. Such a finding would support that cortical abnormalities are inherent to dyslexia and are not a consequence of abnormal reading experience. Results revealed increased CT of the left fusiform gyrus in the dyslexia group relative to controls. Similarly, the dyslexia group showed CT increase of the right superior temporal gyrus, extending into the planum temporale, which resulted in a rightward CT asymmetry on lateralization indices. There were no group differences in SA, GMV, or their lateralization. These findings held true regardless of remediation status. Each reading level group showed the same "double hit" of atypically increased left fusiform CT and rightward superior temporal CT asymmetry. Thus, findings provide evidence that a developmental history of dyslexia is associated with CT abnormalities, independent of remediation status.

  13. Cortical thickness abnormalities associated with dyslexia, independent of remediation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yizhou Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities in cortical structure are commonly observed in children with dyslexia in key regions of the “reading network.” Whether alteration in cortical features reflects pathology inherent to dyslexia or environmental influence (e.g., impoverished reading experience remains unclear. To address this question, we compared MRI-derived metrics of cortical thickness (CT, surface area (SA, gray matter volume (GMV, and their lateralization across three different groups of children with a historical diagnosis of dyslexia, who varied in current reading level. We compared three dyslexia subgroups with: (1 persistent reading and spelling impairment; (2 remediated reading impairment (normal reading scores, and (3 remediated reading and spelling impairments (normal reading and spelling scores; and a control group of (4 typically developing children. All groups were matched for age, gender, handedness, and IQ. We hypothesized that the dyslexia group would show cortical abnormalities in regions of the reading network relative to controls, irrespective of remediation status. Such a finding would support that cortical abnormalities are inherent to dyslexia and are not a consequence of abnormal reading experience. Results revealed increased CT of the left fusiform gyrus in the dyslexia group relative to controls. Similarly, the dyslexia group showed CT increase of the right superior temporal gyrus, extending into the planum temporale, which resulted in a rightward CT asymmetry on lateralization indices. There were no group differences in SA, GMV, or their lateralization. These findings held true regardless of remediation status. Each reading level group showed the same “double hit” of atypically increased left fusiform CT and rightward superior temporal CT asymmetry. Thus, findings provide evidence that a developmental history of dyslexia is associated with CT abnormalities, independent of remediation status.

  14. Cortical thickness abnormalities associated with dyslexia, independent of remediation status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yizhou; Koyama, Maki S.; Milham, Michael P.; Castellanos, F. Xavier; Quinn, Brian T.; Pardoe, Heath; Wang, Xiuyuan; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Devinsky, Orrin; Thesen, Thomas; Blackmon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities in cortical structure are commonly observed in children with dyslexia in key regions of the “reading network.” Whether alteration in cortical features reflects pathology inherent to dyslexia or environmental influence (e.g., impoverished reading experience) remains unclear. To address this question, we compared MRI-derived metrics of cortical thickness (CT), surface area (SA), gray matter volume (GMV), and their lateralization across three different groups of children with a historical diagnosis of dyslexia, who varied in current reading level. We compared three dyslexia subgroups with: (1) persistent reading and spelling impairment; (2) remediated reading impairment (normal reading scores), and (3) remediated reading and spelling impairments (normal reading and spelling scores); and a control group of (4) typically developing children. All groups were matched for age, gender, handedness, and IQ. We hypothesized that the dyslexia group would show cortical abnormalities in regions of the reading network relative to controls, irrespective of remediation status. Such a finding would support that cortical abnormalities are inherent to dyslexia and are not a consequence of abnormal reading experience. Results revealed increased CT of the left fusiform gyrus in the dyslexia group relative to controls. Similarly, the dyslexia group showed CT increase of the right superior temporal gyrus, extending into the planum temporale, which resulted in a rightward CT asymmetry on lateralization indices. There were no group differences in SA, GMV, or their lateralization. These findings held true regardless of remediation status. Each reading level group showed the same “double hit” of atypically increased left fusiform CT and rightward superior temporal CT asymmetry. Thus, findings provide evidence that a developmental history of dyslexia is associated with CT abnormalities, independent of remediation status. PMID:25610779

  15. Adaptive Optics Reveals Photoreceptor Abnormalities in Diabetic Macular Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesper, Peter L.; Scarinci, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic macular ischemia (DMI) is a phenotype of diabetic retinopathy (DR) associated with chronic hypoxia of retinal tissue. The goal of this prospective observational study was to report evidence of photoreceptor abnormalities using adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO) in eyes with DR in the setting of deep capillary plexus (DCP) non-perfusion. Eleven eyes from 11 patients (6 women, age 31–68), diagnosed with DR without macular edema, underwent optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and AOSLO imaging. One patient without OCTA imaging underwent fluorescein angiography to characterize the enlargement of the foveal avascular zone. The parameters studied included photoreceptor heterogeneity packing index (HPi) on AOSLO, as well as DCP non-perfusion and vessel density on OCTA. Using AOSLO, OCTA and spectral domain (SD)-OCT, we observed that photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO and SD-OCT were found in eyes with non-perfusion of the DCP on OCTA. All eight eyes with DCP non-flow on OCTA showed photoreceptor abnormalities on AOSLO. Six of the eight eyes also had outer retinal abnormalities on SD-OCT. Three eyes with DR and robust capillary perfusion of the DCP had normal photoreceptors on SD-OCT and AOSLO. Compared to eyes with DR without DCP non-flow, the eight eyes with DCP non-flow had significantly lower HPi (P = 0.013) and parafoveal DCP vessel density (P = 0.016). We found a significant correlation between cone HPi and parafoveal DCP vessel density (r = 0.681, P = 0.030). Using a novel approach with AOSLO and OCTA, this study shows an association between capillary non-perfusion of the DCP and abnormalities in the photoreceptor layer in eyes with DR. This observation is important in confirming the significant contribution of the DCP to oxygen requirements of photoreceptors in DMI, while highlighting the ability of AOSLO to detect subtle photoreceptor changes not always visible on SD-OCT. PMID:28068435

  16. Liver abnormalities and endocrine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Patrizia

    2013-08-01

    The liver and its pleotropic functions play a fundamental role in regulating metabolism, and is also an inevitable target of multiple metabolic disorders. The numerous and constant relationships and feedback mechanisms between the liver and all endocrine organs is reflected by the fact that an alteration of one oftentimes results in the malfunction of the other. Hypo- and hyperthyroidism are frequently associated with hepatic alterations, and thyroid diseases must be excluded in transaminase elevation of unknown cause. Drugs such as propylthiouracil, used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism, may induce liver damage, and other drugs such as amiodarone, carbamazepine, and several chemotherapeutic agents can lead to both thyroid and liver abnormalities. Liver diseases such as hepatitis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and cirrhosis may cause altered levels of thyroid hormones, and alcoholic liver disease, both due to the noxious substance ethanol as well as to the hepatic damage it causes, may be responsible for altered thyroid function. Both excess and insufficiency of adrenal function may result in altered liver function, and adrenocortical dysfunction may be present in patients with cirrhosis, especially during episodes of decompensation. Again an important player which affects both the endocrine system and the liver, alcohol may be associated with pseudo-Cushing syndrome. Sex hormones, both intrinsic as well as extrinsically administered, have an important impact on liver function. While oestrogens are related to cholestatic liver damage, androgens are the culprit of adenomas and hepatocellular carcinoma, among others. Chronic liver disease, on the other hand, has profound repercussions on sex hormone metabolism, inducing feminization in men and infertility and amenorrhoea in women. Lastly, metabolic syndrome, the pandemia of the present and future centuries, links the spectrum of liver damage ranging from steatosis to cirrhosis, to the array of endocrine alterations

  17. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with sperm disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Y. Pylyp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are among the most common genetic causes of spermatogenic disruptions. Carriers of chromosomal abnormalities are at increased risk of infertility, miscarriage or birth of a child with unbalanced karyotype due to the production of unbalanced gametes. The natural selection against chromosomally abnormal sperm usually prevents fertilization with sperm barring in cases of serious chromosomal abnormalities. However, assisted reproductive technologies in general and intracytoplasmic sperm injection in particular, enable the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to the progeny. Therefore, cytogenetic studies are important in patients with male factor infertility before assisted reproduction treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types and frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities in 724 patients with infertility and to estimate the risk of chromosomal abnormalities detection in subgroups of patients depending on the severity of spermatogenic disruption, aiming at identifying groups of patients in need of cytogenetic studies. Karyotype analysis was performed in 724 blood samples of men attending infertility clinic. Chromosomal preparation was performed by standard techniques. At least 20 GTG-banded metaphase plates with the resolution from 450 to 750 bands per haploid set were analysed in each case. When chromosomal mosaicism was suspected, this number was increased to 50. Abnormal karyotypes were observed in 48 (6.6% patients, including 67% of autosomal abnormalities and 33% of gonosomal abnormalities. Autosomal abnormalities were represented by structural rearrangements. Reciprocal translocations were the most common type of structural chromosomal abnormalities in the studied group, detected with the frequency of 2.6% (n = 19, followed by Robertsonian translocation, observed with the frequency of 1.2% (n = 9. The frequency of inversions was 0.6% (n = 4. Gonosomal abnormalities included 14 cases

  18. Prevalence and Specificity of the Abnormal Niacin Response: A Potential Endophenotype Marker in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Jeffrey K.; Dougherty, George G.; Gautier, Clara H.; Haas, Gretchen L.; Condray, Ruth; Kasckow, John W.; Kisslinger, Benjamin L.; Gurklis, John A.; Messamore, Erik

    2015-01-01

    The skin flush response to niacin is abnormally blunted among a subset of patients with schizophrenia (SZ), preferentially associates with SZ compared to other mental illnesses, occurs frequently in nonpsychotic members of SZ-affected families, appears heritable, and shows evidence of genetic association. The niacin response abnormality (NRA) may prove to be a useful SZ endophenotype. Using a laser Doppler flowmeter, we undertook this study to estimate the prevalence of NRA in SZ (n = 70), bi...

  19. Abnormal grain growth effects on the mechanical behavior of Ni electrodeposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, O. [LMT-Cachan, ENS Cachan/CNRS-UMR 8535/Univ. Paris VI, Cachan (France); Lab. de Mecanique et Genie Civil, Univ. Montpellier II, Montpellier (France); Hubert, O.; Hild, F. [LMT-Cachan, ENS Cachan/CNRS-UMR 8535/Univ. Paris VI, Cachan (France)

    2004-07-01

    The study deals with the long-term reliability of a high precision pressure sensor using bellows. They are mainly made of electroplated Ni whose thermal stability is investigated by DSC. EBSD measurements and SEM observations give some evidence for an abnormal grain growth mechanism whose effects on the elasto-plastic properties of the Ni deposit are experimentally investigated. Abnormal grain growth leads to an increase in the elastic modulus and a strong decrease in the yield strength. (orig.)

  20. ADEPT - Abnormal Doppler Enteral Prescription Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Kenny

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancies complicated by abnormal umbilical artery Doppler blood flow patterns often result in the baby being born both preterm and growth-restricted. These babies are at high risk of milk intolerance and necrotising enterocolitis, as well as post-natal growth failure, and there is no clinical consensus about how best to feed them. Policies of both early milk feeding and late milk feeding are widely used. This randomised controlled trial aims to determine whether a policy of early initiation of milk feeds is beneficial compared with late initiation. Optimising neonatal feeding for this group of babies may have long-term health implications and if either of these policies is shown to be beneficial it can be immediately adopted into clinical practice. Methods and Design Babies with gestational age below 35 weeks, and with birth weight below 10th centile for gestational age, will be randomly allocated to an "early" or "late" enteral feeding regimen, commencing milk feeds on day 2 and day 6 after birth, respectively. Feeds will be gradually increased over 9-13 days (depending on gestational age using a schedule derived from those used in hospitals in the Eastern and South Western Regions of England, based on surveys of feeding practice. Primary outcome measures are time to establish full enteral feeding and necrotising enterocolitis; secondary outcomes include sepsis and growth. The target sample size is 400 babies. This sample size is large enough to detect a clinically meaningful difference of 3 days in time to establish full enteral feeds between the two feeding policies, with 90% power and a 5% 2-sided significance level. Initial recruitment period was 24 months, subsequently extended to 38 months. Discussion There is limited evidence from randomised controlled trials on which to base decisions regarding feeding policy in high risk preterm infants. This multicentre trial will help to guide clinical practice and may also

  1. Abnormal Event Detection Using Local Sparse Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    We propose to detect abnormal events via a sparse subspace clustering algorithm. Unlike most existing approaches, which search for optimized normal bases and detect abnormality based on least square error or reconstruction error from the learned normal patterns, we propose an abnormality measurem...... is found that satisfies: the distance between its local space and the normal space is large. We evaluate our method on two public benchmark datasets: UCSD and Subway Entrance datasets. The comparison to the state-of-the-art methods validate our method's effectiveness....

  2. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Association of early repolarization pattern on ECG with risk of cardiac and all-cause mortality: a population-based prospective cohort study (MONICA/KORA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz F Sinner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early repolarization pattern (ERP on electrocardiogram was associated with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac arrest in a case-control study and with cardiovascular mortality in a Finnish community-based sample. We sought to determine ERP prevalence and its association with cardiac and all-cause mortality in a large, prospective, population-based case-cohort study (Monitoring of Cardiovascular Diseases and Conditions [MONICA]/KORA [Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg] comprised of individuals of Central-European descent. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Electrocardiograms of 1,945 participants aged 35-74 y, representing a source population of 6,213 individuals, were analyzed applying a case-cohort design. Mean follow-up was 18.9 y. Cause of death was ascertained by the 9th revision of the International Classification of Disease (ICD-9 codes as documented in death certificates. ERP-attributable effects on mortality were determined by a weighted Cox proportional hazard model adjusted for covariables. Prevalence of ERP was 13.1% in our study. ERP was associated with cardiac and all-cause mortality, most pronounced in those of younger age and male sex; a clear ERP-age interaction was detected (p = 0.005. Age-stratified analyses showed hazard ratios (HRs for cardiac mortality of 1.96 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-3.68, p = 0.035 for both sexes and 2.65 (95% CI 1.21-5.83, p = 0.015 for men between 35-54 y. An inferior localization of ERP further increased ERP-attributable cardiac mortality to HRs of 3.15 (95% CI 1.58-6.28, p = 0.001 for both sexes and to 4.27 (95% CI 1.90-9.61, p<0.001 for men between 35-54 y. HRs for all-cause mortality were weaker but reached significance. CONCLUSIONS: We found a high prevalence of ERP in our population-based cohort of middle-aged individuals. ERP was associated with about a 2- to 4-fold increased risk of cardiac mortality in individuals between 35 and 54 y. An inferior

  4. Abuse of amphetamines and structural abnormalities in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Steven; O'Neill, Joseph; Fears, Scott; Bartzokis, George; London, Edythe D

    2008-10-01

    We review evidence that structural brain abnormalities are associated with abuse of amphetamines. A brief history of amphetamine use/abuse and evidence for toxicity is followed by a summary of findings from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of human subjects who had abused amphetamines and children who were exposed to amphetamines in utero. Evidence comes from studies that used a variety of techniques including manual tracing, pattern matching, voxel-based, tensor-based, or cortical thickness mapping, quantification of white matter signal hyperintensities, and diffusion tensor imaging. Ten studies compared controls to individuals who were exposed to methamphetamine. Three studies assessed individuals exposed to 3-4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). Brain structural abnormalities were consistently reported in amphetamine abusers, as compared to control subjects. These included lower cortical gray matter volume and higher striatal volume than control subjects. These differences might reflect brain features that could predispose to substance dependence. High striatal volumes might also reflect compensation for toxicity in the dopamine-rich basal ganglia. Prenatal exposure was associated with striatal volume that was below control values, suggesting that such compensation might not occur in utero. Several forms of white matter abnormality are also common and may involve gliosis. Many of the limitations and inconsistencies in the literature relate to techniques and cross-sectional designs, which cannot infer causality. Potential confounding influences include effects of pre existing risk/protective factors, development, gender, severity of amphetamine abuse, abuse of other drugs, abstinence, and differences in lifestyle. Longitudinal designs in which multimodal datasets are acquired and are subjected to multivariate analyses would enhance our ability to provide general conclusions regarding the associations between amphetamine abuse and brain

  5. Energy Homeostasis and Abnormal RNA Metabolism in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Ju; Tsai, Po-Yi; Chern, Yijuang

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease that is clinically characterized by progressive muscle weakness and impaired voluntary movement due to the loss of motor neurons in the brain, brain stem and spinal cord. To date, no effective treatment is available. Ample evidence suggests that impaired RNA homeostasis and abnormal energy status are two major pathogenesis pathways in ALS. In the present review article, we focus on recent studies that report molecular insights of both pathways, and discuss the possibility that energy dysfunction might negatively regulate RNA homeostasis via the impairment of cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling in motor neurons and subsequently contribute to the development of ALS. PMID:28522961

  6. Abnormal electrical brain responses to pitch in congenital amusia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Brattico, Elvira; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2005-09-01

    Congenital amusia is a lifelong disability that prevents afflicted individuals from enjoying music as ordinary people do. The deficit is limited to music and cannot be explained by prior brain lesion, hearing loss, or any cognitive or socio-affective disturbance. Recent behavioral results suggest that this disorder is critically dependent on fine-grained pitch discrimination. Here, we present novel electrophysiological evidence that this disorder can be traced down to a right-lateralized N2-P3 response elicited by pitch changes. This abnormal brain response begins as early as 200 milliseconds after tone onset and may serve as a marker of an anomaly in music acquisition.

  7. Linking abnormal mitosis to the acquisition of DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellman, David

    2012-01-01

    Cellular defects that impair the fidelity of mitosis promote chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. Increasing evidence reveals that errors in mitosis can also promote the direct and indirect acquisition of DNA damage and chromosome breaks. Consequently, deregulated cell division can devastate the integrity of the normal genome and unleash a variety of oncogenic stimuli that may promote transformation. Recent work has shed light on the mechanisms that link abnormal mitosis with the development of DNA damage, how cells respond to such affronts, and the potential impact on tumorigenesis. PMID:23229895

  8. Diagnostic and prognostic values of the V-index, a novel ECG marker quantifying spatial heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization, in patients with symptoms suggestive of non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abächerli, Roger; Twerenbold, Raphael; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Nestelberger, Thomas; Mächler, Patrick; Sassi, Roberto; Rivolta, Massimo W; Roonizi, Ebadollah Kheirati; Mainardi, Luca T; Kozhuharov, Nikola; Rubini Giménez, Maria; Wildi, Karin; Grimm, Karin; Sabti, Zaid; Hillinger, Petra; Puelacher, Christian; Strebel, Ivo; Cupa, Janosch; Badertscher, Patrick; Roux, Isabelle; Schmid, Ramun; Leber, Remo; Osswald, Stefan; Mueller, Christian; Reichlin, Tobias

    2017-06-01

    The V-index is an ECG marker quantifying spatial heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization. We prospectively assessed the diagnostic and prognostic values of the V-index in patients with suspected non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). We prospectively enrolled 497 patients presenting with suspected NSTEMI to the emergency department (ED). Digital 12-lead ECGs of five-minute duration were recorded at presentation. The V-index was automatically calculated in a blinded fashion. Patients with a QRS duration >120ms were ruled out from analysis. The final diagnosis was adjudicated by two independent cardiologists. The prognostic endpoint was all-cause mortality during 24months of follow-up. NSTEMI was the final diagnosis in 14% of patients. V-index levels were higher in patients with AMI compared to other causes of chest pain (median 23ms vs. 18ms, pV-index in addition to conventional ECG-criteria improved the diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of NSTEMI as quantified by area under the ROC curve from 0.66 to 0.73 (p=0.001) and the sensitivity of the ECG for AMI from 41% to 86% (pV-index (pV-index remained an independent predictor of death. The V-index, an ECG marker quantifying spatial heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization, significantly improves the accuracy and sensitivity of the ECG for the diagnosis of NSTEMI and independently predicts mortality during follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Amphibian abnormalities on National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This fact sheet outlines a study done to 1) find the percentage of abnormal frogs and toads on the nation’s National Wildlife Refuges and 2) determine how the...

  10. On two abnormal sharks from Gujarat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalan, U.K.

    The description of the two abnormal sharks, Carchariaswalbeehmi and Eulamia dussumieri collected from Gujarat, India, is given Of these C walbeehmi was double-headed The other shark E dussumieri had thumb snouted albino...

  11. immunological arthritis Prevalence of biochemical and abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-02-02

    Feb 2, 1991 ... immunological abnormalities noted were a positive rheumatoid factor (78,9%), positive ... Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic disease characterised by the occurrence of articular and ..... treatment. Br Med] 1982; 285: ...

  12. The glycometabolism abnormality among schizophrenia patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小立

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential glycometabolism abnormality and the related factors of schizophrenia patients in China. Methods This cross-sectional study included 44 healthy controls(group 1) and 178 inpatient

  13. Basilar artery migraine and reversible imaging abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maytal, J; Libman, R B; Lustrin, E S

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of a basilar artery migraine in a 17-year-old boy with transient CT and MR abnormalities after each of two migraine episodes. A repeat MR study 6 months after the last event showed complete resolution of the lesion. Transient abnormalities on brain images similar to those shown in our case have been reported in patients with migraine and other neurologic conditions and are most likely related to cerebral vasogenic edema.

  14. Abnormal Chromosome Segregation May Trigger Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Cancer is a primary threat to human health as it kills millions of people each year.Scientists have shown that 75% of human cancers have an abnormal number of chromosomes in cells,and the proportion of the cells with an abnormal chromosome number is tightly and positively related to malignance progression and metastasis of cancers. But the pathological mechanism behind the anomaly still remains unknown.

  15. Abnormal Asymmetry of Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Ribolsi, Michele; Zafiris J Daskalakis; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imagin...

  16. Heterotaxy syndromes and abnormal bowel rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Beverley [Stanford University, Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Koppolu, Raji; Sylvester, Karl [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Surgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Murphy, Daniel [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital at Stanford, Department of Cardiology, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bowel rotation abnormalities in heterotaxy are common. As more children survive cardiac surgery, the management of gastrointestinal abnormalities has become controversial. To evaluate imaging of malrotation in heterotaxy with surgical correlation and provide an algorithm for management. Imaging reports of heterotaxic children with upper gastrointestinal (UGI) and/or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) were reviewed. Subsequently, fluoroscopic images were re-reviewed in conjunction with CT/MR studies. The original reports and re-reviewed images were compared and correlated with surgical findings. Nineteen of 34 children with heterotaxy underwent UGI, 13/19 also had SBFT. In 15/19 reports, bowel rotation was called abnormal: 11 malrotation, 4 non-rotation, no cases of volvulus. Re-review, including CT (10/19) and MR (2/19), designated 17/19 (90%) as abnormal, 10 malrotation (abnormal bowel arrangement, narrow or uncertain length of mesentery) and 7 non-rotation (small bowel and colon on opposite sides plus low cecum with probable broad mesentery). The most useful CT/MR findings were absence of retroperitoneal duodenum in most abnormal cases and location of bowel, especially cecum. Abnormal orientation of mesenteric vessels suggested malrotation but was not universal. Nine children had elective bowel surgery; non-rotation was found in 4/9 and malrotation was found in 5/9, with discrepancies (non-rotation at surgery, malrotation on imaging) with 4 original interpretations and 1 re-review. We recommend routine, early UGI and SBFT studies once other, urgent clinical concerns have been stabilized, with elective laparoscopic surgery in abnormal or equivocal cases. Cross-sectional imaging, usually obtained for other reasons, can contribute diagnostically. Attempting to assess mesenteric width is important in differentiating non-rotation from malrotation and more accurately identifies appropriate surgical candidates. (orig.)

  17. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fouad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1% individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8% at the second screening, (P <0.001. Hematuria was the most common urinary abnormalities detected in 245 (9.8% adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1% individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6% individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3% individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5% individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6% of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6% individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1% of them. Asymp- tomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9% of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6% of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8% indivi- duals had <0.5 g/day and twenty (0.8% individuals had 0.5-3 g/day. Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities were more common in males than females and adolescents from rural than urban areas (P <0.01 and (P <0.001, respectively. The present study found a high prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents in our population.

  18. Nail abnormalities in patients with vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    Topal, Ilteris Oguz; Gungor, Sule; Kocaturk, Ozgur Emek; Duman, Hatice; Durmuscan, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Vitiligo is an acquired pigmentary skin disorder affecting 0.1-4% of the general population. The nails may be affected in patients with an autoimmune disease such as psoriasis, and in those with alopecia areata. It has been suggested that nail abnormalities should be apparent in vitiligo patients. Objective: We sought to document the frequency and clinical presentation of nail abnormalities in vitiligo patients compared to healthy volunteers. We also examined the corre...

  19. Light repolarization by scattering media

    CERN Document Server

    Sorrentini, Jacques; Soriano, Gabriel; Amra, Claude

    2011-01-01

    The polarization of a coherent depolarized incident light beam passing through a disordered medium is investigated. The local polarization of the scattered far field and the probability density function are calculated and show an excellent agreement with experiment. It is demonstrated that complex media may confer high degree of polarization (0.75 DOP average) to the incident unpolarized light.

  20. Abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes are common in children with transient congenital hyperinsulinism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Hima Avatapalle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neuroglycopaenia is recognised to be associated with abnormal neurodevelopmental outcomes in 26-44% of children with persistent congenital hyperinsulinism (P-CHI. The prevalence of abnormal neurodevelopment in transient CHI (T-CHI is not known. We have aimed to investigate abnormal neurodevelopment and associated factors in T-CHI and P-CHI. Materials and Methods: A cohort of children with CHI (n=67, age 2.5-5 years was assessed at follow up review and noted to have normal or abnormal (mild or severe neurodevelopmental outcomes for the domains of speech and language, motor and vision. Children were classified as P-CHI (n=33, if they had undergone surgery or remained on medical therapy, or T-CHI (n=34, if medical treatment for hypoglycaemia was stopped. Results: Overall, abnormal neurodevelopment was present in 26 (39% children with CHI, of whom 18 (69% were severe. Importantly, the incidence of abnormal neurodevelopment in T-CHI was similar to that in P-CHI (30% v 47% respectively, p=0.16. The prevalence of severe abnormal neurodevelopment in speech, motor and vision domains was similar in both T-CHI and P-CHI children. For this cohort, we found that the severity of disease (based upon maximal diazoxide dose, [odds ratio (95% confidence intervals 1.3 (1.1;1.5, p=0.03] and early presentation of CHI <7 days following birth [5.9 (1.3;27.8, p=0.02] were significantly associated with abnormal neurodevelopment. There was no significant association with gender, genotype or the histopathological basis of CHI. Conclusions: Abnormal neurodevelopment was evident in one third of children with both T-CHI and P-CHI, early presentation and severe CHI being risk factors. Early recognition and rapid correction of hypoglycaemia are advocated to avoid abnormal neurodevelopment in children with CHI.

  1. Fetal calcifications are associated with chromosomal abnormalities.

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    Ellika Sahlin

    Full Text Available The biological importance of calcifications occasionally noted in fetal tissues (mainly liver at autopsy or ultrasound is largely unexplored. Previous reports hint at an association to infection, circulatory compromise, malformations or chromosomal abnormalities. To identify factors associated with calcifications, we have performed a case-control study on the largest cohort of fetuses with calcifications described thus far.One-hundred and fifty-one fetuses with calcifications and 302 matched controls were selected from the archives of the Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital. Chromosome analysis by karyotyping or quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction was performed. Autopsy and placenta reports were scrutinized for presence of malformations and signs of infection.Calcifications were mainly located in the liver, but also in heart, bowel, and other tissues. Fetuses with calcifications showed a significantly higher proportion of chromosomal abnormalities than controls; 50% vs. 20% (p<0.001. The most frequent aberrations among cases included trisomy 21 (33%, trisomy 18 (22%, and monosomy X (18%. A similar distribution was seen among controls. When comparing cases and controls with chromosomal abnormalities, the cases had a significantly higher prevalence of malformations (95% vs. 77%, p=0.004. Analyzed the other way around, cases with malformations had a significantly higher proportion of chromosomal abnormalities compared with controls, (66% vs. 31%, p<0.001.The presence of fetal calcifications is associated with high risk of chromosomal abnormality in combination with malformations. Identification of a calcification together with a malformation at autopsy more than doubles the probability of detecting a chromosomal abnormality, compared with identification of a malformation only. We propose that identification of a fetal tissue calcification at autopsy, and potentially also at ultrasound examination, should infer

  2. Electrocardiographic abnormalities and serum magnesium in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bergh, Walter M; Algra, Ale; Rinkel, Gabriël J E

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: ECG abnormalities and hypomagnesemia frequently occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Because hypomagnesemia is associated with several ECG abnormalities, we studied whether hypomagnesemia mediates ECG abnormalities after SAH. METHODS: We prospectively studied

  3. Normal or abnormal? 'Normative uncertainty' in psychiatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Andrew M; Baker, Charley

    2015-06-01

    The 'multicultural clinical interaction' presents itself as a dilemma for the mental health practitioner. Literature describes two problematic areas where this issues emerges--how to make an adequate distinction between religious rituals and the rituals that may be symptomatic of 'obsessive compulsive disorder' (OCD), and how to differentiate 'normative' religious or spiritual beliefs, behaviours, and experiences from 'psychotic' illnesses. When it comes to understanding service user's 'idioms of distress', beliefs about how culture influences behaviour can create considerable confusion and 'normative uncertainty' for mental health practitioners. In the absence of clear diagnostic and assessment criteria on distinguishing between 'culture' and 'psychopathology', practitioners have had to rely on their own intuition and seek out possible 'strategies' or 'procedures' from a contradictory and cross-disciplinary evidence base. Decontextualisation of service users' experiences may result in the pathologisation of culturally 'normative' phenomenon, 'category fallacy' errors, and poor health care experiences and outcomes for service users.This paper situates this dilemma within a wider debate that has concerned both the biomedical and social sciences, namely, the unresolved question of 'normality' or 'abnormality'. Indeed, issues that arise from dilemmas surrounding the question of 'culture' or 'psychopathology' are intimately tied to wider cultural ideas about what is considered 'normal'. The disciplines of psychiatry, psychology, and medical anthropology have struggled to establish workable criteria against which to judge behaviour as 'normal', 'abnormal', or 'pathological'. Three models for understanding mental 'abnormality' are evident in 'transcultural psychiatry' (what is now commonly known as 'cultural psychiatry'), and these models have corresponded closely to the interpretive models used by anthropologists attempting to make sense of the apparent diversity of

  4. Cortical thickness and behavior abnormalities in children born preterm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire Zubiaurre-Elorza

    Full Text Available AIM: To identify long-term effects of preterm birth and of periventricular leukomalacia (PVL on cortical thickness (CTh. To study the relationship between CTh and cognitive-behavioral abnormalities. METHODS: We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging on 22 preterm children with PVL, 14 preterm children with no evidence of PVL and 22 full-term peers. T1-weighted images were analyzed with FreeSurfer software. All participants underwent cognitive and behavioral assessments by means of the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL. RESULTS: We did not find global CTh differences between the groups. However, a thinner cortex was found in left postcentral, supramarginal, and caudal middle rostral gyri in preterm children with no evidence of PVL than in the full-term controls, while PVL preterm children showed thicker cortex in right pericalcarine and left rostral middle frontal areas than in preterm children with no evidence of PVL. In the PVL group, internalizing and externalizing scores correlated mainly with CTh in frontal areas. Attentional scores were found to be higher in PVL and correlated with CTh increments in right frontal areas. INTERPRETATION: The preterm group with no evidence of PVL, when compared with full-term children, showed evidence of a different pattern of regional thinning in the cortical gray matter. In turn, PVL preterm children exhibited atypical increases in CTh that may underlie their prevalent behavioral problems.

  5. Myocardial bioenergetic abnormalities in experimental uremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chesser AMS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Alistair MS Chesser,1 Steven M Harwood,2 Martin J Raftery,1 Muhammad M Yaqoob1,2 1Department of Nephrology, Barts Health NHS Trust, Royal London Hospital, 2Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, William Harvey Research Institute, John Vane Science Centre, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK Purpose: Cardiac bioenergetics are known to be abnormal in experimental uremia as exemplified by a reduced phosphocreatine (PCr/adenosine triphosphate (ATP ratio. However, the progression of these bioenergetic changes during the development of uremia still requires further study and was therefore investigated at baseline, 4 weeks and 8 weeks after partial nephrectomy (PNx. Methods: A two-stage PNx uremia model in male Wistar rats was used to explore in vivo cardiac and skeletal muscles' bioenergetic changes over time. High-energy phosphate nucleotides were determined by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR and capillary zone electrophoresis. Results: 31P-NMR spectroscopy revealed lower PCr/ATP ratios in PNx hearts compared to sham (SH-operated animals 4 weeks after PNx (median values given ± SD, 0.64±0.16 PNx, 1.13±0.31 SH, P<0.02. However, 8 weeks after PNx, the same ratio was more comparable between the two groups (0.84±0.15 PNx, 1.04±0.44 SH, P= not significant, suggestive of an adaptive mechanism. When 8-week hearts were prestressed with dobutamine, the PCr/ATP ratio was again lower in the PNx group (1.08±0.36 PNx, 1.55±0.38 SH, P<0.02, indicating a reduced energy reserve during the progression of uremic heart disease. 31P-NMR data were confirmed by capillary zone electrophoresis, and the changes in myocardial bioenergetics were replicated in the skeletal muscle. Conclusion: This study provides evidence of the changes that occur in myocardial energetics in experimental uremia and highlights how skeletal muscle bioenergetics mirror those found in the cardiac tissue and so might potentially serve as a practical surrogate tissue

  6. Dopaminergic system abnormalities Etiopathogenesis of dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Wu; Huifang Shang; Xiaoyi Zou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much research has focused on the close relationship between etiopathogenesis of dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Nevertheless, details of the mechanism are still not clear.OBJECTIVE: To review studies from the past few years about pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the key words "dystonia" and "dopamine", PubMed database and SCI databases were searched from January 1990 to December 2005 for relevant English publications. A total of 73 articles were searched and, initially, all articles were selected. Inclusive criteria: studies based on pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Exclusive criteria: duplicated studies. A total of 19 articles were extracted after preliminary screening.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The data sources were the PubMed and SCI databases. The types of articles chosen were reviews and original articles.DATA SYNTHESIS: Metabolism and function of dopamine in the central nervous system: the chemical constitution of dopamine is a single benzene ring. The encephalic regions of dopamine synthesis and their fiber projections comprise four nervous system pathways. One of these pathways is the substantia nigra-striatum dopamine pathway, which is a side-loop of the basal ganglia circuitry that participates in movement control and plays a main role in the adjustment of extracorticospinal tract movement. Dopamine can lead to the facilitation of movement. Dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system: different modes of dopamine abnormality exist in various forms of dystonia. Abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in several primary dystonias: at present, fifteen gene loci of primary dystonia have been reported (DYT1-DYT15). The relationship between abnormalities of the dopaminergic system and the

  7. The impact of insurance coverage during insurance reform on diagnostic resolution of cancer screening abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Alok; Battaglia, Tracy A; Isabelle, Alexis P; Hanchate, Amresh D; Kalish, Richard L; Bak, Sharon; Mishuris, Rebecca G; Shroff, Swati M; Freund, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    We examined the impact of Massachusetts insurance reform on the care of women at six community health centers with abnormal breast and cervical cancer screening to investigate whether stability of insurance coverage was associated with more timely diagnostic resolution. We conducted Cox proportional hazards models to predict time from cancer screening to diagnostic resolution, examining the impact of 1) insurance status at time of screening abnormality, 2) number of insurance switches over a three-year period, and 3) insurance history over a three-year period. We identified 1,165 women with breast and 781 with cervical cancer screening abnormalities. In the breast cohort, Medicaid insurance at baseline, continuous public insurance, and losing insurance predicted delayed resolution. We did not find these effects in the cervical cohort. These data provide evidence that stability of health insurance coverage with insurance reform nationally may improve timely care after abnormal cancer screening in historically underserved women.

  8. MRI of fetal GI tract abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrac, C; Couture, A; Saguintaah, M; Baud, C

    2004-01-01

    We describe the magnetic resonance (MR) patterns of a variety of fetal gastrointestinal (GI) abnormalities. Thirty-two fetuses between 23 and 38 weeks' gestation with abnormal appearance of the GI tract by ultrasound underwent MR imaging with T1- and T2-weighted sequences. The MR aspect of intestinal atresia (duodenal atresia, one case; small bowel atresia, nine cases) included dilatation of the bowel loops, accurate assessment of the normal bowel distal to the atresia (except in the patient with multiple atresia and apple-peel syndrome), and micro-rectum with decreased T1 signal (except in the patient with duodenal atresia). Megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (one case) was indicated by an abnormal signal of the entire bowel and an abnormal pattern for the urinary tract. Meconium pseudocysts (two cases) were easily differentiated from enteric cysts (two cases). High anorectal malformations with (two cases) or without (one case) urinary fistula and cloacal malformation (one case) are described and MR findings are discussed. The capability of MR imaging to demonstrate the normal bowel with intraperitoneal anomalies (e.g., congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and sacrococcygeal teratoma) is emphasized. MR imaging is informative in the diagnosis of GI tract abnormalities, especially the severe malformations, with much more accuracy than sonography.

  9. OPHTHALMOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine the nature of ophthalmologic abnormalities in severe and profound grades of hearing impaired children and to treat visual impairment if any at the earliest . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted on100 children in the age group of 5 - 14 years with severe and profound hearing loss visiting outpatient department of Ram Lal Eye and ENT hospital Govt. Medical College Amritsar and subjected to detailed ophthalmological examination. RESULTS: 100 children in the age group 5 - 14 years with hearing impairment were enrolled for t he study , 68 had profound and 32 had severe hearing loss . Visual disorders were found to be as high as 71%. Highest percentage was seen in children aged 7 years. Majority of them (50% had refractive error. Out of these 50 children , 28(56% had myopia , 10 (20% hypermetropia and 12(24% had astigmatism . The other ophthalmic abnormalities in our study were conjunctivitis 14(19.71% , fundus abnormalities and squint 11(15.49% , blepharitis 5 (7.04% , vitamin A deficiency 6 (8.04% , amblyopia 8 (11.26% , pupil disorder 3 (4.22% , cataract 3 (4.22% and heterochromia iridis 7 (9.85%. CONCLUSION : The high prevalence of ophthalmic abnormalities in deaf children mandate screening them for possible ophthalmic abnormalities. Early diagnosis and correction of visual d isturbances would go a long way in social and professional performance of these children.

  10. Prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Mohamed; Boraie, Maher

    2016-05-01

    To determine the prevalence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in adolescents, first morning clean mid-stream urine specimens were obtained from 2500 individuals and examined by dipstick and light microscopy. Adolescents with abnormal screening results were reexamined after two weeks and those who had abnormal results twice were subjected to systemic clinical examination and further clinical and laboratory investigations. Eight hundred and three (32.1%) individuals had urinary abnormalities at the first screening, which significantly decreased to 345 (13.8%) at the second screening, (P adolescents who had persistent urine abnormalities; 228 (9.1%) individuals had non glomerular hematuria. The hematuria was isolated in 150 (6%) individuals, combined with leukocyturia in 83 (3.3%) individuals, and combined with proteinuria in 12 (0.5%) individuals. Leukocyturia was detected in 150 (6%) of all studied adolescents; it was isolated in 39 (1.6%) individuals and combined with proteinuria in 28 (1.1%) of them. Asymptomatic bacteriuria was detected in 23 (0.9%) of all studied adolescents; all the cases were females. Proteinuria was detected in 65 (2.6%) of all the studied adolescents; 45 (1.8%) individuals had adolescents from rural than urban areas (P adolescents in our population.

  11. Advances in understanding paternally transmitted Chromosomal Abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, F; Sloter, E; Wyrobek, A J

    2001-03-01

    Multicolor FISH has been adapted for detecting the major types of chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm including aneuploidies for clinically-relevant chromosomes, chromosomal aberrations including breaks and rearrangements, and other numerical abnormalities. The various sperm FISH assays have been used to evaluate healthy men, men of advanced age, and men who have received mutagenic cancer therapy. The mouse has also been used as a model to investigate the mechanism of paternally transmitted genetic damage. Sperm FISH for the mouse has been used to detect chromosomally abnormal mouse sperm, while the PAINT/DAPI analysis of mouse zygotes has been used to evaluate the types of chromosomal defects that can be paternally transmitted to the embryo and their effects on embryonic development.

  12. Abnormal fetal head shape: aetiology and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Olav Bjørn; David, Anna; Thomasson, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Background: Abnormal head shape is an uncommon finding on prenatal ultrasound, often associated with breech presentation, spinabifida, aneuploidy or secondary to oligohydramnios or fetal position. Other aetiologies are rarer and may be more difficult to define. Objective: To determine the aetiolo...... incidence of genetic syndromes, in the absence of a clear diagnosis, referral to a tertiary centre and genetic input is advised as detection of subtle sonographic features may aid diagnosis, allowing for targeted molecular analysis. An algorithm for management will be proposed....... and define management pathways for fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Methods: Our FMU databases were searched to ascertain all fetuses with an abnormal skull shape. Sonographic findings, diagnosis and outcome were reviewed. Results: Of the 370 cases identified, 31.6% were associated with spinabifida...

  13. Abnormal Grain Growth Suppression in Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Stephen J. (Inventor); Claytor, Harold Dale (Inventor); Alexa, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a process for suppressing abnormal grain growth in friction stir welded aluminum alloys by inserting an intermediate annealing treatment ("IAT") after the welding step on the article. The IAT may be followed by a solution heat treatment (SHT) on the article under effectively high solution heat treatment conditions. In at least some embodiments, a deformation step is conducted on the article under effective spin-forming deformation conditions or under effective superplastic deformation conditions. The invention further provides a welded article having suppressed abnormal grain growth, prepared by the process above. Preferably the article is characterized with greater than about 90% reduction in area fraction abnormal grain growth in any friction-stir-welded nugget.

  14. Enhanced monitoring of abnormal emergency department demands

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2016-06-13

    This paper presents a statistical technique for detecting signs of abnormal situation generated by the influx of patients at emergency department (ED). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of abnormal situations caused by abnormal patient arrivals to the ED. More specifically, This work proposed the application of autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models combined with the generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test for anomaly-detection. ARMA was used as the modelling framework of the ARMA-based GLR anomaly-detection methodology. The GLR test was applied to the uncorrelated residuals obtained from the ARMA model to detect anomalies when the data did not fit the reference ARMA model. The ARMA-based GLR hypothesis testing scheme was successfully applied to the practical data collected from the database of the pediatric emergency department (PED) at Lille regional hospital center, France. © 2015 IEEE.

  15. XYY chromosome abnormality in sexual homicide perpetrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briken, Peer; Habermann, Niels; Berner, Wolfgang; Hill, Andreas

    2006-03-05

    In a retrospective investigation of the court reports about sexual homicide perpetrators chromosome analysis had been carried out in 13 of 166 (7.8%) men. Three men (1.8%) with XYY chromosome abnormality were found. This rate is much higher than that found in unselected samples of prisoners (0.7-0.9%) or in the general population (0.01%). The three men had shown prepubescent abnormalities, school problems, and had suffered from physical abuse. The chromosome analysis in all cases had been carried out in connection with the forensic psychiatric court report due to the sexual homicide. However, two men had earlier psychiatric referrals. All were diagnosed as sexual sadistic, showed a psychopathic syndrome or psychopathy according to the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised [Hare RD, 1991, The Hare Psychopathy Checklist-Revised, Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Multi-Health Systems]. Two were multiple murderers. Especially forensic psychiatrists should be vigilant of the possibility of XYY chromosome abnormalities in sexual offenders.

  16. Neurological abnormalities associated with CDMA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, B; Westerman, R

    2001-09-01

    Dysaesthesiae of the scalp and neurological abnormality after mobile phone use have been reported previously, but the roles of the phone per se or the radiations in causing these findings have been questioned. We report finding a neurological abnormality in a patient after accidental exposure of the left side of the face to mobile phone radiation [code division multiple access (CDMA)] from a down-powered mobile phone base station antenna. He had headaches, unilateral left blurred vision and pupil constriction, unilateral altered sensation on the forehead, and abnormalities of current perception thresholds on testing the left trigeminal ophthalmic nerve. His nerve function recovered during 6 months follow-up. His exposure was 0.015-0.06 mW/cm(2) over 1-2 h. The implications regarding health effects of radiofrequency radiation are discussed.

  17. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven Robert

    2015-01-01

    University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire included questions about pain and sensory abnormalities located to the abdominal skin, and physical and psychological function; patient satisfaction with surgery was rated on a 4-point scale. RESULTS: One hundred seventy patients answered the questionnaire......%) patients. The majority of patients reported improvement on all physical and psychological factors. Patients with pain were more often disappointed with the surgery and unwilling to recommend the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, patients were satisfied with the procedure, although abnormal abdominal skin....... Fourteen patients (8.2%) reported pain within the past 7 days related to the abdominoplasty. Abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common and reported by 138 patients (81%). Sensory hypersensitivity was associated with the presence of persistent pain. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported by 149 (88...

  18. Abnormal Head Position in Infantile Nystagmus Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noval, Susana; González-Manrique, Mar; Rodríguez-Del Valle, José María; Rodríguez-Sánchez, José María

    2011-01-01

    Infantile nystagmus is an involuntary, bilateral, conjugate, and rhythmic oscillation of the eyes which is present at birth or develops within the first 6 months of life. It may be pendular or jerk-like and, its intensity usually increases in lateral gaze, decreasing with convergence. Up to 64% of all patients with nystagmus also present strabismus, and even more patients have an abnormal head position. The abnormal head positions are more often horizontal, but they may also be vertical or take the form of a tilt, even though the nystagmus itself is horizontal. The aim of this article is to review available information about the origin and treatment of the abnormal head position associated to nystagmus, and to describe our treatment strategies. PMID:24533187

  19. Occult intraspinal abnormalities and congenital scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Erfani

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: Congenital scoliosis occurs because of either the failure of formation or the failure of segmentation or both. Evaluation of the incidence and the types of occult intraspinal abnormalities in congenital scoliosis is the subject of this study.

    METHODS: During a period of 29 years, 103 patients with congenital scoliosis were studied. MRI was used in 46 patients, myelography or CT myelography was used in 64 patients and both MRI and myelography or CT myelography were used in 7 patients for intraspinal abnormalities.

    RESULTS: In the MRI group, among the 46 patients, 19 patients (41.3% had intraspinal abnormalities consisting syringomyelia in 9 (19.5% diastematomyelia in 8 (17.4%, tethered cord syndrome in 6 (13%, low conus in 5 (10.8% and diplomyelia in 3 (6.5% of the patients. In the myelography group, among the 64 patients, 17 (26.5% had intraspinal abnormalities and diastematomyelia was the most common one found in 14 (21.8% patients.

    CONCLUSIONS: Intraspinal abnormalities are frequent in congenital scoliosis. Syringomyelia may be associated with congenital scoliosis. In congenital scoliosis, rib fusion may be an indicator of intraspinal abnormalities in MRI. A significant difference between clinical findings and intraspinal anomalies (P<0.05 was noted. Moreover, we believe that total spinal MRI with coronal, sagittal and axial views is a valuable tool in determining the intraspinal abnormalities in congenital scoliosis. This method is highly

  20. Hemorheological abnormalities in human arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Rosalia; Hopps, Eugenia; Caimi, Gregorio

    2014-05-01

    Blood rheology is impaired in hypertensive patients. The alteration involves blood and plasma viscosity, and the erythrocyte behaviour is often abnormal. The hemorheological pattern appears to be related to some pathophysiological mechanisms of hypertension and to organ damage, in particular left ventricular hypertrophy and myocardial ischemia. Abnormalities have been observed in erythrocyte membrane fluidity, explored by fluorescence spectroscopy and electron spin resonance. This may be relevant for red cell flow in microvessels and oxygen delivery to tissues. Although blood viscosity is not a direct target of antihypertensive therapy, the rheological properties of blood play a role in the pathophysiology of arterial hypertension and its vascular complications.

  1. Electrocardiographic abnormalities in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommargren, Claire E

    2002-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a serious neurological disorder that is often complicated by the occurrence of electrocardiographic abnormalities unexplained by preexisting cardiac conditions. These morphological waveform changes and arrhythmias often are unrecognized or misinterpreted, potentially placing patients at risk for inappropriate management. Many previous investigations were retrospective and relied on data collected in an unsystematic manner. More recent studies that included use of serial electrocardiograms and Holter recordings have provided new insight into the high prevalence of electrocardiographic changes in subarachnoid hemorrhage. Research on the prevalence, duration, and clinical significance of these electrocardiographic abnormalities and on associated factors and etiological theories is reviewed.

  2. Nonpathologizing trauma interventions in abnormal psychology courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Stephanie M; Luchner, Andrew F; Pickett, Rachel F

    2016-01-01

    Because abnormal psychology courses presuppose a focus on pathological human functioning, nonpathologizing interventions within these classes are particularly powerful and can reach survivors, bystanders, and perpetrators. Interventions are needed to improve the social response to trauma on college campuses. By applying psychodynamic and feminist multicultural theory, instructors can deliver nonpathologizing interventions about trauma and trauma response within these classes. We recommend class-based interventions with the following aims: (a) intentionally using nonpathologizing language, (b) normalizing trauma responses, (c) subjectively defining trauma, (d) challenging secondary victimization, and (e) questioning the delineation of abnormal and normal. The recommendations promote implications for instructor self-reflection, therapy interventions, and future research.

  3. Anaesthesia in operations of congenital craniofacial abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahangirie B

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Some syndromes that are characterized by abnormalities of the skull, facial bones, and mandibule, most of these patients are from the pediatric population. For the anaesthetic management of patients with various craniofacial dysostosis are as follows: 1 The necessary for careful evaluation of the airway by simply observing the patient. 2 Evaluation of the patient for abnormalities of the heart and lungs. 3 Patients may also have increased intracranial pressure. 4 Anaesthetic drugs and techniques: no particular drugs is recommended. Techniques controlled ventilation. 5 All patients should be cared in the intensive care unit after operation between 24-48 hours

  4. [Abnormality of blood coagulation indexes in patients with de novo acute leukemia and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang-Fang; Hu, Kai-Xun; Guo, Mei; Qiao, Jian-Hui; Sun, Qi-Yun; Ai, Hui-Sheng; Yu, Chang-Lin

    2013-04-01

    To explore hemorrhage risk and the clinical significance of abnormal change of prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), plasma fibrinogen (FIB), plasma thrombin time (TT) and d-dimer (D-D) in de novo acute leukemia (except for APL), the different bleeding manifestations of 114 cases of de novo acute leukemia with different coagulation indexes were analyzed retrospectively. The correlation between these blood coagulation indexes and the possible correlative clinical characteristics were analysed, including age, sex, type of acute leukemia, initial white blood cell(WBC) and platelet(Plt) count, the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow and cytogenetic abnormality of patients at diagnosis. The results indicated that the incidence of abnormal blood coagulation was as high as 78.1% for de novo AL patients. These patients with 5 normal blood coagulation indexes may have mild bleeding manifestation, but the more abnormal indexes, the more severe bleeding. Both PT and D-D were sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Incidence of abnormal blood coagulation significantly correlates with the proportion of blast cells in bone marrow (χ(2) = 4.184, OR = 1.021, P coagulation. It is concluded that the coagulation and fibrinolysis are abnormal in most patients with de novo acute leukemia. More abnormal indexes indicate more severe bleeding, and both PT and D-D are sensitive indexes for diagnosis of level II bleeding. Higher proportion of blast cells in bone marrow predicts higher incidence of abnormal blood clotting. Acute leukemia with elderly age, high white blood cell count and adverse cytogenetics do not predict severer abnormal blood clotting. Detection of PT, APTT, TT, FIB, and D-D may help to judge whether the patients are in a state of hypercoagulability or disseminated intravenous coagulation, which will provide experiment evidences for early intervention and medication.

  5. Brain perfusion abnormalities in patients with euthyroid autoimmune thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piga, M.; Serra, A.; Loi, G.L.; Satta, L. [University of Cagliari, Nuclear Medicine - Department of Medical Sciences ' ' M. Aresu' ' , Cagliari (Italy); Deiana, L.; Liberto, M. Di; Mariotti, S. [University of Cagliari, Endocrinology - Department of Medical Sciences ' ' M. Aresu' ' , Cagliari (Italy)

    2004-12-01

    Brain perfusion abnormalities have recently been demonstrated by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in rare cases of severe Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) encephalopathy; moreover, some degree of subtle central nervous system (CNS) involvement has been hypothesised in HT, but no direct evidence has been provided so far. The aim of this study was to assess cortical brain perfusion in patients with euthyroid HT without any clinical evidence of CNS involvement by means of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT. Sixteen adult patients with HT entered this study following informed consent. The diagnosis was based on the coexistence of high titres of anti-thyroid auto-antibodies and diffuse hypoechogenicity of the thyroid on ultrasound in association with normal circulating thyroid hormone and TSH concentrations. Nine consecutive adult patients with non-toxic nodular goitre (NTNG) and ten healthy subjects matched for age and sex were included as control groups. All patients underwent {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT. Image assessment was both qualitative and semiquantitative. Semiquantitative analysis was performed by generation of four regions of interest (ROI) for each cerebral hemisphere - frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital - and one for each cerebellar hemisphere in order to evaluate cortical perfusion asymmetry. The Asymmetry Index (AI) was calculated to provide a measurement of both magnitude and direction of perfusion asymmetry. As assessed by visual examination, {sup 99m}Tc-ECD cerebral distribution was irregular and patchy in HT patients, hypoperfusion being more frequently found in frontal lobes. AI revealed abnormalities in 12/16 HT patients, in three of the nine NTNG patients and in none of the normal controls. A significant difference in the mean AI was found between patients with HT and both patients with NTNG (p<0.003) and normal controls (p<0.001), when only frontal lobes were considered. These results show the high prevalence of brain perfusion

  6. ABNORMAL GASTRIC AND COLONIC PERMEABILITY IN CHILDREN WITH RECURRENT ABDOMINAL PAIN (RAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent histologic studies have suggested evidence of low grade inflammation in many patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Additionally, small intestinal permeability recently has been reported to be abnormal in some adults with IBS. Whether the same is true for children with RAP, a condition...

  7. Use of Virtual Reality Technology to Enhance Undergraduate Learning in Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark-Wroblewski, Kim; Kreiner, David S.; Boeding, Christopher M.; Lopata, Ashley N.; Ryan, Joseph J.; Church, Tina M.

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether using virtual reality (VR) technology to provide students with direct exposure to evidence-based psychological treatment approaches would enhance their understanding of and appreciation for such treatments. Students enrolled in an abnormal psychology course participated in a VR session designed to help clients overcome the fear…

  8. Abnormal Transmethylation/Transsulfuration Metabolism and DNA Hypomethylation among Parents of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Hubanks, Amanda; Rose, Shannon; Gaylor, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated metabolic profile reflects the combined influence of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that affect the candidate pathway of interest. Recent evidence suggests that some autistic children may have reduced detoxification capacity and may be under chronic oxidative stress. Based on reports of abnormal methionine and…

  9. Abnormal Transmethylation/Transsulfuration Metabolism and DNA Hypomethylation among Parents of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, S. Jill; Melnyk, Stepan; Jernigan, Stefanie; Hubanks, Amanda; Rose, Shannon; Gaylor, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated metabolic profile reflects the combined influence of genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors that affect the candidate pathway of interest. Recent evidence suggests that some autistic children may have reduced detoxification capacity and may be under chronic oxidative stress. Based on reports of abnormal methionine and…

  10. Craniofacial abnormalities among patients with Edwards Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano M. Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To determine the frequency and types of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients with trisomy 18 or Edwards syndrome (ES. METHODS This descriptive and retrospective study of a case series included all patients diagnosed with ES in a Clinical Genetics Service of a reference hospital in Southern Brazil from 1975 to 2008. The results of the karyotypic analysis, along with clinical data, were collected from medical records. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 50 patients, of which 66% were female. The median age at first evaluation was 14 days. Regarding the karyotypes, full trisomy of chromosome 18 was the main alteration (90%. Mosaicism was observed in 10%. The main craniofacial abnormalities were: microretrognathia (76%, abnormalities of the ear helix/dysplastic ears (70%, prominent occiput (52%, posteriorly rotated (46% and low set ears (44%, and short palpebral fissures/blepharophimosis (46%. Other uncommon - but relevant - abnormalities included: microtia (18%, orofacial clefts (12%, preauricular tags (10%, facial palsy (4%, encephalocele (4%, absence of external auditory canal (2% and asymmetric face (2%. One patient had an initial suspicion of oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum (OAVS or Goldenhar syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the literature description of a characteristic clinical presentation for ES, craniofacial alterations may be variable among these patients. The OAVS findings in this sample are noteworthy. The association of ES with OAVS has been reported once in the literature.

  11. Metabolic Abnormalities in Children with Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Childhood asthma and obesity have reached epidemic proportions worldwide, and the latter is also contributing to increasing rates of related metabolic disorders, such as diabetes. Yet, the relationship between asthma, obesity, and abnormal lipid and glucose metabolism is not well understood, nor has it been adequately explored in children.

  12. Renal abnormalities in patients with Kallmann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenteno, J C; Méndez, J P; Maya-Núñez, G; Ulloa-Aguirre, A; Kofman-Alfaro, S

    1999-03-01

    To report experience in patients with Kallmann syndrome (KS) in whom urography was used to establish the type and frequency of renal anomalies associated with the disorder. Of 19 patients with KS, 15 had the X-linked recessive form of the disease, whereas the remaining four were sporadic. Each patient underwent intravenous pyelography (IVP) using a non-ionic, low osmolarity contrast medium. Of the 19 patients with KS, 10 had kidney abnormalities; four presented with unilateral renal agenesis and six had less severe forms of renal abnormality (renal malrotation in four and bilateral dilatation of the calyces and pelves in two). One of the patients with unilateral renal agenesis carried a deletion in KAL, the gene responsible for the X-linked type of KS. Three of the four patients with renal malrotation had a confirmed X-linked recessive form and one carried a point mutation in KAL. These results suggest that kidney abnormalities are more frequent and diverse in patients with KS than previously reported. They also indicate that defects in the KAL gene may contribute to abnormal renal development. However, a review of the literature revealed no close correlation between KAL mutations and kidney anomalies in the X-linked type of disease. Taken together, these data suggest that KAL mutations are not invariably associated with failure of renal development and that additional factors (epigenetic or local) may compensate for defects in the KAL protein.

  13. Engineering molecular crystals with abnormally weak cohesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, Kenneth E; Gagnon, Eric; Wuest, James D

    2011-05-14

    Adding astutely placed methyl groups to hexaphenylbenzene increases molecular weight but simultaneously weakens key C-H···π interactions, thereby leading to decreased enthalpies of sublimation and showing that materials with abnormally weak cohesion can be made by identifying and then obstructing interactions that help control association.

  14. Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    1994-11-01

    Full Text Available The present report presents the findings of SIMRAC project GAP 045 entitled ‘Heat stress protection in abnormally hot environments’. It is intended as a reference to develop guidelines which, in turn would assist mine management in establishing safe...

  15. Neurobehavioural Correlates of Abnormal Repetitive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ford

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions in which echolalia and echopraxia occur are reviewed, followed by an attempt to elicit possible mechanisms of these phenomena. A brief description of stereotypical and perseverative behaviour and obsessional phenomena is given. It is suggested that abnormal repetitive behaviour may occur partly as a result of central dopaminergic dysfunction.

  16. Schizophrenogenic Parenting in Abnormal Psychology Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Otto F.

    1989-01-01

    Considers the treatment of family causation of schizophrenia in undergraduate abnormal psychology textbooks. Reviews texts published only after 1986. Points out a number of implications for psychologists which arise from the inclusion in these texts of the idea that parents cause schizophrenia, not the least of which is the potential for…

  17. Teaching Abnormal Psychology in a Multimedia Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, JoAnne

    1996-01-01

    Examines the techniques used in teaching an abnormal psychology class in a multimedia environment with two computers and a variety of audiovisual equipment. Students respond anonymously to various questions via keypads mounted on their desks, then immediately view and discuss summaries of their responses. (MJP)

  18. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  19. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE EEG changes and neuroimaging abnormalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    neuroimaging changes of the brain and EEG abnormalities in correlation to the degree of ... MRI is the method of choice to investigate ... regional gray and white matter volumes .... relation of the cerebellar affection with disease ... were mostly done on mentally retarded cases23 ... vide a certain correlation between the.

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irene; Martinucci; Nicola; de; Bortoli; Maria; Giacchino; Giorgia; Bodini; Elisa; Marabotto; Santino; Marchi; Vincenzo; Savarino; Edoardo; Savarino

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophagealmotility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from nonerosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  2. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  3. Abnormal Events for Emergency Trip in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Guk Hun; Choi, M. J.; Park, S. I.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, S. J.; Park, J. H.; Kwon, I. C

    2006-12-15

    This report gathers abnormal events related to emergency trip of HANARO that happened during its operation over 10 years since the first criticality on February 1995. The collected examples will be utilized to the HANARO's operators as a useful guide.

  4. Meiotic chromosome abnormalities in human spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Renée H

    2006-08-01

    The last few years have witnessed an explosion in the information about chromosome abnormalities in human sperm and the meiotic events that predispose to these abnormalities. We have determined that all chromosomes are susceptible to nondisjunction, but chromosomes 21 and 22 and, especially, the sex chromosomes have an increased frequency of aneuploidy. Studies are just beginning on the effects of potential mutagens on the chromosomal constitution of human sperm. The effects of pesticides and cancer therapeutic agents have been reviewed. In the last decade, there has been a great impetus to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm from infertile men because the advent of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) made it possible for these men to father pregnancies. A large number of studies have demonstrated that infertile men have an increased frequency of chromosomally abnormal sperm and children, even when they have a normal somatic karyotype. Meiotic studies on the pachytene stage of spermatogenesis have demonstrated that infertile men have impaired chromosome synapsis, a significantly decreased frequency of recombination, and an increased frequency of chromosomes completely lacking a recombination site. Such errors make these cells susceptible to meiotic arrest and the production of aneuploid gametes.

  5. Abnormal Selective Attention Normalizes P3 Amplitudes in PDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksma, Marco R.; Kemner, Chantal; Kenemans, J. Leon; van Engeland, Herman

    2006-01-01

    This paper studied whether abnormal P3 amplitudes in PDD are a corollary of abnormalities in ERP components related to selective attention in visual and auditory tasks. Furthermore, this study sought to clarify possible age differences in such abnormalities. Children with PDD showed smaller P3 amplitudes than controls, but no abnormalities in…

  6. Characterizing abnormal behavior in a large population of zoo-housed chimpanzees: prevalence and potential influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Sarah L; Ross, Stephen R; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal behaviors in captive animals are generally defined as behaviors that are atypical for the species and are often considered to be indicators of poor welfare. Although some abnormal behaviors have been empirically linked to conditions related to elevated stress and compromised welfare in primates, others have little or no evidence on which to base such a relationship. The objective of this study was to investigate a recent claim that abnormal behavior is endemic in the captive population by surveying a broad sample of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), while also considering factors associated with the origins of these behaviors. We surveyed animal care staff from 26 accredited zoos to assess the prevalence of abnormal behavior in a large sample of chimpanzees in the United States for which we had information on origin and rearing history. Our results demonstrated that 64% of this sample was reported to engage in some form of abnormal behavior in the past two years and 48% of chimpanzees engaged in abnormal behavior other than coprophagy. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the historical variables that best predicted the occurrence of all abnormal behavior, any abnormal behavior that was not coprophagy, and coprophagy. Rearing had opposing effects on the occurrence of coprophagy and the other abnormal behaviors such that mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform coprophagy, whereas non-mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform other abnormal behaviors. These results support the assertion that coprophagy may be classified separately when assessing abnormal behavior and the welfare of captive chimpanzees. This robust evaluation of the prevalence of abnormal behavior in our sample from the U.S. zoo population also demonstrates the importance of considering the contribution of historical variables to present behavior, in order to better understand the causes of these behaviors and any potential relationship to psychological

  7. Characterizing abnormal behavior in a large population of zoo-housed chimpanzees: prevalence and potential influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Jacobson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal behaviors in captive animals are generally defined as behaviors that are atypical for the species and are often considered to be indicators of poor welfare. Although some abnormal behaviors have been empirically linked to conditions related to elevated stress and compromised welfare in primates, others have little or no evidence on which to base such a relationship. The objective of this study was to investigate a recent claim that abnormal behavior is endemic in the captive population by surveying a broad sample of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes, while also considering factors associated with the origins of these behaviors. We surveyed animal care staff from 26 accredited zoos to assess the prevalence of abnormal behavior in a large sample of chimpanzees in the United States for which we had information on origin and rearing history. Our results demonstrated that 64% of this sample was reported to engage in some form of abnormal behavior in the past two years and 48% of chimpanzees engaged in abnormal behavior other than coprophagy. Logistic regression models were used to analyze the historical variables that best predicted the occurrence of all abnormal behavior, any abnormal behavior that was not coprophagy, and coprophagy. Rearing had opposing effects on the occurrence of coprophagy and the other abnormal behaviors such that mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform coprophagy, whereas non-mother-reared individuals were more likely to perform other abnormal behaviors. These results support the assertion that coprophagy may be classified separately when assessing abnormal behavior and the welfare of captive chimpanzees. This robust evaluation of the prevalence of abnormal behavior in our sample from the U.S. zoo population also demonstrates the importance of considering the contribution of historical variables to present behavior, in order to better understand the causes of these behaviors and any potential relationship to

  8. Canine cerebrospinal fluid total nucleated cell counts and cytology associations with the prevalence of magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo TB

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Timothy B Hugo, Kathryn L Heading, Robert H Labuc Melbourne Veterinary Specialist Centre, Glen Waverley, Vic, Australia Introduction: The combination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI are often used to investigate intracranial disease in dogs. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine if the total nucleated cell count (TNCC or cytology findings in abnormal CSF are associated with the prevalence of MRI abnormalities. Materials and methods: For each case, the TNCC was categorized into one of three groups: A (<25×106/L; B (25–100×106/L; and C (>100×106/L. Cytology findings were categorized by the predominant cell type as lymphocytic, monocytoid, neutrophilic, or eosinopilic. MRI descriptions were classified as either normal or abnormal, and abnormal studies were further evaluated for the presence of specific characteristics (multifocal or diffuse disease versus focal disease, positive T2-weighted hyperintensity, positive FLAIR hyperintensity, contrast enhancement, mass effect, and the presence of poorly or well-defined lesion margins. Results: Forty-five dogs met the inclusion criteria and MRI abnormalities were found in 29/45 (64% dogs. TNCCs were not associated with the prevalence of MRI abnormalities or specific characteristics. Cytology categories were significantly associated with the prevalence of MRI abnormalities (P<0.001. Specifically, monocytoid cytology was 22.8 times more likely to have an abnormal MRI than lymphocytic cytology. CSF cytology was not significantly associated with specific abnormal MRI characteristics. Conclusion: There are minimal associations between CSF abnormalities and the prevalence of MRI abnormalities. These results support the continued importance of utilizing both tests when investigating intracranial disease. When CSF analysis must be performed initially, this study has demonstrated that an abnormal CSF with a monocytoid cytology supports the value of

  9. Retinal abnormalities in multiple sclerosis patients with associated chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Adamczyk-Ludyga

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT is a non-invasive method for the assessment of optic nerve fibers and retinal ganglion cells. This study was aimed at the assessment of retinal abnormalities in multiple sclerosis patients in the context of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency using OCT of the retina and the optic nerve. We examined 239 multiple sclerosis (MS patients, including 220 patients with associated chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and 19 MS patients without venous pathology. The following OCT parameters were assessed: average ganglion cell complex thickness, global loss volume, focal loss volume and average retinal nerve fibre layer thickness. Abnormalities in the azygous and internal jugular veins were evaluated using catheter venography. We found a higher prevalence of abnormal OCT parameters in the patients with previous history of optic neuritis, not only on the side of inflammatory event, but also in the contralateral eye, which is in line with already existing body of evidence. The new and intriguing discovery is that we found statistically significant higher prevalence of abnormal OCT values in multiple sclerosis patients with unilateral stenosis of internal jugular vein. Patients who were not found venous abnormalities, as well as those presenting with pathologic azygous or bilateral internal jugular venous outflows, did not demonstrate a changed frequency of abnormal OCT parameters. Potential association between venous malformations and eye manifestations of multiple sclerosis, as has been demonstrated in this report, justifies further studies on this topic.

  10. Abnormalities of cerebellar foliation and fissuration: classification, neurogenetics and clinicoradiological correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaerel, P. [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium)

    2002-08-01

    Several genes have been found to influence the different cells involved in the processes of foliation and fissuration in the mouse and rat cerebellum. In the light of these new concepts and on the basis of the imaging findings in 42 patients, a classification is proposed for abnormalities of foliation and fissuration. On the basis of recent genetic and experimental evidence on mechanisms which control the origin of the cerebellum, it is suggested that abnormalities of foliation and fissuration form a single group, with a spectrum of severity. Some patients have only abnormal fissuration of the anterior lobe (type 1a) and others additional dysplasia of the anterior and part of the posterior lobe (type 1b). Extension of abnormalities into the hemispheres is often seen in the latter group. A second group has vermian and hemisphere abnormalities (type 2). In addition to the malformation of the anterior lobe of the vermis, three different hemispheric lesions can be seen in this group: cortical dysgenesis, hypertrophy of the cerebellar cortex, and malorientation of the folia. The mild abnormalities (type 1a) can be considered an incidental observation without clinical relevance. The moderate and severe cerebellar anomalies (type 1b and 2) are always associated with cerebellar symptoms and/or signs. (orig.)

  11. Swallowing abnormalities in HIV infected children: an important cause of morbidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nel Etienne D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swallowing disorders, well recognised in adults, contribute to HIV-infection morbidity. Little data however is available for HIV-infected children. The purpose of this study is to describe swallowing disorders in a group of HIV-infected children in Africa after the introduction of combined anti-retroviral therapy. Methods We describe 25 HIV-infected children referred for possible swallowing disorders. Clinical and videofluoroscopic assessment of swallowing (VFSS, HIV stage, and respiratory and neurological examination were recorded. Results Median age was 8 months (range 2.8-92 and 15 (60% were male. Fifteen (60% were referred for recurrent respiratory complaints, 4 (16% for poor growth, 4 (16% for poor feeding and 2 (8% patients for respiratory complaints and either poor growth or feeding. Twenty patients (80% had clinical evidence of swallowing abnormalities: 11 (44% in the oral phase, 4 (16% in the pharyngeal phase, and 5 (25% in both the oral and pharyngeal phases. Thirteen patients had a videofluoroscopic assessment of which 6 (46% where abnormal. Abnormalities were detected in the oral phase in 2, in the pharyngeal phase in 3, and in the oral and pharyngeal phase in 1; all of these patients also had evidence of respiratory involvement. Abnormal swallowing occurred in 85% of children with central nervous system disease. CNS disease was due to HIV encephalopathy (8 and miscellaneous central nervous system diseases (5. Three of 4 (75% patients with thrush had an abnormal oral phase on assessment. No abnormalities of the oesophagus were found. Conclusions This report highlights the importance of swallowing disorders in HIV infected children. Most patients have functional rather than structural or mucosal abnormalities. VFSS makes an important contribution to the diagnosis and management of these patients.

  12. Cardiac abnormalities in children with sickle cell anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, L A; Sodt, P C; Hutcheon, N; Arcilla, R A

    1990-11-01

    The cardiac status of 64 children (ages 0.2 to 18 yr) with sickle cell anemia documented by hemoglobin electrophoresis was evaluated by echocardiography. Left atrial, left ventricular and aortic root dimensions were significantly increased in over 60 percent of these children at all ages compared to values for 99 normal black (non-SCA) control subjects. Left ventricular wall thickness was increased in only 20 percent of older children with sickle cell anemia. Estimated LV mass/m2 and left ventricular cardiac index were increased compared to control subjects (p less than 0.001). Left heart abnormalities expressed as a single composite function, derived from multivariate regression analysis, correlated well with severity of anemia expressed as grams of hemoglobin (r = -0.52, p = less than 0.001) and with percentage of hemoglobin S (r = 0.51, p less than 0.001), but not to the same extent with age. Echocardiographically assessed left ventricular function at rest was comparable to that of control subjects. These data suggest that the major cardiac abnormalities in children are related to the volume overload effects of chronic anemia, and that in this age group, there is no evidence for a distinct "sickle cell cardiomyopathy" or cardiac dysfunction.

  13. Oxidative and inflammatory signals in obesity-associated vascular abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reho, John J; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2017-07-15

    Obesity is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in part due to vascular abnormalities such as endothelial dysfunction and arterial stiffening. The hypertension and other health complications that arise from these vascular defects increase the risk of heart diseases and stroke. Prooxidant and proinflammatory signaling pathways as well as adipocyte-derived factors have emerged as critical mediators of obesity-associated vascular abnormalities. Designing treatments aimed specifically at improving the vascular dysfunction caused by obesity may provide an effective therapeutic approach to prevent the cardiovascular sequelae associated with excessive adiposity. In this review, we discuss the recent evidence supporting the role of oxidative stress and cytokines and inflammatory signals within the vasculature as well as the impact of the surrounding perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) on the regulation of vascular function and arterial stiffening in obesity. In particular, we focus on the highly plastic nature of the vasculature in response to altered oxidant and inflammatory signaling and highlight how weight management can be an effective therapeutic approach to reduce the oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling and improve vascular function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Early Blood Gas Abnormalities and the Preterm Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Alan; Allred, Elizabeth; Kuban, Karl C. K.; Dammann, Olaf; O'Shea, T. Michael; Hirtz, Deborah; Schreiber, Michael D.; Paneth, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    The authors explored associations between blood gas abnormalities in more than 1,000 preterm infants during the first postnatal days and indicators of neonatal brain damage. During 2002–2004, women delivering infants before 28 weeks’ gestation at one of 14 participating institutions in 5 US states were asked to enroll in the study. The authors compared infants with blood gas values in the highest or lowest quintile for gestational age and postnatal day (extreme value) on at least 1 of the first 3 postnatal days with the remainder of the subjects, with separate analyses for blood gas abnormalities on multiple days and for partial pressure of oxygen in the alveolar gas of blood gas derangement (hypoxemia, hyperoxemia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and acidosis) was associated with multiple indicators of brain damage. However, for some, the associations were seen with only 1 day of exposure; others were evident with 2 or more days’ exposure. Findings suggest that individual blood gas derangements do not increase brain damage risk. Rather, the multiple derangements associated with indicators of brain damage might be indicators of immaturity/vulnerability and illness severity. PMID:20807736

  15. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  16. Abnormal lung development in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameis, Dustin; Khoshgoo, Naghmeh; Keijzer, Richard

    2017-06-01

    The outcomes of patients diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) have recently improved. However, mortality and morbidity remain high, and this is primarily caused by the abnormal lung development resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of CDH is poorly understood, despite the identification of certain candidate genes disrupting normal diaphragm and lung morphogenesis in animal models of CDH. Defects within the lung mesenchyme and interstitium contribute to disturbed distal lung development. Frequently, a disturbance in the development of the pleuroperitoneal folds (PPFs) leads to the incomplete formation of the diaphragm and subsequent herniation. Most candidate genes identified in animal models have so far revealed relatively few strong associations in human CDH cases. CDH is likely a highly polygenic disease, and future studies will need to reconcile how disturbances in the expression of multiple genes cause the disease. Herein, we summarize the available literature on abnormal lung development associated with CDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Women's initial experience of abnormal papanicolaou smear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Susan; Hall, Vincent P

    2009-06-01

    To discover the early subjective experience of women affected by abnormal Papanicolaou smear, a qualitative study was undertaken with 8 North Carolina women, 4 to 12 months postnotification of their first abnormal result. Data were analyzed via grounded theory methodology to identify a core theory that could guide interventions to improve follow-up for cancer prevention. This theoretical process is described as a labyrinth journey-an imperative healing process undertaken by all participants, who undertook the following tasks: evaluating peril, seeking refuge, obtaining information, and reframing their self-image. Women who also learned they were infected with the human papillomavirus faced a prolonged sense of threat to their sense of sexual well-being. Their additional tasks related to reevaluating their sexual self-image, and they continued to work on these reframing tasks throughout their 1st year's journey. Progress through the labyrinth depended upon emotional or spiritual support, nonjudgmental acceptance and access to accurate information.

  18. Spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Anil

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury without radiological abnormality is rare in adults. Below we present a case report of 20 yrs old male with isolated cervical cord injury, without accompanying vertebral dislocation or fracture involving the spinal canal rim. He fell down on plain and smooth ground while carrying 40 kg weight overhead and developed quadriparesis with difficulty in respiration. Plain radiographs of the neck revealed no fractures or dislocations. MRI showed bulky spinal cord and an abnormal hyper intense signal on the T2W image from C2 vertebral body level to C3/4 intervertebral disc level predominantly in the anterior aspect of the cord The patient was managed conservatively with head halter traction and invasive ventilatory support for the initial 7 days period in the ICU. In our patient recovery was good and most of the neurological deficit improved over 4 weeks with conservative management.

  19. Mitochondrial abnormalities in the myofibrillar myopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, S; Schaefer, J; Meinhardt, M; Reichmann, H

    2015-11-01

    Myofibrillar myopathies are a genetically diverse group of skeletal muscle disorders, with distinctive muscle histopathology. Causative mutations have been identified in the genes MYOT, LDB3, DES, CRYAB, FLNC, BAG3, DNAJB6, FHL1, PLEC and TTN, which encode proteins which either reside in the Z-disc or associate with the Z-disc. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been described in muscle from patients with a myofibrillar myopathy. We reviewed the literature to determine the extent of mitochondrial dysfunction in each of the myofibrillar myopathy subtypes. Abnormal mitochondrial distribution is a frequent finding in each of the subtypes, but a high frequency of COX-negative or ragged red fibres, a characteristic finding in some of the conventional mitochondrial myopathies, is a rare finding. Few in vitro studies of mitochondrial function have been performed in affected patients.

  20. Abnormal cervical cytology and health care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Maria Eiholm; Baillet, Miguel Vázquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the long-term use of health care services in women with abnormal cytology results compared to women with normal cytology results. METHODS: We did a nationwide population-based study, using women aged 23 to 59years participating in the national organized...... cervical cancer screening program. We included a study population of 40,153 women with abnormal cytology (exposed) and 752,627 women with normal cytology (non-exposed). We retrieved data from the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Pathology Data Bank, the National Health Service, the National......" the cytology result and for the 5-year period "after" the result. RESULTS: During the "before" period exposed women had more contacts to GPs, more contacts to psychologists/psychiatrist, and more hospital admissions than non-exposed women. In both exposed and non-exposed women, health care use increased from...

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  2. Migraine and structural abnormalities in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The aim is to provide an overview of recent studies of structural brain abnormalities in migraine and to discuss the potential clinical significance of their findings. RECENT FINDINGS: Brain structure continues to be a topic of extensive research in migraine. Despite advances...... in neuroimaging techniques, it is not yet clear if migraine is associated with grey matter changes. Recent large population-based studies sustain the notion of increased prevalence of white matter abnormalities in migraine, and possibly of silent infarct-like lesions. The clinical relevance of this association...... is not clear. Structural changes are not related to cognitive decline, but a link to an increased risk of stroke, especially in patients with aura, cannot be ruled out. SUMMARY: Migraine may be a risk factor for structural changes in the brain. It is not yet clear how factors such as migraine sub-type, attack...

  3. [Abnormal hemoglobins in Negroid Ecuadorian populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, N O; Guevara Espinoza, A; Guderian, R H

    1989-02-01

    The prevalence of hemoglobinopathies was determined in the black race located in two distinct geographical areas in Ecuador; in the coastal province of Esmeraldas, particularly the Santiago basin (Rio Cayapas and Rio Onzoles) and in the province of Imbabura, particularly in the intermoutain valley, Valle de Chota. A total of 2038 blood samples were analyzed, 1734 in Esmeraldas and 304 in Inbabura, of which 23.2% (473 individuals) were found to be carriers of abnormal hemoglobins, 25.4% (441) in Esmeraldas and 10.5% (32) in Imbabura. The abnormal hemoglobins found in Esmeraldas were Hb AS (19.2%), Hb AC (5.0%), Hb SS (0.6%) and Hb SC (0.5%) while in Imbabura only Hb AS (9.5%) and Hb AC (0.9%) were found. The factors that could influence the difference in prevalence found in the two geographical areas are discussed.

  4. Developmental pragmatics in normal and abnormal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bara, B G; Bosco, F M; Bucciarelli, M

    1999-07-01

    We propose a critical review of current theories of developmental pragmatics. The underlying assumption is that such a theory ought to account for both normal and abnormal development. From a clinical point of view, we are concerned with the effects of brain damage on the emergence of pragmatic competence. In particular, the paper deals with direct speech acts, indirect speech acts, irony, and deceit in children with head injury, closed head injury, hydrocephalus, focal brain damage, and autism. Since no single theory covers systematically the emergence of pragmatic capacity in normal children, it is not surprising that we have not found a systematic account of deficits in the communicative performance of brain injured children. In our view, the challenge for a pragmatic theory is the determination of the normal developmental pattern within which different pragmatic phenomena may find a precise role. Such a framework of normal behavior would then permit the systematic study of abnormal pragmatic development.

  5. Trading networks, abnormal motifs and stock manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We study trade-based manipulation of stock prices from the perspective of complex trading networks constructed by using detailed information of trades. A stock trading network consists of nodes and directed links, where every trader is a node and a link is formed from one trader to the other if the former sells shares to the latter. Specifically, three abnormal network motifs are investigated, which are found to be formed by a few traders, implying potential intention of price manipulation. W...

  6. Computed tomography in abnormalities of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visser, J.D.; Jonkers, A.; Klasen, H.J. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Academisch Ziekenhuis); Hillen, B. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Lab. voor Anatomie en Embryologie)

    1982-06-26

    The value of computed tomography in the assessment of abnormalities of the hip is demonstrated with the aid of an anatomical preparation and in patients with, respectively, congenital dislocation of a hip, dislocation of the hip in spina bifida, an acetabular fracture and a Ewing tumour. The anteversion of the acetabulum and femur and the instability index of the hip joint can be measured by means of computed tomography.

  7. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in peripheral neuropathies

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal neuronal calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis has been implicated in numerous diseases of the nervous system. The pathogenesis of two increasingly common disorders of the peripheral nervous system, namely neuropathic pain and diabetic polyneuropathy, has been associated with aberrant Ca2+ channel expression and function. Here we review the current state of knowledge regarding the role of Ca2+ dyshomeostasis and associated mitochondrial dysfunction in painful and diabetic neuropathies. The cent...

  8. OPHTHALMOLOGIC ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH IMPAIRED HEARING

    OpenAIRE

    Inderjit; Jagdeepak; Prempal; Anup Narayanrao

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the nature of ophthalmologic abnormalities in severe and profound grades of hearing impaired children and to treat visual impairment if any at the earliest . MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study was conducted on100 children in the age group of 5 - 14 years with severe and profound hearing loss visiting outpatient department of Ram Lal Eye and ENT hospital Govt. Medical College Amritsar and subjected to detailed ophthalmological examination. R...

  9. ABNORMALITIES OF ERG IN CONGENITAL ANIRIDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is generally associated with nystagmus, corneal pannus, cataract, ectopia lentis, glaucoma, macular hypoplasia, optic nerve hypoplasia and compromised visual function. Many theories have been proposed, including a failure in the development of the neural ectoderm and/or an aberrant development of mesoderm. We observed the ERG from 19 patients with congenital aniridia. Fourteen patients had abnormal ERG, including the reduced a wave trough under dark adapted red stimuli with dark adap...

  10. Abnormal Retained Earnings Around The World

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Paulo; Silva,Paulo

    2017-01-01

    Using a firm-level survey database covering 50 countries we evaluate firms´ abnormal retained earnings. The results of our work indicate that firms located in emerging markets retain more earnings than firms from developed countries. On the other hand, firms located on common law based countries retain earnings above the expected and higher than firms placed on civil law based countries. A possible explanation, according to our results, can be seen in the economic growth that these countries ...

  11. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  12. Glucose abnormalities in Asian patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Q

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Qingyan Bo,1 Roberto Orsenigo,2 Junyi Wang,1 Louis Griffel,3 Clifford Brass3 1Beijing Novartis Pharma Co. Ltd., Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Abstract: Many studies have demonstrated a potential association between type 2 diabetes (T2D and hepatitis C virus infection in Western countries, while similar evidence is limited in Asia. We compared the prevalence of glucose abnormalities (impaired fasting glucose [IFG] and T2D and their risk factors between Asian and non-Asian chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients, and evaluated whether glucose abnormalities impacted the viral responses to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment (current standard of care in most Asian countries. This study retrospectively analyzed data of 1,887 CHC patients from three Phase II/III studies with alisporivir (DEB025 as treatment for CHC. The chi-square test was used to compare the prevalence of IFG/T2D between Asian and non-Asian CHC patients, and logistic regression was used to adjust for sex, age, and cirrhosis status. Risk factors for IFG/T2D were evaluated using univariate and multivariate analysis. Our results indicated that the prevalence of IFG/T2D was high in both Asian and non-Asian CHC patients (23.0% vs 20.9%, and no significant difference was found between these two populations (adjusted odds ratio: 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.97, 1.7; P=0.08. Age, sex, and cirrhosis status were risk factors for IFG/T2D in both populations, while body mass index was positively associated with IFG/T2D in non-Asian but not in Asian participants. No significant differences in sustained virological response rates were seen between patients with normal fasting glucose and patients with IFG/T2D for both populations. These results demonstrate that the prevalence of glucose abnormalities in Asian CHC patients was similar to that in non-Asians, and glucose abnormalities had

  13. Optic nerve fast axonal transport abnormalities in primates. Occurrence after short posterior ciliary artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L

    1980-11-01

    Fast axonal transport abnormalities in primate (Aotus trivirgatus) optic nerve were studied in ten eyes at various intervals after occlusion of the lateral short posterior ciliary circulation. Evidence of focal axonal ischemia, as indicated by swelling of mitochondria and dissolution of cytoplasmic detail, was noted as early as one hour after occlusion. Accumulation of mitochondria, microvesicles, and dense bodies, indicating focal interruption of axonal transport mechanisms, was noted in eyes examined at 2, 4, and 6 hours. This accumulation of organelles was limited to the region of the lamina cribrosa. Nerve head abnormalities were not seen in two eyes studied at two weeks.

  14. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Luo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  15. Abnormal erythrocyte metabolism in hepatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J R; Kay, N E; Gottlieb, A J; Oski, F A

    1975-12-01

    Erythrocyte (RBC) metabolic studies were done on 114 patients with severe hepatic disease. Heinz body formation after incubation of RBCs with acetyl phenylhydrazine was found to be significantly higher in patients than in controls. RBC-reduced glutathione levels were lower than those of controls both before and after incubation with acetyl phenylhydrazine, and patients with the highest Heinz body counts had the lowest reduced glutathione levels. RBC methylene blue-stimulated hexose monophosphate (HMP) shunt metabolism and glucose recycling through the shunt were significantly lower in patients with active hepatic disease than in controls. There was no difference in resting HMP shunt activity or in resting recycling of glucose. Despite impairment of shunt metabolism, total glucose consumption was greater in patients than in controls. The patients with the lowest stimulated HMP shunt metabolism and glucose recycling had the highest Heinz body counts, lowest reduced glutathione, and highest total glucose consumption. A continuum of abnormal shunt metabolism was seen, from a mild reduction of stimulated HMP shunt activity to a severe combined decrease in both the HMP shunt and glucose recycling. When measured, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and transketolase were normal or increased. Sequential studies were done on 11 patients who had abnormal metabolic studies. Coincident with improvement of HMP shunt metabolism, the Heinz body counts became lower, reduced glutathione higher, hematocrit higher, and liver function improved. Impaired HMP shunt metabolism appears to be a common, acquired RBC abnormality in patients with severe, active liver disease.

  16. Abnormal asymmetry of brain connectivity in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolsi, Michele; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Siracusano, Alberto; Koch, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a growing body of data has revealed that beyond a dysfunction of connectivity among different brain areas in schizophrenia patients (SCZ), there is also an abnormal asymmetry of functional connectivity compared with healthy subjects. The loss of the cerebral torque and the abnormalities of gyrification, with an increased or more complex cortical folding in the right hemisphere may provide an anatomical basis for such aberrant connectivity in SCZ. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging studies have shown a significant reduction of leftward asymmetry in some key white-matter tracts in SCZ. In this paper, we review the studies that investigated both structural brain asymmetry and asymmetry of functional connectivity in healthy subjects and SCZ. From an analysis of the existing literature on this topic, we can hypothesize an overall generally attenuated asymmetry of functional connectivity in SCZ compared to healthy controls. Such attenuated asymmetry increases with the duration of the disease and correlates with psychotic symptoms. Finally, we hypothesize that structural deficits across the corpus callosum may contribute to the abnormal asymmetry of intra-hemispheric connectivity in schizophrenia.

  17. Abnormal Activity Detection Using Pyroelectric Infrared Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaomu; Tan, Huoyuan; Guan, Qiuju; Liu, Tong; Zhuo, Hankz Hankui; Shen, Baihua

    2016-06-03

    Healthy aging is one of the most important social issues. In this paper, we propose a method for abnormal activity detection without any manual labeling of the training samples. By leveraging the Field of View (FOV) modulation, the spatio-temporal characteristic of human activity is encoded into low-dimension data stream generated by the ceiling-mounted Pyroelectric Infrared (PIR) sensors. The similarity between normal training samples are measured based on Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence of each pair of them. The natural clustering of normal activities is discovered through a self-tuning spectral clustering algorithm with unsupervised model selection on the eigenvectors of a modified similarity matrix. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed to model each cluster of normal activities and form feature vectors. One-Class Support Vector Machines (OSVMs) are used to profile the normal activities and detect abnormal activities. To validate the efficacy of our method, we conducted experiments in real indoor environments. The encouraging results show that our method is able to detect abnormal activities given only the normal training samples, which aims to avoid the laborious and inconsistent data labeling process.

  18. Schizophrenia, abnormal connection, and brain evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, P L

    1983-03-01

    Abnormalities of functional connection between specialized areas in the human brain may underlie the symptoms which constitute the schizophrenia syndrome. Callosal and intrahemispheric fibres may be equally involved. The clinical emergence of symptoms in the later stages of brain maturation may be dependent on myelination of these fibre groups, both of which have extended myelination cycles. Ontogenetically earlier variants of the same mechanism could theoretically result in dyslexia and the syndromes of Kanner and Gilles de la Tourette. As new and unique extensions of specialized function emerge within the evolving brain, biological trial and error of connection both within and between them may produce individuals possessing phylogenetically advanced abilities, or equally, others possessing a wide range of abnormalities including those which comprise the schizophrenia syndrome. A dormant phenotypic potential for schizophrenia may exist in individuals who never develop symptoms during the course of a lifetime though some of these may become clinically apparent under the influence of various precipitating factors. It is concluded that abnormal functional connection and its normal and "supernormal" counterparts may be natural, essential, and inevitable consequences of brain evolution, and that this may have been so throughout the history of vertebrate brain evolution.

  19. Abnormal parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Fen; Wang, Jun-Yuan; Xu, Yi; Huang, Man-Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: It is widely believed that structural abnormalities of the brain contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The parietal lobe is a central hub of multisensory integration, and abnormities in this region might account for the clinical features of schizophrenia. However, few cases of parietal encephalomalacia associated with schizophrenia have been described. Patient concerns and Diagnoses: In this paper, we present a case of a 25-year-old schizophrenia patient with abnormal parietal encephalomalacia. The patient had poor nutrition and frequently had upper respiratory infections during childhood and adolescence. She showed severe schizophrenic symptoms such as visual hallucinations for 2 years. After examining all her possible medical conditions, we found that the patient had a lesion consistent with the diagnosis of encephalomalacia in her right parietal lobe and slight brain atrophy. Interventions: The patient was prescribed olanzapine (10 mg per day). Outcomes: Her symptoms significantly improved after antipsychotic treatment and were still well controlled 1 year later. Lessons: This case suggested that parietal encephalomalacia, which might be caused by inflammatory and infectious conditions in early life and be aggravated by undernutrition, might be implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia. PMID:28272261

  20. [Nutritional abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gea, Joaquim; Martínez-Llorens, Juana; Barreiro, Esther

    2014-07-22

    Nutritional abnormalities are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with a frequency ranging from 2 to 50%, depending on the geographical area and the study design. Diagnostic tools include anthropometry, bioelectrical impedance, dual energy radioabsortiometry and deuterium dilution, being the body mass and the lean mass indices the most frequently used parameters. While the most important consequences of nutritional abnormalities are muscle dysfunction and exercise limitation, factors implicated include an imbalance between caloric intake and consumption, and between anabolic and catabolic hormones, inflammation, tobacco smoking, poor physical activity, hypoxemia, some drugs and aging/comorbidities. The most important molecular mechanism for malnutrition associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease appears to be the mismatching between protein synthesis and breakdown. Among the therapeutic measures proposed for these nutritional abnormalities are improvements in lifestyle and nutritional support, although the use of anabolic drugs (such as secretagogues of the growth hormone) offers a new therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Chromosomal Abnormality in Men with Impaired Spermatogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Mierla

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions are regarded as two most frequent genetic causes associated with failure of spermatogenesis in the Caucasian population. Materials and Methods: To investigate the distribution of genetic defects in the Romanian population with azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, karyotype analysis by G-banding was carried out in 850 idiopathic infertile men and in 49 fertile men with one or more children. Screening for microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region of Y chromosome was performed by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR on a group of 67 patients with no detectable chromosomal abnormality. The results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. Results: In our study chromosomal abnormalities were observed in 12.70% and 8.16% of infertile and fertile individuals respectively. Conclusion: Our data suggests that infertile men with severe azoospermia have higher incidences of genetic defects than fertile men and also patients from any other group. Infertile men with normal sperm present a higher rate of polymorphic variants. It is important to know whether there is a genetic cause of male infertility before patients are subjected to intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI or testicular sperm extraction (TESE/ICSI treatment.

  2. [Frequency of external congenital abnormalities in abortions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo de Arreola, G; López-Serna, N; Treviño-Alanís, M G; Russildi, J M; Arreola-Arredondo, B; Borrego, S A

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to calculate the incidence of external birth defects found in 1,650 aborted fetuses studied from September 1978 to February 1983 at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the University Hospital "Dr. José Eleuterio González" of the U.A.N.L. Medical School. Ninety five of fetuses had external birth defects and 85 had abnormalities in annexes. The Fisher exact test was applied to find the relationship between these abnormalities; no relationship was found. 67.4% had only one birth defect; 32.1% showed several defects. Those defects which were lethal constituted 67%, the majority being of the central nervous system. Defects found in the abdominal wall took second place in frequency followed by abnormalities in either extremity and ear defects. The birth defects seen in early gestational ages differ from those seen in live newborn babies. It is important to carry out morphological and teratological studies, not only in newborns but also during the embrion and fetal periods.

  3. Levetiracetam reduces abnormal network activations in temporal lobe epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandschneider, Britta; Stretton, Jason; Sidhu, Meneka; Centeno, Maria; Kozák, Lajos R.; Symms, Mark; Thompson, Pamela J.; Duncan, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We used functional MRI (fMRI) and a left-lateralizing verbal and a right-lateralizing visual-spatial working memory (WM) paradigm to investigate the effects of levetiracetam (LEV) on cognitive network activations in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Methods: In a retrospective study, we compared task-related fMRI activations and deactivations in 53 patients with left and 54 patients with right TLE treated with (59) or without (48) LEV. In patients on LEV, activation patterns were correlated with the daily LEV dose. Results: We isolated task- and syndrome-specific effects. Patients on LEV showed normalization of functional network deactivations in the right temporal lobe in right TLE during the right-lateralizing visual-spatial task and in the left temporal lobe in left TLE during the verbal task. In a post hoc analysis, a significant dose-dependent effect was demonstrated in right TLE during the visual-spatial WM task: the lower the LEV dose, the greater the abnormal right hippocampal activation. At a less stringent threshold (p < 0.05, uncorrected for multiple comparisons), a similar dose effect was observed in left TLE during the verbal task: both hippocampi were more abnormally activated in patients with lower doses, but more prominently on the left. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that LEV is associated with restoration of normal activation patterns. Longitudinal studies are necessary to establish whether the neural patterns translate to drug response. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with drug-resistant TLE, levetiracetam has a dose-dependent facilitation of deactivation of mesial temporal structures. PMID:25253743

  4. Abnormalities occurring during female gametophyte development result in the diversity of abnormal embryo sacs and leads to abnormal fertilization in indica/japonica hybrids in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yu-Xiang; Hu, Chao-Yue; Lu, Yong-Gen; Li, Jin-Quan; Liu, Xiang-Dong

    2009-01-01

    Embryo sac abortion is one of the major reasons for sterility in indica/japonica hybrids in rice. To clarify the causal mechanism of embryo sac abortion, we studied the female gametophyte development in two indica/japonica hybrids via an eosin B staining procedure for embryo sac scanning using confocal laser scanning microscope. Different types of abnormalities occurred during megasporogenesis and megagametogenesis were demonstrated. The earliest abnormality was observed in the megasporocyte. A lot of the chalazal-most megaspores were degenerated before the mono-nucleate embryo sac stage. Disordered positioning of nucleus and abnormal nucellus tissue were characteristics of the abnormal female gametes from the mono-nucleate to four-nucleate embryo sac stages. The abnormalities that occurred from the early stage of the eight-nucleate embryo sac development to the mature embryo sac stage were characterized by smaller sizes and wrinkled antipodals. Asynchronous nuclear migration, abnormal positioning of nucleus, and degeneration of egg apparatus were also found at the eight-nucleate embryo sac stage. The abnormalities that occurred during female gametophyte development resulted in five major types of abnormal embryo sacs. These abnormal embryo sacs led to abnormal fertilization. Hand pollination using normal pollens on the spikelets during anthesis showed that normal pollens could not exclude the effect of abnormal embryo sac on seed setting.

  5. Abnormalities Occurring during Female Gametophyte Development Result in the Diversity of Abnormal Embryo Sacs and Leads to Abnormal Fertilization in indicaljaponica Hybrids in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Xiang Zeng; Chao-Yue Hu; Yong-Gen Lu; Jin-Quan Li; Xiang-Dong Liu

    2009-01-01

    Embryo sac abortion is one of the major masons for sterility in indicaljaponica hybrids In rice. To clarify the causal mechanism of embryo sac abortion, we studied the female gametophyte development in two indicaljaponica hybrids via an eosin B staining procedure for embryo sac scanning using confocal laser scanning microscope. Different types of abnormalities occurred during megasporogenesis and megagamatogenesis were demonstrated. The earliest abnormality was observed in the megasporocyte. A lot of the chalazal-most megaspores were degenerated before the mono-nucleate embryo sac stage. Disordered positioning of nucleus and abnormal nucallus tissue were characteristics of the abnormal female gametes from the mono-nucleate to four-nucleate embryo sac stages. The abnormalities that occurred from the early stage of the eight-nucleate embryo sac development to the mature embryo sac stage were characterized by smaller sizes and wrinkled antipodals. Asynchronous nuclear migration, abnormal positioning of nucleus, and degeneration of egg apparatus were also found at the eight-nucleate embryo sac stage. The abnormalities that occurred during female gametophyte development resulted in five major types of abnormal embryo sacs. These abnormal embryo sacs led to abnormal fertilization. Hand pollination using normal pollens on the spikelets during anthesis showed that normal pollens could not exclude the effect of abnormal embryo sac on seed setting.

  6. [Abnormal gas collections in the abdomen in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M D; Robinson, A E; Neuffer, F; Smith, W L

    1985-01-01

    Many unusual and uncommon abnormal gas collections within the abdomen may be encountered. This paper reviews the reported causes for unusual gas collections in the abdomen and describes several new causes of abnormal bowel gas collections.

  7. Placental loctogen levels associated with gross fetal abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gau, G S; Cadle, G

    1977-02-01

    Four cases of severe congenital abnormality associated with persistently low maternal serum human placental lactogen levels are described. It is thought that this pattern might act as a warning of severe fetal abnormality.

  8. Phenotype abnormality: 38 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 38 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u544i abnormal for trait of behavioral quality...idermis ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  9. Phenotype abnormality: 41 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 41 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u547i abnormal for trait of behavioral quality...ganelle ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  10. Phenotype abnormality: 36 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 36 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u1ria224u542i abnormal for trait of behavioral quality...tyledon ... abnormal ... anatomical structure arrangement ... behavioral quality

  11. Pericyte coverage of abnormal blood vessels in myelofibrotic bone marrows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zetterberg, Eva; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Migliaccio, Anna Rita

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Myelofibrotic bone marrow displays abnormal angiogenesis but the pathogenic mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Since pericyte abnormalities are described on solid tumor vessels we studied whether vessel morphology and pericyte coverage in bone marrow samples from...

  12. Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic Abnormalities in Chronic Alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.D. Attar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Alcohol is most commonly abused drug worldwide. It has been shown to produce toxic effects in almost every organ system in the body. Many of these medical conditions can be attributed to direct effects of alcohol whereas others are indirect sequelae that may result from nutritional deficiencies or predisposition to trauma. Alcohol consumption has been associated with a variety of cardio vascular disorders this study was thus undertaken to know the Electrocardiographic and Echocardiographic abnormalities in asymptomatic chronic alcoholic patients. Materials and Methods: 50 Patients attending the out-patient clinic & who were admitted in Al Ameen Medical College Hospital and District hospital, Bijapur were selected for the study. It was a prospective study design subjects in age group 20-40, having history of chronic alcoholism as defined, for more than 5 years were evaluated by electrocardiography and echocardiography. Patients with known diabetics, hypertensive and cardiovascular disorders were excluded from the study group. Results: The prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities in patients of chronic alcoholism is 37% in our study. Most common ECG changes are sinus tachycardia (18%, and Non specific ST-T changes (9%. Most common 2D ECHO changes was increased posterior wall thickness (11% and followed by increased interventricular septum thickness and decreased ejection fraction (<40%. The prevalence of cardio vascular abnormalities are more with increased duration of alcohol consumption and also high in advanced age group. Conclusions: This study confirms that many electrocardiographic as well as echocardiographic changes occur prior to symptomatic cardiac disorders established to be caused by chronic alcohol intake such as alcoholic cardiomyopathy .which probably are early indictors of ongoing effects of alcohol and are reversible during the early stages detected by non invasive investigations like Electrocardiography and

  13. Hereditary sideroblastic anemia with associated platelet abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soslau, G; Brodsky, I

    1989-12-01

    A 62 year old male (R.H.) presented with a mild anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) and a history of multiple hemorrhagic episodes. The marrow had 40-50% sideroblasts. Marrow chromosomes were normal. His wife was hematologically normal, while one daughter, age 30 years, had a sideroblastic anemia (Hb 11-12 gm%) with 40-50% sideroblasts in the marrow. Her anemia was first noted at age 15 years. Administration of vitamin B6 did not correct the anemia in either the father or daughter. Platelet abnormalities inherited jointly with this disorder are described for the first time. Both R.H. and his daughter had prolonged bleeding times, with normal PTT, PT times, fVIII:C, fVIII:Ag levels, and vWF multimers, which may rule out a von Willebrand's disease. They have normal platelet numbers but abnormally low platelet adhesiveness and greatly depressed ADP, collagen, and epinephrine responsiveness. Response to ristocetin was in the low normal range, and aggregation with thrombin was normal. While desmopressin completely normalized R.H.'s bleeding time, none of these platelet parameters were improved. No differences in the SDS PAGE protein patterns of RH platelets could be detected in comparison to normal samples. His platelets took up and released serotonin (5HT) normally, and electron micrographs defined no morphological abnormalities. However, no ATP was released from platelets activated with collagen, and when followed by thrombin about fourfold greater ATP was released by control platelets as compared to RH platelets. The dense granule fraction derived from RH platelets contained about 20% the level of ATP, 40% the level of ADP, and 50% the level of 5HT detected in a normal sample. The results indicate that the bleeding disorder is related to a non-classical heritable storage pool defect. The connection between the inherited sideroblastic anemia and platelet defects is obscure.

  14. Haematological abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer; Al Arfaj, Abdurahman Saud; khalil, Najma; Alarfaj, Husain

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the frequency and pattern of haematological abnormalities (HA) in SLE patients at the time of diagnosis and last follow-up, and their relationship with organ involvement. This retrospective study included patients who were diagnosed and treated for SLE from 1982 to 2008 at King Khalid University hospital, Riyadh. Demographic and haematological parameters at diagnosis and the last follow-up, disease manifestations, organ involvement and clinical hematological complications were recorded. Association of HA with organ involvement was explored by multivariate analysis. A total of 624 patients (90.7% females, mean age 34.3±11.9 years) were studied. HA were present in 516 (82.7 %) patients at the time of diagnosis. Anemia was the most frequent HA in 63.0% patients followed by lymphopenia in 40.3%, leukopenia in 30.0%, thrombocytopenia in 10.9% and autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) in 4.6% patients. Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism were diagnosed in 7.4% and 2.6% patients respectively. After a mean follow-up of 9.3±5.3 years, 329/491 (67%) patients still had some HA present. Anemia remained the most common abnormality (51.7% patients) followed by lymphopenia in 33.1%, and thrombocytopenia in 4.8% patients. Leucopenia was associated with oral ulcers (p=0.021) and alopecia (p=0.031), anemia with renal disease (p=0.017), AIHA with neurological involvement (p=0.003), elevated IgG with malar rash (p=0.027), and low C3 with serositis (p=0.026). HA are very common at the time of diagnosis and during follow-up in SLE, and some of these abnormalities are associated with organ damage. This information may help in better management planning of SLE patients.

  15. Skeletal abnormalities of acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, A.; White, S.J.; Rasmussen, J.E.

    1987-08-01

    We report the skeletal abnormalities in a 4 1/2-year-old boy with acrogeria, a progeroid syndrome of premature aging of the skin without the involvement of internal organs seen in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. Acro-osteolysis of the distal phalanges, delayed cranial suture closure with wormian bones, linear lucent defects of the metaphyses, and antegonial notching of the mandible are the predominant skeletal features of the disorder. The skeletal features described in 21 other reported cases of acrogeria are summarized.

  16. Cranial computed tomographic abnormalities in leptomeningeal metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.Y.; Glass, J.P.; Geoffray, A.; Wallace, S.

    1984-11-01

    Sixty-four (57.6%) of 111 cancer patients with cerebrospinal fluid cytology positive for malignant cells had cranial computed tomographic (CT) scans within 2 weeks before or after a lumbar puncture. Twenty-two (34.3%) of the 64 had abnormal CT findings indicative of leptomeningeal metastasis. Thirteen (59.6%) of these 22 patients had associated parenchymal metastases. Recognition of leptomeningeal disease may alter the management of patients with parenchymal metastases. Communicating hydrocephalus in cancer patients should be considered to be related to leptomeningeal metastasis until proven otherwise.

  17. Sexsomnia: abnormal sexual behavior during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Monica L; Poyares, Dalva; Alves, Rosana S C; Skomro, Robert; Tufik, Sergio

    2007-12-01

    This review attempts to assemble the characteristics of a distinct variant of sleepwalking called sexsomnia/sleepsex from the seemingly scarce literature into a coherent theoretical framework. Common features of sexsomnia include sexual arousal with autonomic activation (e.g. nocturnal erection, vaginal lubrication, nocturnal emission, dream orgasms). Somnambulistic sexual behavior and its clinical implications, the role of precipitating factors, diagnostic, treatment, and medico-legal issues are also reviewed. The characteristics of several individuals described in literature including their family/personal history of parasomnia as well as the abnormal behaviors occurring during sleep are reported.

  18. Radiological and orthopedic abnormalities in Satoyoshi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haymon, M.L. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Willis, R.B. [Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Orthopedics; Ehlayel, M.S. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics; Lacassie, Y. [Div. of Genetics, Dept. of Pediatrics, Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, Orleans, LA (United States)]|[Louisiana State Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States). Center for Molecular and Human Genetics]|[Children`s Hospital, New Orleans, LA (United States). Dept. of Pediatrics

    1997-05-01

    Satoyoshi syndrome is a are disorder on unknown etiology characterized by progressive, painful intermittent muscle spasms, serve skeletal abnormalities mimicking a skeletal dyplasia, malabsorption, alopecia, and amenorrhea. We further report on a 20{sup 1}/{sub 2}-year-old Caucasian woman whith characteristic manifestation of the syndrome. Since the establishment of the diagnostic 1 year ago, she has been treated with prednisone with good response. However, treatment of the multiple deformities and fractures has been difficult and challenging. The early recognition and treatment of this disorder is of utmost importance, as the skeletal deformities and fractures seem to be secondary to the muscular spasms, as suggested by Satoyoshi.

  19. Neuroanatomical Abnormalities in Violent Individuals with and without a Diagnosis of Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bene, Victor A; Foxe, John J; Ross, Lars A; Krakowski, Menahem I; Czobor, Pal; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo

    2016-01-01

    Several structural brain abnormalities have been associated with aggression in patients with schizophrenia. However, little is known about shared and distinct abnormalities underlying aggression in these subjects and non-psychotic violent individuals. We applied a region-of-interest volumetric analysis of the amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus bilaterally, as well as whole brain and ventricular volumes to investigate violent (n = 37) and non-violent chronic patients (n = 26) with schizophrenia, non-psychotic violent (n = 24) as well as healthy control subjects (n = 24). Shared and distinct volumetric abnormalities were probed by analysis of variance with the factors violence (non-violent versus violent) and diagnosis (non-psychotic versus psychotic), adjusted for substance abuse, age, academic achievement and negative psychotic symptoms. Patients showed elevated vCSF volume, smaller left hippocampus and smaller left thalamus volumes. This was particularly the case for non-violent individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia. Furthermore, patients had reduction in right thalamus size. With regard to left amygdala, we found an interaction between violence and diagnosis. More specifically, we report a double dissociation with smaller amygdala size linked to violence in non-psychotic individuals, while for psychotic patients smaller size was linked to non-violence. Importantly, the double dissociation appeared to be mostly driven by substance abuse. Overall, we found widespread morphometric abnormalities in subcortical regions in schizophrenia. No evidence for shared volumetric abnormalities in individuals with a history of violence was found. Finally, left amygdala abnormalities in non-psychotic violent individuals were largely accounted for by substance abuse. This might be an indication that the association between amygdala reduction and violence is mediated by substance abuse. Our results indicate the importance of structural abnormalities in aggressive individuals.

  20. Seizure increases electroencephalographic abnormalities in children with tuberculous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prastiya Indra Gunawan

    2016-04-01

    The EEG pattern in children with TBM varies, and EEG abnormalities were more frequently localized in the frontotemporal region. Seizures were associated with EEG abnormalities in children with TBM. EEG abnormalities occurring simultaneously with seizures may predict the occurrence of seizures.

  1. Abnormal immune parameters in HIV-seronegative haemophilic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allersma, DP; Smid, WM; Briet, E

    In HIV-seronegative haemophiliac patients abnormal immune parameters have been demonstrated. In this review data on these abnormalities, their aetiology and clinical consequences are summarized and discussed. The data reviewed show abnormalities at different levels of the adaptive immune system.

  2. Abnormal immune parameters in HIV-seronegative haemophilic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allersma, DP; Smid, WM; Briet, E

    1996-01-01

    In HIV-seronegative haemophiliac patients abnormal immune parameters have been demonstrated. In this review data on these abnormalities, their aetiology and clinical consequences are summarized and discussed. The data reviewed show abnormalities at different levels of the adaptive immune system. Mos

  3. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  4. The Spacing Principle for Unlearning Abnormal Neuronal Synchrony

    OpenAIRE

    Popovych, Oleksandr V.; Markos N Xenakis; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Desynchronizing stimulation techniques were developed to specifically counteract abnormal neuronal synchronization relevant to several neurological and psychiatric disorders. The goal of our approach is to achieve an anti-kindling, where the affected neural networks unlearn abnormal synaptic connectivity and, hence, abnormal neuronal synchrony, by means of desynchronizing stimulation, in particular, Coordinated Reset (CR) stimulation. As known from neuroscience, psychology and education, lear...

  5. Neuroanatomical abnormalities in chronic tinnitus in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjamian, Peyman; Hall, Deborah A.; Palmer, Alan R.; Allan, Thomas W.; Langers, Dave R.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we review studies that have investigated brain morphology in chronic tinnitus in order to better understand the underlying pathophysiology of the disorder. Current consensus is that tinnitus is a disorder involving a distributed network of peripheral and central pathways in the nervous system. However, the precise mechanism remains elusive and it is unclear which structures are involved. Given that brain structure and function are highly related, identification of anatomical differences may shed light upon the mechanism of tinnitus generation and maintenance. We discuss anatomical changes in the auditory cortex, the limbic system, and prefrontal cortex, among others. Specifically, we discuss the gating mechanism of tinnitus and evaluate the evidence in support of the model from studies of brain anatomy. Although individual studies claim significant effects related to tinnitus, outcomes are divergent and even contradictory across studies. Moreover, results are often confounded by the presence of hearing loss. We conclude that, at present, the overall evidence for structural abnormalities specifically related to tinnitus is poor. As this area of research is expanding, we identify some key considerations for research design and propose strategies for future research. PMID:24892904

  6. Klinefelter syndrome: cardiovascular abnormalities and metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calogero, A E; Giagulli, V A; Mongioì, L M; Triggiani, V; Radicioni, A F; Jannini, E A; Pasquali, D

    2017-03-03

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is one of the most common genetic causes of male infertility. This condition is associated with much comorbidity and with a lower life expectancy. The aim of this review is to explore more in depth cardiovascular and metabolic disorders associated to KS. KS patients have an increased risk of cerebrovascular disease (standardized mortality ratio, SMR, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.6-3.0), but it is not clear whether the cause of the death is of thrombotic or hemorrhagic nature. Cardiovascular congenital anomalies (SMR, 7.3; 95% CI, 2.4-17.1) and the development of thrombosis or leg ulcers (SMR, 7.9; 95% CI, 2.9-17.2) are also more frequent in these subjects. Moreover, cardiovascular abnormalities may be at least partially reversed by testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). KS patients have also an increased probability of endocrine and/or metabolic disease, especially obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The effects of TRT on these abnormalities are not entirely clear.

  7. Functional neuroimaging abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan L. McGill

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques have been used to quantitatively assess focal and network abnormalities. Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE is characterized by bilateral synchronous spike–wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG but normal clinical MRI. Dysfunctions involving the neocortex, particularly the prefrontal cortex, and thalamus likely contribute to seizure activity. To identify possible morphometric and functional differences in the brains of IGE patients and normal controls, we employed measures of thalamic volumes, cortical thickness, gray–white blurring, fractional anisotropy (FA measures from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and fractional amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (fALFF in thalamic subregions from resting state functional MRI. Data from 27 patients with IGE and 27 age- and sex-matched controls showed similar thalamic volumes, cortical thickness and gray–white contrast. There were no differences in FA values on DTI in tracts connecting the thalamus and prefrontal cortex. Functional analysis revealed decreased fALFF in the prefrontal cortex (PFC subregion of the thalamus in patients with IGE. We provide minimum detectable effect sizes for each measure used in the study. Our analysis indicates that fMRI-based methods are more sensitive than quantitative structural techniques for characterizing brain abnormalities in IGE.

  8. Abnormal Fixational Eye Movements in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Aasef G; Otero-Millan, Jorge; Kumar, Priyanka; Ghasia, Fatema F

    2016-01-01

    Fixational saccades shift the foveal image to counteract visual fading related to neural adaptation. Drifts are slow eye movements between two adjacent fixational saccades. We quantified fixational saccades and asked whether their changes could be attributed to pathologic drifts seen in amblyopia, one of the most common causes of blindness in childhood. Thirty-six pediatric subjects with varying severity of amblyopia and eleven healthy age-matched controls held their gaze on a visual target. Eye movements were measured with high-resolution video-oculography during fellow eye-viewing and amblyopic eye-viewing conditions. Fixational saccades and drifts were analyzed in the amblyopic and fellow eye and compared with controls. We found an increase in the amplitude with decreased frequency of fixational saccades in children with amblyopia. These alterations in fixational eye movements correlated with the severity of their amblyopia. There was also an increase in eye position variance during drifts in amblyopes. There was no correlation between the eye position variance or the eye velocity during ocular drifts and the amplitude of subsequent fixational saccade. Our findings suggest that abnormalities in fixational saccades in amblyopia are independent of the ocular drift. This investigation of amblyopia in pediatric age group quantitatively characterizes the fixation instability. Impaired properties of fixational saccades could be the consequence of abnormal processing and reorganization of the visual system in amblyopia. Paucity in the visual feedback during amblyopic eye-viewing condition can attribute to the increased eye position variance and drift velocity.

  9. First trimester ultrasound screening of chromosomal abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trninić-Pjević Aleksandra

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A retrocervical subcutaneous collection of fluid at 11-14 weeks of gestation, can be visualized by ultrasound as nuchal translucency (NT. Objective. To examine the distribution of fetal nuchal translucency in low risk population, to determine the detection rate of chromosomal abnormalities in the population of interest based on maternal age and NT measurement. Method. Screening for chromosomal defects, advocated by The Fetal Medicine Foundation (FMF, was performed in 1,341 pregnancies in the period January 2000 - April 2004. Initial risk for chromosomal defects (based on maternal and gestational age and corrected risk, after the NT measurement, were calculated. Complete data were collected from 1,048 patients. Results. Out of 1,048 pregnancies followed, 8 cases of Down’s syndrome were observed, 7 were detected antenatally and 6 out of 7 were detected due to screening that combines maternal age and NT measurement. According to our results, sensitivity of the screening for aneuploidies based on maternal age alone was 12.5% and false positive rate 13.1%, showing that screening based on NT measurement is of great importance. Screening by a combination of maternal age and NT, and selecting a screening-positive group for invasive testing enabled detection of 75% of fetuses with trisomy 21. Conclusion. In screening for chromosomal abnormalities, an approach which combines maternal age and NT is effective and increases the detection rate compared to the use of any single test. .

  10. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression.

  11. Brain Abnormalities in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woojun; Kim, Su-Hyun; Huh, So-Young; Kim, Ho Jin

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an idiopathic inflammatory syndrome of the central nervous system that is characterized by severe attacks of optic neuritis (ON) and myelitis. Until recently, NMO was considered a disease without brain involvement. However, since the discovery of NMO-IgG/antiaqaporin-4 antibody, the concept of NMO was broadened to NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and brain lesions are commonly recognized. Furthermore, some patients present with brain symptoms as their first manifestation and develop recurrent brain symptoms without ON or myelitis. Brain lesions with characteristic locations and configurations can be helpful in the diagnosis of NMOSD. Due to the growing recognition of brain abnormalities in NMOSD, these have been included in the NMO and NMOSD diagnostic criteria or guidelines. Recent technical developments such as diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry reveal new findings related to brain abnormalities in NMOSD that were not identified using conventional MRI. This paper focuses on the incidence and characteristics of the brain lesions found in NMOSD and the symptoms that they cause. Recent studies using advanced imaging techniques are also introduced. PMID:23259063

  12. Brain Abnormalities in Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woojun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is an idiopathic inflammatory syndrome of the central nervous system that is characterized by severe attacks of optic neuritis (ON and myelitis. Until recently, NMO was considered a disease without brain involvement. However, since the discovery of NMO-IgG/antiaqaporin-4 antibody, the concept of NMO was broadened to NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD, and brain lesions are commonly recognized. Furthermore, some patients present with brain symptoms as their first manifestation and develop recurrent brain symptoms without ON or myelitis. Brain lesions with characteristic locations and configurations can be helpful in the diagnosis of NMOSD. Due to the growing recognition of brain abnormalities in NMOSD, these have been included in the NMO and NMOSD diagnostic criteria or guidelines. Recent technical developments such as diffusion tensor imaging, MR spectroscopy, and voxel-based morphometry reveal new findings related to brain abnormalities in NMOSD that were not identified using conventional MRI. This paper focuses on the incidence and characteristics of the brain lesions found in NMOSD and the symptoms that they cause. Recent studies using advanced imaging techniques are also introduced.

  13. Skeleton-Based Abnormal Gait Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Nguyen Nguyen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human gait analysis plays an important role in musculoskeletal disorder diagnosis. Detecting anomalies in human walking, such as shuffling gait, stiff leg or unsteady gait, can be difficult if the prior knowledge of such a gait pattern is not available. We propose an approach for detecting abnormal human gait based on a normal gait model. Instead of employing the color image, silhouette, or spatio-temporal volume, our model is created based on human joint positions (skeleton in time series. We decompose each sequence of normal gait images into gait cycles. Each human instant posture is represented by a feature vector which describes relationships between pairs of bone joints located in the lower body. Such vectors are then converted into codewords using a clustering technique. The normal human gait model is created based on multiple sequences of codewords corresponding to different gait cycles. In the detection stage, a gait cycle with normality likelihood below a threshold, which is determined automatically in the training step, is assumed as an anomaly. The experimental results on both marker-based mocap data and Kinect skeleton show that our method is very promising in distinguishing normal and abnormal gaits with an overall accuracy of 90.12%.

  14. Abnormal position of lymph nodes in a freemartin sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salazar PA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Gonella-Diaza, Luz Zoraya Duarte, Sergio Dominguez, Pedro A SalazarClínica de Grandes Animales, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia, Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia, Bucaramanga, Santander, ColombiaAbstract: In this freemartin case report the authors present the clinical and morphological findings of a freemartin ewe with an abnormal position of two lymph nodes. Freemartins, infertile females from mixed-sex twin pregnancies, are chimeras, having two cell populations: one of their own (XX DNA and one from their male twin (XY DNA. Freemartins can have varying degrees of phenotypic masculinization, including, in some cases, having active male gonads and exhibiting male behaviors such as heat detection and aggressiveness. During the clinical examination of the freemartin ewe, a morphological abnormality of the vulva, the presence of scrotal sacs, and a lack of mammary tissue development were noted. On inspection of the vaginal channel, an extremely enlarged clitoris, resembling a penis, was found. The clinical evidence suggested freemartinism. After the karyotyping diagnosis confirmation, a necropsy was performed and samples were taken for histology and immunohistochemistry. There were two structures found in the scrotal sacs; however, these were found to be lymph nodes, not testicles, and this was confirmed by CD3 lymph protein coloration. On histological study, the phallic structure showed corpus cavernosum and tunica albuginea. The testicles were found retained inside the abdominal cavity, with the presence of atrophic seminiferous tubules. Although the position of the testicles in freemartins has been reported as highly variable, this is the first time, to the best of the authors' knowledge, that a case has been reported where lymph nodes have been found inside the scrotal sacs. It is possible that these were the inguinal lymph nodes, trapped inside the scrotum during fetal growth and development.Keywords: freemartinism

  15. Ocular abnormalities in atopic dermatitis in Indian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaujalgi Radhika

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common skin disease. Long-standing, severe AD with repeated scratching and rubbing of the face, which requires continuous dermatologic care, predisposes the patient to various ocular complications. The knowledge of the frequency and significance of these ocular complications may allow their early diagnosis and treatment. The present study assesses the ocular complications in Indian children suffering from AD. Methods: In order to study the ocular complications in AD, 100 patients (61 male and 39 female between the ages of 1 and 14 years were recruited. All the patients had complete dilated fundus examination with indirect ophthalmoscopy. The lid, conjunctiva and cornea were examined. Also, any evidence of cataract formation and retinal disorders were recorded. Results: The mean age of the children was 5.4 years. Forty-three (43.0% AD patients showed ocular abnormalities in the form of lid and conjunctival changes. Of these, 18 (41.9% patients showed only lid involvement, 16 (37.2% only conjunctival involvement and both conjunctival and lid changes were seen in nine (20.9% patients. Conjunctival changes were mostly in the form of a cobblestone appearance of the papillae, with mild to moderate papillary reaction and papillary hypertrophy. Variables observed to have a significant impact on the development of ocular abnormalities were age more than 5 years, duration of illness> 12 months, positive family history of atopy, presence of palmar hyperlinearity and a combination of both xerosis and Dennie-Morgan fold. Conclusions: The present study is the first of its kind from India to document an association between AD in children and various ocular manifestations. The ocular manifestations observed in our cohort were not associated with significant ocular morbidity or visual impairment possibly because of a less-severe disease in Indians.

  16. Neuromuscular abnormality and autonomic dysfunction in patients with cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Chi-Ren

    2011-05-01

    subtype of axonal sensori-motor neuropathy, is common in patients with CTX. Evidence of lipid metabolic derangement in CTX can be reflected in ultrastructural studies of muscles. With an adequate multi-parametric evaluation, a high incidence of ANS abnormalities can be seen in this rare lipid-storage disease, and a high incidence of small fiber involvement is also reflected in the IENF density measurement of skin biopsies.

  17. Ergonomics for enhancing detection of machine abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illankoon, Prasanna; Abeysekera, John; Singh, Sarbjeet

    2016-10-17

    Detecting abnormal machine conditions is of great importance in an autonomous maintenance environment. Ergonomic aspects can be invaluable when detection of machine abnormalities using human senses is examined. This research outlines the ergonomic issues involved in detecting machine abnormalities and suggests how ergonomics would improve such detections. Cognitive Task Analysis was performed in a plant in Sri Lanka where Total Productive Maintenance is being implemented to identify sensory types that would be used to detect machine abnormalities and relevant Ergonomic characteristics. As the outcome of this research, a methodology comprising of an Ergonomic Gap Analysis Matrix for machine abnormality detection is presented.

  18. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in subgroups of infertile men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dul, E C; Groen, H; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A; Dijkhuizen, T; van Echten-Arends, J; Land, J A

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is assumed to be higher in infertile men and inversely correlated with sperm concentration. Although guidelines advise karyotyping infertile men, karyotyping is costly, therefore it would be of benefit to identify men with the highest risk of chromosomal abnormalities, possibly by using parameters other than sperm concentration. The aim of this study was to evaluate several clinical parameters in azoospermic and non-azoospermic men, in order to assess the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in different subgroups of infertile men. In a retrospective cohort of 1223 azoospermic men and men eligible for ICSI treatment, we studied sperm parameters, hormone levels and medical history for an association with chromosomal abnormalities. The prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in the cohort was 3.1%. No association was found between chromosomal abnormalities and sperm volume, concentration, progressive motility or total motile sperm count. Azoospermia was significantly associated with the presence of a chromosomal abnormality [15.2%, odds ratio (OR) 7.70, P chromosomal abnormalities (OR 2.96, P = 0.013). Azoospermic men with a positive andrologic history had a lower prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities than azoospermic men with an uneventful history (OR 0.28, P = 0.047). In non-azoospermic men, we found that none of the studied variables were associated with the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities. We show that the highest prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities is found in hypergonadotrophic azoospermic men with an uneventful andrologic history.

  19. Meiotic abnormalities and spermatogenic parameters in severe oligoasthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrell, J M; García, F; Veiga, A; Calderón, G; Egozcue, S; Egozcue, J; Barri, P N

    1999-02-01

    The incidence of meiotic abnormalities and their relationship with different spermatogenic parameters was assessed in 103 male patients with presumably idiopathic severe oligoasthenozoospermia (motile sperm concentration Meiotic patterns included normal meiosis and two meiotic abnormalities, i.e. severe arrest and synaptic anomalies. A normal pattern was found in 64 (62.1%), severe arrest in 21 (20.4%) and synaptic anomalies in 18 (17.5%). The overall rate of meiotic abnormalities was 37.9%. Most (66.7%) meiotic abnormalities occurred in patients with a sperm concentration meiotic abnormalities were found in 57.8% of the patients; of these, 26.7% had synaptic anomalies. When the sperm concentration was meiotic abnormalities occurred in 54.8% (synaptic anomalies in 22.6%). There were statistically significant differences among the three meiotic patterns in relation to sperm concentration (P 10 IU/l were the only predictors of meiotic abnormalities.

  20. Lack of significant effect of bilastine administered at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses and concomitantly with ketoconazole on ventricular repolarization: results of a thorough QT study (TQTS) with QT-concentration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyl, Benoît; Kabbaj, Meriam; Azzam, Sara; Sologuren, Ander; Valiente, Román; Reinbolt, Elizabeth; Roupe, Kathryn; Blanco, Nathalie; Wheeler, William

    2012-06-01

    The effect of bilastine on cardiac repolarization was studied in 30 healthy participants during a multiple-dose, triple-dummy, crossover, thorough QT study that included 5 arms: placebo, active control (400 mg moxifloxacin), bilastine at therapeutic and supratherapeutic doses (20 mg and 100 mg once daily, respectively), and bilastine 20 mg administered with ketoconazole 400 mg. Time-matched, triplicate electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded with 13 time points extracted predose and 16 extracted over 72 hours post day 4 dosing. Four QT/RR corrections were implemented: QTcB; QTcF; a linear individual correction (QTcNi), the primary correction; and a nonlinear one (QTcNnl). Moxifloxacin was associated with a significant increase in QTcNi at all time points between 1 and 12 hours, inclusively. Bilastine administration at 20 mg and 100 mg had no clinically significant impact on QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 5.02 ms; upper confidence limit [UCL] of the 1-sided, 95% confidence interval, 7.87 ms). Concomitant administration of ketoconazole and bilastine 20 mg induced a clinically relevant increase in QTc (maximum increase in QTcNi, 9.3 ms; UCL, 12.16 ms). This result was most likely related to the cardiac effect of ketoconazole because for all time points, bilastine plasma concentrations were lower than those observed following the supratherapeutic dose.

  1. The Role of the Ratio of J-Point Elevation Magnitude and R-Wave Amplitude on the Same ECG Lead in the Risk Stratification of Subjects With Early Repolarization Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu-Miao; Ji, Cheng-Cheng; Cheng, Yun-Jiu; Liu, Li-Juan; Zhu, Wei-Qi; Huang, Ying; Chen, Wei-Ying; Wu, Su-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Just as high-risk populations for cardiac arrest exist in patients with Brugada syndrome or long QT syndrome, high-risk and low-risk populations for cardiac arrest also exist in patients with early repolarization pattern (ERP). Electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics can aid the risk stratification of patients with ERP. Electrocardiographic parameters such as magnitude of J-point elevation and J/R ratio were measured. The magnitude of J-point elevation, leads with J points elevated, J/R ratio, morphology of the ST segment, and QT/QTc interval were used in comparative analysis in 2 groups: 57 patients with ERP and cardiac arrest (cardiac arrest group) and 100 patients with ERP but without cardiac arrest (control group). There was no statistical difference in clinical characteristics of the 2 groups. The J/R ratio in the cardiac arrest group was significantly higher than in the control group (26.8% ± 18.1% vs 16.3% ± 10.3%, respectively; P J/R ratio and horizontal/descending ST segment were independently associated with increased risk of cardiac arrest in patients with ERP. In patients with ERP and cardiac arrest, J/R ratios were relatively higher and mostly with horizontal/descending ST segments, suggesting that J/R ratio and ST-segment morphology may be used as indicators for risk stratification in patients with ERP. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ivabradine prolongs phase 3 of cardiac repolarization and blocks the hERG1 (KCNH2) current over a concentration-range overlapping with that required to block HCN4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees-Miller, James P; Guo, Jiqing; Wang, Yibo; Perissinotti, Laura L; Noskov, Sergei Y; Duff, Henry J

    2015-08-01

    In Europe, ivabradine has recently been approved to treat patients with angina who have intolerance to beta blockers and/or heart failure. Ivabradine is considered to act specifically on the sinoatrial node by inhibiting the If current (the funny current) to slow automaticity. However, in vitro studies show that ivabradine prolongs phase 3 repolarization in ventricular tissue. No episodes of Torsades de Pointes have been reported in randomized clinical studies. The objective of this study is to assess whether ivabradine blocked the hERG1 current. In the present study we discovered that ivabradine prolongs action potential and blocks the hERG current over a range of concentrations overlapping with those required to block HCN4. Ivabradine produced tonic, rather than use-dependent block. The mutation Y652A significantly suppressed pharmacologic block of hERG by ivabradine. Disruption of C-type inactivation also suppressed block of hERG1 by ivabradine. Molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that ivabradine may access the inner cavity of the hERG1 via a lipophilic route and has a well-defined binding site in the closed state of the channel. Structural organization of the binding pockets for ivabradine is discussed. Ivabradine blocks hERG and prolongs action potential duration. Our study is potentially important because it indicates the need for active post marketing surveillance of ivabradine. Importantly, proarrhythmia of a number of other drugs has only been discovered during post marketing surveillance.

  3. Association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities of the knee, the trauma mechanism and associated soft-tissue knee injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Nicole [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Department of Forensic Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Forensic Medicine, Zurich (Switzerland); Andreisek, Gustav; Karer, Anissja T.; Manoliu, Andrei; Ulbrich, Erika J. [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Bouaicha, Samy [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Trauma Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Naraghi, Ali [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Seifert, Burkhardt [University of Zurich, Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Prevention Institute, Department of Biostatistics, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the association between traumatic bone marrow abnormalities, the knee injury mechanism, and associated soft tissue injuries in a larger cohort than those in the published literature. Retrospective study including 220 patients with traumatic knee injuries. Knee MRIs were evaluated for trauma mechanism, soft tissue injury, and the location of bone marrow abnormalities. The locations of the abnormalities were correlated with trauma mechanisms and soft tissue injuries using the chi-square test with Bonferroni correction. One hundred and forty-four valgus injuries, 39 pivot shift injuries, 25 lateral patellar dislocations, 8 hyperextensions, and 4 dashboard injuries were included. Valgus and pivot shift injuries showed traumatic bone marrow abnormalities in the posterolateral regions of the tibia. Abnormalities after patellar dislocation were found in the anterolateral and centrolateral femur and patella. Hyperextension injuries were associated with abnormalities in almost all regions, and dashboard injuries were associated with changes in the anterior regions of the tibia and femur. Our study provides evidence of associations between traumatic bone marrow abnormality patterns and different trauma mechanisms in acute knee injury, and reveals some overlap, especially of the two most common trauma mechanisms (valgus and pivot shift), in a large patient cohort. (orig.)

  4. The MsrA knockout mouse exhibits abnormal behavior and brain dopamine levels

    OpenAIRE

    Oien, Derek B.; Osterhaus, Greg L.; Latif, Shaheen A.; Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Fulks, Jenny; Johnson, Michael; Fowler, Stephen C.; Moskovitz, Jackob

    2008-01-01

    Oxidative stress can cause methionine oxidation that has been implicated in various proteins malfunctions, if not adequately reduced by the methionine sulfoxide reductase system. Recent evidence has found oxidized methionine residues in neurodegenerative conditions. Previously, we have described elevated levels of brain pathologies and an abnormal walking pattern in the methionine sulfoxide reductase A knockout (MsrA−/−) mouse. Here we show that MsrA−/− mice have compromised complex task lear...

  5. Abnormal uterine bleeding: a clinicohistopathological analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupamasuresh Y

    2014-06-01

    Methods: In our prospective study of 359 Patients of the age between 46 and 73 years, clinical characteristics and the pattern of endometrial histopathology and their association in women, who present with abnormal uterine bleeding, are categorised into six groups. Results: In our study, a significant correlation of histopathology and BMI was observed with endometrial hyperplasia and malignancy in obese patient i.e. 37 out 96 and 13 out of 23 respectively. The incidence of malignancy has been increasing with the age being 1.6% in 46-50 years to 60% in 70-75 years. In our study 116 (32.3% had hypertension, 33 patients (9.2% had diabetes mellitus, 40 patients (11.1% had hypothyroidism. Conclusions: We found a maximum incidence of AUB in multiparous women. Clinicohistopathological analysis of AUB revealed endometrial hyperplasia in majority of patients. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(3.000: 656-661

  6. Kidney abnormalities in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Revuelta, K; Ricard Andrés, M P

    2011-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell disease exhibits numerous kidney structural and functional abnormalities, changes that are seen along the entire length of the nephron. Changes are most marked in patients with homozygous sickle cell anemia, but are also seen in those with compound heterozygous states and the sickle cell trait. The renal features of sickle cell disease include some of the most common reasons for referral to nephrologists, such as hematuria, proteinuria, tubular disturbances and chronic kidney disease. Therapy of these conditions requires specialized knowledge of their distinct pathogenic mechanisms. Spanish Haemathology and Hemotherapy Association has recently publicated their Clinical Practice Guidelines of SCD management. Renal chapter is reproduced in this article for Nefrología difussion.

  7. Persistent Pain and Sensory Abnormalities after Abdominoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Presman, Benjamin; Finnerup, Kenneth; Andresen, Sven Robert

    2015-01-01

    and characteristics of persistent pain after abdominoplasty, which is one of the most frequent cosmetic surgical procedures. METHODS: In September 2014, a link to a web-based questionnaire was mailed to 217 patients who had undergone abdominoplasty between 2006 and 2014 at the Department of Plastic Surgery, Aalborg....... Fourteen patients (8.2%) reported pain within the past 7 days related to the abdominoplasty. Abnormal abdominal skin sensation was common and reported by 138 patients (81%). Sensory hypersensitivity was associated with the presence of persistent pain. Satisfaction with the procedure was reported by 149 (88...... sensation was common. However, there is a risk of developing persistent neuropathic pain after abdominoplasty, and patients should be informed about this before surgery....

  8. Abnormal Presentation of Choriocarcinoma and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Zohreh; Mottaghi, Mansorhe; Rezaei, Alireza; Ghasemian, Sedighe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms have highly been malignant potential, which usually occurred in child-bearing age women. Unusual feature of this malignancy would be rare, it was important to take in mind the possibility of GTN in different manifestation. Based on the above mentioned, the aim of this presentation would be the management and outcome of a case series of choriocarcinoma patients with abnormal manifestation. Case Presentation We have presented four patients, first who initially manifestation with signs of septic shock, the second case with severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage, the third case with postpartum infection and the forth case was a postmenopausal bleeding patient. Conclusions In case of metastatic choriocarcinoma with precise history, accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment have led us to curable results. PMID:27482332

  9. [Ultrasonic diagnosis of congenital uterine abnormalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, A; Fendel, H

    1988-01-01

    1-2% of women has abnormal uterine development due to nonunification of the Müllerian ducts in the embryonal period. At the RWTH Aachen, in the department of gynaecology and obstetrics, between January and June 1987, we had searched systematically for maldevelopment of the uterus in 2299 echosonografies. In 13 cases we found maldevelopment of internal genital; 5 of these cases were diagnosed by an echosonografic routine-examination. The echografic criteria of the different grades of uterine malformations have been determined, systematized and discussed in relation to the symptoms. The most frequent malformations as uterus subseptus, uterus septus, uterus bicornis and uterus duplex are subject of a detailed discussion. This work demonstrates that echosonografic is a very efficient instrument to diagnose uterine malformations and gives us a very exact anatomic interpretation of malformations.

  10. "Idiopathic" mental retardation and new chromosomal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, Cinzia; Lo-Castro, Adriana; El-Malhany, Nadia; Curatolo, Paolo

    2010-02-14

    Mental retardation is a heterogeneous condition, affecting 1-3% of general population. In the last few years, several emerging clinical entities have been described, due to the advent of newest genetic techniques, such as array Comparative Genomic Hybridization. The detection of cryptic microdeletion/microduplication abnormalities has allowed genotype-phenotype correlations, delineating recognizable syndromic conditions that are herein reviewed. With the aim to provide to Paediatricians a combined clinical and genetic approach to the child with cognitive impairment, a practical diagnostic algorithm is also illustrated. The use of microarray platforms has further reduced the percentage of "idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, previously accounted for about half of total cases. We discussed the putative pathways at the basis of remaining "pure idiopathic" forms of mental retardation, highlighting possible environmental and epigenetic mechanisms as causes of altered cognition.

  11. Abnormal epidermal changes after argon laser treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, R.A.; Knobler, R.M.; Aberer, E.; Klein, W.; Kocsis, F.; Ott, E. (Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1991-02-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a congenital port-wine stain on the forehead was treated three times at 2-month intervals with an argon laser. Six months after the last treatment, moderate blanching and mild scaling confined to the treated area was observed. A biopsy specimen of the treated area revealed a significant decrease in ectatic vessels. However, epidermal changes similar to those of actinic keratosis with disorganized cell layers and marked cytologic abnormalities were seen. Analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes for a defect in DNA repair was negative. Multiple, argon laser-induced photothermal effects may be responsible for the changes observed in our case and may lead to premalignant epidermal transformation.

  12. Computed tomography of the abnormal thymus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, R.L.; Lee, J.K.T.; Sagel, S.S.; Levitt, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) should be the imaging method of choice following plain chest radiographs when a suspected thymic abnormality requires further evaluation. Based upon a six-year experience, including the evaluation of 25 patients with thymic pathology, CT was found useful in suggesting or excluding a diagnosis of thymoma and in distinguishing thymic hyperplasis from thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis. The thickness of the thymic lobes determined by CT was found to be a more accurate indicator of infiltrative disease (thymic hyperplasia and lymphoma) than the width. CT was helpful in differentiating benign thymic cysts from solid tumors, and in defining the extent of a thymic neoplasms. On occasion, CT may suggest the specific histologic nature of a thymic lesion.

  13. Residual gait abnormalities in surgically treated spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelokov, A; Haideri, N; Roach, J

    1993-11-01

    The authors retrospectively studied seven patients who had in situ fusion as adolescents for high-grade (IV, V) spondylolisthesis unresponsive to more conservative means. All patients achieved solid bony union; their pain was relieved; and hamstring spasm had resolved. The authors sought to determine whether crouch gait or any other abnormalities could be demonstrated in patients exhibiting clinical parameters of success. Each patient underwent gait analysis, radiographic analysis, and a physical examination. Four of seven patients demonstrated slight degrees of forward trunk lean during varying phases of gait accompanied by increased hip flexion. One patient demonstrated increased trunk extension accompanied by limited hip flexion. Two patients were essentially normal. The authors were unable to quantify residual crouch in these patients with solidly fused high-grade spondylolisthesis.

  14. Neurostructural Abnormalities in Pediatric Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawn, Jeffrey R.; Hamm, Lisa; Fitzgerald, Daniel A.; Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Monk, Christopher S.; Phan, K. Luan

    2015-01-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated abnormalities in fear and threat processing systems in youth with anxiety disorders; however, the structural neuroanatomy of these systems in children and adolescents remains largely unknown. Using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), gray matter volumes were compared between 38 medication-free patients with anxiety disorders (generalized anxiety disorder; social phobia; separation anxiety disorder, mean age: 14.4 ± 3 years) and 27 comparison subjects (mean age: 14.8 ± 4 years). Compared to healthy subjects, youth with anxiety disorders had larger gray matter volumes in the dorsal anterior cingulate and had decreased gray matter volumes in the inferior frontal gyrus (ventrolateral prefrontal cortex), postcentral gyrus, and cuneus/precuneus. These data suggest the presence of structural differences in regions previously implicated in the processing and regulation of fear in pediatric patients with anxiety disorders. PMID:25890287

  15. States of 13C with abnormal radii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demyanova A.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Differential cross-sections of the elastic and inelastic 13C + α scattering were measured at E(α = 90 MeV. The root mean-square radii( of 13C nucleus in the states: 8.86 (1/2−, 3.09 (1/2+ and 9.90 (3/2− MeV were determined by the Modified diffraction model (MDM. The radii of the first two levels are enhanced compared to that of the ground state of 13C, confirming the suggestion that the 8.86 MeV state is an analogue of the Hoyle state in 12C and the 3.09 MeV state has a neutron halo. Some indications to the abnormally small size of the 9.90 MeV state were obtained.

  16. Skeletal muscle abnormalities in patients with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, N J; Park, J H

    1998-06-01

    Widespread muscle pain and tender points are the most common complaints of fibromyalgia patients, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for these symptoms have been studied intensively during the past decade. It has been suggested that fatigue and pain may lead to decreased levels of physical activity in many patients. The resulting deconditioned state may itself contribute to muscle abnormalities. Associated symptoms such as disturbed sleep, anxiety, depression, or irritable bowel also may have a negative impact on muscle function and level of daily activities. The important interactions between the central nervous and musculoskeletal systems may involve another element, the neuroendocrine stress-response system. This review will consider both the current state of knowledge and also future studies which might be designed to answer more effectively the outstanding questions regarding the underlying pathogenesis of fibromyalgia.

  17. Eye-head coordination abnormalities in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eye-movement abnormalities in schizophrenia are a well-established phenomenon that has been observed in many studies. In such studies, visual targets are usually presented in the center of the visual field, and the subject's head remains fixed. However, in every-day life, targets may also appear in the periphery. This study is among the first to investigate eye and head movements in schizophrenia by presenting targets in the periphery of the visual field. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Two different visual recognition tasks, color recognition and Landolt orientation tasks, were presented at the periphery (at a visual angle of 55° from the center of the field of view. Each subject viewed 96 trials, and all eye and head movements were simultaneously recorded using video-based oculography and magnetic motion tracking of the head. Data from 14 patients with schizophrenia and 14 controls were considered. The patients had similar saccadic latencies in both tasks, whereas controls had shorter saccadic latencies in the Landolt task. Patients performed more head movements, and had increased eye-head offsets during combined eye-head shifts than controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Patients with schizophrenia may not be able to adapt to the two different tasks to the same extent as controls, as seen by the former's task-specific saccadic latency pattern. This can be interpreted as a specific oculomotoric attentional dysfunction and may support the hypothesis that schizophrenia patients have difficulties determining the relevance of stimuli. Patients may also show an uneconomic over-performance of head-movements, which is possibly caused by alterations in frontal executive function that impair the inhibition of head shifts. In addition, a model was created explaining 93% of the variance of the response times as a function of eye and head amplitude, which was only observed in the controls, indicating abnormal eye-head coordination in patients

  18. Abnormally phosphorylated tau is associated with neuronal and axonal loss in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J M; Hampton, D W; Patani, R; Pryce, G; Crowther, R A; Reynolds, R; Franklin, R J M; Giovannoni, G; Compston, D A S; Baker, D; Spillantini, M G; Chandran, S

    2008-07-01

    The pathological correlate of clinical disability and progression in multiple sclerosis is neuronal and axonal loss; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Abnormal phosphorylation of tau is a common feature of some neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. We investigated the presence of tau hyperphosphorylation and its relationship with neuronal and axonal loss in chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (CEAE) and in brain samples from patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. We report the novel finding of abnormal tau phosphorylation in CEAE. We further show that accumulation of insoluble tau is associated with both neuronal and axonal loss that correlates with progression from relapsing-remitting to chronic stages of EAE. Significantly, analysis of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis brain tissue also revealed abnormally phosphorylated tau and the formation of insoluble tau. Together, these observations provide the first evidence implicating abnormal tau in the neurodegenerative phase of tissue injury in experimental and human demyelinating disease.

  19. Environmentally toxicant exposures induced intragenerational transmission of liver abnormalities in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Al-Griw

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental toxicants such as chemicals, heavy metals, and pesticides have been shown to promote transgenerational inheritance of abnormal phenotypes and/or diseases to multiple subsequent generations following parental and/ or ancestral exposures. This study was designed to examine the potential transgenerational action of the environmental toxicant trichloroethane (TCE on transmission of liver abnormality, and to elucidate the molecular etiology of hepatocyte cell damage. A total of thirty two healthy immature female albino mice were randomly divided into three equal groups as follows: a sham group, which did not receive any treatment; a vehicle group, which received corn oil alone, and TCE treated group (3 weeks, 100 μg/kg i.p., every 4th day. The F0 and F1 generation control and TCE populations were sacrificed at the age of four months, and various abnormalities histpathologically investigated. Cell death and oxidative stress indices were also measured. The present study provides experimental evidence for the inheritance of environmentally induced liver abnormalities in mice. The results of this study show that exposure to the TCE promoted adult onset liver abnormalities in F0 female mice as well as unexposed F1 generation offspring. It is the first study to report a transgenerational liver abnormalities in the F1 generation mice through maternal line prior to gestation. This finding was based on careful evaluation of liver histopathological abnormalities, apoptosis of hepatocytes, and measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and nitric oxide in control and TCE populations. There was an increase in liver histopathological abnormalities, cell death, and oxidative lipid damage in F0 and F1 hepatic tissues of TCE treated group. In conclusion, this study showed that the biological and health impacts of environmental toxicant TCE do not end in maternal adults, but are passed on to offspring

  20. Cerebellum abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    Full Text Available Although there is increasing evidence suggesting that there may be subtle abnormalities in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE patients using modern neuroimaging techniques, most of these previous studies focused on the brain grey matter, leaving the underlying white matter abnormalities in IGE largely unknown, which baffles the treatment as well as the understanding of IGE. In this work, we adopted multiple methods from different levels based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to analyze the white matter abnormalities in 14 young male IGE patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS only, comparing with 29 age-matched male healthy controls. First, we performed a voxel-based analysis (VBA of the fractional anisotropy (FA images derived from DTI. Second, we used a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS method to explore the alterations within the white matter skeleton of the patients. Third, we adopted region-of-interest (ROI analyses based on the findings of VBA and TBSS to further confirm abnormal brain regions in the patients. At last, considering the convergent evidences we found by VBA, TBSS and ROI analyses, a subsequent probabilistic fiber tractography study was performed to investigate the abnormal white matter connectivity in the patients. Significantly decreased FA values were consistently observed in the cerebellum of patients, providing fresh evidence and new clues for the important role of cerebellum in IGE with GTCS.

  1. Connectomics and graph theory analyses: Novel insights into network abnormalities in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Kocher, Madison; Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-11-01

    The assessment of neural networks in epilepsy has become increasingly relevant in the context of translational research, given that localized forms of epilepsy are more likely to be related to abnormal function within specific brain networks, as opposed to isolated focal brain pathology. It is notable that variability in clinical outcomes from epilepsy treatment may be a reflection of individual patterns of network abnormalities. As such, network endophenotypes may be important biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of epilepsy. Despite its exceptional potential, measuring abnormal networks in translational research has been thus far constrained by methodologic limitations. Fortunately, recent advancements in neuroscience, particularly in the field of connectomics, permit a detailed assessment of network organization, dynamics, and function at an individual level. Data from the personal connectome can be assessed using principled forms of network analyses based on graph theory, which may disclose patterns of organization that are prone to abnormal dynamics and epileptogenesis. Although the field of connectomics is relatively new, there is already a rapidly growing body of evidence to suggest that it can elucidate several important and fundamental aspects of abnormal networks to epilepsy. In this article, we provide a review of the emerging evidence from connectomics research regarding neural network architecture, dynamics, and function related to epilepsy. We discuss how connectomics may bring together pathophysiologic hypotheses from conceptual and basic models of epilepsy and in vivo biomarkers for clinical translational research. By providing neural network information unique to each individual, the field of connectomics may help to elucidate variability in clinical outcomes and open opportunities for personalized medicine approaches to epilepsy. Connectomics involves complex and rich data from each subject, thus collaborative efforts to enable the

  2. Elevated frequency of abnormalities in barn swallows from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Mousseau, T A; de Lope, F; Saino, N

    2007-08-22

    Ever since the Chernobyl accident in 1986, that contaminated vast areas in surrounding countries with radiation, abnormalities and birth defects have been reported in human populations. Recently, several studies suggested that the elevated frequency of such abnormalities can be attributed to poverty and stress in affected human populations. Here, we present long-term results for a free-living population of barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, demonstrating the presence of 11 morphological abnormalities in populations around Chernobyl, but much less frequently in an uncontaminated Ukrainian control population and three more distant control populations. The presence of these abnormalities in barn swallows is associated with reduced viability. These findings demonstrate a link between morphological abnormalities and radiation in an animal population that cannot be attributed to poverty and stress. The most parsimonious hypothesis for abnormalities in animal and human populations alike is that the effects are caused by the same underlying cause, viz. radiation derived from the Chernobyl accident.

  3. Abnormal grain growth in undoped strontium and barium titanate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeurer, M., E-mail: m.baeurer@ikm.uka.de [Institut fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Shih, S.-J.; Bishop, C. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Harmer, M.P. [Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States); Cockayne, D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Hoffmann, M.J. [Institut fuer Keramik im Maschinenbau, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Abnormal grain growth is a commonly observed phenomenon in perovskite materials. In order to study this phenomenon, grain growth experiments were conducted over a temperature range from 1425 to 1600 deg. C for the model system SrTiO{sub 3} to analyse the nucleation of abnormal grains and to identify the growth mechanism involved for normal and abnormal grains. Grain boundaries of normal and abnormal grains were investigated in quenched samples by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and by energy-dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope. No amorphous film was observed at the grain boundaries for either normal or abnormal grains. Non-stoichiometry at the grain boundaries was identified as a possible reason for the differences in growth speed. The results are compared to the nucleation and growth of abnormal grains in BaTiO{sub 3}.

  4. How Does Structured Sparsity Work in Abnormal Event Detection?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Huamin; Pan, Hong; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    behavior. Otherwise, it should be detected as an abnormal frame. However, it is infeasible to apply structured sparsity algorithms directly in abnormal event detection, which are mainly due to two reasons: 1) abnormal event detection has a highly biased training data - only normal videos are used during...... the training, which is the due to the fact that abnormal videos are limited or even unavailable in advance in most video surveillance applications. As a result, there could be only one label in the training data which hampers supervised learning; 2) Even though there are multiple types of normal behaviors, how...... structure learned from the training data could have a high bias and ruin the precision of abnormal event detection. Therefore, we in the paper propose an algorithm to solve the abnormality detection problem by sparse representation, in which local structured sparsity is preserved in coefficients. To better...

  5. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tueysuez, Beyhan [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Gazioglu, Nurperi [Istanbul University, Department of Neurosurgery, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Uenguer, Savas [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Aji, Dolly Yafet [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatrics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Tuerkmen, Seval [Istanbul University, Department of Pediatric Genetics, Cerrahpasa Medical School, Istanbul (Turkey); Universitatsklinikum Berlin, Charite Virchow-Klinik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered. (orig.)

  6. The time of onset of abnormal calcification in spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüysüz, Beyhan; Gazioğlu, Nurperi; Ungür, Savaş; Aji, Dolly Yafet; Türkmen, Seval

    2009-01-01

    A 1-month-old boy with shortness of extremities on prenatal US was referred to our department with a provisional diagnosis of achondroplasia. His height was normal but he had short extremities and platyspondyly, premature carpal epiphyses on both hands, and short tubular bones with irregular metaphyses on radiographs. Re-evaluation of the patient at the age of 1 year revealed very short height and premature calcification of the costal cartilages and epiphyses. Spondylometaepiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type was diagnosed. This condition is a very rare autosomal recessively inherited disorder, and most of the patients die in early childhood due to neurological involvement. At the age of 2 years and 5 months, a CT scan showed narrowing of the cervical spinal canal. One month later he died suddenly because of spinal cord injury. In conclusion early diagnosis is very important because the recurrence risk is high and patients may die due to early neurological complications. The time of onset of abnormal calcifications, a diagnostic finding of the disease, is at the age of around 1 year in most patients. When abnormal calcifications are not yet present, but radiological changes associated with SMED are present, this rare disease must be considered.

  7. Pyridoxine-Dependent Seizures and MRI Abnormality

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1996-01-01

    An infant with pyridoxine-dependent seizures and MRI, PET, and EEG evidence of diffuse structural or functional brain disease is reported from the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, and the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA.

  8. Abnormal Bleeding During Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women a...

  9. Metabolic abnormalities in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessein, Patrick H; Solomon, Ahmed; Hollan, Ivana

    2016-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) experience an increased cardiometabolic risk factor burden that is substantially driven by systemic inflammation. This occurs less consistently in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Psoriatic arthritis most strongly associates with excess adiposity and metabolic risk. RA patients also often have systemic inflammation-induced proinflammatory high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol particles and lean/muscle mass loss in association with increased adiposity, a condition termed rheumatoid cachexia, which further enhances cardiovascular risk. The presence of proinflammatory HDL and lean mass loss was also reported in patients with AS. Individualized aerobic and resistance exercise programs can improve body composition and metabolic risk factor profiles in RA and AS. Future studies should assess how long-term lifestyle changes can be effectuated and if these can influence cardiovascular events in inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Herein, we review the current evidence on metabolic abnormalities in inflammatory arthritis. We propose management strategies and a research agenda. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Affective psychosis, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and brain perfusion abnormalities: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loviselli Andrea

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently become evident that circulating thyroid antibodies are found in excess among patients suffering from mood disorders. Moreover, a manic episode associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis has recently been reported as the first case of bipolar disorder due to Hashimoto's encephalopathy. We report a case in which Hashimoto's thyroiditis was suspected to be involved in the deteriorating course of mood disorder and discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms linking thyroid autoimmunity with psychopathology. Case presentation A 43-year-old woman, with a history of recurrent depression since the age of 31, developed manic, psychotic, and soft neurological symptoms across the last three years in concomitance with her first diagnosis of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patient underwent a thorough medical and neurological workup. Circulating thyroperoxidase antibodies were highly elevated but thyroid function was adequately maintained with L-thyroxine substitution. EEG was normal and no other signs of current CNS inflammation were evidenced. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging evidenced several non-active lesions in the white matter from both hemispheres, suggestive of a non-specific past vasculitis. Brain single-photon emission computed tomography showed cortical perfusion asymmetry particularly between frontal lobes. Conclusion We hypothesize that abnormalities in cortical perfusion might represent a pathogenic link between thyroid autoimmunity and mood disorders, and that the rare cases of severe Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with mood disorder might be only the tip of an iceberg.

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in patients with autism spectrum disorders from Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiao-Mei; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Tsai, Wen-Che; Fang, Jye-Siung; Su, Ying-Cheng; Chou, Miao-Chun; Liu, Shih-Kai; Chou, Wen-Jiun; Wu, Yu-Yu; Chen, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by verbal communication impairments, social reciprocity deficits, and the presence of restricted interests and stereotyped behaviors. Genetic factors contribute to the incidence of ASD evidently. However, the genetic spectrum of ASD is highly heterogeneous. Chromosomal abnormalities contribute significantly to the genetic deficits of syndromic and non-syndromic ASD. In this study, we conducted karyotyping analysis in a sample of 500 patients (447 males, 53 females) with ASD from Taiwan, the largest cohort in Asia, to the best of our knowledge. We found three patients having sex chromosome aneuploidy, including two cases of 47, XXY and one case of 47, XYY. In addition, we detected a novel reciprocal chromosomal translocation between long arms of chromosomes 4 and 14, designated t(4;14)(q31.3;q24.1), in a patient with Asperger's disorder. This translocation was inherited from his unaffected father, suggesting it might not be pathogenic or it needs further hits to become pathogenic. In line with other studies, our study revealed that subjects with sex chromosomal aneuploidy are liable to neurodevelopmental disorders, including ASD, and conventional karyotyping analysis is still a useful tool in detecting chromosomal translocation in patients with ASD, given that array-based comparative genomic hybridization technology can provide better resolution in detecting copy number variations of genomic DNA.

  12. Hematological abnormalities in severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Allison L; Gaudiani, Jennifer L; Statland, Barbara; Mehler, Philip S

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of hematologic abnormalities in adults with severe anorexia nervosa. We report the first major analysis of hematologic dysfunction in such patients. We retrospectively analyzed the charts of 53 men and women with severe anorexia nervosa, admitted between October 2008 and December 2010 for medical stabilization to our center, which has a national referral base. Patients were predominantly female (89 %), with a median age of 28 years (range 17-65), and were hospitalized for a median duration of 15 days (I.Q.R. 9-29). Nadir body mass index during hospitalization was markedly low at 12.4 kg/m(2) (range 8.4-15.7), and the mean discharge BMI was 13.8 kg/m(2) (range 10.2-16.8). 83 % of patients were anemic (hematocrit  400 k/μL) during their hospitalization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had resolved their neutropenia by discharge. Marked hematologic deficiencies are often present in patients with severe anorexia nervosa, generally attributed to starvation-mediated gelatinous marrow transformation which resolves with proper nutritional rehabilitation. Improved provider awareness of this association may reduce unnecessary testing and costly treatment interventions.

  13. Gait abnormalities following slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kit M; Halliday, Suzanne; Reilly, Chris; Keezel, William

    2004-01-01

    The authors evaluated 30 subjects with treated unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis and a range of severity from mild to severe to characterize gait and strength abnormalities using instrumented three-dimensional gait analysis and isokinetic muscle testing. For slip angles less than 30 degrees, kinematic, kinetic, and strength variables were not significantly different from age- and weight-matched controls. For moderate to severe slips, as slip angle increased, passive hip flexion, hip abduction, and internal rotation in the flexed and extended positions decreased significantly. Persistent pelvic obliquity, medial lateral trunk sway, and trunk obliquity in stance increased, as did extension, adduction, and external rotation during gait. Gait velocity and step length decreased with increased amount of time spent in double limb stance. Hip abductor moment, hip extension moment, knee flexion moment, and ankle dorsiflexion moment were all decreased on the involved side. Hip and knee strength also decreased with increasing slip severity. All of these changes were present on the affected and to a lesser degree the unaffected side. Body center of mass translation or pelvic obliquity in mid-stance greater than one standard deviation above normal correlated well with the impression of compensated or uncompensated Trendelenburg gait.

  14. Abnormal hopping conduction in semiconducting polycrystalline graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongho; Mitchel, William C.; Elhamri, Said; Grazulis, Larry; Altfeder, Igor

    2013-07-01

    We report the observation of an abnormal carrier transport phenomenon in polycrystalline semiconducting graphene grown by solid carbon source molecular beam epitaxy. At the lowest temperatures in samples with small grain size, the conduction does not obey the two-dimensional Mott-type variable-range hopping (VRH) conduction often reported in semiconducting graphene. The hopping exponent p is found to deviate from the 1/3 value expected for Mott VRH with several samples exhibiting a p=2/5 dependence. We also show that the maximum energy difference between hopping sites is larger than the activation energy for nearest-neighbor hopping, violating the assumptions of the Mott model. The 2/5 dependence more closely agrees with the quasi-one-dimensional VRH model proposed by Fogler, Teber, and Shklovskii (FTS). In the FTS model, conduction occurs by tunneling between neighboring metallic wires. We suggest that metallic edge states and conductive grain boundaries play the role of the metallic wires in the FTS model.

  15. Control of Abnormal Synchronization in Neurological Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr V. Popovych

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system synchronization processes play an important role, e.g., in the context of information processing and motor control. However, pathological, excessive synchronization may strongly impair brain function and is a hallmark of several neurological disorders. This focused review addresses the question of how an abnormal neuronal synchronization can specifically be counteracted by invasive and non-invasive brain stimulation as, for instance, by deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease, or by acoustic stimulation for the treatment of tinnitus. On the example of coordinated reset (CR neuromodulation we illustrate how insights into the dynamics of complex systems contribute to successful model-based approaches, which use methods from synergetics, nonlinear dynamics, and statistical physics, for the development of novel therapies for normalization of brain function and synaptic connectivity. Based on the intrinsic multistability of the neuronal populations induced by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP,CR neuromodulation utilizes the mutual interdependence between synaptic connectivity and dynamics of the neuronal networks in order to restore more physiological patterns of connectivity via desynchronization of neuronal activity. The very goal is to shift the neuronal population by stimulation from anabnormally coupled and synchronized state to a desynchronized regime with normalized synaptic connectivity, which significantly outlasts the stimulation cessation, so that long-lasting therapeutic effects can be achieved.

  16. Electroencephalographic abnormalities in antisocial personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada-Reyes, Ana; Alvarez-Amador, Alfredo; Galán-García, Lídice; Valdés-Sosa, Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    The presence of brain dysfunction in violent offenders has been frequently examined with inconsistent results. The aim of the study was to assess the EEG of 84 violent offenders by visual inspection and frequency-domain quantitative analysis in 84 violent prisoners. Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (LORETA) was also employed for theta band of the EEG spectra. Antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) was present in 50 of the offenders and it was absent in the remaining 34. The prevalence of EEG abnormalities, by visual inspection, was similar for both the ASPD group (82%) and non-ASPD group (79%). The brain topography of these anomalies also did not differ between groups, in contrast to results of the EEG quantitative analysis (QEEG) and LORETA that showed remarkable regional differences between both groups. QEEG analysis showed a pattern of excess of theta-delta activities and decrease of alpha band on the right fronto-temporal and left temporo-parietal regions in the ASPD group. LORETA signified an increase of theta activity (5.08 Hz) in ASPD group relative to non-ASPD group within left temporal and parietal regions. Findings indicate that QEEG analysis and techniques of source localization may reveal differences in brain electrical activity among offenders with ASPD, which was not obvious to visual inspection.

  17. Brain MRI abnormalities in neuromyelitis optica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Fei, E-mail: feiwang1973@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Liu Yaou, E-mail: asiaeurope80@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Duan Yunyun, E-mail: duanyun2003@sohu.com [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Li Kuncheng, E-mail: kunchengli@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China); Education Ministry Key Laboratory for Neurodegenerative Disease, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, 45 Chang-Chun St, Xuanwu District, Beijing 100053 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore brain MRI findings in neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and to investigate specific brain lesions with respect to the localization of aquaporin-4 (AQP-4). Materials and methods: Forty admitted patients (36 women) who satisfied the 2006 criteria of Wingerchuk et al. for NMO were included in this study. All patients received a neurological examination and MRI scanning including brain and spinal cord. MRIs were classified as normal, nonspecific, multiple sclerosis-like, typical abnormalities. MS-like lesions were too few to satisfy the Barkhof et al. criteria for MS. Confluent lesions involving high AQP-4 regions were considered typical. Non-enhancing deep white matter lesions other than MS-like lesions or typical lesions were classified as nonspecific. Results: Brain MRI lesions were delineated in 12 patients (25%). Four patients (10%) had hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions. Six (15%) patients were nonspecific, and 2 (5%) patients had multiple sclerosis-like lesions. Conclusion: Brain MRIs are negative in most NMO, and brain lesions do not exclude the diagnosis of NMO. Hypothalamus, brainstem or periventricle lesions, corresponding to high sites of AQP-4 in the brain, are indicative of lesions of NMO.

  18. Imaging findings in fetal diaphragmatic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor; Gudinchet, Francois [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Unit of Radiopediatrics, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Meuli, Reto [University Hospital Center of Lausanne, Department of Radiology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-12-15

    Imaging plays a key role in the detection of a diaphragmatic pathology in utero. US is the screening method, but MRI is increasingly performed. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is by far the most often diagnosed diaphragmatic pathology, but unilateral or bilateral eventration or paralysis can also be identified. Extralobar pulmonary sequestration can be located in the diaphragm and, exceptionally, diaphragmatic tumors or secondary infiltration of the diaphragm from tumors originating from an adjacent organ have been observed in utero. Congenital abnormalities of the diaphragm impair normal lung development. Prenatal imaging provides a detailed anatomical evaluation of the fetus and allows volumetric lung measurements. The comparison of these data with those from normal fetuses at the same gestational age provides information about the severity of pulmonary hypoplasia and improves predictions about the fetus's outcome. This information can help doctors and families to make decisions about management during pregnancy and after birth. We describe a wide spectrum of congenital pathologies of the diaphragm and analyze their embryological basis. Moreover, we describe their prenatal imaging findings with emphasis on MR studies, discuss their differential diagnosis and evaluate the limits of imaging methods in predicting postnatal outcome. (orig.)

  19. Abnormal tyrosine metabolism in chronic cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Giovanni; Leone, Massimo; Bussone, Gennaro; Fiore, Paola Di; Bolner, Andrea; Aguggia, Marco; Saracco, Maria Gabriella; Perini, Francesco; Giordano, Giuseppe; Gucciardi, Antonina; Leon, Alberta

    2017-02-01

    Objective Episodic cluster headache is characterized by abnormalities in tyrosine metabolism (i.e. elevated levels of dopamine, tyramine, octopamine and synephrine and low levels of noradrenalin in plasma and platelets.) It is unknown, however, if such biochemical anomalies are present and/or constitute a predisposing factor in chronic cluster headache. To test this hypothesis, we measured the levels of dopamine and noradrenaline together with those of elusive amines, such as tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, in plasma of chronic cluster patients and control individuals. Methods Plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and trace amines, including tyramine, octopamine and synephrine, were measured in a group of 23 chronic cluster headache patients (10 chronic cluster ab initio and 13 transformed from episodic cluster), and 16 control participants. Results The plasma levels of dopamine, noradrenaline and tyramine were several times higher in chronic cluster headache patients compared with controls. The levels of octopamine and synephrine were significantly lower in plasma of these patients with respect to control individuals. Conclusions These results suggest that anomalies in tyrosine metabolism play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic cluster headache and constitute a predisposing factor for the transformation of the episodic into a chronic form of this primary headache.

  20. Abnormal parietal function in conversion paresis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marije van Beilen

    Full Text Available The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms.

  1. Coagulation abnormalities in the cirrhotic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muciño-Bermejo, Jimena; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Uribe, Misael; Méndez-Sánchez, Nahum

    2013-01-01

    The clotting process is a dynamic array of multiple processes which can be described in four phases: platelet plug initiation and formation, clotting process propagation by the coagulation cascade, clotting termination by antithrombotic mechanisms and clot removal by fibrinolysis. The liver plays a central role in each of these phases of clotting process, as it synthesizes the majority of coagulation factors and proteins involved in fibrinolysis as well as thrombopoeitin, which is responsible for platelet production from megakaryocytes. Many pathological processes associated with cirrhosis, such as portal hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, as well as co-morbid conditions, may also alter the coagulation process. Consequently, patients with liver disease have a disturbed balance of procoagulant and anti-coagulant factors which deviates from the normal coagulation cascade. This situation poses an additional problem in the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to this group of patients, since traditional coagulation test may not be reliable for assessing bleeding or thrombotic risk and traditional transfusional strategies may not be applicable in cirrhotic patients. In this article, we review the pathophysiological bases of coagulation abnormalities, in cirrhotic patients, the diagnostic therapeutic strategies to be followed and its impact on the clinical outcome in the cirrhotic patient.

  2. Abnormal Parietal Function in Conversion Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beilen, Marije; de Jong, Bauke M.; Gieteling, Esther W.; Renken, Remco; Leenders, Klaus L.

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of medically unexplained symptoms such as conversion disorder is poorly understood. This is partly because the interpretation of neuroimaging results in conversion paresis has been complicated by the use of different control groups, tasks and statistical comparisons. The present study includes these different aspects in a single data set. In our study we included both normal controls and feigners to control for conversion paresis. We studied both movement execution and imagery, and we contrasted both within-group and between-group activation. Moreover, to reveal hemisphere-specific effects that have not been reported before, we performed these analyses using both flipped and unflipped data. This approach resulted in the identification of abnormal parietal activation which was specific for conversion paresis patients. Patients also showed reduced activity in the prefrontal cortex, supramarginal gyrus and precuneus, including hemisphere-specific activation that is lateralized in the same hemisphere, regardless of right- or left-sided paresis. We propose that these regions are candidates for an interface between psychological mechanisms and disturbed higher-order motor control. Our study presents an integrative neurophysiological view of the mechanisms that contribute to the etiology of this puzzling psychological disorder, which can be further investigated with other types of conversion symptoms. PMID:22039428

  3. Abnormal high density lipoproteins in cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shore, V. (Lawrence Livermore Lab., CA); Salen, G.; Cheng, F.W.; Forte, T.; Shefer, S.; Tint, G.S.

    1981-11-01

    The plasma lipoprotein profiles and high density lipoproteins (HDL) were characterized in patients with the genetic disease cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). The mean HDL-cholesterol concentration in the CTX plasmas was 14.5 +/- 3.2 mg/dl, about one-third the normal value. The low HDL-cholesterol reflects a low concentration and an abnormal lipid composition of the plasma HDL. Relative to normal HDL, the cholesteryl esters are low, free cholesterol and phospholipids essentially normal, and triglycerides increased. The ratio of apoprotein (apo) to total cholesterol in the HDL of CTX was two to three times greater than normal. In the CTX HDL, the ratio of apoAI to apoAII was high, the proportion of apoC low, and a normally minor form of apoAI increased relative to other forms. The HDL in electron micrographs appeared normal morphologically and in particle size. The adnormalities in lipoprotein distribution profiles and composition of the plasma HDL result from metabolic defects that are not understood but may be linked to the genetic defect in bile acid synthesis in CTX. As a consequence, it is probable that the normal functions of the HDL, possibly including modulation of LDL-cholesterol uptake and the removal of excess cholesterol from peripheral tissues, are perturbed significantly in this disease.

  4. Abnormal cross-frequency coupling in the tinnitus network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eAdamchic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies have identified networks of brain areas and oscillations associated with tinnitus perception. However, how these regions relate to perceptual characteristics of tinnitus, and how oscillations in various frequency bands are associated with communications within the tinnitus network is still incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that apart from changes of the tinnitus severity the changes of tinnitus dominant pitch also have modulating effect on the neuronal activity in a number of brain areas within the tinnitus network. Therefore, in a re-analysis of an existing dataset, we sought to determine how the oscillations in the tinnitus network in the various frequency bands interact. We also investigate how changes of tinnitus loudness, annoyance and pitch affect cross-frequency interaction both within and between nodes of the tinnitus network. Results of this study provide evidence that in tinnitus patients, aside from the previously described changes of oscillatory activity, there are also changes of cross-frequency coupling (CFC; phase-amplitude CFC was increased in tinnitus patients within the auditory cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal regions between the phase of delta-theta and the amplitude of gamma oscillations (Modulation Index [MI] 0.17 in tinnitus patients vs. 0.08 in tinnitus free controls. Moreover, theta phase in the anterior cingulate region modulated gamma in the auditory (MI 0.1 and dorsolateral prefrontal regions (MI 0.19. Reduction of tinnitus severity after acoustic coordinated reset therapy led to a partial normalization of abnormal CFC. Also treatment induced changes in tinnitus pitch significantly modulated changes in CFC. Thus, tinnitus perception is associated with a more pronounced CFC within and between nodes of the tinnitus network. Cross-frequency coupling can coordinate tinnitus-relevant activity in the tinnitus network providing a mechanism for effective communication between nodes

  5. Relationship of sleep abnormalities to patient genotypes in Prader-Willi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vgontzas, A.N.; Kales, A.; Bixler, E.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-20

    To assess whether sleep abnormalities are related to the genetic abnormalities in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), we performed polysomnographic studies (nighttime and daytime) and determined the chromosome 15 genotypes in eight patients with PWS. Four patients demonstrated sleep onset REM periods (SOREM), and five met the objective polysomnographic criteria for severe or moderate excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Three of the four patients with SOREM displayed a paternally derived deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13, whereas the fourth exhibited maternal uniparental heterodisomy in this chromosomal region (UPD). Two of the four patients that did not display SOREM carried paternally derived deletions; the remaining two demonstrated UPD. Four of the five patients with EDS displayed paternal deletions, and the fifth exhibited UPD. One of three patients without evidence of EDS demonstrated paternal deletion; the remaining two showed UPD. Although neither EDS nor SOREM was not consistently associated with a specific genetic abnormality, these phenotypes may be more common in patients with paternal deletions than in those with UPD. Sleep abnormalities in PWS cannot be explained by a single genetic model. 32 refs., 1 tab.

  6. scMRI reveals large-scale brain network abnormalities in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon A Zielinski

    Full Text Available Autism is a complex neurological condition characterized by childhood onset of dysfunction in multiple cognitive domains including socio-emotional function, speech and language, and processing of internally versus externally directed stimuli. Although gross brain anatomic differences in autism are well established, recent studies investigating regional differences in brain structure and function have yielded divergent and seemingly contradictory results. How regional abnormalities relate to the autistic phenotype remains unclear. We hypothesized that autism exhibits distinct perturbations in network-level brain architecture, and that cognitive dysfunction may be reflected by abnormal network structure. Network-level anatomic abnormalities in autism have not been previously described. We used structural covariance MRI to investigate network-level differences in gray matter structure within two large-scale networks strongly implicated in autism, the salience network and the default mode network, in autistic subjects and age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. We report specific perturbations in brain network architecture in the salience and default-mode networks consistent with clinical manifestations of autism. Extent and distribution of the salience network, involved in social-emotional regulation of environmental stimuli, is restricted in autism. In contrast, posterior elements of the default mode network have increased spatial distribution, suggesting a 'posteriorization' of this network. These findings are consistent with a network-based model of autism, and suggest a unifying interpretation of previous work. Moreover, we provide evidence of specific abnormalities in brain network architecture underlying autism that are quantifiable using standard clinical MRI.

  7. Communication abnormalities predict functional outcomes in chronic schizophrenia: differential associations with social and adaptive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowie, Christopher R; Harvey, Philip D

    2008-08-01

    Communication abnormalities are hallmark features of schizophrenia. Despite the prevalence and persistence of these symptoms, little is known about their functional implications. In this study, we examined, in a sample of chronically institutionalized schizophrenia patients (N=317), whether two types of communication abnormalities (i.e., verbal underproductivity and disconnected speech) had differential relationships with social and adaptive outcomes. Baseline ratings of verbal underproductivity, disconnected speech, global cognitive performance, and clinical symptoms, were entered into stepwise regression analyses to examine their relationship with 2.5 year social and adaptive outcomes. At baseline, disconnected speech was significantly associated with socially impolite behavior, while verbal underproductivity was associated with social disengagement and impaired friendships. Both types of communication abnormalities were significantly associated with other types of social skills. Verbal underproductivity predicted follow-up social skills, social engagement, and friendships, accounting for more variance than. cognition or symptoms. In contrast to social outcomes, adaptive outcomes were predicted by baseline neurocognition and clinical symptoms, but not communication abnormalities. These findings provide evidence for specific relationships of communication disorder subtypes with diverse impairments in social functions. In this chronically institutionalized sample, communication disorder was a stronger predictor of social, but not adaptive, outcomes than neurocognition or clinical symptoms.

  8. Is abnormal vaginal microflora a risk factor for intrauterine fetal growth restriction?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NatalijaVedmedovska; Dace Rezeberga; GilbertG G Donders

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To conduct a literature review in search of possible preventable causes for fetal growth restriction.Methods:We performed a systematic literature search regarding abnormal vaginal microflora and fetal growth encompassing the last 27-year (starting from 1986) in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Central to study the evidence that abnormal vaginal microflora is may be related to diminished fetal growth or small for date birth.Results:Most of the 14 studies suggested a significant role of vaginal organisms in impaired fetal growth, unrelated to preterm birth. The neonatal outcome has shown to be largely linked to the preventable or foreseeable fetal factors, such as genetic abnormalities, but also ascending intrauterine infections. Our previous work suggested a role of vaginal organisms in adverse pregnancy outcome, not only preterm birth, but also impaired fetal growth.Conclusions:There is a need for cohort studies designed to unravel this link between abnormal microflora and FGR, in order to enable preventive actions to protect these small babies from severe damage and death by early screening and treatment.

  9. Hypoxia-induced reactive oxygen species cause chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells in the tumor microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyako Kondoh

    Full Text Available There is much evidence that hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment enhances tumor progression. In an earlier study, we reported abnormal phenotypes of tumor-associated endothelial cells such as those resistant to chemotherapy and chromosomal instability. Here we investigated the role of hypoxia in the acquisition of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells. Tumor-associated endothelial cells isolated from human tumor xenografts showed chromosomal abnormalities, >30% of which were aneuploidy. Aneuploidy of the tumor-associated endothelial cells was also shown by simultaneous in-situ hybridization for chromosome 17 and by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD31 antibody for endothelial staining. The aneuploid cells were surrounded by a pimonidazole-positive area, indicating hypoxia. Human microvascular endothelial cells expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in response to either hypoxia or hypoxia-reoxygenation, and in these conditions, they acquired aneuploidy in 7 days. Induction of aneuploidy was inhibited by either inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor or by inhibition of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These results indicate that hypoxia induces chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells through the induction of reactive oxygen species and excess signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tumor microenvironment.

  10. Hypoxia-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Cause Chromosomal Abnormalities in Endothelial Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Yasuhiro; Maishi, Nako; Towfik, Alam Mohammad; Inoue, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    There is much evidence that hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment enhances tumor progression. In an earlier study, we reported abnormal phenotypes of tumor-associated endothelial cells such as those resistant to chemotherapy and chromosomal instability. Here we investigated the role of hypoxia in the acquisition of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells. Tumor-associated endothelial cells isolated from human tumor xenografts showed chromosomal abnormalities, >30% of which were aneuploidy. Aneuploidy of the tumor-associated endothelial cells was also shown by simultaneous in-situ hybridization for chromosome 17 and by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD31 antibody for endothelial staining. The aneuploid cells were surrounded by a pimonidazole-positive area, indicating hypoxia. Human microvascular endothelial cells expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in response to either hypoxia or hypoxia-reoxygenation, and in these conditions, they acquired aneuploidy in 7 days. Induction of aneuploidy was inhibited by either inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor or by inhibition of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These results indicate that hypoxia induces chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells through the induction of reactive oxygen species and excess signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24260373

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with mental retardation in female subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutta Samikshan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal abnormalities are thought to be the most common cause of mental retardation (MR. However, apart from a few selected types with typical aneuploidy, like Downs syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome, etc., the frequency of detectable chromosomal abnormalities in association with idiopathic MR is very low. In this study, we have investigated chromosomal abnormalities in female MR subjects (n = 150 by high-resolution GTG banding. Of them, 30 cases were diagnosed as Downs syndrome. Among the remaining (n = 120, chromosomal abnormalities/marked polymorphisms were detectable in only three MR cases (0.025.

  12. Abnormal traffic flow data detection based on wavelet analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Qian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In view of the traffic flow data of non-stationary, the abnormal data detection is difficult.proposed basing on the wavelet analysis and least squares method of abnormal traffic flow data detection in this paper.First using wavelet analysis to make the traffic flow data of high frequency and low frequency component and separation, and then, combined with least square method to find abnormal points in the reconstructed signal data.Wavelet analysis and least square method, the simulation results show that using wavelet analysis of abnormal traffic flow data detection, effectively reduce the detection results of misjudgment rate and false negative rate.

  13. Abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, C S; ten Cate, C

    1998-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies dealing with abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets. However, these studies demonstrate the presence of abnormal behavior in both songbirds and parrots. Ethological studies on these birds, as well as studies on domestic and zoo birds, indicate that inappropriate rearing and housing conditions may lead to behavioral abnormalities. Together these data indicate that behavioral abnormalities occur among both wild-caught and domesticated pet birds. The severity and magnitude of these abnormalities is probably underestimated, and there is a need for systematic studies on the nature, origin, variability, species-specificity, and reversibility of behavioral problems in pet birds. Abnormal behavior in caged birds may to some extent be prevented and reduced by environmental enrichment. However, most enrichment studies are anecdotal and not based on a thorough analysis of the behavioral abnormalities, which may lead to measures resulting in a reduction of symptoms rather than the underlying causes. Although it is likely that several of these problems could be reduced by modifying rearing and housing conditions, the current insights into the causal mechanisms underlying abnormal behavior of domesticated and wild-caught pet birds are limited, as are the insights into the possibilities of preventing or curing abnormal behavior.

  14. Real-time Multiple Abnormality Detection in Video Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Simon Hartmann; Ren, Huamin; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in video sequences has recently gained an increasing attention within the research community. Although progress has been seen, there are still some limitations in current research. While most systems are designed at detecting specific abnormality, others which...... are capable of detecting more than two types of abnormalities rely on heavy computation. Therefore, we provide a framework for detecting abnormalities in video surveillance by using multiple features and cascade classifiers, yet achieve above real-time processing speed. Experimental results on two datasets...

  15. Chromosomal abnormalities associated with mental retardation in female subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samikshan; Shaw, Jyothi; Sinha, Swagata; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2009-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are thought to be the most common cause of mental retardation (MR). However, apart from a few selected types with typical aneuploidy, like Downs syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, Turner syndrome, etc., the frequency of detectable chromosomal abnormalities in association with idiopathic MR is very low. In this study, we have investigated chromosomal abnormalities in female MR subjects (n = 150) by high-resolution GTG banding. Of them, 30 cases were diagnosed as Downs syndrome. Among the remaining (n = 120), chromosomal abnormalities/marked polymorphisms were detectable in only three MR cases (0.025).

  16. Cytogenetic Analysis for Suspected Chromosomal Abnormalities; A Five Years Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Vijay Kumar; Jindal, Ankur; Puppala, Madhavi; Singh, Pratiksha; Rawat, Kanchan; Kapoor, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Chromosomal abnormalities are the results of alterations in the number or structure of chromosomes causing significant human morbidity and mortality. They are responsible for a large proportion of miscarriages, developmental delay, disorders of sexual development, congenital malformations and mental retardation. Aim The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of different chromosomal abnormalities in North Indian patients referred for cytogenetic analysis. Materials and Methods Total of 859 patients ranging from newborn to 37 years of age were referred to the division of genetics, Department of Paediatrics between 2010 and 2015, with a variety of clinical disorders; Down syndrome (DS), Turner’s syndrome (TS) and Klinefelter syndrome; amenorrhea; ambiguous sex and multiple congenital malformations. Chromosomal analysis was performed on lymphocyte culture according to standard methods. Results Of the 859 cases studied, 371 (43.1%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most common autosomal abnormalities were DS 302 (81.4%) and sex chromosomal abnormalities were TS 51 (13.7%). Numerical abnormalities were accounted for 353 (41.0%) and structural abnormalities 18 (2.0%), respectively. Various other chromosomal anomalies were also reported. Conclusion We have reviewed the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities and found higher rate of chromosomal abnormalities 43.1% in the referred cases. Our data suggest that chromosomal analysis is important tool in the evaluation of genetic disorders and helps clinicians to provide accurate diagnosis and proper genetic counselling. PMID:27790464

  17. Maternal attitude towards first trimester screening for fetal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nerea; Burgos, Jorge; Barbazán, Maria José; Recio, Virginia; Martínez-Astorquiza, Txanton

    2016-05-01

    To explore the maternal attitude towards the screening for structural abnormalities at the 11-13-week scan, according to the severity of the abnormality. A secondary aim was to analyse which maternal characteristics influence in the maternal response. This is a descriptive study based on the responses to 300 self-administrated questionnaires completed immediately before routine ultrasounds scan. A totally of 296 (98.7%) women participated in the study. If the baby had any abnormality 93.9% would prefer to know at 12 weeks, 96.6% if the abnormality was lethal, 95.3% if the abnormality involves severe handicap, 91.2% if the abnormality can only be suspected, but not confirmed until the pregnancy is more advanced (16 or 20 weeks), 77.0% if the abnormality was minor and 79.4% women would like to know at 12 weeks if the baby appeared normal. Maternal age, gestational age at the time of the questionnaire and maternal attitude towards termination of pregnancy were the only factors affecting maternal responses. Pregnant women prefer to be informed in the first trimester about any abnormality in their fetuses, even in cases of minor or only suspected abnormalities. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Update: Consequences of Abnormal Fetal Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Chernausek, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is prevalent worldwide and affects children and adults in multiple ways. These include predisposition to type 2 diabetes mellitus, the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, persistent reduction in stature, and possibly changes in the pattern of puberty. A review of recent literature confirms that the metabolic effects of being born small for gestational age are evident in the very young, persist with age, and are amplified by adiposity. Furthermore...

  19. Results of nocturnal penile tumescence studies are abnormal in sexually functional diabetic men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, E A; Reynolds, C F; Jennings, J R; Thase, M E; Frank, E; Yeager, A; Kupfer, D J

    1992-01-01

    Nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) studies are commonly used in the assessment of sexual dysfunction in diabetic men. While much of the evidence in favor of its use has come from the observation of markedly abnormal NPT in impotent diabetic men, little research has focused on the quality of nocturnal erections in sexually functional diabetics. Ten diabetic men who reported normal daytime sexual function were studied with 4 nights of polysomnography, including NPT assessment. They had significantly diminished NPT profiles when compared with that of an age-matched, nondiabetic, healthy control group. Without controlling for the effect of diabetes on NPT, between 70% and 90% of sexually functional diabetics had NPT profiles in a range that would be classified as indicative of organic sexual dysfunction for a man presenting for evaluation of sexual dysfunction. The finding of NPT abnormalities in a diabetic man should not be taken as evidence for irreversible sexual dysfunction. Rather, the condition of diabetes appears to result in NPT abnormalities, regardless of the adequacy of daytime sexual function.

  20. Coronary artery abnormalities in children with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre-Utile, Alain; Galeotti, Caroline; Koné-Paut, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    Still's disease (Systemic-onset Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: SoJIA) is characterised by high-spiking daily fevers, arthritis and evanescent rashes. Diagnosis of Still's disease is often challenging. Infectious diseases and other inflammatory conditions, especially in young children, Kawasaki disease may look similar. Clinicians often rely on echocardiographic evidence of coronary artery abnormalities to differentiate between Kawasaki disease and Still's disease. Coronary artery dilation would typically favour the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease. We present four children with Still's disease and coronary artery abnormalities who were initially misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease. The first patient had pericarditis and an irregular wall of the left coronary artery, without dilation on echocardiography. The second patient had a left coronary artery dilatation and a pericarditis. The third patient had thickened left coronary artery walls, and the fourth patient had a hyperechogenicity of the left and right coronary arteries. They received IVIG without success. The diagnosis of Still's disease was made secondary with evidence of persistent arthritis. All but one patient finally needed biologic treatments. Coronary abnormalities may be observed during various febrile conditions and do not exclude the diagnosis of Still's disease. Copyright © 2013 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.