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Sample records for replicon vaccine expressing

  1. Alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, Ryan L; Harris, D L Hank; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2012-06-01

    The alphavirus replicon technology has been utilized for many years to develop vaccines for both veterinary and human applications. Many developments have been made to the replicon platform recently, resulting in improved safety and efficacy of replicon particle (RP) vaccines. This review provides a broad overview of the replicon technology and safety features of the system and discusses the current literature on RP and replicon-based vaccines.

  2. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced potency of replicon vaccine using one vector to simultaneously co-express antigen and interleukin-4 molecular adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; An, Huai-Jie; Wei, Xiao-Qi; Xu, Qing; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the utility of interleukin-4 (IL-4) as molecular adjuvant of replicon vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in mouse model. In both Balb/c and C57/BL6 mice that received the plasmid DNA replicon vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the Hc gene of BoNT/A (AHc), the immunogenicity was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-delivery or co-express of the IL-4 molecular adjuvant. The enhanced potencies were also produced by co-delivery or co-expression of the IL-4 molecular adjuvant in mice immunized with the recombinant SFV replicon particles (VRP) vaccines. In particular, when AHc and IL-4 were co-expressed within the same replicon vaccine vector using dual-expression or bicistronic IRES, the anti-AHc antibody titers, serum neutralization titers and survival rates of immunized mice after challenged with BoNT/A were significantly increased. These results indicate IL-4 is an effective Th2-type adjuvant for the replicon vaccines in both strain mice, and the co-expression replicon vaccines described here may be an excellent candidate for further vaccine development in other animals or humans. Thus, we described a strategy to design and develop efficient vaccines against BoNT/A or other pathogens using one replicon vector to simultaneously co-express antigen and molecular adjuvant.

  4. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  5. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  6. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy John Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating, DIVA compatible, and can induce both humoral and cell mediated immune responses. This is the first experiment to demonstrate that Alphavirus-based replicon particles can be utilized in a standard prime/boost vaccination strategy in calves against a commercially significant bovine pathogen. Findings Replicon particles that express bovine viral diarrhea virus sub-genotype 1b E2 glycoprotein were generated and expression was confirmed in vitro using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to E2. Vaccine made from particles was generated in Vero cells and administered to BVDV free calves in a prime/boost regimen at two dosage levels. Vaccination resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that cross-neutralized both type 1 and type 2 BVD genotypes following booster vaccination. Additionally, high dose vaccine administration demonstrated some protection from clinical disease and significantly reduced the degree of leukopenia caused by viral infection. Conclusions Replicon particle vaccines administered in a prime/boost regimen expressing BVDV E2 glycoprotein can induce cross-neutralizing titers, reduce leukopenia post challenge, and mitigate clinical disease in calves. This strategy holds promise for a safe and effective vaccine to BVDV.

  7. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of dengue virus replicons expressing HIV-1 gp120 and other heterologous genes: a potential future tool for dual vaccination against dengue virus and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayton Andrew I

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toward the goals of providing an additional vector to add to the armamentarium available to HIV vaccinologists and of creating a bivalent vaccine effective against dengue virus and HIV, we have attempted to create vectors which express dengue virus non-structural proteins and HIV immunogens. Previously we reported the successful construction of dengue virus replicons which lack structural genes necessary for virion release and spreading infection in culture but which can replicate intracellularly and abundantly produce dengue non-structural proteins. Here we attempted to express heterologous genetic material from these replicons. Results We cloned into a Δpre-M/E dengue virus replicon genes for either green fluorescent protein (GFP, HIV gp160 or HIV gp120 and tested the ability of these constructs to express dengue virus proteins as well as the heterologous proteins in tissue culture after transfection of replicon RNA. Conclusions Heterologous proteins were readily expressed from these constructs. GFP and gp120 demonstrated minimal or no toxicity. Gp160 expressing replicons were found to express proteins abundantly at 36 hours post transfection, but after 50 hrs of transfection, few replicon positive cells could be found despite the presence of cellular debris positive for replicon proteins. This suggested that gp160 expressed from dengue virus replicons is considerably more toxic than either GFP or gp120. The successful expression of heterologous proteins, including HIV gp120 for long periods in culture suggests this vector system may be useful as a vaccine vector, given appropriate delivery methods.

  9. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A Reap; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A.; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E.; Negri, Sarah; Burnett,Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A.; Jeffrey D. Chulay

    2007-01-01

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, an...

  10. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines

  11. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines enc

  12. Engineering a CTL-Tailored Replicon RNA Vaccine against PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Werder, Simea; Nielsen, Morten

    The development of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been hampered by the high mutation rate and the multiple immunoevasive strategies of the virus. With the overall aim of designing a broad coverage vaccine that induces an effective CTL response...... detection in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, a vaccination-challenge experiment using 18 SLA-matched pigs is currently being conducted until July 2016 in which a test group and a control group are being vaccinated twice with VRPs expressing PRRSV epitopes and non-sense control epitopes...... will be available for IVIS. This study exemplifies how bioinformatics epitope prediction, recombinant SLA molecules and RNA virus replicon design can be used to engineer a replicating non-propagating vaccine tailored to deliver conserved and immunogenic CTL epitopes....

  13. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Elizabeth A; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-10-16

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, and robust T-cell responses in mice, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. A toxicity study in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any toxicology parameter. These studies support clinical testing of this novel CMV alphavirus replicon vaccine in humans.

  14. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  15. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  16. An alphavirus replicon-derived candidate vaccine against Rift Valley fever virus.

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    Heise, M T; Whitmore, A; Thompson, J; Parsons, M; Grobbelaar, A A; Kemp, A; Paweska, J T; Madric, K; White, L J; Swanepoel, R; Burt, F J

    2009-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus (genus Phlebovirus) associated with severe disease in livestock and fatal encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever in a proportion of infected humans. Although live attenuated and inactivated vaccines have been used in livestock, and on a limited scale in humans, there is a need for improved anti-RVFV vaccines. Towards this goal, Sindbis virus replicon vectors expressing the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins, as well as the non-structural nsM protein, were constructed and evaluated for their ability to induce protective immune responses against RVFV. These replicon vectors were shown to produce the RVFV glycoproteins to high levels in vitro and to induce systemic anti-RVFV antibody responses in immunized mice, as determined by RVFV-specific ELISA, fluorescent antibody tests, and demonstration of a neutralizing antibody response. Replicon vaccination also provided 100% protection against lethal RVFV challenge by either the intraperitoneal or intranasal route. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that the replicon vectors elicit RVFV-specific neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated sheep. These results suggest that alphavirus-based replicon vectors can induce protective immunity against RVFV, and that this approach merits further investigation into its potential utility as a RVFV vaccine.

  17. Role of TLR3 in the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based vaccines.

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    Diebold, S S; Schulz, O; Alexopoulou, L; Leitner, W W; Flavell, R A; Reis e Sousa, C

    2009-03-01

    Replicon plasmids encoding an alphavirus RNA replicase constitute an alternative to conventional DNA plasmids with promise for DNA vaccination in humans. Replicase activity amplifies the levels of transgene mRNA through a copying process involving double-stranded (ds) RNA intermediates, which contribute to vaccine immunogenicity by activating innate antiviral responses. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a dsRNA innate immune receptor expressed by antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we test the hypothesis that TLR3 is necessary for the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based DNA vaccines. We show that mouse CD8 alpha(+) DC phagocytose dying replicon plasmid-transfected cells in vitro and are activated in a TLR3-dependent manner by dsRNA present within those cells. However, we find that cytotoxic T-cell responses to a replicon plasmid intramuscular vaccine are not diminished in the absence of TLR3 in vivo. Our results underscore the potential role of TLR3 in mediating immune activation by dsRNA-bearing replicon plasmid-transfected cells and indicate that other innate sensing pathways can compensate for TLR3 absence in vivo.

  18. Utility of the Sindbis replicon system as an Env-targeted HIV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, Rob J; Miller, Annett; Wheatley, Adam K; Campbell, Shahan M; Siebentritt, Carly; Purcell, Damian F J

    2013-04-26

    Sindbis replicon-based vaccine vectors are designed to combine the immunostimulatory properties of replicating viruses with the superior safety profile of non-replicating systems. In this study we performed a detailed assessment of Sindbis (SIN) replicon vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) for the induction of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in a small animal model. SIN-derived virus-like particles (VLP) elicited Env-specific antibody responses that were detectable after boosting with recombinant Env protein. This priming effect could be mediated by replicon activity alone but may be enhanced by Env attached to the surface of VLP, offering a potential advantage for this mode of replicon delivery for Env based vaccination strategies. In contrast, the Env-specific CTL responses that were elicited by SIN-VLP were entirely dependent on replicon activity. SIN-VLP priming induced more durable humoral responses than immunization with protein only. This is important from a vaccine perspective, given the intrinsic tendency of Env to induce short-lived antibody responses in the context of vaccination or infection. These results indicate that further efforts to enhance the magnitude and durability of the HIV-1 Env-specific immune responses generated by Sindbis vectors, either alone or as part of prime-boost regimens, are justified.

  19. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon vaccine for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubby, Bolyn; Talarico, Todd; Maughan, Maureen; Reap, Elizabeth A; Berglund, Peter; Kamrud, Kurt I; Copp, Laura; Lewis, Whitney; Cecil, Chad; Norberg, Pamela; Wagner, Jordan; Watson, Aubrey; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce K; Graham, Andrew; Smith, Jonathan F; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-11-23

    We used a propagation-defective, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins from influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 (H3N2). Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots of HA VRP and NA VRP and clinical lots of HA VRP. HA VRP-induced high-titered antibody responses in mice, rabbits and rhesus macaques, as measured by ELISA or hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and robust cellular immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. NA VRP also induced cellular immune responses in mice. A toxicology study with HA VRP and NA VRP in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any parameter. These studies support clinical testing of alphavirus replicon vaccines for influenza.

  20. Individual and bivalent vaccines based on alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs against infection with Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushko, P; Geisbert, J; Parker, M; Jahrling, P; Smith, J

    2001-12-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccines for Lassa and Ebola viruses that are based on an RNA replicon vector derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. The Lassa and Ebola virus genes were expressed from recombinant replicon RNAs that also encoded the replicase function and were capable of efficient intracellular self-amplification. For vaccinations, the recombinant replicons were incorporated into virus-like replicon particles. Guinea pigs vaccinated with particles expressing Lassa virus nucleoprotein or glycoprotein genes were protected from lethal challenge with Lassa virus. Vaccination with particles expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein gene also protected the animals from lethal challenge with Ebola virus. In order to evaluate a single vaccine protecting against both Lassa and Ebola viruses, we developed dual-expression particles that expressed glycoprotein genes of both Ebola and Lassa viruses. Vaccination of guinea pigs with either dual-expression particles or with a mixture of particles expressing Ebola and Lassa virus glycoprotein genes protected the animals against challenges with Ebola and Lassa viruses. The results showed that immune responses can be induced against multiple vaccine antigens coexpressed from an alphavirus replicon and suggested the possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines based upon alphavirus vectors for arenaviruses, filoviruses, and possibly other emerging pathogens.

  1. Development of a vaccine vector based on a subgenomic replicon of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinfeng; Yao, Qingxia; Fan, Huiying; Xiao, Shaobo; Si, Youhui; Chen, Huanchun

    2009-09-01

    In this study, a DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was developed for use as a vaccine vector. This replicon plasmid contained a PRRSV subgenome without structural genes ORF2-ORF6, and was under the transcriptional control of the immediate-early promoter of cytomegalovirus (CMV). Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter gene, the DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of PRRSV, named pOK-Clone20-rep, could express heterologous genes in vitro. After direct inoculation of pOK-Clone20-rep, mice developed antibody responses that were specific for both the EGFP and the N gene in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, mice immunized with pOK-Clone20-rep at a dose of 100microg showed significantly enhanced levels of IFN-gamma compared with those inoculated with 100microg of pcD-EGFP, a conventional DNA vaccine that encodes EGFP. In summary, the results show that the DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of PRRSV could not only mediate foreign gene expression in vitro but also induced an immune response in vivo. Similarly, expression and immunogenicity of the N gene also strengthened the potential of the replicon to serve as a vaccine vector expressing multiple genes. It therefore provides a useful tool for vaccine development and the study of the transcription and replication of PRRSV.

  2. Combined alphavirus replicon particle vaccine induces durable and cross-protective immune responses against equine encephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Douglas S; Glass, Pamela J; Bakken, Russell R; Barth, James F; Lind, Cathleen M; da Silva, Luis; Hart, Mary Kate; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Dudek, Jeanne; Owens, Gary; Kamrud, Kurt I; Parker, Michael D; Smith, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    Alphavirus replicons were evaluated as potential vaccine candidates for Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) when given individually or in combination (V/W/E) to mice or cynomolgus macaques. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in mice to their respective alphavirus. Protection from either subcutaneous or aerosol challenge with VEEV, WEEV, or EEEV was demonstrated out to 12 months after vaccination in mice. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in macaques and demonstrated good protection against aerosol challenge with an epizootic VEEV-IAB virus, Trinidad donkey. Similarly, the EEEV replicon and V/W/E combination vaccine elicited neutralizing antibodies against EEEV and protected against aerosol exposure to a North American variety of EEEV. Both the WEEV replicon and combination V/W/E vaccination, however, elicited poor neutralizing antibodies to WEEV in macaques, and the protection conferred was not as strong. These results demonstrate that a combination V/W/E vaccine is possible for protection against aerosol challenge and that cross-interference between the vaccines is minimal. Importance: Three related viruses belonging to the genus Alphavirus cause severe encephalitis in humans: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Normally transmitted by mosquitoes, these viruses can cause disease when inhaled, so there is concern that these viruses could be used as biological weapons. Prior reports have suggested that vaccines for these three viruses might interfere with one another. We have developed a combined vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis expressing the surface

  3. Pentavalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxin (CNT) family includes botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), serotypes A, B, E, and F of which can cause human botulism, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), which is the causative agent of tetanus. This suggests that the greatest need is for a multivalent or multiagent vaccine that provides protection against all 5 agents. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several pentavalent replicon vaccines that protected mice against BoNTs and TeNT. First, we evaluat...

  4. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Miriam; Kerber, Sarah; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  5. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bolz

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  6. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle vaccine protects nonhuman primates from intramuscular and aerosol challenge with ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew S; Kuehne, Ana I; Barth, James F; Ortiz, Ramon A; Nichols, Donald K; Zak, Samantha E; Stonier, Spencer W; Muhammad, Majidat A; Bakken, Russell R; Prugar, Laura I; Olinger, Gene G; Groebner, Jennifer L; Lee, John S; Pratt, William D; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I; Smith, Jonathan F; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M

    2013-05-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine.

  7. A hemagglutinin-esterase-expressing salmonid alphavirus replicon protects Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) against infectious salmon anemia (ISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Braaen, Stine; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-01-11

    A replicon expression system based on the salmonid alphavirus (SAV) that encodes the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) was constructed and found to be an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Following a single intramuscular immunization, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were effectively protected against subsequent ISAV challenge. Additional replicons coding for the ISAV fusion glycoprotein (F) or the ISAV matrix protein (M) were created and tested in combination with the replicon that encodes the HE. The ISAV HE was confirmed as a potent antigen, but neither the F nor the M proteins were found to be essential for immunization-induced protection. Innate immune response induced at the site of vaccination illustrated the immunogenicity of the SAV-based replicon and its ability to activate antiviral responses in Atlantic salmon. The successful testing of the SAV-based replicon as a vaccine model against ISA showed that the replicon approach may represent a novel immunization technology for the aquaculture industry. It offers potential benefits in terms of safety, efficacy, flexibility, and vaccine production complexity.

  8. Expression of H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin protein fused with protein transduction domain in an alphavirus replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-gui; Wo, Jian-er; Li, Min-wei; Mi, Fen-fang; Yu, Cheng-bo; Lv, Guo-liang; Cao, Hong-Cui; Lu, Hai-feng; Wang, Bao-hong; Zhu, Hanping; Li, Lan-Juan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus replicons, in which structural protein genes are replaced by heterologous genes, express high levels of the heterologous proteins. On the basis of the potencies of replicons to self-replicate and express foreign proteins and the remarkable intercellular transport property of VP22, a novel alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon system of VP22 fused with a model antigen, hemagglutinin (HA), of the human-avian H5N1 influenza virus, was explored in this study. Further, replicon particles expressing HA, VP22, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) individually were used as controls. By flow cytometry based on the analysis of transfection efficiency, SFV-EGFP replicon particle titer was 1.13 x 10(7)transducing units (TU)/ml. The titers of SFV-HA, SFV-VP22 and SFV-VP22-HA replicon particles, which were titrated by using SFV-EGFP replicon particles, were 1.42 x 10(7), 3.23 x 10(7), and 1.01 x 10(7)TU/ml, respectively. HA and VP22-HA expression was observed in SFV-HA- and SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the fluorescence intensity in the SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells was more than that in the SFV-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells. Both SFV-VP22-HA and SFV-HA replicon particles presented a promising approach for developing vaccines against human-avian influenza. VP22-HA fusion protein with similar trafficking properties may also enhance vaccine potency.

  9. Salmonid alphavirus-based replicon vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA): impact of immunization route and interactions of the replicon vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Hoeijmakers, Mathieu; Rimstad, Espen

    2014-02-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV)-based replicon encoding the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE), pSAV/HE, is an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Delivered intramuscularly (i.m.), the replicon vaccine provides high protection against subsequent ISAV challenge in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and induces a strong innate response locally at the injection site. This may be beneficial and could warrant reduced doses and improved efficacy compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In the present study, we found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine did not induce protection, neither alone or in combination with a sub-potent, inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine given i.p. No significant differences between the two immunization routes regarding systemic immune responses could be observed. I.m. injection of the replicon vector encoding a non-viral gene or the protective glycoprotein (G protein) from the heterologous viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) induced no protection against ISA. Although the replicons without the ISAV HE did induce IFN-signaling pathways at the muscle injection site similar to the pSAV/HE replicon they did not improve the efficacy of a sub-potent inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine delivered i.p. Moreover, there was a tendency for reduced efficacy of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine injected i.m. when co-injected with the replicon encoding the VHSV G protein, which previously, after DNA vaccination, have been reported to induce cross-protection against heterologous virus challenge in fish.

  10. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans,...

  11. Packaging of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replicon RNA by a stable cell line expressing its nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Han-Saem; Yun, Gil-Nam; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2011-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a member of the Arteriviridae family, is one of the most common and economically important swine pathogens. Although both live-attenuated and killed-inactivated vaccines against the virus have been available for a decade, PRRSV is still a major problem in the swine industry worldwide. To explore the possibility of producing single-round infectious PRRSV replicon particles as a potential vaccine strategy, we have now generated two necessary components: 1) a stable cell line (BHK/Sinrepl9/PRRSV-N) that constitutively expresses the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleolus and 2) a PRRSV replicon vector (pBAC/PRRSV/Replicon-AN) with a 177-nucleotide deletion, removing the 3'-half portion of ORF7 in the viral genome, from which the self-replicating propagation-defective replicon RNAs were synthesized in vitro by SP6 polymerase run-off transcription. Transfection of this replicon RNA into N protein-expressing BHK-21 cells led to the secretion of infectious particles that packaged the replicon RNA, albeit with a low production efficiency of 0.4 × 10(2) to 1.1 × 10(2) infectious units/ml; the produced particles had only single-round infectivity with no cell-to-cell spread. This trans-complementation system for PRRSV provides a useful platform for studies to define the packaging signals and motifs present within the viral genome and N protein, respectively, and to develop viral replicon-based antiviral vaccines that will stop the infection and spread of this pathogen.

  12. Evaluation of neurovirulence and biodistribution of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Jacek; Adkins, Karissa; Gangolli, Seema; Ren, Jian; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Obregon, Jennifer; Tummolo, Donna; Natuk, Robert J; Brown, Tom P; Parks, Christopher L; Udem, Stephen A; Long, Deborah

    2007-03-08

    The safety of a propagation-defective Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) replicon particle vaccine was examined in mice. After intracranial inoculation we observed approximately 5% body weight loss, modest inflammatory changes in the brain, genome replication, and foreign gene expression. These changes were transient and significantly less severe than those caused by TC-83, a live-attenuated vaccinal strain of VEEV that has been safely used to immunize military personnel and laboratory workers. Replicon particles injected intramuscularly or intravenously were detected at limited sites 3 days post-administration, and were undetectable by day 22. There was no evidence of dissemination to spinal cord or brain after systemic administration. These results demonstrate that propagation-defective VEEV replicon particles are minimally neurovirulent and lack neuroinvasive potential.

  13. Molecular Smallpox Vaccine Delivered by Alphavirus Replicons Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice and Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W.; Ferro, Anthony M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F.; Kamrud, Kurt I.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 70s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 × 106 PFU of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. PMID:19833247

  14. Molecular smallpox vaccine delivered by alphavirus replicons elicits protective immunity in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W; Ferro, Anthony M; Golden, Joseph W; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2009-12-11

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 1970s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 x 10(6)pfu of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine.

  15. A phase I dose escalation trial of vaccine replicon particles (VRP) expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in subjects with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Susan F; Kehoe, Marissa; Durso, Robert; Fernandez, Celina; Olson, William; Gao, Jian P; Israel, Robert; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Stephen

    2013-01-30

    PSMA-VRP is a propagation defective, viral replicon vector system encoding PSMA under phase I evaluation for patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC). The product is derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and incorporates multiple redundant safety features. In this first in human trial, two cohorts of 3 patients with CRPC metastatic to bone were treated with up to five doses of either 0.9×10(7)IU or 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18, followed by an expansion cohort of 6 patients treated with 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18. No toxicities were observed. In the first dose cohort, no PSMA specific cellular immune responses were seen but weak PSMA-specific signals were observed by ELISA. The remaining 9 patients, which included the higher cohort and the extension cohort, had no PSMA specific cellular responses. PSMA-VRP was well-tolerated at both doses. While there did not appear to be clinical benefit nor robust immune signals at the two doses studied, neutralizing antibodies were produced by both cohorts suggesting that dosing was suboptimal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Pickens, Jennifer A; Schuster, Jennifer E; Johnson, Monika; Tollefson, Sharon J; Williams, John V; Davis, Nancy L; Johnston, Robert E; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Slaughter, James C; Smith-House, Frances; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-10

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.

  17. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  18. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  19. An immunogenic and protective alphavirus replicon particle-based dengue vaccine overcomes maternal antibody interference in weanling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Parsons, Melissa M; Whitmore, Alan C; Williams, Brandon M; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    A candidate pediatric dengue virus (DENV) vaccine based on nonpropagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) was tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in weanling mice in the presence and absence of potentially interfering maternal antibodies. A gene cassette encoding envelope proteins prM and E from mouse-adapted DENV type 2 (DENV2) strain NGC was cloned into a VEE replicon vector and packaged into VRP, which programmed proper in vitro expression and processing of DENV2 envelope proteins upon infection of Vero cells. Primary immunization of 3-week-old weanling BALB/c mice in the footpad with DENV2 VRP resulted in high levels of DENV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinates. A booster immunization 12 weeks after the prime immunization resulted in increased neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for at least 30 weeks. Immunization at a range of doses of DENV2 VRP protected mice from an otherwise-lethal intracranial DENV2 challenge. To model vaccination in the presence of maternal antibodies, weanling pups born to DENV2-immune or DENV2-naïve dams were immunized with either DENV2 VRP or live DENV2 given peripherally. The DENV2 VRP vaccine induced neutralizing-antibody responses in young mice regardless of the maternal immune status. In contrast, live-DENV2 vaccination performed poorly in the presence of preexisting anti-DENV2 antibodies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a VRP vaccine approach as an early-life DENV vaccine in populations with high levels of circulating DENV antibodies and suggests the utility of VRP-based vaccines in other instances where maternal antibodies make early vaccination problematic.

  20. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbherr, Stefan J; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  1. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  2. Haemagglutinin and nucleoprotein replicon particle vaccination of swine protects against the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, R L; Mogler, M A; Russell, B J; Loynachan, A T; Harris, D L H; Kamrud, K I

    2013-10-12

    The recent emergence of the pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and H3N2 variant influenza A viruses (IAV) in 2009 and 2011-2012, respectively, highlight the zoonotic potential of influenza viruses and the need for vaccines capable of eliciting heterosubtypic protection. In these studies, single-cycle, propagation-defective replicon particle (RP) vaccines expressing IAV haemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes were constructed and efficacy was evaluated in homologous and heterologous pig challenge studies with the pH1N1 2009 influenza virus (A/California/04/2009). Homologous HA RP vaccination eliminated virus shedding and decreased pulmonary pathology in pigs following pH1N1 2009 challenge. An RP vaccine expressing an H3N2-derived NP gene was able to decrease nasal shedding and viral load following heterosubtypic pH1N1 2009 challenge in pigs. These studies indicate that although homologous vaccination of swine remains the most effective means of preventing IAV infection, other vaccine alternatives do offer a level of heterosubtypic protection, and should continue to be evaluated for their ability to provide broader protection.

  3. Toward Viral Vaccine Development: A Modified Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon as Strategy for Optimizing Immunogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-13

    mutations in NsP genes in SIN and SFV vectors containing the puromycin or neomycin resistance gene, generated replication-persistent vectors that had...hemagglutinin expressed by an alphavirus replicon system protects chickens against lethal infection with Hong Kong-origin H5N1 viruses. Virology 278:55-9

  4. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  5. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  6. Vaccination with Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons encoding cowpox virus structural proteins protects mice from intranasal cowpox virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Natalie J; Ray, Caroline A; Collier, Martha L; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pickup, David J; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-06-05

    An anti-poxvirus vaccine based on replicon particles of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VRP) is being developed. The cowpox virus genes encoding structural proteins corresponding to vaccinia virus proteins A33, B5, and A27 were each expressed from VRP. High serum IgG titers against these proteins were generated in BALB/c mice vaccinated with each of these VRP. VRP induced both IgG1 and IgG2a with a strong predominance of IgG2a production. The response is long-lasting, as evidenced by the retention of high anti-B5 serum IgG titers through at least 50 weeks after priming immunization. Mice vaccinated with B5-, A33- or A27-VRP individually or together survived intranasal challenge with cowpox virus, with the multivalent vaccine formulation providing more effective protection from weight loss and clinical signs of illness than the monovalent vaccines. These results demonstrate that VRP may provide an effective alternative to vaccinia virus vaccines against poxvirus infection.

  7. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. McCullough

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future.

  8. A respiratory syncytial virus replicon that is noncytotoxic and capable of long-term foreign gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhina, Olga; Yednak, Mark A; Collins, Peter L; Olivo, Paul D; Peeples, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic resistance gene to enable detection and selection of replicon-containing cells. Adaptive mutations in the RSV replicon were not required for replicon maintenance. Cells containing the replicon could be cloned and passaged many times in the absence of antibiotic selection, with 99% or more of the cells retaining the replicon after each cell division. Transient expression of the F and G (attachment) glycoproteins supported the production of virions that could transfer the replicon into most cell lines tested. Since the RSV replicon is not toxic to these cultured cells and does not affect their rate of cell division, none of the 8 internal viral proteins, the viral RNA transcripts, or the host response to these molecules or their activities is cytopathic. However, the level of replicon genome and gene expression is controlled in some manner well below that of complete virus and, as such, might avoid cytotoxicity. RSV replicons could be useful for cytoplasmic gene expression in vitro and in vivo and for screening for compounds active against the viral polymerase.

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus replicon expressing the VP2 outer capsid protein of bluetongue virus serotype 8 induces complete protection of sheep against challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochinger, Stefanie; Renevey, Nathalie; Hofmann, Martin A; Zimmer, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that causes an often fatal, hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Different BTV serotypes occur throughout many temperate and tropical regions of the world. In 2006, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) emerged in Central and Northern Europe for the first time. Although this outbreak was eventually controlled using inactivated virus vaccines, the epidemic caused significant economic losses not only from the disease in livestock but also from trade restrictions. To date, BTV vaccines that allow simple serological discrimination of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) have not been approved for use in livestock. In this study, we generated recombinant RNA replicon particles based on single-cycle vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors. Immunization of sheep with infectious VSV replicon particles expressing the outer capsid VP2 protein of BTV-8 resulted in induction of BTV-8 serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent BTV-8 strain, the vaccinated animals neither developed signs of disease nor showed viremia. In contrast, immunization of sheep with recombinant VP5 - the second outer capsid protein of BTV - did not confer protection. Discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals was readily achieved using an ELISA for detection of antibodies against the VP7 antigen. These data indicate that VSV replicon particles potentially represent a safe and efficacious vaccine platform with which to control future outbreaks by BTV-8 or other serotypes, especially in previously non-endemic regions where discrimination between vaccinated and infected animals is crucial.

  10. Effects of rapid antigen degradation and VEE glycoprotein specificity on immune responses induced by a VEE replicon vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluet, M E; Whitmore, A C; Moshkoff, D A; Fu, K; Tang, Y; Collier, M L; West, A; Moore, D T; Swanstrom, R; Johnston, R E; Davis, N L

    2008-01-05

    Genetic vaccines are engineered to produce immunogens de novo in the cells of the host for stimulation of a protective immune response. In some of these systems, antigens engineered for rapid degradation have produced an enhanced cellular immune response by more efficient entry into pathways for processing and presentation of MHC class I peptides. VEE replicon particles (VRP), single cycle vaccine vectors derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), are examined here for the effect of an increased rate of immunogen degradation on VRP vaccine efficacy. VRP expressing the matrix capsid (MA/CA) portion of SIV Gag were altered to promote rapid degradation of MA/CA by various linkages to co-translated ubiquitin or by destabilizing mutations and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for quantitation of anti-MA/CA cellular and humoral immune responses. Rapid degradation by the N-end rule correlated with a dampened immune response relative to unmodified MA/CA when the VRP carried a glycoprotein spike from an attenuated strain of VEE. In contrast, statistically equivalent numbers of IFNgamma(+)T-cells resulted when VRP expressing unstable MA/CA were packaged with the wild-type VEE glycoproteins. These results suggest that the cell types targeted in vivo by VRP carrying mutant or wild type glycoprotein spikes are functionally different, and are consistent with previous findings suggesting that wild-type VEE glycoproteins preferentially target professional antigen presenting cells that use peptides generated from the degraded antigen for direct presentation on MHC.

  11. Modification of a salmonid alphavirus replicon vector for enhanced expression of heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein; Haugland, Øyvind

    2015-03-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV) replicon has been developed to express heterologous antigens but protein production was low to modest compared with terrestrial alphavirus replicons. In this study, we have compared several modifications to a SAV replicon construct and analysed their influence on foreign gene expression. We found that an insertion of a translational enhancer consisting of the N-terminal 102 nt of the capsid gene, together with a nucleotide sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide, caused a significant increase in EGFP reporter gene expression. The importance of fusing a hammerhead (HH) ribozyme sequence at the 5' end of the viral genome was also demonstrated. In contrast, a hepatitis D virus ribozyme (HDV-RZ) sequence placed at the 3' end did not augment expression of inserted genes. Taken together, we have developed a platform for optimized antigen production, which can be applied for immunization of salmonid fish in the future.

  12. Evaluation of the influenza A replicon for transient expression of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Pontiller, Jens; Tauer, Christopher; Palmberger, Dieter; Maccani, Andreas; Baumann, Martina; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-10-11

    Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells has become a very important technique over the last twenty years. It is mainly used for production of complex proteins for biopharmaceutical applications. Transient recombinant protein expression is a possible strategy to produce high quality material for preclinical trials within days. Viral replicon based expression systems have been established over the years and are ideal for transient protein expression. In this study we describe the evaluation of an influenza A replicon for the expression of recombinant proteins. We investigated transfection and expression levels in HEK-293 cells with EGFP and firefly luciferase as reporter proteins. Furthermore, we studied the influence of different influenza non-coding regions and temperature optima for protein expression as well. Additionally, we exploited the viral replication machinery for the expression of an antiviral protein, the human monoclonal anti-HIV-gp41 antibody 3D6. Finally we could demonstrate that the expression of a single secreted protein, an antibody light chain, by the influenza replicon, resulted in fivefold higher expression levels compared to the usually used CMV promoter based expression. We emphasize that the influenza A replicon system is feasible for high level expression of complex proteins in mammalian cells.

  13. Role of innate signalling pathways in the immunogenicity of alphaviral replicon-based vaccines

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    Chen Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alphaviral replicon-based vectors induce potent immune responses both when given as viral particles (VREP or as DNA (DREP. It has been suggested that the strong immune stimulatory effect induced by these types of vectors is mediated by induction of danger signals and activation of innate signalling pathways due to the replicase activity. To investigate the innate signalling pathways involved, mice deficient in either toll-like receptors or downstream innate signalling molecules were immunized with DREP or VREP. Results We show that the induction of a CD8+ T cell response did not require functional TLR3 or MyD88 signalling. However, IRF3, converging several innate signalling pathways and important for generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs, was needed for obtaining a robust primary immune response. Interestingly, type I interferon (IFN, induced by most innate signalling pathways, had a suppressing effect on both the primary and memory T cell responses after DREP and VREP immunization. Conclusions We show that alphaviral replicon-based vectors activate multiple innate signalling pathways, which both activate and restrict the induced immune response. These results further show that there is a delicate balance in the strength of innate signalling and induction of adaptive immune responses that should be taken into consideration when innate signalling molecules, such as type I IFNs, are used as vaccine adjuvant.

  14. A heterologous DNA prime-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle boost dengue vaccine regimen affords complete protection from virus challenge in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Ewing, Dan; Subramanian, Hemavathy; Block, Karla; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kimberly D; Sedegah, Martha; Hayes, Curtis; Porter, Kevin; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2007-11-01

    A candidate vaccine (D1ME-VRP) expressing dengue virus type 1 premembrane and envelope proteins in a Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon particle (VRP) system was constructed and tested in conjunction with a plasmid DNA vaccine (D1ME-DNA) expressing identical dengue virus sequences. Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with three doses of DNA (DDD), three doses of VRP (VVV group), or a heterologous DNA prime-VRP boost regimen (DDV) using two doses of DNA vaccine and a third dose of VRP vaccine. Four weeks after the final immunization, the DDV group produced the highest dengue virus type 1-specific immunoglobulin G antibody responses and virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Moderate T-cell responses were demonstrated only in DDD- and DDV-vaccinated animals. When vaccinated animals were challenged with live virus, all vaccination regimens showed significant protection from viremia. DDV-immunized animals were completely protected from viremia (mean time of viremia = 0 days), whereas DDD- and VVV-vaccinated animals had mean times of viremia of 0.66 and 0.75 day, respectively, compared to 6.33 days for the control group of animals.

  15. [Kunjin virus replicon--a novel viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, E'de; Qin, Chengfeng

    2011-02-01

    Viral replicon is a kind of self-replicating viral RNA sourced from viral genome, which contains viral non-structural genes that are critical for viral genome replication with structural proteins deleted or replaced by foreign genes. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirida family, Flavivirus genus, and Kunjin virus replicon is the first and the clearly defined flavivirus replicon. Kunjun virus replicon has been regarded as an excellent viral vector on account of its high expression, lower cytotoxicity and genetic stability. These unique characteristics of kunjin virus replicons make them suitable for the study of viral genome replication, recombinant proteins production, vaccine development and gene therapy. In this article, recent progress in the development, properties and applications of kunjin virus replicon system was briefly reviewed.

  16. RNA Replicons - A New Approach for Influenza Virus Immunoprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Zimmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicons are derived from either positive- or negative-strand RNA viruses. They represent disabled virus vectors that are not only avirulent, but also unable to revert to virulence. Due to autonomous RNA replication, RNA replicons are able to drive high level, cytosolic expression of recombinant antigens stimulating both the humoral and the cellular branch of the immune system. This review provides an update on the available literature covering influenza virus vaccines based on RNA replicons. The pros and cons of these vaccine strategies will be discussed and future perspectives disclosed.

  17. Preconceptual administration of an alphavirus replicon UL83 (pp65 homolog) vaccine induces humoral and cellular immunity and improves pregnancy outcome in the guinea pig model of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiss, Mark R; Lacayo, Juan C; Belkaid, Yasmine; McGregor, Alistair; Stroup, Greg; Rayner, Jon; Alterson, Kimberly; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Smith, Jonathan F

    2007-03-15

    Development of a vaccine against congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major public health priority. We report the use of a propagation-defective, single-cycle, RNA replicon vector system, derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing GP83, the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) homolog of the human CMV pp65 phosphoprotein. Vaccination with VRP-GP83 induced antibodies and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in GPCMV-seronegative female guinea pigs. Guinea pigs immunized with VRP-GP83 vaccine or with a VRP vaccine expressing influenza hemagglutinin (VRP-HA) were bred for pregnancy and subsequent GPCMV challenge during the early third trimester. Dams vaccinated with VRP-GP83 had improved pregnancy outcomes, compared with dams vaccinated with the VRP-HA control. For VRP-GP83-vaccinated dams, there were 28 live pups and 4 dead pups (13% mortality) among 10 evaluable litters, compared with 9 live pups and 12 dead pups (57% mortality) among 8 evaluable litters in the VRP-HA-vaccinated group (P<.001, Fisher's exact test). Improved pregnancy outcome was accompanied by reductions in maternal blood viral load, measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses directed against a CMV matrix protein can protect against congenital CMV infection and disease.

  18. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, K I; Alterson, K; Custer, M; Dudek, J; Goodman, C; Owens, G; Smith, J F

    2010-07-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans, the latter providing the viral structural proteins necessary to package the replicon RNA into VRP. Current helper RNA designs incorporate the alphavirus 26S promoter to direct the transcription of high levels of structural gene mRNAs. We demonstrate here that the 26S promoter is not required on helper RNAs to produce VRP and propose that such promoterless helper RNAs, by design, reduce the probability of generating replication-competent virus that may otherwise result from RNA recombination.

  20. A Kunjin Replicon Virus-like Particle Vaccine Provides Protection Against Ebola Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyankov, Oleg V; Bodnev, Sergey A; Pyankova, Olga G; Solodkyi, Vladislav V; Pyankov, Stepan A; Setoh, Yin Xiang; Volchkova, Valentina A; Suhrbier, Andreas; Volchkov, Viktor V; Agafonov, Alexander A; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    The current unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa has demonstrated the urgent need for a vaccine. Here, we describe the evaluation of an EBOV vaccine candidate based on Kunjin replicon virus-like particles (KUN VLPs) encoding EBOV glycoprotein with a D637L mutation (GP/D637L) in nonhuman primates. Four African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) were injected subcutaneously with a dose of 10(9) KUN VLPs per animal twice with an interval of 4 weeks, and animals were challenged 3 weeks later intramuscularly with 600 plaque-forming units of Zaire EBOV. Three animals were completely protected against EBOV challenge, while one vaccinated animal and the control animal died from infection. We suggest that KUN VLPs encoding GP/D637L represent a viable EBOV vaccine candidate.

  1. Comparation of Immune Reaction Efficiency of RNA Replicon Vaccine and DNA Vaccine of HBV in Mice%乙肝病毒RNA复制子疫苗与DNA疫苗对小鼠免疫效率的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹锦艳; 杨东; 任林柱; 张英; 闫森; 郝琳琳; 李莉

    2011-01-01

    为建立并获取更有效的乙肝疫苗,本实验通过将所构建的HBVRNA复制子疫苗和DNA疫苗分别免疫小鼠,检测细胞免疫与体液免疫的效果。结果表明,以pSFV为基础构建的疫苗载体免疫小鼠后采集的血清中抗体效价不随免疫剂量的增加而提高,在较低剂量免疫的时候,RNA复制子疫苗所产生的抗体效价优于DNA疫苗。并且RNA复制子疫苗在以较低剂量免疫后脾细胞CTL活性高于DNA疫苗。本研究证明HBVRNA疫苗比DNA疫苗表达效果更好,安全性更高,更具有应用前景。%To establish and obtain a more effective hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), mice cellular and humoral immunity were detected and compared after being immunized by the RNA replicon vaccines and DNA vaccines of HBV which were constructed by our lab. The results showed that RNA replicon vaccines gained higher immune antibody titer, and higher CTL activity of spleen cells than that of DNA vaccines at low-dose, but not dose dependent. It was concluded that HBV RNA vaccines are much safer and gained higher expression efficiency than the DNA vaccines, thus RNA vaccines of HBV are more prospective for the gene therapy of HBV.

  2. Enhancement of protein expression by alphavirus replicons by designing self-replicating subgenomic RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; McAuley, Alexander J; Plante, Jessica A; Frolova, Elena I; Beasley, David W C; Frolov, Ilya

    2014-07-22

    Since the development of infectious cDNA clones of viral RNA genomes and the means of delivery of the in vitro-synthesized RNA into cells, alphaviruses have become an attractive system for expression of heterologous genetic information. Alphaviruses replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm, and their genetic material cannot recombine with cellular DNA. Alphavirus genome-based, self-replicating RNAs (replicons) are widely used vectors for expression of heterologous proteins. Their current design relies on replacement of structural genes, encoded by subgenomic RNAs (SG RNA), with heterologous sequences of interest. The SG RNA is transcribed from a promoter located in the alphavirus-specific RNA replication intermediate and is not further amplified. In this study, we have applied the accumulated knowledge of the mechanism of alphavirus replication and promoter structures, in particular, to increase the expression level of heterologous proteins from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-based replicons. During VEEV infection, replication enzymes are produced in excess to RNA replication intermediates, and a large fraction of them are not involved in RNA synthesis. The newly designed constructs encode SG RNAs, which are not only transcribed from the SG promoter, but are additionally amplified by the previously underused VEEV replication enzymes. These replicons produce SG RNAs and encoded proteins of interest 10- to 50-fold more efficiently than those using a traditional design. A modified replicon encoding West Nile virus (WNV) premembrane and envelope proteins efficiently produced subviral particles and, after a single immunization, elicited high titers of neutralizing antibodies, which protected mice from lethal challenge with WNV.

  3. Development of expression vectors for Escherichia coli based on the pCR2 replicon

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    Deb J K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in metabolic engineering and the need for expanded compatibility required for co-expression studies, underscore the importance of developing new plasmid vectors with properties such as stability and compatibility. Results We utilized the pCR2 replicon of Corynebacterium renale, which harbours multiple plasmids, for constructing a range of expression vectors. Different antibiotic-resistance markers were introduced and the vectors were found to be 100% stable over a large number of generations in the absence of selection pressure. Compatibility of this plasmid was studied with different Escherichia coli plasmid replicons viz. pMB1 and p15A. It was observed that pCR2 was able to coexist with these E.coli plasmids for 60 generations in the absence of selection pressure. Soluble intracellular production was checked by expressing GFP under the lac promoter in an expression plasmid pCR2GFP. Also high level production of human IFNγ was obtained by cloning the h-IFNγ under a T7 promoter in the expression plasmid pCR2-IFNγ and using a dual plasmid heat shock system for expression. Repeated sub-culturing in the absence of selection pressure for six days did not lead to any fall in the production levels post induction, for both GFP and h-IFNγ, demonstrating that pCR2 is a useful plasmid in terms of stability and compatibility. Conclusion We have constructed a series of expression vectors based on the pCR2 replicon and demonstrated its high stability and sustained expression capacity, in the absence of selection pressure which will make it an efficient tool for metabolic engineering and co-expression studies, as well as for scale up of expression.

  4. Virus replicon particles expressing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus proteins elicit immune priming but do not confer protection from viremia in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Melanie; Durán, Margarita García; Ricklin, Meret E; Locher, Samira; Sarraseca, Javier; Rodríguez, María José; McCullough, Kenneth C; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-02-19

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of one of the most devastating and economically significant viral disease of pigs worldwide. The vaccines currently available on the market elicit only limited protection. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replicon particles (VRP) have been used successfully to induce protection against influenza A virus (IAV) in chickens and bluetongue virus in sheep. In this study, VSV VRP expressing the PRRSV envelope proteins GP5, M, GP4, GP3, GP2 and the nucleocapsid protein N, individually or in combination, were generated and evaluated as a potential vector vaccine against PRRSV infection. High level expression of the recombinant PRRSV proteins was demonstrated in cell culture. However, none of the PRRSV antigens expressed from VRP, with the exception of the N protein, did induce any detectable antibody response in pigs before challenge infection with PRRSV. After challenge however, the antibody responses against GP5, GP4 and GP3 appeared in average 2 weeks earlier than in pigs vaccinated with the empty control VRP. No reduction of viremia was observed in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. When pigs were co-vaccinated with VRP expressing IAV antigens and VRP expressing PRRSV glycoproteins, only antibody responses to the IAV antigens were detectable. These data show that the VSV replicon vector can induce immune responses to heterologous proteins in pigs, but that the PRRSV envelope proteins expressed from VSV VRP are poorly immunogenic. Nevertheless, they prime the immune system for significantly earlier B-cell responses following PRRSV challenge infection.

  5. Comparation of Immune Reaction Efficiency of RNA Replicon Vaccine and DNA Vaccine of HBV in Mice%乙肝病毒RNA复制子疫苗与DNA疫苗对小鼠免疫效率的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹锦艳; 杨东; 任林柱; 张英; 闫森; 郝琳琳; 李莉

    2011-01-01

    为建立并获取更有效的乙肝疫苗,本实验通过将所构建的HBV RNA复制子疫苗和DNA疫苗分别免疫小鼠,检测细胞免疫与体液免疫的效果.结果表明,以pSFV为基础构建的疫苗载体免疫小鼠后采集的血清中抗体效价不随免疫剂量的增加而提高,在较低剂量免疫的时候,RNA复制子疫苗所产生的抗体效价优于DNA疫苗.并且RNA复制子疫苗在以较低剂量免疫后脾细胞CTL活性高于DNA疫苗.本研究证明HBV RNA疫苗比DNA疫苗表达效果更好,安全性更高,更具有应用前景.%To establish and obtain a more effective hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), mice cellular and humoral immunity were detected and compared after being immunized by the RNA replicon vaccmes and DNA vaccines of HBV which were constructed by our lab. The results showed that RNA replicon vaccines gained higher immune antibody titer, and higher CTL activity of spleen cells than that of DNA vaccines at low-dose, but not dose dependent.It was concluded that HBV RNA vaccmes are much safer and gained higher expression efficiency than the DNA vaccines, thus RNA vaccines of HBV are more prospective for the gene therapy of HBV.

  6. Reduced expression of Jak-1 and Tyk-2 proteins leads to interferon resistance in Hepatitis C virus replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luftig Ronald

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha interferon in combination with ribavirin is the standard therapy for hepatitis C virus infection. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients fail to eradicate their infection with this regimen. The mechanisms of IFN-resistance are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of host cell factors to the mechanisms of interferon resistance using replicon cell lines. Results HCV replicons with high and low activation of the IFN-promoter were cultured for a prolonged period of time in the presence of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha2b. Stable replicon cell lines with resistant phenotype were isolated and characterized by their ability to continue viral replication in the presence of IFN-alpha. Interferon resistant cell colonies developed only in replicons having lower activation of the IFN promoter and no resistant colonies arose from replicons that exhibit higher activation of the IFN promoter. Individual cell clones were isolated and nine IFN resistant cell lines were established. HCV RNA and protein levels in these cells were not altered by IFN- alpha2b. Reduced signaling and IFN-resistant phenotype was found in all Huh-7 cell lines even after eliminating HCV, suggesting that cellular factors are involved. Resistant phenotype in the replicons is not due to lack of interferon receptor expression. All the cell lines show defect in the JAK-STAT signaling and phosphorylation of STAT 1 and STAT 2 proteins were strongly inhibited due to reduced expression of Tyk2 and Jak-1 protein. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that altered expression of the Jak-Stat signaling proteins can cause IFN resistance using HCV replicon cell clones.

  7. Characterization of an efficient dengue virus replicon for development of assays of discovery of small molecules against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Han; Hu, Han-Shu; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Wu, Szu-Huei; Lin, Hui-Mei; Song, Jen-Shin; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Yueh, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a public health threat to approximately 40% of the global population. At present, neither licensed vaccines nor effective therapies exist, and the mechanism of viral RNA replication is not well understood. Here, we report the development of efficient Renilla luciferase reporter-based DENV replicons that contain the full-length capsid sequence for transient and stable DENV RNA replication. A comparison of the transient and stable expression of this RNA-launched replicon to replicons containing various deletions revealed dengue replicon containing entire mature capsid RNA element has higher replicon activity. An efficient DNA-launched DENV replicon, pCMV-DV2Rep, containing a full-length capsid sequence, was created and successfully applied to evaluate the potency of known DENV inhibitors. Stable cell lines harboring the DENV replicon were easily established by transfecting pCMV-DV2Rep into BHK21 cells. Steady and high replicon reporter signals were observed in the stable DENV replicon cells, even after 30 passages. The stable DENV replicon cells were successfully used to determine the potency of known DENV inhibitors. A high-throughput screening assay based on stable DENV replicon cells was evaluated and shown to have an excellent Z' factor of 0.74. Altogether, the development of our efficient DENV replicon system will facilitate the study of virus replication and the discovery of antiviral compounds.

  8. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluations of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, M; Gilbert, P; Russell, N; Hural, J; Allen, M; Pensiero, M; Chulay, J; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Abdool Karim, S S; Burke, D S

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of positive preclinical data, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine (AVX101), expressing a nonmyristoylated form of Gag, in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults. Escalating doses of AVX101 or placebo were administered subcutaneously to participants in the United States and Southern Africa. Because of vaccine stability issues, the first trial was halted prior to completion of all dose levels and a second trial was implemented. The second trial was also stopped prematurely due to documentation issues with the contract manufacturer. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated through assessments of reactogenicity, reports of adverse events, and assessment of replication-competent and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viremia. Immunogenicity was measured using the following assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-release cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISpot, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and lymphoproliferation assay (LPA). Anti-vector antibodies were also measured. AVX101 was well tolerated and exhibited only modest local reactogenicity. There were 5 serious adverse events reported during the trials; none were considered related to the study vaccine. In contrast to the preclinical data, immune responses in humans were limited. Only low levels of binding antibodies and T-cell responses were seen at the highest doses. This trial also highlighted the difficulties in developing a novel vector for HIV.

  9. Eradication of hepatitis C virus subgenomic replicon by interferon results in aberrant retinol-related protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kazuko; Takaki, Akinobu; Kato, Nobuyuki; Ouchida, Mamoru; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Shiraha, Hidenori; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces several changes in hepatocytes, such as oxidative stress, steatosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Although considerable progress has been made during recent years, the mechanisms underlying these functions remain unclear. We employed proteomic techniques in HCV replicon-harboring cells to determine the effects of HCV replication on host-cell protein expression. We examined two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry to compare and identify differentially expressed proteins between HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring cells and their "cured" cells. One of the identified proteins was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis. Full-length HCV genome RNA replicating and cured cells were also assessed using ELISA. Replicon-harboring cells showed higher expression of retinal dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH-1), which converts retinol to retinoic acid, and the cured cells showed higher expression of retinol-binding protein (RBP), which transports retinol from the liver to target tissues. The alteration in RBP expression was also confirmed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. We conclude that protein expression profiling demonstrated that HCV replicon eradication affected retinol-related protein expression.

  10. Eradication of Hepatitis C Virus Subgenomic Replicon by Interferon Results in Aberrant Retinol-Related Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koike,Kazuko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection induces several changes in hepatocytes, such as oxidative stress, steatosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Although considerable progress has been made during recent years, the mechanisms underlying these functions remain unclear. We employed proteomic techniques in HCV replicon-harboring cells to determine the effects of HCV replication on host-cell protein expression. We examined two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry to compare and identify differentially expressed proteins between HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring cells and their “cured” cells. One of the identified proteins was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blot analysis. Full-length HCV genome RNA replicating and cured cells were also assessed using ELISA. Replicon-harboring cells showed higher expression of retinal dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH-1, which converts retinol to retinoic acid, and the cured cells showed higher expression of retinol-binding protein (RBP, which transports retinol from the liver to target tissues. The alteration in RBP expression was also confirmed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. We conclude that protein expression profiling demonstrated that HCV replicon eradication affected retinol-related protein expression.

  11. Development and Characterization of West Nile Virus Replicon Expressing Secreted Gaussia Luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Shan; Xiaodan Li; Chenglin Deng; Baodi Shang; Linlin Xu; Hanqing Ye; Zhiming Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) reporter replicon of West Nile virus (WNV) and used it to quantify viral translation and RNA replication.The advantage of the Gluc replicon is that Gaussia luciferase is secreted into the culture medium from cells transfected with Gluc replicon RNA,and the medium can be assayed directly for luciferase activity.Using a known Flavivirus inhibitor (NITD008),we demonstrated that the Gluc-WNV replicon could be used for antiviral screening.The Gluc-WNV-Rep will be useful for research in antiviral drug development programs,as well as for studying viral replication and pathogenesis of WNV.

  12. Enhanced immunity against classical swine fever in pigs induced by prime-boost immunization using an alphavirus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Na; Li, Hong-Yu; Li, Miao; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2010-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) - caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) - is a fatal disease of pigs that is responsible for extensive losses to the swine industry worldwide. We had demonstrated previously that a prime-boost vaccination strategy using an alphavirus (Semliki Forest virus, SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine (pSFV1CS-E2) and a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-E2) expressing the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV induced enhanced immune responses in a mouse model. In this study, we evaluated further the efficacy of the heterologous prime-boost immunization approach in pigs, the natural host of CSFV. The results showed that the pigs (n=5) receiving pSFV1CS-E2/rAdV-E2 heterologous prime-boost immunization developed significantly higher titers of CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies and comparable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, compared to the pigs receiving double immunizations with rAdV-E2 alone. When challenged with virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the pigs of the heterologous prime-boost group did not show clinical symptoms or viremia, which were observed in one of the 5 pigs immunized with rAdV-E2 alone and all the 5 control pigs immunized with an empty adenovirus. The results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy can induce solid protective immunity.

  13. An oral Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus delivered by Escherichia coli elicits immune responses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, S S; Saini, M; Kumar, P; Gupta, P K

    2011-01-01

    A Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was delivered by Escherichia coli to elicit immune responses. The orally immunized dogs developed CPV-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibody responses. The cellular immune responses analyzed using lymphocyte proliferation test and flow cytometry indicated CPV-specific sensitization of both CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes. This study demonstrated that the oral CPV DNA vaccine delivered by E. coli can be considered as a promising approach for vaccination of dogs against CPV.

  14. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines.

  15. Japanese encephalitis virus-based replicon RNAs/particles as an expression system for HIV-1 Pr55 Gag that is capable of producing virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Koo, Yongbum; Jeon, Iksoo; Byun, Sung June; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Joo, Yi-Seok; Kim, Seok-Yong; Lee, Young-Min

    2009-09-01

    Ectopic expression of the structural protein Pr55(Gag) of HIV-1 has been limited by the presence of inhibitory sequences in the gag coding region that must normally be counteracted by HIV-1 Rev and RRE. Here, we describe a cytoplasmic RNA replicon based on the RNA genome of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that is capable of expressing HIV-1 gag without requiring Rev/RRE. This replicon system was constructed by deleting all three JEV structural protein-coding regions (C, prM, and E) from the 5'-proximal region of the genome and simultaneously inserting an HIV-1 gag expression cassette driven by the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus into the 3'-proximal noncoding region of the genome. Transfection of this JEV replicon RNA led to expression of Pr55(Gag) in the absence of Rev/RRE in the cytoplasm of hamster BHK-21, human HeLa, and mouse NIH/3T3 cells. Production of the Pr55(Gag) derived from this JEV replicon RNA appeared to be increased by approximately 3-fold when compared to that based on an alphavirus replicon RNA. Biochemical and morphological analyses demonstrated that the Pr55(Gag) proteins were released into the culture medium in the form of virus-like particles. We also observed that the JEV replicon RNAs expressing the Pr55(Gag) could be encapsidated into single-round infectious JEV replicon particles when transfected into a stable packaging cell line that provided the three JEV structural proteins in trans. This ectopic expression of the HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) by JEV-based replicon RNAs/particles in diverse cell types may represent a useful molecular platform for various biological applications in medicine and industry.

  16. Development of new plasmid DNA vaccine vectors with R1-based replicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Diana M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been renewed interest in biopharmaceuticals based on plasmid DNA (pDNA in recent years due to the approval of several veterinary DNA vaccines, on-going clinical trials of human pDNA-based therapies, and significant advances in adjuvants and delivery vehicles that have helped overcome earlier efficacy deficits. With this interest comes the need for high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. To this end, vector engineering is one promising strategy to improve plasmid production. Results In this work, we have constructed a new DNA vaccine vector, pDMB02-GFP, containing the runaway R1 origin of replication. The runaway replication phenotype should result in plasmid copy number amplification after a temperature shift from 30°C to 42°C. However, using Escherichia coli DH5α as a host, we observed that the highest yields of pDMB02-GFP were achieved during constant-temperature culture at 30°C, with a maximum yield of approximately 19 mg pDNA/g DCW being observed. By measuring mRNA and protein levels of the R1 replication initiator protein, RepA, we determined that RepA may be limiting pDMB02-GFP yield at 42°C. A mutant plasmid, pDMB-ATG, was constructed by changing the repA start codon from the sub-optimal GTG to ATG. In cultures of DH5α[pDMB-ATG], temperature-induced plasmid amplification was more dramatic than that observed with pDMB02-GFP, and RepA protein was detectable for several hours longer than in cultures of pDMB02-GFP at 42°C. Conclusions Overall, we have demonstrated that R1-based plasmids can produce high yields of high-quality pDNA without the need for a temperature shift, and have laid the groundwork for further investigation of this class of vectors in the context of plasmid DNA production.

  17. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  18. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogadri, Francesca; Merghoub, Taha; Maughan, Maureen F; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Morris, John; Ritter, Erika; Olmsted, Robert; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2010-09-10

    Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP) simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA) tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2), which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  19. Assessment of the effectiveness of a nuclear-launched TMV-based replicon as a tool for foreign gene expression in plants in comparison to direct gene expression from a nuclear promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Michal; Epel, Bernard L

    2006-02-01

    An environmentally safe Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV)-based expression replicon was constructed that lacks movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP), and which expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from a full CP subgenomic promoter. The TMV replicon, whose cDNA was positioned between an enhanced Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter (CaMV) and a self-cleaving hammerhead ribozyme with a downstream nopaline synthase gene polyadenylation signal [nos-poly(A)], was assessed for its effectiveness to accumulate GFP upon agroinfiltration into plant leaves compared to a control construct in which GFP was directly expressed from the enhanced CaMV 35S promoter. It was determined that individually expressing cells produced ca. 9-fold more GFP from the TMV-based replicon than from the enhanced 35S promoter. In contrast, GFP measurements from total leaf extracts determined that leaves infiltrated with the TMV-based replicon produced ca. 7-fold less GFP than the control construct. These apparently contradictory results can be explained by the low infectivity of the TMV-based replicon as it was found that the number of foci expressing GFP produced in leaves agroinfiltrated with the TMV-based replicon was ca. 66-fold lower than produced by the control.

  20. Proteome analysis of liver cells expressing a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon and biopsy specimens of posttransplantation liver from HCV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jon M; Diamond, Deborah L; Chan, Eric Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G; Carithers, Robert L; Smith, Richard D; Katze, Michael G

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large-scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full-length HCV replicon. We detected >4,200 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of HCV replicon-positive and -negative Huh-7.5 cells identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where a total of >1,500 proteins were detected from only 2 mug of liver biopsy protein digest using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting in the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  1. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-02

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V.

  2. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infect...

  3. Paramyxovirus-based producton of Rift Valley fever virus replicon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Oreshkova, N.; Harders, F.; Bossers, A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Replicon-particle-based vaccines combine the efficacy of live-attenuated vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. Recently, we developed Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) replicon particles, also known as nonspreading RVFV (NSR), and demonstrated that a single vaccination with these

  4. Paramyxovirus-based producton of Rift Valley fever virus replicon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Oreshkova, N.; Harders, F.; Bossers, A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Replicon-particle-based vaccines combine the efficacy of live-attenuated vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. Recently, we developed Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) replicon particles, also known as nonspreading RVFV (NSR), and demonstrated that a single vaccination with these

  5. High level expression of the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus in diverse eukaryotic cells using the Semliki Forest virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, J; Meanger, J; Lambert, P; Li, F; Locarnini, S A; Anderson, D A

    1997-12-01

    The capsid protein of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is encoded by open reading frame 2 (ORF 2) and exhibits variable processing when expressed in insect and COS cells, but nothing is known of its processing in cells relevant to its replication. The full-length ORF 2 protein was expressed at high levels in mammalian cells by insertion of ORF 2 in the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon to generate rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. Expression of the capsid protein was detected readily by metabolic labelling and indirect immunofluorescence in BHK-21 cells transfected with RNA transcripts derived from rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. ORF 2 protein was also expressed at high levels in cells of diverse origin, including liver-derived cell lines Huh7 and HepG2, following infection with recombinant virus derived from cotransfection of BHK-21 cells with the rSFV/HEV ORF 2K and helper SFV replicon RNAs. The addition of hypertonic KCl during metabolic labelling reduced the level of host cell protein synthesis and enhanced the detection of intermediates in ORF 2 protein processing. The wide host range and high level expression directed by SFV replicon particles has particular utility in the analysis of cell-specific factors in the protein processing and assembly of non-cultivable viruses such as HEV.

  6. Control of alphavirus-based gene expression using engineered riboswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Christie L; Yu, Dong; Smolke, Christina D; Geall, Andrew J; Beard, Clayton W; Mason, Peter W

    2015-09-01

    Alphavirus-based replicons are a promising nucleic acid vaccine platform characterized by robust gene expression and immune responses. To further explore their use in vaccination, replicons were engineered to allow conditional control over their gene expression. Riboswitches, comprising a ribozyme actuator and RNA aptamer sensor, were engineered into the replicon 3' UTR. Binding of ligand to aptamer modulates ribozyme activity and, therefore, gene expression. Expression from DNA-launched and VRP-packaged replicons containing riboswitches was successfully regulated, achieving a 47-fold change in expression and modulation of the resulting type I interferon response. Moreover, we developed a novel control architecture where riboswitches were integrated into the 3' and 5' UTR of the subgenomic RNA region of the TC-83 virus, leading to an 1160-fold regulation of viral replication. Our studies demonstrate that the use of riboswitches for control of RNA replicon expression and viral replication holds promise for development of novel and safer vaccination strategies.

  7. Individual and Bivalent Vaccines Based on Alphavirus Replicons Protect Guinea Pigs against Infection with Lassa and Ebola Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Pushko, Peter; Geisbert, Joan; Parker, Michael; Jahrling, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccin...

  8. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian; Tang, I-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at ~6.0.

  9. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  10. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  11. In vitro and in vivo characterization of microRNA-targeted alphavirus replicon and helper RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Coffield, V McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans.

  12. Self-replicating alphavirus RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant nucleic acids are considered as promising next-generation vaccines. These vaccines express the native antigen upon delivery into tissue, thus mimicking live attenuated vaccines without having the risk of reversion to pathogenicity. They also stimulate the innate immune system, thus potentiating responses. Nucleic acid vaccines are easy to produce at reasonable cost and are stable. During the past years, focus has been on the use of plasmid DNA for vaccination. Now mRNA and replicon vaccines have come into focus as promising technology platforms for vaccine development. This review discusses self-replicating RNA vaccines developed from alphavirus expression vectors. These replicon vaccines can be delivered as RNA, DNA or as recombinant virus particles. All three platforms have been pre-clinically evaluated as vaccines against a number of infectious diseases and cancer. Results have been very encouraging and propelled the first human clinical trials, the results of which have been promising.

  13. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States); Frey, Teryl K., E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  14. Cytomegalovirus replicon-based regulation of gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermine Mohr

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for a connection between DNA replication and the expression of adjacent genes. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether a herpesvirus origin of replication can be used to activate or increase the expression of adjacent genes. Cell lines carrying an episomal vector, in which reporter genes are linked to the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt, were constructed. Reporter gene expression was silenced by a histone-deacetylase-dependent mechanism, but was resolved upon lytic infection with MCMV. Replication of the episome was observed subsequent to infection, leading to the induction of gene expression by more than 1000-fold. oriLyt-based regulation thus provided a unique opportunity for virus-induced conditional gene expression without the need for an additional induction mechanism. This principle was exploited to show effective late trans-complementation of the toxic viral protein M50 and the glycoprotein gO of MCMV. Moreover, the application of this principle for intracellular immunization against herpesvirus infection was demonstrated. The results of the present study show that viral infection specifically activated the expression of a dominant-negative transgene, which inhibited viral growth. This conditional system was operative in explant cultures of transgenic mice, but not in vivo. Several applications are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of nonspreading Rift Valley fever virus as a vaccine vector using influenza virus hemagglutinin as a model antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oreshkova, N.; Cornelissen, L.A.H.M.; Haan, de C.A.M.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus replicon particles are capable of infection, genome replication and gene expression, but are unable to produce progeny virions, rendering their use inherently safe. By virtue of this unique combination of features, replicon particles hold great promise for vaccine applications. We previously d

  16. SH2 modified STAT1 induces HLA-I expression and improves IFN-γ signaling in IFN-α resistant HCV replicon cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Poat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have developed multiple stable cell lines containing subgenomic HCV RNA that are resistant to treatment with interferon alpha (IFN-α. Characterization of these IFN-α resistant replicon cells showed defects in the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins due to a defective Jak-STAT pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have developed an alternative strategy to overcome interferon resistance in a cell culture model by improving intracellular STAT1 signaling. An engineered STAT1-CC molecule with double cysteine substitutions in the Src-homology 2 (SH2 domains of STAT1 (at Ala-656 and Asn-658 efficiently phosphorylates and translocates to the nucleus of IFN-resistant cells in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Transfection of a plasmid clone containing STAT1-CC significantly activated the GAS promoter compared to wild type STAT1 and STAT3. The activity of the engineered STAT1-CC is dependent upon the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 701, since the construct with a substituted phenylalanine residue at position 701 (STAT1-CC-Y701F failed to activate GAS promoter in the replicon cells. Intracellular expression of STAT1-CC protein showed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in the resistant cell line after IFN-γ treatment. Transient transfection of STAT1-CC plasmid clone into an interferon resistant cell line resulted in inhibition of viral replication and viral clearance in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Furthermore, the resistant replicon cells transfected with STAT1-CC constructs significantly up regulated surface HLA-1 expression when compared to the wild type and Y to F mutant controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that modification of the SH2 domain of the STAT1 molecule allows for improved IFN-γ signaling through increased STAT1 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, HLA-1 surface expression, and prolonged interferon antiviral gene activation.

  17. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  18. Immune responses in mice vaccinated with a suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the hemagglutinin glycoprotein from the peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Guangqing; Shi, Lijun; Li, Wenchao; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Jin, Hongyan; Xu, Binrui; Li, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), an acute and highly contagious disease, affects sheep, goats, and some small ruminants. The hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein of the PPR virus (PPRV) is considered important for inducing protective immune responses. In this study, a suicidal DNA vaccine based on the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was constructed and tested for its ability to induce immunogenicity in a mouse model. For this, the H gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV replicon vector. The resultant plasmid named pSCA1-H was then transfected into BHK-21 cells following which the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The pSCA1-H plasmid was then injected intramuscularly into BALB/c mice thrice at 2-week intervals. To evaluate the immunogenicity of pSCA1-H, specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies against PPRV-H were measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a microneutralization test, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were also examined using a lymphocyte proliferation assay. The results showed that pSCA1-H could express the H protein in BHK-21 cells. Specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and lymphocyte proliferation responses were all induced in mice. Thus, this suicidal DNA vaccine could be a promising new approach for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  20. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Maria L; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  1. Development of a novel Dengue-1 virus replicon system expressing secretory Gaussia luciferase for analysis of viral replication and discovery of antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Replicon systems have been used for high-throughput screening of anti-dengue virus (anti-DENV) inhibitors and for understanding mechanisms of viral replication. In the present study, we constructed novel DENV-1 replicons encoding Gaussia luciferase that was secreted into the culture medium. Two types of constructs were generated: RNA-based and DNA-based. Each type was translated in an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent or IRES-independent manner. Among these constructs, the DNA-based replicon employing IRES-dependent translation (DGL2) produced the highest titer. Luciferase levels in the culture medium revealed that the DGL2 replicon was inhibited by ribavirin (a well-known DENV inhibitor) at levels similar to those measured for drug inhibition of multi-round DENV-1 infection. These results indicate that the DNA-based IRES-driven DENV-1 replicon may facilitate studies on viral replication and antiviral compound discovery.

  2. Structure and immunogenicity of alternative forms of the simian immunodeficiency virus gag protein expressed using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L

    2007-06-05

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-) or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infected primary mouse embryo fibroblasts, mouse L929 cells and primate Vero cells showed comparable expression levels for each protein, as well as extracellular virus-like particles (VRP-Gagmyr+) and distinctive cytoplasmic aggregates (VRP-Gagmyr-) with each cell type. VRP were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and immune responses were compared using an interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISPOT assay and a serum antibody ELISA. Although all three VRP generated similar levels of IFN-gamma-producing cells at 1 week post-boost, at 10 weeks post-boost the MA/CA-VRP-induced response was maintained at a significantly higher level relative to that induced by Gagmyr+-VRP. Antibody responses to MA/CA-VRP and Gagmyr+-VRP were not significantly different.

  3. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Individual and bivalent vaccines against botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunzhou; Yu, Jiyu; Li, Na; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Weiyuan; Sun, Zhiwei

    2009-10-19

    We evaluated individual and bivalent replicon vaccines against Clostridiumbotulinum neurotoxin serotypes A (BoNT/A) or B (BoNT/B). The DNA replicon vaccine (pSCARSBHc) encoding the Hc domain of BoNT/B (BHc) induced better responses and protection against BoNT/B mouse challenge than conventional DNA vaccine. The dual-expressing DNA vaccine (pSCARSA/BHc) protected similarly to a DNA replicon vaccine mixture (pSCARSAHc+pSCARSBHc). Additionally, recombinant SFV particles, VRP-AHc or VRP-BHc, protected mice from high-dose BoNT/A or BoNT/B challenge, respectively. Mice given either dual-expressing VRP-A/BHc or mixture of VRP-AHc and VRP-BHc were protected from challenge with serotype A/B mixtures. These data justify further testing in other animals or humans.

  5. Construction and use of a versatile set of broad-host-range cloning and expression vectors based on the RK2 replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatny, J M; Brautaset, T; Winther-Larsen, H C; Haugan, K; Valla, S

    1997-01-01

    The plasmid vectors described in this report are derived from the broad-host-range RK2 replicon and can be maintained in many gram-negative bacterial species. The complete nucleotide sequences of all of the cloning and expression vectors are known. Important characteristics of the cloning vectors are as follows: a size range of 4.8 to 7.1 kb, unique cloning sites, different antibiotic resistance markers for selection of plasmid-containing cells, oriT-mediated conjugative plasmid transfer, plasmid stabilization functions, and a means for a simple method for modification of plasmid copy number. Expression vectors were constructed by insertion of the inducible Pu or Pm promoter together with its regulatory gene xylR or xylS, respectively, from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida. One of these vectors was used in an analysis of the correlation between phosphoglucomutase activity and amylose accumulation in Escherichia coli. The experiments showed that amylose synthesis was only marginally affected by the level of basal expression from the Pm promoter of the Acetobacter xylinum phosphoglucomutase gene (celB). In contrast, amylose accumulation was strongly reduced when transcription from Pm was induced. CelB was also expressed with a very high induction ratio in Xanthomonas campestris. These experiments showed that the A. xylinum celB gene could not complement the role of the bifunctional X. campestris phosphoglucomutase-phosphomannomutase gene in xanthan biosynthesis. We believe that the vectors described here are useful for cloning experiments, gene expression, and physiological studies with a wide range of bacteria and presumably also for analysis of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:9023917

  6. Establishment of a robust hepatitis C virus replicon cell line over-expressing P-glycoprotein that facilitates analysis of P-gp drug transporter effects on inhibitor antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Dennis; Falk, Paul; Yu, Fei; Zhai, Guangzhi; Quan, Yong; Faria, Teresa; Cao, Kai; Scola, Paul; McPhee, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an active efflux pump affecting the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of drugs that are P-gp substrates. The Caco-2 bi-directional assay is widely used to identify drug-P-gp interactions in vitro. For molecules exhibiting non-classical drug properties however, ambiguous results limit its use in lead optimization. The goal of this study was to develop a robust cell-based assay system to directly measure the role of P-gp-driven efflux in reducing the potency of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication inhibitors. Vinblastine (Vin) was employed to select for a Vin-resistant HCV replicon (313-11) from the parental cell line (377-2). The 313-11 cell line was >50-fold resistant to Vin and over-expressed P-gp, as determined by Western immunoblots. Increased expression of P-gp was mediated by up-regulation of the MDR1 transcript. The reduced potency of different classes of HCV replication inhibitors in the 313-11 P-gp cell line was restored in the presence of known P-gp inhibitors. Addition of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, increased the uptake of a radiolabeled HCV replication inhibitor by 14-fold in the 313-11 replicon cell line. Finally, a positive correlation was demonstrated between potency in the 313-11 replicon and the bi-directional Caco-2 efflux ratio for a panel of HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, a robust P-gp HCV replicon cell-based assay has been developed to measure the effect of the P-gp efflux pump on the potency of different classes of HCV replication inhibitors. This system establishes a direct correlation between antiviral activity and the effect of P-gp efflux in a single cell line.

  7. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of MicroRNA-Targeted Alphavirus Replicon and Helper RNAs ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I.; Coffield, V. McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A.; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans. PMID:20504925

  8. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  9. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  10. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  11. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  12. Construction and applications of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin; Zhe, Mingjia; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Meng, Chunchun; Zhang, Miaotao; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    The study of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has long been hindered by the absence of an in vitro culture system. In this study, using RHDV as a model, a series of DNA-based reporter replicons were constructed in which the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene was fused in-frame with the open reading frame of the replicon. In this construct, the Fluc gene was inserted where the coding region of viral structural protein was deleted and was under the control of a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter. Fluc activity analysis showed that these reporter replicons replicate efficiently in mammalian cells. On the basis of the replicon, 5'non-coding regions (5'NCR) and genome-linked protein (VPg) were deleted, and the effect on the expression of replicon was analyzed. The results showed that the expression level of Fluc was reduced in the absence of 5'NCR and VPg, suggesting that the 5'NCR and VPg may play an important role in replication and/or translation of RHDV. To further verify the speculation, we also constructed a replication deficient mutant (pRHDV-luc/Δ3D), and the impact of 5'NCR and VPg deletion on viral translation efficiency was analyzed, our results indicated that both VPg and 5'NCR were involved in RHDV translation.

  13. Recombinant expression systems for allergen vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohan B; Bhalla, Prem L

    2006-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy of future is likely to be based on allergy vaccines that contain engineered allergens modified to abolish or substantially reduce their IgE-binding activity in order to remove the risk of unwanted anaphylactic responses. The development of efficient systems for the production of recombinant allergens in sufficient quantities is requirement for establishing use of engineered allergens as components of allergy vaccines. This review outlines relative advantages and disadvantages of various heterologous systems for production of recombinant allergens. Microbial systems are most convenient and cost effective platforms for the production of recombinant allergens. However, lack of post-translational processing implies that some allergens have to be expressed in eukaryotic systems for proper folding and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation. Yeast systems can yield high levels of recombinant allergens but often are associated with hyper- glycosylation problems. Mammalian cell culture systems offer suitable post -translational modifications but are nearly hundred fold more expensive than microbial systems. The use of plants as bio-factories for production of recombinant allergens is emerging as a very attractive option as plants-based production system offer several advantages over other expression systems such as post translational processing of proteins, low production costs, scale up ability and enhanced safety due to absence of animal or human pathogens.

  14. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    OpenAIRE

    Gerosolimo Germano; Dallapiccola Bruno; Bruni Roberto; Ferraris Alessandro; Tataseo Paola; Tritarelli Elena; Marcantonio Cinzia; Ciccaglione Anna; Costantino Angela; Rapicetta Maria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system). Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 ...

  15. Kunjin virus replicons: an RNA-based, non-cytopathic viral vector system for protein production, vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Suhrbier, A.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The application of viral vectors for gene expression and delivery is rapidly evolving, with several entering clinical trials. However, a number of issues, including safety, gene expression levels, cell selectivity and antivector immunity, are driving the search for new vector systems. A number of re

  16. Effects of Hepatitis C Mixture on RNA Expression of Different Genotypic HCV Replicons%丙肝合剂对不同基因型丙型肝炎病毒复制子基因表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李京涛; 魏海梁; 席奇; 刘亚珠; 闫曙光; 惠毅; 宋春荣; 李日向; 常占杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibition mechanism of Hepatitis C Mixture for RNA expression of different genotypic HCV replicons in vitro.MethodsDifferent genotypic HCV replicon cell models were established. According to the disparity of genotypes, they were divided into three groups which named HCV 1b, HCV 2a and J6/JFH1. The Huh7.5.1 cell colonies which contain HCV replicon RNA were treated with various concentrations of Hepatitis C Mixture for 48 h. Then the luciferase activity and cytotoxicity of cell colonieswere detected. MTT method was used to detect cytotoxicity. IFN-2α and DMSO were selected as positive and negative control for eliminating the experiment errors.ResultsLuciferase activities of three groups showed a dose dependent decrease. Luciferase activities of three groups were significant different (P<0.05). Multiple comparisons were performed and showed the luciferase activity of HCV 2a group was lower than those in HCV 1b and J6/JFH1 groups (P<0.05). The results of MTT showed that when cells were treated with 0.2 g/mL of Hepatitis C Mixture, cellular survival rate was higher over 99%. ConclusionHepatitis C Mixture could partly inhibit the RNA expression of different genotypic HCV replicons in vitro, especially the HCV 2a replicon. The optimal inhibitory concentrations of Hepatitis C Mixture is 0.1 g/mL.%目的 通过体外实验探讨丙肝合剂抑制不同基因型丙型肝炎病毒(HCV)复制子基因表达的机制.方法建立不同基因型HCV复制子细胞模型,按基因型不同分为HCV 1b组、HCV 2a组和J6/JFH1组,不同浓度丙肝合剂干预负载复制子的Huh7.5.1细胞48 h后,收集细胞裂解液,进行荧光素酶活性测定,MTT法检测细胞毒性.选择IFN-2α和DMSO分别作为阳性对照和阴性对照以排除实验误差.结果 3组荧光素酶活性呈剂量依赖性下降,3组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).多重比较显示,HCV 2a组荧光素酶活性显著低于HCV 1b组和J6/JFH1组(P<0.05).MTT实验结

  17. Development of Novel Vaccines and Therapeutics Using Plant-Based Expression Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    is 458  room for improvement (e.g., reducing in planta aggregate formation), we obtained a 459  comparatively high level of expression for plant-based...Gils, M., Kandzia, R., Klimyuk, V., and Gleba, Y. (2004) In 675  planta engineering of viral RNA replicons: efficient assembly by recombination of DNA

  18. Identification and construction of replicon vectors of Japanese encephalits virus(strain SA14-14-2)%乙脑病毒SA14-14-2株复制子载体的构建及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦艳; 李川; 陆鹏; 于建石; 李建东; 刘琴芝; 张全福; 李德新

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to lay the groundwork for studying the novel vaccine Identified.Methods (1)Two replicons were constructed.One's prM/E gene was deleted completely(Full △prM/E Replicon),the other's prM/E gene was deleted partially(213 bp of C terminal of E gene was reserved;PaaiM △prM/E Replicon),and the deleted parts Was replaced as the MCS.(2)Replicons RNA were which will use the JEV as the vector,replicon vectors of JEV was constructed and transfected into BHK-21 cell.After 24,48,72,96 h,method of real-time PCR was used to identify Replicons'replication ability.(3)YFP gene was inserted into the MCS of those two replicons.Their RNA was transfected into BHK-21 cell.Expression of YFP was tested by the fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometer.Results (1)After the two replicons RNA were transfected into BHK-21 cell,as time went by,the quantity of RNA inereased.(2)After RNA of the replicons with YFP were transfected into BHK-21cell,increasing trend of fluorescent signal and rate of YFP positive cell was observed and tested.Conclusion Full △prM/E Replicon and Partial △prM/E Replicon have the ability to duplicate itself and express the foreign protein.%目的 构建乙脑病毒SA14-14-2株复制子载体,为进一步研究以乙脑病毒为载体的新型疫苗奠定基础.方法 (1)构建了两个乙脑病毒复制子:一个为完全缺失PrM/E基因(命名为Full △prM/E Replicon);一个保留E基因C端213 bp(命名为Partial △prM/E Replicon),并代之以多克隆位点.(2)将复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞,于24、48、72、96 h采用Real-time PCR验证复制子的自主复制能力.(3)于复制子多克隆位点处插入YFP报告基因,并将含报告基因的复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞,采用荧光显微镜观察及流式细胞仪检测验证YFP的表达.结果 (1)两个复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞后,RNA有随时间增加而不断增多的趋势.(2)含报告基因的复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞后,荧光信号持续增强,表达YFP的阳性

  19. Production of single-round infectious chimeric flaviviruses with DNA-based Japanese encephalitis virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Wakita, Takaji

    2014-01-01

    A method for rapid production of single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) of flavivirus would be useful for viral mutagenesis studies. Here, we established a DNA-based production system for SRIPs of flavivirus. We constructed a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) subgenomic replicon plasmid, which lacked the C-prM-E (capsid-pre-membrane-envelope) coding region, under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. When the JEV replicon plasmid was transiently co-transfected with a JEV C-prM-E expression plasmid into 293T cells, SRIPs were produced, indicating successful trans-complementation with JEV structural proteins. Equivalent production levels were observed when C and prM-E proteins were provided separately. Furthermore, dengue types 1-4, West Nile, yellow fever or tick-borne encephalitis virus prM-E proteins could be utilized for production of chimaeric flavivirus SRIPs, although the production was less efficient for dengue and yellow fever viruses. These results indicated that our plasmid-based system is suitable for investigating the life cycles of flaviviruses, diagnostic applications and development of safer vaccine candidates.

  20. Vaccine to Confer to Nonhuman Primates Complete Protection Against Multistrain Ebola and Marburg Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Therefore, much progress has been made using alternative vaccine platforms, such as recombinant viral vec- tors. For example, alphavirus replicons...immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys of DNA plas- mid, recombinant vaccinia virus, and replication -defective adenovirus vec- tors expressing a human...recombinants. Virology 239:206–216. 14. Hevey, M., D. Negley, P. Pushko, J. Smith, and A. Schmaljohn. 1998. Mar- burg virus vaccines based upon alphavirus

  1. Construction of yellow fever virus subgenomic replicons by yeast-based homologous recombination cloning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina R.A. Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicon derived from Flavivirus genome is a valuable tool for studying viral replication independent of virion assembly and maturation, besides being a great potencial for heterologous gene expression. In this study we described the construction of subgenomic replicons of yellow fever virus by yeast-based homologous recombination technique. The plasmid containing the yellow fever 17D strain replicon (pBSC-repYFV-17D, previously characterized, was handled to heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (repYFV-17D-GFP and firefly luciferase (repYFV-17D-Luc reporter genes. Both replicons were constructed by homologous recombination between the linearized vector pBSC-repYFV-17D and the PCR product containing homologous 25 nucleotides ends incorporated into PCR primers. The genomic organization of these constructs is similar to repYFV-17D, but with insertion of the reporter gene between the remaining 63 N-terminal nucleotides of the capsid protein and 72 C-terminal nucleotides of the E protein. The replicons repYFV-17D-GFP and repYFV-17D-Luc showed efficient replication and expression of the reporter genes. The yeast-based homologous recombination technique used in this study proved to be applicable for manipulation of the yellow fever virus genome in order to construct subgenomic replicons.

  2. Characterization of a Minimal pKW2124 Replicon from Weissella cibaria KLC140 and Its Application for the Construction of the Weissella Expression Vector pKUCm1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Jin eKu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 2.1-kb plasmid was previously isolated from Weissella cibaria KLC140 in kimchi and cloned into pUC19 along with the slpA and gfp genes, resulting in an 8.6-kb pKWCSLGFP construct for use as a novel surface display vector. To reduce the size of the vector, the minimal replicon of pKW2124 was determined. The pKW2124 plasmid contains a putative origin of replication (ori, a potential ribosomal binding site (RBS, and the repA gene encoding a plasmid replication protein. To conduct the minimal replicon experiment, three different PCR products (MR1, ori + RBS + repA; MR2, RBS + repA; MR2’, repA; MR3, fragment of repA were obtained and cloned into pUC19 (pKUCm1, pKUCm2, and pKUCm3, respectively containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT gene. These three constructed vectors were electroporated into W. confusa ATCC 10881 with different transformation efficiencies of 1.5×105 CFU/μg, 1.3×101 CFU/μg, and no transformation, respectively, suggesting that the putative ori, RBS, and repA gene are essential for optimum plasmid replication. Subsequent segregational plasmid stability testing of pKUCm1 and pKUCm2 showed that the vector pKUCm1 is highly stable up to 100 generations but pKUCm2 was completely lost after 60 generations, suggesting that the putative ori may be important for plasmid stability in the host strain. In addition, a host range test of pKUCm1 revealed that it has a broad host range spectrum including Weissella, Lactococcus, Leuconostoc, and even Lactobacillus. To verify the application of pKUCm1, the β-galactosidase gene and its promoter region from W. cibaria KSD1 were cloned in the vector, resulting in pKUGal. Expression of the β-galactosidase gene was confirmed using blue-white screening after IPTG induction. The small and stable pKUGal vector will be useful for gene transfer, expression, and manipulation in the Weissella genome and in other lactic acid bacteria.

  3. Alphavirus replicon particles acting as adjuvants promote CD8+ T cell responses to co-delivered antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert E

    2008-08-05

    Alphavirus replicon particles induce strong antibody and CD8+ T cell responses to expressed antigens in numerous experimental systems. We have recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) possess adjuvant activity for systemic and mucosal antibody responses. In this report, we demonstrate that VRP induced an increased and balanced serum IgG subtype response to co-delivered antigen, with simultaneous induction of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and increased both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as measured by an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Additionally, VRP further increased antigen-specific T cell immunity in an additive fashion following co-delivery with the TLR ligand, CpG DNA. VRP infection led to recruitment of CD8+ T cells into the mucosal compartment, possibly utilizing the mucosal homing receptor, as this integrin was upregulated on CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node of VRP-infected animals, where VRP-infected dendritic cells reside. This newly recognized ability of VRP to mediate increased T cell response towards co-delivered antigen provides the potential to both define the molecular basis of alphavirus-induced immunity, and improve alphavirus-based vaccines.

  4. Recombinant measles AIK-C vaccine strain expressing heterologous virus antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Sawada, Akihito; Yamaji, Yoshiaki; Ito, Takashi

    2016-01-04

    Further attenuated measles vaccines were developed more than 50 years ago and have been used throughout the world. Recombinant measles vaccine candidates have been developed and express several heterologous virus protective antigens. Immunogenicity and protective actions were confirmed using experimental animals: transgenic mice, cotton rats, and primates. The recent development of measles vaccine-based vectored vaccine candidates has been reviewed and some information on recombinant measles vaccines expressing respiratory syncytial virus proteins has been shown and discussed.

  5. Immunization responses against equine influenza virus (EIV) based on recombinant Alphavirus replicon plasmid expressing EIV hemagglutinin gene%马流感病毒血凝素基因甲病毒复制子重组表达质粒的构建及其免疫效力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇铮; 郭巍; 孙元; 戚亭; 仇华吉; 相文华

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate DNA vaccination against equine influenza virus (EIV), the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of American and European H3N8 subtype EIV were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into a Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon based plasmid of pSFV to construct the recombinant plasmid pSFV1CS-EIV-HA, respectively. The HA expressions were identified in the 293T cells transfected with the recombinant plasmid by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Furthermore, the specific HI antibody, IFN-γ or IL-4 level were detected in BALB/c mice immunized with either single or both of the recombinant plasmids. However, the virus was failed to detect in immunized BALB/c mice by the RT-PCR detection or the virus isolation. The results indicated that the recombinant plasmids possessed a capability for inducing effective immune responses in animals, which was a promising candidate DNA vaccine against EIV infection.%为评价马流感病毒(EIV) HA基因核酸免疫效果,本研究以甲病毒复制子载体pSFV1CS分别构建了表达EIV H3N8亚型的美洲型和欧洲型HA基因的重组真核表达质粒.并将其转染293T细胞,经间接免疫荧光鉴定表明HA基因获得表达;以重组质粒免疫的BALB/c鼠能够检测到特异性抗体产生,而且HI抗体水平持续升高,同时小鼠体内IFN-γ、IL-4分泌水平也有所升高.攻毒后小鼠表现轻度临床症状,但病毒分离和RT-PCR 均未检测到病毒.上述结果表明,该重组质粒pSFV1CS-EIV-HA具有良好的免疫原性并且可以诱导免疫动物产生较高免疫应答的能力.

  6. Expression of hBD-2 induced by 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhenwei; Lei, Han

    2012-10-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide with high activity and broad spectrum activity. hBD-2 expression may be highly elevated by microorganisms and inflammation. We reported that the majority of common vaccines used, including 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine, could induce the expression of hBD-2 in epithelial cells. Among them, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine was effective at a lower concentration (0.5 µg/ml), while Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine were effective at the concentration of 1 µg/ml. However, bacteriostatic experiments revealed that the split influenza virus vaccine was capable of inducing the highest antimicrobial activity. The medium of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine treatment group had a higher antimicrobial activity than the medium of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine treatment group. The transcriptional regulator of hBD-2, that is, the NF-κB subunit, had a high level of activity, while the normal epithelial cells showed barely detectable activity, indicating that these vaccines have potential for clinical application.

  7. Development of a novel adenovirus-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features for malignant hematopoietic cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, F; Lu, Z; Li, Z; Zuo, H; Zhang, Q; Li, Q; Wang, H; Wang, L-S

    2013-08-01

    To improve the expression levels of transgenes in malignant hematopoietic cells, we developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP that contains a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon and chimeric fibers of Ad5 and Ad11p. Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP infected >95% of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells and 23.65% of HL-60 cells, and led to moderate Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) transgene expression intensity. The infection efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary human leukemia cells ranged from 9.34-89.63% (median, 28.58%) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100, compared with only 3.37-44.54% (median, 10.42%) in cells infected by Ad5/F11p-GFP. Importantly, Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP led to a significantly higher transgene expression level in primary leukemia cells, as indicated by the relative fluorescence intensity, compared to cells infected with Ad5/F11p-GFP. The increased expression of EGFP in Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP-infected cells was associated with the accumulation of abundant subgenomic mRNA. Additionally, infection of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells by Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP was significantly inhibited by blocking CD46 receptor; however, other factors may affect the gene-transfer efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary leukemia cells. In conclusion, we successfully developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features, which represents a promising vector for gene modifications during the production of cell-based vaccines for leukemia patients.

  8. [Influence of Japanese enciphalitis virus capsid protein on the self-replicate ability of JEV replicon vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Shan; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Du, Yun; Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Weiyuan

    2010-08-01

    To optimize a self-replicate Japanese enciphalitis virus (JEV) replicon, and to make it as an efficient vector to express the heterologous protein, we constructed three JEV replicons by PCR-based shortening the length of capsid genes. The vectors remained full or part of C gene, based on the JEV replicon pCTCJEV. Lac Z was selected as the reporter gene to verify the self-replicate ability of these DNA-based replicons. While transfected into the cell lines CME-4, which continuously expressing the JEV structure proteins C-prM-E, the JEV replicons pCMW-2M-1LACZ, pCMW-2M-3LACZ, which remained the first 23aa and 68aa of C protein, can express the reporter protein as the same level as pCMW-2M-LACZ with the full-length C protein. These results illustrated that the JEV replicon vector with 69-nt of the C gene can retain the self-replicate ability, and provide valuable tools to construct a possible vector for a long-lasting JEV RNA virus expression system.

  9. Salmonid alphavirus replicon is functional in fish, mammalian and insect cells and in vivo in shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christel M; Pemula, Anand Kumar; Braaen, Stine; Sankaran, Krishnan; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-11-19

    The Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is the etiological agent of pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Sleeping disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). SAV differs from alphaviruses infecting terrestrial animals in that it infects salmonid fish at low temperatures and does not use an arthropod vector for transmission. In this study we have shown that a SAVbased replicon could express proteins when driven by the subgenomic promoter in vitro in cells from fish, mammals and insects, as well as in vivo in shrimps (Litopanaeus vannamei). The SAV-replicon was found to be functional at temperatures ranging from 4 to 37°C. Protein expression was slow and moderate compared to that reported from terrestrial alphavirus replicons or from vectors where protein expression was under control of the immediate early CMV-promoter. No cytopathic effect was visually observable in cells transfected with SAV-replicon vectors. Double stranded RNA was present for several days after transfection of the SAV-replicon in fish cell lines and its presence was indicated also in shrimp. The combination of prolonged dsRNA production, low toxicity, and wide temperature range for expression, may potentially be advantageous for the use of the SAV replicon to induce immune responses in aquaculture of fish and shrimp.

  10. Alphavirus replicon-based enhancement of mucosal and systemic immunity is linked to the innate response generated by primary immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Daniel R; Jorquera, Patricia; Todd, Tracie; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E; Barro, Mario

    2010-04-19

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) function as an effective systemic, cellular and mucosal adjuvant when codelivered with antigen, and show promise for use as a component in new and existing human vaccine formulations. We show here that VRP are effective at low dose and by intramuscular delivery, two useful features for implementation of VRP as a vaccine adjuvant. In mice receiving a prime and boost with antigen, we found that VRP are required in prime only to produce a full adjuvant effect. This outcome indicates that the events triggered during prime with VRP are sufficient to establish the nature and magnitude of the immune response to a second exposure to antigen. Events induced by VRP in the draining lymph node after prime include robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, upregulation of CD69 on leukocytes, and increased cellularity, with a disproportionate increase of a cell population expressing CD11c, CD11b, and F4/80. We show that antigen delivered 24h after administration of VRP does not benefit from an adjuvant effect, indicating that the events which are critical to VRP-mediated adjuvant activity occur within the first 24h. Further studies of the events induced by VRP will help elucidate the mechanism of VRP adjuvant activity and will advance the safe implementation of this adjuvant in human vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Establishment of a new quality control and vaccine safety test for influenza vaccines and adjuvants using gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momose, Haruka; Mizukami, Takuo; Kuramitsu, Madoka; Takizawa, Kazuya; Masumi, Atsuko; Araki, Kumiko; Furuhata, Keiko; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2015-01-01

    We have previously identified 17 biomarker genes which were upregulated by whole virion influenza vaccines, and reported that gene expression profiles of these biomarker genes had a good correlation with conventional animal safety tests checking body weight and leukocyte counts. In this study, we have shown that conventional animal tests showed varied and no dose-dependent results in serially diluted bulk materials of influenza HA vaccines. In contrast, dose dependency was clearly shown in the expression profiles of biomarker genes, demonstrating higher sensitivity of gene expression analysis than the current animal safety tests of influenza vaccines. The introduction of branched DNA based-concurrent expression analysis could simplify the complexity of multiple gene expression approach, and could shorten the test period from 7 days to 3 days. Furthermore, upregulation of 10 genes, Zbp1, Mx2, Irf7, Lgals9, Ifi47, Tapbp, Timp1, Trafd1, Psmb9, and Tap2, was seen upon virosomal-adjuvanted vaccine treatment, indicating that these biomarkers could be useful for the safety control of virosomal-adjuvanted vaccines. In summary, profiling biomarker gene expression could be a useful, rapid, and highly sensitive method of animal safety testing compared with conventional methods, and could be used to evaluate the safety of various types of influenza vaccines, including adjuvanted vaccine.

  12. Understanding the molecular mechanism of host-based statin resistance in hepatitis C virus replicon containing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delang, Leen; Scheers, Els; Grabner, Mareike; Verpaalen, Ben; Helsen, Nicky; Vanstreels, Els; Daelemans, Dirk; Verfaillie, Catherine; Neyts, Johan

    2015-08-01

    A number of statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit the in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). In HCV-infected patients, addition of statins to the earlier standard of care therapy (pegIFN-α and ribavirin) resulted in increased sustained virological response rates. The mechanism by which statins inhibit HCV replication has not yet been elucidated. In an attempt to gain insight in the underlying mechanism, hepatoma cells carrying an HCV replicon were passaged in the presence of increasing concentrations of fluvastatin. Fluvastatin-resistant replicon containing cells could be generated and proved ∼8-fold less susceptible to fluvastatin than wild-type cultures. The growth efficiency of the resistant replicon containing cells was comparable to that of wild-type replicon cells. The fluvastatin-resistant phenotype was not conferred by mutations in the viral genome but is caused by cellular changes. The resistant cell line had a markedly increased HMG-CoA reductase expression upon statin treatment. Furthermore, the expression of the efflux transporter P-gp was increased in fluvastatin-resistant replicon cells (determined by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry). This increased expression resulted also in an increased functional transport activity as measured by the P-gp mediated efflux of calcein AM. In conclusion, we demonstrate that statin resistance in HCV replicon containing hepatoma cells is conferred by changes in the cellular environment.

  13. Vaccines to combat river blindness: expression, selection and formulation of vaccines against infection with Onchocerca volvulus in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jessica A; Zhan, Bin; Bonne-Année, Sandra; Deckman, Jessica M; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Klei, Thomas R; Lustigman, Sara; Abraham, David

    2014-08-01

    Human onchocerciasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by Onchocerca volvulus and an important cause of blindness and chronic disability in the developing world. Although mass drug administration of ivermectin has had a profound effect on control of the disease, additional tools are critically needed including the need for a vaccine against onchocerciasis. The objectives of the present study were to: (i) select antigens with known vaccine pedigrees as components of a vaccine; (ii) produce the selected vaccine antigens under controlled conditions, using two expression systems and in one laboratory and (iii) evaluate their vaccine efficacy using a single immunisation protocol in mice. In addition, we tested the hypothesis that joining protective antigens as a fusion protein or in combination, into a multivalent vaccine, would improve the ability of the vaccine to induce protective immunity. Out of eight vaccine candidates tested in this study, Ov-103, Ov-RAL-2 and Ov-CPI-2M were shown to reproducibly induce protective immunity when administered individually, as fusion proteins or in combination. Although there was no increase in the level of protective immunity induced by combining the antigens into one vaccine, these antigens remain strong candidates for inclusion in a vaccine to control onchocerciasis in humans. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Stable co-existence of separate replicons in Escherichia coli is dependent on once-per-cell-cycle initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarstad, K.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2003-01-01

    C sequences (mini-chromosomes) are also initiated in synchrony with the eight chromosomal origins. We demonstrate that specific inactivation of newly formed, hemimethylated origins (sequestration) was required for the stable coexistence of oriC-dependent replicons. Cells in which initiations were not confined...... to a short interval in the cell cycle (carrying mutations in sequestration or initiation genes or expressing excess initiator protein) could not support stable co-existence of several oriC-dependent replicons. The results show that such stable co-existence of oriC-dependent replicons; is dependent on both...... a period of sequestration that is longer than the initiation interval and a reduction of the initiation potential during the sequestration period. These regulatory requirements are the same as those required to confine initiation of each replicon to once, and only once, per cell cycle....

  15. A vaccine grade of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing mammalian myostatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tingting

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely-used system for protein expression. We previously showed that heat-killed whole recombinant yeast vaccine expressing mammalian myostatin can modulate myostatin function in mice, resulting in increase of body weight and muscle composition in these animals. Foreign DNA introduced into yeast cells can be lost soon unless cells are continuously cultured in selection media, which usually contain antibiotics. For cost and safety concerns, it is essential to optimize conditions to produce quality food and pharmaceutical products. Results We developed a simple but effective method to engineer a yeast strain stably expressing mammalian myostatin. This method utilized high-copy-number integration of myostatin gene into the ribosomal DNA of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the final step, antibiotic selection marker was removed using the Cre-LoxP system to minimize any possible side-effects for animals. The resulting yeast strain can be maintained in rich culture media and stably express mammalian myostatin for two years. Oral administration of the recombinant yeast was able to induce immune response to myostatin and modulated the body weight of mice. Conclusions Establishment of such yeast strain is a step further toward transformation of yeast cells into edible vaccine to improve meat production in farm animals and treat human muscle-wasting diseases in the future.

  16. Immunogenic and replicative properties of classical swine fever virus replicon particles modified to induce IFN-α/β and carry foreign genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Rolf; Summerfield, Artur; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; McCullough, Kenneth C; Tratschin, Jon-Duri; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2011-02-04

    Virus replicon particles (VRP) are genetically engineered infectious virions incapable of generating progeny virus due to partial or complete deletion of at least one structural gene. VRP fulfil the criteria of a safe vaccine and gene delivery system. With VRP derived from classical swine fever virus (CSF-VRP), a single intradermal vaccination protects from disease. Spreading of the challenge virus in the host is however not completely abolished. Parameters that are critical for immunogenicity of CSF-VRP are not well characterized. Considering the importance of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) to immune defence development, we generated IFN-α/β-inducing VRP to determine how this would influence vaccine efficacy. We also evaluated the effect of co-expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the vaccine context. The VRP were capable of long-term replication in cell culture despite the presence of IFN-α/β. In vivo, RNA replication was essential for the induction of an immune response. IFN-α/β-inducing and GM-CSF-expressing CSF-VRP were similar to unmodified VRP in terms of antibody and peripheral T-cell responses, and in reducing the blood levels of challenge virus RNA. Importantly, the IFN-α/β-inducing VRP did show increased efficacy over the unmodified VRP in terms of B-cell and T-cell responses, when tested with secondary immune responses by in vitro restimulation assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A novel dengue virus inhibitor, BP13944, discovered by high-throughput screening with dengue virus replicon cells selects for resistance in the viral NS2B/NS3 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Chen; Hu, Han-Shu; Wu, Ren-Huang; Wu, Szu-Huei; Lee, Shiow-Ju; Jiaang, Weir-Torn; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Huang, Zhi-Shun; Wu, Huey-Nan; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes disease globally, resulting in an estimated 25 to 100 million new infections per year. No effective DENV vaccine is available, and the current treatment is only supportive. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop therapeutic agents to cure this epidemic disease. In the present study, we identified a potential small-molecule inhibitor, BP13944, via high-throughput screening (HTS) of 60,000 compounds using a stable cell line harboring an efficient luciferase replicon of DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2). BP13944 reduced the expression of the DENV replicon reporter in cells, showing a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 1.03 ± 0.09 μM. Without detectable cytotoxicity, the compound inhibited replication or viral RNA synthesis in all four serotypes of DENV but not in Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Sequencing analyses of several individual clones derived from BP13944-resistant RNAs purified from cells harboring the DENV-2 replicon revealed a consensus amino acid substitution (E66G) in the region of the NS3 protease domain. Introduction of E66G into the DENV replicon, an infectious DENV cDNA clone, and recombinant NS2B/NS3 protease constructs conferred 15.2-, 17.2-, and 3.1-fold resistance to BP13944, respectively. Our results identify an effective small-molecule inhibitor, BP13944, which likely targets the DENV NS3 protease. BP13944 could be considered part of a more effective treatment regime for inhibiting DENV in the future.

  18. Construction and Characterization of a Hepatitis B Virus Replicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ping LU; Bao-ju WANG; Ji-hua DONG; Zhao LIU; Shi-he GUAN; Meng-ji LU; Dong-liang YANG

    2007-01-01

    To establish a replication cellular model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and determine its application in antiviral drug evaluation,we constructed an expression plasmid which contained 1.3 copies of the HBV genome,and measured the level of viral replication after transient transfection in Huh7 cells.We then observed the effect of antiviral drug administration.1.3 fold of the HBV(ayw) gene fragment was cloned into pCR2.1 by PCR and restriction endonuclease digestion.The recombinant plasmid was trans ient transfected into Huh7 cells,HBsAg,HBeAg and HBV DNA in supernatant of Huh7 cells were measured by ELISA and real-time PCR respectively; intracellular HBV replicative intermediates and intracellular HBV transcripts were detected by Southern blot and Northern blot respectively.The antiviral effect of adefovir,a novel anti-HBV nucleotide analogue,was evaluated in this cellular model system.The results indicated that a recombinant plasmid of HBV replicon was constructed successfully; the HBV genome carried in plasmid pHBV1.3 could efficiently replicate and be expressed in Huh 7 cells,adefovir could inhibit HBV replication in this cellular model,and the inhibition was dosage-dependent.The conclusion is HBV replicon,which can initiate viral replication efficiently in hepatoma cells,may be a useful tool in the study of HBV replication and antiviral drug.

  19. Immunogenicity of DNA and Recombinant Sendai Virus Vaccines Expressing the HIV-1 gag Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia FENG; Shuang-qing YU; Tsugumine Shu; Tetsuro Matano; Mamoru Hasegawa; Xiao-li WANG; Hong-tao MA; Hong-xia LI; Yi ZENG

    2008-01-01

    Combinations of DNA and recombinant-viral-vector based vaccines are promising AIDS vaccine methods because of their potential for inducing cellular immune responses. It was found that Gag-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) responses were associated with lowering viremia in an untreated HIV-1 infected cohort. The main objectives of our studies were the construction of DNA and recombinant Sendal virus vector (rSeV) vaccines containing a gag gene from the prevalent Thailand subtype B strain in China and trying to use these vaccines for therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines. The candidate plasmid DNA vaccine pcDNA3.1(+)-gag and recombinant Sendai virus vaccine (rSeV-gag) were constructed separately. It was verified by Western blotting analysis that both DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines expressed the HIV-1 Gag protein correctly and efficiently. Balb/c mice were immunized with these two vaccines in different administration schemes. HIV-1 Gag-specific CTL responses and antibody levels were detected by intracellular cytokine staining assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) respectively. Combined vaccines in a DNA prime/rSeV-gag boost vaccination regimen induced the strongest and most long-lasting Gag-specific CTL and antibody responses. It maintained relatively high levels even 9 weeks post immunization. This data indicated that the prime-boost regimen with DNA and rSeV-gag vaccines may offer promising HIV vaccine regimens.

  20. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  1. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, A

    2008-06-23

    Full Text Available highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC...

  2. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  3. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Yang, Xiao Yi; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Kim Lyerly, H

    2012-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based replicon particle (VRPs) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and antitumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)), and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12, and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP-IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing antitumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than that of VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted.

  4. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)) and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12 and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing anti-tumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  5. Strategies for the plant-based expression of dengue subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Yun-Kiam; Smith, Duncan R

    2010-10-01

    Despite significant efforts in many countries, there is still no commercially viable dengue vaccine. Currently, attention is focused on the development of either live attenuated vaccines or live attenuated chimaeric vaccines using a variety of backbones. Alternate vaccine approaches, such as whole inactivated virus and subunit vaccines are in the early stages of development, and are each associated with different problems. Subunit vaccines offer the advantage of providing a uniform antigen of well-defined nature, without the added risk of introducing any genetic material into the person being inoculated. Preliminary trials of subunit vaccines (using dengue E protein) in rhesus monkeys have shown promising results. However, the primary disadvantages of dengue subunit vaccines are the low levels of expression of dengue proteins in mammalian or insect cells, as well as the added unknown risks of antigens produced from mammalian cells containing other potential sources of contamination. In the past two decades, plants have emerged as an alternative platform for expression of biopharmaceutical products, including antigens of bacterial, fungal or viral origin. In the present minireview, we highlight the current plant expression technologies used for expression of biopharmaceutical products, with an emphasis on plants as a production system for dengue subunit vaccines.

  6. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  7. Cdc45 limits replicon usage from a low density of preRCs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip G; Winter, Sherry L; Zaika, Elena; Cao, Thinh V; Oguz, Umut; Koomen, John M; Hamlin, Joyce L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about mammalian preRC stoichiometry, the number of preRCs on chromosomes, and how this relates to replicon size and usage. We show here that, on average, each 100-kb of the mammalian genome contains a preRC composed of approximately one ORC hexamer, 4-5 MCM hexamers, and 2 Cdc6. Relative to these subunits, ∼0.35 total molecules of the pre-Initiation Complex factor Cdc45 are present. Thus, based on ORC availability, somatic cells contain ∼70,000 preRCs of this average total stoichiometry, although subunits may not be juxtaposed with each other. Except for ORC, the chromatin-bound complement of preRC subunits is even lower. Cdc45 is present at very low levels relative to the preRC subunits, but is highly stable, and the same limited number of stable Cdc45 molecules are present from the beginning of S-phase to its completion. Efforts to artificially increase Cdc45 levels through ectopic expression block cell growth. However, microinjection of excess purified Cdc45 into S-phase nuclei activates additional replication foci by three-fold, indicating that Cdc45 functions to activate dormant preRCs and is rate-limiting for somatic replicon usage. Paradoxically, although Cdc45 colocalizes in vivo with some MCM sites and is rate-limiting for DNA replication to occur, neither Cdc45 nor MCMs colocalize with active replication sites. Embryonic metazoan chromatin consists of small replicons that are used efficiently via an excess of preRC subunits. In contrast, somatic mammalian cells contain a low density of preRCs, each containing only a few MCMs that compete for limiting amounts of Cdc45. This provides a molecular explanation why, relative to embryonic replicon dynamics, somatic replicons are, on average, larger and origin efficiency tends to be lower. The stable, continuous, and rate-limiting nature of Cdc45 suggests that Cdc45 contributes to the staggering of replicon usage throughout S-phase, and that replicon activation requires reutilization of

  8. A New Method for the Evaluation of Vaccine Safety Based on Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Momose

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the past 50 years, quality control and safety tests have been used to evaluate vaccine safety. However, conventional animal safety tests need to be improved in several aspects. For example, the number of test animals used needs to be reduced and the test period shortened. It is, therefore, necessary to develop a new vaccine evaluation system. In this review, we show that gene expression patterns are well correlated to biological responses in vaccinated rats. Our findings and methods using experimental biology and genome science provide an important means of assessment for vaccine toxicity.

  9. Replication efficiency of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids derived from porcine circovirus 2 in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Henry, Aurélie; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Jestin, André

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a method was developed to measure replication rates of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids in eukaryotic cells. This method is based on the discriminative quantitation of MboI-resistant, non-replicated input plasmids and DpnI-resistant, replicated plasmids. To do so, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) replicon-based plasmids were constructed. These plasmids contained the PCV2 origin of replication, the PCV2 Rep promoter and the PCV2 Rep gene. The results show that the replication rate depends on the length of the PCV2 replicon-based plasmid and not on the respective position of the Rep promoter and the promoter of the gene of interest that encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In all cases, it was necessary to add the Rep gene encoded by a plasmid and cotransfected as a replication booster. This method can evaluate the replication potential of replicon-based plasmids quickly and is thereby a promising tool for the development of plasmids for vaccine purposes.

  10. The next generation recombinant human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates-beyond gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Anders E; Mason, Peter W

    2012-11-19

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects the majority of the global population and persists within the infected host for life; infection of healthy adults rarely leads to severe acute clinical symptoms. In contrast, HCMV is a leading infectious cause of congenital disease and a common cause of complications in transplant recipients. A vaccine to prevent HCMV disease in these populations is a widely recognized medical need. We review recent advances in our understanding of the candidate vaccine antigens and published clinical trial data for the four most recent HCMV vaccine candidates: a gB subunit adjuvanted with MF59, a DNA vaccine expressing gB and pp65, alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing gB and a pp65-IE1 fusion protein, and a pp65 peptide vaccine. The candidates are safe, although some adverse events were reported for an adjuvanted variant of the pp65 peptide vaccine. The gB/MF59 vaccine elicited strong humoral responses with limited durability. The gB/pp65 DNA vaccine elicited cellular immunity, and the pp65 peptide vaccine elicited modest cellular immunity, but only when formulated with an adjuvant. Only the VRP vaccine expressing gB and pp65-IE1 elicited both humoral and cellular immunity. The gB/MF59 vaccine showed a short-term 50% efficacy at preventing infection of seronegative women and significantly reduced viremia and need for antivirals in solid organ transplant recipients, and the gB/pp65 DNA vaccine showed signs of clinical benefit in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Importantly, the partial efficacy of the subunit and DNA vaccines is new evidence that both humoral and cellular immunity contribute to controlling HCMV-related disease. These data show the clinical feasibility of a recombinant HCMV vaccine. We discuss areas for potential improvements in the next generation of vaccine candidates.

  11. Anti-microbial peptide gene expression during oral vaccination: analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simuyandi, M; Kapulu, M; Kelly, P

    2016-11-01

    We have observed previously that micronutrient supplementation ameliorated suppression of α-defensin expression during diarrhoea. However, how interactions between anti-microbial peptide (AMP) expression and diarrhoeal disease are altered by micronutrient supplementation remain unclear. Using oral vaccination as a model of intestinal infection, we measured changes in AMP expression during multiple micronutrient supplementation. In the first part, volunteers underwent duodenal jejunal biopsy before and at 1, 2, 4 or 7 days after administration of one of three live, attenuated oral vaccines against rotavirus, typhoid and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. In the second part, participants were randomized to receive a multiple micronutrient supplement or placebo for 6 weeks before undergoing intestinal biopsy, vaccination against typhoid and rebiopsy after 14 days. Expression of human alpha-defensin (HD)5, HD6, hBD1, hBD2 and LL-37 was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Taken together, the bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, reduced HD5 expression (P = 0·02, signed-rank test) and reduced LL-37 expression in seven of the eight individuals whose biopsies had expression prevaccination (P = 0·03). hBD2 was not detected. In the controlled trial, HD5 and HD6 expression after vaccination was lower [median ratio 0·5, interquartile range (IQR) = 0·07-2·2 and 0·58, IQR = 0·13-2·3, respectively] than before vaccination. There was no significant effect detected of micronutrient supplementation on expression of HD5, HD6, hBD1 or LL-37. We conclude that live attenuated bacterial vaccines, but not rotavirus vaccine, can reduce intestinal α-defensins, and typhoid vaccine reduced LL-37 expression. We found no evidence that micronutrient supplementation in the short term had any impact on anti-microbial peptide expression. © 2016 The Authors. Clinical & Experimental Immunology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  12. Novel methods for expression of foreign antigens in live vector vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Harley, Regina H.; Galen, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial live vector vaccines represent a vaccine development strategy that offers exceptional flexibility. In this approach, genes encoding protective antigens of unrelated bacterial, viral or parasitic pathogens are expressed in an attenuated bacterial vaccine strain that delivers these foreign antigens to the immune system, thereby eliciting relevant immune responses. Rather than expressing these antigens using low copy expression plasmids, here we pursue expression of foreign proteins from the live vector chromosome. Our strategy is designed to compensate for the inherent disadvantage of loss of gene dosage (vs. plasmid-based expression) by integrating antigen-encoding gene cassettes into multiple chromosomal sites already inactivated in an attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi vaccine candidate. We tested expression of a cassette encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) integrated separately into native guaBA, htrA or clyA chromosomal loci. Using single integrations, we show that expression levels of GFPuv are significantly affected by the site of integration, regardless of the inclusion of additional strong promoters within the incoming cassette. Using cassettes integrated into both guaBA and htrA, we observe cumulative synthesis levels from two integration sites superior to single integrations. Most importantly, we observe that GFPuv expression increases in a growth phase-dependent manner, suggesting that foreign antigen synthesis may be “tuned” to the physiology of the live vaccine. We expect this novel platform expression technology to prove invaluable in the development of a wide variety of multivalent live vector vaccines, capable of expressing multiple antigens from both chromosomal and plasmid-based expression systems within a single strain. PMID:23406777

  13. Inhibition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus subgenomic replicon by RNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Sophie; Lear, Zoe; Herod, Morgan R; Ryan, Martin; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2014-12-01

    We have previously documented the inhibitory activity of RNA aptamers to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of foot-and-mouth disease virus (3D(pol)). Here we report their modification and use with a subgenomic replicon incorporating GFP (pGFP-PAC replicon), allowing replication to be monitored and quantified in real-time. GFP expression in transfected BHK-21 cells reached a maximum at approximately 8 h post-transfection, at which time change in morphology of the cells was consistent with a virus-induced cytopathic effect. However, transfection of replicon-bearing cells with a 3D(pol) aptamer RNA resulted in inhibition of GFP expression and maintenance of normal cell morphology, whereas a control aptamer RNA had little effect. The inhibition was correlated with a reduction in 3D(pol) (detected by immunoblotting) and shown to be dose dependent. The 3D(pol) aptamers appeared to be more effective than 2'-C-methylcytidine (2'CMC). Aptamers to components of the replication complex are therefore useful molecular tools for studying viral replication and also have potential as diagnostic molecules in the future.

  14. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  15. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  16. Comprehensive gene expression profiling following DNA vaccination of rainbow trout against infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Nichols, Krista M.; Winton, James R.; Kurath, Gael; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler, Paul; Hansen, John D.; Herwig, Russell P.; Park, Linda K.

    2006-01-01

    The DNA vaccine based on the glycoprotein gene of Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus induces a non-specific anti-viral immune response and long-term specific immunity against IHNV. This study characterized gene expression responses associated with the early anti-viral response. Homozygous rainbow trout were injected intra-muscularly (I.M.) with vector DNA or the IHNV DNA vaccine. Gene expression in muscle tissue (I.M. site) was evaluated using a 16,008 feature salmon cDNA microarray. Eighty different genes were significantly modulated in the vector DNA group while 910 genes were modulated in the IHNV DNA vaccinate group relative to control group. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to examine expression of selected immune genes at the I.M. site and in other secondary tissues. In the localized response (I.M. site), the magnitudes of gene expression changes were much greater in the vaccinate group relative to the vector DNA group for the majority of genes analyzed. At secondary systemic sites (e.g. gill, kidney and spleen), type I IFN-related genes were up-regulated in only the IHNV DNA vaccinated group. The results presented here suggest that the IHNV DNA vaccine induces up-regulation of the type I IFN system across multiple tissues, which is the functional basis of early anti-viral immunity.

  17. Construction and characterization of a stable subgenomic replicon system of a Brazilian dengue virus type 3 strain (BR DEN3 290-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosimann, Ana Luiza Pamplona; de Borba, Luana; Bordignon, Juliano; Mason, Peter W; dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause the most common arboviral disease afflicting men. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The mechanisms involved in the disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. The severity of the disease seems to be influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of DENV can be used to study viral replication mechanisms and evaluate the effects of antiviral drugs on viral replication. The objective was to generate and characterize biologically a replicon from a clinical isolate of DENV-3, as part of our studies to understand how this new isolate interacts with cells. To obtain this replicon several RT-PCR fragments encoding the non-structural proteins genes were cloned in high-copy vectors, and used to assemble the replicon in a BAC plasmid vector containing a synthetic DNA molecule encoding the 5' and 3' ends of a viral cDNA with a T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase promoter and a ribozyme. In vitro transcribed RNA recovered from this BAC plasmid was transfected into C6/36 mosquito cells, and dengue virus protein expression was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies. The results showed that the replicon was replicated efficiently in cells, demonstrating successful assembly of a DENV-3 replicon.

  18. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satparkash Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS, an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  19. Immune response to dna vaccine expressing transferrin binding protein a gene of Pasteurella multocida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Satparkash; Singh, Vijendra Pal; Cheema, Pawanjit Singh; Sandey, Maninder; Ranjan, Rajeev; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2011-04-01

    Haemorrhagic Septicaemia (HS), an acute and fatal disease of cattle and buffalo is primarily caused by serotype B:2 or E:2 of Pasteurella multocida. The transferrin binding protein A (TbpA) has been found to act as immunogen and potent vaccine candidate in various Gram negative bacteria including P. multocida. The present study was carried out to evaluate the potential of this antigen as a DNA vaccine against HS in mice model. The tbpA gene of P. multocida serotype B:2 was cloned in a mammalian expression vector alone and along with murine IL2 gene as immunological adjuvant to produce monocistronic and bicistronic DNA vaccine constructs, respectively. The immune response to DNA vaccines was evaluated based on serum antibody titres and lymphocyte proliferation assay. A significant increase in humoral and cell mediated immune responses was observed in mice vaccinated with DNA vaccines as compared to non immunized group. Additionally, the bicistronic DNA vaccine provided superior immune response and protection level following challenge as compared to monocistronic construct. The study revealed that DNA vaccine presents a promising approach for the prevention of HS.

  20. The immune response induced by DNA vaccine expressing nfa1 gene against Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Hee; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2012-12-01

    The pathogenic free-living amoeba, Naegleria fowleri, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis in experimental animals and in humans. The nfa1 gene that was cloned from N. fowleri is located on pseudopodia, especially amoebic food cups and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri. In this study, we constructed and characterized retroviral vector and lentiviral vector systems for nfa1 DNA vaccination in mice. We constructed the retroviral vector (pQCXIN) and the lentiviral vector (pCDH) cloned with the egfp-nfa1 gene. The expression of nfa1 gene in Chinese hamster ovary cell and human primary nasal epithelial cell transfected with the pQCXIN/egfp-nfa1 vector or pCDH/egfp-nfa1 vector was observed by fluorescent microscopy and Western blotting analysis. Our viral vector systems effectively delivered the nfa1 gene to the target cells and expressed the Nfa1 protein within the target cells. To evaluate immune responses of nfa1-vaccinated mice, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of each retro- or lentiviral vector expressing nfa1 gene. DNA vaccination using viral vectors expressing nfa1 significantly stimulated the production of Nfa1-specific IgG subclass, as well as IgG levels. In particular, both levels of IgG2a (Th1) and IgG1 (Th2) were significantly increased in mice vaccinated with viral vectors. These results show the nfa1-vaccination induce efficiently Th1 type, as well as Th2 type immune responses. This is the first report to construct viral vector systems and to evaluate immune responses as DNA vaccination in N. fowleri infection. Furthermore, these results suggest that nfal vaccination may be an effective method for treatment of N. fowleri infection.

  1. Design and Construction of Shrimp Antiviral DNA Vaccines Expressing Long and Short Hairpins for Protection by RNA Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Aparna; Pathakota, Gireesh-Babu; Annam, Pavan-Kumar

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccines present the aquaculture industry with an effective and economically viable method of controlling viral pathogens that drastically affect productivity. Since specific immune response is rudimentary in invertebrates, the presence of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway in shrimps provides a promising new approach to vaccination. Plasmid DNA vaccines that express short or long double stranded RNA in vivo have shown protection against viral diseases. The design, construction and considerations for preparing such vaccines are discussed.

  2. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus vaccine vectors expressing filovirus glycoproteins lack neurovirulence in nonhuman primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad E Mire

    Full Text Available The filoviruses, Marburg virus and Ebola virus, cause severe hemorrhagic fever with high mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Among the most promising filovirus vaccines under development is a system based on recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV that expresses an individual filovirus glycoprotein (GP in place of the VSV glycoprotein (G. The main concern with all replication-competent vaccines, including the rVSV filovirus GP vectors, is their safety. To address this concern, we performed a neurovirulence study using 21 cynomolgus macaques where the vaccines were administered intrathalamically. Seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV GP; seven animals received a rVSV vector expressing the Lake Victoria marburgvirus (MARV GP; three animals received rVSV-wild type (wt vector, and four animals received vehicle control. Two of three animals given rVSV-wt showed severe neurological symptoms whereas animals receiving vehicle control, rVSV-ZEBOV-GP, or rVSV-MARV-GP did not develop these symptoms. Histological analysis revealed major lesions in neural tissues of all three rVSV-wt animals; however, no significant lesions were observed in any animals from the filovirus vaccine or vehicle control groups. These data strongly suggest that rVSV filovirus GP vaccine vectors lack the neurovirulence properties associated with the rVSV-wt parent vector and support their further development as a vaccine platform for human use.

  3. Vaccines for gonorrhea: can we rise to the challenge?

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    Weiyan eZhu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses to the gonococcus after natural infection ordinarily result in little immunity to reinfection, due to antigenic variation of the gonococcus, and redirection or suppression of immune responses. Brinton and colleagues demonstrated that parenteral immunization of male human volunteers with a purified pilus vaccine gave partial protection against infection by the homologous strain. However, the vaccine failed in a clinical trial. Recent vaccine development efforts have focused on the female mouse model of genital gonococcal infection. Here we discuss the state of the field, including our unpublished data regarding efficacy in the mouse model of either viral replicon particle (VRP vaccines, or outer membrane vesicle (OMV vaccines. The OMV vaccines failed, despite excellent serum and mucosal antibody responses. Protection after a regimen consisting of a PorB-VRP prime plus recombinant PorB boost was correlated with apparent Th1, but not with antibody, responses. Protection probably was due to powerful adjuvant effects of the VRP vector. New tools including novel transgenic mice expressing human genes required for gonococcal infection should enable future research. Surrogates for immunity are needed. Increasing antimicrobial resistance trends among gonococci makes development of a vaccine more urgent.

  4. Vaccines expressing the innate immune modulator EAT-2 elicit potent effector memory T lymphocyte responses despite pre-existing vaccine immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser Ali; Seregin, Sergey S; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Rastall, David P W; Liu, Chyong-Jy J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    The mixed results from recent vaccine clinical trials targeting HIV-1 justify the need to enhance the potency of HIV-1 vaccine platforms in general. Use of first-generation recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) platforms failed to protect vaccinees from HIV-1 infection. One hypothesis is that the rAd5-based vaccine failed due to the presence of pre-existing Ad5 immunity in many vaccines. We recently confirmed that EAT-2-expressing rAd5 vectors uniquely activate the innate immune system and improve cellular immune responses against rAd5-expressed Ags, inclusive of HIV/Gag. In this study, we report that use of the rAd5-EAT-2 vaccine can also induce potent cellular immune responses to HIV-1 Ags despite the presence of Ad5-specific immunity. Compared to controls expressing a mutant SH2 domain form of EAT-2, Ad5 immune mice vaccinated with an rAd5-wild-type EAT-2 HIV/Gag-specific vaccine formulation significantly facilitated the induction of several arms of the innate immune system. These responses positively correlated with an improved ability of the vaccine to induce stronger effector memory T cell-biased, cellular immune responses to a coexpressed Ag despite pre-existing anti-Ad5 immunity. Moreover, inclusion of EAT-2 in the vaccine mixture improves the generation of polyfunctional cytolytic CD8(+) T cell responses as characterized by enhanced production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, cytotoxic degranulation, and increased in vivo cytolytic activity. These data suggest a new approach whereby inclusion of EAT-2 expression in stringent human vaccination applications can provide a more effective vaccine against HIV-1 specifically in Ad5 immune subjects.

  5. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus.

  6. Expression of HIV-1 antigens in plants as potential subunit vaccines

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    Tanzer Fiona L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has infected more than 40 million people worldwide, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa. The high prevalence of HIV-1 subtype C in southern Africa necessitates the development of cheap, effective vaccines. One means of production is the use of plants, for which a number of different techniques have been successfully developed. HIV-1 Pr55Gag is a promising HIV-1 vaccine candidate: we compared the expression of this and a truncated Gag (p17/p24 and the p24 capsid subunit in Nicotiana spp. using transgenic plants and transient expression via Agrobacterium tumefaciens and recombinant tobamovirus vectors. We also investigated the influence of subcellular localisation of recombinant protein to the chloroplast and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER on protein yield. We partially purified a selected vaccine candidate and tested its stimulation of a humoral and cellular immune response in mice. Results Both transient and transgenic expression of the HIV antigens were successful, although expression of Pr55Gag was low in all systems; however, the Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of p24 and p17/p24 yielded best, to more than 1 mg p24/kg fresh weight. Chloroplast targeted protein levels were highest in transient and transgenic expression of p24 and p17/p24. The transiently-expressed p17/p24 was not immunogenic in mice as a homologous vaccine, but it significantly boosted a humoral and T cell immune response primed by a gag DNA vaccine, pTHGagC. Conclusion Transient agroinfiltration was best for expression of all of the recombinant proteins tested, and p24 and p17/p24 were expressed at much higher levels than Pr55Gag. Our results highlight the usefulness of plastid signal peptides in enhancing the production of recombinant proteins meant for use as vaccines. The p17/p24 protein effectively boosted T cell and humoral responses in mice primed by the DNA vaccine pTHGagC, showing that this plant

  7. Evaluation of IFN-γ and TGFβ1 Genes Expression in Guinea Pigs Vaccinated with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Type O Inactivated Vaccine

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    R. Pasandideh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is a severely contagious viral disease in cloven-hooved animals that it causes considerable economic losses in livestock productivity. Vaccination is one of the most effective procedures for control of FMD. One of vaccines performances is stimulating expression of some immune system genes, which called cytokines. In this study, expression changes of IFN-γ and TGFβ1 genes were evaluated in vaccinated guinea pigs with FMD type O inactivated vaccine. Blood samples were collected from vaccinated and control (no vaccinated guinea pigs in three distinct times. After blood sampling, RNA was extracted and converted to cDNA. For measuring IFN-γ and TGFβ1 genes expression, relative Real-time PCR procedure was used. The results showed that expression of IFN-γ and TGFβ1 genes in the second and third blood sampling were significantly increased in comparison to the first blood sampling. Because increasing of cytokines expression is an indicative of the immune system response, these genes can be used as indicators for testing effects of the recombinant vaccines.

  8. Application of a Scalable Plant Transient Gene Expression Platform for Malaria Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Voepel, Nadja; Beiss, Veronique; Edgue, Gueven; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive research efforts there is currently no vaccine that provides sustained sterile immunity against malaria. In this context, a large number of targets from the different stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle have been evaluated as vaccine candidates. None of these candidates has fulfilled expectations, and as long as we lack a single target that induces strain-transcending protective immune responses, combining key antigens from different life cycle stages seems to be the most promising route toward the development of efficacious malaria vaccines. After the identification of potential targets using approaches such as omics-based technology and reverse immunology, the rapid expression, purification, and characterization of these proteins, as well as the generation and analysis of fusion constructs combining different promising antigens or antigen domains before committing to expensive and time consuming clinical development, represents one of the bottlenecks in the vaccine development pipeline. The production of recombinant proteins by transient gene expression in plants is a robust and versatile alternative to cell-based microbial and eukaryotic production platforms. The transfection of plant tissues and/or whole plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens offers a low technical entry barrier, low costs, and a high degree of flexibility embedded within a rapid and scalable workflow. Recombinant proteins can easily be targeted to different subcellular compartments according to their physicochemical requirements, including post-translational modifications, to ensure optimal yields of high quality product, and to support simple and economical downstream processing. Here, we demonstrate the use of a plant transient expression platform based on transfection with A. tumefaciens as essential component of a malaria vaccine development workflow involving screens for expression, solubility, and stability using fluorescent fusion proteins. Our

  9. Application of a Scalable Plant Transient Gene Expression Platform for Malaria Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Holger; Boes, Alexander; Voepel, Nadja; Beiss, Veronique; Edgue, Gueven; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Schillberg, Stefan; Reimann, Andreas; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive research efforts there is currently no vaccine that provides sustained sterile immunity against malaria. In this context, a large number of targets from the different stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle have been evaluated as vaccine candidates. None of these candidates has fulfilled expectations, and as long as we lack a single target that induces strain-transcending protective immune responses, combining key antigens from different life cycle stages seems to be the most promising route toward the development of efficacious malaria vaccines. After the identification of potential targets using approaches such as omics-based technology and reverse immunology, the rapid expression, purification, and characterization of these proteins, as well as the generation and analysis of fusion constructs combining different promising antigens or antigen domains before committing to expensive and time consuming clinical development, represents one of the bottlenecks in the vaccine development pipeline. The production of recombinant proteins by transient gene expression in plants is a robust and versatile alternative to cell-based microbial and eukaryotic production platforms. The transfection of plant tissues and/or whole plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens offers a low technical entry barrier, low costs, and a high degree of flexibility embedded within a rapid and scalable workflow. Recombinant proteins can easily be targeted to different subcellular compartments according to their physicochemical requirements, including post-translational modifications, to ensure optimal yields of high quality product, and to support simple and economical downstream processing. Here, we demonstrate the use of a plant transient expression platform based on transfection with A. tumefaciens as essential component of a malaria vaccine development workflow involving screens for expression, solubility, and stability using fluorescent fusion proteins. Our

  10. Application of a scalable plant transient gene expression platform for malaria vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger eSpiegel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite decades of intensive research efforts there is currently no vaccine that provides sustained sterile immunity against malaria. In this context, a large number of targets from the different stages of the Plasmodium falciparum life cycle have been evaluated as vaccine candidates. None of these candidates has fulfilled expectations, and as long as we lack a single target that induces strain-transcending protective immune responses, combining key antigens from different life cycle stages seems to be the most promising route towards the development of efficacious malaria vaccines. After the identification of potential targets using approaches such as omics-based technology and reverse immunology, the rapid expression, purification and characterization of these proteins, as well as the generation and analysis of fusion constructs combining different promising antigens or antigen domains before committing to expensive and time consuming clinical development, represents one of the bottlenecks in the vaccine development pipeline. The production of recombinant proteins by transient gene expression in plants is a robust and versatile alternative to cell-based microbial and eukaryotic production platforms. The transfection of plant tissues and/or whole plants using Agrobacterium tumefaciens offers a low technical entry barrier, low costs and a high degree of flexibility embedded within a rapid and scalable workflow. Recombinant proteins can easily be targeted to different subcellular compartments according to their physicochemical requirements, including post-translational modifications, to ensure optimal yields of high quality product, and to support simple and economical downstream processing. Here we demonstrate the use of a plant transient expression platform based on transfection with A. tumefaciens as essential component of a malaria vaccine development workflow involving screens for expression, solubility and stability using fluorescent fusion

  11. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

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    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  12. Protection of mice against Chlamydophila abortus infection with a bacteriophage-mediated DNA vaccine expressing the major outer membrane protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Yong; Liu, Wei; Clark, Jason R; March, John B; Yang, Junjing; He, Cheng

    2011-12-15

    A bacteriophage-delivered DNA vaccine against Chlamydophila abortus was constructed by cloning a eukaryotic cassette containing the ompA gene (which expresses the Major Outer Membrane Protein) into a bacteriophage lambda vector. Four groups, each of 20 BALB/c mice were inoculated separately with the phage vaccine, a conventional DNA vaccine based on the same ompA expression cassette, a live attenuated vaccine (strain 1B) or the empty phage vector. The phage and DNA vaccines and empty phage vector were administered intramuscularly on days 0, 14 and 28; the attenuated vaccine was given once on day 0. Half the animals in each group were challenged on day 42 by intraperitoneal injection of live C. abortus and sacrificed on day 49. Phage-vaccinated mice developed moderate antibody levels against C. abortus and yielded higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with the attenuated live vaccine group. Clearance of chlamydiae from spleens was significantly better in the attenuated vaccine group compared with the phage vaccine group, while both groups were significantly superior to the DNA vaccine and control groups (p<0.01). Although levels of protection in the mouse model were lower in phage-vaccinated animals, than in 1B vaccinated animals, phage vaccines offer several other advantages, such as easier handling and safety, potentially cheaper production and no chance of reversion to virulence. Although these are preliminary results in a model system, it is possible that with further optimisation immunization with phage vaccines may provide a novel way to improve protection against C. abortus infection and trials in large animals are currently being initiated.

  13. Sustained immune complex-mediated reduction in CD16 expression after vaccination regulates NK cell function

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    Martin R Goodier

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linking of FcγRIII (CD16 by immune complexes induces antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC by natural killer (NK cells, contributing to control of intracellular pathogens; this pathway can also be targeted for immunotherapy of cancerous or otherwise diseased cells. However, down-regulation of CD16 expression on activated NK cells may limit or regulate this response. Here, we report sustained downregulation of CD16 expression on NK cells in vivo after intramuscular (but not intranasal influenza vaccination. CD16 downregulation persisted for at least 12 weeks after vaccination and was associated with robust enhancement of influenza-specific plasma antibodies after intramuscular (but not intranasal vaccination. This effect could be emulated in vitro by co-culture of NK cells with influenza antigen and immune serum and, consistent with the sustained effects after vaccination, only very limited recovery of CD16 expression was observed during long term in vitro culture of immune complex-treated cells. CD16 downregulation was most marked among normally CD16high CD57+ NK cells, irrespective of NKG2C expression, and was strongly positively associated with degranulation (surface CD107a expression. CD16 downregulation was partially reversed by inhibition of ADAM17 matrix metalloprotease, leading to a sustained increase in both CD107a and CD25(IL-2R expression. Both the degranulation and CD25 responses of CD57+ NK cells were uniquely dependent on TIV-specific IgG. These data support a role for CD16 in early activation of NK cells after vaccination and for CD16 down regulation as a means to modulate NK cell responses and maintain immune homeostasis of both antibody and T cell-dependent pathways.

  14. Aging-dependent alterations in gene expression and a mitochondrial signature of responsiveness to human influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Juilee; Mohanty, Subhasis; West, A Phillip; Joshi, Samit R; Ueda, Ikuyo; Wilson, Jean; Meng, Hailong; Blevins, Tamara P; Tsang, Sui; Trentalange, Mark; Siconolfi, Barbara; Park, Koonam; Gill, Thomas M; Belshe, Robert B; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S; Kleinstein, Steven H; Shaw, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate gene expression pathways underlying age-associated impairment in influenza vaccine response, we screened young (age 21-30) and older (age≥65) adults receiving influenza vaccine in two consecutive seasons and identified those with strong or absent response to vaccine, including a subset of older adults meeting criteria for frailty. PBMCs obtained prior to vaccination (Day 0) and at day 2 or 4, day 7 and day 28 post-vaccine were subjected to gene expression microarray analysis. We defined a response signature and also detected induction of a type I interferon response at day 2 and a plasma cell signature at day 7 post-vaccine in young responders. The response signature was dysregulated in older adults, with the plasma cell signature induced at day 2, and was never induced in frail subjects (who were all non-responders). We also identified a mitochondrial signature in young vaccine responders containing genes mediating mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation that was consistent in two different vaccine seasons and verified by analyses of mitochondrial content and protein expression. These results represent the first genome-wide transcriptional profiling analysis of age-associated dynamics following influenza vaccination, and implicate changes in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as a critical factor in human vaccine responsiveness.

  15. Arbovirus vaccines: opportunities for the baculovirus-insect cell expression system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metz, S.W.H.; Pijlman, G.P.

    2011-01-01

    The baculovirus-insect cell expression system is a well-established technology for the production of heterologous viral (glyco)proteins in cultured cells, applicable for basic scientific research as well as for the development and production of vaccines and diagnostics. Arboviruses form an emerging

  16. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papaneri, Amy B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Wirblich, Christoph [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt [Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Jahrling, Peter B. [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States); Integrated Research Facility, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick MD, 21702 (United States); Schnell, Matthias J., E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Jefferson Vaccine Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Blaney, Joseph E., E-mail: jblaney@niaid.nih.gov [Emerging Viral Pathogens Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Fort Detrick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  17. Distribution and expression in vitro and in vivo of DNA vaccine against lymphocystis disease virus in Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑风荣; 孙修勤; 刘洪展; 吴兴安; 钟楠; 王波; 周国栋

    2010-01-01

    Lymphocystis disease,caused by the lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV),is a significant worldwide problem in fish industry causing substantial economic losses.In this study,we aimed to develop the DNA vaccine against LCDV,using DNA vaccination technology.We evaluated plasmid pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3 kb as a DNA vaccine candidate.The plasmid DNA was transiently expressed after liposome transfection into the eukaryotic COS 7 cell line.The distribution and expression of the DNA vaccine (pEGFP-N2-LCDV1.3kb) were also ana...

  18. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, G.; Racaniello, V.R. (Columbia Univ. College of Physicians Surgeons, New York, NY (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3,064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S-labeled) viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2A{sup pro}, 2C, and 3D{sup pol} and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs.

  19. High level expression, purification and characterization of recombinant CCR5 as a vaccine candidate against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kongtian; Xue, Xiaochang; Li, Meng; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Cun; Li, Weina; Hao, Qiang; Wang, Zenglu; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yingqi

    2013-06-01

    Cysteine-cysteine chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is an important co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and CCR5 neutralizing agents have proven efficient in patients suffering from HIV infection. Here, we expressed and purified various CCR5 vaccines named rCCR5, PADRE-rCCR5, GST-C1 and GST-C2 composed of different epitopes of CCR5. Results showed that vaccines containing multiple epitopes (rCCR5 and PADRE-rCCR5) induced stronger immune responses than single-epitope ones (GST-C1 and GST-C2). In addition, the elicited antibodies can specifically bind CCR5(+) U937 but not CCR5(-) Wish cells. These results demonstrate that the CCR5 vaccines are useful for further research, especially for the in vitro preclinical evaluation of their potential as biological CCR5 neutralizing agents.

  20. Cytomegalovirus-based vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein protects nonhuman primates from Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Murphy, Aisling A; Feldmann, Friederike; Parkins, Christopher J; Haddock, Elaine; Hanley, Patrick W; Emery, Matthew J; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Feldmann, Heinz; Jarvis, Michael A

    2016-02-15

    Ebolaviruses pose significant public health problems due to their high lethality, unpredictable emergence, and localization to the poorest areas of the world. In addition to implementation of standard public health control procedures, a number of experimental human vaccines are being explored as a further means for outbreak control. Recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vectors are a novel vaccine platform that have been shown to induce substantial levels of durable, but primarily T-cell-biased responses against the encoded heterologous target antigen. Herein, we demonstrate the ability of rhesus CMV (RhCMV) expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) to provide protective immunity to rhesus macaques against lethal EBOV challenge. Surprisingly, vaccination was associated with high levels of GP-specific antibodies, but with no detectable GP-directed cellular immunity.

  1. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

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    Misako Yoneda

    Full Text Available Nipah virus (NiV is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G. Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi. Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  2. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  3. Progress toward a universal H5N1 vaccine: a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara-expressing trivalent hemagglutinin vaccine.

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    Mookkan Prabakaran

    Full Text Available The rapid evolution of new sublineages of H5N1 influenza poses the greatest challenge in control of H5N1 infection by currently existing vaccines. To overcome this, an MVAtor vector expressing three H5HA antigens A/Vietnam/1203/04, A/Indonesia/669/06 and A/Anhui/01/05 (MVAtor-tri-HA vector was developed to elicit broad cross-protection against diverse clades by covering amino acid variations in the major neutralizing epitopes of HA among H5N1 subtypes.BALB/c mice and guinea pigs were immunized i.m. with 8×107 TCID50/animal of MVAtor-tri-HA vector. The immunogenicity and cross-protective immunity of the MVAtor-tri-HA vector was evaluated against diverse clades of H5N1 strains.The results showed that mice immunized with MVAtor-tri-HA vector induced robust cross-neutralizing immunity to diverse H5N1 clades. In addition, the MVAtor-tri-HA vector completely protected against 10 MLD50 of a divergent clade of H5N1 infection (clade 7. Importantly, the serological surveillance of post-vaccinated guinea pig sera demonstrated that MVAtor-tri-HA vector was able to elicit strong cross-clade neutralizing immunity against twenty different H5N1 strains from six clades that emerged between 1997 and 2012.The present findings revealed that incorporation of carefully selected HA genes from divergent H5N1 strains within a single vector could be an effective approach in developing a vaccine with broad coverage to prevent infection during a pandemic situation.

  4. Therapeutic vaccination with a trivalent T-cell receptor (TCR) peptide vaccine restores deficient FoxP3 expression and TCR recognition in subjects with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbark, Arthur A; Culbertson, Nicole E; Bartholomew, Richard M; Huan, Jianya; Agotsch, Marci; LaTocha, Dorian; Yadav, Vijayshree; Mass, Michele; Whitham, Ruth; Lovera, Jesus; Milano, June; Theofan, Georgia; Chou, Yuan K; Offner, Halina; Bourdette, Dennis N

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination using T-cell receptor (TCR) peptides from V genes commonly expressed by potentially pathogenic T cells remains an approach of interest for treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases. We developed a trivalent TCR vaccine containing complementarity determining region (CDR) 2 peptides from BV5S2, BV6S5 and BV13S1 emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant that reliably induced high frequencies of TCR-specific T cells. To evaluate induction of regulatory T-cell subtypes, immunological and clinical parameters were followed in 23 treatment-naïve subjects with relapsing-remitting or progressive MS who received 12 monthly injections of the trivalent peptide vaccine over 1 year in an open-label study design. Prior to vaccination, subjects had reduced expression of forkhead box (Fox) P3 message and protein, and reduced recognition of the expressed TCR repertoire by TCR-reactive cells compared with healthy control donors. After three or four injections, most vaccinated MS subjects developed high frequencies of circulating interleukin (IL)-10-secreting T cells specific for the injected TCR peptides and significantly enhanced expression of FoxP3 by regulatory T cells present in both 'native' CD4+ CD25+ and 'inducible' CD4+ CD25- peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At the end of the trial, PBMC from vaccinated MS subjects retained or further increased FoxP3 expression levels, exhibited significantly enhanced recognition of the TCR V gene repertoire apparently generated by perturbation of the TCR network, and significantly suppressed neuroantigen but not recall antigen responses. These findings demonstrate that therapeutic vaccination using only three commonly expressed BV gene determinants can induce an expanded immunoregulatory network in vivo that may optimally control complex autoreactive responses that characterize the inflammatory phase of MS.

  5. Single-dose immunization with virus replicon particles confers rapid robust protection against Rift Valley fever virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Kimberly A; Bird, Brian H; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Nichol, Stuart T; Albariño, César G

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in people and livestock throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The potential for RVFV introduction outside the area of endemicity highlights the need for fast-acting, safe, and efficacious vaccines. Here, we demonstrate a robust system for the reverse genetics generation of a RVF virus replicon particle (VRP(RVF)) vaccine candidate. Using a mouse model, we show that VRP(RVF) immunization provides the optimal balance of safety and single-dose robust efficacy. VRP(RVF) can actively synthesize viral RNA and proteins but lacks structural glycoprotein genes, preventing spread within immunized individuals and reducing the risk of vaccine-induced pathogenicity. VRP(RVF) proved to be completely safe following intracranial inoculation of suckling mice, a stringent test of vaccine safety. Single-dose subcutaneous immunization with VRP(RVF), although it is highly attenuated, completely protected mice against a virulent RVFV challenge dose which was 100,000-fold greater than the 50% lethal dose (LD(50)). Robust protection from lethal challenge was observed by 24 h postvaccination, with 100% protection induced in as little as 96 h. We show that a single subcutaneous VRP(RVF) immunization initiated a systemic antiviral state followed by an enhanced adaptive response. These data contrast sharply with the much-reduced survivability and immune responses observed among animals immunized with nonreplicating viral particles, indicating that replication, even if confined to the initially infected cells, contributes substantially to protective efficacy at early and late time points postimmunization. These data demonstrate that replicon vaccines successfully bridge the gap between safety and efficacy and provide insights into the kinetics of antiviral protection from RVFV infection.

  6. Preliminary study about sublingual administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in miniature pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyekwon; Kim, Jeong-Ki; Song, Hohyun; Choi, Jungah; Shim, Byoungshik; Kang, Bokyu; Moon, Hyoungjoon; Yeom, Minjoo; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Song, Daesub; Song, Manki

    2014-09-01

    Sublingual (SL) administration of influenza vaccine would be non-invasive and effective way to give human populations protective immunity against the virus, especially when pandemic influenza outbreaks. In this study, the efficacy of pandemic influenza virus-based subunit vaccines was tested after sublingual (SL) adjuvant administration in pigs. Eight specific pathogen-free Yucatan pigs were divided into 4 groups: nonvaccinated but challenged (A) and vaccinated and challenged (B, C, and D). The vaccinated groups were subdivided by vaccine type and inoculation route: SL subunit vaccine (hemagglutinin antigen 1 [HA1] + wild-type cholera toxin [wtCT], B); IM subunit vaccine (HA1 + aluminum hydroxide, C); and IM inactivated vaccine (+ aluminum hydroxide, D). The vaccines were administered twice at a 2-week interval. All pigs were challenged with pandemic influenza virus (A/swine/GCVP-KS01/2009 [H1N1]) and monitored for clinical signs, serology, viral shedding, and histopathology. After vaccination, hemagglutination inhibition titre was higher in group D (320) than in the other vaccinated groups (40-80) at the time of challenge. The mobility and feed intake were reduced in group C. Both viral shedding and histopathological lesions were reduced in groups B and D. Although this study has limitation due to the limited number of pigs (2 pigs per a group), the preliminary data in this study provided the protective potential of SL administration of bacteria-expressed pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine in pigs. There should be additional animal studies about effective adjuvant system and vaccine types for the use of SL influenza vaccination.

  7. Vaccine development against the Taenia solium parasite: the role of recombinant protein expression in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles; Jayashi, César; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Taenia solium is a zoonotic parasite that causes cysticercosis. The parasite is a major cause of human disease in impoverished communities where it is transmitted to humans from pigs which act as intermediate hosts. Vaccination of pigs to prevent transmission of T. solium to humans is an approach that has been investigated to control the disease. A recombinant vaccine antigen, TSOL18, has been remarkably successful at reducing infection of pigs with T. solium in several experimental challenge trials. The vaccine has been shown to eliminate transmission of naturally acquired T. solium in a field trial conducted in Africa. We recently reported that the vaccine was also effective in a field trial conducted in Peru. The TSOL18 recombinant antigen for each of these trials has been produced by expression in Escherichia coli. Here we discuss research that has been undertaken on the TSOL18 antigen and related antigens with a focus on improved methods of preparation of recombinant TSOL18 and optimized expression in Escherichia coli.

  8. Pichia pastoris expressed EtMic2 protein as a potential vaccine against chicken coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Peipei; Sun, Hui; Liu, Qing; Wang, Longjiang; Wang, Tiantian; Shi, Wenyan; Li, Hongmei; Xiao, Yihong; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Fangkun; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2014-09-15

    Chicken coccidiosis caused by Eimeria species leads to tremendous economic losses to the avian industry worldwide. Identification of parasite life cycle specific antigens is a critical step in recombinant protein vaccine development against Eimeria infections. In the present study, we amplified and cloned the microneme-2 (EtMIC2) gene from Eimeria tenella wild type strain SD-01, and expressed the EtMic2 protein using Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli expression systems, respectively. The EtMic2 proteins expressed by P. pastoris and E. coli were used as vaccines to immunize chickens and their protective efficacies were compared and evaluated. The results indicated that both P. pastoris and E. coli expressed EtMic2 proteins exhibited good immunogenicity in stimulating host immune responses and the Pichia expressed EtMic2 provided better protection than the E. coli expressed EtMic2 did by significantly increasing growth rate, inducing high specific antibody response, reducing the oocyst output and cecal lesions. Particularly, the Pichia expressed EtMic2 protein exhibited much better ability in inducing cell mediated immune response than the E. coli expressed EtMic2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. CONSTRUCTION OF HUMAN INTERLUEKIN-18 DNA VACCINE AND IT'S EXPRESSION IN MAMMALIAN CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To construct the human interleukin-18(hIL-18) DNA plasmids vaccine and to express the eukaryotic plasmids vaccine in mammalian cell lines Cos-7 and D5.Methods Gene recombinant technique was used to construct hIL-18 eukaryotic expression vectors.Calcium phosphate method was performed to transect recombinant hIL-18 eukaryotic expression vectors into Cos-7 and D5 cells.In situ hybridization and Western Blot were implemented to verify the transient expression of recombinant hIL-18 in Cos-7 and D5.Results The eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1-IL 18 was constructed successfully.hIL-18 was transiently expressed in Cos-7 and D5.Conclusion The eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAX1-IL 18 was constructed.In situ hybridization and Western Blot results proved the successful transient expression of pVAX1-IL 18 in Cos-7 and D5.Therefore,the work has settled the foundation for further biological research on hIL-18,including immunogene therapy through hIL-18.

  10. Identification of two replicons in phage-plasmid P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, A; Serina, S; Terzano, S; Dehò, G; Ghisotti, D

    1998-06-05

    DNA replication of phage-plasmid P4 proceeds bidirectionally from the ori1 site (previously named ori), but requires a second cis-acting region, crr. Replication depends on the product of the P4 alpha gene, a protein with primase and helicase activity, that binds both ori1 and crr. A negative regulator of P4 DNA replication, the Cnr protein, is required for copy number control of plasmid P4. Using a plasmid complementation test for replication, we found that two replicons, both dependent on the alpha gene product, coexist in P4. The first replicon is made by the cnr and alpha genes and the ori1 and crr sites. The second is limited to the alpha and crr region. Thus, in the absence of the ori1 region, replication can initiate at a different site. By deletion mapping, a cis-acting region, ori2, essential for replication of the alpha-crr replicon was mapped within a 270-bp fragment in the first half of the alpha gene. The ori2 site was found to be dispensable in a replicon that contains ori1. A construct that besides crr and alpha carries also the cnr gene was unable to replicate, suggesting that Cnr not only controls replication from ori1, but also silences ori2.

  11. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

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    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  12. Protective immune responses in rabbits induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the VP60 gene of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingjie; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Meng, Chun; Wu, Run; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). The VP60 gene of RHDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/VP60, was transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using indirect immunofluorescence and a western blot assay. In addition, immunogenicity was studied in rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were injected intramuscularly twice with pSCA/VP60 at 2-week intervals. They were challenged with an RHDV isolate 2weeks after the second immunization. In all cases, anti-RHDV antibodies were detected by ELISA. Additionally, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method, and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. Our results showed that RHDV-specific antibodies and an RHDV-specific cell-mediated immune response were strongly induced in rabbits. Furthermore, all of the rabbits were protected against challenge with wild type RHDV. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the suicidal DNA vaccine is a promising vaccine candidate that facilitates the prevention of rabbit hemorrhagic disease caused by RHDV.

  13. Bacterial antigen expression is an important component in inducing an immune response to orally administered Salmonella-delivered DNA vaccines.

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    Michelle E Gahan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of Salmonella to deliver heterologous antigens from DNA vaccines is a well-accepted extension of the success of oral Salmonella vaccines in animal models. Attenuated S. typhimurium and S. typhi strains are safe and efficacious, and their use to deliver DNA vaccines combines the advantages of both vaccine approaches, while complementing the limitations of each technology. An important aspect of the basic biology of the Salmonella/DNA vaccine platform is the relative contributions of prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression in production of the vaccine antigen. Gene expression in DNA vaccines is commonly under the control of the eukaryotic cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The aim of this study was to identify and disable putative bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter and evaluate the immunogenicity of the resulting DNA vaccine delivered orally by S. typhimurium. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The results reported here clearly demonstrate the presence of bacterial promoters within the CMV promoter. These promoters have homology to the bacterial consensus sequence and functional activity. To disable prokaryotic expression from the CMV promoter a series of genetic manipulations were performed to remove the two major bacterial promoters and add a bacteria transcription terminator downstream of the CMV promoter. S. typhimurium was used to immunise BALB/c mice orally with a DNA vaccine encoding the C-fragment of tetanus toxin (TT under control of the original or the modified CMV promoter. Although both promoters functioned equally well in eukaryotic cells, as indicated by equivalent immune responses following intramuscular delivery, only the original CMV promoter was able to induce an anti-TT specific response following oral delivery by S. typhimurium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that prokaryotic expression of the antigen and co-delivery of this protein by Salmonella are at least partially responsible for the successful

  14. Oral vaccination of mice against rodent malaria with recombinant expressing MSP-119

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Hong Zhang; Pei-Hong Jiang; Ning-Jun Li; Mi Shi; Weida Huang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To construct the recombinant Lactococcus lactis as oral delivery vaccination against malaria.METHODS: The C-terminal 19-ku fragments of MSP1(MSP-119) of Plasmodium yoelii265-BY was expressed in L. lactis and the recombinant L. lactis was administered orally to BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. After seven interval vaccinations within 4 wk, the mice were challenged with P.yoelii 265-BY parasites of erythrocytic stage. The protective efficacy of recombinant L.lactiswas evaluated.RESULTS: The peak parasitemias in average for the experiment groups of BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice were 0.8±0.4% and 20.8±26.5%, respectively, and those of their control groups were 12.0±0.8% and 60.8±9.6%, respectively. None of the BALB/c mice in both experimental group and control group died during the experiment.However, all the C57BL/6 mice in the control group died within 23 d and all the vaccinated mice survived well.CONCLUSION: The results imply the potential of recombinant L.lactis as oral delivery vaccination against malaria.

  15. Pre- and post-exposure safety and efficacy of attenuated rabies virus vaccines are enhanced by their expression of IFNγ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkhouse, Darryll A. [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Faber, Milosz [Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 465, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Hooper, D. Craig, E-mail: douglas.hooper@jefferson.edu [Department of Cancer Biology, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Center for Neurovirology 1020 Locust St., Jefferson Alumni Hall, Room 454, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with evidence of a strong correlation between interferon gamma (IFNγ) production and rabies virus (RABV) clearance from the CNS, we recently demonstrated that engineering a pathogenic RABV to express IFNγ highly attenuates the virus. Reasoning that IFNγ expression by RABV vaccines would enhance their safety and efficacy, we reverse-engineered two proven vaccine vectors, GAS and GASGAS, to express murine IFNγ. Mortality and morbidity were monitored during suckling mice infection, immunize/challenge experiments and mixed intracranial infections. We demonstrate that GASγ and GASγGAS are significantly attenuated in suckling mice compared to the GASGAS vaccine. GASγ better protects mice from lethal DRV4 RABV infection in both pre- and post-exposure experiments compared to GASGAS. Finally, GASγGAS reduces post-infection neurological sequelae, compared to control, during mixed intracranial infection with DRV4. These data show IFNγ expression by a vaccine vector can enhance its safety while increasing its efficacy as pre- and post-exposure treatment. - Highlights: • IFNγ expression improves attenuated rabies virus safety and immunogenicity. • IFNγ expression is safer and more immunogenic than doubling glycoprotein expression. • Co-infection with IFNγ-expressing RABV prevents wild-type rabies virus lethality. • Vaccine safety and efficacy is additive for IFNγ and double glycoprotein expression.

  16. A recombinant rabies vaccine expressing the trimeric form of the glycoprotein confers enhanced immunogenicity and protection in outbred mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koraka, Penelope; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Cox, Manon; Chubet, Rick; Amerongen, Geert van; Lövgren-Bengtsson, Karen; Martina, Byron E E; Roose, Jouke; Rottier, Peter J M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-08-06

    Rabies is a disease characterized by an invariably lethal encephalitis of viral origin that can be controlled by preventive vaccination programs of wildlife, domestic animals and humans in areas with a high risk of exposure. Currently available vaccines are expensive, cumbersome to produce and require intensive immunization and booster schemes to induce and maintain protective immunity. In the present study, we describe the development of candidate recombinant subunit rabies vaccines based on the glycoprotein G of the prototype rabies virus (RABV-G) expressed either as a monomer (RABV-mG) or in its native trimeric configuration (RABV-tG), with or without Matrix-M™ adjuvant. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of the respective candidate vaccines were tested in outbred NIH Swiss albino mice. The RABV-tG candidate vaccine proved to be superior to the RABV-mG vaccine candidate both in terms of immunogenicity and efficacy. The relatively poor immunogenicity of the RABV-mG vaccine candidate was greatly improved by the addition of the adjuvant. A single, low dose of RABV-tG in combination with Matrix-M™ induced high levels of high avidity neutralizing antibodies and protected all mice against challenge with a lethal dose of RABV. Consequently RABV-tG used in combination with Matrix-M™ is a promising vaccine candidate that overcomes the limitations of currently used vaccines.

  17. Effects of an oxycodone conjugate vaccine on oxycodone self-administration and oxycodone-induced brain gene expression in rats.

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    Marco Pravetoni

    Full Text Available Prescription opioid abuse is an increasing public health concern in the USA. A vaccine comprising a hapten (OXY conjugated to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (OXY-KLH has been shown to attenuate the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone. Here, the vaccine's ability to prevent acquisition of intravenous (i.v. oxycodone self-administration was studied in rats. Effects of vaccination on oxycodone-induced changes in the expression of several genes within the mesolimbic system, which are regulated by chronic opiate use, were also examined. Vaccination with OXY-KLH reduced the proportion of rats acquiring i.v. self-administration of oxycodone under a fixed ratio (FR 3 schedule of reinforcement compared to control rats immunized with the unconjugated KLH carrier protein. Vaccination significantly reduced the mean number of infusions at FR3, total number of infusions, and total oxycodone intake during the entire protocol. Compared to oxycodone self-administering control rats immunized with the carrier alone, rats vaccinated with the OXY-KLH immunogen showed increased levels of adenylate cyclase 5 (Adcy5 and decreased levels of early growth response protein 2 (Egr2 and the early immediate gene c-Fos in the striatum. These data suggest that vaccination with OXY-KLH can attenuate the reinforcing effects of oxycodone at a clinically-relevant exposure level. Analysis of mRNA expression identified some addiction-relevant markers that may be of interest in understanding oxycodone effects or the protection provided by vaccination.

  18. Avirulent Marek's disease virus type 1 strain 814 vectored vaccine expressing avian influenza (AI virus H5 haemagglutinin induced better protection than turkey herpesvirus vectored AI vaccine.

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    Hongyu Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herpesvirus of turkey (HVT as a vector to express the haemagglutinin (HA of avian influenza virus (AIV H5 was developed and its protection against lethal Marek's disease virus (MDV and highly pathogenic AIV (HPAIV challenges was evaluated previously. It is well-known that avirulemt MDV type 1 vaccines are more effective than HVT in prevention of lethal MDV infection. To further increase protective efficacy against HPAIV and lethal MDV, a recombinant MDV type 1 strain 814 was developed to express HA gene of HPAIV H5N1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A recombinant MDV-1 strain 814 expressing HA gene of HPAIV H5N1 virus A/goose/Guangdong/3/96 at the US2 site (rMDV-HA was developed under the control of a human CMV immediate-early promoter. The HA expression in the rMDV-HA was tested by immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses, and in vitro and in vivo growth properties of rMDV-HA were also analyzed. Furthermore, we evaluated and compared the protective immunity of rMDV-HA and previously constructed rHVT-HA against HPAIV and lethal MDV. Vaccination of chickens with rMDV-HA induced 80% protection against HPAIV, which was better than the protection rate by rHVT-HA (66.7%. In the animal study with MDV challenge, chickens immunized with rMDV-HA were completely protected against virulent MDV strain J-1 whereas rHVT-HA only induced 80% protection with the same challenge dose. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rMDV-HA vaccine was more effective than rHVT-HA vaccine for protection against lethal MDV and HPAIV challenges. Therefore, avirulent MDV type 1 vaccine is a better vector than HVT for development of a recombinant live virus vaccine against virulent MDV and HPAIV in poultry.

  19. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  20. Analysis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles packaged in different coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Alterson, Kim D; Andrews, Chasity; Copp, Laura O; Lewis, Whitney C; Hubby, Bolyn; Patel, Deepa; Rayner, Jonathan O; Talarico, Todd; Smith, Jonathan F

    2008-07-16

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon system was used to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) packaged with a number of different VEE-derived glycoprotein (GP) coats. The GP coat is believed to be responsible for the cellular tropism noted for VRP and it is possible that different VEE GP coats may have different affinities for cells. We examined VRP packaged in four different VEE GP coats for their ability to infect cells in vitro and to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. The VRP preparations were characterized to determine both infectious units (IU) and genome equivalents (GE) prior to in vivo analysis. VRP packaged with different VEE GP coats demonstrated widely varying GE/IU ratios based on Vero cell infectivity. BALB/c mice were immunized with the different VRP based on equal GE titers and the humoral and cellular responses to the expressed HIV gag gene measured. The magnitude of the immune responses measured in mice revealed small but significant differences between different GP coats when immunization was based on GE titers. We suggest that care should be taken when alternative coat proteins are used to package vector-based systems as the titers determined by cell culture infection may not represent accurate particle numbers and in turn may not accurately represent actual in vivo dose.

  1. Analysis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles packaged in different coats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt I Kamrud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE virus replicon system was used to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP packaged with a number of different VEE-derived glycoprotein (GP coats. The GP coat is believed to be responsible for the cellular tropism noted for VRP and it is possible that different VEE GP coats may have different affinities for cells. We examined VRP packaged in four different VEE GP coats for their ability to infect cells in vitro and to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The VRP preparations were characterized to determine both infectious units (IU and genome equivalents (GE prior to in vivo analysis. VRP packaged with different VEE GP coats demonstrated widely varying GE/IU ratios based on Vero cell infectivity. BALB/c mice were immunized with the different VRP based on equal GE titers and the humoral and cellular responses to the expressed HIV gag gene measured. The magnitude of the immune responses measured in mice revealed small but significant differences between different GP coats when immunization was based on GE titers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that care should be taken when alternative coat proteins are used to package vector-based systems as the titers determined by cell culture infection may not represent accurate particle numbers and in turn may not accurately represent actual in vivo dose.

  2. The yellow fever 17D vaccine virus as a vector for the expression of foreign proteins: development of new live flavivirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna C Bonaldo

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Flaviviridae is a family of about 70 mostly arthropod-borne viruses many of which are major public health problems with members being present in most continents. Among the most important are yellow fever (YF, dengue with its four serotypes and Japanese encephalitis virus. A live attenuated virus is used as a cost effective, safe and efficacious vaccine against YF but no other live flavivirus vaccines have been licensed. The rise of recombinant DNA technology and its application to study flavivirus genome structure and expression has opened new possibilities for flavivirus vaccine development. One new approach is the use of cDNAs encopassing the whole viral genome to generate infectious RNA after in vitro transcription. This methodology allows the genetic mapping of specific viral functions and the design of viral mutants with considerable potential as new live attenuated viruses. The use of infectious cDNA as a carrier for heterologous antigens is gaining importance as chimeric viruses are shown to be viable, immunogenic and less virulent as compared to the parental viruses. The use of DNA to overcome mutation rates intrinsic of RNA virus populations in conjunction with vaccine production in cell culture should improve the reliability and lower the cost for production of live attenuated vaccines. The YF virus despite a long period ignored by researchers probably due to the effectiveness of the vaccine has made a come back, both in nature as human populations grow and reach endemic areas as well as in the laboratory being a suitable model to understand the biology of flaviviruses in general and providing new alternatives for vaccine development through the use of the 17D vaccine strain.

  3. Protection from SARS coronavirus conferred by live measles vaccine expressing the spike glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escriou, Nicolas; Callendret, Benoît; Lorin, Valérie; Combredet, Chantal; Marianneau, Philippe; Février, Michèle; Tangy, Frédéric

    2014-03-01

    The recent identification of a novel human coronavirus responsible of a SARS-like illness in the Middle-East a decade after the SARS pandemic, demonstrates that reemergence of a SARS-like coronavirus from an animal reservoir remains a credible threat. Because SARS is contracted by aerosolized contamination of the respiratory tract, a vaccine inducing mucosal long-term protection would be an asset to control new epidemics. To this aim, we generated live attenuated recombinant measles vaccine (MV) candidates expressing either the membrane-anchored SARS-CoV spike (S) protein or its secreted soluble ectodomain (Ssol). In mice susceptible to measles virus, recombinant MV expressing the anchored full-length S induced the highest titers of neutralizing antibodies and fully protected immunized animals from intranasal infectious challenge with SARS-CoV. As compared to immunization with adjuvanted recombinant Ssol protein, recombinant MV induced stronger and Th1-biased responses, a hallmark of live attenuated viruses and a highly desirable feature for an antiviral vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the persistence and gene expression of an anti-Chlamydophila psittaci DNA vaccine in turkey muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanrompay Daisy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA vaccination has been shown to elicit specific cellular and humoral immune responses to many different agents in a broad variety of species. However, looking at a commercial use, the duration of the immune response against the vaccine is critical. Therefore the persistence of the DNA vaccine, as well as its expression, should be investigated. We conducted these investigations on a DNA vaccine against Chlamydophila psittaci, a Gram-negative intracellular bacterium which causes respiratory disease in turkeys and humans. Previous studies showed that the DNA vaccine confers partial protection against C. psittaci infection in turkeys. Turkeys were injected intramuscularly with the DNA vaccine : a eukaryotic expression vector (pcDNA1::MOMP expressing the major outer membrane protein (MOMP of an avian C. psittaci serovar D strain. Over a period of 11 weeks, cellular uptake of the DNA vaccine was examined by PCR, transcription of the insert by reverse transcript-PCR (RT-PCR and mRNA translation by immunofluorescence staining of muscle biopsies. Results The results indicate that the DNA vaccine persists in turkey muscle for at least 10 weeks. Moreover, during this period of time MOMP was continuously expressed, as evidenced by the immunofluorescence staining and RT-PCR. Conclusion Since C. psittaci infections occur at the age of 3 to 6 and 8 to 12 weeks, a vaccine persistence of 10 weeks seems adequate. Therefore, further research should concentrate on improving the elicited immune response, more specifically the cell-mediated immune response, rather than prolonging the lifespan of the plasmid.

  5. Alphavirus replicon-based adjuvants enhance the immunogenicity and effectiveness of Fluzone ® in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon R; Barro, Mario; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J; Johnston, Robert E

    2011-01-29

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) without a transgene (null VRP) have been used to adjuvant effective humoral [1], cellular [2], and mucosal [3] immune responses in mice. To assess the adjuvant activity of null VRP in the context of a licensed inactivated influenza virus vaccine, rhesus monkeys were immunized with Fluzone(®) alone or Fluzone(®) mixed with null VRP and then challenged with a human seasonal influenza isolate, A/Memphis/7/2001 (H1N1). Compared to Fluzone(®) alone, Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals had stronger influenza-specific CD4(+) T cell responses (4.4 fold) with significantly higher levels of virus-specific IFN-γ (7.6 fold) and IL-2 (5.3 fold) producing CD4+ T cells. Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals also had significantly higher plasma anti-influenza IgG (pVRP immunization was 1.2 log greater (pVRP immunized monkeys had a significantly lower level of viral replication (pVRP immunized monkeys immediately after challenge. There were significant inverse correlations between influenza RNA levels in tracheal lavages and plasma anti-influenza HI and IgG anti-influenza antibody titers prior to challenge. These results demonstrate that null VRP dramatically improve both the immunogenicity and protection elicited by a licensed inactivated influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The dynamic replicon: adapting to a changing cellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, John

    2010-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells are often exposed to fluctuations in growth conditions as well as endogenous and exogenous stress-related agents. During development, global patterns of gene transcription change substantially, and these changes are associated with altered patterns of DNA replication and larger distances between replication origins in somatic cells compared to embryos. Conversely, when cells experience difficulties while replicating DNA, the replication program is dramatically altered and distances between replication origins decrease. Recent evidence indicates that each unit of replication, or replicon, can correspond to one or more potential replication origins, but in the case of multiple potential origins, only one is selected to initiate replication of the replicon. How one origin is selected from multiple potential origins and how origin densities are regulated during genome duplication remains unclear. The following review addresses some of the mechanisms involved in regulating replication origins during both a normal and perturbed eukaryotic cell cycle.

  7. Expression, purification and antigenicity of Neospora caninum-antigens using silkworm larvae targeting for subunit vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Takahiro; Dong, Jinhua; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2013-02-18

    Infection of Neospora caninum causes abortion in cattle, which has a serious worldwide impact on the economic performance of the dairy and beef industries. Now, inexpensive and efficacious vaccines are required to protect cattle from neosporosis in livestock industry. In this study, N. caninum surface antigen 1 (SAG1) and SAG1-related sequence 2 (SRS2) were expressed in hemolymph of silkworm larvae as a soluble form. Expressed SAG1 and SRS2 clearly showed antigenicity against N. caninum-positive sera of cow. SAG1 and SRS2 were purified to near homogeneity from hemolymph of silkworm larvae using anti-FLAG M2 antibody agarose: approximately 1.7 mg of SAG1 from 10 silkworm larvae and 370 μg of SRS2 from 17 silkworm larvae. Mice that were injected by antigens induced antibodies against SAG1 and SRS2. This study indicates that it is possible that this silkworm expression system leads to a large-scale production of N. caninum-antigens with biological function and low production cost. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid expression system paves the way to produce largely and rapidly these recombinant antigens for its application to subunit vaccines against neosporosis in cattle.

  8. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Li; Hye Na Kang; Lorne A Babiuk; Qiang Liu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models.METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation,ELISPOT for the number of interferon-γ secreting cells,and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays.RESULTS: Intradermal injection of E2 DNA vaccine induced strong Th1-like immune responses in mice. In piglets, E2 DNA vaccine elicited moderate and more balanced immune responses. A DNA vaccine prime and protein boost vaccination strategy induced significantly higher E2-specific antibody levels and shifted the immune response towards Th2-like ones in piglets.CONCLUSION: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein elicited E2-specific immune responses in mice and piglets. Recombinant E2 protein vaccination following DNA immunization significantly increased the antibody response in piglets. These HCV E2 vaccines may represent promising hepatitis C vaccine candidates for further investigations.

  9. The replication domain model: regulating replicon firing in the context of large-scale chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Benjamin D; Gilbert, David M

    2013-11-29

    The "Replicon Theory" of Jacob, Brenner, and Cuzin has reliably served as the paradigm for regulating the sites where individual replicons initiate replication. Concurrent with the replicon model was Taylor's demonstration that plant and animal chromosomes replicate segmentally in a defined temporal sequence, via cytologically defined units too large to be accounted for by a single replicon. Instead, there seemed to be a program to choreograph when chromosome units replicate during S phase, executed by initiation at clusters of individual replicons within each segment. Here, we summarize recent molecular evidence for the existence of such units, now known as "replication domains", and discuss how the organization of large chromosomes into structural units has added additional layers of regulation to the original replicon model.

  10. Race-related differences in antibody responses to the inactivated influenza vaccine are linked to distinct pre-vaccination gene expression profiles in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurupati, Raj; Kossenkov, Andrew; Haut, Larissa; Kannan, Senthil; Xiang, Zhiquan; Li, Yan; Doyle, Susan; Liu, Qin; Schmader, Kenneth; Showe, Louise; Ertl, Hildegund

    2016-09-27

    We conducted a 5-year study analyzing antibody and B cell responses to the influenza A virus components of the inactivated influenza vaccine, trivalent (IIV3) or quadrivalent (IIV4) in younger (aged 35-45) and aged (≥65 years of age) Caucasian and African American individuals. Antibody titers to the two influenza A virus strains, distribution of circulating B cell subsets and the blood transcriptome were tested at baseline and after vaccination while expression of immunoregulatory markers on B cells were analyzed at baseline. African Americans mounted higher virus neutralizing and IgG antibody responses to the H1N1 component of IIV3 or 4 compared to Caucasians. African Americans had higher levels of circulating B cell subsets compared to Caucasians. Expression of two co-regulators, i.e., programmed death (PD)-1 and the B and T cell attenuator (BTLA) were differentially expressed in the two cohorts. Race-related differences were caused by samples from younger African Americans, while results obtained with samples of aged African Americans were similar to those of aged Caucasians. Gene expression profiling by Illumina arrays revealed highly significant differences in 1368 probes at baseline between Caucasians and African Americans although samples from both cohorts showed comparable changes in transcriptome following vaccination. Genes differently expressed between samples from African Americans and Caucasians regardless of age were enriched for myeloid genes, while the transcripts that differed in expression between younger African Americans and younger Caucasians were enriched for those specific for B-cells.

  11. Vaccination with lentiviral vector expressing the nfa1 gene confers a protective immune response to mice infected with Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Yang, Hee-Jong; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2013-07-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a pathogenic free-living amoeba, causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and animals. The nfa1 gene (360 bp), cloned from a cDNA library of N. fowleri, produces a 13.1-kDa recombinant protein which is located on pseudopodia, particularly the food cup structure. The nfa1 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of N. fowleri infection. To examine the effect of nfa1 DNA vaccination against N. fowleri infection, we constructed a lentiviral vector (pCDH) expressing the nfa1 gene. For the in vivo mouse study, BALB/c mice were intranasally vaccinated with viral particles of a viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene. To evaluate the effect of vaccination and immune responses of mice, we analyzed the IgG levels (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), cytokine induction (interleukin-4 [IL-4] and gamma interferon [IFN-γ]), and survival rates of mice that developed PAM. The levels of both IgG and IgG subclasses (IgG1 and IgG2a) in vaccinated mice were significantly increased. The cytokine analysis showed that vaccinated mice exhibited greater IL-4 and IFN-γ production than the other control groups, suggesting a Th1/Th2 mixed-type immune response. In vaccinated mice, high levels of Nfa1-specific IgG antibodies continued until 12 weeks postvaccination. The mice vaccinated with viral vector expressing the nfa1 gene also exhibited significantly higher survival rates (90%) after challenge with N. fowleri trophozoites. Finally, the nfa1 vaccination effectively induced protective immunity by humoral and cellular immune responses in N. fowleri-infected mice. These results suggest that DNA vaccination using a viral vector may be a potential tool against N. fowleri infection.

  12. Elicitation of strong immune responses by a DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2 in murine and porcine animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Kang, H.N.; Babiuk, L.A.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immunogenicity of a hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 DNA vaccine alone or with a protein vaccine boost in murine and porcine animal models. METHODS: A DNA vaccine expressing a secreted form of HCV E2 protein was constructed and used to vaccinate mice and piglets with or without...... boosting with a recombinant E2 protein vaccine formulated with CpG ODN and 10% Emulsigen. The immunogenicity of HCV E2 vaccines was analyzed by ELISA for antibody responses, MTT assay for lymphocyte proliferation, ELISPOT for the number of interferon-gamma secreting cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte assays...

  13. Robust and persistent replication of the genotype 6a hepatitis C virus replicon in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Peng, Betty; Chan, Katie; Gong, Ruoyu; Yang, Huiling; Delaney, William; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-05-01

    Genotype 6 (GT6) hepatitis C virus (HCV) is prevalent in Southeast Asia and southern China, where it can constitute up to 50% of HCV infections. Despite this, no direct-acting antivirals are approved to treat GT6 HCV infection, and no cell culture systems have been described. In this study, we aimed to develop a GT6 HCV subgenomic replicon to facilitate the identification and development of new HCV therapies with pan-genotype activity. A subgenomic replicon cDNA encoding a GT6a consensus sequence plus an NS5A amino acid substitution (S232I) was synthesized. Electroporation of RNA encoding the GT6a replicon into Huh-7-derived cells consistently yielded 20 to 100 stable replicon colonies. Genotypic analyses of individual replicon colonies revealed new adaptive mutations across multiple viral nonstructural proteins. The E30V and K272R mutations in NS3 and the K34R mutation in NS4A were observed most frequently and were confirmed to enhance GT6a replicon replication in the presence of the NS5A amino acid substitution S232I. These new adaptive mutations allowed establishment of robust luciferase-encoding GT6a replicons for reproducible quantification of HCV replication, and the luciferase-encoding replicons enabled efficient determinations of antiviral activity for HCV inhibitors in a 384-well assay format. While nucleoside/nucleotide NS5B inhibitors and cyclophilin A inhibitors had similar antiviral activities against both GT6a and GT1b replicons, some nonnucleoside NS5B inhibitors, NS3 protease inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors had less antiviral activity against GT6a replicons. In conjunction with other genotype replicons, this robust GT6a replicon system will aid in the development of pan-genotypic HCV regimens.

  14. Optimized codon usage enhances the expression and immunogenicity of DNA vaccine encoding Taenia solium oncosphere TSOL18 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Yuan; Chang, Xue-Lian; Tao, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Xiao-Li; Jiao, Yu-Meng; Chen, Yong; Qi, Wen-Juan; Xia, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Di; Sun, Xin; Shen, Ji-Long; Fang, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Cysticercosis due to larval cysts of Taenia solium, is a serious public health problem affecting humans in numerous regions worldwide. The oncospheral stage-specific TSOL18 antigen is a promising candidate for an anti-cysticercosis vaccine. It has been reported that the immunogenicity of the DNA vaccine may be enhanced through codon optimization of candidate genes. The aim of the present study was to further increase the efficacy of the cysticercosis DNA vaccine; therefore, a codon optimized recombinant expression plasmid pVAX1/TSOL18 was developed in order to enhance expression and immunogenicity of TSOL18. The gene encoding TSOL18 of Taenia solium was optimized, and the resulting opt-TSOL18 gene was amplified and expressed. The results of the present study showed that the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully expressed in CHO-K1 cells, and immunized mice vaccinated with opt-TSOL18 recombinant expression plasmids demonstrated opt‑TSOL18 expression in muscle fibers, as determined by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene produced a significantly greater effect compared with that of TSOL18 and active spleen cells were markedly stimulated in vaccinated mice. 3H-thymidine incorporation was significantly greater in the opt-TSOL18 group compared with that of the TSOL18, pVAX and blank control groups (P<0.01). In conclusion, the eukaryotic expression vector containing the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene was successfully constructed and was confirmed to be expressed in vivo and in vitro. The expression and immunogenicity of the codon-optimized TSOL18 gene were markedly greater compared with that of the un-optimized gene. Therefore, these results may provide the basis for an optimized TSOL18 gene vaccine against cysticercosis.

  15. Alphaviral vector-transduced dendritic cells are successful therapeutic vaccines against neu-overexpressing tumors in wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Timothy P; Burgents, Joseph E; Long, Brian; Ferrer, Ivana; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Tisch, Roland M; Johnston, Robert E; Serody, Jonathan S

    2007-09-04

    While dendritic cell (DC) vaccines can protect hosts from tumor challenge, their ability to effectively inhibit the growth of established tumors remains indeterminate. Previously, we have shown that human DCs transduced with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) were potent stimulators of antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the ability of VRP-transduced DCs (VRP-DCs) to induce therapeutic immunity in vivo against tumors overexpressing the neu oncoprotein. Transduction of murine DCs with VRPs resulted in high-level transgene expression, DC maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Vaccination with VRP-DCs expressing a truncated neu oncoprotein induced robust neu-specific CD8(+) T cell and anti-neu IgG responses. Furthermore, a single vaccination with VRP-DCs induced the regression of large established tumors in wild-type mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), T cells completely abrogated inhibition of tumor growth following vaccination. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VRP-DC vaccines induce potent immunity against established tumors, and emphasize the importance of the generation of both CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses for efficient tumor inhibition. These findings provide the rationale for future evaluation of VRP-DC vaccines in the clinical setting.

  16. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  17. Construction of two Listeria ivanovii attenuated strains expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens for TB vaccine purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingqing; Zhou, Mengying; Xu, Zongkai; Khanniche, Asma; Shen, Hao; Wang, Chuan

    2015-02-20

    Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) has failed in complete control of tuberculosis (TB), thus, novel tuberculosis vaccines are urgently needed. We have constructed several TB vaccine candidates, which are characterized by the use of Listeria ivanovii (LI) strain as an antigen delivery vector. Two L. ivanovii attenuated recombinant strains L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv0129c and L. ivanovii△actAplcB-Rv3875 were successfully screened. Results from genome PCR and sequencing showed that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen gene cassette coding for Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein respectively had been integrated into LI genome downstream of mpl gene. Western blot confirmed the secretion of Ag85C or ESAT-6 protein from the recombinant LI strains. These two recombinant strains showed similar growth curves as wide type strain in vitro. In vivo, they transiently propagated in mice spleen and liver, and induced specific CD8(+) IFN-γ secretion. Therefore, in this paper, two novel LI attenuated strains expressing specific TB antigens were successfully constructed. The promising growth characteristics in mice immune system and the capability of induction of IFN-γ secretion make them of potential interest for development of TB vaccines.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum vaccine vector expressing hemagglutinin provides protection against H9N2 challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shao-Hua; Yang, Wen-Tao; Yang, Gui-Lian; Zhang, Xu-Ke; Liu, Yu-Ying; Zhang, Li-Jiao; Ye, Li-Ping; Hu, Jing-Tao; Xing, Xin; Qi, Chong; Li, Yu; Wang, Chun-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hemagglutinin (HA) has been demonstrated as an effective candidate vaccine antigen against AIVs. Dendritic cell-targeting peptide (DCpep) can enhance the robustness of immune responses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether DCpep could enhance the immune response against H9N2 AIV when utilizing Lactobacillus plantarum NC8 (NC8) to present HA-DCpep in mouse and chicken models. To accomplish this, a mucosal vaccine of a recombinant NC8 strain expressing HA and DCpep that was constructed in a previous study was employed. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. Orally administered NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep elicited high serum titers of hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies in mice and also induced robust T cell immune responses in both mouse and chicken models. These results revealed that recombinant L. plantarum NC8-pSIP409-HA-DCpep is an effective vaccine candidate against H9N2 AIVs.

  19. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cambridge CD

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chino D Cambridge, Shree R Singh, Alain B Waffo, Stacie J Fairley, Vida A DennisCenter for NanoBiotechnology Research (CNBR, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USAAbstract: Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167–250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25–400 µg/mL to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24–72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and

  20. Co-expression of tumor antigen and interleukin-2 from an adenoviral vector augments the efficiency of therapeutic tumor vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Nørgaard Nielsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that for the majority of antigens, adenoviral vaccines expressing the target antigen fused to the MHC associated invariant chain (Ii) induce an accelerated, augmented, and prolonged transgene-specific CD8+ T-cell response. Here we describe a new adenoviral vaccine vector...... approach where the target antigen fused to Ii is expressed from the adenoviral E1 region and IL-2 is expressed from the E3 region. Immunization of mice with this new vector construct resulted in an augmented primary effector CD8+ T-cell response. Furthermore, in a melanoma model we observed significantly...

  1. Expression, purification and evaluation of recombinant lipoprotein of Salmonella typhi as a vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anand; Kundu, Subir; Debnath Das, Mira

    2017-03-01

    Lipoprotein has been reported as a vaccine candidate against many pathogenic bacteria, it plays direct role as a virulence-associated function. Here the approach is toward the expression of recombinant lipoprotein of Salmonella typhi in prokaryotic host and its evaluation as a vaccine candidate. Lipoprotein gene (lp1) was cloned in pET32a expression vector in addition to Bam HI and Hind III restriction sites, and BL21(pLysS) was used as prokaryotic expression host for transformation. Lipoprotein induction was performed by IPTG and 55 kDa (31 kDa of Gene +24 kDa of vector additional protein with His-tag) was analyzed by 12% SDS-PAGE. The recombinant lipoprotein was purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography due to the addition of 6X His-tag in recombinant lipoprotein. Western blot analysis using anti-His tag polyclonal antibodies confirmed the specificity of recombinant lipoprotein. Immunogenicity and protection study of recombinant lipoprotein against S. Typhi was performed in BALB/c mice. Adjuvants IFA and alum salts were used to enhance the immune response. ELISA results proved that biologically active truncated recombinant lipoprotein (31 kDa) is a suitable immunogen. Alum salts used as adjuvant was effective for long-lasting immunity. Copyright © 2017 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oral Immunization of Mice With Vaccine of Attenuated Salmonella typhimurium Expressing Helicobacter pylori Urease B Subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XING-LONG YANG; WEN-CHAO LIU; WU-WEI YANG; DONG ZHONG; YU-HU LIU; JING-DONG ZHANG; JIAN-HUI JIANG; SHAN-SHAN LI

    2005-01-01

    Objective To prepare the live recombinant vaccine of attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 expressing Helicobacterpylori (H. pylori) B subunit (UreB) and to determine whether it could be used as an oral vaccine against H. pylori infection. Methods Using genomic DNA of H. pylori Sydney strain (SS1) as template, the H. pylori UreB gene fragment was amplified by PCR and subcloned into the expression vector pTC01. The recombinant plasmid pTC01-UreB was then transferred into LB5000 to obtain modified forms, and further conversed into the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 to obtain recombinant SL3261/pCT01-UreB as an oral immunization reagent, which was then used to orally immunize Balb/c mice twice at a three-week interval. Twelve weeks later, anti-UreB IgA antibodies in intestinal fluid and IgG antibodies in sera were determined by ELISA. The relating data in control groups (including body weight, gastric inflammation, etc.) were also collected. Results The sequencing analysis showed that the UreB gene fragment amplified by PCR was consistent with the sequence of the H. pylori UreB gene. The restriction enzyme digestion revealed that the correct pTC01-UreB was obtained.SDS-PAGE and Western blot showed that a 61KD protein was expressed in SL3261/pTC01-UreB, which could be recognized by anti-H. pylori UreB antiserum and was absent in the control containing only Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 strain. The multiple oral immunization with SL3261/pTC01-UreB could significantly induce H. pylori specific mucosal IgA response as well as serum IgG responses. IFN-γ and IL-10 levels were significantly increased in SL3261/pTC01-UreB group, and no obvious side effect and change in gastric inflammation were observed. Conclusion The attenuated vaccine of Salmonella typhimurium expressing H. pylori UreB can be used as an oral vaccine against H. pylori infection.

  3. The porcine circovirus type 1 capsid gene promoter improves antigen expression and immunogenicity in a HIV-1 plasmid vaccine

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    Burger Marieta

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the promising avenues for development of vaccines against Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and other human pathogens is the use of plasmid-based DNA vaccines. However, relatively large doses of plasmid must be injected for a relatively weak response. We investigated whether genome elements from Porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV-1, an apathogenic small ssDNA-containing virus, had useful expression-enhancing properties that could allow dose-sparing in a plasmid vaccine. Results The linearised PCV-1 genome inserted 5' of the CMV promoter in the well-characterised HIV-1 plasmid vaccine pTHgrttnC increased expression of the polyantigen up to 2-fold, and elicited 3-fold higher CTL responses in mice at 10-fold lower doses than unmodified pTHgrttnC. The PCV-1 capsid gene promoter (Pcap alone was equally effective. Enhancing activity was traced to a putative composite host transcription factor binding site and a "Conserved Late Element" transcription-enhancing sequence previously unidentified in circoviruses. Conclusions We identified a novel PCV-1 genome-derived enhancer sequence that significantly increased antigen expression from plasmids in in vitro assays, and improved immunogenicity in mice of the HIV-1 subtype C vaccine plasmid, pTHgrttnC. This should allow significant dose sparing of, or increased responses to, this and other plasmid-based vaccines. We also report investigations of the potential of other circovirus-derived sequences to be similarly used.

  4. KMP11-HASPB fusion protein-expressing lentiviral vaccine protects BALB/c mice against Leishmania major infection

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    Nahid Mortazavidehkordi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophilic acylated surface protein B (HASPB is an immunogenic Leishmania-specific protein that antibodies are produced against it in the sera of Leishmania-infected individuals. Kinetoplastid membrane protein 11 (KMP11 is another Leishmania antigen and considered as suitable candidate for vaccine development leishmaniasis. It is a highly conserved surface protein expressed in both promastigotes and amastigotes. In this study, KMP11 and HASPB coding sequences were cloned into a pCDH-cGFPlentiviral vector as a fusion protein to be used as a DNA vaccine against L.major. KMP11-HASPB fusion protein was successfully expressed as evidenced by RT-PCR and western blot assays. The effect of the vaccine was determined by evaluating the level of IFN-γ, IL-10, IgG1, and IgG2a performed using ELISA as well as determining the parasite load after challenge with L.major in vaccinated mice. The results revealed that IFN-γ, IL-10, IgG1, and IgG2a significantly increased after vaccination using KMP11-HASPB-expressing lentiviruses in BALB/c mice. It is noteworthy that the level of IFN-γ and IgG2a was higher than that of IL-10 and IgG1, respectively, which indicates the activation Th1 cells, macrophages, and cellular immunity. Moreover, the parasite load in the spleen and liver of vaccinated mice after challenge was significantly lower than that of controls.

  5. High gene expression of inflammatory markers and IL-17A correlates with severity of injection site reactions of Atlantic salmon vaccinated with oil-adjuvanted vaccines

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    Koop Ben F

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two decades after the introduction of oil-based vaccines in the control of bacterial and viral diseases in farmed salmonids, the mechanisms of induced side effects manifested as intra-abdominal granulomas remain unresolved. Side effects have been associated with generation of auto-antibodies and autoimmunity but the underlying profile of inflammatory and immune response has not been characterized. This study was undertaken with the aim to elucidate the inflammatory and immune mechanisms of granuloma formation at gene expression level associated with high and low side effect (granuloma indices. Groups of Atlantic salmon parr were injected intraperitoneally with oil-adjuvanted vaccines containing either high or low concentrations of Aeromonas salmonicida or Moritella viscosa antigens in order to induce polarized (severe and mild granulomatous reactions. The established granulomatous reactions were confirmed by gross and histological methods at 3 months post vaccination when responses were known to have matured. The corresponding gene expression patterns in the head kidneys were profiled using salmonid cDNA microarrays followed by validation by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR. qPCR was also used to examine the expression of additional genes known to be important in the adaptive immune response. Results Granulomatous lesions were observed in all vaccinated fish. The presence of severe granulomas was associated with a profile of up-regulation of innate immunity-related genes such as complement factors C1q and C6, mannose binding protein, lysozyme C, C-type lectin receptor, CD209, Cathepsin D, CD63, LECT-2, CC chemokine and metallothionein. In addition, TGF-β (p = 0.001, IL-17A (p = 0.007 and its receptor (IL-17AR (p = 0.009 representing TH17 were significantly up-regulated in the group with severe granulomas as were arginase and IgM. None of the genes directly reflective of TH1 T cell lineage (IFN-γ, CD4 or TH2 (GATA-3

  6. Optimizing expression of the pregnancy malaria vaccine candidate, VAR2CSA in Pichia pastoris

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    Narum David L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background VAR2CSA is the main candidate for a vaccine against pregnancy-associated malaria, but vaccine development is complicated by the large size and complex disulfide bonding pattern of the protein. Recent X-ray crystallographic information suggests that domain boundaries of VAR2CSA Duffy binding-like (DBL domains may be larger than previously predicted and include two additional cysteine residues. This study investigated whether longer constructs would improve VAR2CSA recombinant protein secretion from Pichia pastoris and if domain boundaries were applicable across different VAR2CSA alleles. Methods VAR2CSA sequences were bioinformatically analysed to identify the predicted C11 and C12 cysteine residues at the C-termini of DBL domains and revised N- and C-termimal domain boundaries were predicted in VAR2CSA. Multiple construct boundaries were systematically evaluated for protein secretion in P. pastoris and secreted proteins were tested as immunogens. Results From a total of 42 different VAR2CSA constructs, 15 proteins (36% were secreted. Longer construct boundaries, including the predicted C11 and C12 cysteine residues, generally improved expression of poorly or non-secreted domains and permitted expression of all six VAR2CSA DBL domains. However, protein secretion was still highly empiric and affected by subtle differences in domain boundaries and allelic variation between VAR2CSA sequences. Eleven of the secreted proteins were used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies reacted with CSA-binding infected erythrocytes, indicating that P. pastoris recombinant proteins possessed native protein epitopes. Conclusion These findings strengthen emerging data for a revision of DBL domain boundaries in var-encoded proteins and may facilitate pregnancy malaria vaccine development.

  7. A tetravalent alphavirus-vector based dengue vaccine provides effective immunity in an early life mouse model.

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    Khalil, Syed Muaz; Tonkin, Daniel R; Mattocks, Melissa D; Snead, Andrew T; Johnston, Robert E; White, Laura J

    2014-07-07

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) cause 390 million clinical infections every year, several hundred thousand of which progress to severe hemorrhagic and shock syndromes. Preexisting immunity resulting from a previous DENV infection is the major risk factor for severe dengue during secondary heterologous infections. During primary infections in infants, maternal antibodies pose an analogous risk. At the same time, maternal antibodies are likely to prevent induction of endogenous anti-DENV antibodies in response to current live, attenuated virus (LAV) vaccine candidates. Any effective early life dengue vaccine has to overcome maternal antibody interference (leading to ineffective vaccination) and poor induction of antibody responses (increasing the risk of severe dengue disease upon primary infection). In a previous study, we demonstrated that a non-propagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon expression vector (VRP), expressing the ectodomain of DENV E protein (E85), overcomes maternal interference in a BALB/c mouse model. We report here that a single immunization with a tetravalent VRP vaccine induced NAb and T-cell responses to each serotype at a level equivalent to the monovalent vaccine components, suggesting that this vaccine modality can overcome serotype interference. Furthermore, neonatal immunization was durable and could be boosted later in life to further increase NAb and T-cell responses. Although the neonatal immune response was lower in magnitude than responses in adult BALB/c mice, we demonstrate that VRP vaccines generated protective immunity from a lethal challenge after a single neonatal immunization. In summary, VRP vaccines expressing DENV antigens were immunogenic and protective in neonates, and hence are promising candidates for safe and effective vaccination in early life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Viral vector vaccines expressing nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein genes of avian bornaviruses ameliorate homologous challenge infections in cockatiels and common canaries.

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    Olbert, Marita; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela; Herden, Christiane; Malberg, Sara; Runge, Solveig; Staeheli, Peter; Rubbenstroth, Dennis

    2016-11-10

    Avian bornaviruses are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), an often fatal disease of parrots and related species (order Psittaciformes) which is widely distributed in captive psittacine populations and may affect endangered species. Here, we established a vaccination strategy employing two different well described viral vectors, namely recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that were engineered to express the phosphoprotein and nucleoprotein genes of two avian bornaviruses, parrot bornavirus 4 (PaBV-4) and canary bornavirus 2 (CnBV-2). When combined in a heterologous prime/boost vaccination regime, NDV and MVA vaccine viruses established self-limiting infections and induced a bornavirus-specific humoral immune response in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica). After challenge infection with a homologous bornavirus, shedding of bornavirus RNA and viral loads in tissue samples were significantly reduced in immunized birds, indicating that vaccination markedly delayed the course of infection. However, cockatiels still developed signs of PDD if the vaccine failed to prevent viral persistence. Our work demonstrates that avian bornavirus infections can be repressed by vaccine-induced immunity. It represents a first crucial step towards a protective vaccination strategy to combat PDD in psittacine birds.

  9. A cucumber mosaic virus based expression system for the production of porcine circovirus specific vaccines.

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    Akos Gellért

    Full Text Available Potential porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2 capsid protein epitopes, suitable for expression on the surface of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV particles were determined by a thorough analysis of the predicted PCV capsid protein structure. The ab initio protein structure prediction was carried out with fold recognition and threading methods. The putative PCV epitopes were selected on the basis of PCV virion models and integrated into the plant virus coat protein, after amino acid position 131. The recombinants were tested for infectivity and stability on different Nicotiana species and stable recombinant virus particles were purified. The particles were tested for their ability to bind to PCV induced porcine antibodies and used for specific antibody induction in mice and pigs. The results showed that PCV epitopes expressed on the CMV surface were recognized by the porcine antibodies and they were also able to induce PCV specific antibody response. Challenge experiment with PCV2 carried out in immunized pigs showed partial protection against the infection. Based on these results it was concluded that specific antiviral vaccine production for the given pathogen was feasible, offering an inexpensive way for the mass production of such vaccines.

  10. Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine candidates using human CD4+ T-cells expression cloning.

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    Coler, Rhea N; Dillon, Davin C; Skeiky, Yasir A W; Kahn, Maria; Orme, Ian M; Lobet, Yves; Reed, Steven G; Alderson, Mark R

    2009-01-07

    To identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens as candidates for a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), we have employed a CD4+ T-cell expression screening method. Mtb-specific CD4+ T-cell lines from nine healthy PPD positive donors were stimulated with different antigenic substrates including autologous dendritic cells (DC) infected with Mtb, or cultured with culture filtrate proteins (CFP), and purified protein derivative of Mtb (PPD). These lines were used to screen a genomic Mtb library expressed in Escherichia coli and processed and presented by autologous DC. This screening led to the recovery of numerous T-cell antigens, including both novel and previously described antigens. One of these novel antigens, referred to as Mtb9.8 (Rv0287), was recognized by multiple T-cell lines, stimulated with either Mtb-infected DC or CFP. Using the mouse and guinea pig models of TB, high levels of IFN-gamma were produced, and solid protection from Mtb challenge was observed following immunization with Mtb9.8 formulated in either AS02A or AS01B Adjuvant Systems. These results demonstrate that T-cell screening of the Mtb genome can be used to identify CD4+ T-cell antigens that are candidates for vaccine development.

  11. Effects of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis on cellular recruitment and cytokine gene expression in caecum of vaccinated chickens.

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    Carvajal, Bárbara González; Methner, Ulrich; Pieper, Jana; Berndt, Angela

    2008-10-01

    Although vaccination of poultry is a suitable method to limit human food borne gastroenteritis caused by Salmonella (S.), the immune mechanisms responsible for a longer lasting protection against Salmonella infection in birds are not completely understood. To reveal unique protection-related immune parameters, day-old chicks were vaccinated with a commercial live S. Enteritidis vaccine and challenged with wild-type S. Enteritidis 147N at day 56 of life. The bacterial cell count was determined in gut and liver, while the immune cell composition and cytokine gene expression patterns were analysed by immunohistochemistry and quantitative real-time RT-PCR in caecum samples. The presented data suggest that the vaccine-elicited immune protection against the Salmonella wild-type infection was rather related to the bacterial count in gut mucosa and liver than to the colonisation in gut lumen. The higher number of Salmonella wild-type organisms found in caecal wall and liver of the non-immunised compared to immunised birds after challenge correlated with a more pronounced gene expression rate for IL-8, LITAF, iNOS, IL-12 and IFN-gamma. In contrast, immunised birds exhibited higher amounts of CD8(+) T cells as well as IgA than the non-immunised chickens after S. Enteritidis 147N infection in caecum. The results demonstrated a distinctive immune reaction pattern of previously vaccinated compared to non-vaccinated chickens upon S. Enteritidis wild-type challenge.

  12. Recombinant Leishmania tarentolae expressing the A2 virulence gene as a novel candidate vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

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    Mizbani, Amir; Taheri, Tahereh; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taslimi, Yasaman; Azizi, Hiva; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2009-12-10

    Visceral leishmaniasis is the most severe form of leishmaniasis. To date, there is no effective vaccine against this disease. Many antigens have been examined so far as protein- or DNA-based vaccines, but none of them conferred complete long-term protection. The use of live attenuated vaccines has recently emerged as a promising vaccination strategy. In this study, we stably expressed the Leishmania donovani A2 antigen in Leishmania tarentolae, a non-pathogenic member of the genus Leishmania, and evaluated its protective efficacy as a live vaccine against L. infantum challenge. Our results show that a single intraperitoneal administration of the A2-recombinant L. tarentolae strain protects BALB/c mice against L. infantum challenge and that protective immunity is associated with high levels of IFN-gamma production prior and after challenge. This is accompanied by reduced levels of IL-5 production after challenge, leading to a potent Th1 immune response. In contrast, intravenous injection elicited a Th2 type response, characterized by higher levels of IL-5 and high humoral immune response, resulting in a less efficient protection. All together, these results indicate the promise of A2-expressing L. tarentolae as a safe live vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis.

  13. Further characterization of the immune response in mice to inactivated and live rabies vaccines expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein

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    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously developed (a) replication-competent, (b) replication-deficient, and (c) chemically inactivated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing ebolavirus (EBOV) glycoprotein (GP) that induce humoral immunity against each virus and confer protection from both lethal RABV and mouse-adapted EBOV challenge in mice. Here, we expand our investigation of the immunogenic properties of these bivalent vaccines in mice. Both live and killed vaccines induced primary EBOV GP-specific T-cells and a robust recall response as measured by interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. In addition to cellular immunity, an effective filovirus vaccine will likely require a multivalent humoral immune response against multiple virus species. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we demonstrated that inactivated RV-GP could be formulated with another inactivated RABV vaccine expressing the nontoxic fragment of botulinum neurotoxin A heavy chain (HC50) without a reduction in immunity to each component. Finally, we demonstrated that humoral immunity to GP could be induced by immunization of mice with inactivated RV-GP in the presence of pre-existing immunity to RABV. The ability of these novel vaccines to induce strong humoral and cellular immunity indicates that they should be further evaluated in additional animal models of infection. PMID:22884661

  14. Production and evaluation of a recombinant subunit vaccine against botulinum neurotoxin serotype B using a 293E expression system.

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    Yu, YunZhou; Shi, DanYang; Liu, Si; Gong, Zheng-Wei; Wang, Shuang; Sun, ZhiWei

    2015-01-01

    Although Escherichia coli and yeast were commonly used to express recombinant Hc of botulinum neurotoxins, as an alternative, in current study, a 293E expression system was used to express the Hc of botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BHc) as soluble recombinant protein for experimental vaccine evaluation. Our results demonstrated that the 293E expression system could produce high level of recombinant secreted BHc protein, which was immunorecognized specifically by anti-botulinum neurotoxin serotype B (BoNT/B) sera and showed ganglioside binding activities. The serological response and efficacy of recombinant BHc formulated with aluminum hydroxide adjuvant were evaluated in mice. Immunization with Alhydrogel-formulated BHc subunit vaccine afforded the effective protection against BoNT/B challenge. A frequency- and dose-dependent effect to immunization with BHc subunit vaccine was observed and the ELISA antibody titers correlated well with neutralizing antibody titers and protection. And a solid-phase assay showed that the neutralizing antibodies from the BHc-immunized mice inhibited the binding of BHc to the ganglioside GT1b. Our results also show that the plasmid pABE293SBHc derived of the 293E expression system as DNA vaccine is capable of inducing stronger humoral response and protective efficacy against BoNT/B than the pVAX1SBHc. In summary, immunization with the 293E-expressed BHc protein generates effective immune protection against BoNT/B as E. coli or yeast-expressed BHc, so the efficient expression of botulinum Hc protein for experimental vaccine can be prepared using the 293E expression system.

  15. Matrix expression and vaccination control for epidemic dynamics over dynamic networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peilian GUO; Yuzhen WANG

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates epidemic dynamics over dynamic networks via the approach of semi-tensor product of matrices. First, a formal susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic dynamic model over dynamic networks (SISED-DN) is given. Second, based on a class of determinate co-evolutionary rule, the matrix expressions are established for the dynamics of individual states and network topologies, respectively. Then, all possible final spreading equilibria are obtained for any given initial epidemic state and network topology by the matrix expression. Third, a sufficient and necessary condition of the existence of state feedback vaccination control is presented to make every individual susceptible. The study of illustrative examples shows the effectiveness of our new results.

  16. Recombinant Varicella-Zoster Virus Vaccines as Platforms for Expression of Foreign Antigens

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    Wayne L. Gray

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Varicella-zoster virus (VZV vaccines induce immunity against childhood chickenpox and against shingles in older adults. The safety, efficacy, and widespread use of VZV vaccines suggest that they may also be effective as recombinant vaccines against other infectious diseases that affect the young and the elderly. The generation of recombinant VZV vaccines and their evaluation in animal models are reviewed. The potential advantages and limitations of recombinant VZV vaccines are addressed.

  17. Resistance studies of a dithiazol analogue, DBPR110, as a potential hepatitis C virus NS5A inhibitor in replicon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Mei; Wang, Jing-Chyi; Hu, Han-Shu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Wu, Su-Ying; Yang, Chi-Chen; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Hsu, Tsu-An; Jiaang, Weir-Torn; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Yueh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, affects approximately 3% of the world's population and is becoming the leading cause of liver disease in the world. Therefore, the development of novel or more effective treatment strategies to treat chronic HCV infection is urgently needed. In our previous study, we identified a potential HCV NS5A inhibitor, BP008. After further systemic optimization, we discovered a more potent HCV inhibitor, DBPR110. DBPR110 reduced the reporter expression of the HCV1b replicon with a 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) and a selective index value of 3.9 ± 0.9 pM and >12,800,000, respectively. DBPR110 reduced HCV2a replicon activity with an EC(50) and a selective index value of 228.8 ± 98.4 pM and >173,130, respectively. Sequencing analyses of several individual clones derived from the DBPR110-resistant RNAs purified from cells harboring genotype 1b and 2a HCV replicons revealed that amino acid substitutions mainly within the N-terminal region (domain I) of NS5A were associated with decreased inhibitor susceptibility. P58L/T and Y93H/N in genotype 1b and T24A, P58L, and Y93H in the genotype 2a replicon were the key substitutions for resistance selection. In the 1b replicon, V153M, M202L, and M265V play a compensatory role in replication and drug resistance. Moreover, DBPR110 displayed synergistic effects with alpha interferon (IFN-α), an NS3 protease inhibitor, and an NS5B polymerase inhibitor. In summary, our results present an effective small-molecule inhibitor, DBPR110, that potentially targets HCV NS5A. DBPR110 could be part of a more effective therapeutic strategy for HCV in the future.

  18. Recombinant Measles AIK-C Vaccine Strain Expressing the prM-E Antigen of Japanese Encephalitis Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Akira; Toriniwa, Hiroko; Komiya, Tomoyoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    An inactivated Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) vaccine, which induces neutralizing antibodies, has been used for many years in Japan. In the present study, the JEV prM-E protein gene was cloned, inserted at the P/M junction of measles AIK-C cDNA, and an infectious virus was recovered. The JEV E protein was expressed in B95a cells infected with the recombinant virus. Cotton rats were inoculated with recombinant virus. Measles PA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. Neutralizing antibodies against JEV developed one week after inoculation, and EIA antibodies were detected three weeks after immunization. The measles AIK-C-based recombinant virus simultaneously induced measles and JEV immune responses, and may be a candidate for infant vaccines. Therefore, the present strategy of recombinant viruses based on a measles vaccine vector would be applicable to the platform for vaccine development.

  19. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing the peste des petits ruminants virus F or H proteins overcomes viral immunosuppression and induces protective immunity against PPRV challenge in sheep.

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    Rojas, José M; Moreno, Héctor; Valcárcel, Félix; Peña, Lourdes; Sevilla, Noemí; Martín, Verónica

    2014-01-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F) or hemagglutinin protein (H) from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines.

  20. Poor immune responses of newborn rhesus macaques to measles virus DNA vaccines expressing the hemagglutinin and fusion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polack, Fernando P; Lydy, Shari L; Lee, Sok-Hyong; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Adams, Robert J; Robinson, Harriet L; Griffin, Diane E

    2013-02-01

    A vaccine that would protect young infants against measles could facilitate elimination efforts and decrease morbidity and mortality in developing countries. However, immaturity of the immune system is an important obstacle to the development of such a vaccine. In this study, DNA vaccines expressing the measles virus (MeV) hemagglutinin (H) protein or H and fusion (F) proteins, previously shown to protect juvenile macaques, were used to immunize groups of 4 newborn rhesus macaques. Monkeys were inoculated intradermally with 200 μg of each DNA at birth and at 10 months of age. As controls, 2 newborn macaques were similarly vaccinated with DNA encoding the influenza virus H5, and 4 received one dose of the current live attenuated MeV vaccine (LAV) intramuscularly. All monkeys were monitored for development of MeV-specific neutralizing and binding IgG antibody and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These responses were poor compared to the responses induced by LAV. At 18 months of age, all monkeys were challenged intratracheally with a wild-type strain of MeV. Monkeys that received the DNA vaccine encoding H and F, but not H alone, were primed for an MeV-specific CD8(+) CTL response but not for production of antibody. LAV-vaccinated monkeys were protected from rash and viremia, while DNA-vaccinated monkeys developed rashes, similar to control monkeys, but had 10-fold lower levels of viremia. We conclude that vaccination of infant macaques with DNA encoding MeV H and F provided only partial protection from MeV infection.

  1. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

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    Christoph Jindra

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c. prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease.

  2. Attenuated Recombinant Influenza A Virus Expressing HPV16 E6 and E7 as a Novel Therapeutic Vaccine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, Christoph; Huber, Bettina; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Wolschek, Markus; Ferko, Boris; Muster, Thomas; Brandt, Sabine; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, most often HPV16 and HPV18, causes all cervical and most anal cancers, and a subset of vulvar, vaginal, penile and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Two prophylactic virus-like particle (VLPs)-based vaccines, are available that protect against vaccine type-associated persistent infection and associated disease, yet have no therapeutic effect on existing lesions or infections. We have generated recombinant live-attenuated influenza A viruses expressing the HPV16 oncogenes E6 and E7 as experimental immunotherapeutic vaccine candidates. The influenza A virus life cycle lacks DNA intermediates as important safety feature. Different serotypes were generated to ensure efficient prime and boost immunizations. The immune response to vaccination in C57BL/6 mice was characterized by peptide ELISA and IFN-γ ELISpot, demonstrating induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy was analyzed in the murine HPV16-positive TC-1 tumor challenge model. Subcutaneous (s.c.) prime and boost vaccinations of mice with recombinant influenza A serotypes H1N1 and H3N2, followed by challenge with TC-1 cells resulted in complete protection or significantly reduced tumor growth as compared to control animals. In a therapeutic setting, s.c. vaccination of mice with established TC-1 tumors decelerated tumor growth and significantly prolonged survival. Importantly, intralesional vaccine administration induced complete tumor regression in 25% of animals, and significantly reduced tumor growth in 50% of mice. These results suggest recombinant E6E7 influenza viruses as a promising new approach for the development of a therapeutic vaccine against HPV-induced disease.

  3. Prime-boost bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination with lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines expressing antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 improves protective efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Yang, Enzhuo; Wang, Jianguang; Li, Rui; Li, Guanghua; Liu, Guoyuan; Song, Na; Huang, Qi; Kong, Cong; Wang, Honghai

    2014-10-01

    To prevent the global spread of tuberculosis (TB), more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are urgently needed. As a result of the success of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in protecting children against miliary and meningeal TB, the majority of individuals will have been vaccinated with BCG; hence, boosting BCG-primed immunity will probably be a key component of future vaccine strategies. In this study, we compared the ability of DNA-, protein- and lentiviral vector-based vaccines that express the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost the effects of BCG in the context of immunity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in C57BL/6 mice. Our results demonstrated that prime-boost BCG vaccination with a lentiviral vector expressing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 significantly enhanced immune responses, including T helper type 1 and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses, compared with DNA- and protein-based vaccines. However, lentivirus-vectored and DNA-based vaccines greatly improved the protective efficacy of BCG against M. tuberculosis, as indicated by a lack of weight loss and significantly reduced bacterial loads and histological damage in the lung. Our study suggests that the use of lentiviral or DNA vaccines containing the antigens Ag85B and Rv3425 to boost BCG is a good choice for the rational design of an efficient vaccination strategy against TB.

  4. Over-expression of fHbp in Arabdopsis for development of meningococcal serogroup B subunit vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Nuo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jisheng; Jin, Libo; Xing, Shaochen; Jiang, Chao; Li, Xiaokun

    2016-07-01

    Due to lack of commercial vaccine against the serogroup B (MenB) of Neisseria meningitides, the incidence of meningococcal disease remains high. To solve the issue, transgenic plants are used as bioreactors to produce a plant-derived fHbp subunit vaccine. In this study, the fHbp gene was optimized according to the codon usage bias of Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesized artificially, cloned into an expression vector, driven by a seed-specific promoter, and introduced into A. thaliana by Agrobacterium-mediated floral-dip transformation. Transgenic plants were identified by glufosinate selection, quickstix strips for PAT/bar tests and PCR analysis. The five plants showing higher expression of recombinant fHbp were screened through indirect ELISA. Southern blot analysis showed that the transgenic line rHF-22 had a single-copy integration and the highest expression of fHbp. Recombinant fHbp was purified from seeds of rHF-22 by nitrilotriacetic acid-mediated affinity chromatography, and the purity was 82.5%. BALB/c mice were tested for fHbp vaccine protection from lethal MenB infection, and the relative percent survival was found to be 80%. This study indicates that the recombinant fHbp produced from seeds of rHF-22 is a potential candidate for commercial MenB vaccine. It also provides a reference for safe, cheap and large-scale production of other plant-made vaccines.

  5. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus Replicon High-Permissive and Low-Permissive Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Xin, Zhongshuai; Han, Wei; Fan, Jingjing; Yin, Bin; Wu, Shuzhen; Yang, Wei; Yuan, Jiangang; Qiang, Boqin; Sun, Wei; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the leading causes of severe hepatitis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCV replication and pathogenesis remain unclear. The development of the subgenome replicon model system significantly enhanced study of HCV. However, the permissiveness of the HCV subgenome replicon greatly differs among different hepatoma cell lines. Proteomic analysis of different permissive cell lines might provide new clues in understanding HCV replication. In this study, to detect potential candidates that might account for the differences in HCV replication. Label-free and iTRAQ labeling were used to analyze the differentially expressed protein profiles between Huh7.5.1 wt and HepG2 cells. A total of 4919 proteins were quantified in which 114 proteins were commonly identified as differentially expressed by both quantitative methods. A total of 37 differential proteins were validated by qRT-PCR. The differential expression of Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1), Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), vimentin, Proteasome activator complex subunit1 (PSME1), and Cathepsin B (CTSB) were verified by western blot. And over-expression of CTSB or knock-down of vimentin induced significant changes to HCV RNA levels. Additionally, we demonstrated that CTSB was able to inhibit HCV replication and viral protein translation. These results highlight the potential role of CTSB and vimentin in virus replication.

  6. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus Replicon High-Permissive and Low-Permissive Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the leading causes of severe hepatitis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCV replication and pathogenesis remain unclear. The development of the subgenome replicon model system significantly enhanced study of HCV. However, the permissiveness of the HCV subgenome replicon greatly differs among different hepatoma cell lines. Proteomic analysis of different permissive cell lines might provide new clues in understanding HCV replication. In this study, to detect potential candidates that might account for the differences in HCV replication. Label-free and iTRAQ labeling were used to analyze the differentially expressed protein profiles between Huh7.5.1 wt and HepG2 cells. A total of 4919 proteins were quantified in which 114 proteins were commonly identified as differentially expressed by both quantitative methods. A total of 37 differential proteins were validated by qRT-PCR. The differential expression of Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1, carboxylesterase 1 (CES1, vimentin, Proteasome activator complex subunit1 (PSME1, and Cathepsin B (CTSB were verified by western blot. And over-expression of CTSB or knock-down of vimentin induced significant changes to HCV RNA levels. Additionally, we demonstrated that CTSB was able to inhibit HCV replication and viral protein translation. These results highlight the potential role of CTSB and vimentin in virus replication.

  7. A Kunjin replicon vector encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor for intra-tumoral gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang-Le, D.; Smeenk, L.; Anraku, I.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wang, X.J.; Vrij, de J.; Liu, W.J.; Le, T.T.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently developed a non-cytopathic RNA replicon-based viral vector system based on the flavivirus Kunjin. Here, we illustrate the utility of the Kunjin replicon system for gene therapy. Intra-tumoral injections of Kunjin replicon virus-like particles encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating

  8. Formulation, characterization, and expression of a recombinant MOMP Chlamydia trachomatis DNA vaccine encapsulated in chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambridge, Chino D; Singh, Shree R; Waffo, Alain B; Fairley, Stacie J; Dennis, Vida A

    2013-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Previous vaccination attempts have employed the recombinant major outer membrane protein (MOMP) of C. trachomatis nonetheless, with limited success, perhaps, due to stability, degradation, and delivery issues. In this study we cloned C. trachomatis recombinant MOMP DNA (DMOMP) and encapsulated it in chitosan nanoparticles (DMCNP) using the complex coacervation technique. Physiochemical characterizations of DMCNP included transmission and scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and zeta potential. Encapsulated DMOMP was 167-250 nm, with a uniform spherical shape and homogenous morphology, and an encapsulation efficiency > 90%. A slow release pattern of encapsulated DMOMP, especially in acidic solution, was observed over 7 days. The zeta potential of DMCNP was ~8.80 mV, which indicated that it was highly stable. Toxicity studies of DMCNP (25-400 μg/mL) to Cos-7 cells using the MTT assay revealed minimal toxicity over 24-72 hours with >90% viable cells. Ultra-violet visible (UV-vis) spectra indicated encapsulated DMOMP protection by chitosan, whereas agarose gel electrophoresis verified its protection from enzymatic degradation. Expression of MOMP protein in DMCNP-transfected Cos-7 cells was demonstrated via Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Significantly, intramuscular injection of BALB/c mice with DMCNP confirmed the delivery of encapsulated DMOMP, and expression of the MOMP gene transcript in thigh muscles and spleens. Our data show that encapsulation of DMOMP in biodegradable chitosan nanoparticles imparts stability and protection from enzymatic digestion, and enhances delivery and expression of DMOMP in vitro and in mice. Further investigations of the nanoencapsulated DMCNP vaccine formulation against C. trachomatis in mice are warranted.

  9. Recombinant adeno-vaccine expressing enterovirus 71-like particles against hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Liang Tsou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 and coxsackieviruses (CV are the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD. There is not currently a vaccine available against HFMD, even though a newly developed formalin-inactivated EV71 (FI-EV71 vaccine has been tested in clinical trial and has shown efficacy against EV71. We have designed and genetically engineered a recombinant adenovirus Ad-EVVLP with the EV71 P1 and 3CD genes inserted into the E1/E3-deleted adenoviral genome. Ad-EVVLP were produced in HEK-293A cells. In addition to Ad-EVVLP particles, virus-like particles (VLPs formed from the physical association of EV71 capsid proteins, VP0, VP1, and VP3 expressed from P1 gene products. They were digested by 3CD protease and confirmed to be produced by Ad-EVVLP-producing cells, as determined using transmission electron microscopy and western blotting. Mouse immunogenicity studies showed that Ad-EVVLP-immunized antisera neutralized the EV71 B4 and C2 genotypes. Activation of VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells associated with Th1/Th2-balanced IFN-ɣ, IL-17, IL-4, and IL-13 was induced; in contrast, FI-EV71 induced only Th2-mediated neutralizing antibody against EV71 and low VLP-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. The antiviral immunity against EV71 was clearly demonstrated in mice vaccinated with Ad-EVVLP in a hSCARB2 transgenic (hSCARB2-Tg mouse challenge model. Ad-EVVLP-vaccinated mice were 100% protected and demonstrated reduced viral load in both the CNS and muscle tissues. Ad-EVVLP successfully induced anti-CVA16 immunities. Although antisera had no neutralizing activity against CVA16, the 3C-specific CD4+ and CD8+/IFN-γ T cells were identified, which could mediate protection against CVA16 challenge. FI-EV71 did not induce 3C-mediated immunity and had no efficacy against the CVA16 challenge. These results suggest that Ad-EVVLP can enhance neutralizing antibody and protective cellular immune responses to prevent EV71 infection and

  10. Enhanced expression of HIV and SIV vaccine antigens in the structural gene region of live attenuated rubella viral vectors and their incorporation into virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virnik, Konstantin; Ni, Yisheng; Berkower, Ira

    2013-04-19

    Despite the urgent need for an HIV vaccine, its development has been hindered by virus variability, weak immunogenicity of conserved epitopes, and limited durability of the immune response. For other viruses, difficulties with immunogenicity were overcome by developing live attenuated vaccine strains. However, there is no reliable method of attenuation for HIV, and an attenuated strain would risk reversion to wild type. We have developed rubella viral vectors, based on the live attenuated vaccine strain RA27/3, which are capable of expressing important HIV and SIV vaccine antigens. The rubella vaccine strain has demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and long lasting protection in millions of children. Rubella vectors combine the growth and immunogenicity of live rubella vaccine with the antigenicity of HIV or SIV inserts. This is the first report showing that live attenuated rubella vectors can stably express HIV and SIV vaccine antigens at an insertion site located within the structural gene region. Unlike the Not I site described previously, the new site accommodates a broader range of vaccine antigens without interfering with essential viral functions. In addition, antigens expressed at the structural site were controlled by the strong subgenomic promoter, resulting in higher levels and longer duration of antigen expression. The inserts were expressed as part of the structural polyprotein, processed to free antigen, and incorporated into rubella virions. The rubella vaccine strain readily infects rhesus macaques, and these animals will be the model of choice for testing vector growth in vivo and immunogenicity.

  11. 重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫原性的分析%Immunogenicity of Recombinant PA4 Replicon Virus Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马尧; 李娜; 余云舟; 孙志伟; 俞炜源

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To construct recombinant Semliki forest virus(SFV) replicon virus particles contained domain 4 of the protective antigen (PA4) from anthrax,and further study its immunogenicity. Methods: The recombinant virus particles (RVP) were prepared by cotranfecting the expression vector pSCAR-SPA4 with helper vector pSHCAR and expression of antigen PA4 was also confirmed by indirect imumofluorescence. Mice were immunized with RVP and antibody level of sera from mice was measured. Lymphocyte proliferate responses and cytokine levelswere measured after specifically stimulate splenocyte. Results: After immunization of mice,high antibody titer was measured. Specifically stimulated splenocytes with PA4 antigen can induce lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4. Conclusion: Recombinant PA4 replicon virus particles vaccine can induce high titer antibody and cellular immunity response. The data presented in the report suggested that the recombinant PA4 replicon virus particles in this study may be developed into an alternative vaccine candidate for anthrax.%目的:构建携带炭疽毒素保护性抗原第四结构域(PA4)基因的重组Semliki森林病毒(SFV)复制子病毒颗粒,并对其免疫原性进行研究.方法:将编码炭疽PA4的SFV复制子DNA载体pSCAR-SPA4,与辅助SFV DNA载体pSHCAR共转染BHK21细胞,制备表达PA4的重组复制子病毒颗粒;用重组复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫小鼠,并采用ELISA法检测其血清抗体水平和细胞因子IFN-γ和IL-4.结果:免疫小鼠血清中检测到较高的抗体水平,免疫小鼠的脾淋巴细胞经特异性抗原刺激后产生了明显的T细胞增殖反应并分泌产生了IFN-γ和IL-4.结论:重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫小鼠后能够产生特异性的抗体反应和细胞免疫反应.制备的重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒极有潜力作为人用炭疽候选疫苗,为进一步研究新型炭疽疫苗奠定了基础.

  12. Gene expression profile correlates with T cell infiltration and relative survival in glioblastoma patients vaccinated with dendritic cell immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Robert M.; Soto, Horacio; Konkankit, Vera; Odesa, Sylvia K.; Eskin, Ascia; Yong, William H.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liau, Linda M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility, safety, and toxicity of autologous tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cell (DC) vaccination and toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in patients with newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma. Clinical and immune responses were monitored and correlated with tumor gene expression profiles. Experimental Design Twenty-three patients with glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) were enrolled in this dose-escalation study and received three biweekly injections of glioma lysate-pulsed DCs followed by booster vaccinations with either imiquimod or poly-ICLC adjuvant every three months until tumor progression. Gene expression profiling, IHC, FACS, and cytokine bead arrays were performed on patient tumors and PBMC. Results DC vaccinations are safe and not associated with any dose-limiting toxicity. The median overall survival from the time of initial surgical diagnosis of glioblastoma was 31.4 months, with a one-, two-, and three-year survival rate of 91%, 55% and 47%, respectively. Patients whose tumors had mesenchymal gene expression signatures exhibited increased survival following DC vaccination compared to historical controls of the same genetic subtype. Tumor samples with a mesenchymal gene expression signature had a higher number of CD3+ and CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) compared with glioblastomas of other gene expression signatures (p = 0.006). Conclusion Autologous tumor lysate-pulsed DC vaccination in conjunction with TLR agonists is safe as adjuvant therapy in newly diagnosed and recurrent glioblastoma patients. Our results suggest that the mesenchymal gene expression profile may identify an immunogenic subgroup of glioblastoma that may be more responsive to immune-based therapies. PMID:21135147

  13. A novel meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccine with constitutive expression of FetA: A phase I clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsay, L; Dold, C; Green, C A; Rollier, C S; Norheim, G; Sadarangani, M; Shanyinde, M; Brehony, C; Thompson, A J; Sanders, H; Chan, H; Haworth, K; Derrick, J P; Feavers, I M; Maiden, M C; Pollard, A J

    2015-09-01

    Outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines are used against outbreaks of capsular group B Neisseria meningitidis (MenB) caused by strains expressing particular PorA outer membrane proteins (OMPs). Ferric enterobactin receptor (FetA) is another variable OMP that induces type-specific bactericidal antibodies, and the combination of judiciously chosen PorA and FetA variants in vaccine formulations is a potential approach to broaden protection of such vaccines. The OMV vaccine MenPF-1 was generated by genetically modifying N. meningitidis strain 44/76 to constitutively express FetA. Three doses of 25 μg or 50 μg of MenPF-1 were delivered intra-muscularly to 52 healthy adults. MenPF-1 was safe and well tolerated. Immunogenicity was measured by serum bactericidal assay (SBA) against wild-type and isogenic mutant strains. After 3 doses, the proportion of volunteers with SBA titres ≥1:4 (the putative protective titre) was 98% for the wild-type strain, and 77% for the strain 44/76 FetA(on)PorA(off) compared to 51% in the strain 44/76 FetA(off)PorA(off), demonstrating that vaccination with MenPF-1 simultaneously induced FetA and PorA bactericidal antibodies. This study provides a proof-of-concept for generating bactericidal antibodies against FetA after OMV vaccination in humans. Prevalence-based choice of PorA and FetA types can be used to formulate a vaccine for broad protection against MenB disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. P and M gene junction is the optimal insertion site in Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for foreign gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) has been developed as a vector for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. However, the optimal insertion site for foreign gene expression remained to be determined. In the present study, we inserted the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene into five different intergenic ...

  15. The pathogenic and vaccine strains of equine infectious anemia virus differentially induce cytokine and chemokine expression and apoptosis in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yue-Zhi; Cao, Xue-Zhi; Li, Liang; Li, Li; Jiang, Cheng-Gang; Wang, Xue-Feng; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2011-09-01

    The attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine was the first attenuated lentivirus vaccine to be used in a large-scale application and has been used to successfully control the spread of equine infectious anemia (EIA) in China. To better understand the potential role of cytokines in the pathogenesis of EIAV infection and resulting immune response, we used branched DNA technology to compare the mRNA expression levels of 12 cytokines and chemokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IP-10, IL-8, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, MCP-1, and MCP-2, in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs) infected with the EIAV(DLV121) vaccine strain or the parental EIAV(DLV34) pathogenic strain. Infection with EIAV(DLV34) and EIAV(DLV121) both caused changes in the mRNA levels of various cytokines and chemokines in eMDMs. In the early stage of infection with EIAV(DLV34) (0-24h), the expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly up-regulated, while with EIAV(DLV121), expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 was markedly up-regulated. The effects on the expression of other cytokines and chemokines were similar between these two strains of virus. During the first 4 days after infection, the expression level of IL-4 in cells infected with the pathogenic strain were significantly higher than that in cells infected with the vaccine strain, but the expression of IL-1α and IL-1β induced by the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that observed with the pathogenic strain. In addition, after 4 days of infection with the pathogenic strain, the expression levels of 5 chemokines, but not IP-10, were markedly increased in eMDMs. In contrast, the vaccine strain did not up-regulate these chemokines to this level. Contrary to our expectation, induced apoptosis in eMDMs infected with the vaccine strain was significantly higher than that infected with the pathogenic strain 4 days and 6 days after infection. Together, these

  16. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  17. Characterization of NoV P particle-based chimeric protein vaccines developed from two different expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lu; Jin, Hao; Yu, Yongjiao; Yu, Bin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Yin, Yuhe; Yu, Xianghui; Wu, Hui; Kong, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The Norovirus (NoV) P domain, with three surface loops for foreign antigen insertion, has been demonstrated as an excellent platform for antigen presentation and novel vaccine development. The P domain alone can self-assemble into a P dimer, 12-mer small particle or 24-mer P particle, and vaccines based on those particles may elicit different levels of immunogenicity. Currently, P particles are generally produced in soluble expression systems in Escherichia coli, mainly in the 24-mer form. However, the low yield of the soluble protein has hindered further clinical applications of P particle-based protein vaccines. In this study, we inserted the Alzheimer's disease (AD) immunogen Aβ1-6 into the three loops of the P particle to generate an AD protein vaccine. To increase the yield of this chimeric protein, we tested the generation of proteins in a soluble expression system and an inclusion body expression system separately in E. coli. The result showed that the inclusion body expression system could greatly enhance the product yield of the chimeric protein compared with the soluble expression system. The refolded protein from the inclusion bodies was mainly in the 12-mer form, while the protein generated from the soluble supernatant was mainly in the 24-mer form. Moreover, the immunogenicity of soluble proteins was significantly stronger than that of the refolded proteins. Thus, comparisons between the two expression methods suggested that the soluble expression system generated chimeric P particles with better immunogenicity, while inclusion body expression system yielded more P particle proteins.

  18. Characterization of CD8+ T cell differentiation following SIVΔnef vaccination by transcription factor expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M Billingsley

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The onset of protective immunity against pathogenic SIV challenge in SIVΔnef-vaccinated macaques is delayed for 15-20 weeks, a process that is related to qualitative changes in CD8+ T cell responses induced by SIVΔnef. As a novel approach to characterize cell differentiation following vaccination, we used multi-target qPCR to measure transcription factor expression in naïve and memory subsets of CD8++ T cells, and in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells obtained from SIVΔnef-vaccinated or wild type SIVmac239-infected macaques. Unsupervised clustering of expression profiles organized naïve and memory CD8+ T cells into groups concordant with cell surface phenotype. Transcription factor expression patterns in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in SIVΔnef-vaccinated animals were distinct from those observed in purified CD8+ T cell subsets obtained from naïve animals, and were intermediate to expression profiles of purified central memory and effector memory T cells. Expression of transcription factors elicited by SIVΔnef vaccination also varied over time: cells obtained at later time points, temporally associated with greater protection, appeared more central-memory like than cells obtained at earlier time points, which appeared more effector memory-like. Expression of transcription factors associated with effector differentiation, such as ID2 and RUNX3, were decreased over time, while expression of transcription factors associated with quiescence or memory differentiation, such as TCF7, BCOR and EOMES, increased. CD8+ T cells specific for a more conserved epitope expressed higher levels of TBX21 and BATF, and appeared more effector-like than cells specific for an escaped epitope, consistent with continued activation by replicating vaccine virus. These data suggest transcription factor expression profiling is a novel method that can provide additional data complementary to the analysis of memory cell differentiation based on classical phenotypic markers

  19. [Effects of the site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zhu, Wu-Yang; Fu, Shi-Hong; He, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on the characteristics of replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus, a Sindbis virus (SINV) isolated in China. The mutant vector pBRep-726L, pBRep-726S, pBRep-726V or pBRep-726A was constructed by introducing nsP2-726Pro --> Leu, nsP2-726Pro --> Ser, nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala into XJ-160 viral replicon vector pBRepXJ respectively. To quantitatively and qualitatively determine the site-directed mutagenesis on the replicon, the recombinant plasmids expressing Neomycinr (Neo(r)), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or Renilla luciferase (R. luc) were constructed by cloning report genes into pBRepXJ or mutant XJ-160 vector respectively. And in vitro-synthesized RNA from expression vectors were electroporated into BHK-21 cells. Compared with the wild-type replicon, the mutation nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala accelerated the processing of CPE on BHK-21 cells and simultaneously enhanced its self-replicating capacity. The mutant vector pBRep-726L with Leu substitution exhibited similar packaging capacity to that of pBRepXJ. In contrast, pBRep-726S exhibited a medium phenotype, including the process of CPE and the activity of R. luc expression in BHK-21 cells. The site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro not only regulates directly XJ-160 virus vector-host cell interactions, but also plays an important role in its packaging capacity. All of these results lay a basis for researching the relation between the structure and function of alphavirus genome and developing alphavirus vector system with Chinese intellectual property.

  20. Development and characterization of a replicon-based phenotypic assay for assessing HCV NS4B from clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajyaguru, Sonal; Yang, Huiling; Martin, Ross; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei

    2013-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B inhibitors have shown potent inhibition of HCV replication in vitro. To assess the effect of viral diversity on the susceptibility to NS4B inhibitors, genotype (GT)-specific GT1a and GT1b replicon shuttle vectors were designed and created for cloning HCV NS4B genes from clinical isolates. For the GT1b NS4B shuttle vector, the S2204I adaptive mutation was introduced in NS5A to improve replication due to the replacement of the K1846T adaptive mutation in NS4B with NS4B from the clinical isolates. In addition to the adaptive mutations, a newly identified Huh-7 cell line, Huh-7-1C, which is highly permissive for both GT1a and GT1b replication, was used to further enhance the replication levels. HCV NS4B gene from clinical isolates was amplified and inserted into the corresponding GT1a and GT1b modified lab strain chimeric replicons. GT1a and GT1b chimeric replicons expressing diverse NS4B genes from corresponding subtypes of clinical isolates replicated at highly efficient levels for phenotypic analysis. Due to natural variation in their amino acid residues in NS4B, these isolates displayed varying drug susceptibilities to an NS4B inhibitor. In mixed populations with wild-type, the sensitivity of resistance detection of NS4B resistant mutants H94R and V105M was between 20% and 80%. The chimeric shuttle vectors can be used to characterize the activity of antiviral drugs targeting NS4B from diverse natural clinical isolates and aid in the development of novel compounds against HCV NS4B.

  1. Novel hepatitis C virus reporter replicon cell lines enable efficient antiviral screening against genotype 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Margaret; Yang, Huiling; Sun, Siu-Chi; Peng, Betty; Tian, Yang; Pagratis, Nikos; Greenstein, Andrew E; Delaney, William E

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicon is the primary tool for evaluating the activity of anti-HCV compounds in drug discovery research. Despite the prevalence of HCV genotype 1a (approximately 70% of U.S. HCV patients), few genotype 1a reporter replicon cell lines have been described; this is presumably due to the low replication capacity of such constructs in available Huh-7 cells. In this report, we describe the selection of highly permissive Huh-7 cell lines that support robust replication of genotype 1a subgenomic replicons harboring luciferase reporter genes. These novel cell lines support the replication of multiple genotype 1a replicons (including the H77 and SF9 strains), are significantly more permissive to genotype 1a HCV replication than parental Huh7-Lunet cells, and maintain stable genotype 1a replication levels suitable for antiviral screening. We found that the sensitivity of genotype 1a luciferase replicons to known antivirals was highly consistent between individual genotype 1a clonal cell lines but could vary significantly between genotypes 1a and 1b. Sequencing of the nonstructural region of 12 stable replicon cell clones suggested that the enhanced permissivity is likely due to cellular component(s) in these new cell lines rather than the evolution of novel adaptive mutations in the replicons. These new reagents will enhance drug discovery efforts targeting genotype 1a and facilitate the profiling of compound activity among different HCV genotypes and subtypes.

  2. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  3. Construction of self-replicating subgenomic dengue virus 4 (DENV4) replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Del Angel, Rosa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 are members of mosquito-borne flavivirus genus of Flaviviridae family that encode one long open reading frame (ORF) that is translated to a polyprotein. Both host and virally encoded proteases function in the processing of the polyprotein by co-translational and posttranslational mechanisms to yield 10 mature proteins prior to viral RNA replication. To study cis- and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication, many groups [1-8] have constructed cDNAs encoding West Nile virus (WNV), DENV, or yellow fever virus reporter replicon RNAs. The replicon plasmids constructed in our laboratory for WNV [9] and the DENV4 replicon described here are arranged in the order of 5'-untranslated region (UTR), the N-terminal coding sequence of capsid (C), Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene with a translation termination codon, and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element from encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) for cap-independent translation of the downstream ORF that codes for a polyprotein precursor, CterE-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5, followed by the 3'-UTR. In the second DENV4 replicon, the Rluc gene is fused sequentially downstream to the 20 amino acid (aa) FMDV 2A protease coding sequence, neomycin resistance gene (Neo(r)), a termination codon, and the EMCV leader followed by the same polyprotein coding sequence and 3'-UTR as in the first replicon. The first replicon is useful to study by transient transfection experiments the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication. The second DENV4 replicon is used to establish a stable monkey kidney (Vero) cell line by transfection of replicon RNA and selection in the presence of the G418, an analog of neomycin. This replicon is useful for screening and identifying antiviral compounds that are potential inhibitors of viral replication.

  4. Increasing a Robust Antigen-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response by FMDV DNA Vaccination with IL-9 Expressing Construct

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    Qiang Zou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various chemokines and cytokines as adjuvants can be used to improve efficacy of DNA vaccination. In this study, we sought to investigate if a DNA construct expressing IL-9 (designed as proV-IL9 as a molecular adjuvant enhance antigen specific immune responses elicited by the pcD-VP1 DNA vaccination. Mice immunized with pcD-VP1 combined with proV-IL9 developed a strong humoral response. In addition, the coinoculation induced significant higher level of antigen-specific cell proliferation and cytotoxic response. This agreed well with higher expression level of IFN-γ and perforin in CD8+ T cells, but not with IL-17 in these T cells. The results indicate that IL-9 induces the development of IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc1, but not the IL-17-producing CD8+ T cells (Tc17. Up-regulated expressions of BCL-2 and BCL-XL were exhibited in these Tc1 cells, suggesting that IL-9 may trigger antiapoptosis mechanism in these cells. Together, these results demonstrated that IL-9 used as molecular adjuvant could enhance the immunogenicity of DNA vaccination, in augmenting humoral and cellular responses and particularly promoting Tc1 activations. Thus, the IL-9 may be utilized as a potent Tc1 adjuvant for DNA vaccines.

  5. Relation of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression with antibody response to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagigi, Alberto; Pensieroso, Simone; Ruffin, Nicolas; Sammicheli, Stefano; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Pan-Hammarström, Qiang; Hejdeman, Bo; Nilsson, Anna; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-04-26

    The relevance of CD4+T-cells, viral load and age in the immunological response to influenza infection and vaccination in HIV-1 infected individuals has previously been pointed out. Our study aimed at assessing, in the setting of 2009 A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccination, whether quantification of activation-induced deaminase (AID) expression in blood B-cells may provide additional indications for predicting antibody response to vaccination in HIV-1 infected patients with similar CD4+T-cell counts and age. Forty-seven healthy controls, 37 ART-treated and 17 treatment-naïve HIV-1 infected patients were enrolled in the study. Blood was collected prior to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination and at 1, 3 and 6 months after vaccination. Antibody titers to A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine were measured by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay while the mRNA expression levels of AID were measured by quantitative real time PCR. Upon B-cell activation in vitro, AID increase correlated to antibody response to the A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine at 1 month after vaccination in all individuals. In addition, the maximum expression levels of AID were significantly higher in those individuals who still carried protective levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies after 6 months from vaccination. No correlation was found between CD4+T-cell counts or age at vaccination or HIV-1 viral load and levels of A(H1N1)pdm09 antibodies. Assessing AID expression before vaccination may be an additional useful tool for defining a vaccination strategy in immune-compromised individuals at risk of immunization failure.

  6. A CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/Lox system-based express vaccine development strategy against re-emerging Pseudorabies virus

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Virus evolves rapidly to escape vaccine-induced immunity, posing a desperate demand for efficient vaccine development biotechnologies. Here we present an express vaccine development strategy based on CRISPR/Cas9 and Cre/Lox system against re-emerging Pseudorabies virus, which caused the recent devastating swine pseudorabies outbreak in China. By CRISPR/Cas9 system, the virulent genes of the newly isolated strain were simultaneously substituted by marker genes, which were subsequently excised ...

  7. RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicon transfected Huh-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagya, Neetu; Varma, Satya Pavan Kumar; Thakral, Deepshi; Joshi, Prashant; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is as varied as they appear similar; while HBV causes an acute and/or chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, HEV mostly causes an acute self-limiting disease. In both infections, host responses are crucial in disease establishment and/or virus clearance. In the wake of worsening prognosis described during HEV super-infection over chronic HBV hepatitis, we investigated the host responses by studying alterations in gene expression in liver cells (Huh-7 cell line) by transfection with HEV replicon only (HEV-only), HBV replicon only (HBV-only) and both HBV and HEV replicons (HBV+HEV). Virus replication was validated by strand-specific real-time RT-PCR for HEV and HBsAg ELISA of the culture supernatants for HBV. Indirect immunofluorescence for the respective viral proteins confirmed infection. Transcription profiling was carried out by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the poly-A enriched RNA from the transfected cells. Averages of 600 million bases within 5.6 million reads were sequenced in each sample and ∼15,800 genes were mapped with at least one or more reads. A total of 461 genes in HBV+HEV, 408 in HBV-only and 306 in HEV-only groups were differentially expressed as compared to mock transfection control by two folds (preplicon transfected RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis to understand the host responses against HEV and HBV.

  8. 西尼罗病毒RNA复制子系统的建立与应用%Construction and identification of West Nile virus Chin-01 strain replicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富军; 李晓峰; 曹飞; 赵慧; 邓永强; 朱舜亚; 姜涛; 秦鄂德; 秦成峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To obtain a West Nile virus (WNV) RNA replicon efficiently expressing foreign proteins in cells. Methods CMV promoter within WNV replicon pWNrep was replaced with SP6 promoter, and Pac I restriction enzyme site was introduced to the immediate downstream of 3'UTR of WNV genome, yielding pSP6-WNrep. Then, the reporter genes enhanced green fluorescent protein ( eGFP) or Renilla luciferase ( R. luc) were inserted into the pSP6-WNrep, resulting in pSP6-WNrep/eGFP and pSP6-WNrep/R. luc respectively. The plasmids were linearized with Pac I and used as templates for in vitro transcription. The transcript RNA was transfected into BHK-21 cells. The expression level of GFP and luciferase activity were evaluated. Results and Conclusion The plasmids pSP6-WNrep, pSP6-WNrep/eGFP and pSP6-WNrep/R. luc were identified by restriction enzyme digestions and nucleotide sequencing. The expression of GFP could be observed in the transfected cells till 72 h. Additionally, luciferase signals continued to increase at 72 h post trans-fection. This research can facilitate the development of a single-round infectious WNV vaccine candidate.%目的 构建具有复制和表达活性的RNA形式的西尼罗病毒(WNV)复制子.方法 在DNA形式的WNV复制子pWNrep的基础上,将其CMV启动子替换成SP6启动子,并在3'UTR端引入Pac Ⅰ酶切位点,构建复制子克隆pSP6-WNrep.同时,将增强型绿色荧光蛋白(eGFP)和海肾荧光素酶(R.luc)报告基因分别插入上述复制子质粒中,获得含有报告基因的复制子pSP6-WNrep/eGFP和pSP6-WNrep/R.hc.将上述克隆线性化后进行体外转录,将转录体RNA转染BHK-21细胞,观察不同时间点绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)的活性和R.luc活性.结果与结论 获得了WNV复制子pSP6-WNrep、pSP6-WNrep/eGFP和pSP6-WNrep/R.luc,酶切和测序鉴定结果显示,序列与预期一致.将含有报告基因的复制子转染细胞72 h后仍能观察到荧光信号,R.luc的活性随时间延长而增强

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus replicon RNA synthesis by PSI-352938, a cyclic phosphate prodrug of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-2'-β-C-methylguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Angela M; Espiritu, Christine; Murakami, Eisuke; Zennou, Veronique; Bansal, Shalini; Micolochick Steuer, Holly M; Niu, Congrong; Keilman, Meg; Bao, Haiying; Bourne, Nigel; Veselenak, Ronald L; Reddy, P Ganapati; Chang, Wonsuk; Du, Jinfa; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Sofia, Michael J; Otto, Michael J; Furman, Phillip A

    2011-06-01

    PSI-352938 is a novel cyclic phosphate prodrug of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-2'-β-C-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate that has potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vitro. The studies described here characterize the in vitro anti-HCV activity of PSI-352938, alone and in combination with other inhibitors of HCV, and the cross-resistance profile of PSI-352938. The effective concentration required to achieve 50% inhibition for PSI-352938, determined using genotype 1a-, 1b-, and 2a-derived replicons stably expressed in the Lunet cell line, were 0.20, 0.13, and 0.14 μM, respectively. The active 5'-triphosphate metabolite, PSI-352666, inhibited recombinant NS5B polymerase from genotypes 1 to 4 with comparable 50% inhibitory concentrations. In contrast, PSI-352938 did not inhibit the replication of hepatitis B virus or human immunodeficiency virus in vitro. PSI-352666 did not significantly affect the activity of human DNA and RNA polymerases. PSI-352938 and its cyclic phosphate metabolites did not affect the cyclic GMP-mediated activation of protein kinase G. Clearance studies using replicon cells demonstrated that PSI-352938 cleared cells of HCV replicon RNA and prevented replicon rebound. An additive to synergistic effect was observed when PSI-352938 was combined with other classes of HCV inhibitors, including alpha interferon, ribavirin, NS3/4A inhibitors, an NS5A inhibitor, and nucleoside/nucleotide and nonnucleoside inhibitors. Cross-resistance studies showed that PSI-352938 remained fully active against replicons containing the S282T or the S96T/N142T amino acid alteration. Replicons that contain mutations conferring resistance to various classes of nonnucleoside inhibitors also remained sensitive to inhibition by PSI-352938. PSI-352938 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical study in genotype 1-infected individuals.

  10. Plant expressed coccidial antigens as potential vaccine candidates in protecting chicken against coccidiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, Kota; Sriraman, Rajan; Subramanian, B Mohana; Rao, N Hanumantha; Kasa, Balaji; Donikeni, Jagan; Narasu, M Lakshmi; Srinivasan, V A

    2012-06-22

    Coccidiosis is a disease caused by intracellular parasites belonging to the genus Eimeria. In the present study, we transiently expressed two coccidial antigens EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as poly histidine-tagged fusion proteins in tobacco. We have evaluated the protective efficacy of plant expressed EtMIC1 as monovalent and as well as bi-valent formulation where EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 were used in combination. The protective efficacy of these formulations was evaluated using homologous challenge in chickens. We observed better serum antibody response, weight gain and reduced oocyst shedding in birds immunized with EtMIC1 and EtMIC2 as bivalent formulation compared to monovalent formulation. However, IFN-γ response was not significant in birds immunized with EtMIC1 compared to the birds immunized with EtMIC2. Our results indicate the potential use of these antigens as vaccine candidates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A recombinant raccoon poxvirus vaccine expressing both Yersinia pestis F1 and truncated V antigens protects animals against lethal plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Kingstad-Bakke, B; Berlier, W; Osorio, J.E.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated in mice and prairie dogs that simultaneous administration of two recombinant raccoon poxviruses (rRCN) expressing Yersinia pestis antigens (F1 and V307-a truncated version of the V protein) provided superior protection against plague challenge compared to individual single antigen constructs. To reduce costs of vaccine production and facilitate implementation of a sylvatic plague vaccine (SPV) control program for prairie dogs, a dual antigen construct is more desirable. Here we report the construction and characterization of a novel RCN-vectored vaccine that simultaneously expresses both F1 and V307 antigens. This dual antigen vaccine provided similar levels of protection against plague in both mice and prairie dogs as compared to simultaneous administration of the two single antigen constructs and was also shown to protect mice against an F1 negative strain of Y. pestis.. The equivalent safety, immunogenicity and efficacy profile of the dual RCN-F1/V307 construct warrants further evaluation in field efficacy studies in sylvatic plague endemic areas.

  12. Enhancing DNA vaccine potency against hantavirus by co-administration of interleukin-12 expression vector as a genetic adjuvant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Lan-yan; MOU Ling; LIN Song; LU Run-ming; LUO En-jie

    2005-01-01

    Background The heavy incidence and mortality of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome, as well as no specific drugs in curing the disease,clearly indicate the need for development of the more effective hantavirus vaccine. Refining the DNA vaccination strategy to elicit more clinically efficacious immune responses is now under intensive investigation. In the present study, we examined the effects of using an interleukin-12 expression plasmid as a genetic adjuvant to enhance the immune responses induced by a DNA vaccine based on the S gene encoding nucleocapsid protein against hantavirus. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized three times by intramuscular inoculations of DNA vaccine encoding of hantanvirus nucleocapsid protein alone or in combination with a plasmid expressing murine interleukin-12 (pcIL-12). Booster immunizations were employed 2 times at 2-week interval. To evaluate the humoral and cellular immune responses, antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation and antibody production were assayed by MTT method and ELISA respectively. The level of interleukin-4 and interferon-γ in the splenic lymphocytic cultured supernatant were detected with ELISA kit at day 5, 10, 17, 35 and 42 after primary immunization.Conclusion Humoral and cytokine responses elicited by pcDNA3.1+S inoculation can be modulated by co-inoculation with pcIL-12 and efficiently induced Th1-dominant immune responses.

  13. Development of stable Vibrio cholerae O1 Hikojima type vaccine strains co-expressing the Inaba and Ogawa lipopolysaccharide antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan L Karlsson

    Full Text Available We describe here the development of stable classical and El Tor V. cholerae O1 strains of the Hikojima serotype that co-express the Inaba and Ogawa antigens of O1 lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Mutation of the wbeT gene reduced LPS perosamine methylation and thereby gave only partial transformation into Ogawa LPS on the cell surface. The strains express approximately equal amounts of Inaba- and Ogawa-LPS antigens which are preserved after formalin-inactivation of the bacteria. Oral immunizations of both inbred and outbred mice with formalin-inactivated whole-cell vaccine preparations of these strains elicited strong intestinal IgA anti-LPS as well as serum vibriocidal antibody responses against both Inaba and Ogawa that were fully comparable to the responses induced by the licensed Dukoral vaccine. Passive protection studies in infant mice showed that immune sera raised against either of the novel Hikojima vaccine strains protected baby mice against infection with virulent strains of both serotypes. This study illustrates the power of using genetic manipulation to improve the properties of bacteria strains for use in killed whole-cell vaccines.

  14. Protective vaccination against infectious bursal disease virus with whole recombinant Kluyveromyces lactis yeast expressing the viral VP2 subunit.

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    Marina Arnold

    Full Text Available Here we report on vaccination approaches against infectious bursal disease (IBD of poultry that were performed with complete yeast of the species Kluyveromyces lactis (K. lactis. Employing a genetic system that enables the rapid production of stably transfected recombinant K. lactis, we generated yeast strains that expressed defined quantities of the virus capsid forming protein VP2 of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV. Both, subcutaneous as well as oral vaccination regiments with the heat-inactivated but otherwise untreated yeast induced IBDV-neutralizing antibodies in mice and chickens. A full protection against a subsequent IBDV infection was achieved by subcutaneous inoculation of only milligram amounts of yeast per chicken. Oral vaccination also generated protection: while mortality was observed in control animals after virus challenge, none of the vaccinees died and ca. one-tenth were protected as indicated by the absence of lesions in the bursa of Fabricius. Recombinant K. lactis was thus indicated as a potent tool for the induction of a protective immune response by different applications. Subcutaneously applied K. lactis that expresses the IBDV VP2 was shown to function as an efficacious anti-IBD subunit vaccine.

  15. Cholera toxin-B (ctxB) antigen expressing Salmonella Typhimurium polyvalent vaccine exerts protective immune response against Vibrio cholerae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwakarma, Vikalp; Sahoo, Sushree Sangita; Das, Susmita; Ray, Shilpa; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich; Suar, Mrutyunjay

    2015-04-08

    Live attenuated vaccines are cost effective approach for preventing a broad range of infectious diseases, and thus are of great interest. However, immune-defects can predispose the patient to infections by the vaccine candidate itself. So far, few live vaccine candidates have been designed specifically for immune compromised individuals. Recently, we reported a new Salmonella Typhimurium Z234-vaccine strain (Periaswamy et al., PLoS ONE 2012;7:e45433), which was specifically attenuated in the NADPH-oxidase deficient host. In the present study, the Z234-vaccine strain was further engineered to express heterologous antigen (Vibrio cholerae toxin antigen subunit-B, i.e. CtxB) with the intention of creating a vector for simultaneous protection against Cholera and Salmonellosis. The primary aim of this study was to ensure the expression of CtxB antigen by the recombinant vaccine strain Z234-pMS101. The antigen CtxB was expressed through Z234 as a fusion protein with N-terminal signal sequence of Salmonella outer protein (SopE), an effector protein from Salmonella under the control of SopE promoter. The CtxB-expressing plasmid construct pMS101 (pM968-pSopE-ctxB) was found to be stable both in vitro and in vivo. In an oral mouse infection model, the vaccine strain Z234-pMS101 efficiently colonized the host gut. The extent of protection was confirmed after challenging the immunized hosts with live V. cholerae. Vaccinated mice showed reduced gut colonization by V. cholerae. Further assessment of immunological parameters supported the possibility of conferring effective immune response by Z234-pMS101 vaccine strain. Overall, the Z234-pMS101 vaccine strain showed potential as a promising polyvalent vaccine candidate to protect against S. Typhimurium and V. cholerae infection simultaneously. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. VACCINATION OF HYBRID STRIPED BASS: GROWTH, IMMUNE REACTION AND GENE EXPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Westerman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid striped bass (42.6+4.9 g wet wt; 139.3+6.1 mm length, were randomly stocked into one of 6 tanks (n=6 tank-1 of a custom designed, recirculating life support system (RLSS. Water quality was as follows: DO2 (6.50.6 mg l-1, pH (7.70.5, TAN (0.06-1.31 mg l-1, nitrite (0.06-0.60 mg l-1 and nitrate (2.0-32.1 mg l-1, salinity 5 ppt, temperature 28±1 oC. A 12:12 photophase:scotophase was used, with a 30 min. dusk-dawn dimming of lights. Fish were fed at 4% body wt d-1 as two separate feedings (08.00 and 16.00 h. Dietary crude protein and lipid levels were 40% and 10% respectively. Tanks were randomly paired and fish either left untreated, vaccinated, or sham injected. The vaccine employed was an experimental formalin killed Streptococcus iniae oil-in-water adjuvanted bacterin. Fish were weighed and measured bimonthly for 8 wk with group weights being employed to adjust feeding rates. At trial termination, all animals were weighed and measured, and their condition factor (CF and feed conversion ratios (FCR calculated. Visceral somatic (VSI and hepatosomatic (HSI indices and intraperitoneal fat (IPF and muscle ratios (MR were also assessed. Blood was taken from anaesthetized fish and hematocrit recorded. Blood was allowed to clot overnight at 5 oC after which serum protein levels were recorded and lysozyme activity measured. Livers were prepared for microarray evaluation using standard techniques using a Danio rerio genechip to assess global changes in gene expression. No differences were observed with respect to final weights, lengths, CF, FCR, or HSI although differences (P < 0.001 were determined for VSI, which was higher in control animals. Packed cell volume and serum protein levels were similar across groups (P > 0.05. Time-course of changes in serum lysozyme activity described an initial reduction in lysozyme activity followed by a rebounding in activity which peaked 25 days post-treatments. Evaluation of lysozyme activity among time

  17. Transgene optimization, immunogenicity and in vitro efficacy of viral vectored vaccines expressing two alleles of Plasmodium falciparum AMA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi Biswas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 is a leading candidate vaccine antigen against blood-stage malaria, although to date numerous clinical trials using mainly protein-in-adjuvant vaccines have shown limited success. Here we describe the pre-clinical development and optimization of recombinant human and simian adenoviral (AdHu5 and ChAd63 and orthopoxviral (MVA vectors encoding transgene inserts for Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 (PfAMA1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: AdHu5-MVA prime-boost vaccination in mice and rabbits using these vectors encoding the 3D7 allele of PfAMA1 induced cellular immune responses as well as high-titer antibodies that showed growth inhibitory activity (GIA against the homologous but not heterologous parasite strains. In an effort to overcome the issues of PfAMA1 antigenic polymorphism and pre-existing immunity to AdHu5, a simian adenoviral (ChAd63 vector and MVA encoding two alleles of PfAMA1 were developed. This antigen, composed of the 3D7 and FVO alleles of PfAMA1 fused in tandem and with expression driven by a single promoter, was optimized for antigen secretion and transmembrane expression. These bi-allelic PfAMA1 vaccines, when administered to mice and rabbits, demonstrated comparable immunogenicity to the mono-allelic vaccines and purified serum IgG now showed GIA against the two divergent strains of P. falciparum encoded in the vaccine. CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cell responses against epitopes that were both common and unique to the two alleles of PfAMA1 were also measured in mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Optimized transgene inserts encoding two divergent alleles of the same antigen can be successfully inserted into adeno- and pox-viral vaccine vectors. Adenovirus-MVA immunization leads to the induction of T cell responses common to both alleles, as well as functional antibody responses that are effective against both of the encoded strains of P. falciparum in vitro. These data support the further clinical

  18. A full-length Plasmodium falciparum recombinant circumsporozoite protein expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens platform as a malaria vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Noe

    Full Text Available The circumsporozoite protein (CSP of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunofluorescence assay (IFA, as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime

  19. Hepatitis C genotype 1a replicon improved through introduction of fitness mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitenleitner, Christian; Bechtel, Jill; Arfsten, Ann; Hamatake, Robert

    2012-04-01

    The use of subgenomic replicon systems has long been a valuable screening tool for the discovery of small molecule antivirals against Hepatitis C virus. While genotype 1a replicon systems have been widely used in stable systems, use in transient assays has been hampered by low signal. Here we describe the generation of a more robust genotype 1a (H77) replicon through the introduction of two fitness mutations, NS4A-K1691R and NS4B-E1726G, for use in transient transfections. While these mutations significantly improved the signal to noise ratio, leading to more robust data, they have no effect on the potency of tool compounds against various targets of HCV, thereby making this new system a powerful tool for screening of compounds against the genotype 1a replicon.

  20. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates recovered from Broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominate serotype recovered from broiler slaughter in the United States and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serotype. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 ...

  2. Recombinant adenovirus expressing the haemagglutinin of Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) protects goats against challenge with pathogenic virus; a DIVA vaccine for PPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Rebecca; Baron, Jana; Batten, Carrie; Baron, Michael; Taylor, Geraldine

    2014-02-26

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV) is a morbillivirus that can cause severe disease in sheep and goats, characterised by pyrexia, pneumo-enteritis, and gastritis. The socio-economic burden of the disease is increasing in underdeveloped countries, with poor livestock keepers being affected the most. Current vaccines consist of cell-culture attenuated strains of PPRV, which induce a similar antibody profile to that induced by natural infection. Generation of a vaccine that enables differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) would benefit PPR control and eradication programmes, particularly in the later stages of an eradication campaign and for countries where the disease is not endemic. In order to create a vaccine that would enable infected animals to be distinguished from vaccinated ones (DIVA vaccine), we have evaluated the immunogenicity of recombinant fowlpox (FP) and replication-defective recombinant human adenovirus 5 (Ad), expressing PPRV F and H proteins, in goats. The Ad constructs induced higher levels of virus-specific and neutralising antibodies, and primed greater numbers of CD8+ T cells than the FP-vectored vaccines. Importantly, a single dose of Ad-H, with or without the addition of Ad expressing ovine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and/or ovine interleukin-2, not only induced strong antibody and cell-mediated immunity but also completely protected goats against challenge with virulent PPRV, 4 months after vaccination. Replication-defective Ad-H therefore offers the possibility of an effective DIVA vaccine.

  3. A recombinant measles vaccine expressing chikungunya virus-like particles is strongly immunogenic and protects mice from lethal challenge with chikungunya virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandler, Samantha; Ruffié, Claude; Combredet, Chantal; Brault, Jean-Baptiste; Najburg, Valérie; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Habel, André; Tauber, Erich; Desprès, Philippe; Tangy, Frédéric

    2013-08-12

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, recently reemerged in the Indian Ocean, India and Southeast Asia, causing millions of cases of severe polyarthralgia. No specific treatment to prevent disease or vaccine to limit epidemics is currently available. Here we describe a recombinant live-attenuated measles vaccine (MV) expressing CHIKV virus-like particles comprising capsid and envelope structural proteins from the recent CHIKV strain La Reunion. Immunization of mice susceptible to measles virus induced high titers of CHIKV antibodies that neutralized several primary isolates. Specific cellular immune responses were also elicited. A single immunization with this vaccine candidate protected all mice from a lethal CHIKV challenge, and passive transfer of immune sera conferred protection to naïve mice. Measles vaccine is one of the safest and most effective human vaccines. A recombinant MV-CHIKV virus could make a safe and effective vaccine against chikungunya that deserves to be further tested in human trials.

  4. Hepatitis C virus RNA elimination and development of resistance in replicon cells treated with BMS-790052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunfu; Huang, Haichang; Valera, Lourdes; Sun, Jin-Hua; O'Boyle, Donald R; Nower, Peter T; Jia, Lingling; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Xin; Altaf, Aneela; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    BMS-790052, a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex inhibitor, targeting nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), displays picomolar to nanomolar potency against genotypes 1 to 5. This exceptional potency translated into robust anti-HCV activity in clinical studies with HCV genotype 1-infected subjects. To date, all BMS-790052-associated resistance mutations have mapped to the N-terminal region of NS5A. To further characterize the antiviral activity of BMS-790052, HCV replicon elimination and colony formation assays were performed. Replicon was cleared from genotype 1a and 1b replicon cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Elimination of the genotype 1a replicon required longer treatment durations and higher concentrations of BMS-790052 than those for the genotype1b replicon. Single amino acid substitutions that conferred relatively low levels of resistance were observed at early time points and at low doses. Higher doses and longer treatment durations yielded mutations that conferred greater levels of resistance, including linked amino acid substitutions. Replicon cells that survived inhibitor treatment remained fully sensitivity to pegylated alpha interferon (pegIFN-α) and other HCV inhibitors. Moreover, genotype 1a replicon elimination was markedly enhanced when pegIFN-α and BMS-790052 were combined. Resistant variants observed in this study were very similar to those observed in a multiple ascending dose (MAD) monotherapy trial of BMS-790052, validating replicon elimination studies as a model to predict clinical resistance. Insights gained from the in vitro anti-HCV activity and resistance profiles of BMS-790052 will be used to help guide the clinical development of this novel HCV inhibitor.

  5. Good manufacturing practices production of a purification-free oral cholera vaccine expressed in transgenic rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashima, Koji; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Suzuki, Yuji; Minakawa, Satomi; Takeyama, Natsumi; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Azegami, Tatsuhiko; Tanimoto, Takeshi; Kuroda, Masaharu; Tamura, Minoru; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The first Good Manufacturing Practices production of a purification-free rice-based oral cholera vaccine (MucoRice-CTB) from transgenic plants in a closed cultivation system yielded a product meeting regulatory requirements. Despite our knowledge of their advantages, plant-based vaccines remain unavailable for human use in both developing and industrialized countries. A leading, practical obstacle to their widespread use is producing plant-based vaccines that meet governmental regulatory requirements. Here, we report the first production according to current Good Manufacturing Practices of a rice-based vaccine, the cholera vaccine MucoRice-CTB, at an academic institution. To this end, we established specifications and methods for the master seed bank (MSB) of MucoRice-CTB, which was previously generated as a selection-marker-free line, evaluated its propagation, and given that the stored seeds must be renewed periodically. The production of MucoRice-CTB incorporated a closed hydroponic system for cultivating the transgenic plants, to minimize variations in expression and quality during vaccine manufacture. This type of molecular farming factory can be operated year-round, generating three harvests annually, and is cost- and production-effective. Rice was polished to a ratio of 95 % and then powdered to produce the MucoRice-CTB drug substance, and the identity, potency, and safety of the MucoRice-CTB product met pre-established release requirements. The formulation of MucoRice-CTB made by fine-powdering of drug substance and packaged in an aluminum pouch is being evaluated in a physician-initiated phase I study.

  6. Development of a novel thermostable Newcastle disease virus vaccine vector for expression of a heterologous gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    The thermostable Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccines have been used widely to control Newcastle disease (ND) for village flocks, due to their independence of cold chains for delivery and storage. To explore the potential use of the thermostable NDV as a vaccine vector, an infectious clone of the...

  7. Oral vaccination with salmonella simultaneously expressing Yersinia pestis F1 and V antigens protects against bubonic and pneumonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghong; Hinnebusch, B Joseph; Trunkle, Theresa; Bosio, Catharine M; Suo, Zhiyong; Tighe, Mike; Harmsen, Ann; Becker, Todd; Crist, Kathryn; Walters, Nancy; Avci, Recep; Pascual, David W

    2007-01-15

    The gut provides a large area for immunization enabling the development of mucosal and systemic Ab responses. To test whether the protective Ags to Yersinia pestis can be orally delivered, the Y. pestis caf1 operon, encoding the F1-Ag and virulence Ag (V-Ag) were cloned into attenuated Salmonella vaccine vectors. F1-Ag expression was controlled under a promoter from the caf1 operon; two different promoters (P), PtetA in pV3, PphoP in pV4, as well as a chimera of the two in pV55 were tested. F1-Ag was amply expressed; the chimera in the pV55 showed the best V-Ag expression. Oral immunization with Salmonella-F1 elicited elevated secretory (S)-IgA and serum IgG titers, and Salmonella-V-Ag(pV55) elicited much greater S-IgA and serum IgG Ab titers than Salmonella-V-Ag(pV3) or Salmonella-V-Ag(pV4). Hence, a new Salmonella vaccine, Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags, made with a single plasmid containing the caf1 operon and the chimeric promoter for V-Ag allowed the simultaneous expression of F1 capsule and V-Ag. Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags elicited elevated Ab titers similar to their monotypic derivatives. For bubonic plague, mice dosed with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags and Salmonella-F1-Ag showed similar efficacy (>83% survival) against approximately 1000 LD(50) Y. pestis. For pneumonic plague, immunized mice required immunity to both F1- and V-Ags because the mice vaccinated with Salmonella-(F1+V)Ags protected against 100 LD(50) Y. pestis. These results show that a single Salmonella vaccine can deliver both F1- and V-Ags to effect both systemic and mucosal immune protection against Y. pestis.

  8. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori-specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) as a vaccination target. The hpaA gene was inserted into pET28a (+) as cloning and expression vectors respectively. The recombinant plasmid (pET-hpaA) was subjected to sequencing other than polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and digestion analysis. Protein expression was induced by adding 1 mM isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside to cultures of E. coli strain BL21 transformed with pET-hpaA. Protein expression assessed with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Protein purification of flagellar sheath adhesion was by FPLC. The restriction endonuclease digestion, PCR amplification analysis showed that the hpaA gene of 730 bp was amplified from H. pylori DNA and sequencing analysis of the pET-hpaA confirmed the cloning accuracy and in frame insertion of hpaA fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis showed the expression of an approximately 29,000 Da protein. Sequencing results along with SDS-PAGE analysis confirms the expression of recombinant hpaA in the heterologous E. coli BL21. Conclusion A prokaryotic expression system for hpaA gene was successfully constructed. These results indicate that production of a specific recombinant protein is an alternative and potentially more expeditious strategy for development of H. pylori vaccine.

  9. Protection and synergism by recombinant fowl pox vaccines expressing multiple genes from Marek's disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lucy E; Witter, R L; Reddy, S M; Wu, P; Yanagida, N; Yoshida, S

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant fowl poxviruses (rFPVs) were constructed to express genes from serotype 1 Marek's disease virus (MDV) coding for glycoproteins B, E, I, H, and UL32 (gB1, gE, gI, gH, and UL32). An additional rFPV was constructed to contain four MDV genes (gB1, gE, gI, and UL32). These rFPVs were evaluated for their ability to protect maternal antibody-positive chickens against challenge with highly virulent MDV isolates. The protection induced by a single rFPV/gB1 (42%) confirmed our previous finding. The protection induced by rFPV/gI (43%), rFPV/gB1UL32 (46%), rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%), and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32 (70%) contributed to additional knowledge on MDV genes involved in protective immunity. In contrast, the rFPV containing gE, gH, or UL32 did not induce significant protection compared with turkey herpesvirus (HVT). Levels of protection by rFPV/gB1 and rFPV/gl were comparable with that of HVT. Only gB1 and gI conferred synergism in rFPV containing these two genes. Protection by both rFPV/gB1gEgI (72%) and rFPV/gB1gEgIUL32(70%) against Marek's disease was significantly enhanced compared with a single gB1 or gI gene (40%). This protective synergism between gB1 and gI in rFPVs may be the basis for better protection when bivalent vaccines between serotypes 2 and 3 were used. When rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 + HVT were used as vaccine against Md5 challenge, the protection was significantly enhanced (94%). This synergism between rFPV/gB1gIgEUL32 and HVT indicates additional genes yet to be discovered in HVT may be responsible for the enhancement.

  10. Immunoscreening of Plasmodium falciparum proteins expressed in a wheat germ cell-free system reveals a novel malaria vaccine candidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Masayuki; Takashima, Eizo; Ito, Daisuke; Miura, Kazutoyo; Thongkukiatkul, Amporn; Diouf, Ababacar; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Diakite, Mahamadou; Long, Carole A.; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2017-01-01

    The number of malaria vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical development is limited. To identify novel blood-stage malaria vaccine candidates, we constructed a library of 1,827P. falciparum proteins prepared using the wheat germ cell-free system (WGCFS). Also, a high-throughput AlphaScreen procedure was developed to measure antibody reactivity to the recombinant products. Purified IgGs from residents in malaria endemic areas have shown functional activity against blood-stage parasites as judged by an in vitro parasite Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA). Therefore, we evaluated the GIA activity of 51 plasma samples prepared from Malian adults living in a malaria endemic area against the WGCFS library. Using the AlphaScreen-based immunoreactivity measurements, antibody reactivity against 3 proteins was positively associated with GIA activity. Since anti-LSA3-C responses showed the strongest correlation with GIA activity, this protein was investigated further. Anti-LSA3-C-specific antibody purified from Malian adult plasmas showed GIA activity, and expression of LSA3 in blood-stage parasites was confirmed by western blotting. Taken together, we identified LSA3 as a novel blood-stage vaccine candidate, and we propose that this system will be useful for future vaccine candidate discovery. PMID:28378857

  11. In vitro analysis of expression vectors for DNA vaccination of horses: the effect of a Kozak sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsteinsdóttir Sigurbjörg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One of the prerequisite for developing DNA vaccines for horses are vectors that are efficiently expressed in horse cells. We have analysed the ectopic expression of the human serum albumin gene in primary horse cells from different tissues. The vectors used are of pcDNA and pUC origin and include the cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. The pUC vectors contain CMV intron A whereas the pcDNA vectors do not. Insertion of intron A diminished the expression from the pcDNA vectors whereas insertion of a Kozak sequence upstream of the gene in two types of pUC vectors increased significantly the in vitro expression in primary horse cells derived from skin, lung, duodenum and kidney. We report for the first time the significance of full consensus Kozak sequences for protein expression in horse cells in vitro.

  12. 登革病毒质粒型微复制子载体的构建和鉴定%Construction and identification of mini-DNA replicon vector on the basis of Dengue Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李木丽; 张凤娟; 尉研; 孙继国; 王焕琴; 吴萌; 梁国栋; 赵玉敏; 朱武洋

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construction and identification of mini-DNA replicon vector on the basis of Dengue virus.Methods Based on Dengue virus type 4 infectious clone p4,a cassette with the deletion of PrM-E gene and most of non-structure protein gene was constructed through OL-PCR.Then we constructed the mini-DNA micro replicon vector pcDEN-△ prME by inserting the cassette into the pCDNA3.1 (+),an eukaryotic expression vector.Results To identify and verify the packaging function of the mini replicon vector,the qualitative EGFP report gene and quantitative luciferase gene was respectively cloned into pcDEN-△prME,constrcuting engineering vector pcDEN-△prME-EGFP and pcDEN-△prME-GLUC.Transfection experiment results show that the mini replicon vector could successfully express EGFP reporter gene and sea renal luciferase report gene.Conclusion mini-DNA replicon vector pcDEN-△prME constructed in this study can express exogenous genes successfully,which only contains Dengue virus necessary cis element and NS5 key sequence missing most of the structure of genes at the same time,making the vector in simplifying experiments and greatly improve the capacity of the viral vector.This study provides a powerful tool for further research on Flavivirus antiviral drug screening and new vaccine development,and provides a new technical platform for molecular regulation mechanism of viral replication and translation.%目的 构建登革病毒质粒型微复制子载体,并对其功能进行鉴定.方法 以登革病毒4型感染性cDNA克隆p4为分子基础,通过融合PCR方法构建删除病毒结构基因和大部分非结构基因的表达盒,并将其克隆入真核表达载体pCDNA3.1(+)的CMV启动子下游以构建包含病毒复制和翻译必需顺式作用元件和NS5关键序列的质粒型微复制子载体pcDEN-△prME.结果 为验证微复制子载体的包装功能,将定性的绿色荧光蛋白报告基因和定量的海肾荧光素酶基因分别克隆至pcDEN-△pr

  13. Oral Delivery of a Novel Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Expressing Influenza A Virus Proteins Protects Mice against H5N1 and H1N1 Viral Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenglin Pei

    Full Text Available Attenuated strains of invasive enteric bacteria, such as Salmonella, represent promising gene delivery agents for nucleic acid-based vaccines as they can be administrated orally. In this study, we constructed a novel attenuated strain of Salmonella for the delivery and expression of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus. We showed that the constructed Salmonella strain exhibited efficient gene transfer activity for HA and NA expression and little cytotoxicity and pathogenicity in mice. Using BALB/c mice as the model, we evaluated the immune responses and protection induced by the constructed Salmonella-based vaccine. Our study showed that the Salmonella-based vaccine induced significant production of anti-HA serum IgG and mucosal IgA, and of anti-HA interferon-γ producing T cells in orally vaccinated mice. Furthermore, mice orally vaccinated with the Salmonella vaccine expressing viral HA and NA proteins were completely protected from lethal challenge of highly pathogenic H5N1 as well as H1N1 influenza viruses while none of the animals treated with the Salmonella vaccine carrying the empty expression vector with no viral antigen expression was protected. These results suggest that the Salmonella-based vaccine elicits strong antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and provides effective immune protection against multiple strains of influenza viruses. Furthermore, our study demonstrates the feasibility of developing novel attenuated Salmonella strains as new oral vaccine vectors against influenza viruses.

  14. A bivalent typhoid live vector vaccine expressing both chromosome- and plasmid-encoded Yersinia pestis antigens fully protects against murine lethal pulmonary plague infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galen, James E; Wang, Jin Yuan; Carrasco, Jose A; Lloyd, Scott A; Mellado-Sanchez, Gabriela; Diaz-McNair, Jovita; Franco, Olga; Buskirk, Amanda D; Nataro, James P; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated bacteria hold great promise as multivalent mucosal vaccines against a variety of pathogens. A major challenge of this approach has been the successful delivery of sufficient amounts of vaccine antigens to adequately prime the immune system without overattenuating the live vaccine. Here we used a live attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain to create a bivalent mucosal plague vaccine that produces both the protective F1 capsular antigen of Yersinia pestis and the LcrV protein required for secretion of virulence effector proteins. To reduce the metabolic burden associated with the coexpression of F1 and LcrV within the live vector, we balanced expression of both antigens by combining plasmid-based expression of F1 with chromosomal expression of LcrV from three independent loci. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of this novel vaccine were assessed in mice by using a heterologous prime-boost immunization strategy and compared to those of a conventional strain in which F1 and LcrV were expressed from a single low-copy-number plasmid. The serum antibody responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced by the optimized bivalent vaccine were indistinguishable from those elicited by the parent strain, suggesting an adequate immunogenic capacity maintained through preservation of bacterial fitness; in contrast, LPS titers were 10-fold lower in mice immunized with the conventional vaccine strain. Importantly, mice receiving the optimized bivalent vaccine were fully protected against lethal pulmonary challenge. These results demonstrate the feasibility of distributing foreign antigen expression across both chromosomal and plasmid locations within a single vaccine organism for induction of protective immunity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joëlle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P; Bertin, Gérard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 microg pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, IFN-gamma) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-gamma and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  16. Xenogeneic human p53 DNA vaccination by electroporation breaks immune tolerance to control murine tumors expressing mouse p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruey-Shyang Soong

    Full Text Available The pivotal role of p53 as a tumor suppressor protein is illustrated by the fact that this protein is found mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. In most cases, mutations in p53 greatly increase the otherwise short half-life of this protein in normal tissue and cause it to accumulate in the cytoplasm of tumors. The overexpression of mutated p53 in tumor cells makes p53 a potentially desirable target for the development of cancer immunotherapy. However, p53 protein represents an endogenous tumor-associated antigen (TAA. Immunization against a self-antigen is challenging because an antigen-specific immune response likely generates only low affinity antigen-specific CD8(+ T-cells. This represents a bottleneck of tumor immunotherapy when targeting endogenous TAAs expressed by tumors. The objective of the current study is to develop a safe cancer immunotherapy using a naked DNA vaccine. The vaccine employs a xenogeneic p53 gene to break immune tolerance resulting in a potent therapeutic antitumor effect against tumors expressing mutated p53. Our study assessed the therapeutic antitumor effect after immunization with DNA encoding human p53 (hp53 or mouse p53 (mp53. Mice immunized with xenogeneic full length hp53 DNA plasmid intramuscularly followed by electroporation were protected against challenge with murine colon cancer MC38 while those immunized with mp53 DNA were not. In a therapeutic model, established MC38 tumors were also well controlled by treatment with hp53 DNA therapy in tumor bearing mice compared to mp53 DNA. Mice vaccinated with hp53 DNA plasmid also exhibited an increase in mp53-specific CD8(+ T-cell precursors compared to vaccination with mp53 DNA. Antibody depletion experiments also demonstrated that CD8(+ T-cells play crucial roles in the antitumor effects. This study showed intramuscular vaccination with xenogeneic p53 DNA vaccine followed by electroporation is capable of inducing potent antitumor effects against tumors

  17. Recombinant infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) H120 vaccine strain expressing the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) protects chickens against IBV and NDV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhou, Yingshun; Li, Jianan; Fu, Li; Ji, Gaosheng; Zeng, Fanya; Zhou, Long; Gao, Wenqian; Wang, Hongning

    2016-05-01

    Infectious bronchitis (IB) and Newcastle disease (ND) are common viral diseases of chickens, which are caused by infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), respectively. Vaccination with live attenuated strains of IBV-H120 and NDV-LaSota are important for the control of IB and ND. However, conventional live attenuated vaccines are expensive and result in the inability to differentiate between infected and vaccinated chickens. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new efficacious vaccines. In this study, using a previously established reverse genetics system, we generated a recombinant IBV virus based on the IBV H120 vaccine strain expressing the haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of NDV. The recombinant virus, R-H120-HN/5a, exhibited growth dynamics, pathogenicity and viral titers that were similar to those of the parental IBV H120, but it had acquired hemagglutination activity from NDV. Vaccination of SPF chickens with the R-H120-HN/5a virus induced a humoral response at a level comparable to that of the LaSota/H120 commercial bivalent vaccine and provided significant protection against challenge with virulent IBV and NDV. In summary, the results of this study indicate that the IBV H120 strain could serve as an effective tool for designing vaccines against IB and other infectious diseases, and the generation of IBV R-H120-HN/5a provides a solid foundation for the development of an effective bivalent vaccine against IBV and NDV.

  18. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases.

  19. Preventive DNA vaccination against CEA-expressing tumors with anti-idiotypic scFv6.C4 DNA in CEA-expressing transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denapoli, Priscila M A; Zanetti, Bianca F; Dos Santos, Adara A; de Moraes, Jane Z; Han, Sang W

    2017-03-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is expressed during embryonic life and in low level during adult life. Consequently, the CEA is recognized by the immune system as a self-antigen and thus CEA-expressing tumors are tolerated. Previously, we constructed a single chain variable fragment using the 6.C4 (scFv6.C4) hybridoma cell line, which gave rise to antibodies able to recognize CEA when C57/Bl6 mice were immunized. Here, the scFv6.C4 ability to prevent the CEA-expressing tumor growth was assessed in CEA-expressing transgenic mice CEA2682. CEA2682 mice immunized with the scFv6.C4 expressing plasmid vector (uP/PS-scFv6.C4) by electroporation gave rise to the CEA-specific AB3 antibody after the third immunization. Sera from immunized mice reacted with CEA-expressing human colorectal cell lines CO112, HCT-8, and LISP-1, as well as with murine melanoma B16F10 cells expressing CEA (B16F10-CEA). Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) from uP/PS-scFv6.C4 immunized mice lysed B16F10-CEA (56.7%) and B16F10 expressing scFv6.C4 (B16F10-scFv6.C4) (46.7%) cells, against CTL from uP-immunized mice (10%). After the last immunization, 5 × 10(5) B16F10-CEA cells were injected into the left flank. All mice immunized with the uP empty vector died within 40 days, but uP/PS-scFv6.C4 vaccinated mice (40%) remained free of tumor for more than 100 days. Splenocytes obtained from uP/PS-scFv6.C4 vaccinated mice showed higher T-cell proliferative activity than those from uP vaccinated mice. Collectively, DNA vaccination with the uP-PS/scFv6.C4 plasmid vector was able to give rise to specific humoral and cellular responses, which were sufficient to retard growth and/or eliminate the injected B16F10-CEA cells.

  20. Safety and High Level Efficacy of the Combination Malaria Vaccine Regimen of RTS,S/AS01B With Chimpanzee Adenovirus 63 and Modified Vaccinia Ankara Vectored Vaccines Expressing ME-TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampling, Tommy; Ewer, Katie J.; Bowyer, Georgina; Bliss, Carly M.; Edwards, Nick J.; Wright, Danny; Payne, Ruth O.; Venkatraman, Navin; de Barra, Eoghan; Snudden, Claudia M.; Poulton, Ian D.; de Graaf, Hans; Sukhtankar, Priya; Roberts, Rachel; Ivinson, Karen; Weltzin, Rich; Rajkumar, Bebi-Yassin; Wille-Reece, Ulrike; Lee, Cynthia K.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Sinden, Robert E.; Gerry, Stephen; Lawrie, Alison M.; Vekemans, Johan; Morelle, Danielle; Lievens, Marc; Ballou, Ripley W.; Cooke, Graham S.; Faust, Saul N.; Gilbert, Sarah; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The need for a highly efficacious vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum remains pressing. In this controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) study, we assessed the safety, efficacy and immunogenicity of a schedule combining 2 distinct vaccine types in a staggered immunization regimen: one inducing high-titer antibodies to circumsporozoite protein (RTS,S/AS01B) and the other inducing potent T-cell responses to thrombospondin-related adhesion protein (TRAP) by using a viral vector. Method. Thirty-seven healthy malaria-naive adults were vaccinated with either a chimpanzee adenovirus 63 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara–vectored vaccine expressing a multiepitope string fused to TRAP and 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B (group 1; n = 20) or 3 doses of RTS,S/AS01B alone (group 2; n = 17). CHMI was delivered by mosquito bites to 33 vaccinated subjects at week 12 after the first vaccination and to 6 unvaccinated controls. Results. No suspected unexpected serious adverse reactions or severe adverse events related to vaccination were reported. Protective vaccine efficacy was observed in 14 of 17 subjects (82.4%) in group 1 and 12 of 16 subjects (75%) in group 2. All control subjects received a diagnosis of blood-stage malaria parasite infection. Both vaccination regimens were immunogenic. Fourteen protected subjects underwent repeat CHMI 6 months after initial CHMI; 7 of 8 (87.5%) in group 1 and 5 of 6 (83.3%) in group 2 remained protected. Conclusions. The high level of sterile efficacy observed in this trial is encouraging for further evaluation of combination approaches using these vaccine types. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01883609. PMID:27307573

  1. Transfected Babesia bovis Expressing a Tick GST as a Live Vector Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldiges, Daiane P.; Laughery, Jacob M.; Tagliari, Nelson Junior; Leite Filho, Ronaldo Viana; Davis, William C.; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Termignoni, Carlos; Knowles, Donald P.; Suarez, Carlos E.

    2016-01-01

    The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan protozoan parasite responsible for bovine Babesiosis. This study describes the development and testing of a live B. bovis vaccine expressing the protective tick antigen glutathione-S-transferase from Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlGST). The B. bovis S74-T3B parasites were electroporated with a plasmid containing the bidirectional Ef-1α (elongation factor 1 alpha) promoter of B. bovis controlling expression of two independent genes, the selectable marker GFP-BSD (green fluorescent protein–blasticidin deaminase), and HlGST fused to the MSA-1 (merozoite surface antigen 1) signal peptide from B. bovis. Electroporation followed by blasticidin selection resulted in the emergence of a mixed B. bovis transfected line (termed HlGST) in in vitro cultures, containing parasites with distinct patterns of insertion of both exogenous genes, either in or outside the Ef-1α locus. A B. bovis clonal line termed HlGST-Cln expressing intracellular GFP and HlGST in the surface of merozoites was then derived from the mixed parasite line HlGST using a fluorescent activated cell sorter. Two independent calf immunization trials were performed via intravenous inoculation of the HlGST-Cln and a previously described control consisting of an irrelevant transfected clonal line of B. bovis designated GFP-Cln. The control GFP-Cln line contains a copy of the GFP-BSD gene inserted into the Ef-1α locus of B. bovis in an identical fashion as the HIGST-Cln parasites. All animals inoculated with the HlGST-Cln and GFP-Cln transfected parasites developed mild babesiosis. Tick egg fertility and fully engorged female tick weight was reduced significantly in R. microplus feeding on HlGST-Cln-immunized calves

  2. Transfected Babesia bovis Expressing a Tick GST as a Live Vector Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane P Oldiges

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Rhipicephalus microplus tick is a notorious blood-feeding ectoparasite of livestock, especially cattle, responsible for massive losses in animal production. It is the main vector for transmission of pathogenic bacteria and parasites, including Babesia bovis, an intraerythrocytic apicomplexan protozoan parasite responsible for bovine Babesiosis. This study describes the development and testing of a live B. bovis vaccine expressing the protective tick antigen glutathione-S-transferase from Haemaphysalis longicornis (HlGST. The B. bovis S74-T3B parasites were electroporated with a plasmid containing the bidirectional Ef-1α (elongation factor 1 alpha promoter of B. bovis controlling expression of two independent genes, the selectable marker GFP-BSD (green fluorescent protein-blasticidin deaminase, and HlGST fused to the MSA-1 (merozoite surface antigen 1 signal peptide from B. bovis. Electroporation followed by blasticidin selection resulted in the emergence of a mixed B. bovis transfected line (termed HlGST in in vitro cultures, containing parasites with distinct patterns of insertion of both exogenous genes, either in or outside the Ef-1α locus. A B. bovis clonal line termed HlGST-Cln expressing intracellular GFP and HlGST in the surface of merozoites was then derived from the mixed parasite line HlGST using a fluorescent activated cell sorter. Two independent calf immunization trials were performed via intravenous inoculation of the HlGST-Cln and a previously described control consisting of an irrelevant transfected clonal line of B. bovis designated GFP-Cln. The control GFP-Cln line contains a copy of the GFP-BSD gene inserted into the Ef-1α locus of B. bovis in an identical fashion as the HIGST-Cln parasites. All animals inoculated with the HlGST-Cln and GFP-Cln transfected parasites developed mild babesiosis. Tick egg fertility and fully engorged female tick weight was reduced significantly in R. microplus feeding on Hl

  3. Differential miRNA Expression in the Liver of Balb/c Mice Protected by Vaccination during Crisis of Plasmodium chabaudi Blood-Stage Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dkhil, Mohamed A.; Al-Quraishy, Saleh A.; Abdel-Baki, Abdel-Azeem S.; Delic, Denis; Wunderlich, Frank

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are increasingly recognized as epigenetic regulators for outcome of diverse infectious diseases and vaccination efficacy, but little information referring to this exists for malaria. This study investigates possible effects of both protective vaccination and P. chabaudi malaria on the miRNome of the liver as an effector against blood-stage malaria using miRNA microarrays and quantitative PCR. Plasmodium chabaudi blood-stage malaria takes a lethal outcome in female Balb/c mice, but a self-healing course after immunization with a non-infectious blood-stage vaccine. The liver robustly expresses 71 miRNA species at varying levels, among which 65 miRNA species respond to malaria evidenced as steadily increasing or decreasing expressions reaching highest or lowest levels toward the end of the crisis phase on day 11 p.i. in lethal malaria. Protective vaccination does not affect constitutive miRNA expression, but leads to significant (p malaria.

  4. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

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    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  5. Deep sequencing uncovers numerous small RNAs on all four replicons of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Ina; Overlöper, Aaron; Nowrousian, Minou; Sharma, Cynthia M; Narberhaus, Franz

    2012-04-01

    Agrobacterium species are capable of interkingdom gene transfer between bacteria and plants. The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of a circular and a linear chromosome, the At-plasmid and the Ti-plasmid, which harbors bacterial virulence genes required for tumor formation in plants. Little is known about promoter sequences and the small RNA (sRNA) repertoire of this and other α-proteobacteria. We used a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach to map transcriptional start sites of 388 annotated genes and operons. In addition, a total number of 228 sRNAs was revealed from all four Agrobacterium replicons. Twenty-two of these were confirmed by independent RNA gel blot analysis and several sRNAs were differentially expressed in response to growth media, growth phase, temperature or pH. One sRNA from the Ti-plasmid was massively induced under virulence conditions. The presence of 76 cis-antisense sRNAs, two of them on the reverse strand of virulence genes, suggests considerable antisense transcription in Agrobacterium. The information gained from this study provides a valuable reservoir for an in-depth understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and infection process of Agrobacterium.

  6. The preparation of HL-60 cells vaccine expressing BCG heat shock protein 70 and detection of its immunogenicity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Ling; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Sun, Li-Rong; Yang, Jing; Xu, Hui-Juan

    2012-10-01

    Gene-modified cell vaccines are the best way to achieve the immunotherapy for all types of acute leukemia. In this study, the recombinant eukaryotic expression vector (pDisplay-HSP70) of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) of Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) was constructed by amplifying the whole BCG HSP70 gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sub-cloning into the polyclone endonuclease sites in pDisplay. Then the HL-60 cell vaccine expressing the protein onto the cell surface was prepared by lipofectamine transfection and its anti-tumor effect and mechanism were further studied. Results showed that the fragment of BCG HSP70 was consistent with Mycobacterium tuberculosis HSP70 gene published in GeneBank. DNA sequencing showed that the recombinant vector was correctly constructed and named pDisplay-HSP70. After BCG HSP70 gene transfection, the yellow-green fluorescence on the HL-60 cells surface was observed under a fluorescence microscope. The immunogenicity of HSP70-transfected HL-60 cells exhibited upregulated proliferation of lymphocytes, increased cytokine secretion (IFN-γ) and enhanced killing activity. These results suggested that gene transfection of BCG HSP70 could significantly enhance the immunogenicity of HL-60 cells. It may be used as a suitable candidate gene-modified cell vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

  7. CD4+ T-cell loss and delayed expression of modulators of immune responses at mucosal sites of vaccinated macaques following SIV(mac251) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, M; Boasso, A; Ma, Z-M; Cecchinato, V; Venzon, D; Doster, M N; Tsai, W P; Shearer, G M; Fuchs, D; Felber, B K; Pavlakis, G N; Miller, C J; Franchini, G

    2008-11-01

    Systemic immunization of macaques with a combination of DNA-poxvirus-based vaccines confers protection from high level of both systemic and mucosal viral replication following rectal exposure to the pathogenic SIV(mac251). Here we investigated early post-infection events in rectal and vaginal tissues, and found that the loss of CCR5+CD4+ T cells was equivalent in vaccinated and control macaques, despite a three logs reduction at mucosal sites of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RNA in the vaccinated group. Even though a normal CD4+ T cell number is not reconstituted at mucosal sites in either group, vaccination appeared to confer a better preservation of the CD4+ CCR5+ T cells that replenish these sites. Analysis of rectal tissues RNA following challenge exposure demonstrated a decreased expression in vaccinated macaques of transforming growth factor-beta, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, FoxP3, and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, an immune suppressive enzyme expressed by dendritic cells that converts tryptophan to kynurenine and limits T-cell responses. Accordingly, the ratio of kynurenine and tryptophan in the plasma was significantly reduced in the vaccinated animals respect to the controls. Thus, preexisting adaptive immune responses induced by these vaccine modalities, although they do not protect from CD4+ T-cell depletion, nevertheless, they contain SIV(mac251) replication and delay expression of markers of T-cell activation and/or suppression at mucosal sites.

  8. Listeria-vectored vaccine expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 30 kDa major secretory protein via the constitutively active prfA* regulon boosts BCG efficacy against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qingmei; Dillon, Barbara Jane; Masleša-Galić, Saša; Horwitz, Marcus A

    2017-06-19

    A potent vaccine against tuberculosis, one of the world's deadliest diseases, is needed to enhance the immunity of people worldwide, most of whom have been vaccinated with the partially effective BCG vaccine. Here we investigate novel live attenuated recombinant Listeria monocytogenes (rLm) vaccines expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) 30 kDa major secretory protein (r30/Ag85B) (rLm30) as heterologous booster vaccines in animals primed with BCG. Using three attenuated Lm vectors, rLm ΔactA (LmI), rLm ΔactA ΔinlB (LmII), and rLm ΔactA ΔinlBprfA* (LmIII), we constructed five rLm30 vaccine candidates expressing the r30 linked in-frame to the Lm Listeriolycin O signal sequence and driven by the hly promoter (h30) or linked in-frame to the ActA N-terminus and driven by the actA promoter (a30). All five rLm30 vaccines secreted r30 in broth and macrophages; while rLm expressing r30 via a constitutively active prfA* regulon (rLmIII/a30) expressed the greatest amount of r30 in broth culture, all five rLm vaccines expressed equivalent amounts of r30 in infected macrophages. In comparative studies, boosting BCG-immunized mice with rLmIII/a30 induced the strongest antigen-specific T-cell responses, including splenic and lung polyfunctional CD4+ T-cells expressing the three cytokines of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) (P 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Expression, purification and crystallization of CTB-MPR, a candidate mucosal vaccine component against HIV-1

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    Ho-Hsien Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available CTB-MPR is a fusion protein between the B subunit of cholera toxin (CTB and the membrane-proximal region of gp41 (MPR, the transmembrane envelope protein of Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1, and has previously been shown to induce the production of anti-HIV-1 antibodies with antiviral functions. To further improve the design of this candidate vaccine, X-ray crystallography experiments were performed to obtain structural information about this fusion protein. Several variants of CTB-MPR were designed, constructed and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. The first variant contained a flexible GPGP linker between CTB and MPR, and yielded crystals that diffracted to a resolution of 2.3 Å, but only the CTB region was detected in the electron-density map. A second variant, in which the CTB was directly attached to MPR, was shown to destabilize pentamer formation. A third construct containing a polyalanine linker between CTB and MPR proved to stabilize the pentameric form of the protein during purification. The purification procedure was shown to produce a homogeneously pure and monodisperse sample for crystallization. Initial crystallization experiments led to pseudo-crystals which were ordered in only two dimensions and were disordered in the third dimension. Nanocrystals obtained using the same precipitant showed promising X-ray diffraction to 5 Å resolution in femtosecond nanocrystallography experiments at the Linac Coherent Light Source at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The results demonstrate the utility of femtosecond X-ray crystallography to enable structural analysis based on nano/microcrystals of a protein for which no macroscopic crystals ordered in three dimensions have been observed before.

  10. Generation of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) Recombinants Expressing the Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus (ILTV) Glycoprotein gB or gD as Dual Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Spatz, Stephen; Zsak, Laszlo; Yu, Qingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is a highly contagious acute respiratory disease of chickens caused by infection with infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), a member of the family Herpesviridae. The current commercial ILT vaccines are either unsafe or ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop safer and more efficacious vaccines. Newcastle disease (ND), caused by infection with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, is one of the most serious infectious diseases of poultry. The NDV LaSota strain, a naturally occurring low-virulence NDV strain, has been routinely used as a live vaccine throughout the world. This chapter describes the generation of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota vaccine strain-based recombinant viruses expressing glycoprotein B (gB) or glycoprotein D (gD) of ILTV as dual vaccines against ND and ILT using reverse genetics technology.

  11. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD.

  12. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD in humans and non-human primates (NHPs. Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs, vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirus∆VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD.

  13. Constitutive Expression of the Vi Polysaccharide Capsular Antigen in Attenuated Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Oral Vaccine Strain CVD 909

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin Yuan; Noriega, Fernando R.; Galen, James E.; Barry, Eileen; Levine, Myron M.

    2000-01-01

    Live oral Ty21a and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccines provide significant protection against typhoid fever, albeit by distinct immune mechanisms. Vi stimulates serum immunoglobulin G Vi antibodies, whereas Ty21a, which does not express Vi, elicits humoral and cell-mediated immune responses other than Vi antibodies. Protection may be enhanced if serum Vi antibody as well as cell-mediated and humoral responses can be stimulated. Disappointingly, several new attenuated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi oral vaccines (e.g., CVD 908-htrA and Ty800) that elicit serum O and H antibody and cell-mediated responses following a single dose do not stimulate serum Vi antibody. Vi expression is regulated in response to environmental signals such as osmolarity by controlling the transcription of tviA in the viaB locus. To investigate if Vi antibodies can be stimulated if Vi expression is rendered constitutive, we replaced PtviA in serovar Typhi vaccine CVD 908-htrA with the constitutive promoter Ptac, resulting in CVD 909. CVD 909 expresses Vi even under high-osmolarity conditions and is less invasive for Henle 407 cells. In mice immunized with a single intranasal dose, CVD 909 was more immunogenic than CVD 908-htrA in eliciting serum Vi antibodies (geometric mean titer of 160 versus 49, P = 0.0007), whereas O antibody responses were virtually identical (geometric mean titer of 87 versus 80). In mice challenged intraperitoneally with wild-type serovar Typhi 4 weeks after a single intranasal immunization, the mortality of those immunized with CVD 909 (3 of 8) was significantly lower than that of control mice (10 of 10, P = 0.043) or mice given CVD 908-htrA (9 of 10, P = 0.0065). PMID:10899868

  14. Construction of recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine expressing H pylori ureB and IL-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Xu; Zhao-Shen Li; Yi-Qi Du; Yan-Fang Gong; Hua Yang; Bo Sun; Jing Jin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine encoding H pylori ureB gene and mouse IL-2 gene and to detect its immunogenicity in vitro and in vivo.METHODS: H pylori ureB and mouse IL-2 gene fragments were amplified by potymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pUCmT vector. DNA sequence of the amplified ureB and IL-2 genes was assayed, then cloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES through enzyme digestion and ligation reactions resulting in pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2. The recombinant plasmids were used to transform competent E. Coli DH5a, and the positive clones were screened by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion. Then, the recombinant pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2 were used to transform LB5000 and the recombinant plasmids extracted from LB5000 were finally introduced into the final host SL7207. After that, recombinant strains were grown in vitro repeatedly. In order to detect the immunogenicity of the vaccine in vitro, pIRES-ureB and pIRES-ureB-IL-2 were transfected to COS-7 cells using Lipofectamine TM 2000, the immunogenicity of expressed UreB and IL-2 proteins was assayed with SDS-PAGE and Western blot. C57BL/6 mice were orally immunized with 1 x 108 recombinant attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine. Four weeks after vaccination, mice were challenged with 1 x 107 CFU of live Hpylori SSI. Mice were sacrificed and the stomach was isolated for examination of H pylori 4 wk post-challenge.RESULTS: The 1700 base pair ureB gene fragment amplified from the genomic DNA was consistent with the sequence of H pylori ureB by sequence analysis. The amplified 510 base pair fragment was consistent with the sequence of mouse IL-2 in gene bank. It was confirmed by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion that H pylori ureB and mouse IL-2 genes were inserted into the eukaryotic expression vector pIRES. The experiments in vitro snowed that stable recombinant live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium DNA vaccine carrying

  15. Immunogenicity of a meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccine with attenuated endotoxin and over-expressed factor H binding protein in infant rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberling, Oliver; Seubert, Anja; Santos, George; Colaprico, Annalisa; Ugozzoli, Mildred; Donnelly, John; Granoff, Dan M

    2011-06-24

    We previously investigated immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV) vaccines prepared from recombinant strains with attenuated endotoxin (ΔLpxL1) and over-expressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) in a mouse model. The vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses. While human toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) is mainly stimulated by wildtype meningococcal endotoxin, mouse TLR-4 is stimulated by both the wildtype and mutant endotoxin. An adjuvant effect in mice of the mutant endotoxin would be expected to be much less in humans, and may have contributed to the broad mouse bactericidal responses. Here we show that as previously reported for humans, rhesus primate peripheral blood mononuclear cells incubated with a NOMV vaccine from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains had lower proinflammatory cytokine responses than with a control wildtype NOMV vaccine. The cytokine responses to the mutant vaccine were similar to those elicited by a detergent-treated, wildtype outer membrane vesicle vaccine that had been safely administered to humans. Monkeys (N=4) were immunized beginning at ages 2-3 months with three doses of a NOMV vaccine prepared from ΔLpxL1 recombinant strains with over-expressed fHbp in the variant 1 and 2 groups. The mutant NOMV vaccine elicited serum bactericidal titers≥1:4 against all 10 genetically diverse strains tested, including 9 with heterologous PorA to those in the vaccine. Negative-control animals had serum bactericidal titers<1:4. Thus, the mutant NOMV vaccine elicited broadly protective serum antibodies in a non-human infant primate model that is more relevant for predicting human antibody responses than mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis

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    Yu Ziniu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. Results A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165, an origin of replication (ori165 and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10 were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMβ1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. Conclusion The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMβ1 family replicons.

  17. Identification of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmwe, Su Su; Aizaki, Hideki; Date, Tomoko; Murakami, Kyoko; Ishii, Koji; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2010-03-01

    Ribavirin (RBV), a nucleoside analogue, is used in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in combination with interferons. However, potential mechanisms of RBV resistance during HCV replication remain poorly understood. Serial passage of cells harboring HCV genotype 2a replicon in the presence of RBV resulted in the reduced susceptibility of the replicon to RBV. Transfection of fresh cells with RNA from RBV-resistant replicon cells demonstrated that the RBV resistance observed is largely replicon-derived. Four major amino acid substitutions: T1134S in NS3, P1969S in NS4B, V2405A in NS5A, and Y2471H in NS5B region, were identified. Site-directed mutagenesis of these mutations into the replicon indicated that Y2471H plays a role in the reduced susceptibility to RBV and leads to decrease in replication fitness. The results, in addition to analysis of sequence database, suggest that HCV variants with reduced susceptibility to RBV identified are preferential to genotype 2a.

  18. Replicon-dependent bacterial genome evolution: the case of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardini, Marco; Pini, Francesco; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele G; Mengoni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial species, such as the alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, are characterized by open pangenomes and contain multipartite genomes consisting of a chromosome and other large-sized replicons, such as chromids, megaplasmids, and plasmids. The evolutionary forces in both functional and structural aspects that shape the pangenome of species with multipartite genomes are still poorly understood. Therefore, we sequenced the genomes of 10 new S. meliloti strains, analyzed with four publicly available additional genomic sequences. Results indicated that the three main replicons present in these strains (a chromosome, a chromid, and a megaplasmid) partly show replicon-specific behaviors related to strain differentiation. In particular, the pSymB chromid was shown to be a hot spot for positively selected genes, and, unexpectedly, genes resident in the pSymB chromid were also found to be more widespread in distant taxa than those located in the other replicons. Moreover, through the exploitation of a DNA proximity network, a series of conserved "DNA backbones" were found to shape the evolution of the genome structure, with the rest of the genome experiencing rearrangements. The presented data allow depicting a scenario where the pSymB chromid has a distinctive role in intraspecies differentiation and in evolution through positive selection, whereas the pSymA megaplasmid mostly contributes to structural fluidity and to the emergence of new functions, indicating a specific evolutionary role for each replicon in the pangenome evolution.

  19. Evaluation of live-attenuated Salmonella vaccines expressing Campylobacter antigens for control of C. jejuni in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Anthony M; Wang, Jinhong; Hudson, Debra L; Grant, Andrew J; Jones, Michael A; Maskell, Duncan J; Stevens, Mark P

    2010-01-22

    Campylobacter jejuni is a zoonotic bacterial pathogen of worldwide importance. It is estimated that 460,000 human infections occur in the United Kingdom per annum and these involve acute enteritis and may be complicated by severe systemic sequelae. Such infections are frequently associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry meat and strategies to control C. jejuni in poultry are expected to limit pathogen entry into the food chain and the incidence of human disease. Toward this aim, a total of 840 Light Sussex chickens were used to evaluate a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DeltaaroA vaccine expressing the C. jejuni amino acid binding protein CjaA as a plasmid-borne fusion to the C-terminus of fragment C of tetanus toxin. Chickens were given the vaccine at 1-day-old and two weeks later by oral gavage, then challenged after a further two weeks with C. jejuni. Across six biological replicates, statistically significant reductions in caecal C. jejuni of c. 1.4log(10) colony-forming units/g were observed at three and four weeks post-challenge relative to age-matched unvaccinated birds. Protection was associated with the induction of CjaA-specific serum IgY and biliary IgA. Protection was not observed using a vaccine strain containing the empty plasmid. Vaccination with recombinant CjaA subcutaneously at the same intervals significantly reduced the caecal load of C. jejuni at three and four weeks post-challenge. Taken together these data imply that responses directed against CjaA, rather than competitive or cross-protective effects mediated by the carrier, confer protection. The impact of varying parameters on the efficacy of the S. Typhimurium DeltaaroA vaccine expressing TetC-CjaA was also tested. Delaying the age at primary vaccination had little impact on protection or humoral responses to CjaA. The use of the parent strain as carrier or changing the attenuating mutation of the carrier to DeltaspaS or DeltassaU enhanced the protective effect

  20. Improved cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses to a tumor antigen by vaccines co-expressing the SLAM-associated adaptor EAT-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Y A; Seregin, S S; Kousa, Y A; Rastall, D P W; Appledorn, D M; Godbehere, S; Schutte, B C; Amalfitano, A

    2013-10-01

    The signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated adaptor Ewing's sarcoma's-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) is primarily expressed in dendritic cells, macrophages and natural killer cells. Including EAT-2 in a vaccination regimen enhanced innate and adaptive immune responses toward pathogen-derived antigens, even in the face of pre-existing vaccine immunity. Herein, we investigate whether co-vaccinations with two recombinant Ad5 (rAd5) vectors, one expressing the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and one expressing EAT-2, can induce more potent CEA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) and antitumor activity in the therapeutic CEA-expressing MC-38 tumor model. Our results suggest that inclusion of EAT-2 significantly alters the kinetics of Th1-biasing proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine responses, and enhances anti-CEA-specific CTL responses. As a result, rAd5-EAT2-augmented rAd5-CEA vaccinations are more efficient in eliminating CEA-expressing target cells as measured by an in vivo CTL assay. Administration of rAd5-EAT2 vaccines also reduced the rate of growth of MC-38 tumor growth in vivo. Also, an increase in MC-38 tumor cell apoptosis (as measured by hematoxylin and eosin staining, active caspase-3 and granzyme B levels within the tumors) was observed. These data provide evidence that more efficient, CEA-specific effector T cells are generated by rAd5 vaccines expressing CEA, when augmented by rAd5 vaccines expressing EAT-2, and this regimen may be a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy in general.

  1. Vaccination of Mice with Salmonella Expressing VapA: Mucosal and Systemic Th1 Responses Provide Protection against Rhodococcus equi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Aline F.; Ruas, Luciana P.; Cardoso, Silvia A.; Soares, Sandro G.; Roque-Barreira, Maria-Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Conventional vaccines to prevent the pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi have not been successful. We have recently demonstrated that immunization with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium expressing the VapA antigen protects mice against R. equi infection. We now report that oral vaccination of mice with this recombinant strain results in high and persistent fecal levels of antigen-specific IgA, and specific proliferation of the spleen cells of immunized mice in response to the in vitro stimulation with R. equi antigen. After in vitro stimulation, spleen cells of immunized mice produce high levels of Th1 cytokines and show a prominent mRNA expression of the Th1 transcription factor T-bet, in detriment of the Th2 transcription factor GATA-3. Following R. equi challenge, a high H2O2, NO, IL-12, and IFN-γ content is detected in the organs of immunized mice. On the other hand, TNF-α and IL-4 levels are markedly lower in the organs of vaccinated mice, compared with the non-vaccinated ones. The IL-10 content and the mRNA transcription level of TGF-β are also higher in the organs of immunized mice. A greater incidence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and B lymphocytes is verified in vaccinated mice. However, there is no difference between vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice in terms of the frequency of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Finally, we show that the vaccination confers a long-term protection against R. equi infection. Altogether, these data indicate that the oral vaccination of mice with S. enterica Typhimurium expressing VapA induces specific and long-lasting humoral and cellular responses against the pathogen, which are appropriately regulated and allow tissue integrity after challenge. PMID:20072623

  2. Vaccination of mice with salmonella expressing VapA: mucosal and systemic Th1 responses provide protection against Rhodococcus equi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline F Oliveira

    Full Text Available Conventional vaccines to prevent the pneumonia caused by Rhodococcus equi have not been successful. We have recently demonstrated that immunization with Salmonella enterica Typhimurium expressing the VapA antigen protects mice against R. equi infection. We now report that oral vaccination of mice with this recombinant strain results in high and persistent fecal levels of antigen-specific IgA, and specific proliferation of the spleen cells of immunized mice in response to the in vitro stimulation with R. equi antigen. After in vitro stimulation, spleen cells of immunized mice produce high levels of Th1 cytokines and show a prominent mRNA expression of the Th1 transcription factor T-bet, in detriment of the Th2 transcription factor GATA-3. Following R. equi challenge, a high H2O2, NO, IL-12, and IFN-gamma content is detected in the organs of immunized mice. On the other hand, TNF-alpha and IL-4 levels are markedly lower in the organs of vaccinated mice, compared with the non-vaccinated ones. The IL-10 content and the mRNA transcription level of TGF-beta are also higher in the organs of immunized mice. A greater incidence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and B lymphocytes is verified in vaccinated mice. However, there is no difference between vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice in terms of the frequency of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells. Finally, we show that the vaccination confers a long-term protection against R. equi infection. Altogether, these data indicate that the oral vaccination of mice with S. enterica Typhimurium expressing VapA induces specific and long-lasting humoral and cellular responses against the pathogen, which are appropriately regulated and allow tissue integrity after challenge.

  3. Vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing the peste des petits ruminants virus F or H proteins overcomes viral immunosuppression and induces protective immunity against PPRV challenge in sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M Rojas

    Full Text Available Peste des petits ruminants (PPR is a highly contagious disease of small ruminants caused by the Morbillivirus peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV. Two recombinant replication-defective human adenoviruses serotype 5 (Ad5 expressing either the highly immunogenic fusion protein (F or hemagglutinin protein (H from PPRV were used to vaccinate sheep by intramuscular inoculation. Both recombinant adenovirus vaccines elicited PPRV-specific B- and T-cell responses. Thus, neutralizing antibodies were detected in sera from immunized sheep. In addition, we detected a significant antigen specific T-cell response in vaccinated sheep against two different PPRV strains, indicating that the vaccine induced heterologous T cell responses. Importantly, no clinical signs and undetectable virus shedding were observed after virulent PPRV challenge in vaccinated sheep. These vaccines also overcame the T cell immunosuppression induced by PPRV in control animals. The results indicate that these adenovirus constructs could be a promising alternative to current vaccine strategies for the development of PPRV DIVA vaccines.

  4. A Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) viral vaccine expressing nucleoprotein is immunogenic but fails to confer protection against lethal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowall, SD; Buttigieg, KR; Findlay-Wilson, SJD; Rayner, E; Pearson, G; Miloszewska, A; Graham, VA; Carroll, MW; Hewson, R

    2016-01-01

    Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) is a severe tick-borne disease, endemic in many countries in Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe and Asia. Between 15–70% of reported cases are fatal with no approved vaccine available. In the present study, the attenuated poxvirus vector, Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara, was used to develop a recombinant candidate vaccine expressing the CCHF virus nucleoprotein. Cellular and humoral immunogenicity was confirmed in 2 mouse strains, including type I interferon receptor knockout mice, which are susceptible to CCHF disease. Despite the immune responses generated post-immunisation, the vaccine failed to protect animals from lethal disease in a challenge model. PMID:26309231

  5. A recombinant Yellow Fever 17D vaccine expressing Lassa virus glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredenbeek, Peter J; Molenkamp, Richard; Spaan, Willy J M; Deubel, Vincent; Marianneau, Phillippe; Salvato, Maria S; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Zapata, Juan; Tikhonov, Ilia; Patterson, Jean; Carrion, Ricardo; Ticer, Anysha; Brasky, Kathleen; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2006-02-20

    The Yellow Fever Vaccine 17D (YFV17D) has been used as a vector for the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor (LASV-GPC) resulting in construction of YFV17D/LASV-GPC recombinant virus. The virus was replication-competent and processed the LASV-GPC in cell cultures. The recombinant replicated poorly in guinea pigs but still elicited specific antibodies against LASV and YFV17D antigens. A single subcutaneous injection of the recombinant vaccine protected strain 13 guinea pigs against fatal Lassa Fever. This study demonstrates the potential to develop an YFV17D-based bivalent vaccine against two viruses that are endemic in the same area of Africa.

  6. Expression, purification and refolding of a self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) malaria vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qin; Dasgupta, Debleena; Doll, Tais A P F; Burkhard, Peter; Lanar, David E

    2013-05-01

    There are many ways to present antigens to the immune system. We have used a repetitive antigen display technology that relies on the self-assembly of 60 protein chains into a spherical self-assembling protein nanoparticle (SAPN) to develop a vaccine against Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The protein sequence contains selected B- and T-cell epitopes of the circumsporozoite protein of P. falciparum (PfCSP) and, when assembled into a nanoparticle induces strong, long-lived and protective immune responses against the PfCSP. Here we describe the conditions needed for promoting self-assembly of a P. falciparum vaccine nanoparticle, PfCSP-KMY-SAPN, and note pitfalls that may occur when determining conditions for other SAPN vaccines. Attention was paid to selecting processes that were amenable to scale up and cGMP manufacturing.

  7. T-Cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-Tailed Deer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tyler C Thacker; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Waters, W. Ray

    2009-01-01

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either M. bovis BCG strain Pasteur or BCG strain Danish. Both vaccinees and unvaccinated controls were subsequently inoculated with virulent M. bovis via the intratonsillar route. Real-time PCR was used to assess T-cell mRNA expression in peripheral blo...

  8. Intrarectal vaccination with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing carcinoembronic antigen induces mucosal and systemic immunity and prevents progression of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Schulze, Seunghee; Kim, Hong Sung; Wainstein, Alberto; Kim, Dae Won; Yang, Wein Cui; Moroziewicz, Dorota; Mong, Phyllus Y; Bereta, Michal; Taback, Bret; Wang, Qin; Kaufman, Howard L

    2008-12-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa contains an intact immune system that protects the host from pathogens and communicates with the systemic immune system. Absorptive epithelial cells in the mucosa give rise to malignant tumors although the interaction between tumor cells and the mucosal immune system is not well defined. The pathophysiology of colorectal cancer has been elucidated through studies of hereditary syndromes, such as familial adenomatous polyposis, a cancer predisposition syndrome caused by germline mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor gene. Patients with FAP develop adenomas and inevitably progress to invasive carcinomas by the age of 40. To better delineate the role of mucosal immunity in colorectal cancer, we evaluated the efficacy of intrarectal recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the human carcinoembryonic Ag (CEA) in a murine FAP model in which mice are predisposed to colorectal cancer and also express human CEA in the gut. Mucosal vaccination reduced the incidence of spontaneous adenomas and completely prevented progression to invasive carcinoma. The therapeutic effects were associated with induction of mucosal CEA-specific IgA Ab titers and CD8(+) CTLs. Mucosal vaccination was also associated with an increase in systemic CEA-specific IgG Ab titers, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses and resulted in growth inhibition of s.c. implanted CEA-expressing tumors suggesting communication between mucosal and systemic immune compartments. Thus, intrarectal vaccination induces mucosal and systemic antitumor immunity and prevents progression of spontaneous colorectal cancer. These results have implications for the prevention of colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

  9. Recombinant Measles Virus Vaccine Expressing the Nipah Virus Glycoprotein Protects against Lethal Nipah Virus Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Misako Yoneda; Marie-Claude Georges-Courbot; Fusako Ikeda; Miho Ishii; Noriyo Nagata; Frederic Jacquot; Hervé Raoul; Hiroki Sato; Chieko Kai

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study,...

  10. Low Cost Tuberculosis Vaccine Antigens in Capsules: Expression in Chloroplasts, Bio-Encapsulation, Stability and Functional Evaluation In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Priya Saikumar Lakshmi; Dheeraj Verma; Xiangdong Yang; Bethany Lloyd; Henry Daniell

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading fatal infectious diseases. The development of TB vaccines has been recognized as a major public health priority by the World Health Organization. In this study, three candidate antigens, ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secretory antigenic target) and Mtb72F (a fusion polyprotein from two TB antigens, Mtb32 and Mtb39) fused with cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) and LipY (a cell wall protein) were expressed in tobacco and/or lettuce ...

  11. Cloning, expression and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of Helicobacter pylori in Escherichia coli host as a vaccination target

    OpenAIRE

    Soleimani, Neda; Mohabati Mobarez, Ashraf; Farhangi, Baharak

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Helicobacter pylori is a widely distributed gram-negative bacterium that infects the human stomach and duodenum. HpaA is a H. pylori–specific lipoprotein that has been shown to be an effective protective antigen against H. pylori infection. HpaA of H. pylori as a vaccine antigen is fully competent for stimulation of immune responses. The aim of this project is cloning, expression, and purification flagellar sheath adhesion of H. pylori in Escherichia coli host by fast protein liquid c...

  12. A booster vaccine expressing a latency-associated antigen augments BCG induced immunity and confers enhanced protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bappaditya Dey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In spite of a consistent protection against tuberculosis (TB in children, Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG fails to provide adequate protection against the disease in adults as well as against reactivation of latent infections or exogenous reinfections. It has been speculated that failure to generate adequate memory T cell response, elicitation of inadequate immune response against latency-associated antigens and inability to impart long-term immunity against M. tuberculosis infections are some of the key factors responsible for the limited efficiency of BCG in controlling TB. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we evaluated the ability of a DNA vaccine expressing α-crystallin--a key latency antigen of M. tuberculosis to boost the BCG induced immunity. 'BCG prime-DNA boost' regimen (B/D confers robust protection in guinea pigs along with a reduced pathology in comparison to BCG vaccination (1.37 log(10 and 1.96 log(10 fewer bacilli in lungs and spleen, respectively; p<0.01. In addition, B/D regimen also confers enhanced protection in mice. Further, we show that B/D immunization in mice results in a heightened frequency of PPD and antigen specific multi-functional CD4 T cells (3(+ simultaneously producing interferon (IFNγ, tumor necrosis factor (TNFα and interleukin (IL2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results clearly indicate the superiority of α-crystallin based B/D regimen over BCG. Our study, also demonstrates that protection against TB is predictable by an increased frequency of 3(+ Th1 cells with superior effector functions. We anticipate that this study would significantly contribute towards the development of superior booster vaccines for BCG vaccinated individuals. In addition, this regimen can also be expected to reduce the risk of developing active TB due to reactivation of latent infection.

  13. In silico analysis and recombinant expression of BamA protein as a universal vaccine against Escherichia coli in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qingfeng; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Xiumin; Teng, Da; Wang, Jianhua

    2016-06-01

    Colibacillosis, caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli, is a common disease in animals and human worldwide with extensive losses in breeding industry and with millions of people death annually. There is thus an urgent need for the development of universal vaccines against colibacillosis. In this study, the BamA protein was analyzed in silico for sequence homology, physicochemical properties, allergenic prediction, and epitopes prediction. The BamA protein (containing 286 amino acids) clusters in E. coli were retrieved in UniProtKB database, in which 81.7 % sequences were identical (Uniref entry A7ZHR7), and sequences with 94.82 % identity were above 93.4 %. Moreover, BamA was highly conserved among Salmonella and Shigella and has no allergenicity to mice and human. The epitopes of BamA were located principally in periplasm and extracellular domain. Surf_Ag_VNR domain (at position 448-810 aa) of BamA was expressed, purified, and then used for immunization of mice. Titers of the rBamA sera were 1:736,000 and 1:152,000 against rBamA and E. coli and over 1:27,000 against Salmonella and Shigella. Opsonophagocytosis result revealed that the rBamA sera strengthened the phagocytic activity of neutrophils against E. coli. The survival rate of mice vaccinated with rBamA and PBS was 80 and 20 %, respectively. These data indicated that BamA could serve as a promising universal vaccine candidate for the development of a protective subunit vaccine against bacterial infection. Thus, the above protocol would provide more feasible technical clues and choices for available control of pathogenic E. coli, Salmonella, and Shigella.

  14. The administration of intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine induces changes in the nasal microbiota and nasal epithelium gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabichi, Y; Li, K; Hu, S; Nguyen, C; Wang, X; Elashoff, D; Saira, K; Frank, Bryan; Bihan, Monika; Ghedin, E; Methé, Barbara A; Deng, Jane C

    2015-12-15

    Viral infections such as influenza have been shown to predispose hosts to increased colonization of the respiratory tract by pathogenic bacteria and secondary bacterial pneumonia. To examine how viral infections and host antiviral immune responses alter the upper respiratory microbiota, we analyzed nasal bacterial composition by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing in healthy adults at baseline and at 1 to 2 weeks and 4 to 6 weeks following instillation of live attenuated influenza vaccine or intranasal sterile saline. A subset of these samples was submitted for microarray host gene expression profiling. We found that live attenuated influenza vaccination led to significant changes in microbial community structure, diversity, and core taxonomic membership as well as increases in the relative abundances of Staphylococcus and Bacteroides genera (both p < 0.05). Hypergeometric testing for the enrichment of gene ontology terms in the vaccinated group reflected a robust up-regulation of type I and type II interferon-stimulated genes in the vaccinated group relative to controls. Translational murine studies showed that poly I:C administration did in fact permit greater nasal Staphylococcus aureus persistence, a response absent in interferon alpha/beta receptor deficient mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that although the human nasal bacterial community is heterogeneous and typically individually robust, activation of a type I interferon (IFN)-mediated antiviral response may foster the disproportionate emergence of potentially pathogenic species such as S. aureus. This study was registered with Clinicaltrials.gov on 11/3/15, NCT02597647 .

  15. Expression profile of bio-defense genes in Penaeus monodon gills in response to formalin inactivated white spot syndrome virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheer, N S; Poulose, Gigi; Thomas, Ancy; Viswanath, Kiron; Kulkarni, Amod; Narayanan, R B; Philip, Rosamma; Singh, I S Bright

    2015-05-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most devastating pathogen of penaeid shrimp. While developing technology to vaccinate shrimp against WSSV, it is imperative to look into the immune response of the animal at molecular level. However, very little information has been generated in this direction. The present study is an attempt to understand the expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues of Penaeus monodon in response to formalin inactivated WSSV. A WSSV vaccine with a viral titer of 1×10(9) DNA copies was prepared and orally administered to P. monodon at a rate of 1.75×10(6) DNA copies of inactivated virus preparation (IVP) day(-1) for 7days. The animals were challenged with WSSV on 1st and 5th day post vaccination, and temporal expression of bio-defense genes in gill tissues was studied. Survival of 100% and 50% were observed respectively on 1st and 5th day post vaccination challenge. The humoral immune genes prophenoloxidase (proPO), alpha 2-macroglobulin (α2M), crustin and PmRACK, and the cell mediated immune genes caspase and Rab7 were up regulated in gill tissue upon vaccination and challenge. The expression of humoral gene crustin and cellular gene Rab7 was related to survival in IVP administered shrimp. Results of the study suggest that these genes have roles in protecting shrimp from WSSV on vaccination.

  16. Construction of a chimeric hepatitis C virus replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huang; Zhu, Wandi; Han, Qingxia; Pei, Rongjuan; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Subgenomic replicons of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been widely used for studying HCV replication. Here, we report a new subgenomic replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronically infected patient. The coding sequence of HCV was recovered from a Chinese chronic hepatitis C patient displaying high serum HCV copy numbers. A consensus sequence designated as CCH strain was constructed based on the sequences of five clones and this was classified by sequence alignment as belonging to genotype 2a. The subgenomic replicon of CCH was replication-deficient in cell culture, due to dysfunctions in NS3 and NS5B. Various JFH1/CCH chimeric replicons were constructed, and specific mutations were introduced. The introduction of mutations could partially restore the replication of chimeric replicons. A replication-competent chimeric construct was finally obtained by the introduction of NS3 from JFH1 into the backbone of the CCH strain.

  17. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freistadt Marion S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function.

  18. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistadt, Marion S; Eberle, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases) in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A) yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function. PMID:17352827

  19. Analysis of adipose tissue immune gene expression after vaccination of rainbow trout with adjuvanted bacterins reveals an association with side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Kimberly A; Wang, Tiehui; Alnabulsi, Ayham; Douglas, Alex; Russell, K Spencer; Tubbs, Lincoln; Arous, Juliette Ben; Secombes, Christopher J

    2017-08-01

    Most existing fish vaccines are presented in the form of oil-based emulsions delivered by intraperitoneal injection. Whilst very effective they are frequently associated with inflammatory responses that can result in clinically significant side-effects often involving the adipose tissue that is in direct contact with the vaccine. To explore the potential of immune gene expression changes in the adipose tissue of fish to be markers of vaccination efficacy or development of side-effects we have studied the response to a bacterial (Aeromonas salmonicida) vaccine administered with two different adjuvants. The first adjuvant was Montanide™ ISA 763A VG, thought to induce a mostly humoral response, and the second was Montanide™ ISA 761 VG that gives a more balanced humoral and cell mediated response. Following vaccination tissue samples were collected at days 3, 14 and 28 for RTqPCR analysis. Fifty immune genes were studied with a focus on a) pro-inflammatory associated molecules and b) adaptive immune response related molecules linked with possible Th1, Th2, Th17 and T-regulatory pathways, with the expression data analysed for associations with Speilberg post-vaccination side effect scores. The results showed that the adipose tissue is a particularly sensitive and discriminatory tissue for studying adjuvant effects. A clear upregulation of many immune genes occurred in response to both vaccine groups, which persisted over time and overlapped with the appearance of visible adhesions. Our analysis revealed a relationship between adipose tissue immune function and the development of vaccine-induced adhesions giving the potential to use immune gene expression profiling in this tissue to predict the side-effects seen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Multiple linear B-cell epitopes of classical swine fever virus glycoprotein E2 expressed in E.coli as multiple epitope vaccine induces a protective immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jian-Chao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Classical swine fever is a highly contagious disease of swine caused by classical swine fever virus, an OIE list A pathogen. Epitope-based vaccines is one of the current focuses in the development of new vaccines against classical swine fever virus (CSFV. Two B-cell linear epitopes rE2-ba from the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV, rE2-a (CFRREKPFPHRMDCVTTTVENED, aa844-865 and rE2-b (CKEDYRYAISSTNEIGLLGAGGLT, aa693-716, were constructed and heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli as multiple epitope vaccine. Fifteen 6-week-old specified-pathogen-free (SPF piglets were intramuscularly immunized with epitopes twice at 2-week intervals. All epitope-vaccinated pigs could mount an anamnestic response after booster vaccination with neutralizing antibody titers ranging from 1:16 to 1:256. At this time, the pigs were subjected to challenge infection with a dose of 1 × 106 TCID50 virulent CSFV strain. After challenge infection, all of the rE2-ba-immunized pigs were alive and without symptoms or signs of CSF. In contrast, the control pigs continuously exhibited signs of CSF and had to be euthanized because of severe clinical symptoms at 5 days post challenge infection. The data from in vivo experiments shown that the multiple epitope rE2-ba shown a greater protection (similar to that of HCLV vaccine than that of mono-epitope peptide(rE2-a or rE2-b. Therefore, The results demonstrated that this multiple epitope peptide expressed in a prokaryotic system can be used as a potential DIVA (differentiating infected from vaccinated animals vaccine. The E.coli-expressed E2 multiple B-cell linear epitopes retains correct immunogenicity and is able to induce a protective immune response against CSFV infection.

  1. Low cost tuberculosis vaccine antigens in capsules: expression in chloroplasts, bio-encapsulation, stability and functional evaluation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Saikumar Lakshmi

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading fatal infectious diseases. The development of TB vaccines has been recognized as a major public health priority by the World Health Organization. In this study, three candidate antigens, ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secretory antigenic target and Mtb72F (a fusion polyprotein from two TB antigens, Mtb32 and Mtb39 fused with cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB and LipY (a cell wall protein were expressed in tobacco and/or lettuce chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation/oral delivery. Site-specific transgene integration into the chloroplast genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. In transplastomic leaves, CTB fusion proteins existed in soluble monomeric or multimeric forms of expected sizes and their expression levels varied depending upon the developmental stage and time of leaf harvest, with the highest-level of accumulation in mature leaves harvested at 6PM. The CTB-ESAT6 and CTB-Mtb72F expression levels reached up to 7.5% and 1.2% of total soluble protein respectively in mature tobacco leaves. Transplastomic CTB-ESAT6 lettuce plants accumulated up to 0.75% of total leaf protein. Western blot analysis of lyophilized lettuce leaves stored at room temperature for up to six months showed that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein was stable and preserved proper folding, disulfide bonds and assembly into pentamers for prolonged periods. Also, antigen concentration per gram of leaf tissue was increased 22 fold after lyophilization. Hemolysis assay with purified CTB-ESAT6 protein showed partial hemolysis of red blood cells and confirmed functionality of the ESAT-6 antigen. GM1-binding assay demonstrated that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein formed pentamers to bind with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. The expression of functional Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in transplastomic plants should facilitate development of a cost-effective and orally deliverable TB booster vaccine with potential

  2. Low cost tuberculosis vaccine antigens in capsules: expression in chloroplasts, bio-encapsulation, stability and functional evaluation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Priya Saikumar; Verma, Dheeraj; Yang, Xiangdong; Lloyd, Bethany; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is one of the leading fatal infectious diseases. The development of TB vaccines has been recognized as a major public health priority by the World Health Organization. In this study, three candidate antigens, ESAT-6 (6 kDa early secretory antigenic target) and Mtb72F (a fusion polyprotein from two TB antigens, Mtb32 and Mtb39) fused with cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) and LipY (a cell wall protein) were expressed in tobacco and/or lettuce chloroplasts to facilitate bioencapsulation/oral delivery. Site-specific transgene integration into the chloroplast genome was confirmed by Southern blot analysis. In transplastomic leaves, CTB fusion proteins existed in soluble monomeric or multimeric forms of expected sizes and their expression levels varied depending upon the developmental stage and time of leaf harvest, with the highest-level of accumulation in mature leaves harvested at 6PM. The CTB-ESAT6 and CTB-Mtb72F expression levels reached up to 7.5% and 1.2% of total soluble protein respectively in mature tobacco leaves. Transplastomic CTB-ESAT6 lettuce plants accumulated up to 0.75% of total leaf protein. Western blot analysis of lyophilized lettuce leaves stored at room temperature for up to six months showed that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein was stable and preserved proper folding, disulfide bonds and assembly into pentamers for prolonged periods. Also, antigen concentration per gram of leaf tissue was increased 22 fold after lyophilization. Hemolysis assay with purified CTB-ESAT6 protein showed partial hemolysis of red blood cells and confirmed functionality of the ESAT-6 antigen. GM1-binding assay demonstrated that the CTB-ESAT6 fusion protein formed pentamers to bind with the GM1-ganglioside receptor. The expression of functional Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in transplastomic plants should facilitate development of a cost-effective and orally deliverable TB booster vaccine with potential for long

  3. Protective immunization of horses with a recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine co-expressing genes encoding the outer capsid proteins of African horse sickness virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Alan J; Quan, Melvyn; Lourens, Carina W; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Minke, Jules M; Yao, Jiansheng; He, Ling; Nordgren, Robert; Gardner, Ian A; Maclachlan, N James

    2009-07-16

    We describe the development and preliminary characterization of a recombinant canarypox virus vectored (ALVAC) vaccine for protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness virus (AHSV) infection. Horses (n=8) immunized with either of two concentrations of recombinant canarypox virus vector (ALVAC-AHSV) co-expressing synthetic genes encoding the outer capsid proteins (VP2 and VP5) of AHSV serotype 4 (AHSV-4) developed variable titres (horse immunized with a commercial recombinant canarypox virus vectored vaccine expressing the haemagglutinin genes of two equine influenza H3N8 viruses was seronegative to AHSV and following infection with virulent AHSV-4 developed pyrexia, thrombocytopenia and marked oedema of the supraorbital fossae typical of the "dikkop" or cardiac form of African horse sickness. AHSV was detected by virus isolation and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in the blood of the control horse from 8 days onwards after challenge infection whereas AHSV was not detected at any time in the blood of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses. The control horse seroconverted to AHSV by 2 weeks after challenge infection as determined by both virus neutralization and ELISA assays, whereas six of eight of the ALVAC-AHSV vaccinated horses did not seroconvert by either assay following challenge infection with virulent AHSV-4. These data confirm that the ALVAC-AHSV vaccine will be useful for the protective immunization of equids against African horse sickness, and avoids many of the problems inherent to live-attenuated AHSV vaccines.

  4. The yellow fever 17D vaccine virus: molecular basis of viral attenuation and its use as an expression vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galler R.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The yellow fever (YF virus is the prototype flavivirus. The use of molecular techniques has unraveled the basic mechanisms of viral genome structure and expression. Recent trends in flavivirus research include the use of infectious clone technology with which it is possible to recover virus from cloned cDNA. Using this technique, mutations can be introduced at any point of the viral genome and their resulting effect on virus phenotype can be assessed. This approach has opened new possibilities to study several biological viral features with special emphasis on the issue of virulence/attenuation of the YF virus. The feasibility of using YF virus 17D vaccine strain, for which infectious cDNA is available, as a vector for the expression of heterologous antigens is reviewed

  5. A new adenovirus based vaccine vector expressing an Eimeria tenella derived TLR agonist improves cellular immune responses to an antigenic target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel M Appledorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenoviral based vectors remain promising vaccine platforms for use against numerous pathogens, including HIV. Recent vaccine trials utilizing Adenovirus based vaccines expressing HIV antigens confirmed induction of cellular immune responses, but these responses failed to prevent HIV infections in vaccinees. This illustrates the need to develop vaccine formulations capable of generating more potent T-cell responses to HIV antigens, such as HIV-Gag, since robust immune responses to this antigen correlate with improved outcomes in long-term non-progressor HIV infected individuals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we designed a novel vaccine strategy utilizing an Ad-based vector expressing a potent TLR agonist derived from Eimeria tenella as an adjuvant to improve immune responses from a [E1-]Ad-based HIV-Gag vaccine. Our results confirm that expression of rEA elicits significantly increased TLR mediated innate immune responses as measured by the influx of plasma cytokines and chemokines, and activation of innate immune responding cells. Furthermore, our data show that the quantity and quality of HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ and CD8(- T-cell responses were significantly improved when coupled with rEA expression. These responses also correlated with a significantly increased number of HIV-Gag derived epitopes being recognized by host T cells. Finally, functional assays confirmed that rEA expression significantly improved antigen specific CTL responses, in vivo. Moreover, we show that these improved responses were dependent upon improved TLR pathway interactions. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data presented in this study illustrate the potential utility of Ad-based vectors expressing TLR agonists to improve clinical outcomes dependent upon induction of robust, antigen specific immune responses.

  6. RNA疫苗%RNA vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴浩飞; 罗丹

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines consist of plasmid DNA,viral vectors and RNA vaccines.Since the nucleic acid vaccines combine the benefits of live-attenuated vaccines,and avoid the problems of complication related to live-attenuated vaccine safety and production,they may change the way that next generation vaccines are produced.RNA vaccines,including those based on messenger RNA (mRNA) and self-amplifying RNA replicons,have the potential to break through the limitations of plasmid DNA and viral vectors.With solving the issue of cost and manufacturing feasibility,the commercialization of RNA vaccines has become promising.The concept of RNA vaccines has been demonstrated in humans,and the prospects for further development into commercial products are very encouraging.%核酸疫苗包括质粒DNA、病毒载体和RNA疫苗,极有可能促成新一代疫苗生产方式的变革,因为它既综合了减毒活疫苗的优势,又避免了减毒活疫苗的安全性及生产复杂性等问题.RNA疫苗,包括基于信使RNA(mRNA)和自我扩增RNA复制子的疫苗,能克服质粒DNA和病毒载体的局限性.随着RNA疫苗的生产可行性及成本问题的解决,RNA疫苗商业化的曙光已经显现.RNA疫苗概念在人体中已得到验证,其进一步开发为商业化产品的前景令人鼓舞.

  7. WSSV ie1 promoter is more efficient than CMV promoter to express H5 hemagglutinin from influenza virus in baculovirus as a chicken vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The worldwide outbreak of influenza A (H5N1 viruses among poultry species and humans highlighted the need to develop efficacious and safe vaccines based on efficient and scaleable production. Results White spot syndrome virus (WSSV immediate-early promoter one (ie1 was shown to be a stronger promoter for gene expression in insect cells compared with Cytomegalovirus immediate-early (CMV promoter in luciferase assays. In an attempt to improve expression efficiency, a recombinant baculovirus was constructed expressing hemagglutinin (HA of H5N1 influenza virus under the control of WSSV ie1 promoter. HA expression in SF9 cells increased significantly with baculovirus under WSSV ie1 promoter, compared with CMV promoter based on HA contents and hemagglutination activity. Further, immunization with baculovirus under WSSV ie1 promoter in chickens elicited higher level anti-HA antibodies compared to CMV promoter, as indicated in hemagglutination inhibition, virus neutralization and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. By immunohistochemistry, strong HA antigen expression was observed in different chicken organs with vaccination of WSSV ie1 promoter controlled baculovirus, confirming higher efficiency in HA expression by WSSV ie1 promoter. Conclusion The production of H5 HA by baculovirus was enhanced with WSSV ie1 promoter, especially compared with CMV promoter. This contributed to effective elicitation of HA-specific antibody in vaccinated chickens. This study provides an alternative choice for baculovirus based vaccine production.

  8. RNA Replicon-based Vaccines%RNA复制子疫苗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇华吉; 李卫平; 童光志

    2003-01-01

    RNA复制子是自主复制的RNA,保留了病毒复制酶基因,而结构蛋白基因缺失,由外源抗原基因取代,复制酶可控制载体RNA在胞浆中高水平复制和外源基因的高水平表达.用于开发复制子的主要是单股正链RNA病毒,如甲病毒(辛德比斯病毒、塞姆利基森林病毒、委内瑞拉马脑炎病毒)、黄病毒(登革热病毒、昆津病毒)、小RNA病毒(脊髓灰质炎病毒、人鼻病毒)、副粘病毒(犬瘟热病毒)、杯状病毒(猫杯状病毒).基于复制子的疫苗不会产生能复制的感染性病毒粒子,不可能与细胞基因组发生整合,但可诱导全身免疫和粘膜免疫以及MHC-I限制性CTL反应,而不受体内已有载体抗体的干扰.目前已开发了大量基于复制子的疫苗和肿瘤的治疗性和预防性疫苗,并在很多疾病模型上取得成功,包括病毒(流感病毒、人免疫缺陷病毒、拉沙病毒、马尔堡病毒、呼吸道合胞体病毒、诺沃克样病毒、马动脉炎病毒等)肿瘤(人乳头瘤、癌胚抗原、B16肿瘤、小鼠黑素瘤等)、以及细菌毒素(肉毒杆菌毒素、葡萄球菌肠毒素、破伤风毒素等).

  9. Oral Vaccination Against Anthrax Using a Transgenic Plant Expressing Protective Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-09-01

    need for effective vaccines which will induce the mucosal immunity system against this highly lethal human pathogen. Characterization of virulence factor...colonizing the mucosal tissue in the gut and therefore may induce mucosal immunity to F I antigen through association with the Peyer’s patches... mucosal immunity , the antigen must first be stable in the gut and then be able to penetrate the epithelial cells to facilitate absorption by M cells. For

  10. Monitoring the determinants of efficient viral replication using Classical Swine Fever Virus-reporter replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Everett, Helen; Crooke, Helen

    2012-01-01

    proteins considered non-essential for RNA replication were constructed and these deletions were replaced with an in-frame insertion of the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) sequence. RNA transcripts from these replicons should be translated as a single functional open reading frame. Full-genome cDNAs (~10-12,3 kb...

  11. Targeted mutagenesis of dengue virus type 2 replicon RNA by yeast in vivo recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Mark; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The use of cDNA infectious clones or subgenomic replicons is indispensable in studying flavivirus biology. Mutating nucleotides or amino acid residues gives important clues to their function in the viral life cycle. However, a major challenge to the establishment of a reverse genetics system for flaviviruses is the instability of their nucleotide sequences in Escherichia coli. Thus, direct cloning using conventional restriction enzyme-based procedures usually leads to unwanted rearrangements of the construct. In this chapter, we discuss a cloning strategy that bypasses traditional cloning procedures. We take advantage of the observations from previous studies that (1) unstable sequences in bacteria can be cloned in eukaryotic systems and (2) Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a well-studied genetics system to introduce sequences using homologous recombination. We describe a protocol to perform targeted mutagenesis in a subgenomic dengue virus 2 replicon. Our method makes use of homologous recombination in yeast using a linearized replicon and a PCR product containing the desired mutation. Constructs derived from this method can be propagated in E. coli with improved stability. Thus, yeast in vivo recombination provides an excellent strategy to genetically engineer flavivirus infectious clones or replicons because this system is compatible with inherently unstable sequences of flaviviruses and is not restricted by the limitations of traditional cloning procedures.

  12. Cytoskeletal Requirements for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Synthesis in the HCV Replicon Cell Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Bost, Anne G.; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  13. Cytoskeletal requirements for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in the HCV replicon cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Anne G; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A

    2003-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  14. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was modified by targeted...

  15. Construction, Expression and Identification of a Recombinant BCG Vaccine Encoding Human Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 65

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴五星; 梁靓; 高红; 黄海浪; 陈智浩; 程继忠; 皇甫永穆

    2004-01-01

    Heat shock protein 65 (HSP65) is one of the most important protective immunogens against the tuberculosis infection. The signal sequence of antigen 85B and the whole HSP65 DNA sequence of human Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) were amplified from BCG genome and plasmid pCMV-MTHSP65 respectively by polymerase chain reactions (PCR). These two sequences were cloned into the plasmid pBCG-2100 under the control of the promoter of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) from human M. tuberculosis, yielding the prokaryotic shuttle expression plasmid pBCG-SP-HSP65. Results of restriction endonuclease analysis, PCR detection and DNA sequencing analysis showed that the two cloned DNA sequences were consistent with those previously reported, and the direction of their inserting into the recombinant was correct and the reading frame had been maintained. The recombinants were electroporated into BCG to construct the recombinant BCG vaccine and induced by heating. The induced expression detected by SDS-PAGE showed that the content of 65 kD protein expressed in recombinant BCG was 35.69 % in total bacterial protein and 74.09 % in the cell lysate supernatants, suggesting that the recombinant HSP65 gene could express in BCG with high efficiency and the expressed proteins were mainly soluble. Western-blot showed that the secretive recombinant proteins could specifically combine with antibody against M.tuberculosis HSP65, indicating that the recombinant proteins possess the biological activity of HSP65.

  16. Transient replication of a hepatitis C virus genotype 1b replicon chimera encoding NS5A-5B from genotype 3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylefjord, Helen; Danielsson, Axel; Sedig, Susanne; Belda, Oscar; Wiktelius, Daniel; Vrang, Lotta; Targett-Adams, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pathogen of global significance, experimental therapies in current clinical development include highly efficacious all-oral combinations of HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). If approved for use, these new treatment regimens will impact dramatically upon our capacity to eradicate HCV in the majority of virus-infected patients. However, recent data from late-stage clinical evaluations demonstrated that individuals infected with HCV genotype (GT) 3 responded less well to all-oral DAA combinations than patients infected with other HCV GTs. In light of these observations, the present study sought to expand the number of molecular tools available to investigate small molecule-mediated inhibition of HCV GT3 NS5A and NS5B proteins in preclinical tissue-culture systems. Accordingly, a novel subgenomic HCV replicon chimera was created by utilizing a GT1b backbone modified to produce NS5A and NS5B proteins from a consensus sequence generated from HCV GT3a genomic sequences deposited online at the European Hepatitis C Virus database. This approach avoided the need to isolate and amplify HCV genomes from sera derived from HCV-infected patients. The replicon chimera, together with a version engineered to express NS5A encoding a Y93H mutation, demonstrated levels of replication in transient assays robust enough to assess accurate antiviral activities of inhibitors representing different HCV DAA classes. Thus, the replicon chimera represents a new simple molecular tool suitable for drug discovery programmes aimed at investigating, understanding, and improving GT3a activities of HCV DAAs targeting NS5A or NS5B.

  17. Vaccination of horses with a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara virus (MVA) expressing African horse sickness (AHS) virus major capsid protein VP2 provides complete clinical protection against challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberca, Berta; Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Cabana, Marta; Calvo-Pinilla, Eva; Viaplana, Elisenda; Frost, Lorraine; Gubbins, Simon; Urniza, Alicia; Mertens, Peter; Castillo-Olivares, Javier

    2014-06-17

    African horse sickness virus (AHSV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that infects all species of equidae and causes high mortality in horses. Previously, a recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus expressing the protein VP2 of AHSV serotype 4 was shown to induce virus neutralising antibodies in horses and protected interferon alpha receptor gene knock-out mice (IFNAR -/-) against virulent AHSV challenge. This study builds on the previous work, examining the protective efficacy of MVA-VP2 vaccination in the natural host of AHSV infection. A study group of 4 horses was vaccinated twice with a recombinant MVA virus expressing the major capsid protein (VP2) of AHSV serotype 9. Vaccinated animals and a control group of unvaccinated horses were then challenged with a virulent strain of AHSV-9. The vaccinated animals were completely protected against clinical disease and also against viraemia as measured by standard end-point dilution assays. In contrast, all control horses presented viraemia after challenge and succumbed to the infection. These results demonstrate the potential of recombinant MVA viruses expressing the outer capsid VP2 of AHSV as a protective vaccine against AHSV infection in the field.

  18. Expression of the SLAM family of receptors adapter EAT-2 as a novel strategy for enhancing beneficial immune responses to vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Appledorn, Daniel M; Seregin, Sergey S; Liu, Chyong-jy J; Schuldt, Nathaniel J; Godbehere, Sarah; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2011-01-15

    Recent studies have shown that activation of the signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM) family of receptors plays an important role in several aspects of immune regulation. However, translation of this knowledge into a useful clinical application has not been undertaken. One important area where SLAM-mediated immune regulation may have keen importance is in the field of vaccinology. Because SLAM signaling plays such a critical role in the innate and adaptive immunity, we endeavored to develop a strategy to improve the efficacy of vaccines by incorporation of proteins known to be important in SLAM-mediated signaling. In this study, we hypothesized that coexpression of the SLAM adapter EWS-FLI1-activated transcript 2 (EAT-2) along with a pathogen-derived Ag would facilitate induction of beneficial innate immune responses, resulting in improved induction of Ag-specific adaptive immune responses. To test this hypothesis, we used rAd5 vector-based vaccines expressing murine EAT-2, or the HIV-1-derived Ag Gag. Compared with appropriate controls, rAd5 vectors expressing EAT-2 facilitated bystander activation of NK, NKT, B, and T cells early after their administration into animals. EAT-2 overexpression also augments the expression of APC (macrophages and dendritic cells) surface markers. Indeed, this multitiered activation of the innate immune system by vaccine-mediated EAT-2 expression enhanced the induction of Ag-specific cellular immune responses. Because both mice and humans express highly conserved EAT-2 adapters, our results suggest that human vaccination strategies that specifically facilitate SLAM signaling may improve vaccine potency when targeting HIV Ags specifically, as well as numerous other vaccine targets in general.

  19. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beernink, Peter T; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Pajon, Rolando; Braga, Emily M; Ram, Sanjay; Granoff, Dan M

    2012-01-01

    The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH), is fH-binding protein (fHbp), which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV) from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001) and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003). By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002), and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001). Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  20. The effect of human factor H on immunogenicity of meningococcal native outer membrane vesicle vaccines with over-expressed factor H binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Beernink

    Full Text Available The binding of human complement inhibitors to vaccine antigens in vivo could diminish their immunogenicity. A meningococcal ligand for the complement down-regulator, factor H (fH, is fH-binding protein (fHbp, which is specific for human fH. Vaccines containing recombinant fHbp or native outer membrane vesicles (NOMV from mutant strains with over-expressed fHbp are in clinical development. In a previous study in transgenic mice, the presence of human fH impaired the immunogenicity of a recombinant fHbp vaccine. In the present study, we prepared two NOMV vaccines from mutant group B strains with over-expressed wild-type fHbp or an R41S mutant fHbp with no detectable fH binding. In wild-type mice in which mouse fH did not bind to fHbp in either vaccine, the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp elicited 2-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.001 and 4-fold higher complement-mediated bactericidal titers against a PorA-heterologous strain than the NOMV with the mutant fHbp (P = 0.003. By adsorption, the bactericidal antibodies were shown to be directed at fHbp. In transgenic mice in which human fH bound to the wild-type fHbp but not to the R41S fHbp, the NOMV vaccine with the mutant fHbp elicited 5-fold higher serum IgG anti-fHbp titers (P = 0.002, and 19-fold higher bactericidal titers than the NOMV vaccine with wild-type fHbp (P = 0.001. Thus, in mice that differed only by the presence of human fH, the respective results with the two vaccines were opposite. The enhanced bactericidal activity elicited by the mutant fHbp vaccine in the presence of human fH far outweighed the loss of immunogenicity of the mutant protein in wild-type animals. Engineering fHbp not to bind to its cognate complement inhibitor, therefore, may increase vaccine immunogenicity in humans.

  1. Construction and characterization of bivalent vaccine candidate expressing HspA and Mr18000 OMP from Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To construct a recombinant vector which can express outer membrane protein (OMP) with Mr18 000 and heat shock protein A (HspA) from Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)in E.coli BL21, and to exploit the possibility for obtaining the vaccine conferring protection from H. pylori infection.METHODS: The target gene of HspA was amplified from H.pylori chromosome by PCR, and then inserted into the prokaryotic expression vector pET32a (+) by restrictive endonuclease enzyme kpn Ⅰ, BamH Ⅰ simultaneously. The recombinant vector was used to sequence, and then together with pET32a (+)/Omp18, digested by restrictive endonuclease enzyme Hind Ⅲ and BamH Ⅰ simultaneously. pET32a(+)/HspA and Omp18 were recovered from 1% agarose gel by gel kit, and ligated with T4 ligase by BarmH Ⅰ digested viscidity end. The recombinant plasmid of pET32a(+)/HspA/Omp18 was transformed and expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) under induction of IPTG. After purification, its antigenicity of the fusion protein was detected by Western blot.RESULTS: Enzyme digestion analysis and sequencing showed that the target genes were inserted into the recombinant vector, composed of 891 base pairs, encoded objective polypeptides of 297 amino acid residues. Compared with GenBank reported by Tomb et al, there were 1.3 %and 1.4 % differences in obtained H. pylori nucleotide sequence and amino acid residues, respectively. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that relative molecule mass (Mr) of the expressed product was Mr 51 000,Mr of protein expressed by pET32a (+) was about Mr 20 000, and soluble expression product accounted for 18.96 % of total bacterial protein.After purification with Ni+2-NTA agarose resins, the purification of recombinant fusion protein was about 95 %. Western blot showed that recombinant fusion protein could be recognized by the patients′ serum infected with H. pylori and anti-Omp18 monoclone, suggesting that this protein had good antigenicity.CONCLUSION: The gene coding for H. pylori Mr18 000OMP and

  2. Ordering the mob: Insights into replicon and MOB typing schemes from analysis of a curated dataset of publicly available plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlek, Alex; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Walker, A Sarah; Woodford, Neil; Anjum, Muna F; Stoesser, Nicole

    2017-03-09

    Plasmid typing can provide insights into the epidemiology and transmission of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. The principal plasmid typing schemes are replicon typing and MOB typing, which utilize variation in replication loci and relaxase proteins respectively. Previous studies investigating the proportion of plasmids assigned a type by these schemes ('typeability') have yielded conflicting results; moreover, thousands of plasmid sequences have been added to NCBI in recent years, without consistent annotation to indicate which sequences represent complete plasmids. Here, a curated dataset of complete Enterobacteriaceae plasmids from NCBI was compiled, and used to assess the typeability and concordance of in silico replicon and MOB typing schemes. Concordance was assessed at hierarchical replicon type resolutions, from replicon family-level to plasmid multilocus sequence type (pMLST)-level, where available. We found that 85% and 65% of the curated plasmids could be replicon and MOB typed, respectively. Overall, plasmid size and the number of resistance genes were significant independent predictors of replicon and MOB typing success. We found some degree of non-concordance between replicon families and MOB types, which was only partly resolved when partitioning plasmids into finer-resolution groups (replicon and pMLST types). In some cases, non-concordance was attributed to ambiguous boundaries between MOBP and MOBQ types; in other cases, backbone mosaicism was considered a more plausible explanation. β-lactamase resistance genes tended not to show fidelity to a particular plasmid type, though some previously reported associations were supported. Overall, replicon and MOB typing schemes are likely to continue playing an important role in plasmid analysis, but their performance is constrained by the diverse and dynamic nature of plasmid genomes.

  3. Mosquito cell-derived West Nile virus replicon particles mimic arbovirus inoculum and have reduced spread in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brendan T; Moreira, Fernando R; Carlson, Tim W; Bernard, Kristen A

    2017-02-01

    Half of the human population is at risk of infection by an arthropod-borne virus. Many of these arboviruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and Zika viruses, infect humans by way of a bite from an infected mosquito. This infectious inoculum is insect cell-derived giving the virus particles distinct qualities not present in secondary infectious virus particles produced by infected vertebrate host cells. The insect cell-derived particles differ in the glycosylation of virus structural proteins and the lipid content of the envelope, as well as their induction of cytokines. Thus, in order to accurately mimic the inoculum delivered by arthropods, arboviruses should be derived from arthropod cells. Previous studies have packaged replicon genome in mammalian cells to produce replicon particles, which undergo only one round of infection, but no studies exist packaging replicon particles in mosquito cells. Here we optimized the packaging of West Nile virus replicon genome in mosquito cells and produced replicon particles at high concentration, allowing us to mimic mosquito cell-derived viral inoculum. These particles were mature with similar genome equivalents-to-infectious units as full-length West Nile virus. We then compared the mosquito cell-derived particles to mammalian cell-derived particles in mice. Both replicon particles infected skin at the inoculation site and the draining lymph node by 3 hours post-inoculation. The mammalian cell-derived replicon particles spread from the site of inoculation to the spleen and contralateral lymph nodes significantly more than the particles derived from mosquito cells. This in vivo difference in spread of West Nile replicons in the inoculum demonstrates the importance of using arthropod cell-derived particles to model early events in arboviral infection and highlights the value of these novel arthropod cell-derived replicon particles for studying the earliest virus-host interactions for arboviruses.

  4. Mosquito cell-derived West Nile virus replicon particles mimic arbovirus inoculum and have reduced spread in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brendan T.; Moreira, Fernando R.; Carlson, Tim W.

    2017-01-01

    Half of the human population is at risk of infection by an arthropod-borne virus. Many of these arboviruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and Zika viruses, infect humans by way of a bite from an infected mosquito. This infectious inoculum is insect cell-derived giving the virus particles distinct qualities not present in secondary infectious virus particles produced by infected vertebrate host cells. The insect cell-derived particles differ in the glycosylation of virus structural proteins and the lipid content of the envelope, as well as their induction of cytokines. Thus, in order to accurately mimic the inoculum delivered by arthropods, arboviruses should be derived from arthropod cells. Previous studies have packaged replicon genome in mammalian cells to produce replicon particles, which undergo only one round of infection, but no studies exist packaging replicon particles in mosquito cells. Here we optimized the packaging of West Nile virus replicon genome in mosquito cells and produced replicon particles at high concentration, allowing us to mimic mosquito cell-derived viral inoculum. These particles were mature with similar genome equivalents-to-infectious units as full-length West Nile virus. We then compared the mosquito cell-derived particles to mammalian cell-derived particles in mice. Both replicon particles infected skin at the inoculation site and the draining lymph node by 3 hours post-inoculation. The mammalian cell-derived replicon particles spread from the site of inoculation to the spleen and contralateral lymph nodes significantly more than the particles derived from mosquito cells. This in vivo difference in spread of West Nile replicons in the inoculum demonstrates the importance of using arthropod cell-derived particles to model early events in arboviral infection and highlights the value of these novel arthropod cell-derived replicon particles for studying the earliest virus-host interactions for arboviruses. PMID:28187142

  5. Effects of selenium supplementation on selenoprotein gene expression and response to influenza vaccine challenge: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Goldson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The uncertainty surrounding dietary requirements for selenium (Se is partly due to limitations in biomarkers of Se status that are related to health outcomes. In this study we determined the effect of different doses and forms of Se on gene expression of selenoprotein S (SEPS1, selenoprotein W (SEPW1 and selenoprotein R (SEPR, and responses to an immune function challenge, influenza vaccine, were measured in order to identify functional markers of Se status. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A 12 week human dietary intervention study was undertaken in 119 volunteers who received placebo, 50, 100 or 200 µg/day Se-enriched yeast (Se-yeast or meals containing unenriched or Se-enriched onions (50 µg/day. Gene expression was quantified in RNA samples extracted from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC's using quantitative RT-PCR. There was a significant increase in SEPW1 mRNA in the Se-enriched onion group (50 µg/day compared with the unenriched onion group. SEPR and SEPW1 did not change significantly over the duration of the supplementation period in the control or Se-yeast groups, except at week 10 when SEPW1 mRNA levels were significantly lower in the 200 µg/day Se-yeast group compared to the placebo group. Levels of SEPS1 mRNA increased significantly 7 days after the influenza vaccine challenge, the magnitude of the increase in SEPS1 gene expression was dose-dependent, with a significantly greater response with higher Se supplementation. CONCLUSIONS: This novel finding provides preliminary evidence for a role of SEPS1 in the immune response, and further supports the relationship between Se status and immune function. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT00279812].

  6. Increasing versatility of the DNA vaccines through modification of the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Lopez, Alicia; García-Valtanen, Pablo; Ortega-Villaizan, María Del Mar; Chico, Verónica; Medina-Gali, Regla María; Perez, Luis; Coll, Julio; Estepa, Amparo

    2013-01-01

    The route of administration of DNA vaccines can play a key role in the magnitude and quality of the immune response triggered after their administration. DNA vaccines containing the gene of the membrane-anchored glycoprotein (gpG) of the fish rhabdoviruses infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral haematopoietic septicaemia virus (VHSV), perhaps the most effective DNA vaccines generated so far, confer maximum protection when injected intramuscularly in contrast to their low efficacy when injected intraperitoneally. In this work, taking as a model the DNA vaccine against VHSV, we focused on developing a more versatile DNA vaccine capable of inducing protective immunity regardless of the administration route used. For that, we designed two alternative constructs to gpG₁₋₅₀₇ (the wild type membrane-anchored gpG of VHSV) encoding either a soluble (gpG₁₋₄₆₂) or a secreted soluble (gpG(LmPle20-462)) form of the VHSV-gpG. In vivo immunisation/challenge assays showed that only gpG(LmPle20-462) (the secreted soluble form) conferred protective immunity against VHSV lethal challenge via both intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection, being this the first description of a fish viral DNA vaccine that confers protection when administered intraperitoneally. Moreover, this new DNA vaccine construct also conferred protection when administered in the presence of an oil adjuvant suggesting that DNA vaccines against rhabdoviruses could be included in the formulation of current multicomponent-intaperitoneally injectable fish vaccines formulated with an oil adjuvant. On the other hand, a strong recruitment of membrane immunoglobulin expressing B cells, mainly membrane IgT, as well as t-bet expressing T cells, at early times post-immunisation, was specifically observed in the fish immunised with the secreted soluble form of the VHSV-gpG protein; this may indicate that the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo

  7. Increasing versatility of the DNA vaccines through modification of the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in vivo transfected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Martinez-Lopez

    Full Text Available The route of administration of DNA vaccines can play a key role in the magnitude and quality of the immune response triggered after their administration. DNA vaccines containing the gene of the membrane-anchored glycoprotein (gpG of the fish rhabdoviruses infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV or viral haematopoietic septicaemia virus (VHSV, perhaps the most effective DNA vaccines generated so far, confer maximum protection when injected intramuscularly in contrast to their low efficacy when injected intraperitoneally. In this work, taking as a model the DNA vaccine against VHSV, we focused on developing a more versatile DNA vaccine capable of inducing protective immunity regardless of the administration route used. For that, we designed two alternative constructs to gpG₁₋₅₀₇ (the wild type membrane-anchored gpG of VHSV encoding either a soluble (gpG₁₋₄₆₂ or a secreted soluble (gpG(LmPle20-462 form of the VHSV-gpG. In vivo immunisation/challenge assays showed that only gpG(LmPle20-462 (the secreted soluble form conferred protective immunity against VHSV lethal challenge via both intramuscular and intraperitoneal injection, being this the first description of a fish viral DNA vaccine that confers protection when administered intraperitoneally. Moreover, this new DNA vaccine construct also conferred protection when administered in the presence of an oil adjuvant suggesting that DNA vaccines against rhabdoviruses could be included in the formulation of current multicomponent-intaperitoneally injectable fish vaccines formulated with an oil adjuvant. On the other hand, a strong recruitment of membrane immunoglobulin expressing B cells, mainly membrane IgT, as well as t-bet expressing T cells, at early times post-immunisation, was specifically observed in the fish immunised with the secreted soluble form of the VHSV-gpG protein; this may indicate that the subcellular location of plasmid-encoded antigen expression in the in

  8. Evaluation of a vectored equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) vaccine expressing H3 haemagglutinin in the protection of dogs against canine influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Cristina; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Metzger, Stephan M; Hoelzer, Karin; Dubovi, Edward J; Kim, Sung G; Parrish, Colin R; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2008-05-01

    In 2004, canine influenza virus (CIV) was identified as a respiratory pathogen of dogs for the first time and found to be closely related to H3N8 equine influenza virus (EIV). We generated a recombinant vectored vaccine that expresses H3 of a recent isolate of EIV using equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) as the delivery vehicle. This EHV-1 vectored vaccine exhibited robust and stable EIV H3 expression and induced a strong influenza virus-specific response in both mice and dogs upon intranasal or subcutaneous administration. Furthermore, upon challenge with the recent CIV isolate A/canine/PA/10915-07, protection of vaccinated dogs could be demonstrated by a significant reduction in clinical sings, and, more importantly, by a significant reduction in virus shedding. We concluded that the EHV-1/H3 recombinant vector can be a valuable alternative for protection of dogs against clinical disease induced by CIV and can significantly reduce virus spread.

  9. Thymic Self-Antigen Expression for the Design of a Negative/Tolerogenic Self-Vaccine against Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Alami Chentoufi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Before being able to react against infectious non-self-antigens, the immune system has to be educated in the recognition and tolerance of neuroendocrine proteins, and this critical process essentially takes place in the thymus. The development of the autoimmune diabetogenic response results from a thymus dysfunction in programming central self-tolerance to pancreatic insulin-secreting islet β cells, leading to the breakdown of immune homeostasis with an enrichment of islet β cell reactive effector T cells and a deficiency of β cell-specific natural regulatory T cells (nTreg in the peripheral T-lymphocyte repertoire. Insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2 is the dominant member of the insulin family expressed during fetal life by the thymic epithelium under the control of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene/protein. Based on the close homology and cross-tolerance between insulin, the primary T1D autoantigen, and IGF-2, the dominant self-antigen of the insulin family, a novel type of vaccination, so-called “negative/tolerogenic self-vaccination”, is currently developed for prevention and cure of T1D. If this approach were found to be effective for reprogramming immunological tolerance in T1D, it could pave the way for the design of negative self-vaccines against autoimmune endocrine diseases, as well as other organ-specific autoimmune diseases.

  10. Construction and Expression of Bivalent Membrane-anchored DNA Vaccine Encoding Sj14FABP and Sj26GST Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ping; DAI Wuxing; LIU Shuojie; YANG Ping; CHENG Jizhong; LIANG Liang; CHEN Zhihao; GAO Hong

    2006-01-01

    In order to construct a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid containing membrane-anchored Sjcl4FABP and Sjc26GST genes and identify their expression in vitro, Sj14 and Sj26 genes were obtained by RT-PCR with total RNA of Schistosoma japonicum adult worms as the template and cloned into eukaryotic expression plasmid pVAC to construct recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14 and pVAC-Sj26. Then a 23 amino-acid signal peptide of human interleukin-2 (IL-2) upstream Sj14 or Sj26 gene and a membrane-anchored sequence containing 32 amino-acids of carboxyl-terminal of human placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) downstream were amplified by PCR as the template of plasmid pVAC-Sjl4 or pVAC-Sj26 only to get two gene fragments including Sjl4 gene and Sj26 gene. The two modified genes were altogether cloned into a eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pIRES,resulting in another new recombinant plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14. The expression of Sj14 and Sj26genes was detected by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescent assays (IFA) when the plasmid pIRES-Sj26-Sj 14 was transfected into eukaryotic Hela cells. Restriction enzyme analysis, PCR and sequencing results revealed that the recombinant plasmids pVAC-Sj14, pVAC-Sj26 and pIRES-Sj26-Sj14 were successfully constructed and the expression of modified Sj 14 and Sj26 genes could be detected by RT-PCR and IFA. A bivalent membrane-anchored DNA vaccine encoding Sj14 and Sj26 genes was acquired and expressed proteins were proved to be mostly anchored in cellular membranes.

  11. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV vaccine; Vaccination - HPV vaccine ... and Gynecologists. Committee opinion No. 641: human papillomavirus vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2015;126(3):e38-e43. PMID: ...

  12. Expression, purification, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of a recombinant Tc24 antigen as a vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Campos, Viridiana; Martinez-Vega, Pedro; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Wei, Junfei; Liu, Zhuyun; Kwityn, Cliff; Hammond, Molly; Ortega-López, Jaime; Zhan, Bin; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Dumonteil, Eric

    2015-08-26

    The Tc24 calcium binding protein from the flagellar pocket of Trypanosoma cruzi is under evaluation as a candidate vaccine antigen against Chagas disease. Previously, a DNA vaccine encoding Tc24 was shown to be an effective vaccine (both as a preventive and therapeutic intervention) in mice and dogs, as evidenced by reductions in T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as reduced cardiac inflammation and increased host survival. Here we developed a suitable platform for the large scale production of recombinant Tc24 (rTc24) and show that when rTc24 is combined with a monophosphoryl-lipid A (MPLA) adjuvant, the formulated vaccine induces a Th1-biased immune response in mice, comprised of elevated IgG2a antibody levels and interferon-gamma levels from splenocytes, compared to controls. These immune responses also resulted in statistically significant decreased T. cruzi parasitemia and cardiac amastigotes, as well as increased survival following T. cruzi challenge infections, compared to controls. Partial protective efficacy was shown regardless of whether the antigen was expressed in Escherichia coli or in yeast (Pichia pastoris). While mouse vaccinations will require further modifications in order to optimize protective efficacy, such studies provide a basis for further evaluations of vaccines comprised of rTc24, together with alternative adjuvants and additional recombinant antigens.

  13. DNA vaccine encoding Der p2 allergen down-regulates STAT6 expression in mouse model of allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6 ) plays a critical role in the late phase of Th2-dependent allergy induction. STAT6 is essential to Th2 cell differentiation, recruitment, and effector function. Our previous study confirmed that DNA vaccination inhibited STAT6 expression of spleen cells induced by allergen. In the present study, we determined whether DNA vaccine encoding Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus group 2 (Der p2 ) could down-regulate the expression and activation of STAT6 in lung tissue from asthmatic mice.Methods After DNA vaccine immunization, BALB/c mice were sensitized by intraperitoneal injection and challenged by intranasal instillation of rDer p2. The levels of the cytokines IL-4 and IL-13 in BAL fluid were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The lung tissue was assessed by immunohistochemical staining with anti-STAT6. The protein expression of STAT6 was determined by Western blot. The activation of STAT6 binding ability was analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay.Results DNA vaccine encoding Der p2 allergen effectively decreased the levels of IL-4 and IL-13 in the asthmatic mice. Histological evidence and Western blot showed that the expression of STAT6 in the DNA treated mice was markedly attenuated. STAT6 binding to specific DNA motif in lung tissue from the gene vaccinated mice was inhibited.Conclusion DNA vaccine encoding Der p2 prevents allergic pulmonary inflammation probably by inhibiting the STAT6 signaling pathway in mice with Der p2 allergen-induced allergic airway inflammation.

  14. Pathogen-induced proapoptotic phenotype and high CD95 (Fas expression accompany a suboptimal CD8+ T-cell response: reversal by adenoviral vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ronnie Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available MHC class Ia-restricted CD8(+ T cells are important mediators of the adaptive immune response against infections caused by intracellular microorganisms. Whereas antigen-specific effector CD8(+ T cells can clear infection caused by intracellular pathogens, in some circumstances, the immune response is suboptimal and the microorganisms survive, causing host death or chronic infection. Here, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms that could explain why CD8(+ T cell-mediated immunity during infection with the human protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is not optimal. For that purpose, we compared the CD8(+ T-cell mediated immune responses in mice infected with T. cruzi or vaccinated with a recombinant adenovirus expressing an immunodominant parasite antigen. Several functional and phenotypic characteristics of specific CD8(+ T cells overlapped. Among few exceptions was an accelerated expansion of the immune response in adenoviral vaccinated mice when compared to infected ones. Also, there was an upregulated expression of the apoptotic-signaling receptor CD95 on the surface of specific T cells from infected mice, which was not observed in the case of adenoviral-vaccinated mice. Most importantly, adenoviral vaccine provided at the time of infection significantly reduced the upregulation of CD95 expression and the proapoptotic phenotype of pathogen-specific CD8(+ cells expanded during infection. In parallel, infected adenovirus-vaccinated mice had a stronger CD8 T-cell mediated immune response and survived an otherwise lethal infection. We concluded that a suboptimal CD8(+ T-cell response is associated with an upregulation of CD95 expression and a proapoptotic phenotype. Both can be blocked by adenoviral vaccination.

  15. Development and immunogenicity of recombinant GapA(+) Mycoplasma gallisepticum vaccine strain ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein and chicken interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shil, Pollob K; Kanci, Anna; Browning, Glenn F; Markham, Philip F

    2011-04-12

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen of poultry that causes chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. A live attenuated vaccine, ts-11, has been used for the control of MG in several countries. The efficacy of this vaccine is highly dose dependent and the flock antibody response is weak. To improve the functionality of the vaccine and investigate its potential as a delivery vector for foreign antigens and immunomodulatory proteins, we developed a derivative of ts-11 expressing infectious bronchitis virus-S1 glycoprotein (IBV-S1) and releasing chicken interleukin-6 into the extracellular milieu (MG ts-11 C3 (+CS)) using a transposon-based delivery vector. Following administration of MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) to chickens by eye-drop, an antibody response to MG and IBV-S1, as determined by the rapid serum agglutination test (RSA) and Western blotting, respectively, could be detected. Birds inoculated with the recombinant vaccine had significantly enhanced weight gain and were partially protected against damage by pathogenic IBV. These results indicate that the ChIL-6 released by MG ts-11 C3 (+CS) may have had a non-specific effect on growth rate. They also suggest that ts-11 is a promising vaccine vector, capable of delivering heterologous protective antigens, and may also provide non-specific benefits when engineered to express immunomodulatory proteins. With some improvements in the expression system, it could be used to induce a targeted immune response against specific mucosal pathogens, and co-expression of several antigens would allow development of a novel multivalent vaccine.

  16. Construction, expression and immunogenicity of a novel anti-hypertension angiotensin II vaccine based on hepatitis A virus-like particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xia; Guo, Lili; Wu, Jinyuan; Mi, Kai; Yin, Na; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Hongjun; Sun, Maosheng

    2013-06-01

    Hypertension is a serious worldwide public health problem. The aim of this study is to design anti-hypertension angiotensin II (Ang II) vaccine using molecular biology and immunological method. This novel anti-hypertension vaccine, which is a chimeric protein named pHAV-4Ang IIs, presents four successive repeated Ang IIs as the functional epitope on the surface of the hepatitis A virus-like particle(HAVLP). In this study, pHAV-4Ang IIs was expressed using Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System. With the RT-PCR analysis, SDS-PAGE, western blot, IFA, electron microscope methods for identification of expression products, these results confirmed that stable expression of pHAV-4Ang IIs can be effectively achieved in infected sf9 cells. Spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs) were immunized with pHAV-4Ang IIs to test immunogenicity and pharmacodynamic action. The results showed that this anti-hypertension vaccine can induce high titer Ang II -specific IgG antibody for almost 10 weeks. When antibody titer reached the peak at 8th week, the mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) degraded approximately 23 mmHg compared with the PBS control group, and the mean diastolic blood pressure (DBP) degraded approximately 12 mmHg compared with the PBS control group. These results suggest that this anti-hypertension vaccine has good immunogenicity and good effect on reduction of blood pressure in SHRs, which provide reliable base for large-scale preparation of this hypertension vaccine in the future, and a new direction of exploration for the development of anti-hypertension therapeutic vaccine.

  17. Monovalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Nonhuman Primates Against Infection with Multiple Marburg Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    equine encephalitis replicon particle, where the antigen of interest, in this case the MARV glyc- oprotein (GP), is inserted in place of the struc- tural... herpes B antibody-negative in testing prior to initiation of the study. The VLP-vaccinated monkeys received three intramuscular injec- tions at 42-day...date, the most successful filovirus vaccines have been based on viral vec- tors, such as adenovirus, venezulan equine encephalitis repli- con, human

  18. Expression, purification, and characterization of the Necator americanus aspartic protease-1 (Na-APR-1 (M74)) antigen, a component of the bivalent human hookworm vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seid, Christopher A; Curti, Elena; Jones, R Mark; Hudspeth, Elissa; Rezende, Wanderson; Pollet, Jeroen; Center, Lori; Versteeg, Leroy; Pritchard, Sonya; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Yusibov, Vidadi; Hotez, Peter J; Bottazzi, Maria Elena

    2015-01-01

    Over 400 million people living in the world's poorest developing nations are infected with hookworms, mostly of the genus Necator americanus. A bivalent human hookworm vaccine composed of the Necator americanus Glutathione S-Transferase-1 (Na-GST-1) and the Necator americanus Aspartic Protease-1 (Na-APR-1 (M74)) is currently under development by the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (Sabin PDP). Both monovalent vaccines are currently in Phase 1 trials. Both Na-GST-1 and Na-APR-1 antigens are expressed as recombinant proteins. While Na-GST-1 was found to express with high yields in Pichia pastoris, the level of expression of Na-APR-1 in this host was too low to be suitable for a manufacturing process. When the tobacco plant Nicotiana benthamiana was evaluated as an expression system, acceptable levels of solubility, yield, and stability were attained. Observed expression levels of Na-APR-1 (M74) using this system are ∼300 mg/kg. Here we describe the achievements and obstacles encountered during process development as well as characterization and stability of the purified Na-APR-1 (M74) protein and formulated vaccine. The expression, purification and analysis of purified Na-APR-1 (M74) protein obtained from representative 5 kg reproducibility runs performed to qualify the Na-APR-1 (M74) production process is also presented. This process has been successfully transferred to a pilot plant and a 50 kg scale manufacturing campaign under current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) has been performed. The 50 kg run has provided a sufficient amount of protein to support the ongoing hookworm vaccine development program of the Sabin PDP.

  19. Recombinant viral-vectored vaccines expressing Plasmodium chabaudi AS apical membrane antigen 1: mechanisms of vaccine-induced blood-stage protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sumi; Spencer, Alexandra J; Forbes, Emily K; Gilbert, Sarah C; Holder, Anthony A; Hill, Adrian V S; Draper, Simon J

    2012-05-15

    Apical membrane Ag 1 (AMA1) is one of the leading candidate Ags for inclusion in a subunit vaccine against blood-stage malaria. However, the efficacy of Ab-inducing recombinant AMA1 protein vaccines in phase IIa/b clinical trials remains disappointing. In this article, we describe the development of recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 and modified vaccinia virus Ankara vectors encoding AMA1 from the Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi strain AS. These vectors, when used in a heterologous prime-boost regimen in BALB/c mice, are capable of inducing strong transgene-specific humoral and cellular immune responses. We show that this vaccination regimen is protective against a nonlethal P. chabaudi chabaudi strain AS blood-stage challenge, resulting in reduced peak parasitemias. The role of vaccine-induced, AMA1-specific Abs and T cells in mediating the antiparasite effect was investigated by in vivo depletion of CD4(+) T cells and adoptive-transfer studies into naive and immunodeficient mice. Depletion of CD4(+) T cells led to a loss of vaccine-induced protection. Adoptive-transfer studies confirmed that efficacy is mediated by both CD4(+) T cells and Abs functioning in the context of an intact immune system. Unlike previous studies, these results confirm that Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells, induced by a clinically relevant vaccine-delivery platform, can make a significant contribution to vaccine blood-stage efficacy in the P. chabaudi model. Given that cell-mediated immunity may also contribute to parasite control in human malaria, these data support the clinical development of viral-vectored vaccines that induce both T cell and Abs against Plasmodium falciparum blood-stage malaria Ags like AMA1.

  20. Recombinant human adenovirus-5 expressing capsid proteins of Indian vaccine strains of foot-and-mouth disease virus elicits effective antibody response in cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant adenovirus-5 vectored foot-and-mouth disease constructs (Ad5- FMD) were made for three Indian vaccine virus serotypes O,A and Asia 1. Constructs co-expressing foot-and- mouth disease virus (FMDV) capsid and viral 3C protease sequences, were evaluated for their ability to induce a neutral...

  1. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  2. Prokaryote-expressed M2e protein improves H9N2 influenza vaccine efficacy and protection against lethal influenza A virus in mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Lee, Jun-Han; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Song, Min-Suk; Baek, Yun-Hee; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Lim, Gyo-Jin; Decano, Arun; Chowdhury, Mohammed Ye; Seo, Su-Kyung; Song, Man Ki; Kim, Chul-Joong; Choi, Young-Ki

    2013-01-01

    .... For these reasons, we investigated the efficacy of an inactivated H9N2 virus vaccine (a-H9N2) mixed with M2e (1xM2e or 4xM2e) proteins expressed in Escherichia coli, which contains the consensus of sequence the extracellular domain of matrix 2...

  3. Expression of micro-RNAs and immune-relevant genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) upon vaccination with a Viral Haemorrhagic Septicemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Development of strategies to alleviate potential disease outbreaks in sea-farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) due to wildlife marine reservoir of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) remains imperative. A DNA vaccine expressing VHSV glycoprotein (G) gene has been developed and...

  4. Expression of Porcine Interleukin-2 and Porcine Interleukin-6 and Their Adjuvant Effects on Gene Deleted Vaccine of Pseudorabies Virus (TK-/gG-/LacZ+)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Lin; HE Qi-gai; CHEN Huan-chun; XIAO Shao-bo; WU Mei-zhou; LU Jian-qiang; HAN Li

    2003-01-01

    Porcine interleukin-2 and porcine interleukin-6 cDNA sequences were cloned into the expressing vectors pET-28a and pGEX-KG respectively. They were expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3) with high-level production. The gene deleted vaccine of pseudorabies virus Ea strain (TK-/gG-/LacZ+) was mixed with the two different purified recombinant proteins each, or both, with the doses of 2, 5 or 10 μg ml-1. Ten groups of pseudorabies negative antibody swines were immuned twice with tested vaccines with different doses, or control vaccine, respectively. The antibody titers of the test groups were detected by neutralization test, and the daily weight gains of swines were calculated and analyzed statistically. In the study, all the neutralizing antibody titers in test groups were higher than the control group, and the recombinant proteins appeared a dose dependent adjuvant effect. The tested vaccines with 2 μg ml-1 pIL-2 and with 10 μg ml-1 pIL-2/pIL-6 got significant and extremely significant differences, compared with the vaccines without pILs. The difference of the daily weight gain indicated the potential positive influence of pIL-2 and pIL-6 on immune protection.

  5. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  6. Cloning, expression and molecular analysis of Iranian Brucella melitensis Omp25 gene for designing a subunit vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Soheil; Tahmoorespur, Mojtaba; Sekhavati, Mohammad Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a well-known domestic animal infectious disease, which is caused by Brucella bacterium. The outer membrane protein 25 kDa (Omp25) gene plays an important role in simulating of TNF-α, IFN-α, macrophage, and cytokines cells. In the current study molecular cloning and expression analysis of Omp25 gene for designing a subunit vaccine against Brucella was investigated. Amplifying the full length of candidate gene was performed using specific primers. Sub-cloning of this gene conducted using pTZ57R/T vector in TOP10F strain of Escherichia coli(E.coli) as the host. Also, pET32(a)+ vector used for expression in BL21 (DE3) strain of E.coli. Omp25 gene with 642 bp size was amplified and cloned successfully. The expression results were confirmed by sequencing and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analyses which showed 42 kDa protein band correctly. Also, phylogenic analysis showed this gene has a near genetic relation with other Brucella strains. According to our results we can propose this gene as a candidate useful for stimulation of cell-mediated and humoral immunity system in future study. PMID:27920824

  7. Vaccination for Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  8. Proteomics Reveals that Proteins Expressed During the Early Stage of Bacillus anthracis Infection Are Potential Targets for the Development of Vaccines and Drugs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Ming Huang; Craig A. Elmets; De-chu C. Tang; Fuming Li; Nabiha Yusuf

    2004-01-01

    In this review, we advance a new concept in developing vaccines and/or drugs to target specific proteins expressed during the early stage of Bacillus anthracis (an thrax) infection and address existing challenges to this concept. Three proteins (immune inhibitor A, GPR-like spore protease, and alanine racemase) initially identified by proteomics in our laboratory were found to have differential expres sions during anthrax spore germination and early outgrowth. Other studies of different bacillus strains indicate that these three proteins are involved in either germination or cytotoxicity of spores, suggesting that they may serve as potential targets for the design of anti-anthrax vaccines and drugs.

  9. Next-generation dengue vaccines: novel strategies currently under development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has become the most important arboviral infection worldwide with more than 30 million cases of dengue fever estimated to occur each year. The need for a dengue vaccine is great and several live attenuated dengue candidate vaccines are proceeding through clinical evaluation. The need to induce a balanced immune response against all four DENV serotypes with a single vaccine has been a challenge for dengue vaccine developers. A live attenuated DENV chimeric vaccine produced by Sanofi Pasteur has recently entered Phase III evaluation in numerous dengue-endemic regions of the world. Viral interference between serotypes contained in live vaccines has required up to three doses of the vaccine be given over a 12-month period of time. For this reason, novel DENV candidate vaccines are being developed with the goal of achieving a protective immune response with an immunization schedule that can be given over the course of a few months. These next-generation candidates include DNA vaccines, recombinant adenovirus vectored vaccines, alphavirus replicons, and sub-unit protein vaccines. Several of these novel candidates will be discussed.

  10. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replicon That Is Noncytotoxic and Capable of Long-Term Foreign Gene Expression▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic ...

  11. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Daniel R.; Whitmore, Alan; Robert E Johnston; Barro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By ana...

  12. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Daniel R.; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro,Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By ana...

  13. A simple method for construction of pir+ Enterobacterial hosts for maintenance of R6K replicon plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The R6K replicon is one of the best studied bacterial plasmid replicons. Replication of the R6K plasmid and derivatives harboring its γ origin of replication (oriR6Kγ is dependent on the pir gene-encoded π protein. Originally encoded by R6K, this protein is usually provided in trans in hosts engineered to support replication of plasmids harboring oriR6Kγ. In Escherichia coli this is commonly achieved by chromosomal integration of pir either via lysogenization with a λpir phage or homologous recombination at a pre-determined locus. Findings Current methods for construction of host strains for oriR6Kγ-containing plasmids involve procedures that do not allow selection for presence of the pir gene and require cumbersome and time-consuming screening steps. In this study, we established a mini-Tn7-based method for rapid and reliable construction of pir+ host strains. Using a curable mini-Tn7 delivery plasmid, pir expressing derivatives of several commonly used E. coli cloning and mobilizer strains were isolated using both the wild-type pir+ gene as well as the copy-up pir-116 allele. In addition, we isolated pir+ and pir-116 expressing derivatives of a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In both E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, the presence of the pir+ wild-type or pir-116 alleles allowed the replication of oriR6Kγ-containing plasmids. Conclusions A mini-Tn7 system was employed for rapid and reliable engineering of E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium host strains for plasmids containing oriR6Kγ. Since mini-Tn7 elements transpose in most, if not all, Gram negative bacteria, we anticipate that with relatively minor modifications this newly established method will for the first time allow engineering of other bacterial species to enable replication of plasmids with oriR6Kγ.

  14. Infection of nonhost species dendritic cells in vitro with an attenuated myxoma virus induces gene expression that predicts its efficacy as a vaccine vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S; Foulon, E; Pignolet, B; Deplanche, M; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; Bertagnoli, S; Meyer, G; Foucras, G

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant myxoma virus (MYXV) can be produced without a loss of infectivity, and its highly specific host range makes it an ideal vaccine vector candidate, although careful examination of its interaction with the immune system is necessary. Similar to rabbit bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), ovine dendritic cells can be infected by SG33, a MYXV vaccine strain, and support recombinant antigen expression. The frequency of infected cells in the nonhost was lower and the virus cycle was abortive in these cell types. Among BM-DC subpopulations, Langerhans cell-like DCs were preferentially infected at low multiplicities of infection. Interestingly, ovine BM-DCs remained susceptible to MYXV after maturation, although apoptosis occurred shortly after infection as a function of the virus titer. When gene expression was assessed in infected BM-DC cultures, type I interferon (IFN)-related and inflammatory genes were strongly upregulated. DC gene expression profiles were compared with the profiles produced by other poxviruses in interaction with DCs, but very few commonalities were found, although genes that were previously shown to predict vaccine efficacy were present. Collectively, these data support the idea that MYXV permits efficient priming of adaptive immune responses and should be considered a promising vaccine vector along with other poxviruses.

  15. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3 genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimstad Espen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus (SAV causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  16. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3) genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marius; Villoing, Stephane; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2009-10-27

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6). Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR) of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE). Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  17. Acute infection with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles catalyzes a systemic antiviral state and protects from lethal virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Jennifer L; Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Webb, Drue L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-12-01

    The host innate immune response provides a critical first line of defense against invading pathogens, inducing an antiviral state to impede the spread of infection. While numerous studies have documented antiviral responses within actively infected tissues, few have described the earliest innate response induced systemically by infection. Here, utilizing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) to limit infection to the initially infected cells in vivo, a rapid activation of the antiviral response was demonstrated not only within the murine draining lymph node, where replication was confined, but also within distal tissues. In the liver and brain, expression of interferon-stimulated genes was detected by 1 to 3 h following VRP footpad inoculation, reaching peak expression of >100-fold over that in mock-infected animals. Moreover, mice receiving a VRP footpad inoculation 6, 12, or 24 h prior to an otherwise lethal VEE footpad challenge were completely protected from death, including a drastic reduction in challenge virus titers. VRP pretreatment also provided protection from intranasal VEE challenge and extended the average survival time following intracranial challenge. Signaling through the interferon receptor was necessary for antiviral gene induction and protection from VEE challenge. However, VRP pretreatment failed to protect mice from a heterologous, lethal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus, yet conferred protection following challenge with influenza virus. Collectively, these results document a rapid modulation of the host innate response within hours of infection, capable of rapidly alerting the entire animal to pathogen invasion and leading to protection from viral disease.

  18. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Thitaram, Sutawee N; Meinersmann, Richard J; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Englen, Mark D

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli in relation to plasmid replicon types, animal sources, and genotypes. E. coli isolates (n = 35) from seven different animal sources were selected and tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine genetic relationships among the E. coli isolates. Plasmid types based on their incompatibility (Inc) replicon types were determined, and linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed for antimicrobial resistance profiles, replicon types, and animal source. A high degree of genotypic diversity was observed: 34 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types among the 35 isolates examined. Twelve different plasmid Inc types were detected, and all isolates carried at least one replicon type. IncF (n = 25; 71.4%) and IncFIB (n = 19; 54.3%) were the most common replicon types identified. Chloramphenicol resistance was significantly linked with four Inc types (A/C, FIIA, F, and Y), and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was linked with three Inc types (B/O, P and Y). Resistance to any other antimicrobial was linked to two or fewer replicon types. The isolate source was linked with resistance to seven antimicrobials and IncI1. We conclude that commensal E. coli from animal sources are highly variable genotypically and are reservoirs of a diverse array of plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance.

  19. HBV RNA复制子疫苗、DNA疫苗在BHK-21细胞中表达情况的比较%Detecting the expression efficiency of the RNA replicon vaccines and DNA vaccine of HBV in BHK-21 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉; 逄大欣; 任林柱; 张英; 杨东; 闫森; 李小平; 高飞; 肖雪斌; 欧阳红生

    2010-01-01

    为建立更有效的乙肝疫苗,通过将所构建的HBVRNA疫苗和DNA疫苗分别转染BHK-21细胞,并比较其在细胞中表达情况及细胞凋亡现象.以pSFV为基础构建的疫苗载体的表达效率高于以pcDNA3.1为基础构建的疫苗载体,pSFV为基础构建的疫苗栽体出现细胞凋亡的现象.HBVRNA疫苗比DNA疫苗表达效果更好,安全性更高,更具有应用前景.

  20. Analysis of anamnestic immune responses in adult horses and priming in neonates induced by a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene of Rhodococcus equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, A Marianela; Hines, Melissa T; Palmer, Guy H; Knowles, Donald P; Alperin, Debra C; Hines, Stephen A

    2003-09-08

    Rhodococcus equi remains one of the most important pathogens of early life in horses, yet conventional vaccines to prevent rhodococcal pneumonia have not been successful. DNA vaccination offers an alternative to conventional vaccines with specific advantages for immunization of neonates. We developed a DNA vaccine expressing the vapA gene (pVR1055vapA) that induced an anamnestic response characterized by virulence associated protein A (VapA)-specific IgG antibodies in sera and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) as well as VapA-specific proliferation of pulmonary lymphocytes when tested in adult ponies. In contrast, none of the adults receiving the control plasmid responded. To determine if pVR1055vapA induced VapA-specific responses in the foal, the targeted age group for vaccination against R. equi, 10 naïve foals were randomly assigned at birth to two groups of five. At 8-15 days of age (day 1), foals were vaccinated by intranasal and intradermal (i.d.) routes with either pVR1055vapA or the negative control pVR1055vapA_rev. All foals were DNA boosted at day 14 and protein boosted at day 30 with either recombinant VapA or recombinant CAT (control group). Prior to the protein boost, neither group developed VapA-specific immune responses. However, at day 45, two of the VR1055vapA-vaccinated foals had increased titers of VapA-specific IgGb, IgM and IgGa in the sera, and IgG in the BALF. The induction of the opsonizing isotypes IgGa and IgGb has been previously shown to be associated with protection against R. equi. No VapA-specific immune responses were detected in the control group. This study indicates that the DNA vaccine effectively stimulates anamnestic systemic and pulmonary immune responses in adult horses. The results in foals suggest that the DNA vaccine also primed a subset of immunized neonates. These data support further development and modification to produce a DNA vaccine to more effectively prime neonatal foals.

  1. Blockade of CTLA-4 promotes the development of effector CD8+ T lymphocytes and the therapeutic effect of vaccination with an attenuated protozoan expressing NY-ESO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Luara Isabela; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; de Faria, Paula Cristina; Junqueira, Caroline; Dutra, Miriam Santos; Teixeira, Santuza Maria Ribeiro; Rodrigues, Maurício Martins; Ritter, Gerd; Bannard, Oliver; Fearon, Douglas Thomas; Antonelli, Lis Ribeiro; Gazzinelli, Ricardo Tostes

    2015-03-01

    The development of cancer immunotherapy has long been a challenge. Here, we report that prophylactic vaccination with a highly attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi strain expressing NY-ESO-1 (CL-14-NY-ESO-1) induces both effector memory and effector CD8(+) T lymphocytes that efficiently prevent tumor development. However, the therapeutic effect of such a vaccine is limited. We also demonstrate that blockade of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA-4) during vaccination enhances the frequency of NY-ESO-1-specific effector CD8(+) T cells producing IFN-γ and promotes lymphocyte migration to the tumor infiltrate. As a result, therapy with CL-14-NY-ESO-1 together with anti-CTLA-4 is highly effective in controlling the development of an established melanoma.

  2. A recombinant fowlpox virus vaccine expressing glycoprotein B gene from CVI988/Rispens strain of MDV: protection studies in different chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Peng, D; Wu, X; Xing, L; Zhang, R

    1999-01-01

    Recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) was constructed to express glycoprotein B (gB) gene from CVI988/Rispens strain of Marek's disease virus (MDV). The rFPV-gB/R alone and in combination with herpesvirus of turkey (HVT) preparations were evaluated for their protective efficacy against challenge with very virulent MDV strains Md5 and RB1B in different chickens. The rFPV-gB/R alone induced protection comparable to that by HVT vaccines in both Ab- SPF chickens and Ab+ production chickens. Significant protective synergism was observed in one of these two types of commercial production chickens when rFPV-gB/R was combined with HVT of either cell-associated or cell-free preparations. Immunogenesis studies showed that rFPV-gB/R, just like conventional vaccines, significantly reduced the level of viremia, splenocytes infection and feather follicle shedding of challenge virus in vaccinated chickens.

  3. Long-term programming of antigen-specific immunity from gene expression signatures in the PBMC of rhesus macaques immunized with an SIV DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Belisle

    Full Text Available While HIV-1-specific cellular immunity is thought to be critical for the suppression of viral replication, the correlates of protection have not yet been determined. Rhesus macaques (RM are an important animal model for the study and development of vaccines against HIV/AIDS. Our laboratory has helped to develop and study DNA-based vaccines in which recent technological advances, including genetic optimization and in vivo electroporation (EP, have helped to dramatically boost their immunogenicity. In this study, RMs were immunized with a DNA vaccine including individual plasmids encoding SIV gag, env, and pol alone, or in combination with a molecular adjuvant, plasmid DNA expressing the chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES, followed by EP. Along with standard immunological assays, flow-based activation analysis without ex vivo restimulation and high-throughput gene expression analysis was performed. Strong cellular immunity was induced by vaccination which was supported by all assays including PBMC microarray analysis that identified the up-regulation of 563 gene sequences including those involved in interferon signaling. Furthermore, 699 gene sequences were differentially regulated in these groups at peak viremia following SIVmac251 challenge. We observed that the RANTES-adjuvanted animals were significantly better at suppressing viral replication during chronic infection and exhibited a distinct pattern of gene expression which included immune cell-trafficking and cell cycle genes. Furthermore, a greater percentage of vaccine-induced central memory CD8+ T-cells capable of an activated phenotype were detected in these animals as measured by activation analysis. Thus, co-immunization with the RANTES molecular adjuvant followed by EP led to the generation of cellular immunity that was transcriptionally distinct and had a greater protective efficacy than its DNA alone counterpart. Furthermore, activation analysis and high-throughput gene expression data may

  4. Specific anti-tumor effect induced by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium vaccine expressing extracellular region of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun; DONG Jian; PU Ping; WANG ZhiQiang; HONG Min; CHEN MingQing

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to study the stable expression of exogenous gene encoding therapeutic protein in attenuated Salmonella typhimurium, observe the metabolism of oral gene vac-cine carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium in BALB/c mouse, and investigate the feasibility of prevention and treatment of tumors by the recombinant bacteria. Recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1+ VEGFR2(n1-7) was transformed into competent attenuated Salmonella typhimurium SL3261 to develop oral DNA vaccine SL3261-pcDNA3.1+VEGFR2(n1-7). To observe whether the exogenous gene can be ex-pressed in the recombinant bacteria, PCR was performed to amplify the CMV promoter of the eu-karyotic expression vector as the proof of stable expression of exogenous protein; transmission elec-tron microscopy (TEM) was applied to observe the morphology of the recombinant bacteria to confirm that the exogenous gene has no impact on the growth of the bacteria, and then BALB/c mice were immunized with the gene vaccine. After inoculation of the gene vaccine, the recombinant bacteria SL3261 could be detected in the tissues such as small intestine, colon, liver and spleen. And then, mice in each group were challenged with tumor cells. The results of animal experiment showed that tumor growth of the mice in experimental group was inhibited and survival time of immunized mice was pro-longed compared with control groups. A higher lymphocyte infiltration in tumors from animals treated with DNA vaccine was observed. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples revealed an en-hanced accumulation of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, as well as an increase in CD4+ cells in the tu-mors of animals treated with the oral gene vaccine compared to tumors from control group mice. UI-trastructure of the tumor tissue showed that tumor cells in the samples of the immunized mice were well-differentiated. Our research confirmed that the exogenous gene can be stably expressed in the attenuated Salmonella typhimurium and has no

  5. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Safety Smallpox Vaccine Safety Common Concerns Adjuvants Autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper on MMR and Autism Fainting (Syncope) Febrile ...

  6. Properly folded bacterially expressed H1N1 hemagglutinin globular head and ectodomain vaccines protect ferrets against H1N1 pandemic influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surender Khurana

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the face of impending influenza pandemic, a rapid vaccine production and mass vaccination is the most effective approach to prevent the large scale mortality and morbidity that was associated with the 1918 "Spanish Flu". The traditional process of influenza vaccine production in eggs is time consuming and may not meet the demands of rapid global vaccination required to curtail influenza pandemic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recombinant technology can be used to express the hemagglutinin (HA of the emerging new influenza strain in a variety of systems including mammalian, insect, and bacterial cells. In this study, two forms of HA proteins derived from the currently circulating novel H1N1 A/California/07/2009 virus, HA1 (1-330 and HA (1-480, were expressed and purified from E. coli under controlled redox refolding conditions that favoured proper protein folding. However, only the recombinant HA1 (1-330 protein formed oligomers, including functional trimers that bound receptor and caused agglutination of human red blood cells. These proteins were used to vaccinate ferrets prior to challenge with the A/California/07/2009 virus. Both proteins induced neutralizing antibodies, and reduced viral loads in nasal washes. However, the HA1 (1-330 protein that had higher content of multimeric forms provided better protection from fever and weight loss at a lower vaccine dose compared with HA (1-480. Protein yield for the HA1 (1-330 ranged around 40 mg/Liter, while the HA (1-480 yield was 0.4-0.8 mg/Liter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study that describes production in bacterial system of properly folded functional globular HA1 domain trimers, lacking the HA2 transmembrane protein, that elicit potent neutralizing antibody responses following vaccination and protect ferrets from in vivo challenge. The combination of bacterial expression system with established quality control methods could provide a mechanism for rapid large

  7. A mouse model based on replication-competent Tiantan vaccinia expressing luciferase/HIV-1 Gag fusion protein for the evaluation of protective efficacy of HIV vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yang; QIU Chao; LIU Lian-xing; FENG Yan-meng; ZHU Ting; XU Jian-qing

    2009-01-01

    Background Developing an effective vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a grand challenge after more than two decades of intensive effort. It is partially due to the lack of suitable animal models for screening and prioritizing vaccine candidates. In this study, we aim to develop a mice model to test HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. Methods We constructed a recombinant vaccinia expressing firefly luciferase and HIV-1 Gag fusion protein based on Tiantan strain, an attenuated but replication-competent poxvirus (rTTV-lucgag). By quantifying the luciferase activity as its read out, we defined the biodistribution of Tiantan strain poxvirus in mice inoculated intraperitoneally and attempted to apply this model to evaluate the HIV-1 vaccine efficacy. Results Our data demonstrated that the rTTV-lucgag was able to express high level of luciferase (≤106 relative luciferase units (RLU)/mg protein) and HIV-1 Gag (>3 folds increase comparing to the control). After intraperitoneal inoculation, this virus had dominant replication in the ovary, uterus, and cervix of mice and the luciferase activities in those organs are significantly correlated with viral titers (r2=0.71, P <0.01). Pre-immunization with an HIV gag DNA vaccine reduced the luciferase activity in ovary from (6006+3141) RLU/mg protein in control group to (1538±463) RLU/mg protein in vaccine group (P=0.1969). Conclusions The luciferase activity in ovary could represent viral replication in vivo;, this rTTV-lucgag/mice model may be suitable to assess the protective efficacy of cytotoxic T-cell responses to HIV Gag with less tedious work and high through-put.

  8. Expression, purification, and evaluation of recombinant LecA as a candidate for an amebic colitis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, L; Abhyankar, M; Noor, Z; Read, K; Pedersen, K; White, R; Fox, C; Petri, W A; Lyerly, D

    2014-02-26

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic colitis and liver abscess, is considered a major enteric pathogen in residents and travelers to developing countries where the disease is endemic. Interaction of this protozoan parasite with the intestine is mediated through the binding of the trophozoite stage to intestinal mucin and epithelium via a galactose and N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Gal/GalNAc) lectin comprised of a disulfide linked heavy (ca. 180 kDa) and light chain (ca. 35 kDa) and a noncovalently bound intermediate subunit (ca. 150 kDa). Our efforts to develop a vaccine against this pathogen have focused on an internal 578 amino acid fragment, designated LecA, located within the cysteine-rich region of the heavy chain subunit because: (i) it is a major target of adherence-blocking antibodies of seropositive individuals and (ii) vaccination with his-tagged LecA provides protection in animal models. We developed a purification process for preparing highly purified non-tagged LecA using a codon-optimized gene expressed in Escherichia coli. The process consisted of: (i) cell lysis, collection and washing of inclusion bodies; (ii) solubilization and refolding of denatured LecA; and (iii) a polishing gel filtration step. The purified fragment existed primarily as a random coil with β-sheet structure, contained low endotoxin and nucleic acid, was highly immunoreactive, and elicited antibodies that recognized native lectin and that inhibited in vitro adherence of trophozoites to CHO cells. Immunization of CBA mice with LecA resulted in significant protection against cecal colitis. Our procedure yields sufficient amounts of highly purified LecA for future studies on stability, immunogenicity, and protection with protein-adjuvant formulations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Jamshidi, Shahram; Shirian, Sadegh; Mahdavi, Niousha; Hassankhani, Mehdi; Daneshbod, Yahya; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL. PMID:26197085

  10. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shahbazi

    Full Text Available Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL.

  11. B cells from knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody b12 carry an innocuous B cell receptor responsive to HIV vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B; Doores, Katherine J; Aoki-Ota, Miyo; Le, Khoa; Schief, William R; Wyatt, Richard T; Burton, Dennis R; Nemazee, David

    2013-09-15

    Broadly neutralizing Abs against HIV protect from infection, but their routine elicitation by vaccination has not been achieved. To generate small animal models to test vaccine candidates, we have generated targeted transgenic ("knock-in") mice expressing, in the physiological Ig H and L chain loci, two well-studied broadly neutralizing Abs: 4E10, which interacts with the membrane proximal external region of gp41, and b12, which binds to the CD4 binding site on gp120. 4E10HL mice are described in the companion article (Doyle-Cooper et al., J. Immunol. 191: 3186-3191). In this article, we describe b12 mice. B cells in b12HL mice, in contrast to the case in 4E10 mice, were abundant and essentially monoclonal, retaining the b12 specificity. In cell culture, b12HL B cells responded avidly to HIV envelope gp140 trimers and to BCR ligands. Upon transfer to wild-type recipients, b12HL B cells responded robustly to vaccination with gp140 trimers. Vaccinated b12H mice, although generating abundant precursors and Abs with affinity for Env, were unable to rapidly generate neutralizing Abs, highlighting the importance of developing Ag forms that better focus responses to neutralizing epitopes. The b12HL and b12H mice should be useful in optimizing HIV vaccine candidates to elicit a neutralizing response while avoiding nonprotective specificities.

  12. Evaluation of Live Recombinant Nonpathogenic Leishmania tarentolae Expressing Cysteine Proteinase and A2 Genes as a Candidate Vaccine against Experimental Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Mehdi; Zahedifard, Farnaz; Taheri, Tahereh; Taslimi, Yasaman; Jamshidi, Shahram; Shirian, Sadegh; Mahdavi, Niousha; Hassankhani, Mehdi; Daneshbod, Yahya; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Papadopoulou, Barbara; Rafati, Sima

    2015-01-01

    Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis (CVL) is a major veterinary and public health problem caused by Leishmania infantum (L. infantum) in many endemic countries. It is a severe chronic disease with generalized parasite spread to the reticuloendothelial system, such as spleen, liver and bone marrow and is often fatal when left untreated. Control of VL in dogs would dramatically decrease infection pressure of L. infantum for humans, since dogs are the main domestic reservoir. In the past decade, various subunits and DNA antigens have been identified as potential vaccine candidates in experimental animal models, but none has been approved for human use so far. In this study, we vaccinated outbreed dogs with a prime-boost regimen based on recombinant L. tarentolae expressing the L. donovani A2 antigen along with cysteine proteinase genes (CPA and CPB without its unusual C-terminal extension (CPB-CTE) and evaluated its immunogenicity and protective immunity against L. infantum infectious challenge. We showed that vaccinated animals produced significantly higher levels of IgG2, but not IgG1, and also IFN-γ and TNF-α, but low IL-10 levels, before and after challenge as compared to control animals. Protection in dogs was also correlated with a strong DTH response and low parasite burden in the vaccinated group. Altogether, immunization with recombinant L. tarentolae A2-CPA-CPB-CTE was proven to be immunogenic and induced partial protection in dogs, hence representing a promising live vaccine candidate against CVL.

  13. Expression of Helicobacter pylori TonB protein in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana: toward production of vaccine antigens in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbina, Irina; Engstrand, Lars; Andersson, Sören; Strid, Ake

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to produce a recombinant version of the highly antigenic Helicobacter pylori TonB (iron-dependent siderophore transporter protein HP1341) in transgenic plants as a candidate oral vaccine antigen. Using Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer, we introduced three different constructs of the tonB gene into the genome of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We investigated transgene insertion by PCR, produced TonB antibodies for analysis of the production of the recombinant protein in plants, verified the identity of the protein produced by mass spectrometry analysis, and analyzed the number of genetic inserts in the plants by Southern blotting. Three different constructs of the expression cassette (full-length tonB, tonB truncated in the 5' end removing the codons for a transmembrane helix, and the latter construct with codons for the endoplasmic reticulum SEKDEL retention signal added to the 3' end) were used to find the most effective way to express the TonB antigen. Production of TonB protein was detected in plants transformed with each of the constructs, confirmed by both Western blotting and mass spectrometry analysis. No considerable differences in protein expression from the three different constructs were observed. The protein concentration in the plants was at least 0.05% of the total soluble proteins. The Helicobacter pylori TonB protein can be produced in Arabidopsis thaliana plants in a form that is recognizable by rabbit anti-TonB antiserum. These TonB-expressing plants are highly suitable for animal studies of oral administration as a route for immunization against Helicobacter infections. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Expression and intercellular trafficking of the VP22 protein of CVI988/Rispens vaccine strain of Marek's disease virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN HongJun; SONG CuiPing; QIN AiJian; ZHANG ChenFei

    2007-01-01

    The viral protein 22 (VP22) in the tegument of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1) plays an important role in cell-to-cell spread and viral propagation. Antiserum against the carboxyl terminus of VP22 was prepared by immunizing mice with recombinant VP22 expressed in E. coli, and used to investigate its expression in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells infected with different MDV-1 strains. At an infection dose of PFU=50, intercellular trafficking of the VP22 into the nuclei of the surrounding receipt cells was detected as early as 3 hours post infection. By 6 hours after infection (before viral plague formation), the protein was detected in the whole nuclei of the recipient cells with no difference among MDV-1 strains CVI988/Rispens, GA and RB1B. Intra-nuclear accumulation of the VP22 protein was further increased when the viral plagues started to form. These results indicate that, albeit the existence of the 201TKSERT206 deletion, the VP22 of the CVI988/Rispens vaccine strain has also intercellular-trafficking function, which might serve as a potential alternative delivering protein instead of virulent strains VP22.

  15. Evaluation and Selection of Appropriate Reference Genes for Real-Time Quantitative PCR Analysis of Gene Expression in Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) during Vaccination and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Erlong; Wang, Kaiyu; Chen, Defang; Wang, Jun; He, Yang; Long, Bo; Yang, Lei; Yang, Qian; Geng, Yi; Huang, Xiaoli; Ouyang, Ping; Lai, Weimin

    2015-04-30

    qPCR as a powerful and attractive methodology has been widely applied to aquaculture researches for gene expression analyses. However, the suitable reference selection is critical for normalizing target genes expression in qPCR. In the present study, six commonly used endogenous controls were selected as candidate reference genes to evaluate and analyze their expression levels, stabilities and normalization to immune-related gene IgM expression during vaccination and infection in spleen of tilapia with RefFinder and GeNorm programs. The results showed that all of these candidate reference genes exhibited transcriptional variations to some extent at different periods. Among them, EF1A was the most stable reference with RefFinder, followed by 18S rRNA, ACTB, UBCE, TUBA and GAPDH respectively and the optimal number of reference genes for IgM normalization under different experiment sets was two with GeNorm. Meanwhile, combination the Cq (quantification cycle) value and the recommended comprehensive ranking of reference genes, EF1A and ACTB, the two optimal reference genes, were used together as reference genes for accurate analysis of immune-related gene expression during vaccination and infection in Nile tilapia with qPCR. Moreover, the highest IgM expression level was at two weeks post-vaccination when normalized to EF1A, 18S rRNA, ACTB, and EF1A together with ACTB compared to one week post-vaccination before normalizing, which was also consistent with the IgM antibody titers detection by ELISA.

  16. Vaccine efficacy in senescent mice challenged with recombinant SARS-CoV bearing epidemic and zoonotic spike variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Deming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV was identified as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, a disease characterized by severe pneumonia that sometimes results in death. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that crossed the species barrier, most likely originating from bats or from other species including civets, raccoon dogs, domestic cats, swine, and rodents. A SARS-CoV vaccine should confer long-term protection, especially in vulnerable senescent populations, against both the 2003 epidemic strains and zoonotic strains that may yet emerge from animal reservoirs. We report the comprehensive investigation of SARS vaccine efficacy in young and senescent mice following homologous and heterologous challenge.Using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP expressing the 2003 epidemic Urbani SARS-CoV strain spike (S glycoprotein (VRP-S or the nucleocapsid (N protein from the same strain (VRP-N, we demonstrate that VRP-S, but not VRP-N vaccines provide complete short- and long-term protection against homologous strain challenge in young and senescent mice. To test VRP vaccine efficacy against a heterologous SARS-CoV, we used phylogenetic analyses, synthetic biology, and reverse genetics to construct a chimeric virus (icGDO3-S encoding a synthetic S glycoprotein gene of the most genetically divergent human strain, GDO3, which clusters among the zoonotic SARS-CoV. icGD03-S replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cells and in the lungs of young and senescent mice, and was highly resistant to neutralization with antisera directed against the Urbani strain. Although VRP-S vaccines provided complete short-term protection against heterologous icGD03-S challenge in young mice, only limited protection was seen in vaccinated senescent animals. VRP-N vaccines not only failed to protect from homologous or heterologous challenge, but resulted in enhanced immunopathology with eosinophilic

  17. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Live L. tarentolae Expressing KMP11-NTGP96-GFP Fusion as a Vaccine Candidate against Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis Caused by L. infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid NASIRI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of present study was to evaluate the protective efficacy of live recombinant L. tarentolae expressing KMP11-NTGP96-GFP fusion as candidates for live engineered recombinant vaccine against visceral leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice.Methods: KMP-11 and NT-GP96 genes cloned into the pJET1.2/blunt cloning vector and then into pEGFP-N1 expression vector. The KMP-11, NT-GP96 and GFP fused in pEGFP-N1 and subcloned into Leishmanian pLEXSY-neo vector. Finally this construct was transferred to L. tarentolae by electroporation. Tranfection was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, WESTERN blot, flowcytometry and RT-PCR. Protective efficacy of this construct was evaluated as a vaccine candidate against visceral leishmaniasis. Parasite burden, humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed before and at 4 weeks after challenge.Results: KMP- NT-Gp96-GFP Fusion was cloned successfully into pLEXSY -neo vector and this construct successfully transferred to L. tarentolae. Finding indicated that immunization with L. tarentolae tarentolae-KMP11-NTGP96-GFP provides significant protection against visceral leishmaniasis and was able to induce an increased expression of IFN-γ and IgG2a. Following challenge, a reduced parasite load in the spleen of the KMP11-NTGP96-GFP immunized group was detected.Conclusion: The present study is the first to use a combination of a Leishmania antigen with an immunologic antigen in live recombinant L. tarentolae and results suggest that L. tarentolae-KMP11-NTGP96-GFP could be considered as a potential tool in vaccination against visceral leishmaniasis and this vaccination strategy could provide a potent rout for future vaccine development. 

  18. Yeast-expressed recombinant protein of the receptor-binding domain in SARS-CoV spike protein with deglycosylated forms as a SARS vaccine candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hsiang; Du, Lanying; Chag, Shivali M; Ma, Cuiqing; Tricoche, Nancy; Tao, Xinrong; Seid, Christopher A; Hudspeth, Elissa M; Lustigman, Sara; Tseng, Chien-Te K; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Zhan, Bin; Jiang, Shibo

    2014-01-01

    Development of vaccines for preventing a future pandemic of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and for biodefense preparedness is urgently needed. Our previous studies have shown that a candidate SARS vaccine antigen consisting of the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of SARS-CoV spike protein can induce potent neutralizing antibody responses and protection against SARS-CoV challenge in vaccinated animals. To optimize expression conditions for scale-up production of the RBD vaccine candidate, we hypothesized that this could be potentially achieved by removing glycosylation sites in the RBD protein. In this study, we constructed two RBD protein variants: 1) RBD193-WT (193-aa, residues 318-510) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD193-N1, RBD193-N2, RBD193-N3); 2) RBD219-WT (219-aa, residues 318-536) and its deglycosylated forms (RBD219-N1, RBD219-N2, and RBD219-N3). All constructs were expressed as recombinant proteins in yeast. The purified recombinant proteins of these constructs were compared for their antigenicity, functionality and immunogenicity in mice using alum as the adjuvant. We found that RBD219-N1 exhibited high expression yield, and maintained its antigenicity and functionality. More importantly, RBD219-N1 induced significantly stronger RBD-specific antibody responses and a higher level of neutralizing antibodies in immunized mice than RBD193-WT, RBD193-N1, RBD193-N3, or RBD219-WT. These results suggest that RBD219-N1 could be selected as an optimal SARS vaccine candidate for further development.

  19. Antibody-mediated protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge of macaques immunized with alphavirus replicon particles and boosted with trimeric envelope glycoprotein in MF59 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Kan, Elaine; Legg, Harold; Lian, Ying; Bost, Kristen; Zhou, Fengmin; Goodsell, Amanda; Zur Megede, Jan; Polo, John; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Otten, Gillis R; Miller, Christopher J; Vajdy, Michael; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2010-06-01

    We have previously shown that rhesus macaques were partially protected against high-dose intravenous challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162P4) following sequential immunization with alphavirus replicon particles (VRP) of a chimeric recombinant VEE/SIN alphavirus (derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEE] and the Sindbis virus [SIN]) encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1(SF162) gp140DeltaV2 envelope (Env) and trimeric Env protein in MF59 adjuvant (R. Xu, I. K. Srivastava, C. E. Greer, I. Zarkikh, Z. Kraft, L. Kuller, J. M. Polo, S. W. Barnett, and L. Stamatatos, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 22:1022-1030, 2006). The protection did not require T-cell immune responses directed toward simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag. We extend those findings here to demonstrate antibody-mediated protection against mucosal challenge in macaques using prime-boost regimens incorporating both intramuscular and mucosal routes of delivery. The macaques in the vaccination groups were primed with VRP and then boosted with Env protein in MF59 adjuvant, or they were given VRP intramuscular immunizations alone and then challenged with SHIV(SF162P4) (intrarectal challenge). The results demonstrated that these vaccines were able to effectively protect the macaques to different degrees against subsequent mucosal SHIV challenge, but most noteworthy, all macaques that received the intramuscular VRP prime plus Env protein boost were completely protected. A statistically significant association was observed between the titer of virus neutralizing and binding antibodies as well as the avidity of anti-Env antibodies measured prechallenge and protection from infection. These results highlight the merit of the alphavirus replicon vector prime plus Env protein boost vaccine approach for the induction of protective antibody responses and are of particular relevance to advancing our understanding of the potential correlates of immune protection against

  20. Expression of chicken parvovirus VP2 in chicken embryo fibroblasts requires codon optimization for production of naked DNA and vectored meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatz, Stephen J; Volkening, Jeremy D; Mullis, Robert; Li, Fenglan; Mercado, John; Zsak, Laszlo

    2013-10-01

    Meleagrid herpesvirus type 1 (MeHV-1) is an ideal vector for the expression of antigens from pathogenic avian organisms in order to generate vaccines. Chicken parvovirus (ChPV) is a widespread infectious virus that causes serious disease in chickens. It is one of the etiological agents largely suspected in causing Runting Stunting Syndrome (RSS) in chickens. Initial attempts to express the wild-type gene encoding the capsid protein VP2 of ChPV by insertion into the thymidine kinase gene of MeHV-1 were unsuccessful. However, transient expression of a codon-optimized synthetic VP2 gene cloned into the bicistronic vector pIRES2-Ds-Red2, could be demonstrated by immunocytochemical staining of transfected chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs). Red fluorescence could also be detected in these transfected cells since the red fluorescent protein gene is downstream from the internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Strikingly, fluorescence could not be demonstrated in cells transiently transfected with the bicistronic vector containing the wild-type or non-codon-optimized VP2 gene. Immunocytochemical staining of these cells also failed to demonstrate expression of wild-type VP2, indicating that the lack of expression was at the RNA level and the VP2 protein was not toxic to CEFs. Chickens vaccinated with a DNA vaccine consisting of the bicistronic vector containing the codon-optimized VP2 elicited a humoral immune response as measured by a VP2-specific ELISA. This VP2 codon-optimized bicistronic cassette was rescued into the MeHV-1 genome generating a vectored vaccine against ChPV disease.

  1. Brucellosis vaccines for livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zakia I; Pascual, David W

    2016-11-15

    Brucellosis is a livestock disease responsible for fetal loss due to abortions. Worldwide, this disease has profound economic and social impact by reducing the ability of livestock producers to provide an adequate supply of disease-free meat and dairy products. In addition to its presence in domesticated animals, brucellosis is harbored in a number of wildlife species creating new disease reservoirs, which adds to the difficulty of eradicating this disease. Broad and consistent use of the available vaccines would contribute in reducing the incidence of brucellosis. Unfortunately, this practice is not common. In addition, the current brucellosis vaccines cannot provide sterilizing immunity, and in certain circumstances, vaccinated livestock are not protected against co-mingling Brucella-infected wildlife. Given that these vaccines are inadequate for conferring complete protection for some vaccinated livestock, alternatives are being sought, and these include genetic modifications of current vaccines or their reformulations. Alternatively, many groups have sought to develop new vaccines. Subunit vaccines, delivered as a combination of soluble vaccine plus adjuvant or the heterologous expression of Brucella epitopes by different vaccine vectors are currently being tested. New live attenuated Brucella vaccines are also being developed and tested in their natural hosts. Yet, what is rarely considered is the route of vaccination which could improve vaccine efficacy. Since Brucella infections are mostly transmitted mucosally, mucosal delivery of a vaccine has the potential of eliciting a more robust protective immune response for improved efficacy. Hence, this review will examine these questions and provide the status of new vaccines for livestock brucellosis.

  2. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis C virus replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to a benzofuran inhibitor, HCV-796.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Anita Y M; Cheng, Huiming; Johann, Stephen; Mullen, Stanley; Chunduru, Srinivas K; Young, Dorothy C; Bard, Joel; Chopra, Rajiv; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Mansour, Tarek; O'Connell, John

    2008-09-01

    HCV-796 selectively inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In hepatoma cells containing a genotype 1b HCV replicon, HCV-796 reduced HCV RNA levels by 3 to 4 log(10) HCV copies/mug total RNA (the concentration of the compound that inhibited 50% of the HCV RNA level was 9 nM). Cells bearing replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to HCV-796 were generated in the presence of HCV-796, followed by G418 selection. Sequence analysis of the NS5B gene derived from the replicon variants revealed several amino acid changes within 5 A of the drug-binding pocket. Specifically, mutations were observed at Leu314, Cys316, Ile363, Ser365, and Met414 of NS5B, which directly interact with HCV-796. The impacts of the amino acid substitutions on viral fitness and drug susceptibility were examined in recombinant replicons and NS5B enzymes with the single-amino-acid mutations. The replicon variants were 10- to 1,000-fold less efficient in forming colonies in cells than the wild-type replicon; the S365L variant failed to establish a stable cell line. Other variants (L314F, I363V, and M414V) had four- to ninefold-lower steady-state HCV RNA levels. Reduced binding affinity with HCV-796 was demonstrated in an enzyme harboring the C316Y mutation. The effects of these resistance mutations were structurally rationalized using X-ray crystallography data. While different levels of resistance to HCV-796 were observed in the replicon and enzyme variants, these variants retained their susceptibilities to pegylated interferon, ribavirin, and other HCV-specific inhibitors. The combined virological, biochemical, biophysical, and structural approaches revealed the mechanism of resistance in the variants selected by the potent polymerase inhibitor HCV-796.

  3. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqun He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning.

  4. Towards the development of an oral vaccine against porcine cysticercosis: expression of the protective HP6/TSOL18 antigen in transgenic carrots cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal-Escalante, Elizabeth; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Hernández, Marisela; Cervantes, Jacquelynne; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; Rosas, Gabriela; Garate, Teresa; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio

    2016-03-01

    The Taenia solium HP6/TSOL18 antigen was produced in carrot cells, yielding an immunogenic protein that induced significant protection in an experimental murine model against T. crassiceps cysticercosis when orally administered. This result supports the potential of HP6/TSOL18-carrot as a low-cost anti-cysticercosis vaccine candidate. Cysticercosis is a zoonosis caused by Taenia solium that can be prevented by interrupting the parasite life cycle through pig vaccination. Several injectable vaccine candidates have been reported, but the logistic difficulties and costs for its application limited its use in nationwide control programs. Oral plant-based vaccines can deal with this limitation, because of their easy administration and low cost. A stable expression of the HP6/TSOL18 anti-T. solium cysticercosis protective antigen in carrot calli transformed with an optimized transgene is herein reported. An antigen accumulation up to 14 µg g(-1) of dry-weight biomass was achieved in the generated carrot lines. Mouse immunization with one of the transformed calli induced both specific IgG and IgA anti-HP6/TSOL18 antibodies. A statistically significant reduction in the expected number of T. crassiceps cysticerci was observed in mice orally immunized with carrot-made HP6/TSOL18, in a similar extent to that obtained by subcutaneous immunization with recombinant HP6/TSOL18 protein. In this study, a new oral plant-made version of the HP6/TSOL18 anti-cysticercosis vaccine is reported. The vaccine candidate should be further tested against porcine cysticercosis.

  5. An OMV Vaccine Derived from a Capsular Group B Meningococcus with Constitutive FetA Expression: Preclinical Evaluation of Immunogenicity and Toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnstein Norheim

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of effective protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against capsular group C meningococcal disease in Europe, meningococci of capsular group B remain a major cause of death and can result in debilitating sequelae. The outer membrane proteins PorA and FetA have previously been shown to induce bactericidal antibodies in humans. Despite considerable antigenic variation among PorA and FetA OMPs in meningococci, systematic molecular epidemiological studies revealed this variation is highly structured so that a limited repertoire of antigenic types is congruent with the hyperinvasive meningococcal lineages that have caused most of the meningococcal disease in Europe in recent decades. Here we describe the development of a prototype vaccine against capsular group B meningococcal infection based on a N. meningitidis isolate genetically engineered to have constitutive expression of the outer membrane protein FetA. Deoxycholate outer membrane vesicles (dOMVs extracted from cells cultivated in modified Frantz medium contained 21.8% PorA protein, 7.7% FetA protein and 0.03 μg LPS per μg protein (3%. The antibody response to the vaccine was tested in three mouse strains and the toxicological profile of the vaccine was tested in New Zealand white rabbits. Administration of the vaccine, MenPF-1, when given by intramuscular injection on 4 occasions over a 9 week period, was well tolerated in rabbits up to 50 μg/dose, with no evidence of systemic toxicity. These data indicated that the MenPF-1 vaccine had a toxicological profile suitable for testing in a phase I clinical trial.

  6. An OMV Vaccine Derived from a Capsular Group B Meningococcus with Constitutive FetA Expression: Preclinical Evaluation of Immunogenicity and Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, Gunnstein; Sanders, Holly; Mellesdal, Jardar W; Sundfør, Idunn; Chan, Hannah; Brehony, Carina; Vipond, Caroline; Dold, Chris; Care, Rory; Saleem, Muhammad; Maiden, Martin C J; Derrick, Jeremy P; Feavers, Ian; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Following the introduction of effective protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines against capsular group C meningococcal disease in Europe, meningococci of capsular group B remain a major cause of death and can result in debilitating sequelae. The outer membrane proteins PorA and FetA have previously been shown to induce bactericidal antibodies in humans. Despite considerable antigenic variation among PorA and FetA OMPs in meningococci, systematic molecular epidemiological studies revealed this variation is highly structured so that a limited repertoire of antigenic types is congruent with the hyperinvasive meningococcal lineages that have caused most of the meningococcal disease in Europe in recent decades. Here we describe the development of a prototype vaccine against capsular group B meningococcal infection based on a N. meningitidis isolate genetically engineered to have constitutive expression of the outer membrane protein FetA. Deoxycholate outer membrane vesicles (dOMVs) extracted from cells cultivated in modified Frantz medium contained 21.8% PorA protein, 7.7% FetA protein and 0.03 μg LPS per μg protein (3%). The antibody response to the vaccine was tested in three mouse strains and the toxicological profile of the vaccine was tested in New Zealand white rabbits. Administration of the vaccine, MenPF-1, when given by intramuscular injection on 4 occasions over a 9 week period, was well tolerated in rabbits up to 50 μg/dose, with no evidence of systemic toxicity. These data indicated that the MenPF-1 vaccine had a toxicological profile suitable for testing in a phase I clinical trial.

  7. A vesicular stomatitis virus replicon-based bioassay for the rapid and sensitive determination of multi-species type I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berger Rentsch

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN comprise a family of cytokines that signal through a common cellular receptor to induce a plethora of genes with antiviral and other activities. Recombinant IFNs are used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection, multiple sclerosis, and certain malignancies. The capability of type I IFN to suppress virus replication and resultant cytopathic effects is frequently used to measure their bioactivity. However, these assays are time-consuming and require appropriate biosafety containment. In this study, an improved IFN assay is presented which is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV replicon encoding two reporter proteins, firefly luciferase and green fluorescent protein. The vector lacks the essential envelope glycoprotein (G gene of VSV and is propagated on a G protein-expressing transgenic cell line. Several mammalian and avian cells turned out to be susceptible to infection with the complemented replicon particles. Infected cells readily expressed the reporter proteins at high levels five hours post infection. When human fibroblasts were treated with serial dilutions of human IFN-β prior to infection, reporter expression was accordingly suppressed. This method was more sensitive and faster than a classical IFN bioassay based on VSV cytopathic effects. In addition, the antiviral activity of human IFN-λ (interleukin-29, a type III IFN, was determined on Calu-3 cells. Both IFN-β and IFN-λ were acid-stable, but only IFN-β was resistant to alkaline treatment. The antiviral activities of canine, porcine, and avian type I IFN were analysed with cell lines derived from the corresponding species. This safe bioassay will be useful for the rapid and sensitive quantification of multi-species type I IFN and potentially other antiviral cytokines.

  8. Temperature influences the expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following DNA vaccination and VHS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Gautier, Laurent; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    A DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein (G) genes of the salmonid rhabdovirus viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) has proven highly efficient against the disease caused by this virus in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Several studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both...

  9. A recombinant rabies vaccine expressing the trimeric form of the glycoprotein confers enhanced immunogenicity and protection in outbred mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koraka, Penelope; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Cox, Manon; Chubet, Rick; Amerongen, Geert van; Lövgren-Bengtsson, Karen; Martina, Byron E E; Roose, Jouke; Rottier, Peter J M; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-01-01

    Rabies is a disease characterized by an invariably lethal encephalitis of viral origin that can be controlled by preventive vaccination programs of wildlife, domestic animals and humans in areas with a high risk of exposure. Currently available vaccines are expensive, cumbersome to produce and requi

  10. Adjuvant Vaccine Immunotherapy of Resected, Clinically Node-negative Melanoma: Long-Term Outcome and Impact of HLA Class I Antigen Expression on Overall Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, William E.; Unger, Joseph M.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Porter, Mark J.; Thompson, John A.; Kempf, Raymond A.; Othus, Megan; Ribas, Antoni; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Associations between HLA class I antigen expression and efficacy of a melanoma vaccine (Melacine) were initially described in stage IV melanoma. Similar associations were observed in S9035, a phase III adjuvant trial evaluating Melacine for two years versus observation in patients with stage II melanoma. This report provides long-term results. The effects of treatment on relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated, and pre-specified analyses investigated associations between treatment and HLA expression. Multivariable analyses were adjusted for tumor thickness, ulceration and site, method of nodal staging and sex. P=.01 was considered significant in subset analyses to account for multiple comparisons. For the entire study population of 689 patients, there were no significant differences in RFS or OS by arm. HLA serotyping was performed on 553 (80%) patients (vaccine 294, observation 259). Among the subpopulation with HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 serotype, vaccine arm patients (n=178) had marginally improved RFS (adjusted P=.02) and significantly improved OS compared with observation arm patients (n=145), with 10-year OS of 75% and 63%, respectively (hazard ratio 0.62, 99% CI 0.37-1.02, P=.01). There was no impact of HLA-A2 and/or HLA-Cw3 expression among observation arm patients. Analysis of mature data from S9035 indicates a significant OS benefit from adjuvant vaccine therapy for HLA-A2- and/or HLA-Cw3-expressing melanoma patients. The possibility of interactions between HLA type and outcome should be considered in future immunotherapy trials. Further investigations of melanoma-associated antigens present in Melacine and presented by HLA-A2 and HLA-Cw3 may be warranted. PMID:24994597

  11. Active and passive immune responses to transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) in swine inoculated with recombinant baculovirus-expressed TGEV spike glycoprotein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoup, D I; Jackwood, D J; Saif, L J

    1997-03-01

    Baculovirus-expressed transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) spike (S) glycoprotein vaccines were inoculated parenterally in swine to determine whether such vaccines could induce serum and whey virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies and protective lactogenic immunity for TGEV-challenge-exposed pigs. ANIMALS AND PROCEDURES: 3 recombinant baculoviruses that expressed full or partial length TGEV Miller strain S glycoproteins were inoculated SC in 17 conventionally raised 11-day-old TGEV-seronegative pigs to determine whether the recombinant S glycoproteins would elicit serum VN antibodies. Eleven TGEV-seronegative pregnant sows were inoculated SC or intramammarily with subunit vaccines (R2-2 or R3-5) or control proteins. Pigs born to 9 of the 11 sows were challenge exposed at 4 to 5 days of age with the virulent Miller strain, and passive immunity was assessed. Serum and whey antibody responses to TGEV were analyzed by VN and ELISA testing. Recombinant S glycoproteins (R2-2 or R3-5) containing the 4 major antigenic sites induced similar VN antibody titers to TGEV in serum and colostrum, but low (some sows) or no VN antibody titer was detected in milk. Subcutaneous inoculation of sows with R2-2 or R3-5 elicited IgG, but not IgA antibodies to TGEV in colostrum. Morbidity was 100%, and mortality ranged from 20 to 80% in TGEV challenge-exposed pigs nursing sows inoculated SC or intramammarily with TGEV S glycoprotein vaccines. Parenterally administered TGEV S glycoprotein vaccines elicit VN antibodies to TGEV in serum and colostrum that do not fully provide active or passive immunity in swine.

  12. Cancer Vaccines: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sunil; Prendergast, George C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine approaches for cancer differ from traditional vaccine approaches for infectious disease in tending to focus on clearing active disease rather than preventing disease. In this review, we provide a brief overview of different types of vaccines and adjuvants that have been investigated for the purpose of controlling cancer burdens in patients, some of which are approved for clinical use or in late-stage clinical trials, such as the personalized dendritic cell vaccine sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the recombinant viral prostate cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac-VF). Vaccines against human viruses implicated in the development and progression of certain cancers, such as human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, are not considered here. Cancers express "altered self" antigens that tend to induce weaker responses than the "foreign" antigens expressed by infectious agents. Thus, immune stimulants and adjuvant approaches have been explored widely. Vaccine types considered include autologous patient-derived immune cell vaccines, tumor antigen-expressing recombinant virus vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines, and heterologous whole-cell vaccines derived from established human tumor cell lines. Opportunities to develop effective cancer vaccines may benefit from seminal recent advances in understanding how immunosuppressive barricades are erected by tumors to mediate immune escape. In particular, targeted ablation of these barricades with novel agents, such as the immune checkpoint drug ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) approved recently for clinical use, may offer significant leverage to vaccinologists seeking to control and prevent malignancy.

  13. A Non-oncogenic HPV 16 E6/E7 Vaccine Enhances Treatment of HPV Expressing Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieking, Bryant G.; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Spanos, William C.; Lee, Kimberly M.; Vermeer, Paola; Lee, Walter T.; Xu, Younong; Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S.; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Balint, Joseph P.; Jones, Frank R.; Lee, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative factor for greater than 90% of cervical cancers and 25% of head and neck cancers. The incidence of HPV positive (+) head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) has greatly increased in the last 30 years. E6 and E7 are the two key viral oncoproteins that induce and propagate cellular transformation. An immune response generated during cisplatin/radiation therapy improves tumor clearance of HPV(+) cancers. Augmenting this induced response during therapy with an adenoviral HPV16 E6/E7 vaccine improves long term survival in preclinical models. Here we describe the generation of an HPV16 E6/E7 construct, which contains mutations that render E6/E7 non-oncogenic, while preserving antigenicity. These mutations do not allow E6/E7 to degrade p53, pRb, PTPN13, or activate telomerase. Non-oncogenic E6/E7 (E6Δ/E7Δ) expressed as a stable integrant, or in the [E1-, E2b-] adenovirus, lacks the ability to transform human cells while retaining the ability to induce an HPV specific immune response. Moreover, E6Δ/E7Δ plus chemotherapy/radiation statistically enhances clearance of established HPV(+) cancer in vivo. PMID:22918471

  14. The vaccine efficacy of recombinant duck enteritis virus expressing secreted E with or without PrM proteins of duck tembusu virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Pucheng; Liu, Jinxiong; Jiang, Yongping; Zhao, Yuhui; Li, Qimeng; Wu, Li; He, Xijun; Chen, Hualan

    2014-09-15

    A newly emerged tembusu virus that causes egg-drop has been affecting ducks in China since 2010. Currently, no vaccine is available for this disease. A live attenuated duck enteritis virus (DEV; a herpesvirus) vaccine has been used routinely to control lethal DEV in ducks since the 1960s. Here, we constructed two recombinant DEVs by transfecting overlapping fosmid DNAs. One virus, rDEV-TE, expresses the truncated form of the envelope glycoprotein (TE) of duck tembusu virus (DTMUV), and the other virus, rDEV-PrM/TE, expresses both the TE and pre-membrane proteins (PrM). Animal study demonstrated that both recombinant viruses induced measurable anti-DTMUV neutralizing antibodies in ducks. After two doses of recombinant virus, rDEV-PrM/TE completely protected ducks from DTMUV challenge, whereas rDEV-TE only conferred partial protection. These results demonstrate that recombinant DEV expressing the TE and pre-membrane proteins is protective and can serve as a potential candidate vaccine to prevent DTMUV infection in ducks.

  15. Haemophilus parasuis Subunit Vaccines Based on Native Proteins with Affinity to Porcine Transferrin Prevent the Expression of Proinflammatory Chemokines and Cytokines in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Frandoloso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression of chemokines (CCL-2 and CXCL-8 and cytokines (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-10 was evaluated by RT-qPCR in colostrum-deprived pigs vaccinated and challenged with Haemophilus parasuis serovar 5. Two vaccines containing native proteins with affinity to porcine transferrin (NPAPTim and NPAPTit were tested, along with two control groups: one inoculated with PBS instead of antigen (challenge group (CHG, and another one nonimmunized and noninfected (blank group. The use of NPAPTim and NPAPTit resulted in complete protection against H. parasuis (no clinical signs and/or lesions, and both vaccines were capable of avoiding the expression of the proinflammatory molecules to levels similar to physiological values in blank group. However, overexpression of all proinflammatory molecules was observed in CHG group, mainly in the target infection tissues (brain, lungs, and spleen. High expression of CCL-2, CXCL-8, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 can be considered one of the characteristics of H. parasuis infection by serovar 5.

  16. Construction of a recombinant Lactococcus lactis strain expressing a fusion protein of Omp22 and HpaA from Helicobact