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Sample records for replicon rvfv vaccines

  1. Alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, Ryan L; Harris, D L Hank; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2012-06-01

    The alphavirus replicon technology has been utilized for many years to develop vaccines for both veterinary and human applications. Many developments have been made to the replicon platform recently, resulting in improved safety and efficacy of replicon particle (RP) vaccines. This review provides a broad overview of the replicon technology and safety features of the system and discusses the current literature on RP and replicon-based vaccines.

  2. An alphavirus replicon-derived candidate vaccine against Rift Valley fever virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, M T; Whitmore, A; Thompson, J; Parsons, M; Grobbelaar, A A; Kemp, A; Paweska, J T; Madric, K; White, L J; Swanepoel, R; Burt, F J

    2009-09-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus (genus Phlebovirus) associated with severe disease in livestock and fatal encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever in a proportion of infected humans. Although live attenuated and inactivated vaccines have been used in livestock, and on a limited scale in humans, there is a need for improved anti-RVFV vaccines. Towards this goal, Sindbis virus replicon vectors expressing the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins, as well as the non-structural nsM protein, were constructed and evaluated for their ability to induce protective immune responses against RVFV. These replicon vectors were shown to produce the RVFV glycoproteins to high levels in vitro and to induce systemic anti-RVFV antibody responses in immunized mice, as determined by RVFV-specific ELISA, fluorescent antibody tests, and demonstration of a neutralizing antibody response. Replicon vaccination also provided 100% protection against lethal RVFV challenge by either the intraperitoneal or intranasal route. Furthermore, preliminary results indicate that the replicon vectors elicit RVFV-specific neutralizing antibody responses in vaccinated sheep. These results suggest that alphavirus-based replicon vectors can induce protective immunity against RVFV, and that this approach merits further investigation into its potential utility as a RVFV vaccine.

  3. Paramyxovirus-based producton of Rift Valley fever virus replicon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Oreshkova, N.; Harders, F.; Bossers, A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Replicon-particle-based vaccines combine the efficacy of live-attenuated vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. Recently, we developed Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) replicon particles, also known as nonspreading RVFV (NSR), and demonstrated that a single vaccination with these

  4. Paramyxovirus-based producton of Rift Valley fever virus replicon particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Oreshkova, N.; Harders, F.; Bossers, A.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Replicon-particle-based vaccines combine the efficacy of live-attenuated vaccines with the safety of inactivated or subunit vaccines. Recently, we developed Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) replicon particles, also known as nonspreading RVFV (NSR), and demonstrated that a single vaccination with these

  5. Potent tetravalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Guo, Jin-Peng; An, Huai-Jie; Zhang, Shu-Ming; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-05-07

    Human botulism is commonly associated with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) serotypes A, B, E and F. This suggests that the greatest need is for a tetravalent vaccine that provides protection against all four of these serotypes. In current study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several tetravalent vaccines that protected mice against the four serotypes. Firstly, monovalent replicon vaccine against BoNT induced better antibody response and protection than that of corresponding conventional DNA vaccine. Secondly, dual-expression DNA replicon pSCARSE/FHc or replicon particle VRP-E/FHc vaccine was well resistant to the challenge of BoNT/E and BoNT/F mixture as a combination vaccine composed of two monovalent replicon vaccines. Finally, the dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle tetravalent vaccine could simultaneously and effectively neutralize and protect the four BoNT serotypes. Protection correlated directly with serum ELISA titers and neutralization antibody levels to BoNTs. Therefore, replicon-based DNA or particle might be effective vector to develop BoNT vaccines, which might be more desirable for use in clinical application than the conventional DNA vaccines. Our studies demonstrate the utility of combining dual-expression DNA replicon or replicon particle vaccines into multi-agent formulations as potent tetravalent vaccines for eliciting protective responses to four serotypes of BoNTs.

  6. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  7. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines

  8. Kunjin replicon-based simian immunodeficiency virus gag vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anruka, I.; Mokhonov, V.; Rattanasena, P.; Mokhonova, E.; Leung, J.Y.; Pijlman, G.P.; Cara, A.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2008-01-01

    An RNA-based, non-cytopathic replicon vector system, based on the flavivirus Kunjin, has shown considerable promise as a new vaccine delivery system. Here we describe the testing in mice of four different SIVmac239 gag vaccines delivered by Kunjin replicon virus-like-particles. The four vaccines enc

  9. Engineering a CTL-Tailored Replicon RNA Vaccine against PRRSV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Werder, Simea; Nielsen, Morten

    The development of vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been hampered by the high mutation rate and the multiple immunoevasive strategies of the virus. With the overall aim of designing a broad coverage vaccine that induces an effective CTL response...... detection in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, a vaccination-challenge experiment using 18 SLA-matched pigs is currently being conducted until July 2016 in which a test group and a control group are being vaccinated twice with VRPs expressing PRRSV epitopes and non-sense control epitopes...... will be available for IVIS. This study exemplifies how bioinformatics epitope prediction, recombinant SLA molecules and RNA virus replicon design can be used to engineer a replicating non-propagating vaccine tailored to deliver conserved and immunogenic CTL epitopes....

  10. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth A Reap; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A.; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E.; Negri, Sarah; Burnett,Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A.; Jeffrey D. Chulay

    2007-01-01

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, an...

  11. Potentiation of anthrax vaccines using protective antigen-expressing viral replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Chao; An, Huai-Jie; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Xu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    DNA vaccines require improvement for human use because they are generally weak stimulators of the immune system in humans. The efficacy of DNA vaccines can be improved using a viral replicon as vector to administer antigen of pathogen. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the conventional non-viral DNA, viral replicon DNA or viral replicon particles (VRP) vaccines encoding different forms of anthrax protective antigen (PA) for specific immunity and protective potency against anthrax. Our current results clearly suggested that these viral replicon DNA or VRP vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) induced stronger PA-specific immune responses than the conventional non-viral DNA vaccines when encoding the same antigen forms, which resulted in potent protection against challenge with the Bacillus anthracis strain A16R. Additionally, the naked PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines without the need for high doses or demanding particular delivery regimens elicited robust immune responses and afforded completely protective potencies, which indicated the potential of the SFV replicon as vector of anthrax vaccines for use in clinical application. Therefore, our results suggest that these PA-expressing SFV replicon DNA or VRP vaccines may be suitable as candidate vaccines against anthrax. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Pentavalent replicon vaccines against botulinum neurotoxins and tetanus toxin using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus replicon vectors

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The clostridial neurotoxin (CNT) family includes botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), serotypes A, B, E, and F of which can cause human botulism, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT), which is the causative agent of tetanus. This suggests that the greatest need is for a multivalent or multiagent vaccine that provides protection against all 5 agents. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of generating several pentavalent replicon vaccines that protected mice against BoNTs and TeNT. First, we evaluat...

  13. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon particle vaccine for cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reap, Elizabeth A; Morris, John; Dryga, Sergey A; Maughan, Maureen; Talarico, Todd; Esch, Robert E; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce; Graham, Andrew; Olmsted, Robert A; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-10-16

    We used a replication-incompetent, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the extracellular domain of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) glycoprotein B or a pp65/IE1 fusion protein. Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots and clinical lots of each alphavirus replicon vaccine component. The vaccine induced high-titered antibody responses in mice and rabbits, as measured by ELISA and CMV neutralization assays, and robust T-cell responses in mice, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. A toxicity study in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any toxicology parameter. These studies support clinical testing of this novel CMV alphavirus replicon vaccine in humans.

  14. [The vaccines based on the replicon of the venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus against viral hemorrhagic fevers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A A; Plekhanova, T M; Sidorova, O N; Borisevich, S V; Makhlay, A A

    2015-01-01

    The status of the various recombinant DNA and RNA-derived candidate vaccines, as well as the Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis virus (VEEV) replicon vaccine system against extremely hazardous viral hemorrhagic fevers, were reviewed. The VEEV-based replication-incompetent vectors offer attractive features in terms of safety, high expression levels of the heterologous viral antigen, tropism to dendritic cells, robust immune responses, protection efficacy, low potential for pre-existing anti-vector immunity and possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines were tested. These features of the VEEV replicon system hold much promise for the development of new generation vaccine candidates against viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  15. Salmonid alphavirus-based replicon vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA): impact of immunization route and interactions of the replicon vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Hoeijmakers, Mathieu; Rimstad, Espen

    2014-02-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV)-based replicon encoding the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE), pSAV/HE, is an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Delivered intramuscularly (i.m.), the replicon vaccine provides high protection against subsequent ISAV challenge in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and induces a strong innate response locally at the injection site. This may be beneficial and could warrant reduced doses and improved efficacy compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In the present study, we found that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine did not induce protection, neither alone or in combination with a sub-potent, inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine given i.p. No significant differences between the two immunization routes regarding systemic immune responses could be observed. I.m. injection of the replicon vector encoding a non-viral gene or the protective glycoprotein (G protein) from the heterologous viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) induced no protection against ISA. Although the replicons without the ISAV HE did induce IFN-signaling pathways at the muscle injection site similar to the pSAV/HE replicon they did not improve the efficacy of a sub-potent inactivated low-dose ISAV vaccine delivered i.p. Moreover, there was a tendency for reduced efficacy of the pSAV/HE replicon vaccine injected i.m. when co-injected with the replicon encoding the VHSV G protein, which previously, after DNA vaccination, have been reported to induce cross-protection against heterologous virus challenge in fish.

  16. Role of TLR3 in the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebold, S S; Schulz, O; Alexopoulou, L; Leitner, W W; Flavell, R A; Reis e Sousa, C

    2009-03-01

    Replicon plasmids encoding an alphavirus RNA replicase constitute an alternative to conventional DNA plasmids with promise for DNA vaccination in humans. Replicase activity amplifies the levels of transgene mRNA through a copying process involving double-stranded (ds) RNA intermediates, which contribute to vaccine immunogenicity by activating innate antiviral responses. Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a dsRNA innate immune receptor expressed by antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we test the hypothesis that TLR3 is necessary for the immunogenicity of replicon plasmid-based DNA vaccines. We show that mouse CD8 alpha(+) DC phagocytose dying replicon plasmid-transfected cells in vitro and are activated in a TLR3-dependent manner by dsRNA present within those cells. However, we find that cytotoxic T-cell responses to a replicon plasmid intramuscular vaccine are not diminished in the absence of TLR3 in vivo. Our results underscore the potential role of TLR3 in mediating immune activation by dsRNA-bearing replicon plasmid-transfected cells and indicate that other innate sensing pathways can compensate for TLR3 absence in vivo.

  17. Utility of the Sindbis replicon system as an Env-targeted HIV vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center, Rob J; Miller, Annett; Wheatley, Adam K; Campbell, Shahan M; Siebentritt, Carly; Purcell, Damian F J

    2013-04-26

    Sindbis replicon-based vaccine vectors are designed to combine the immunostimulatory properties of replicating viruses with the superior safety profile of non-replicating systems. In this study we performed a detailed assessment of Sindbis (SIN) replicon vectors expressing HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) for the induction of cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in a small animal model. SIN-derived virus-like particles (VLP) elicited Env-specific antibody responses that were detectable after boosting with recombinant Env protein. This priming effect could be mediated by replicon activity alone but may be enhanced by Env attached to the surface of VLP, offering a potential advantage for this mode of replicon delivery for Env based vaccination strategies. In contrast, the Env-specific CTL responses that were elicited by SIN-VLP were entirely dependent on replicon activity. SIN-VLP priming induced more durable humoral responses than immunization with protein only. This is important from a vaccine perspective, given the intrinsic tendency of Env to induce short-lived antibody responses in the context of vaccination or infection. These results indicate that further efforts to enhance the magnitude and durability of the HIV-1 Env-specific immune responses generated by Sindbis vectors, either alone or as part of prime-boost regimens, are justified.

  18. Enhanced potency of replicon vaccine using one vector to simultaneously co-express antigen and interleukin-4 molecular adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yao; An, Huai-Jie; Wei, Xiao-Qi; Xu, Qing; Yu, Yun-Zhou; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the utility of interleukin-4 (IL-4) as molecular adjuvant of replicon vaccines for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) in mouse model. In both Balb/c and C57/BL6 mice that received the plasmid DNA replicon vaccines derived from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) encoding the Hc gene of BoNT/A (AHc), the immunogenicity was significantly modulated and enhanced by co-delivery or co-express of the IL-4 molecular adjuvant. The enhanced potencies were also produced by co-delivery or co-expression of the IL-4 molecular adjuvant in mice immunized with the recombinant SFV replicon particles (VRP) vaccines. In particular, when AHc and IL-4 were co-expressed within the same replicon vaccine vector using dual-expression or bicistronic IRES, the anti-AHc antibody titers, serum neutralization titers and survival rates of immunized mice after challenged with BoNT/A were significantly increased. These results indicate IL-4 is an effective Th2-type adjuvant for the replicon vaccines in both strain mice, and the co-expression replicon vaccines described here may be an excellent candidate for further vaccine development in other animals or humans. Thus, we described a strategy to design and develop efficient vaccines against BoNT/A or other pathogens using one replicon vector to simultaneously co-express antigen and molecular adjuvant.

  19. Development and preclinical evaluation of an alphavirus replicon vaccine for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubby, Bolyn; Talarico, Todd; Maughan, Maureen; Reap, Elizabeth A; Berglund, Peter; Kamrud, Kurt I; Copp, Laura; Lewis, Whitney; Cecil, Chad; Norberg, Pamela; Wagner, Jordan; Watson, Aubrey; Negri, Sarah; Burnett, Bruce K; Graham, Andrew; Smith, Jonathan F; Chulay, Jeffrey D

    2007-11-23

    We used a propagation-defective, single-cycle, alphavirus replicon vector system to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) proteins from influenza A/Wyoming/03/2003 (H3N2). Efficient production methods were scaled to produce pilot lots of HA VRP and NA VRP and clinical lots of HA VRP. HA VRP-induced high-titered antibody responses in mice, rabbits and rhesus macaques, as measured by ELISA or hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays, and robust cellular immune responses in mice and rhesus macaques, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. NA VRP also induced cellular immune responses in mice. A toxicology study with HA VRP and NA VRP in rabbits showed no adverse effects in any parameter. These studies support clinical testing of alphavirus replicon vaccines for influenza.

  20. Immunogenicity of a DNA-launched replicon-based canine parvovirus DNA vaccine expressing VP2 antigen in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Shyam S; Saini, Mohini; Kumar, Pankaj; Gupta, Praveen K

    2012-10-01

    A replicon-based DNA vaccine encoding VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was developed by cloning CPV-VP2 gene into a replicon-based DNA vaccine vector (pAlpha). The characteristics of a replicon-based DNA vaccine like, self-amplification of transcripts and induction of apoptosis were analyzed in transfected mammalian cells. When the pAlpha-CPV-VP2 was injected intradermal as DNA-launched replicon-based DNA vaccine in dogs, it induced CPV-specific humoral and cell mediated immune responses. The virus neutralization antibody and lymphocyte proliferative responses were higher than conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. These results indicated that DNA-launched replicon-based CPV DNA vaccine was effective in inducing both CPV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses and can be considered as effective alternative to conventional CPV DNA vaccine and commercial CPV vaccine. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier India Pvt Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Miriam; Kerber, Sarah; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  2. Use of Recombinant Virus Replicon Particles for Vaccination against Mycobacterium ulcerans Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Bolz

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer, caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing disease of the skin and subcutaneous tissue, which is most prevalent in rural regions of West African countries. The majority of clinical presentations seen in patients are ulcers on limbs that can be treated by eight weeks of antibiotic therapy. Nevertheless, scarring and permanent disabilities occur frequently and Buruli ulcer still causes high morbidity. A vaccine against the disease is so far not available but would be of great benefit if used for prophylaxis as well as therapy. In the present study, vesicular stomatitis virus-based RNA replicon particles encoding the M. ulcerans proteins MUL2232 and MUL3720 were generated and the expression of the recombinant antigens characterized in vitro. Immunisation of mice with the recombinant replicon particles elicited antibodies that reacted with the endogenous antigens of M. ulcerans cells. A prime-boost immunization regimen with MUL2232-recombinant replicon particles and recombinant MUL2232 protein induced a strong immune response but only slightly reduced bacterial multiplication in a mouse model of M. ulcerans infection. We conclude that a monovalent vaccine based on the MUL2232 antigen will probably not sufficiently control M. ulcerans infection in humans.

  3. Combined alphavirus replicon particle vaccine induces durable and cross-protective immune responses against equine encephalitis viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Douglas S; Glass, Pamela J; Bakken, Russell R; Barth, James F; Lind, Cathleen M; da Silva, Luis; Hart, Mary Kate; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Dudek, Jeanne; Owens, Gary; Kamrud, Kurt I; Parker, Michael D; Smith, Jonathan

    2014-10-01

    Alphavirus replicons were evaluated as potential vaccine candidates for Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), or eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) when given individually or in combination (V/W/E) to mice or cynomolgus macaques. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in mice to their respective alphavirus. Protection from either subcutaneous or aerosol challenge with VEEV, WEEV, or EEEV was demonstrated out to 12 months after vaccination in mice. Individual replicon vaccines or the combination V/W/E replicon vaccine elicited strong neutralizing antibodies in macaques and demonstrated good protection against aerosol challenge with an epizootic VEEV-IAB virus, Trinidad donkey. Similarly, the EEEV replicon and V/W/E combination vaccine elicited neutralizing antibodies against EEEV and protected against aerosol exposure to a North American variety of EEEV. Both the WEEV replicon and combination V/W/E vaccination, however, elicited poor neutralizing antibodies to WEEV in macaques, and the protection conferred was not as strong. These results demonstrate that a combination V/W/E vaccine is possible for protection against aerosol challenge and that cross-interference between the vaccines is minimal. Importance: Three related viruses belonging to the genus Alphavirus cause severe encephalitis in humans: Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV). Normally transmitted by mosquitoes, these viruses can cause disease when inhaled, so there is concern that these viruses could be used as biological weapons. Prior reports have suggested that vaccines for these three viruses might interfere with one another. We have developed a combined vaccine for Venezuelan equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis, and eastern equine encephalitis expressing the surface

  4. Individual and bivalent vaccines based on alphavirus replicons protect guinea pigs against infection with Lassa and Ebola viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushko, P; Geisbert, J; Parker, M; Jahrling, P; Smith, J

    2001-12-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccines for Lassa and Ebola viruses that are based on an RNA replicon vector derived from an attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. The Lassa and Ebola virus genes were expressed from recombinant replicon RNAs that also encoded the replicase function and were capable of efficient intracellular self-amplification. For vaccinations, the recombinant replicons were incorporated into virus-like replicon particles. Guinea pigs vaccinated with particles expressing Lassa virus nucleoprotein or glycoprotein genes were protected from lethal challenge with Lassa virus. Vaccination with particles expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein gene also protected the animals from lethal challenge with Ebola virus. In order to evaluate a single vaccine protecting against both Lassa and Ebola viruses, we developed dual-expression particles that expressed glycoprotein genes of both Ebola and Lassa viruses. Vaccination of guinea pigs with either dual-expression particles or with a mixture of particles expressing Ebola and Lassa virus glycoprotein genes protected the animals against challenges with Ebola and Lassa viruses. The results showed that immune responses can be induced against multiple vaccine antigens coexpressed from an alphavirus replicon and suggested the possibility of engineering multivalent vaccines based upon alphavirus vectors for arenaviruses, filoviruses, and possibly other emerging pathogens.

  5. Self-Amplifying Replicon RNA Vaccine Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Synthetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C. McCullough

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC play essential roles determining efficacy of vaccine delivery with respect to immune defence development and regulation. This renders DCs important targets for vaccine delivery, particularly RNA vaccines. While delivery of interfering RNA oligonucleotides to the appropriate intracellular sites for RNA-interference has proven successful, the methodologies are identical for RNA vaccines, which require delivery to RNA translation sites. Delivery of mRNA has benefitted from application of cationic entities; these offer value following endocytosis of RNA, when cationic or amphipathic properties can promote endocytic vesicle membrane perturbation to facilitate cytosolic translocation. The present review presents how such advances are being applied to the delivery of a new form of RNA vaccine, replicons (RepRNA carrying inserted foreign genes of interest encoding vaccine antigens. Approaches have been developed for delivery to DCs, leading to the translation of the RepRNA and encoded vaccine antigens both in vitro and in vivo. Potential mechanisms favouring efficient delivery leading to translation are discussed with respect to the DC endocytic machinery, showing the importance of cytosolic translocation from acidifying endocytic structures. The review relates the DC endocytic pathways to immune response induction, and the potential advantages for these self-replicating RNA vaccines in the near future.

  6. Development of a vaccine vector based on a subgenomic replicon of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinfeng; Yao, Qingxia; Fan, Huiying; Xiao, Shaobo; Si, Youhui; Chen, Huanchun

    2009-09-01

    In this study, a DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was developed for use as a vaccine vector. This replicon plasmid contained a PRRSV subgenome without structural genes ORF2-ORF6, and was under the transcriptional control of the immediate-early promoter of cytomegalovirus (CMV). Using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) as a reporter gene, the DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of PRRSV, named pOK-Clone20-rep, could express heterologous genes in vitro. After direct inoculation of pOK-Clone20-rep, mice developed antibody responses that were specific for both the EGFP and the N gene in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, mice immunized with pOK-Clone20-rep at a dose of 100microg showed significantly enhanced levels of IFN-gamma compared with those inoculated with 100microg of pcD-EGFP, a conventional DNA vaccine that encodes EGFP. In summary, the results show that the DNA-launched subgenomic replicon of PRRSV could not only mediate foreign gene expression in vitro but also induced an immune response in vivo. Similarly, expression and immunogenicity of the N gene also strengthened the potential of the replicon to serve as a vaccine vector expressing multiple genes. It therefore provides a useful tool for vaccine development and the study of the transcription and replication of PRRSV.

  7. Role of innate signalling pathways in the immunogenicity of alphaviral replicon-based vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alphaviral replicon-based vectors induce potent immune responses both when given as viral particles (VREP or as DNA (DREP. It has been suggested that the strong immune stimulatory effect induced by these types of vectors is mediated by induction of danger signals and activation of innate signalling pathways due to the replicase activity. To investigate the innate signalling pathways involved, mice deficient in either toll-like receptors or downstream innate signalling molecules were immunized with DREP or VREP. Results We show that the induction of a CD8+ T cell response did not require functional TLR3 or MyD88 signalling. However, IRF3, converging several innate signalling pathways and important for generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs, was needed for obtaining a robust primary immune response. Interestingly, type I interferon (IFN, induced by most innate signalling pathways, had a suppressing effect on both the primary and memory T cell responses after DREP and VREP immunization. Conclusions We show that alphaviral replicon-based vectors activate multiple innate signalling pathways, which both activate and restrict the induced immune response. These results further show that there is a delicate balance in the strength of innate signalling and induction of adaptive immune responses that should be taken into consideration when innate signalling molecules, such as type I IFNs, are used as vaccine adjuvant.

  8. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle vaccine protects nonhuman primates from intramuscular and aerosol challenge with ebolavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew S; Kuehne, Ana I; Barth, James F; Ortiz, Ramon A; Nichols, Donald K; Zak, Samantha E; Stonier, Spencer W; Muhammad, Majidat A; Bakken, Russell R; Prugar, Laura I; Olinger, Gene G; Groebner, Jennifer L; Lee, John S; Pratt, William D; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt I; Smith, Jonathan F; Hart, Mary Kate; Dye, John M

    2013-05-01

    There are no vaccines or therapeutics currently approved for the prevention or treatment of ebolavirus infection. Previously, a replicon vaccine based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) demonstrated protective efficacy against Marburg virus in nonhuman primates. Here, we report the protective efficacy of Sudan virus (SUDV)- and Ebola virus (EBOV)-specific VEEV replicon particle (VRP) vaccines in nonhuman primates. VRP vaccines were developed to express the glycoprotein (GP) of either SUDV or EBOV. A single intramuscular vaccination of cynomolgus macaques with VRP expressing SUDV GP provided complete protection against intramuscular challenge with SUDV. Vaccination against SUDV and subsequent survival of SUDV challenge did not fully protect cynomolgus macaques against intramuscular EBOV back-challenge. However, a single simultaneous intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP combined with VRP expressing EBOV GP did provide complete protection against intramuscular challenge with either SUDV or EBOV in cynomolgus macaques. Finally, intramuscular vaccination with VRP expressing SUDV GP completely protected cynomolgus macaques when challenged with aerosolized SUDV, although complete protection against aerosol challenge required two vaccinations with this vaccine.

  9. The contribution of type I interferon signaling to immunity induced by alphavirus replicon vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert

    2008-09-15

    The type I interferon (IFN) system is critical for protecting the mammalian host from numerous virus infections and plays a key role in shaping the antiviral adaptive immune response. In this report, the importance of type I IFN signaling was assessed in a mouse model of alphavirus-induced humoral immune induction. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from influenza virus (HA-VRP) were used to vaccinate both wildtype (wt) and IFN alpha/beta receptor knockout (RKO) mice. HA-VRP vaccination induced equivalent levels of flu-specific systemic IgG, mucosal IgG, and systemic IgA antibodies in both wt and IFN RKO mice. In contrast, HA-VRP vaccination of IFN RKO mice failed to induce significant levels of flu-specific mucosal IgA antibodies at multiple mucosal surfaces. In the VRP adjuvant system, co-delivery of null VRP with ovalbumin (OVA) protein significantly increased the levels of OVA-specific serum IgG, fecal IgG, and fecal IgA antibodies in both wt and RKO mice, suggesting that type I IFN signaling plays a less significant role in the VRP adjuvant effect. Taken together, these results suggest that (1) at least in regard to IFN signaling, the mechanisms which regulate alphavirus-induced immunity differ when VRP are utilized as expression vectors as opposed to adjuvants, and (2) type I IFN signaling is required for the induction of mucosal IgA antibodies directed against VRP-expressed antigen. These results shed new light on the regulatory networks which promote immune induction, and specifically mucosal immune induction, with alphavirus vaccine vectors.

  10. Development and evaluation of a replicon particle vaccine expressing the E2 glycoprotein of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loy John Dustin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus is one of the most significant and costly viral pathogens of cattle worldwide. Alphavirus-derived replicon particles have been shown to be safe and highly effective vaccine vectors against a variety of human and veterinary pathogens. Replicon particles are non-propagating, DIVA compatible, and can induce both humoral and cell mediated immune responses. This is the first experiment to demonstrate that Alphavirus-based replicon particles can be utilized in a standard prime/boost vaccination strategy in calves against a commercially significant bovine pathogen. Findings Replicon particles that express bovine viral diarrhea virus sub-genotype 1b E2 glycoprotein were generated and expression was confirmed in vitro using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific to E2. Vaccine made from particles was generated in Vero cells and administered to BVDV free calves in a prime/boost regimen at two dosage levels. Vaccination resulted in neutralizing antibody titers that cross-neutralized both type 1 and type 2 BVD genotypes following booster vaccination. Additionally, high dose vaccine administration demonstrated some protection from clinical disease and significantly reduced the degree of leukopenia caused by viral infection. Conclusions Replicon particle vaccines administered in a prime/boost regimen expressing BVDV E2 glycoprotein can induce cross-neutralizing titers, reduce leukopenia post challenge, and mitigate clinical disease in calves. This strategy holds promise for a safe and effective vaccine to BVDV.

  11. Molecular Smallpox Vaccine Delivered by Alphavirus Replicons Elicits Protective Immunity in Mice and Non-human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W.; Ferro, Anthony M.; Golden, Joseph W.; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F.; Kamrud, Kurt I.

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 70s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRP) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 × 106 PFU of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine. PMID:19833247

  12. Molecular smallpox vaccine delivered by alphavirus replicons elicits protective immunity in mice and non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Jay W; Ferro, Anthony M; Golden, Joseph W; Silvera, Peter; Dudek, Jeanne; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Rivers, Bryan; Morris, John; Owens, Gary; Smith, Jonathan F; Kamrud, Kurt I

    2009-12-11

    Naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated as a result of successful vaccination campaigns during the 1960s and 1970s. Because of its highly contagious nature and high mortality rate, smallpox has significant potential as a biological weapon. Unfortunately, the current vaccine for orthopoxviruses is contraindicated for large portions of the population. Thus, there is a need for new, safe, and effective orthopoxvirus vaccines. Alphavirus replicon vectors, derived from strains of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, are being used to develop alternatives to the current smallpox vaccine. Here, we demonstrated that virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing the vaccinia virus A33R, B5R, A27L, and L1R genes elicited protective immunity in mice comparable to vaccination with live-vaccinia virus. Furthermore, cynomolgus macaques vaccinated with a combination of the four poxvirus VRPs (4pox-VRP) developed antibody responses to each antigen. These antibody responses were able to neutralize and inhibit the spread of both vaccinia virus and monkeypox virus. Macaques vaccinated with 4pox-VRP, flu HA VRP (negative control), or live-vaccinia virus (positive control) were challenged intravenously with 5 x 10(6)pfu of monkeypox virus 1 month after the second VRP vaccination. Four of the six negative control animals succumbed to monkeypox and the remaining two animals demonstrated either severe or grave disease. Importantly, all 10 macaques vaccinated with the 4pox-VRP vaccine survived without developing severe disease. These findings revealed that a single-boost VRP smallpox vaccine shows promise as a safe alternative to the currently licensed live-vaccinia virus smallpox vaccine.

  13. Single-dose immunization with virus replicon particles confers rapid robust protection against Rift Valley fever virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Kimberly A; Bird, Brian H; Metcalfe, Maureen G; Nichol, Stuart T; Albariño, César G

    2012-04-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in people and livestock throughout Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The potential for RVFV introduction outside the area of endemicity highlights the need for fast-acting, safe, and efficacious vaccines. Here, we demonstrate a robust system for the reverse genetics generation of a RVF virus replicon particle (VRP(RVF)) vaccine candidate. Using a mouse model, we show that VRP(RVF) immunization provides the optimal balance of safety and single-dose robust efficacy. VRP(RVF) can actively synthesize viral RNA and proteins but lacks structural glycoprotein genes, preventing spread within immunized individuals and reducing the risk of vaccine-induced pathogenicity. VRP(RVF) proved to be completely safe following intracranial inoculation of suckling mice, a stringent test of vaccine safety. Single-dose subcutaneous immunization with VRP(RVF), although it is highly attenuated, completely protected mice against a virulent RVFV challenge dose which was 100,000-fold greater than the 50% lethal dose (LD(50)). Robust protection from lethal challenge was observed by 24 h postvaccination, with 100% protection induced in as little as 96 h. We show that a single subcutaneous VRP(RVF) immunization initiated a systemic antiviral state followed by an enhanced adaptive response. These data contrast sharply with the much-reduced survivability and immune responses observed among animals immunized with nonreplicating viral particles, indicating that replication, even if confined to the initially infected cells, contributes substantially to protective efficacy at early and late time points postimmunization. These data demonstrate that replicon vaccines successfully bridge the gap between safety and efficacy and provide insights into the kinetics of antiviral protection from RVFV infection.

  14. An immunogenic and protective alphavirus replicon particle-based dengue vaccine overcomes maternal antibody interference in weanling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Parsons, Melissa M; Whitmore, Alan C; Williams, Brandon M; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-10-01

    A candidate pediatric dengue virus (DENV) vaccine based on nonpropagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) was tested for immunogenicity and protective efficacy in weanling mice in the presence and absence of potentially interfering maternal antibodies. A gene cassette encoding envelope proteins prM and E from mouse-adapted DENV type 2 (DENV2) strain NGC was cloned into a VEE replicon vector and packaged into VRP, which programmed proper in vitro expression and processing of DENV2 envelope proteins upon infection of Vero cells. Primary immunization of 3-week-old weanling BALB/c mice in the footpad with DENV2 VRP resulted in high levels of DENV-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibodies and significant titers of neutralizing antibodies in all vaccinates. A booster immunization 12 weeks after the prime immunization resulted in increased neutralizing antibodies that were sustained for at least 30 weeks. Immunization at a range of doses of DENV2 VRP protected mice from an otherwise-lethal intracranial DENV2 challenge. To model vaccination in the presence of maternal antibodies, weanling pups born to DENV2-immune or DENV2-naïve dams were immunized with either DENV2 VRP or live DENV2 given peripherally. The DENV2 VRP vaccine induced neutralizing-antibody responses in young mice regardless of the maternal immune status. In contrast, live-DENV2 vaccination performed poorly in the presence of preexisting anti-DENV2 antibodies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a VRP vaccine approach as an early-life DENV vaccine in populations with high levels of circulating DENV antibodies and suggests the utility of VRP-based vaccines in other instances where maternal antibodies make early vaccination problematic.

  15. Immunogenicity and efficacy of alphavirus-derived replicon vaccines for respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Pickens, Jennifer A; Schuster, Jennifer E; Johnson, Monika; Tollefson, Sharon J; Williams, John V; Davis, Nancy L; Johnston, Robert E; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Slaughter, James C; Smith-House, Frances; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-10

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are major causes of illness among children, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. No vaccine has been licensed for protection against either of these viruses. We tested the ability of two Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based viral replicon particle (VEE-VRP) vaccines that express the hRSV or hMPV fusion (F) protein to confer protection against hRSV or hMPV in African green monkeys. Animals immunized with VEE-VRP vaccines developed RSV or MPV F-specific antibodies and serum neutralizing activity. Compared to control animals, immunized animals were better able to control viral load in the respiratory mucosa following challenge and had lower levels of viral genome in nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids. The high level of immunogenicity and protective efficacy induced by these vaccine candidates in nonhuman primates suggest that they hold promise for further development.

  16. A Kunjin Replicon Virus-like Particle Vaccine Provides Protection Against Ebola Virus Infection in Nonhuman Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyankov, Oleg V; Bodnev, Sergey A; Pyankova, Olga G; Solodkyi, Vladislav V; Pyankov, Stepan A; Setoh, Yin Xiang; Volchkova, Valentina A; Suhrbier, Andreas; Volchkov, Viktor V; Agafonov, Alexander A; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2015-10-01

    The current unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus (EBOV) disease in West Africa has demonstrated the urgent need for a vaccine. Here, we describe the evaluation of an EBOV vaccine candidate based on Kunjin replicon virus-like particles (KUN VLPs) encoding EBOV glycoprotein with a D637L mutation (GP/D637L) in nonhuman primates. Four African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) were injected subcutaneously with a dose of 10(9) KUN VLPs per animal twice with an interval of 4 weeks, and animals were challenged 3 weeks later intramuscularly with 600 plaque-forming units of Zaire EBOV. Three animals were completely protected against EBOV challenge, while one vaccinated animal and the control animal died from infection. We suggest that KUN VLPs encoding GP/D637L represent a viable EBOV vaccine candidate.

  17. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbherr, Stefan J; Brostoff, Terza; Tippenhauer, Merve; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Zimmer, Gert

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA) was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA) by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade). Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  18. Vaccination with recombinant RNA replicon particles protects chickens from H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J Halbherr

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIV of subtype H5N1 not only cause a devastating disease in domestic chickens and turkeys but also pose a continuous threat to public health. In some countries, H5N1 viruses continue to circulate and evolve into new clades and subclades. The rapid evolution of these viruses represents a problem for virus diagnosis and control. In this work, recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV vectors expressing HA of subtype H5 were generated. To comply with biosafety issues the G gene was deleted from the VSV genome. The resulting vaccine vector VSV*ΔG(HA was propagated on helper cells providing the VSV G protein in trans. Vaccination of chickens with a single intramuscular dose of 2×10⁸ infectious replicon particles without adjuvant conferred complete protection from lethal H5N1 infection. Subsequent application of the same vaccine strongly boosted the humoral immune response and completely prevented shedding of challenge virus and transmission to sentinel birds. The vaccine allowed serological differentiation of infected from vaccinated animals (DIVA by employing a commercially available ELISA. Immunized chickens produced antibodies with neutralizing activity against multiple H5 viruses representing clades 1, 2.2, 2.5, and low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (classical clade. Studies using chimeric H1/H5 hemagglutinins showed that the neutralizing activity was predominantly directed against the globular head domain. In summary, these results suggest that VSV replicon particles are safe and potent DIVA vaccines that may help to control avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry.

  19. Development of dengue virus replicons expressing HIV-1 gp120 and other heterologous genes: a potential future tool for dual vaccination against dengue virus and HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayton Andrew I

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Toward the goals of providing an additional vector to add to the armamentarium available to HIV vaccinologists and of creating a bivalent vaccine effective against dengue virus and HIV, we have attempted to create vectors which express dengue virus non-structural proteins and HIV immunogens. Previously we reported the successful construction of dengue virus replicons which lack structural genes necessary for virion release and spreading infection in culture but which can replicate intracellularly and abundantly produce dengue non-structural proteins. Here we attempted to express heterologous genetic material from these replicons. Results We cloned into a Δpre-M/E dengue virus replicon genes for either green fluorescent protein (GFP, HIV gp160 or HIV gp120 and tested the ability of these constructs to express dengue virus proteins as well as the heterologous proteins in tissue culture after transfection of replicon RNA. Conclusions Heterologous proteins were readily expressed from these constructs. GFP and gp120 demonstrated minimal or no toxicity. Gp160 expressing replicons were found to express proteins abundantly at 36 hours post transfection, but after 50 hrs of transfection, few replicon positive cells could be found despite the presence of cellular debris positive for replicon proteins. This suggested that gp160 expressed from dengue virus replicons is considerably more toxic than either GFP or gp120. The successful expression of heterologous proteins, including HIV gp120 for long periods in culture suggests this vector system may be useful as a vaccine vector, given appropriate delivery methods.

  20. Haemagglutinin and nucleoprotein replicon particle vaccination of swine protects against the pandemic H1N1 2009 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Veen, R L; Mogler, M A; Russell, B J; Loynachan, A T; Harris, D L H; Kamrud, K I

    2013-10-12

    The recent emergence of the pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) and H3N2 variant influenza A viruses (IAV) in 2009 and 2011-2012, respectively, highlight the zoonotic potential of influenza viruses and the need for vaccines capable of eliciting heterosubtypic protection. In these studies, single-cycle, propagation-defective replicon particle (RP) vaccines expressing IAV haemagglutinin (HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) genes were constructed and efficacy was evaluated in homologous and heterologous pig challenge studies with the pH1N1 2009 influenza virus (A/California/04/2009). Homologous HA RP vaccination eliminated virus shedding and decreased pulmonary pathology in pigs following pH1N1 2009 challenge. An RP vaccine expressing an H3N2-derived NP gene was able to decrease nasal shedding and viral load following heterosubtypic pH1N1 2009 challenge in pigs. These studies indicate that although homologous vaccination of swine remains the most effective means of preventing IAV infection, other vaccine alternatives do offer a level of heterosubtypic protection, and should continue to be evaluated for their ability to provide broader protection.

  1. Vaccination with Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicons encoding cowpox virus structural proteins protects mice from intranasal cowpox virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornburg, Natalie J; Ray, Caroline A; Collier, Martha L; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pickup, David J; Johnston, Robert E

    2007-06-05

    An anti-poxvirus vaccine based on replicon particles of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VRP) is being developed. The cowpox virus genes encoding structural proteins corresponding to vaccinia virus proteins A33, B5, and A27 were each expressed from VRP. High serum IgG titers against these proteins were generated in BALB/c mice vaccinated with each of these VRP. VRP induced both IgG1 and IgG2a with a strong predominance of IgG2a production. The response is long-lasting, as evidenced by the retention of high anti-B5 serum IgG titers through at least 50 weeks after priming immunization. Mice vaccinated with B5-, A33- or A27-VRP individually or together survived intranasal challenge with cowpox virus, with the multivalent vaccine formulation providing more effective protection from weight loss and clinical signs of illness than the monovalent vaccines. These results demonstrate that VRP may provide an effective alternative to vaccinia virus vaccines against poxvirus infection.

  2. Toward Viral Vaccine Development: A Modified Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Replicon as Strategy for Optimizing Immunogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-13

    mutations in NsP genes in SIN and SFV vectors containing the puromycin or neomycin resistance gene, generated replication-persistent vectors that had...hemagglutinin expressed by an alphavirus replicon system protects chickens against lethal infection with Hong Kong-origin H5N1 viruses. Virology 278:55-9

  3. Effects of rapid antigen degradation and VEE glycoprotein specificity on immune responses induced by a VEE replicon vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluet, M E; Whitmore, A C; Moshkoff, D A; Fu, K; Tang, Y; Collier, M L; West, A; Moore, D T; Swanstrom, R; Johnston, R E; Davis, N L

    2008-01-05

    Genetic vaccines are engineered to produce immunogens de novo in the cells of the host for stimulation of a protective immune response. In some of these systems, antigens engineered for rapid degradation have produced an enhanced cellular immune response by more efficient entry into pathways for processing and presentation of MHC class I peptides. VEE replicon particles (VRP), single cycle vaccine vectors derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE), are examined here for the effect of an increased rate of immunogen degradation on VRP vaccine efficacy. VRP expressing the matrix capsid (MA/CA) portion of SIV Gag were altered to promote rapid degradation of MA/CA by various linkages to co-translated ubiquitin or by destabilizing mutations and were used to immunize BALB/c mice for quantitation of anti-MA/CA cellular and humoral immune responses. Rapid degradation by the N-end rule correlated with a dampened immune response relative to unmodified MA/CA when the VRP carried a glycoprotein spike from an attenuated strain of VEE. In contrast, statistically equivalent numbers of IFNgamma(+)T-cells resulted when VRP expressing unstable MA/CA were packaged with the wild-type VEE glycoproteins. These results suggest that the cell types targeted in vivo by VRP carrying mutant or wild type glycoprotein spikes are functionally different, and are consistent with previous findings suggesting that wild-type VEE glycoproteins preferentially target professional antigen presenting cells that use peptides generated from the degraded antigen for direct presentation on MHC.

  4. An oral Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus delivered by Escherichia coli elicits immune responses in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, S S; Saini, M; Kumar, P; Gupta, P K

    2011-01-01

    A Sindbis virus replicon-based DNA vaccine containing VP2 gene of canine parvovirus (CPV) was delivered by Escherichia coli to elicit immune responses. The orally immunized dogs developed CPV-specific serum IgG and virus neutralizing antibody responses. The cellular immune responses analyzed using lymphocyte proliferation test and flow cytometry indicated CPV-specific sensitization of both CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ lymphocytes. This study demonstrated that the oral CPV DNA vaccine delivered by E. coli can be considered as a promising approach for vaccination of dogs against CPV.

  5. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines.

  6. A heterologous DNA prime-Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particle boost dengue vaccine regimen affords complete protection from virus challenge in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lan; Ewing, Dan; Subramanian, Hemavathy; Block, Karla; Rayner, Jonathan; Alterson, Kimberly D; Sedegah, Martha; Hayes, Curtis; Porter, Kevin; Raviprakash, Kanakatte

    2007-11-01

    A candidate vaccine (D1ME-VRP) expressing dengue virus type 1 premembrane and envelope proteins in a Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon particle (VRP) system was constructed and tested in conjunction with a plasmid DNA vaccine (D1ME-DNA) expressing identical dengue virus sequences. Cynomolgus macaques were vaccinated with three doses of DNA (DDD), three doses of VRP (VVV group), or a heterologous DNA prime-VRP boost regimen (DDV) using two doses of DNA vaccine and a third dose of VRP vaccine. Four weeks after the final immunization, the DDV group produced the highest dengue virus type 1-specific immunoglobulin G antibody responses and virus-neutralizing antibody titers. Moderate T-cell responses were demonstrated only in DDD- and DDV-vaccinated animals. When vaccinated animals were challenged with live virus, all vaccination regimens showed significant protection from viremia. DDV-immunized animals were completely protected from viremia (mean time of viremia = 0 days), whereas DDD- and VVV-vaccinated animals had mean times of viremia of 0.66 and 0.75 day, respectively, compared to 6.33 days for the control group of animals.

  7. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans,...

  8. Development of new plasmid DNA vaccine vectors with R1-based replicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Diana M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been renewed interest in biopharmaceuticals based on plasmid DNA (pDNA in recent years due to the approval of several veterinary DNA vaccines, on-going clinical trials of human pDNA-based therapies, and significant advances in adjuvants and delivery vehicles that have helped overcome earlier efficacy deficits. With this interest comes the need for high-yield, cost-effective manufacturing processes. To this end, vector engineering is one promising strategy to improve plasmid production. Results In this work, we have constructed a new DNA vaccine vector, pDMB02-GFP, containing the runaway R1 origin of replication. The runaway replication phenotype should result in plasmid copy number amplification after a temperature shift from 30°C to 42°C. However, using Escherichia coli DH5α as a host, we observed that the highest yields of pDMB02-GFP were achieved during constant-temperature culture at 30°C, with a maximum yield of approximately 19 mg pDNA/g DCW being observed. By measuring mRNA and protein levels of the R1 replication initiator protein, RepA, we determined that RepA may be limiting pDMB02-GFP yield at 42°C. A mutant plasmid, pDMB-ATG, was constructed by changing the repA start codon from the sub-optimal GTG to ATG. In cultures of DH5α[pDMB-ATG], temperature-induced plasmid amplification was more dramatic than that observed with pDMB02-GFP, and RepA protein was detectable for several hours longer than in cultures of pDMB02-GFP at 42°C. Conclusions Overall, we have demonstrated that R1-based plasmids can produce high yields of high-quality pDNA without the need for a temperature shift, and have laid the groundwork for further investigation of this class of vectors in the context of plasmid DNA production.

  9. Chimeric classical swine fever (CSF)-Japanese encephalitis (JE) viral replicon as a non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Wu, Rui; Li, Robert W; Li, Ling; Xiong, Zhongliang; Zhao, Haizhong; Guo, Deyin; Pan, Zishu

    2012-04-01

    A trans-complemented chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon was constructed using an infectious cDNA clone of the CSF virus (CSFV) Alfort/187 strain. The CSFV E2 gene was deleted, and a fragment containing the region encoding a truncated envelope protein (tE, amino acid 292-402, domain III) of JE virus (JEV) was inserted into the resultant plasmid, pA187delE2, to generate the recombinant cDNA clone pA187delE2/JEV-tE. Porcine kidney 15 (PK15) cells that constitutively express the CSFV E2p7 proteins were then transfected with in vitro-transcribed RNA from pA187delE2/JEV-tE. As a result, the chimeric CSF-JE virus replicon particle (VRP), rv187delE2/JEV-tE, was rescued. In a mouse model, immunization with the chimeric CSF-JE VRP induced strong production of JEV-specific antibody and conferred protection against a lethal JEV challenge. Pigs immunized with CSF-JE VRP displayed strong anti-CSFV and anti-JEV antibody responses and protection against CSFV and JEV challenge infections. Our evidence suggests that E2-complemented CSF-JE VRP not only has potential as a live-attenuated non-transmissible vaccine candidate against CSF and JE but also serves as a potential DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine for CSF in pigs. Together, our data suggest that the non-transmissible chimeric VRP expressing foreign antigenic proteins may represent a promising strategy for bivalent DIVA vaccine design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparation of Immune Reaction Efficiency of RNA Replicon Vaccine and DNA Vaccine of HBV in Mice%乙肝病毒RNA复制子疫苗与DNA疫苗对小鼠免疫效率的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹锦艳; 杨东; 任林柱; 张英; 闫森; 郝琳琳; 李莉

    2011-01-01

    为建立并获取更有效的乙肝疫苗,本实验通过将所构建的HBVRNA复制子疫苗和DNA疫苗分别免疫小鼠,检测细胞免疫与体液免疫的效果。结果表明,以pSFV为基础构建的疫苗载体免疫小鼠后采集的血清中抗体效价不随免疫剂量的增加而提高,在较低剂量免疫的时候,RNA复制子疫苗所产生的抗体效价优于DNA疫苗。并且RNA复制子疫苗在以较低剂量免疫后脾细胞CTL活性高于DNA疫苗。本研究证明HBVRNA疫苗比DNA疫苗表达效果更好,安全性更高,更具有应用前景。%To establish and obtain a more effective hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), mice cellular and humoral immunity were detected and compared after being immunized by the RNA replicon vaccines and DNA vaccines of HBV which were constructed by our lab. The results showed that RNA replicon vaccines gained higher immune antibody titer, and higher CTL activity of spleen cells than that of DNA vaccines at low-dose, but not dose dependent. It was concluded that HBV RNA vaccines are much safer and gained higher expression efficiency than the DNA vaccines, thus RNA vaccines of HBV are more prospective for the gene therapy of HBV.

  11. Comparation of Immune Reaction Efficiency of RNA Replicon Vaccine and DNA Vaccine of HBV in Mice%乙肝病毒RNA复制子疫苗与DNA疫苗对小鼠免疫效率的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹锦艳; 杨东; 任林柱; 张英; 闫森; 郝琳琳; 李莉

    2011-01-01

    为建立并获取更有效的乙肝疫苗,本实验通过将所构建的HBV RNA复制子疫苗和DNA疫苗分别免疫小鼠,检测细胞免疫与体液免疫的效果.结果表明,以pSFV为基础构建的疫苗载体免疫小鼠后采集的血清中抗体效价不随免疫剂量的增加而提高,在较低剂量免疫的时候,RNA复制子疫苗所产生的抗体效价优于DNA疫苗.并且RNA复制子疫苗在以较低剂量免疫后脾细胞CTL活性高于DNA疫苗.本研究证明HBV RNA疫苗比DNA疫苗表达效果更好,安全性更高,更具有应用前景.%To establish and obtain a more effective hepatitis B vaccine (HBV), mice cellular and humoral immunity were detected and compared after being immunized by the RNA replicon vaccmes and DNA vaccines of HBV which were constructed by our lab. The results showed that RNA replicon vaccines gained higher immune antibody titer, and higher CTL activity of spleen cells than that of DNA vaccines at low-dose, but not dose dependent.It was concluded that HBV RNA vaccmes are much safer and gained higher expression efficiency than the DNA vaccines, thus RNA vaccines of HBV are more prospective for the gene therapy of HBV.

  12. Phase I safety and immunogenicity evaluations of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecker, M; Gilbert, P; Russell, N; Hural, J; Allen, M; Pensiero, M; Chulay, J; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Abdool Karim, S S; Burke, D S

    2012-10-01

    On the basis of positive preclinical data, we evaluated the safety and immunogenicity of an alphavirus replicon HIV-1 subtype C gag vaccine (AVX101), expressing a nonmyristoylated form of Gag, in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials in healthy HIV-1-uninfected adults. Escalating doses of AVX101 or placebo were administered subcutaneously to participants in the United States and Southern Africa. Because of vaccine stability issues, the first trial was halted prior to completion of all dose levels and a second trial was implemented. The second trial was also stopped prematurely due to documentation issues with the contract manufacturer. Safety and immunogenicity were evaluated through assessments of reactogenicity, reports of adverse events, and assessment of replication-competent and Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) viremia. Immunogenicity was measured using the following assays: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chromium 51 ((51)Cr)-release cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), gamma interferon (IFN-γ) ELISpot, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and lymphoproliferation assay (LPA). Anti-vector antibodies were also measured. AVX101 was well tolerated and exhibited only modest local reactogenicity. There were 5 serious adverse events reported during the trials; none were considered related to the study vaccine. In contrast to the preclinical data, immune responses in humans were limited. Only low levels of binding antibodies and T-cell responses were seen at the highest doses. This trial also highlighted the difficulties in developing a novel vector for HIV.

  13. Preconceptual administration of an alphavirus replicon UL83 (pp65 homolog) vaccine induces humoral and cellular immunity and improves pregnancy outcome in the guinea pig model of congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleiss, Mark R; Lacayo, Juan C; Belkaid, Yasmine; McGregor, Alistair; Stroup, Greg; Rayner, Jon; Alterson, Kimberly; Chulay, Jeffrey D; Smith, Jonathan F

    2007-03-15

    Development of a vaccine against congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a major public health priority. We report the use of a propagation-defective, single-cycle, RNA replicon vector system, derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRPs) expressing GP83, the guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) homolog of the human CMV pp65 phosphoprotein. Vaccination with VRP-GP83 induced antibodies and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses in GPCMV-seronegative female guinea pigs. Guinea pigs immunized with VRP-GP83 vaccine or with a VRP vaccine expressing influenza hemagglutinin (VRP-HA) were bred for pregnancy and subsequent GPCMV challenge during the early third trimester. Dams vaccinated with VRP-GP83 had improved pregnancy outcomes, compared with dams vaccinated with the VRP-HA control. For VRP-GP83-vaccinated dams, there were 28 live pups and 4 dead pups (13% mortality) among 10 evaluable litters, compared with 9 live pups and 12 dead pups (57% mortality) among 8 evaluable litters in the VRP-HA-vaccinated group (P<.001, Fisher's exact test). Improved pregnancy outcome was accompanied by reductions in maternal blood viral load, measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. These results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses directed against a CMV matrix protein can protect against congenital CMV infection and disease.

  14. Enhanced immunity against classical swine fever in pigs induced by prime-boost immunization using an alphavirus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine and a recombinant adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Li, Na; Li, Hong-Yu; Li, Miao; Qiu, Hua-Ji

    2010-09-15

    Classical swine fever (CSF) - caused by the classical swine fever virus (CSFV) - is a fatal disease of pigs that is responsible for extensive losses to the swine industry worldwide. We had demonstrated previously that a prime-boost vaccination strategy using an alphavirus (Semliki Forest virus, SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine (pSFV1CS-E2) and a recombinant adenovirus (rAdV-E2) expressing the E2 glycoprotein of CSFV induced enhanced immune responses in a mouse model. In this study, we evaluated further the efficacy of the heterologous prime-boost immunization approach in pigs, the natural host of CSFV. The results showed that the pigs (n=5) receiving pSFV1CS-E2/rAdV-E2 heterologous prime-boost immunization developed significantly higher titers of CSFV-specific neutralizing antibodies and comparable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation, compared to the pigs receiving double immunizations with rAdV-E2 alone. When challenged with virulent CSFV Shimen strain, the pigs of the heterologous prime-boost group did not show clinical symptoms or viremia, which were observed in one of the 5 pigs immunized with rAdV-E2 alone and all the 5 control pigs immunized with an empty adenovirus. The results demonstrate that the heterologous DNA prime and recombinant adenovirus boost strategy can induce solid protective immunity.

  15. Individual and Bivalent Vaccines Based on Alphavirus Replicons Protect Guinea Pigs against Infection with Lassa and Ebola Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Pushko, Peter; Geisbert, Joan; Parker, Michael; Jahrling, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Lassa and Ebola viruses cause acute, often fatal, hemorrhagic fever diseases, for which no effective vaccines are currently available. Although lethal human disease outbreaks have been confined so far to sub-Saharan Africa, they also pose significant epidemiological concern worldwide as demonstrated by several instances of accidental importation of the viruses into North America and Europe. In the present study, we developed experimental individual vaccines for Lassa virus and bivalent vaccin...

  16. [Kunjin virus replicon--a novel viral vector].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shihua; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, E'de; Qin, Chengfeng

    2011-02-01

    Viral replicon is a kind of self-replicating viral RNA sourced from viral genome, which contains viral non-structural genes that are critical for viral genome replication with structural proteins deleted or replaced by foreign genes. Kunjin virus is a member of the Flavivirida family, Flavivirus genus, and Kunjin virus replicon is the first and the clearly defined flavivirus replicon. Kunjun virus replicon has been regarded as an excellent viral vector on account of its high expression, lower cytotoxicity and genetic stability. These unique characteristics of kunjin virus replicons make them suitable for the study of viral genome replication, recombinant proteins production, vaccine development and gene therapy. In this article, recent progress in the development, properties and applications of kunjin virus replicon system was briefly reviewed.

  17. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by beta-galactosidase alpha-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  18. RNA Replicons - A New Approach for Influenza Virus Immunoprophylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Zimmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicons are derived from either positive- or negative-strand RNA viruses. They represent disabled virus vectors that are not only avirulent, but also unable to revert to virulence. Due to autonomous RNA replication, RNA replicons are able to drive high level, cytosolic expression of recombinant antigens stimulating both the humoral and the cellular branch of the immune system. This review provides an update on the available literature covering influenza virus vaccines based on RNA replicons. The pros and cons of these vaccine strategies will be discussed and future perspectives disclosed.

  19. Development of a novel, single-cycle replicable rift valley Fever vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Murakami

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae is an arbovirus that causes severe disease in humans and livestock in sub-Saharan African countries. Although the MP-12 strain of RVFV is a live attenuated vaccine candidate, neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence of MP-12 in mice may be a concern when vaccinating certain individuals, especially those that are immunocompromised. We have developed a novel, single-cycle replicable MP-12 (scMP-12, which carries an L RNA, M RNA mutant encoding a mutant envelope protein lacking an endoplasmic reticulum retrieval signal and defective for membrane fusion function, and S RNA encoding N protein and green fluorescent protein. The scMP-12 underwent efficient amplification, then formed plaques and retained the introduced mutation after serial passages in a cell line stably expressing viral envelope proteins. However, inoculation of the scMP-12 into naïve cells resulted in a single round of viral replication, and production of low levels of noninfectious virus-like particles. Intracranial inoculation of scMP-12 into suckling mice did not cause clinical signs or death, a finding which demonstrated that the scMP-12 lacked neurovirulence. Mice immunized with a single dose of scMP-12 produced neutralizing antibodies, whose titers were higher than in mice immunized with replicon particles carrying L RNA and S RNA encoding N protein and green fluorescent protein. Moreover, 90% of the scMP-12-immunized mice were protected from wild-type RVFV challenge by efficiently suppressing viremia and replication of the challenge virus in the liver and the spleen. These data demonstrated that scMP-12 is a safe and immunogenic RVFV vaccine candidate.

  20. Development and characterization of promoterless helper RNAs for the production of alphavirus replicon particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, K I; Alterson, K; Custer, M; Dudek, J; Goodman, C; Owens, G; Smith, J F

    2010-07-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon systems are frequently used as preclinical vectors and as antigen discovery tools, and they have recently been assessed in clinical vaccine trials. Typically, alphavirus replicon RNAs are delivered within virus-like replicon particles (VRP) that are produced following transfection of replicon RNA and two helper RNAs into permissive cells in vitro. The non-structural proteins expressed from the replicon RNA amplify the replicon RNA in cis and the helper RNAs in trans, the latter providing the viral structural proteins necessary to package the replicon RNA into VRP. Current helper RNA designs incorporate the alphavirus 26S promoter to direct the transcription of high levels of structural gene mRNAs. We demonstrate here that the 26S promoter is not required on helper RNAs to produce VRP and propose that such promoterless helper RNAs, by design, reduce the probability of generating replication-competent virus that may otherwise result from RNA recombination.

  1. Characterization of an efficient dengue virus replicon for development of assays of discovery of small molecules against dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Chen; Tsai, Ming-Han; Hu, Han-Shu; Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Wu, Szu-Huei; Lin, Hui-Mei; Song, Jen-Shin; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Yueh, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a public health threat to approximately 40% of the global population. At present, neither licensed vaccines nor effective therapies exist, and the mechanism of viral RNA replication is not well understood. Here, we report the development of efficient Renilla luciferase reporter-based DENV replicons that contain the full-length capsid sequence for transient and stable DENV RNA replication. A comparison of the transient and stable expression of this RNA-launched replicon to replicons containing various deletions revealed dengue replicon containing entire mature capsid RNA element has higher replicon activity. An efficient DNA-launched DENV replicon, pCMV-DV2Rep, containing a full-length capsid sequence, was created and successfully applied to evaluate the potency of known DENV inhibitors. Stable cell lines harboring the DENV replicon were easily established by transfecting pCMV-DV2Rep into BHK21 cells. Steady and high replicon reporter signals were observed in the stable DENV replicon cells, even after 30 passages. The stable DENV replicon cells were successfully used to determine the potency of known DENV inhibitors. A high-throughput screening assay based on stable DENV replicon cells was evaluated and shown to have an excellent Z' factor of 0.74. Altogether, the development of our efficient DENV replicon system will facilitate the study of virus replication and the discovery of antiviral compounds.

  2. A phase I dose escalation trial of vaccine replicon particles (VRP) expressing prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) in subjects with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Susan F; Kehoe, Marissa; Durso, Robert; Fernandez, Celina; Olson, William; Gao, Jian P; Israel, Robert; Scher, Howard I; Morris, Stephen

    2013-01-30

    PSMA-VRP is a propagation defective, viral replicon vector system encoding PSMA under phase I evaluation for patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC). The product is derived from an attenuated strain of the alphavirus, Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis (VEE) virus, and incorporates multiple redundant safety features. In this first in human trial, two cohorts of 3 patients with CRPC metastatic to bone were treated with up to five doses of either 0.9×10(7)IU or 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18, followed by an expansion cohort of 6 patients treated with 0.36×10(8)IU of PSMA-VRP at weeks 1, 4, 7, 10 and 18. No toxicities were observed. In the first dose cohort, no PSMA specific cellular immune responses were seen but weak PSMA-specific signals were observed by ELISA. The remaining 9 patients, which included the higher cohort and the extension cohort, had no PSMA specific cellular responses. PSMA-VRP was well-tolerated at both doses. While there did not appear to be clinical benefit nor robust immune signals at the two doses studied, neutralizing antibodies were produced by both cohorts suggesting that dosing was suboptimal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.

    1987-03-16

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs.

  4. A hemagglutinin-esterase-expressing salmonid alphavirus replicon protects Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) against infectious salmon anemia (ISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Astrid; Hodneland, Kjartan; Frost, Petter; Braaen, Stine; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-01-11

    A replicon expression system based on the salmonid alphavirus (SAV) that encodes the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) was constructed and found to be an efficacious vaccine against infectious salmon anemia (ISA). Following a single intramuscular immunization, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) were effectively protected against subsequent ISAV challenge. Additional replicons coding for the ISAV fusion glycoprotein (F) or the ISAV matrix protein (M) were created and tested in combination with the replicon that encodes the HE. The ISAV HE was confirmed as a potent antigen, but neither the F nor the M proteins were found to be essential for immunization-induced protection. Innate immune response induced at the site of vaccination illustrated the immunogenicity of the SAV-based replicon and its ability to activate antiviral responses in Atlantic salmon. The successful testing of the SAV-based replicon as a vaccine model against ISA showed that the replicon approach may represent a novel immunization technology for the aquaculture industry. It offers potential benefits in terms of safety, efficacy, flexibility, and vaccine production complexity.

  5. Mucosal and systemic adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M.; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Collier, Martha L.; Richmond, Erin M. B.; Davis, Nancy L.; Staats, Herman F.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2006-03-01

    Vaccination represents the most effective control measure in the fight against infectious diseases. Local mucosal immune responses are critical for protection from, and resolution of, infection by numerous mucosal pathogens. Antigen processing across mucosal surfaces is the natural route by which mucosal immunity is generated, as peripheral antigen delivery typically fails to induce mucosal immune responses. However, we demonstrate in this article that mucosal immune responses are evident at multiple mucosal surfaces after parenteral delivery of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP). Moreover, coinoculation of null VRP (not expressing any transgene) with inactivated influenza virions, or ovalbumin, resulted in a significant increase in antigen-specific systemic IgG and fecal IgA antibodies, compared with antigen alone. Pretreatment of VRP with UV light largely abrogated this adjuvant effect. These results demonstrate that alphavirus replicon particles possess intrinsic systemic and mucosal adjuvant activity and suggest that VRP RNA replication is the trigger for this activity. We feel that these observations and the continued experimentation they stimulate will ultimately define the specific components of an alternative pathway for the induction of mucosal immunity, and if the activity is evident in humans, will enable new possibilities for safe and inexpensive subunit and inactivated vaccines. vaccine vector | Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus | viral immunology | RNA virus

  6. Expression of H5N1 influenza virus hemagglutinin protein fused with protein transduction domain in an alphavirus replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shi-gui; Wo, Jian-er; Li, Min-wei; Mi, Fen-fang; Yu, Cheng-bo; Lv, Guo-liang; Cao, Hong-Cui; Lu, Hai-feng; Wang, Bao-hong; Zhu, Hanping; Li, Lan-Juan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus replicons, in which structural protein genes are replaced by heterologous genes, express high levels of the heterologous proteins. On the basis of the potencies of replicons to self-replicate and express foreign proteins and the remarkable intercellular transport property of VP22, a novel alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon system of VP22 fused with a model antigen, hemagglutinin (HA), of the human-avian H5N1 influenza virus, was explored in this study. Further, replicon particles expressing HA, VP22, and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) individually were used as controls. By flow cytometry based on the analysis of transfection efficiency, SFV-EGFP replicon particle titer was 1.13 x 10(7)transducing units (TU)/ml. The titers of SFV-HA, SFV-VP22 and SFV-VP22-HA replicon particles, which were titrated by using SFV-EGFP replicon particles, were 1.42 x 10(7), 3.23 x 10(7), and 1.01 x 10(7)TU/ml, respectively. HA and VP22-HA expression was observed in SFV-HA- and SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells, respectively. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the fluorescence intensity in the SFV-VP22-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells was more than that in the SFV-HA-transfected BHK-21 cells. Both SFV-VP22-HA and SFV-HA replicon particles presented a promising approach for developing vaccines against human-avian influenza. VP22-HA fusion protein with similar trafficking properties may also enhance vaccine potency.

  7. In vitro and in vivo characterization of microRNA-targeted alphavirus replicon and helper RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Coffield, V McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-08-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans.

  8. Packaging of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replicon RNA by a stable cell line expressing its nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung-Hak; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Jin-Kyoung; Jang, Han-Saem; Yun, Gil-Nam; Choi, Eun-Jin; Song, Jae-Young; Yun, Sang-Im; Lee, Young-Min

    2011-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), a member of the Arteriviridae family, is one of the most common and economically important swine pathogens. Although both live-attenuated and killed-inactivated vaccines against the virus have been available for a decade, PRRSV is still a major problem in the swine industry worldwide. To explore the possibility of producing single-round infectious PRRSV replicon particles as a potential vaccine strategy, we have now generated two necessary components: 1) a stable cell line (BHK/Sinrepl9/PRRSV-N) that constitutively expresses the viral nucleocapsid (N) protein localized to the cytoplasm and the nucleolus and 2) a PRRSV replicon vector (pBAC/PRRSV/Replicon-AN) with a 177-nucleotide deletion, removing the 3'-half portion of ORF7 in the viral genome, from which the self-replicating propagation-defective replicon RNAs were synthesized in vitro by SP6 polymerase run-off transcription. Transfection of this replicon RNA into N protein-expressing BHK-21 cells led to the secretion of infectious particles that packaged the replicon RNA, albeit with a low production efficiency of 0.4 × 10(2) to 1.1 × 10(2) infectious units/ml; the produced particles had only single-round infectivity with no cell-to-cell spread. This trans-complementation system for PRRSV provides a useful platform for studies to define the packaging signals and motifs present within the viral genome and N protein, respectively, and to develop viral replicon-based antiviral vaccines that will stop the infection and spread of this pathogen.

  9. Efficacy of a recombinant Rift Valley fever virus MP-12 with NSm deletion as a vaccine candidate in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartl, Hana M; Nfon, Charles K; Zhang, Shunzhen; Marszal, Peter; Wilson, William C; Morrill, John C; Bettinger, George E; Peters, Clarence J

    2014-04-25

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family and Phlebovirus genus, causes RVF, a disease of ruminants and man, endemic in Sub-Saharan African countries. However, outbreaks in Yemen and Saudi Arabia demonstrate the ability for RVFV to spread into virgin territory and thus the need exists to develop safe and efficacious vaccines that can be used outside the endemic zones. Commercial RVFV vaccines are available but have limitations that prevent their use in disease-free countries. Consequently, there are ongoing efforts to develop and/or improve RVFV vaccines with global acceptability. In this study a previously developed MP-12-derived vaccine candidate with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre Gn region of the M segment (arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384) developed by T. Ikegami, that was already shown to be safe in pregnant sheep causing neither abortion nor fetal malformation was further evaluated. This vaccine was tested for protection of sheep from viremia and fever following challenge with virulent RVFV ZH501 strain. A single vaccination with arMP-12-ΔNSm21/384 fully protected sheep when challenged four weeks post vaccination, thereby demonstrating that this vaccine is efficacious in protecting these animals from RVFV infection.

  10. Evaluation of neurovirulence and biodistribution of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles expressing herpes simplex virus type 2 glycoprotein D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Jacek; Adkins, Karissa; Gangolli, Seema; Ren, Jian; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Obregon, Jennifer; Tummolo, Donna; Natuk, Robert J; Brown, Tom P; Parks, Christopher L; Udem, Stephen A; Long, Deborah

    2007-03-08

    The safety of a propagation-defective Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) replicon particle vaccine was examined in mice. After intracranial inoculation we observed approximately 5% body weight loss, modest inflammatory changes in the brain, genome replication, and foreign gene expression. These changes were transient and significantly less severe than those caused by TC-83, a live-attenuated vaccinal strain of VEEV that has been safely used to immunize military personnel and laboratory workers. Replicon particles injected intramuscularly or intravenously were detected at limited sites 3 days post-administration, and were undetectable by day 22. There was no evidence of dissemination to spinal cord or brain after systemic administration. These results demonstrate that propagation-defective VEEV replicon particles are minimally neurovirulent and lack neuroinvasive potential.

  11. A Recombinant Rift Valley Fever Virus Glycoprotein Subunit Vaccine Confers Full Protection against Rift Valley Fever Challenge in Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faburay, Bonto; Wilson, William C; Gaudreault, Natasha N; Davis, A Sally; Shivanna, Vinay; Bawa, Bhupinder; Sunwoo, Sun Young; Ma, Wenjun; Drolet, Barbara S; Morozov, Igor; McVey, D Scott; Richt, Juergen A

    2016-06-14

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suitable for use in livestock or humans outside endemic areas. Here we report the evaluation of the efficacy of a recombinant subunit vaccine based on the RVFV Gn and Gc glycoproteins. In a previous study, the vaccine elicited strong virus neutralizing antibody responses in sheep and was DIVA (differentiating naturally infected from vaccinated animals) compatible. In the current efficacy study, a group of sheep (n = 5) was vaccinated subcutaneously with the glycoprotein-based subunit vaccine candidate and then subjected to heterologous challenge with the virulent Kenya-128B-15 RVFV strain. The vaccine elicited high virus neutralizing antibody titers and conferred complete protection in all vaccinated sheep, as evidenced by prevention of viremia, fever and absence of RVFV-associated histopathological lesions. We conclude that the subunit vaccine platform represents a promising strategy for the prevention and control of RVFV infections in susceptible hosts.

  12. Characterization of cell lines stably transfected with rubella virus replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Xu, Jie [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States); Frey, Teryl K., E-mail: tfrey@gsu.edu [Department of Biology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4010, Atlanta GA 30302-4010 (United States)

    2012-07-20

    Rubella virus (RUBV) replicons expressing a drug resistance gene and a gene of interest were used to select cell lines uniformly harboring the replicon. Replicons expressing GFP and a virus capsid protein GFP fusion (C-GFP) were compared. Vero or BHK cells transfected with either replicon survived drug selection and grew into a monolayer. However, survival was {approx}9-fold greater following transfection with the C-GFP-replicon than with the GFP-expressing replicon and while the C-GFP-replicon cells grew similarly to non-transfected cells, the GFP-replicon cells grew slower. Neither was due to the ability of the CP to enhance RNA synthesis but survival during drug selection was correlated with the ability of CP to inhibit apoptosis. Additionally, C-GFP-replicon cells were not cured of the replicon in the absence of drug selection. Interferon-alpha suppressed replicon RNA and protein synthesis, but did not cure the cells, explaining in part the ability of RUBV to establish persistent infections.

  13. Recombination-ready Sindbis replicon expression vectors for transgene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Ken E

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sindbis viruses have been widely used as tools to study gene function in cells. Despite the utility of these systems, the construction and production of alphavirus replicons is time consuming and inefficient due to potential additional restriction sites within the insert region and lack of directionality for insert ligation. In this report, we present a system useful for producing recombinant Sindbis replicons that uses lambda phage recombination technology to rapidly and specifically construct replicon expression plasmids that contain insert regions in the desired orientation. Results Recombination of the gene of interest with the replicon plasmid resulted in nearly 100% recombinants, each of which contained a correctly orientated insert. Replicons were easily produced in cell culture and packaged into pseudo-infectious viral particles. Insect and mammalian cells infected with pseudo-infectious viral particles expressed various transgenes at high levels. Finally, inserts from persistently replicating replicon RNA were easily isolated and recombined back into entry plasmids for sequencing and subsequent analysis. Conclusion Replication-ready replicon expression plasmids make the use of alphavirus replicons fast and easy as compared to traditional replicon production methods. This system represents a significant step forward in the utility and ease of use of alphavirus replicons in the study of gene function.

  14. A Polyprotein-Expressing Salmonid Alphavirus Replicon Induces Modest Protection in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo Salar Against Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azila Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is an important strategy for the control and prevention of infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN in farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar in the post-smolt stage in sea-water. In this study, a heterologous gene expression system, based on a replicon construct of salmonid alphavirus (SAV, was used for in vitro and in vivo expression of IPN virus proteins. The large open reading frame of segment A, encoding the polyprotein NH2-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH, as well as pVP2, were cloned and expressed by the SAV replicon in Chinook salmon embryo cells (CHSE-214 and epithelioma papulosum cyprini (EPC cells. The replicon constructs pSAV/polyprotein (pSAV/PP and pSAV/pVP2 were used to immunize Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar by a single intramuscular injection and tested in a subsequent IPN virus (IPNV challenge trial. A low to moderate protection against IPN was observed in fish immunized with the replicon vaccine that encoded the pSAV/PP, while the pSAV/pVP2 construct was not found to induce protection.

  15. Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  16. Self-replicating alphavirus RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant nucleic acids are considered as promising next-generation vaccines. These vaccines express the native antigen upon delivery into tissue, thus mimicking live attenuated vaccines without having the risk of reversion to pathogenicity. They also stimulate the innate immune system, thus potentiating responses. Nucleic acid vaccines are easy to produce at reasonable cost and are stable. During the past years, focus has been on the use of plasmid DNA for vaccination. Now mRNA and replicon vaccines have come into focus as promising technology platforms for vaccine development. This review discusses self-replicating RNA vaccines developed from alphavirus expression vectors. These replicon vaccines can be delivered as RNA, DNA or as recombinant virus particles. All three platforms have been pre-clinically evaluated as vaccines against a number of infectious diseases and cancer. Results have been very encouraging and propelled the first human clinical trials, the results of which have been promising.

  17. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M Sánchez-Puig

    Full Text Available Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  18. A vaccinia virus recombinant transcribing an alphavirus replicon and expressing alphavirus structural proteins leads to packaging of alphavirus infectious single cycle particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Puig, Juana M; Lorenzo, María M; Blasco, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses and Alphaviruses constitute two promising viral vectors that have been used extensively as expression systems, or as vehicles for vaccine purposes. Poxviruses, like vaccinia virus (VV) are well-established vaccine vectors having large insertion capacity, excellent stability, and ease of administration. In turn, replicons derived from Alphaviruses like Semliki Forest virus (SFV) are potent protein expression and immunization vectors but stocks are difficult to produce and maintain. In an attempt to demonstrate the use of a Poxvirus as a means for the delivery of small vaccine vectors, we have constructed and characterized VV/SFV hybrid vectors. A SFV replicon cDNA was inserted in the VV genome and placed under the control of a VV early promoter. The replicon, transcribed from the VV genome as an early transcript, was functional, and thus capable of initiating its own replication and transcription. Further, we constructed a VV recombinant additionally expressing the SFV structural proteins under the control of a vaccinia synthetic early/late promoter. Infection with this recombinant produced concurrent transcription of the replicon and expression of SFV structural proteins, and led to the generation of replicon-containing SFV particles that were released to the medium and were able to infect additional cells. This combined VV/SFV system in a single virus allows the use of VV as a SFV delivery vehicle in vivo. The combination of two vectors, and the possibility of generating in vivo single-cycle, replicon containing alphavirus particles, may open new strategies in vaccine development or in the design of oncolytic viruses.

  19. Participation of the lytic replicon in bacteriophage P1 plasmid maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    P1 bacteriophage carries at least two replicons: a plasmid replicon and a viral lytic replicon. Since the isolated plasmid replicon can maintain itself stably at the low copy number characteristic of intact P1 prophage, it has been assumed that this replicon is responsible for driving prophage replication. We provide evidence that when replication from the plasmid replicon is prevented, prophage replication continues, albeit at a reduced rate. The residual plasmid replication is due to incomp...

  20. Vesicular stomatitis virus replicon expressing the VP2 outer capsid protein of bluetongue virus serotype 8 induces complete protection of sheep against challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochinger, Stefanie; Renevey, Nathalie; Hofmann, Martin A; Zimmer, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an arthropod-borne pathogen that causes an often fatal, hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Different BTV serotypes occur throughout many temperate and tropical regions of the world. In 2006, BTV serotype 8 (BTV-8) emerged in Central and Northern Europe for the first time. Although this outbreak was eventually controlled using inactivated virus vaccines, the epidemic caused significant economic losses not only from the disease in livestock but also from trade restrictions. To date, BTV vaccines that allow simple serological discrimination of infected and vaccinated animals (DIVA) have not been approved for use in livestock. In this study, we generated recombinant RNA replicon particles based on single-cycle vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) vectors. Immunization of sheep with infectious VSV replicon particles expressing the outer capsid VP2 protein of BTV-8 resulted in induction of BTV-8 serotype-specific neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with a virulent BTV-8 strain, the vaccinated animals neither developed signs of disease nor showed viremia. In contrast, immunization of sheep with recombinant VP5 - the second outer capsid protein of BTV - did not confer protection. Discrimination of infected from vaccinated animals was readily achieved using an ELISA for detection of antibodies against the VP7 antigen. These data indicate that VSV replicon particles potentially represent a safe and efficacious vaccine platform with which to control future outbreaks by BTV-8 or other serotypes, especially in previously non-endemic regions where discrimination between vaccinated and infected animals is crucial.

  1. The effect of Rift Valley fever virus Clone 13 vaccine on semen quality in rams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoff Brown

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is an arthropod-borne viral disease of importance in livestock and humans. Epidemics occur periodically in domestic ruminants. People in contact with infected livestock may develop disease that varies from mild flu-like symptoms to fatal viraemia. Livestock vaccination may assist in disease control. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV Clone 13 is a relatively new vaccine against RVF, derived from an avirulent natural mutant strain of RVFV, and has been shown to confer protective immunity against experimental infection with RVFV. The hypothesis tested in the current trial was that rams vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine would not experience a reduction in semen quality (measured by evaluating the percentage progressively motile and percentage morphologically normal spermatozoa in successive ejaculates relative to unvaccinated control animals. Ram lambs were screened for antibodies to RVFV using a serum neutralisation test. Animals without detectable antibodies (n = 23 were randomly allocated to either a test group (n = 12 or a control group (n = 11. Animals in the test group were vaccinated with RVFV Clone 13 vaccine. Daily rectal temperature measurements and weekly semen and blood samples were taken from all animals. Seven animals were eliminated from the statistical analysis because of potential confounding factors. Logistic regression analysis was performed on data gathered from the remaining animals to determine whether an association existed between animal group, rectal temperature and semen quality parameters. No correlation existed between the treatment group and values obtained for the semen quality parameters measured. There was no statistically significant post-vaccination decline in the percentage of live morphologically normal spermatozoa, or the percentage of progressively motile spermatozoa, either when assessed amongst all animals or when assessed within individual groups. A repeat study with a larger sample

  2. Replication efficiency of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids derived from porcine circovirus 2 in eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Dory, Daniel; Henry, Aurélie; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Jestin, André

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a method was developed to measure replication rates of rolling-circle replicon-based plasmids in eukaryotic cells. This method is based on the discriminative quantitation of MboI-resistant, non-replicated input plasmids and DpnI-resistant, replicated plasmids. To do so, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) replicon-based plasmids were constructed. These plasmids contained the PCV2 origin of replication, the PCV2 Rep promoter and the PCV2 Rep gene. The results show that the replication rate depends on the length of the PCV2 replicon-based plasmid and not on the respective position of the Rep promoter and the promoter of the gene of interest that encodes the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP). In all cases, it was necessary to add the Rep gene encoded by a plasmid and cotransfected as a replication booster. This method can evaluate the replication potential of replicon-based plasmids quickly and is thereby a promising tool for the development of plasmids for vaccine purposes.

  3. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of MicroRNA-Targeted Alphavirus Replicon and Helper RNAs ▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I.; Coffield, V. McNeil; Owens, Gary; Goodman, Christin; Alterson, Kim; Custer, Max; Murphy, Michael A.; Lewis, Whitney; Timberlake, Sarah; Wansley, Elizabeth K.; Berglund, Peter; Smith, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Alphavirus-based replicon vector systems (family Togaviridae) have been developed as expression vectors with demonstrated potential in vaccine development against both infectious diseases and cancer. The single-cycle nature of virus-like replicon particles (VRP), generated by supplying the structural proteins from separate replicable helper RNAs, is an attractive safety component of these systems. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important cellular RNA regulation elements. Recently, miRNAs have been employed as a mechanism to attenuate or restrict cellular tropism of replication-competent viruses, such as oncolytic adenoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, and picornaviruses as well as nonreplicating lentiviral and adenoviral vectors. Here, we describe the incorporation of miRNA-specific target sequences into replicable alphavirus helper RNAs that are used in trans to provide the structural proteins required for VRP production. VRP were found to be efficiently produced using miRNA-targeted helper RNAs if miRNA-specific inhibitors were introduced into cells during VRP production. In the absence of such inhibitors, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating helper RNA replication in vitro. When miRNA targets were incorporated into a replicon RNA, cellular miRNAs were capable of downregulating replicon RNA replication upon delivery of VRP into animals, demonstrating activity in vivo. These data provide the first example of miRNA-specific repression of alphavirus replicon and helper RNA replication and demonstrate the feasibility of miRNA targeting of expression vector helper functions that are provided in trans. PMID:20504925

  4. Alphavirus-Based Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Alphavirus vectors based on Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus have been widely applied for vaccine development. Naked RNA replicons, recombinant viral particles, and layered DNA vectors have been subjected to immunization in preclinical animal models with antigens for viral targets and tumor antigens. Moreover, a limited number of clinical trials have been conducted in humans. Vaccination with alphavirus vectors has demonstrated efficient immune responses and has showed protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus and tumor cells, respectively. Moreover, vaccines have been developed against alphaviruses causing epidemics such as Chikungunya virus.

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of Onderstepoort Biological Products’ Rift Valley fever Clone 13 vaccine in sheep and goats under field conditions in Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modou M. Lo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This blinded field safety study was conducted in Senegal to assess safety and immunogenicity of administration of the registered dose of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV Clone 13 vaccine (Onderstepoort Biological Products to sheep and goats of West African breeds under natural conditions. A total of 267 small ruminants (220 sheep, 47 goats were included; half received RVFV Clone 13 vaccine at the recommended dose and half received the diluent (as placebo only. The study was performed on three commercial farms in the northern and eastern region of Senegal in accordance with veterinary good clinical practices. The animals were observed daily for 3 days after vaccination, and then weekly for 1 year. In both sheep and goats vaccinated against RVFV seroconversion rates above 70% were recorded. No seroconversion related to RVFV was observed in placebo-treated animals. No statistically significant differences were determined between placebo and vaccinated groups for mean rectal temperatures for the first 3 days after administration (p > 0.05. No abnormal clinical signs related to treatment were noted, and only one slight injection site reaction was observed in one vaccinated animal for 2 days after vaccination. Out of 176 births assessed over 1 year (93 from the vaccinated group, 83 from the placebo group, 9 were abnormal in the placebo group and 3 in the vaccinated group (p > 0.05. The frequency of adverse events was similar in the placebo and vaccinated groups. RVFV Clone 13 vaccine administered according to the manufacturer’s instructions was safe and well tolerated in West African breeds of sheep and goats, including animals of approximately 6 months of age and pregnant females, under field conditions in Senegal. Antibody levels persisted up to 1 year after vaccination.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of Onderstepoort Biological Products' Rift Valley fever Clone 13 vaccine in sheep and goats under field conditions in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Modou M; Mbao, Victor; Sierra, Pascale; Thiongane, Yaya; Diop, Mariame; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste

    2015-05-29

    This blinded field safety study was conducted in Senegal to assess safety and immunogenicity of administration of the registered dose of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Clone 13 vaccine (Onderstepoort Biological Products) to sheep and goats of West African breeds under natural conditions. A total of 267 small ruminants (220 sheep, 47 goats) were included; half received RVFV Clone 13 vaccine at the recommended dose and half received the diluent (as placebo) only. The study was performed on three commercial farms in the northern and eastern region of Senegal in accordance with veterinary good clinical practices. The animals were observed daily for 3 days after vaccination, and then weekly for 1 year. In both sheep and goats vaccinated against RVFV seroconversion rates above 70% were recorded. No seroconversion related to RVFV was observed in placebo-treated animals. No statistically significant differences were determined between placebo and vaccinated groups for mean rectal temperatures for the first 3 days after administration (p > 0.05). No abnormal clinical signs related to treatment were noted, and only one slight injection site reaction was observed in one vaccinated animal for 2 days after vaccination. Out of 176 births assessed over 1 year (93 from the vaccinated group, 83 from the placebo group), 9 were abnormal in the placebo group and 3 in the vaccinated group (p > 0.05). The frequency of adverse events was similar in the placebo and vaccinated groups. RVFV Clone 13 vaccine administered according to the manufacturer's instructions was safe and well tolerated in West African breeds of sheep and goats, including animals of approximately 6 months of age and pregnant females, under field conditions in Senegal. Antibody levels persisted up to 1 year after vaccination.

  7. Evaluation of nonspreading Rift Valley fever virus as a vaccine vector using influenza virus hemagglutinin as a model antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oreshkova, N.; Cornelissen, L.A.H.M.; Haan, de C.A.M.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Virus replicon particles are capable of infection, genome replication and gene expression, but are unable to produce progeny virions, rendering their use inherently safe. By virtue of this unique combination of features, replicon particles hold great promise for vaccine applications. We previously d

  8. Production of single-round infectious chimeric flaviviruses with DNA-based Japanese encephalitis virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryosuke; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Konishi, Eiji; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Aizaki, Hideki; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Wakita, Takaji

    2014-01-01

    A method for rapid production of single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) of flavivirus would be useful for viral mutagenesis studies. Here, we established a DNA-based production system for SRIPs of flavivirus. We constructed a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) subgenomic replicon plasmid, which lacked the C-prM-E (capsid-pre-membrane-envelope) coding region, under the control of the cytomegalovirus promoter. When the JEV replicon plasmid was transiently co-transfected with a JEV C-prM-E expression plasmid into 293T cells, SRIPs were produced, indicating successful trans-complementation with JEV structural proteins. Equivalent production levels were observed when C and prM-E proteins were provided separately. Furthermore, dengue types 1-4, West Nile, yellow fever or tick-borne encephalitis virus prM-E proteins could be utilized for production of chimaeric flavivirus SRIPs, although the production was less efficient for dengue and yellow fever viruses. These results indicated that our plasmid-based system is suitable for investigating the life cycles of flaviviruses, diagnostic applications and development of safer vaccine candidates.

  9. Construction and applications of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binbin; Zhe, Mingjia; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Meng, Chunchun; Zhang, Miaotao; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-01-01

    The study of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) has long been hindered by the absence of an in vitro culture system. In this study, using RHDV as a model, a series of DNA-based reporter replicons were constructed in which the firefly luciferase (Fluc) gene was fused in-frame with the open reading frame of the replicon. In this construct, the Fluc gene was inserted where the coding region of viral structural protein was deleted and was under the control of a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter. Fluc activity analysis showed that these reporter replicons replicate efficiently in mammalian cells. On the basis of the replicon, 5'non-coding regions (5'NCR) and genome-linked protein (VPg) were deleted, and the effect on the expression of replicon was analyzed. The results showed that the expression level of Fluc was reduced in the absence of 5'NCR and VPg, suggesting that the 5'NCR and VPg may play an important role in replication and/or translation of RHDV. To further verify the speculation, we also constructed a replication deficient mutant (pRHDV-luc/Δ3D), and the impact of 5'NCR and VPg deletion on viral translation efficiency was analyzed, our results indicated that both VPg and 5'NCR were involved in RHDV translation.

  10. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  11. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  12. Comparative efficacy of two next-generation Rift Valley fever vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, J; Oreshkova, N; van Keulen, L; Kant, J; Bosch, B J; Bouloy, M; Moulin, V; Goovaerts, D; Moormann, R J M

    2014-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a re-emerging zoonotic bunyavirus of the genus Phlebovirus. A natural isolate containing a large attenuating deletion in the small (S) genome segment previously yielded a highly effective vaccine virus, named Clone 13. The deletion in the S segment abrogates express

  13. Construction and characterization of poliovirus subgenomic replicons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, G.; Racaniello, V.R. (Columbia Univ. College of Physicians Surgeons, New York, NY (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Poliovirus RNAs containing in-frame deletions within the capsid-coding region were produced by in vitro transcription of altered poliovirus type 1 cDNA by using bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase. Three RNAs were transcribed that contained deletions of 2,317 nucleotides (bases 747 to 3,064), 1,781 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,956), and 1,295 nucleotides (bases 1,175 to 2,470). All three subgenomic RNAs replicated after transfection into HeLa cells, demonstrating that sequences encoding the capsid polypeptides are not essential for viral RNA replication in vivo. Viral RNA containing the largest deletion (R1) replicated approximately three times better than full-length RNA produced in vitro. Northern blot (RNA blot) hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA from HeLa cells at different times after transfection with R1 demonstrated the presence of increasing amounts of the expected 5.1-kilobase subgenomic RNA. Analysis by immunoprecipitation of ({sup 35}S-labeled) viral proteins induced after transfection of R1 RNA into HeLa cells revealed the presence of proteins 2A{sup pro}, 2C, and 3D{sup pol} and its precursors, suggesting that the polyprotein cleavages are similar to those occurring in virus-infected cells. These internally and terminally deleted RNAs inhibited the replication of subgenomic replicons R1, R2, and R3 and caused a reduction in plaque size when cotransfected with P1/Mahoney or P2/Lansing viral RNA, suggesting that individual cells had received both RNAs.

  14. Identification of two replicons in phage-plasmid P4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocchetti, A; Serina, S; Terzano, S; Dehò, G; Ghisotti, D

    1998-06-05

    DNA replication of phage-plasmid P4 proceeds bidirectionally from the ori1 site (previously named ori), but requires a second cis-acting region, crr. Replication depends on the product of the P4 alpha gene, a protein with primase and helicase activity, that binds both ori1 and crr. A negative regulator of P4 DNA replication, the Cnr protein, is required for copy number control of plasmid P4. Using a plasmid complementation test for replication, we found that two replicons, both dependent on the alpha gene product, coexist in P4. The first replicon is made by the cnr and alpha genes and the ori1 and crr sites. The second is limited to the alpha and crr region. Thus, in the absence of the ori1 region, replication can initiate at a different site. By deletion mapping, a cis-acting region, ori2, essential for replication of the alpha-crr replicon was mapped within a 270-bp fragment in the first half of the alpha gene. The ori2 site was found to be dispensable in a replicon that contains ori1. A construct that besides crr and alpha carries also the cnr gene was unable to replicate, suggesting that Cnr not only controls replication from ori1, but also silences ori2.

  15. A recombinant Rift Valley fever virus glycoprotein subunit vaccine confers full protection against Rift Valley fever challenge in sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen causing disease outbreaks in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The virus has great potential for transboundary spread due to the presence of competent vectors in non-endemic areas. There is currently no fully licensed vaccine suita...

  16. Alphavirus replicon-based adjuvants enhance the immunogenicity and effectiveness of Fluzone ® in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy D; Matzinger, Shannon R; Barro, Mario; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Miller, Christopher J; Johnston, Robert E

    2011-01-29

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) without a transgene (null VRP) have been used to adjuvant effective humoral [1], cellular [2], and mucosal [3] immune responses in mice. To assess the adjuvant activity of null VRP in the context of a licensed inactivated influenza virus vaccine, rhesus monkeys were immunized with Fluzone(®) alone or Fluzone(®) mixed with null VRP and then challenged with a human seasonal influenza isolate, A/Memphis/7/2001 (H1N1). Compared to Fluzone(®) alone, Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals had stronger influenza-specific CD4(+) T cell responses (4.4 fold) with significantly higher levels of virus-specific IFN-γ (7.6 fold) and IL-2 (5.3 fold) producing CD4+ T cells. Fluzone(®)+null VRP immunized animals also had significantly higher plasma anti-influenza IgG (pVRP immunization was 1.2 log greater (pVRP immunized monkeys had a significantly lower level of viral replication (pVRP immunized monkeys immediately after challenge. There were significant inverse correlations between influenza RNA levels in tracheal lavages and plasma anti-influenza HI and IgG anti-influenza antibody titers prior to challenge. These results demonstrate that null VRP dramatically improve both the immunogenicity and protection elicited by a licensed inactivated influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The dynamic replicon: adapting to a changing cellular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, John

    2010-02-01

    Eukaryotic cells are often exposed to fluctuations in growth conditions as well as endogenous and exogenous stress-related agents. During development, global patterns of gene transcription change substantially, and these changes are associated with altered patterns of DNA replication and larger distances between replication origins in somatic cells compared to embryos. Conversely, when cells experience difficulties while replicating DNA, the replication program is dramatically altered and distances between replication origins decrease. Recent evidence indicates that each unit of replication, or replicon, can correspond to one or more potential replication origins, but in the case of multiple potential origins, only one is selected to initiate replication of the replicon. How one origin is selected from multiple potential origins and how origin densities are regulated during genome duplication remains unclear. The following review addresses some of the mechanisms involved in regulating replication origins during both a normal and perturbed eukaryotic cell cycle.

  18. The replication domain model: regulating replicon firing in the context of large-scale chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Benjamin D; Gilbert, David M

    2013-11-29

    The "Replicon Theory" of Jacob, Brenner, and Cuzin has reliably served as the paradigm for regulating the sites where individual replicons initiate replication. Concurrent with the replicon model was Taylor's demonstration that plant and animal chromosomes replicate segmentally in a defined temporal sequence, via cytologically defined units too large to be accounted for by a single replicon. Instead, there seemed to be a program to choreograph when chromosome units replicate during S phase, executed by initiation at clusters of individual replicons within each segment. Here, we summarize recent molecular evidence for the existence of such units, now known as "replication domains", and discuss how the organization of large chromosomes into structural units has added additional layers of regulation to the original replicon model.

  19. Robust and persistent replication of the genotype 6a hepatitis C virus replicon in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mei; Peng, Betty; Chan, Katie; Gong, Ruoyu; Yang, Huiling; Delaney, William; Cheng, Guofeng

    2014-05-01

    Genotype 6 (GT6) hepatitis C virus (HCV) is prevalent in Southeast Asia and southern China, where it can constitute up to 50% of HCV infections. Despite this, no direct-acting antivirals are approved to treat GT6 HCV infection, and no cell culture systems have been described. In this study, we aimed to develop a GT6 HCV subgenomic replicon to facilitate the identification and development of new HCV therapies with pan-genotype activity. A subgenomic replicon cDNA encoding a GT6a consensus sequence plus an NS5A amino acid substitution (S232I) was synthesized. Electroporation of RNA encoding the GT6a replicon into Huh-7-derived cells consistently yielded 20 to 100 stable replicon colonies. Genotypic analyses of individual replicon colonies revealed new adaptive mutations across multiple viral nonstructural proteins. The E30V and K272R mutations in NS3 and the K34R mutation in NS4A were observed most frequently and were confirmed to enhance GT6a replicon replication in the presence of the NS5A amino acid substitution S232I. These new adaptive mutations allowed establishment of robust luciferase-encoding GT6a replicons for reproducible quantification of HCV replication, and the luciferase-encoding replicons enabled efficient determinations of antiviral activity for HCV inhibitors in a 384-well assay format. While nucleoside/nucleotide NS5B inhibitors and cyclophilin A inhibitors had similar antiviral activities against both GT6a and GT1b replicons, some nonnucleoside NS5B inhibitors, NS3 protease inhibitors, and NS5A inhibitors had less antiviral activity against GT6a replicons. In conjunction with other genotype replicons, this robust GT6a replicon system will aid in the development of pan-genotypic HCV regimens.

  20. Identification and construction of replicon vectors of Japanese encephalits virus(strain SA14-14-2)%乙脑病毒SA14-14-2株复制子载体的构建及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦艳; 李川; 陆鹏; 于建石; 李建东; 刘琴芝; 张全福; 李德新

    2009-01-01

    Objective In order to lay the groundwork for studying the novel vaccine Identified.Methods (1)Two replicons were constructed.One's prM/E gene was deleted completely(Full △prM/E Replicon),the other's prM/E gene was deleted partially(213 bp of C terminal of E gene was reserved;PaaiM △prM/E Replicon),and the deleted parts Was replaced as the MCS.(2)Replicons RNA were which will use the JEV as the vector,replicon vectors of JEV was constructed and transfected into BHK-21 cell.After 24,48,72,96 h,method of real-time PCR was used to identify Replicons'replication ability.(3)YFP gene was inserted into the MCS of those two replicons.Their RNA was transfected into BHK-21 cell.Expression of YFP was tested by the fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometer.Results (1)After the two replicons RNA were transfected into BHK-21 cell,as time went by,the quantity of RNA inereased.(2)After RNA of the replicons with YFP were transfected into BHK-21cell,increasing trend of fluorescent signal and rate of YFP positive cell was observed and tested.Conclusion Full △prM/E Replicon and Partial △prM/E Replicon have the ability to duplicate itself and express the foreign protein.%目的 构建乙脑病毒SA14-14-2株复制子载体,为进一步研究以乙脑病毒为载体的新型疫苗奠定基础.方法 (1)构建了两个乙脑病毒复制子:一个为完全缺失PrM/E基因(命名为Full △prM/E Replicon);一个保留E基因C端213 bp(命名为Partial △prM/E Replicon),并代之以多克隆位点.(2)将复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞,于24、48、72、96 h采用Real-time PCR验证复制子的自主复制能力.(3)于复制子多克隆位点处插入YFP报告基因,并将含报告基因的复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞,采用荧光显微镜观察及流式细胞仪检测验证YFP的表达.结果 (1)两个复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞后,RNA有随时间增加而不断增多的趋势.(2)含报告基因的复制子RNA转染BHK-21细胞后,荧光信号持续增强,表达YFP的阳性

  1. Development and Characterization of West Nile Virus Replicon Expressing Secreted Gaussia Luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Shan; Xiaodan Li; Chenglin Deng; Baodi Shang; Linlin Xu; Hanqing Ye; Zhiming Yuan

    2013-01-01

    We developed a Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) reporter replicon of West Nile virus (WNV) and used it to quantify viral translation and RNA replication.The advantage of the Gluc replicon is that Gaussia luciferase is secreted into the culture medium from cells transfected with Gluc replicon RNA,and the medium can be assayed directly for luciferase activity.Using a known Flavivirus inhibitor (NITD008),we demonstrated that the Gluc-WNV replicon could be used for antiviral screening.The Gluc-WNV-Rep will be useful for research in antiviral drug development programs,as well as for studying viral replication and pathogenesis of WNV.

  2. Individual and bivalent vaccines against botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A and B using DNA-based Semliki Forest virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yunzhou; Yu, Jiyu; Li, Na; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Weiyuan; Sun, Zhiwei

    2009-10-19

    We evaluated individual and bivalent replicon vaccines against Clostridiumbotulinum neurotoxin serotypes A (BoNT/A) or B (BoNT/B). The DNA replicon vaccine (pSCARSBHc) encoding the Hc domain of BoNT/B (BHc) induced better responses and protection against BoNT/B mouse challenge than conventional DNA vaccine. The dual-expressing DNA vaccine (pSCARSA/BHc) protected similarly to a DNA replicon vaccine mixture (pSCARSAHc+pSCARSBHc). Additionally, recombinant SFV particles, VRP-AHc or VRP-BHc, protected mice from high-dose BoNT/A or BoNT/B challenge, respectively. Mice given either dual-expressing VRP-A/BHc or mixture of VRP-AHc and VRP-BHc were protected from challenge with serotype A/B mixtures. These data justify further testing in other animals or humans.

  3. Alphavirus replicon particles acting as adjuvants promote CD8+ T cell responses to co-delivered antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Staats, Herman F; Johnston, Robert E

    2008-08-05

    Alphavirus replicon particles induce strong antibody and CD8+ T cell responses to expressed antigens in numerous experimental systems. We have recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) possess adjuvant activity for systemic and mucosal antibody responses. In this report, we demonstrate that VRP induced an increased and balanced serum IgG subtype response to co-delivered antigen, with simultaneous induction of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies, and increased both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, as measured by an IFN-gamma ELISPOT assay. Additionally, VRP further increased antigen-specific T cell immunity in an additive fashion following co-delivery with the TLR ligand, CpG DNA. VRP infection led to recruitment of CD8+ T cells into the mucosal compartment, possibly utilizing the mucosal homing receptor, as this integrin was upregulated on CD8+ T cells in the draining lymph node of VRP-infected animals, where VRP-infected dendritic cells reside. This newly recognized ability of VRP to mediate increased T cell response towards co-delivered antigen provides the potential to both define the molecular basis of alphavirus-induced immunity, and improve alphavirus-based vaccines.

  4. A Kunjin replicon vector encoding granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor for intra-tumoral gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoang-Le, D.; Smeenk, L.; Anraku, I.; Pijlman, G.P.; Wang, X.J.; Vrij, de J.; Liu, W.J.; Le, T.T.; Schroder, W.A.; Khromykh, A.A.; Suhrbier, A.

    2009-01-01

    We have recently developed a non-cytopathic RNA replicon-based viral vector system based on the flavivirus Kunjin. Here, we illustrate the utility of the Kunjin replicon system for gene therapy. Intra-tumoral injections of Kunjin replicon virus-like particles encoding granulocyte colony-stimulating

  5. Construction and Characterization of a Hepatitis B Virus Replicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin-ping LU; Bao-ju WANG; Ji-hua DONG; Zhao LIU; Shi-he GUAN; Meng-ji LU; Dong-liang YANG

    2007-01-01

    To establish a replication cellular model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and determine its application in antiviral drug evaluation,we constructed an expression plasmid which contained 1.3 copies of the HBV genome,and measured the level of viral replication after transient transfection in Huh7 cells.We then observed the effect of antiviral drug administration.1.3 fold of the HBV(ayw) gene fragment was cloned into pCR2.1 by PCR and restriction endonuclease digestion.The recombinant plasmid was trans ient transfected into Huh7 cells,HBsAg,HBeAg and HBV DNA in supernatant of Huh7 cells were measured by ELISA and real-time PCR respectively; intracellular HBV replicative intermediates and intracellular HBV transcripts were detected by Southern blot and Northern blot respectively.The antiviral effect of adefovir,a novel anti-HBV nucleotide analogue,was evaluated in this cellular model system.The results indicated that a recombinant plasmid of HBV replicon was constructed successfully; the HBV genome carried in plasmid pHBV1.3 could efficiently replicate and be expressed in Huh 7 cells,adefovir could inhibit HBV replication in this cellular model,and the inhibition was dosage-dependent.The conclusion is HBV replicon,which can initiate viral replication efficiently in hepatoma cells,may be a useful tool in the study of HBV replication and antiviral drug.

  6. Alphavirus replicon-based enhancement of mucosal and systemic immunity is linked to the innate response generated by primary immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Daniel R; Jorquera, Patricia; Todd, Tracie; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E; Barro, Mario

    2010-04-19

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) function as an effective systemic, cellular and mucosal adjuvant when codelivered with antigen, and show promise for use as a component in new and existing human vaccine formulations. We show here that VRP are effective at low dose and by intramuscular delivery, two useful features for implementation of VRP as a vaccine adjuvant. In mice receiving a prime and boost with antigen, we found that VRP are required in prime only to produce a full adjuvant effect. This outcome indicates that the events triggered during prime with VRP are sufficient to establish the nature and magnitude of the immune response to a second exposure to antigen. Events induced by VRP in the draining lymph node after prime include robust secretion of many inflammatory cytokines, upregulation of CD69 on leukocytes, and increased cellularity, with a disproportionate increase of a cell population expressing CD11c, CD11b, and F4/80. We show that antigen delivered 24h after administration of VRP does not benefit from an adjuvant effect, indicating that the events which are critical to VRP-mediated adjuvant activity occur within the first 24h. Further studies of the events induced by VRP will help elucidate the mechanism of VRP adjuvant activity and will advance the safe implementation of this adjuvant in human vaccines. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Virus replicon particles expressing porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus proteins elicit immune priming but do not confer protection from viremia in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, Melanie; Durán, Margarita García; Ricklin, Meret E; Locher, Samira; Sarraseca, Javier; Rodríguez, María José; McCullough, Kenneth C; Summerfield, Artur; Zimmer, Gert; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2016-02-19

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of one of the most devastating and economically significant viral disease of pigs worldwide. The vaccines currently available on the market elicit only limited protection. Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replicon particles (VRP) have been used successfully to induce protection against influenza A virus (IAV) in chickens and bluetongue virus in sheep. In this study, VSV VRP expressing the PRRSV envelope proteins GP5, M, GP4, GP3, GP2 and the nucleocapsid protein N, individually or in combination, were generated and evaluated as a potential vector vaccine against PRRSV infection. High level expression of the recombinant PRRSV proteins was demonstrated in cell culture. However, none of the PRRSV antigens expressed from VRP, with the exception of the N protein, did induce any detectable antibody response in pigs before challenge infection with PRRSV. After challenge however, the antibody responses against GP5, GP4 and GP3 appeared in average 2 weeks earlier than in pigs vaccinated with the empty control VRP. No reduction of viremia was observed in the vaccinated group compared with the control group. When pigs were co-vaccinated with VRP expressing IAV antigens and VRP expressing PRRSV glycoproteins, only antibody responses to the IAV antigens were detectable. These data show that the VSV replicon vector can induce immune responses to heterologous proteins in pigs, but that the PRRSV envelope proteins expressed from VSV VRP are poorly immunogenic. Nevertheless, they prime the immune system for significantly earlier B-cell responses following PRRSV challenge infection.

  8. A respiratory syncytial virus replicon that is noncytotoxic and capable of long-term foreign gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykhina, Olga; Yednak, Mark A; Collins, Peter L; Olivo, Paul D; Peeples, Mark E

    2011-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic resistance gene to enable detection and selection of replicon-containing cells. Adaptive mutations in the RSV replicon were not required for replicon maintenance. Cells containing the replicon could be cloned and passaged many times in the absence of antibiotic selection, with 99% or more of the cells retaining the replicon after each cell division. Transient expression of the F and G (attachment) glycoproteins supported the production of virions that could transfer the replicon into most cell lines tested. Since the RSV replicon is not toxic to these cultured cells and does not affect their rate of cell division, none of the 8 internal viral proteins, the viral RNA transcripts, or the host response to these molecules or their activities is cytopathic. However, the level of replicon genome and gene expression is controlled in some manner well below that of complete virus and, as such, might avoid cytotoxicity. RSV replicons could be useful for cytoplasmic gene expression in vitro and in vivo and for screening for compounds active against the viral polymerase.

  9. Novel hepatitis C virus reporter replicon cell lines enable efficient antiviral screening against genotype 1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Margaret; Yang, Huiling; Sun, Siu-Chi; Peng, Betty; Tian, Yang; Pagratis, Nikos; Greenstein, Andrew E; Delaney, William E

    2010-08-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) subgenomic replicon is the primary tool for evaluating the activity of anti-HCV compounds in drug discovery research. Despite the prevalence of HCV genotype 1a (approximately 70% of U.S. HCV patients), few genotype 1a reporter replicon cell lines have been described; this is presumably due to the low replication capacity of such constructs in available Huh-7 cells. In this report, we describe the selection of highly permissive Huh-7 cell lines that support robust replication of genotype 1a subgenomic replicons harboring luciferase reporter genes. These novel cell lines support the replication of multiple genotype 1a replicons (including the H77 and SF9 strains), are significantly more permissive to genotype 1a HCV replication than parental Huh7-Lunet cells, and maintain stable genotype 1a replication levels suitable for antiviral screening. We found that the sensitivity of genotype 1a luciferase replicons to known antivirals was highly consistent between individual genotype 1a clonal cell lines but could vary significantly between genotypes 1a and 1b. Sequencing of the nonstructural region of 12 stable replicon cell clones suggested that the enhanced permissivity is likely due to cellular component(s) in these new cell lines rather than the evolution of novel adaptive mutations in the replicons. These new reagents will enhance drug discovery efforts targeting genotype 1a and facilitate the profiling of compound activity among different HCV genotypes and subtypes.

  10. Construction of self-replicating subgenomic dengue virus 4 (DENV4) replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Del Angel, Rosa; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus serotypes 1-4 are members of mosquito-borne flavivirus genus of Flaviviridae family that encode one long open reading frame (ORF) that is translated to a polyprotein. Both host and virally encoded proteases function in the processing of the polyprotein by co-translational and posttranslational mechanisms to yield 10 mature proteins prior to viral RNA replication. To study cis- and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication, many groups [1-8] have constructed cDNAs encoding West Nile virus (WNV), DENV, or yellow fever virus reporter replicon RNAs. The replicon plasmids constructed in our laboratory for WNV [9] and the DENV4 replicon described here are arranged in the order of 5'-untranslated region (UTR), the N-terminal coding sequence of capsid (C), Renilla luciferase (Rluc) reporter gene with a translation termination codon, and an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element from encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) for cap-independent translation of the downstream ORF that codes for a polyprotein precursor, CterE-NS1-NS2A-NS2B-NS3-NS4A-NS4B-NS5, followed by the 3'-UTR. In the second DENV4 replicon, the Rluc gene is fused sequentially downstream to the 20 amino acid (aa) FMDV 2A protease coding sequence, neomycin resistance gene (Neo(r)), a termination codon, and the EMCV leader followed by the same polyprotein coding sequence and 3'-UTR as in the first replicon. The first replicon is useful to study by transient transfection experiments the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in viral RNA replication. The second DENV4 replicon is used to establish a stable monkey kidney (Vero) cell line by transfection of replicon RNA and selection in the presence of the G418, an analog of neomycin. This replicon is useful for screening and identifying antiviral compounds that are potential inhibitors of viral replication.

  11. Development of a novel adenovirus-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features for malignant hematopoietic cell transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Xiao, F; Lu, Z; Li, Z; Zuo, H; Zhang, Q; Li, Q; Wang, H; Wang, L-S

    2013-08-01

    To improve the expression levels of transgenes in malignant hematopoietic cells, we developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP that contains a Semliki Forest Virus (SFV) replicon and chimeric fibers of Ad5 and Ad11p. Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP infected >95% of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells and 23.65% of HL-60 cells, and led to moderate Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (EGFP) transgene expression intensity. The infection efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary human leukemia cells ranged from 9.34-89.63% (median, 28.58%) at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100, compared with only 3.37-44.54% (median, 10.42%) in cells infected by Ad5/F11p-GFP. Importantly, Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP led to a significantly higher transgene expression level in primary leukemia cells, as indicated by the relative fluorescence intensity, compared to cells infected with Ad5/F11p-GFP. The increased expression of EGFP in Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP-infected cells was associated with the accumulation of abundant subgenomic mRNA. Additionally, infection of K562, U937 or Jurkat cells by Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP was significantly inhibited by blocking CD46 receptor; however, other factors may affect the gene-transfer efficiency of Ad5/F11p-SFV-GFP in primary leukemia cells. In conclusion, we successfully developed a novel adenoviral-alphavirus hybrid vector with RNA replicon features, which represents a promising vector for gene modifications during the production of cell-based vaccines for leukemia patients.

  12. Hepatitis C genotype 1a replicon improved through introduction of fitness mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voitenleitner, Christian; Bechtel, Jill; Arfsten, Ann; Hamatake, Robert

    2012-04-01

    The use of subgenomic replicon systems has long been a valuable screening tool for the discovery of small molecule antivirals against Hepatitis C virus. While genotype 1a replicon systems have been widely used in stable systems, use in transient assays has been hampered by low signal. Here we describe the generation of a more robust genotype 1a (H77) replicon through the introduction of two fitness mutations, NS4A-K1691R and NS4B-E1726G, for use in transient transfections. While these mutations significantly improved the signal to noise ratio, leading to more robust data, they have no effect on the potency of tool compounds against various targets of HCV, thereby making this new system a powerful tool for screening of compounds against the genotype 1a replicon.

  13. Development of a high-throughput replicon assay for the identification of respiratory syncytial virus inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong-Yip, Choi-Lai; Plant, Helen; Sharpe, Paul; Fan, Jun; Rich, Kirsty; Gorseth, Elise; Yu, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug discovery has been hindered by the lack of good chemistry starting points and would benefit from robust and convenient assays for high-throughput screening (HTS). In this paper, we present the development and optimization of a 384-well RSV replicon assay that enabled HTS for RSV replication inhibitors with a low bio-containment requirement. The established replicon assay was successfully implemented for high-throughput screening. A validation screen was performed which demonstrated high assay performance and reproducibility. Assay quality was further confirmed via demonstration of appropriate pharmacology for different classes of RSV replication tool inhibitors. RSV replicon and cytotoxicity assays were further developed into a multiplexed format that measured both inhibition of viral replication and cytotoxicity from the same well. This provided a time and cost efficient approach to support lead optimization. In summary, we have developed a robust RSV replicon assay to help expedite the discovery of novel RSV therapeutics.

  14. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Plasmid Replicon Typing of Salmonella enterica serovar Kentucky isolates recovered from Broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella Kentucky has become the predominate serotype recovered from broiler slaughter in the United States and the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has increased dramatically in this serotype. Relationships between AMR, genotype, and plasmid replicon types were characterized for 600 ...

  15. Hepatitis C virus RNA elimination and development of resistance in replicon cells treated with BMS-790052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunfu; Huang, Haichang; Valera, Lourdes; Sun, Jin-Hua; O'Boyle, Donald R; Nower, Peter T; Jia, Lingling; Qiu, Dike; Huang, Xin; Altaf, Aneela; Gao, Min; Fridell, Robert A

    2012-03-01

    BMS-790052, a first-in-class hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication complex inhibitor, targeting nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A), displays picomolar to nanomolar potency against genotypes 1 to 5. This exceptional potency translated into robust anti-HCV activity in clinical studies with HCV genotype 1-infected subjects. To date, all BMS-790052-associated resistance mutations have mapped to the N-terminal region of NS5A. To further characterize the antiviral activity of BMS-790052, HCV replicon elimination and colony formation assays were performed. Replicon was cleared from genotype 1a and 1b replicon cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Elimination of the genotype 1a replicon required longer treatment durations and higher concentrations of BMS-790052 than those for the genotype1b replicon. Single amino acid substitutions that conferred relatively low levels of resistance were observed at early time points and at low doses. Higher doses and longer treatment durations yielded mutations that conferred greater levels of resistance, including linked amino acid substitutions. Replicon cells that survived inhibitor treatment remained fully sensitivity to pegylated alpha interferon (pegIFN-α) and other HCV inhibitors. Moreover, genotype 1a replicon elimination was markedly enhanced when pegIFN-α and BMS-790052 were combined. Resistant variants observed in this study were very similar to those observed in a multiple ascending dose (MAD) monotherapy trial of BMS-790052, validating replicon elimination studies as a model to predict clinical resistance. Insights gained from the in vitro anti-HCV activity and resistance profiles of BMS-790052 will be used to help guide the clinical development of this novel HCV inhibitor.

  16. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

    OpenAIRE

    Gerosolimo Germano; Dallapiccola Bruno; Bruni Roberto; Ferraris Alessandro; Tataseo Paola; Tritarelli Elena; Marcantonio Cinzia; Ciccaglione Anna; Costantino Angela; Rapicetta Maria

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system). Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 ...

  17. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  18. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogadri, Francesca; Merghoub, Taha; Maughan, Maureen F; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Morris, John; Ritter, Erika; Olmsted, Robert; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2010-09-10

    Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP) simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA) tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2), which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  19. Construction of yellow fever virus subgenomic replicons by yeast-based homologous recombination cloning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina R.A. Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicon derived from Flavivirus genome is a valuable tool for studying viral replication independent of virion assembly and maturation, besides being a great potencial for heterologous gene expression. In this study we described the construction of subgenomic replicons of yellow fever virus by yeast-based homologous recombination technique. The plasmid containing the yellow fever 17D strain replicon (pBSC-repYFV-17D, previously characterized, was handled to heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (repYFV-17D-GFP and firefly luciferase (repYFV-17D-Luc reporter genes. Both replicons were constructed by homologous recombination between the linearized vector pBSC-repYFV-17D and the PCR product containing homologous 25 nucleotides ends incorporated into PCR primers. The genomic organization of these constructs is similar to repYFV-17D, but with insertion of the reporter gene between the remaining 63 N-terminal nucleotides of the capsid protein and 72 C-terminal nucleotides of the E protein. The replicons repYFV-17D-GFP and repYFV-17D-Luc showed efficient replication and expression of the reporter genes. The yeast-based homologous recombination technique used in this study proved to be applicable for manipulation of the yellow fever virus genome in order to construct subgenomic replicons.

  20. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases.

  1. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Xin; Yao, Hang-Ping; Wu, Nan-Ping; Gao, Hai-Nv; Wu, Hai-Bo; Jin, Chang-Zhong; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Xie, Tian-Shen; Li, Lan-Juan

    2015-01-01

    Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD) in humans and non-human primates (NHPs). Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs), vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirusx2206;VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV)-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD.

  2. Ebolavirus Vaccines: Progress in the Fight Against Ebola Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xin Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses are highly infectious pathogens that cause lethal Ebola virus disease (EVD in humans and non-human primates (NHPs. Due to their high pathogenicity and transmissibility, as well as the potential to be misused as a bioterrorism agent, ebolaviruses would threaten the health of global populations if not controlled. In this review, we describe the origin and structure of ebolaviruses and the development of vaccines from the beginning of the 1980s, including conventional ebolavirus vaccines, DNA vaccines, Ebola virus-like particles (VLPs, vaccinia virus-based vaccines, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV-like replicon particles, Kunjin virus-based vaccine, recombinant Zaire Ebolavirus∆VP30, recombinant cytomegalovirus (CMV-based vaccines, recombinant rabies virus (RABV-based vaccines, recombinant paramyxovirus-based vaccines, adenovirus-based vaccines and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based vaccines. No licensed vaccine or specific treatment is currently available to counteract ebolavirus infection, although DNA plasmids and several viral vector approaches have been evaluated as promising vaccine platforms. These vaccine candidates have been confirmed to be successful in protecting NHPs against lethal infection. Moreover, these vaccine candidates were successfully advanced to clinical trials. The present review provides an update of the current research on Ebola vaccines, with the aim of providing an overview on current prospects in the fight against EVD.

  3. Immunogenic and replicative properties of classical swine fever virus replicon particles modified to induce IFN-α/β and carry foreign genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Rolf; Summerfield, Artur; Thomann-Harwood, Lisa J; McCullough, Kenneth C; Tratschin, Jon-Duri; Ruggli, Nicolas

    2011-02-04

    Virus replicon particles (VRP) are genetically engineered infectious virions incapable of generating progeny virus due to partial or complete deletion of at least one structural gene. VRP fulfil the criteria of a safe vaccine and gene delivery system. With VRP derived from classical swine fever virus (CSF-VRP), a single intradermal vaccination protects from disease. Spreading of the challenge virus in the host is however not completely abolished. Parameters that are critical for immunogenicity of CSF-VRP are not well characterized. Considering the importance of type I interferon (IFN-α/β) to immune defence development, we generated IFN-α/β-inducing VRP to determine how this would influence vaccine efficacy. We also evaluated the effect of co-expressing granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the vaccine context. The VRP were capable of long-term replication in cell culture despite the presence of IFN-α/β. In vivo, RNA replication was essential for the induction of an immune response. IFN-α/β-inducing and GM-CSF-expressing CSF-VRP were similar to unmodified VRP in terms of antibody and peripheral T-cell responses, and in reducing the blood levels of challenge virus RNA. Importantly, the IFN-α/β-inducing VRP did show increased efficacy over the unmodified VRP in terms of B-cell and T-cell responses, when tested with secondary immune responses by in vitro restimulation assay. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ziniu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. Results A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165, an origin of replication (ori165 and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10 were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMβ1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. Conclusion The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMβ1 family replicons.

  5. Identification of hepatitis C virus genotype 2a replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hmwe, Su Su; Aizaki, Hideki; Date, Tomoko; Murakami, Kyoko; Ishii, Koji; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Koike, Kazuhiko; Wakita, Takaji; Suzuki, Tetsuro

    2010-03-01

    Ribavirin (RBV), a nucleoside analogue, is used in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in combination with interferons. However, potential mechanisms of RBV resistance during HCV replication remain poorly understood. Serial passage of cells harboring HCV genotype 2a replicon in the presence of RBV resulted in the reduced susceptibility of the replicon to RBV. Transfection of fresh cells with RNA from RBV-resistant replicon cells demonstrated that the RBV resistance observed is largely replicon-derived. Four major amino acid substitutions: T1134S in NS3, P1969S in NS4B, V2405A in NS5A, and Y2471H in NS5B region, were identified. Site-directed mutagenesis of these mutations into the replicon indicated that Y2471H plays a role in the reduced susceptibility to RBV and leads to decrease in replication fitness. The results, in addition to analysis of sequence database, suggest that HCV variants with reduced susceptibility to RBV identified are preferential to genotype 2a.

  6. Replicon-dependent bacterial genome evolution: the case of Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galardini, Marco; Pini, Francesco; Bazzicalupo, Marco; Biondi, Emanuele G; Mengoni, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    Many bacterial species, such as the alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti, are characterized by open pangenomes and contain multipartite genomes consisting of a chromosome and other large-sized replicons, such as chromids, megaplasmids, and plasmids. The evolutionary forces in both functional and structural aspects that shape the pangenome of species with multipartite genomes are still poorly understood. Therefore, we sequenced the genomes of 10 new S. meliloti strains, analyzed with four publicly available additional genomic sequences. Results indicated that the three main replicons present in these strains (a chromosome, a chromid, and a megaplasmid) partly show replicon-specific behaviors related to strain differentiation. In particular, the pSymB chromid was shown to be a hot spot for positively selected genes, and, unexpectedly, genes resident in the pSymB chromid were also found to be more widespread in distant taxa than those located in the other replicons. Moreover, through the exploitation of a DNA proximity network, a series of conserved "DNA backbones" were found to shape the evolution of the genome structure, with the rest of the genome experiencing rearrangements. The presented data allow depicting a scenario where the pSymB chromid has a distinctive role in intraspecies differentiation and in evolution through positive selection, whereas the pSymA megaplasmid mostly contributes to structural fluidity and to the emergence of new functions, indicating a specific evolutionary role for each replicon in the pangenome evolution.

  7. A novel dengue virus inhibitor, BP13944, discovered by high-throughput screening with dengue virus replicon cells selects for resistance in the viral NS2B/NS3 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi-Chen; Hu, Han-Shu; Wu, Ren-Huang; Wu, Szu-Huei; Lee, Shiow-Ju; Jiaang, Weir-Torn; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Huang, Zhi-Shun; Wu, Huey-Nan; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) causes disease globally, resulting in an estimated 25 to 100 million new infections per year. No effective DENV vaccine is available, and the current treatment is only supportive. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop therapeutic agents to cure this epidemic disease. In the present study, we identified a potential small-molecule inhibitor, BP13944, via high-throughput screening (HTS) of 60,000 compounds using a stable cell line harboring an efficient luciferase replicon of DENV serotype 2 (DENV-2). BP13944 reduced the expression of the DENV replicon reporter in cells, showing a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 1.03 ± 0.09 μM. Without detectable cytotoxicity, the compound inhibited replication or viral RNA synthesis in all four serotypes of DENV but not in Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Sequencing analyses of several individual clones derived from BP13944-resistant RNAs purified from cells harboring the DENV-2 replicon revealed a consensus amino acid substitution (E66G) in the region of the NS3 protease domain. Introduction of E66G into the DENV replicon, an infectious DENV cDNA clone, and recombinant NS2B/NS3 protease constructs conferred 15.2-, 17.2-, and 3.1-fold resistance to BP13944, respectively. Our results identify an effective small-molecule inhibitor, BP13944, which likely targets the DENV NS3 protease. BP13944 could be considered part of a more effective treatment regime for inhibiting DENV in the future.

  8. Evaluation of the Efficacy, Potential for Vector Transmission, and Duration of Immunity of MP-12, an Attenuated Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Candidate, in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    and L (24–26), thus significantly reducing the risk of reversion to viru - lence that might otherwise arise from a recombination event with other viruses ...Transmission, and Duration of Immunity of MP-12, an Attenuated Rift Valley Fever Virus Vaccine Candidate, in Sheep 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...Immunol. 2015; 22(8):930-937 14. ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes serious disease in ruminants and humans in Africa. In North America

  9. Modification of a salmonid alphavirus replicon vector for enhanced expression of heterologous antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tz-Chun; Johansson, Daniel X; Liljeström, Peter; Evensen, Øystein; Haugland, Øyvind

    2015-03-01

    A salmonid alphavirus (SAV) replicon has been developed to express heterologous antigens but protein production was low to modest compared with terrestrial alphavirus replicons. In this study, we have compared several modifications to a SAV replicon construct and analysed their influence on foreign gene expression. We found that an insertion of a translational enhancer consisting of the N-terminal 102 nt of the capsid gene, together with a nucleotide sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A peptide, caused a significant increase in EGFP reporter gene expression. The importance of fusing a hammerhead (HH) ribozyme sequence at the 5' end of the viral genome was also demonstrated. In contrast, a hepatitis D virus ribozyme (HDV-RZ) sequence placed at the 3' end did not augment expression of inserted genes. Taken together, we have developed a platform for optimized antigen production, which can be applied for immunization of salmonid fish in the future.

  10. Vaccine to Confer to Nonhuman Primates Complete Protection Against Multistrain Ebola and Marburg Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Therefore, much progress has been made using alternative vaccine platforms, such as recombinant viral vec- tors. For example, alphavirus replicons...immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys of DNA plas- mid, recombinant vaccinia virus, and replication -defective adenovirus vec- tors expressing a human...recombinants. Virology 239:206–216. 14. Hevey, M., D. Negley, P. Pushko, J. Smith, and A. Schmaljohn. 1998. Mar- burg virus vaccines based upon alphavirus

  11. The adjuvant activity of alphavirus replicons is enhanced by incorporating the microbial molecule flagellin into the replicon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Ligands of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs including Toll-like receptors (TLRs stimulate innate and adaptive immune responses and are considered as potent adjuvants. Combinations of ligands might act in synergy to induce stronger and broader immune responses compared to stand-alone ligands. Alphaviruses stimulate endosomal TLRs 3, 7 and 8 as well as the cytoplasmic PRR MDA-5, resulting in induction of a strong type I interferon (IFN response. Bacterial flagellin stimulates TLR5 and when delivered intracellularly the cytosolic PRR NLRC4, leading to secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Both alphaviruses and flagellin have independently been shown to act as adjuvants for antigen-specific antibody responses. Here, we hypothesized that alphavirus and flagellin would act in synergy when combined. We therefore cloned the Salmonella Typhimurium flagellin (FliC gene into an alphavirus replicon and assessed its adjuvant activity on the antibody response against co-administered antigen. In mice immunized with recombinant alphavirus, antibody responses were greatly enhanced compared to soluble FliC or control alphavirus. Both IgG1 and IgG2a/c responses were increased, indicating an enhancement of both Th1 and Th2 type responses. The adjuvant activity of FliC-expressing alphavirus was diminished but not abolished in the absence of TLR5 or type I IFN signaling, suggesting the contribution of several signaling pathways and some synergistic and redundant activity of its components. Thus, we have created a recombinant adjuvant that stimulates multiple signaling pathways of innate immunity resulting in a strong and broad antibody response.

  12. Construction of a chimeric hepatitis C virus replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huang; Zhu, Wandi; Han, Qingxia; Pei, Rongjuan; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Subgenomic replicons of hepatitis C virus (HCV) have been widely used for studying HCV replication. Here, we report a new subgenomic replicon based on a strain isolated from a chronically infected patient. The coding sequence of HCV was recovered from a Chinese chronic hepatitis C patient displaying high serum HCV copy numbers. A consensus sequence designated as CCH strain was constructed based on the sequences of five clones and this was classified by sequence alignment as belonging to genotype 2a. The subgenomic replicon of CCH was replication-deficient in cell culture, due to dysfunctions in NS3 and NS5B. Various JFH1/CCH chimeric replicons were constructed, and specific mutations were introduced. The introduction of mutations could partially restore the replication of chimeric replicons. A replication-competent chimeric construct was finally obtained by the introduction of NS3 from JFH1 into the backbone of the CCH strain.

  13. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freistadt Marion S

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function.

  14. Conserved aspartic acid 233 and alanine 231 are not required for poliovirus polymerase function in replicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freistadt, Marion S; Eberle, Karen E

    2007-01-01

    Nucleic acid polymerases have similar structures and motifs. The function of an aspartic acid (conserved in all classes of nucleic acid polymerases) in motif A remains poorly understood in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. We mutated this residue to alanine in a poliovirus replicon. The resulting mutant could still replicate, although at a reduced level. In addition, mutation A231C (also in motif A) yielded high levels of replication. Taken together these results show that poliovirus polymerase conserved residues D233 and A231 are not essential to poliovirus replicon function. PMID:17352827

  15. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Yang, Xiao Yi; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M; Smith, Jonathan; Kim Lyerly, H

    2012-11-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-based replicon particle (VRPs) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP-expressing interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and antitumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)), and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12, and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP-IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing antitumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than that of VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted.

  16. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associated antigen, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) (VRP-CEA(6D)) and VRP-IL-12 was also administered at the same site or at a distant location. CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses were measured. To determine antitumor activity, mice were implanted with MC38-CEA-2 cells and immunized with VRP-CEA with and without VRP-IL-12 and tumor growth and mouse survival were measured. VRP-IL-12 greatly enhanced CEA-specific T cell and antibody responses when combined with VRP-CEA(6D) vaccination. VRP IL-12 was superior to IL-12 protein at enhancing immune responses. Vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) plus VRP-IL-12 was superior to VRP-CEA(6D) or VRP-IL-12 alone in inducing anti-tumor activity and prolonging survival in tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, local injection of VRP-IL-12 at the VRP-CEA(6D) injection site provided more potent activation of CEA-specific immune responses than VRP-IL-12 injected at a distant site from the VRP-CEA injections. Together, this study shows that VRP-IL-12 enhances vaccination with VRP-CEA(6D) and was more effective at activating CEA-specific T cell responses when locally expressed at the vaccine site. Clinical trials evaluating the adjuvant effect of VRP-IL-12 at enhancing the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines are warranted. PMID:22488274

  17. Breaking the chain: Rift Valley fever virus control via livestock vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Brian H; Nichol, Stuart T

    2012-06-01

    Rift Valley fever virus is a mosquito-borne pathogen of livestock and humans that causes widespread and devastating outbreaks of severe and often fatal disease throughout Africa and portions of the Arabian Peninsula. Outbreaks can involve tens to hundreds of thousands of human cases, and millions of livestock. The severity of the disease varies by species, but in sheep and cattle 'abortion storms', high neonatal (∼70%), and adult mortality (20-30%) are features. Human cases are generally self-limiting, but severe complications such as hepatitis, retinitis, delayed-onset encephalitis, or a hemorrhagic syndrome with a case fatality of 10-20% can occur. There are no commercially available human vaccines. Livestock provide key ecological links between the Aedes sp. mosquito vector and humans. High viremias in livestock lead to spillover of RVFV into other anthrophillic vectors (Culex and Anopheles sp. mosquitoes), and, importantly, close contact with infected animal tissues and fluids or aborted fetal materials from these animals is a major risk factor for severe and lethal human infections. Vaccination programs targeting livestock during non-epidemic periods or as an early countermeasure against nascent outbreaks could therefore eliminate one of the main sources of human infection and limit the overall scope of epidemics. To this end, research groups have recently reported novel next generation RVFV vaccines that are safe for use in pregnant and young animals. Preventing RVFV infection of livestock by vaccination is a key element in breaking the chain of human epidemics, and could lead to control of this significant public health threat.

  18. RNA疫苗%RNA vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴浩飞; 罗丹

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines consist of plasmid DNA,viral vectors and RNA vaccines.Since the nucleic acid vaccines combine the benefits of live-attenuated vaccines,and avoid the problems of complication related to live-attenuated vaccine safety and production,they may change the way that next generation vaccines are produced.RNA vaccines,including those based on messenger RNA (mRNA) and self-amplifying RNA replicons,have the potential to break through the limitations of plasmid DNA and viral vectors.With solving the issue of cost and manufacturing feasibility,the commercialization of RNA vaccines has become promising.The concept of RNA vaccines has been demonstrated in humans,and the prospects for further development into commercial products are very encouraging.%核酸疫苗包括质粒DNA、病毒载体和RNA疫苗,极有可能促成新一代疫苗生产方式的变革,因为它既综合了减毒活疫苗的优势,又避免了减毒活疫苗的安全性及生产复杂性等问题.RNA疫苗,包括基于信使RNA(mRNA)和自我扩增RNA复制子的疫苗,能克服质粒DNA和病毒载体的局限性.随着RNA疫苗的生产可行性及成本问题的解决,RNA疫苗商业化的曙光已经显现.RNA疫苗概念在人体中已得到验证,其进一步开发为商业化产品的前景令人鼓舞.

  19. RNA Replicon-based Vaccines%RNA复制子疫苗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇华吉; 李卫平; 童光志

    2003-01-01

    RNA复制子是自主复制的RNA,保留了病毒复制酶基因,而结构蛋白基因缺失,由外源抗原基因取代,复制酶可控制载体RNA在胞浆中高水平复制和外源基因的高水平表达.用于开发复制子的主要是单股正链RNA病毒,如甲病毒(辛德比斯病毒、塞姆利基森林病毒、委内瑞拉马脑炎病毒)、黄病毒(登革热病毒、昆津病毒)、小RNA病毒(脊髓灰质炎病毒、人鼻病毒)、副粘病毒(犬瘟热病毒)、杯状病毒(猫杯状病毒).基于复制子的疫苗不会产生能复制的感染性病毒粒子,不可能与细胞基因组发生整合,但可诱导全身免疫和粘膜免疫以及MHC-I限制性CTL反应,而不受体内已有载体抗体的干扰.目前已开发了大量基于复制子的疫苗和肿瘤的治疗性和预防性疫苗,并在很多疾病模型上取得成功,包括病毒(流感病毒、人免疫缺陷病毒、拉沙病毒、马尔堡病毒、呼吸道合胞体病毒、诺沃克样病毒、马动脉炎病毒等)肿瘤(人乳头瘤、癌胚抗原、B16肿瘤、小鼠黑素瘤等)、以及细菌毒素(肉毒杆菌毒素、葡萄球菌肠毒素、破伤风毒素等).

  20. Monitoring the determinants of efficient viral replication using Classical Swine Fever Virus-reporter replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Everett, Helen; Crooke, Helen

    2012-01-01

    proteins considered non-essential for RNA replication were constructed and these deletions were replaced with an in-frame insertion of the Renilla luciferase (Rluc) sequence. RNA transcripts from these replicons should be translated as a single functional open reading frame. Full-genome cDNAs (~10-12,3 kb...

  1. Evaluation of the influenza A replicon for transient expression of recombinant proteins in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Pontiller, Jens; Tauer, Christopher; Palmberger, Dieter; Maccani, Andreas; Baumann, Martina; Grabherr, Reingard

    2010-10-11

    Recombinant protein expression in mammalian cells has become a very important technique over the last twenty years. It is mainly used for production of complex proteins for biopharmaceutical applications. Transient recombinant protein expression is a possible strategy to produce high quality material for preclinical trials within days. Viral replicon based expression systems have been established over the years and are ideal for transient protein expression. In this study we describe the evaluation of an influenza A replicon for the expression of recombinant proteins. We investigated transfection and expression levels in HEK-293 cells with EGFP and firefly luciferase as reporter proteins. Furthermore, we studied the influence of different influenza non-coding regions and temperature optima for protein expression as well. Additionally, we exploited the viral replication machinery for the expression of an antiviral protein, the human monoclonal anti-HIV-gp41 antibody 3D6. Finally we could demonstrate that the expression of a single secreted protein, an antibody light chain, by the influenza replicon, resulted in fivefold higher expression levels compared to the usually used CMV promoter based expression. We emphasize that the influenza A replicon system is feasible for high level expression of complex proteins in mammalian cells.

  2. Targeted mutagenesis of dengue virus type 2 replicon RNA by yeast in vivo recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Mark; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    The use of cDNA infectious clones or subgenomic replicons is indispensable in studying flavivirus biology. Mutating nucleotides or amino acid residues gives important clues to their function in the viral life cycle. However, a major challenge to the establishment of a reverse genetics system for flaviviruses is the instability of their nucleotide sequences in Escherichia coli. Thus, direct cloning using conventional restriction enzyme-based procedures usually leads to unwanted rearrangements of the construct. In this chapter, we discuss a cloning strategy that bypasses traditional cloning procedures. We take advantage of the observations from previous studies that (1) unstable sequences in bacteria can be cloned in eukaryotic systems and (2) Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a well-studied genetics system to introduce sequences using homologous recombination. We describe a protocol to perform targeted mutagenesis in a subgenomic dengue virus 2 replicon. Our method makes use of homologous recombination in yeast using a linearized replicon and a PCR product containing the desired mutation. Constructs derived from this method can be propagated in E. coli with improved stability. Thus, yeast in vivo recombination provides an excellent strategy to genetically engineer flavivirus infectious clones or replicons because this system is compatible with inherently unstable sequences of flaviviruses and is not restricted by the limitations of traditional cloning procedures.

  3. Cytoskeletal Requirements for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Synthesis in the HCV Replicon Cell Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Bost, Anne G.; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  4. Cytoskeletal requirements for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in the HCV replicon cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Anne G; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A

    2003-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  5. Analysis of classical swine fever virus RNA replication determinants using replicons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian; Fahnøe, Ulrik; Gullberg, Maria;

    2013-01-01

    Self-replicating RNAs (replicons), with or without reporter gene sequences, derived from the genome of the Paderborn strain of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) have been produced. The full-length viral cDNA, propagated within a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), was modified by targeted...

  6. Cdc45 limits replicon usage from a low density of preRCs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Philip G; Winter, Sherry L; Zaika, Elena; Cao, Thinh V; Oguz, Umut; Koomen, John M; Hamlin, Joyce L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about mammalian preRC stoichiometry, the number of preRCs on chromosomes, and how this relates to replicon size and usage. We show here that, on average, each 100-kb of the mammalian genome contains a preRC composed of approximately one ORC hexamer, 4-5 MCM hexamers, and 2 Cdc6. Relative to these subunits, ∼0.35 total molecules of the pre-Initiation Complex factor Cdc45 are present. Thus, based on ORC availability, somatic cells contain ∼70,000 preRCs of this average total stoichiometry, although subunits may not be juxtaposed with each other. Except for ORC, the chromatin-bound complement of preRC subunits is even lower. Cdc45 is present at very low levels relative to the preRC subunits, but is highly stable, and the same limited number of stable Cdc45 molecules are present from the beginning of S-phase to its completion. Efforts to artificially increase Cdc45 levels through ectopic expression block cell growth. However, microinjection of excess purified Cdc45 into S-phase nuclei activates additional replication foci by three-fold, indicating that Cdc45 functions to activate dormant preRCs and is rate-limiting for somatic replicon usage. Paradoxically, although Cdc45 colocalizes in vivo with some MCM sites and is rate-limiting for DNA replication to occur, neither Cdc45 nor MCMs colocalize with active replication sites. Embryonic metazoan chromatin consists of small replicons that are used efficiently via an excess of preRC subunits. In contrast, somatic mammalian cells contain a low density of preRCs, each containing only a few MCMs that compete for limiting amounts of Cdc45. This provides a molecular explanation why, relative to embryonic replicon dynamics, somatic replicons are, on average, larger and origin efficiency tends to be lower. The stable, continuous, and rate-limiting nature of Cdc45 suggests that Cdc45 contributes to the staggering of replicon usage throughout S-phase, and that replicon activation requires reutilization of

  7. Ordering the mob: Insights into replicon and MOB typing schemes from analysis of a curated dataset of publicly available plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlek, Alex; Phan, Hang; Sheppard, Anna E; Doumith, Michel; Ellington, Matthew; Peto, Tim; Crook, Derrick; Walker, A Sarah; Woodford, Neil; Anjum, Muna F; Stoesser, Nicole

    2017-03-09

    Plasmid typing can provide insights into the epidemiology and transmission of plasmid-mediated antibiotic resistance. The principal plasmid typing schemes are replicon typing and MOB typing, which utilize variation in replication loci and relaxase proteins respectively. Previous studies investigating the proportion of plasmids assigned a type by these schemes ('typeability') have yielded conflicting results; moreover, thousands of plasmid sequences have been added to NCBI in recent years, without consistent annotation to indicate which sequences represent complete plasmids. Here, a curated dataset of complete Enterobacteriaceae plasmids from NCBI was compiled, and used to assess the typeability and concordance of in silico replicon and MOB typing schemes. Concordance was assessed at hierarchical replicon type resolutions, from replicon family-level to plasmid multilocus sequence type (pMLST)-level, where available. We found that 85% and 65% of the curated plasmids could be replicon and MOB typed, respectively. Overall, plasmid size and the number of resistance genes were significant independent predictors of replicon and MOB typing success. We found some degree of non-concordance between replicon families and MOB types, which was only partly resolved when partitioning plasmids into finer-resolution groups (replicon and pMLST types). In some cases, non-concordance was attributed to ambiguous boundaries between MOBP and MOBQ types; in other cases, backbone mosaicism was considered a more plausible explanation. β-lactamase resistance genes tended not to show fidelity to a particular plasmid type, though some previously reported associations were supported. Overall, replicon and MOB typing schemes are likely to continue playing an important role in plasmid analysis, but their performance is constrained by the diverse and dynamic nature of plasmid genomes.

  8. Mosquito cell-derived West Nile virus replicon particles mimic arbovirus inoculum and have reduced spread in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brendan T; Moreira, Fernando R; Carlson, Tim W; Bernard, Kristen A

    2017-02-01

    Half of the human population is at risk of infection by an arthropod-borne virus. Many of these arboviruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and Zika viruses, infect humans by way of a bite from an infected mosquito. This infectious inoculum is insect cell-derived giving the virus particles distinct qualities not present in secondary infectious virus particles produced by infected vertebrate host cells. The insect cell-derived particles differ in the glycosylation of virus structural proteins and the lipid content of the envelope, as well as their induction of cytokines. Thus, in order to accurately mimic the inoculum delivered by arthropods, arboviruses should be derived from arthropod cells. Previous studies have packaged replicon genome in mammalian cells to produce replicon particles, which undergo only one round of infection, but no studies exist packaging replicon particles in mosquito cells. Here we optimized the packaging of West Nile virus replicon genome in mosquito cells and produced replicon particles at high concentration, allowing us to mimic mosquito cell-derived viral inoculum. These particles were mature with similar genome equivalents-to-infectious units as full-length West Nile virus. We then compared the mosquito cell-derived particles to mammalian cell-derived particles in mice. Both replicon particles infected skin at the inoculation site and the draining lymph node by 3 hours post-inoculation. The mammalian cell-derived replicon particles spread from the site of inoculation to the spleen and contralateral lymph nodes significantly more than the particles derived from mosquito cells. This in vivo difference in spread of West Nile replicons in the inoculum demonstrates the importance of using arthropod cell-derived particles to model early events in arboviral infection and highlights the value of these novel arthropod cell-derived replicon particles for studying the earliest virus-host interactions for arboviruses.

  9. Mosquito cell-derived West Nile virus replicon particles mimic arbovirus inoculum and have reduced spread in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brendan T.; Moreira, Fernando R.; Carlson, Tim W.

    2017-01-01

    Half of the human population is at risk of infection by an arthropod-borne virus. Many of these arboviruses, such as West Nile, dengue, and Zika viruses, infect humans by way of a bite from an infected mosquito. This infectious inoculum is insect cell-derived giving the virus particles distinct qualities not present in secondary infectious virus particles produced by infected vertebrate host cells. The insect cell-derived particles differ in the glycosylation of virus structural proteins and the lipid content of the envelope, as well as their induction of cytokines. Thus, in order to accurately mimic the inoculum delivered by arthropods, arboviruses should be derived from arthropod cells. Previous studies have packaged replicon genome in mammalian cells to produce replicon particles, which undergo only one round of infection, but no studies exist packaging replicon particles in mosquito cells. Here we optimized the packaging of West Nile virus replicon genome in mosquito cells and produced replicon particles at high concentration, allowing us to mimic mosquito cell-derived viral inoculum. These particles were mature with similar genome equivalents-to-infectious units as full-length West Nile virus. We then compared the mosquito cell-derived particles to mammalian cell-derived particles in mice. Both replicon particles infected skin at the inoculation site and the draining lymph node by 3 hours post-inoculation. The mammalian cell-derived replicon particles spread from the site of inoculation to the spleen and contralateral lymph nodes significantly more than the particles derived from mosquito cells. This in vivo difference in spread of West Nile replicons in the inoculum demonstrates the importance of using arthropod cell-derived particles to model early events in arboviral infection and highlights the value of these novel arthropod cell-derived replicon particles for studying the earliest virus-host interactions for arboviruses. PMID:28187142

  10. HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cervix - HPV vaccine; Abnormal Pap smear - HPV vaccine; Vaccination - HPV vaccine ... and Gynecologists. Committee opinion No. 641: human papillomavirus vaccination. Obstet Gynecol . 2015;126(3):e38-e43. PMID: ...

  11. Monovalent Virus-Like Particle Vaccine Protects Guinea Pigs and Nonhuman Primates Against Infection with Multiple Marburg Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    equine encephalitis replicon particle, where the antigen of interest, in this case the MARV glyc- oprotein (GP), is inserted in place of the struc- tural... herpes B antibody-negative in testing prior to initiation of the study. The VLP-vaccinated monkeys received three intramuscular injec- tions at 42-day...date, the most successful filovirus vaccines have been based on viral vec- tors, such as adenovirus, venezulan equine encephalitis repli- con, human

  12. Orderly Replication and Segregation of the Four Replicons of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Li Du

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genomes typically consist of a single chromosome and, optionally, one or more plasmids. But whole-genome sequencing reveals about ten per-cent of them to be multipartite, with additional replicons which by size and indispensability are considered secondary chromosomes. This raises the questions of how their replication and partition is managed without compromising genome stability and of how such genomes arose. Vibrio cholerae, with a 1 Mb replicon in addition to its 3 Mb chromosome, is the only species for which maintenance of a multipartite genome has been investigated. In this study we have explored the more complex genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia (strain J2315. It comprises an extra replicon (c2 of 3.21 Mb, comparable in size to the3.87Mb main chromosome (c1, another extra replicon(c3 of 0.87 Mb and a plasmid of 0.09 Mb. The replication origin of c1 is typically chromosomal and those of c2 and c3 are plasmid-like; all are replicated bidirectionally. Fluorescence microscopy of tagged origins indicates that all initiate replication at mid-cell and segregate towards the cell quarter positions sequentially, c1-c2-p1/c3. c2 segregation is as well-phased with the cell cycle as c1, implying that this plasmid-like origin has become subject to regulation not typical of plasmids; in contrast, c3 segregates more randomly through the cycle. Disruption of individual Par systems by deletion of parAB or by addition of parS sites showed each Par system to govern the positioning of its own replicon only. Inactivation of c1, c2 and c3 Par systems not only reduced growth rate, generated anucleate cells and compromised viability but influenced processes beyond replicon partition, notably regulation of replication, chromosome condensation and cell size determination. In particular, the absence of the c1 ParA protein altered replication of all three chromosomes, suggesting that the partition system of the main chromosome is a major participant in the

  13. Stable co-existence of separate replicons in Escherichia coli is dependent on once-per-cell-cycle initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarstad, K.; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2003-01-01

    C sequences (mini-chromosomes) are also initiated in synchrony with the eight chromosomal origins. We demonstrate that specific inactivation of newly formed, hemimethylated origins (sequestration) was required for the stable coexistence of oriC-dependent replicons. Cells in which initiations were not confined...... to a short interval in the cell cycle (carrying mutations in sequestration or initiation genes or expressing excess initiator protein) could not support stable co-existence of several oriC-dependent replicons. The results show that such stable co-existence of oriC-dependent replicons; is dependent on both...... a period of sequestration that is longer than the initiation interval and a reduction of the initiation potential during the sequestration period. These regulatory requirements are the same as those required to confine initiation of each replicon to once, and only once, per cell cycle....

  14. Next-generation dengue vaccines: novel strategies currently under development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Anna P; Whitehead, Stephen S

    2011-10-01

    Dengue has become the most important arboviral infection worldwide with more than 30 million cases of dengue fever estimated to occur each year. The need for a dengue vaccine is great and several live attenuated dengue candidate vaccines are proceeding through clinical evaluation. The need to induce a balanced immune response against all four DENV serotypes with a single vaccine has been a challenge for dengue vaccine developers. A live attenuated DENV chimeric vaccine produced by Sanofi Pasteur has recently entered Phase III evaluation in numerous dengue-endemic regions of the world. Viral interference between serotypes contained in live vaccines has required up to three doses of the vaccine be given over a 12-month period of time. For this reason, novel DENV candidate vaccines are being developed with the goal of achieving a protective immune response with an immunization schedule that can be given over the course of a few months. These next-generation candidates include DNA vaccines, recombinant adenovirus vectored vaccines, alphavirus replicons, and sub-unit protein vaccines. Several of these novel candidates will be discussed.

  15. A Respiratory Syncytial Virus Replicon That Is Noncytotoxic and Capable of Long-Term Foreign Gene Expression▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection of most cultured cell lines causes cell-cell fusion and death. Cell fusion is caused by the fusion (F) glycoprotein and is clearly cytopathic, but other aspects of RSV infection may also contribute to cytopathology. To investigate this possibility, we generated an RSV replicon that lacks all three of its glycoprotein genes and so cannot cause cell-cell fusion or virus spread. This replicon includes a green fluorescent protein gene and an antibiotic ...

  16. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Daniel R.; Whitmore, Alan; Robert E Johnston; Barro, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By ana...

  17. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, Daniel R.; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert E.; Barro,Mario

    2012-01-01

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By ana...

  18. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L Knudsen

    Full Text Available Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  19. Alphavirus replicon DNA expressing HIV antigens is an excellent prime for boosting with recombinant modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) or with HIV gp140 protein antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Maria L; Ljungberg, Karl; Tatoud, Roger; Weber, Jonathan; Esteban, Mariano; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Vaccination with DNA is an attractive strategy for induction of pathogen-specific T cells and antibodies. Studies in humans have shown that DNA vaccines are safe, but their immunogenicity needs further improvement. As a step towards this goal, we have previously demonstrated that immunogenicity is increased with the use of an alphavirus DNA-launched replicon (DREP) vector compared to conventional DNA vaccines. In this study, we investigated the effect of varying the dose and number of administrations of DREP when given as a prime prior to a heterologous boost with poxvirus vector (MVA) and/or HIV gp140 protein formulated in glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA-AF) adjuvant. The DREP and MVA vaccine constructs encoded Env and a Gag-Pol-Nef fusion protein from HIV clade C. One to three administrations of 0.2 μg DREP induced lower HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses than the equivalent number of immunizations with 10 μg DREP. However, the two doses were equally efficient as a priming component in a heterologous prime-boost regimen. The magnitude of immune responses depended on the number of priming immunizations rather than the dose. A single low dose of DREP prior to a heterologous boost resulted in greatly increased immune responses compared to MVA or protein antigen alone, demonstrating that a mere 0.2 μg DREP was sufficient for priming immune responses. Following a DREP prime, T cell responses were expanded greatly by an MVA boost, and IgG responses were also expanded when boosted with protein antigen. When MVA and protein were administered simultaneously following multiple DREP primes, responses were slightly compromised compared to administering them sequentially. In conclusion, we have demonstrated efficient priming of HIV-specific T cell and IgG responses with a low dose of DREP, and shown that the priming effect depends on number of primes administered rather than dose.

  20. Understanding the molecular mechanism of host-based statin resistance in hepatitis C virus replicon containing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delang, Leen; Scheers, Els; Grabner, Mareike; Verpaalen, Ben; Helsen, Nicky; Vanstreels, Els; Daelemans, Dirk; Verfaillie, Catherine; Neyts, Johan

    2015-08-01

    A number of statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs, inhibit the in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). In HCV-infected patients, addition of statins to the earlier standard of care therapy (pegIFN-α and ribavirin) resulted in increased sustained virological response rates. The mechanism by which statins inhibit HCV replication has not yet been elucidated. In an attempt to gain insight in the underlying mechanism, hepatoma cells carrying an HCV replicon were passaged in the presence of increasing concentrations of fluvastatin. Fluvastatin-resistant replicon containing cells could be generated and proved ∼8-fold less susceptible to fluvastatin than wild-type cultures. The growth efficiency of the resistant replicon containing cells was comparable to that of wild-type replicon cells. The fluvastatin-resistant phenotype was not conferred by mutations in the viral genome but is caused by cellular changes. The resistant cell line had a markedly increased HMG-CoA reductase expression upon statin treatment. Furthermore, the expression of the efflux transporter P-gp was increased in fluvastatin-resistant replicon cells (determined by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry). This increased expression resulted also in an increased functional transport activity as measured by the P-gp mediated efflux of calcein AM. In conclusion, we demonstrate that statin resistance in HCV replicon containing hepatoma cells is conferred by changes in the cellular environment.

  1. Characterization of multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli by antimicrobial resistance profiles, plasmid replicon typing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Rebecca L; Frye, Jonathan G; Thitaram, Sutawee N; Meinersmann, Richard J; Fedorka-Cray, Paula J; Englen, Mark D

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the distribution of multidrug resistance in Escherichia coli in relation to plasmid replicon types, animal sources, and genotypes. E. coli isolates (n = 35) from seven different animal sources were selected and tested for susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis was used to determine genetic relationships among the E. coli isolates. Plasmid types based on their incompatibility (Inc) replicon types were determined, and linkage disequilibrium analysis was performed for antimicrobial resistance profiles, replicon types, and animal source. A high degree of genotypic diversity was observed: 34 different pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types among the 35 isolates examined. Twelve different plasmid Inc types were detected, and all isolates carried at least one replicon type. IncF (n = 25; 71.4%) and IncFIB (n = 19; 54.3%) were the most common replicon types identified. Chloramphenicol resistance was significantly linked with four Inc types (A/C, FIIA, F, and Y), and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid was linked with three Inc types (B/O, P and Y). Resistance to any other antimicrobial was linked to two or fewer replicon types. The isolate source was linked with resistance to seven antimicrobials and IncI1. We conclude that commensal E. coli from animal sources are highly variable genotypically and are reservoirs of a diverse array of plasmids carrying antimicrobial resistance.

  2. [Influence of Japanese enciphalitis virus capsid protein on the self-replicate ability of JEV replicon vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Shan; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Du, Yun; Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Weiyuan

    2010-08-01

    To optimize a self-replicate Japanese enciphalitis virus (JEV) replicon, and to make it as an efficient vector to express the heterologous protein, we constructed three JEV replicons by PCR-based shortening the length of capsid genes. The vectors remained full or part of C gene, based on the JEV replicon pCTCJEV. Lac Z was selected as the reporter gene to verify the self-replicate ability of these DNA-based replicons. While transfected into the cell lines CME-4, which continuously expressing the JEV structure proteins C-prM-E, the JEV replicons pCMW-2M-1LACZ, pCMW-2M-3LACZ, which remained the first 23aa and 68aa of C protein, can express the reporter protein as the same level as pCMW-2M-LACZ with the full-length C protein. These results illustrated that the JEV replicon vector with 69-nt of the C gene can retain the self-replicate ability, and provide valuable tools to construct a possible vector for a long-lasting JEV RNA virus expression system.

  3. Salmonid alphavirus replicon is functional in fish, mammalian and insect cells and in vivo in shrimps (Litopenaeus vannamei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Christel M; Pemula, Anand Kumar; Braaen, Stine; Sankaran, Krishnan; Rimstad, Espen

    2013-11-19

    The Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is the etiological agent of pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) and Sleeping disease in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). SAV differs from alphaviruses infecting terrestrial animals in that it infects salmonid fish at low temperatures and does not use an arthropod vector for transmission. In this study we have shown that a SAVbased replicon could express proteins when driven by the subgenomic promoter in vitro in cells from fish, mammals and insects, as well as in vivo in shrimps (Litopanaeus vannamei). The SAV-replicon was found to be functional at temperatures ranging from 4 to 37°C. Protein expression was slow and moderate compared to that reported from terrestrial alphavirus replicons or from vectors where protein expression was under control of the immediate early CMV-promoter. No cytopathic effect was visually observable in cells transfected with SAV-replicon vectors. Double stranded RNA was present for several days after transfection of the SAV-replicon in fish cell lines and its presence was indicated also in shrimp. The combination of prolonged dsRNA production, low toxicity, and wide temperature range for expression, may potentially be advantageous for the use of the SAV replicon to induce immune responses in aquaculture of fish and shrimp.

  4. Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Safety Smallpox Vaccine Safety Common Concerns Adjuvants Autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper on MMR and Autism Fainting (Syncope) Febrile ...

  5. Enhancement of protein expression by alphavirus replicons by designing self-replicating subgenomic RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Atasheva, Svetlana; McAuley, Alexander J; Plante, Jessica A; Frolova, Elena I; Beasley, David W C; Frolov, Ilya

    2014-07-22

    Since the development of infectious cDNA clones of viral RNA genomes and the means of delivery of the in vitro-synthesized RNA into cells, alphaviruses have become an attractive system for expression of heterologous genetic information. Alphaviruses replicate exclusively in the cytoplasm, and their genetic material cannot recombine with cellular DNA. Alphavirus genome-based, self-replicating RNAs (replicons) are widely used vectors for expression of heterologous proteins. Their current design relies on replacement of structural genes, encoded by subgenomic RNAs (SG RNA), with heterologous sequences of interest. The SG RNA is transcribed from a promoter located in the alphavirus-specific RNA replication intermediate and is not further amplified. In this study, we have applied the accumulated knowledge of the mechanism of alphavirus replication and promoter structures, in particular, to increase the expression level of heterologous proteins from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV)-based replicons. During VEEV infection, replication enzymes are produced in excess to RNA replication intermediates, and a large fraction of them are not involved in RNA synthesis. The newly designed constructs encode SG RNAs, which are not only transcribed from the SG promoter, but are additionally amplified by the previously underused VEEV replication enzymes. These replicons produce SG RNAs and encoded proteins of interest 10- to 50-fold more efficiently than those using a traditional design. A modified replicon encoding West Nile virus (WNV) premembrane and envelope proteins efficiently produced subviral particles and, after a single immunization, elicited high titers of neutralizing antibodies, which protected mice from lethal challenge with WNV.

  6. Inhibition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus subgenomic replicon by RNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Sophie; Lear, Zoe; Herod, Morgan R; Ryan, Martin; Rowlands, David J; Stonehouse, Nicola J

    2014-12-01

    We have previously documented the inhibitory activity of RNA aptamers to the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of foot-and-mouth disease virus (3D(pol)). Here we report their modification and use with a subgenomic replicon incorporating GFP (pGFP-PAC replicon), allowing replication to be monitored and quantified in real-time. GFP expression in transfected BHK-21 cells reached a maximum at approximately 8 h post-transfection, at which time change in morphology of the cells was consistent with a virus-induced cytopathic effect. However, transfection of replicon-bearing cells with a 3D(pol) aptamer RNA resulted in inhibition of GFP expression and maintenance of normal cell morphology, whereas a control aptamer RNA had little effect. The inhibition was correlated with a reduction in 3D(pol) (detected by immunoblotting) and shown to be dose dependent. The 3D(pol) aptamers appeared to be more effective than 2'-C-methylcytidine (2'CMC). Aptamers to components of the replication complex are therefore useful molecular tools for studying viral replication and also have potential as diagnostic molecules in the future.

  7. Antibody-mediated protection against mucosal simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenge of macaques immunized with alphavirus replicon particles and boosted with trimeric envelope glycoprotein in MF59 adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Susan W; Burke, Brian; Sun, Yide; Kan, Elaine; Legg, Harold; Lian, Ying; Bost, Kristen; Zhou, Fengmin; Goodsell, Amanda; Zur Megede, Jan; Polo, John; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey; Otten, Gillis R; Miller, Christopher J; Vajdy, Michael; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2010-06-01

    We have previously shown that rhesus macaques were partially protected against high-dose intravenous challenge with simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV(SF162P4) following sequential immunization with alphavirus replicon particles (VRP) of a chimeric recombinant VEE/SIN alphavirus (derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus [VEE] and the Sindbis virus [SIN]) encoding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 HIV-1(SF162) gp140DeltaV2 envelope (Env) and trimeric Env protein in MF59 adjuvant (R. Xu, I. K. Srivastava, C. E. Greer, I. Zarkikh, Z. Kraft, L. Kuller, J. M. Polo, S. W. Barnett, and L. Stamatatos, AIDS Res. Hum. Retroviruses 22:1022-1030, 2006). The protection did not require T-cell immune responses directed toward simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag. We extend those findings here to demonstrate antibody-mediated protection against mucosal challenge in macaques using prime-boost regimens incorporating both intramuscular and mucosal routes of delivery. The macaques in the vaccination groups were primed with VRP and then boosted with Env protein in MF59 adjuvant, or they were given VRP intramuscular immunizations alone and then challenged with SHIV(SF162P4) (intrarectal challenge). The results demonstrated that these vaccines were able to effectively protect the macaques to different degrees against subsequent mucosal SHIV challenge, but most noteworthy, all macaques that received the intramuscular VRP prime plus Env protein boost were completely protected. A statistically significant association was observed between the titer of virus neutralizing and binding antibodies as well as the avidity of anti-Env antibodies measured prechallenge and protection from infection. These results highlight the merit of the alphavirus replicon vector prime plus Env protein boost vaccine approach for the induction of protective antibody responses and are of particular relevance to advancing our understanding of the potential correlates of immune protection against

  8. Molecular mechanism of hepatitis C virus replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to a benzofuran inhibitor, HCV-796.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Anita Y M; Cheng, Huiming; Johann, Stephen; Mullen, Stanley; Chunduru, Srinivas K; Young, Dorothy C; Bard, Joel; Chopra, Rajiv; Krishnamurthy, Girija; Mansour, Tarek; O'Connell, John

    2008-09-01

    HCV-796 selectively inhibits hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. In hepatoma cells containing a genotype 1b HCV replicon, HCV-796 reduced HCV RNA levels by 3 to 4 log(10) HCV copies/mug total RNA (the concentration of the compound that inhibited 50% of the HCV RNA level was 9 nM). Cells bearing replicon variants with reduced susceptibility to HCV-796 were generated in the presence of HCV-796, followed by G418 selection. Sequence analysis of the NS5B gene derived from the replicon variants revealed several amino acid changes within 5 A of the drug-binding pocket. Specifically, mutations were observed at Leu314, Cys316, Ile363, Ser365, and Met414 of NS5B, which directly interact with HCV-796. The impacts of the amino acid substitutions on viral fitness and drug susceptibility were examined in recombinant replicons and NS5B enzymes with the single-amino-acid mutations. The replicon variants were 10- to 1,000-fold less efficient in forming colonies in cells than the wild-type replicon; the S365L variant failed to establish a stable cell line. Other variants (L314F, I363V, and M414V) had four- to ninefold-lower steady-state HCV RNA levels. Reduced binding affinity with HCV-796 was demonstrated in an enzyme harboring the C316Y mutation. The effects of these resistance mutations were structurally rationalized using X-ray crystallography data. While different levels of resistance to HCV-796 were observed in the replicon and enzyme variants, these variants retained their susceptibilities to pegylated interferon, ribavirin, and other HCV-specific inhibitors. The combined virological, biochemical, biophysical, and structural approaches revealed the mechanism of resistance in the variants selected by the potent polymerase inhibitor HCV-796.

  9. Reduced expression of Jak-1 and Tyk-2 proteins leads to interferon resistance in Hepatitis C virus replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luftig Ronald

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha interferon in combination with ribavirin is the standard therapy for hepatitis C virus infection. Unfortunately, a significant number of patients fail to eradicate their infection with this regimen. The mechanisms of IFN-resistance are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of host cell factors to the mechanisms of interferon resistance using replicon cell lines. Results HCV replicons with high and low activation of the IFN-promoter were cultured for a prolonged period of time in the presence of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha2b. Stable replicon cell lines with resistant phenotype were isolated and characterized by their ability to continue viral replication in the presence of IFN-alpha. Interferon resistant cell colonies developed only in replicons having lower activation of the IFN promoter and no resistant colonies arose from replicons that exhibit higher activation of the IFN promoter. Individual cell clones were isolated and nine IFN resistant cell lines were established. HCV RNA and protein levels in these cells were not altered by IFN- alpha2b. Reduced signaling and IFN-resistant phenotype was found in all Huh-7 cell lines even after eliminating HCV, suggesting that cellular factors are involved. Resistant phenotype in the replicons is not due to lack of interferon receptor expression. All the cell lines show defect in the JAK-STAT signaling and phosphorylation of STAT 1 and STAT 2 proteins were strongly inhibited due to reduced expression of Tyk2 and Jak-1 protein. Conclusion This in vitro study provides evidence that altered expression of the Jak-Stat signaling proteins can cause IFN resistance using HCV replicon cell clones.

  10. Replication of a hepatitis C virus replicon clone in mouse cells

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    Chisari Francis V

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is a significant public health burden and small animal models are needed to study the pathology and immunobiology of the virus. In effort to develop experimental HCV mouse models, we screened a panel of HCV replicons to identify clones capable of replicating in mouse hepatocytes. Results We report the establishment of stable HCV replication in mouse hepatocyte and fibroblast cell lines using replicons derived from the JFH-1 genotype 2a consensus sequence. Viral RNA replication efficiency in mouse cells was comparable to that observed in human Huh-7 replicon cells, with negative-strand HCV RNA and the viral NS5A protein being readily detected by Northern and Western Blot analysis, respectively. Although HCV replication was established in the absence of adaptive mutations that might otherwise compromise the in vitro infectivity of the JFH-1 clone, no infectious virus was detected when the culture medium from full length HCV RNA replicating mouse cells was titrated on Huh-7 cells, suggesting that the mouse cells were unable to support production of infectious progeny viral particles. Consistent with an additional block in viral entry, infectious JFH-1 particles produced in Huh-7 cells were not able to establish detectable HCV RNA replication in naïve mouse cells. Conclusion Thus, this report expands the repertoire of HCV replication systems and possibly represents a step toward developing mouse models of HCV replication, but it also highlights that other species restrictions might continue to make the development of a purely murine HCV infectious model challenging.

  11. Development of expression vectors for Escherichia coli based on the pCR2 replicon

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    Deb J K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent developments in metabolic engineering and the need for expanded compatibility required for co-expression studies, underscore the importance of developing new plasmid vectors with properties such as stability and compatibility. Results We utilized the pCR2 replicon of Corynebacterium renale, which harbours multiple plasmids, for constructing a range of expression vectors. Different antibiotic-resistance markers were introduced and the vectors were found to be 100% stable over a large number of generations in the absence of selection pressure. Compatibility of this plasmid was studied with different Escherichia coli plasmid replicons viz. pMB1 and p15A. It was observed that pCR2 was able to coexist with these E.coli plasmids for 60 generations in the absence of selection pressure. Soluble intracellular production was checked by expressing GFP under the lac promoter in an expression plasmid pCR2GFP. Also high level production of human IFNγ was obtained by cloning the h-IFNγ under a T7 promoter in the expression plasmid pCR2-IFNγ and using a dual plasmid heat shock system for expression. Repeated sub-culturing in the absence of selection pressure for six days did not lead to any fall in the production levels post induction, for both GFP and h-IFNγ, demonstrating that pCR2 is a useful plasmid in terms of stability and compatibility. Conclusion We have constructed a series of expression vectors based on the pCR2 replicon and demonstrated its high stability and sustained expression capacity, in the absence of selection pressure which will make it an efficient tool for metabolic engineering and co-expression studies, as well as for scale up of expression.

  12. Efficient replication of genotype 3a and 4a hepatitis C virus replicons in human hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saeed, Mohsan; Scheel, Troels K H; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of hepatitis C, the quest for pan-genotype, effective, and well-tolerated inhibitors continues. To facilitate these efforts, it is desirable to have in vitro replication systems for all major HCV genotypes. However, cell culture replication systems exist...... for only genotypes 1a, 1b, and 2a. In this study, we generated G418-selectable subgenomic replicons for prototype strains of genotypes 3a (S52) and 4a (ED43). Production of G418-resistant colonies by S52 and ED43 in Huh-7.5 cells required the amino acid substitutions S2210I and R2882G, respectively, cell...... culture adaptive mutations originally reported for genotype 1b replicons. RNA replication was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and detection of viral protein. Sequencing of multiple independent replicon clones revealed the presence of additional nonsynonymous mutations. Interestingly...

  13. Replicon modes and fixed-point marginal stability for systems with extended impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesare, Luigi; Mercaldo, Maria Teresa

    1999-08-01

    The fixed-point marginal stability, found for systems with extended quenched impurities within a one-step replica symmetry breaking (RSB) renormalization-group treatment, is further explored in terms of replicon eigenvalues, recently introduced as a simple way to investigate the fixed-point stability properties with respect to the continuous RSB modes. We find that the marginal stability occurs again when these modes are taken into account, in contrast with the short-range correlated impurity case where the continuous RSB fluctuations drastically change the one-step RSB fixed-point stability scenario.

  14. Microarray analysis identifies a common set of cellular genes modulated by different HCV replicon clones

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    Gerosolimo Germano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA synthesis and protein expression affect cell homeostasis by modulation of gene expression. The impact of HCV replication on global cell transcription has not been fully evaluated. Thus, we analysed the expression profiles of different clones of human hepatoma-derived Huh-7 cells carrying a self-replicating HCV RNA which express all viral proteins (HCV replicon system. Results First, we compared the expression profile of HCV replicon clone 21-5 with both the Huh-7 parental cells and the 21-5 cured (21-5c cells. In these latter, the HCV RNA has been eliminated by IFN-α treatment. To confirm data, we also analyzed microarray results from both the 21-5 and two other HCV replicon clones, 22-6 and 21-7, compared to the Huh-7 cells. The study was carried out by using the Applied Biosystems (AB Human Genome Survey Microarray v1.0 which provides 31,700 probes that correspond to 27,868 human genes. Microarray analysis revealed a specific transcriptional program induced by HCV in replicon cells respect to both IFN-α-cured and Huh-7 cells. From the original datasets of differentially expressed genes, we selected by Venn diagrams a final list of 38 genes modulated by HCV in all clones. Most of the 38 genes have never been described before and showed high fold-change associated with significant p-value, strongly supporting data reliability. Classification of the 38 genes by Panther System identified functional categories that were significantly enriched in this gene set, such as histones and ribosomal proteins as well as extracellular matrix and intracellular protein traffic. The dataset also included new genes involved in lipid metabolism, extracellular matrix and cytoskeletal network, which may be critical for HCV replication and pathogenesis. Conclusion Our data provide a comprehensive analysis of alterations in gene expression induced by HCV replication and reveal modulation of new genes potentially useful

  15. [Travelers' vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kazunobu

    2011-09-01

    The number of Japanese oversea travelers has gradually increased year by year, however they usually pay less attention to the poor physical condition at the voyage place. Many oversea travelers caught vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. The Vaccine Guideline for Oversea Travelers 2010 published by Japanese Society of Travel Health will be helpful for spreading the knowledge of travelers' vaccine and vaccine preventable diseases in developing countries. Many travelers' vaccines have not licensed in Japan. I hope these travelers' vaccines, such as typhoid vaccine, meningococcal vaccine, cholera vaccine and so on will be licensed in the near future.

  16. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

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    Leena Pohjala

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV, an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2, obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs. The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV, their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate

  17. Inhibitors of alphavirus entry and replication identified with a stable Chikungunya replicon cell line and virus-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjala, Leena; Utt, Age; Varjak, Margus; Lulla, Aleksei; Merits, Andres; Ahola, Tero; Tammela, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), an alphavirus, has recently caused epidemic outbreaks and is therefore considered a re-emerging pathogen for which no effective treatment is available. In this study, a CHIKV replicon containing the virus replicase proteins together with puromycin acetyltransferase, EGFP and Renilla luciferase marker genes was constructed. The replicon was transfected into BHK cells to yield a stable cell line. A non-cytopathic phenotype was achieved by a Pro718 to Gly substitution and a five amino acid insertion within non-structural protein 2 (nsP2), obtained through selection for stable growth. Characterization of the replicon cell line by Northern blotting analysis revealed reduced levels of viral RNA synthesis. The CHIKV replicon cell line was validated for antiviral screening in 96-well format and used for a focused screen of 356 compounds (natural compounds and clinically approved drugs). The 5,7-dihydroxyflavones apigenin, chrysin, naringenin and silybin were found to suppress activities of EGFP and Rluc marker genes expressed by the CHIKV replicon. In a concomitant screen against Semliki Forest virus (SFV), their anti-alphaviral activity was confirmed and several additional inhibitors of SFV with IC₅₀ values between 0.4 and 24 µM were identified. Chlorpromazine and five other compounds with a 10H-phenothiazinyl structure were shown to inhibit SFV entry using a novel entry assay based on a temperature-sensitive SFV mutant. These compounds also reduced SFV and Sindbis virus-induced cytopathic effect and inhibited SFV virion production in virus yield experiments. Finally, antiviral effects of selected compounds were confirmed using infectious CHIKV. In summary, the presented approach for discovering alphaviral inhibitors enabled us to identify potential lead structures for the development of alphavirus entry and replication phase inhibitors as well as demonstrated the usefulness of CHIKV replicon and SFV as biosafe surrogate models for anti

  18. Development of a novel Dengue-1 virus replicon system expressing secretory Gaussia luciferase for analysis of viral replication and discovery of antiviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi; Tajima, Shigeru; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Hishiki, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    Replicon systems have been used for high-throughput screening of anti-dengue virus (anti-DENV) inhibitors and for understanding mechanisms of viral replication. In the present study, we constructed novel DENV-1 replicons encoding Gaussia luciferase that was secreted into the culture medium. Two types of constructs were generated: RNA-based and DNA-based. Each type was translated in an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent or IRES-independent manner. Among these constructs, the DNA-based replicon employing IRES-dependent translation (DGL2) produced the highest titer. Luciferase levels in the culture medium revealed that the DGL2 replicon was inhibited by ribavirin (a well-known DENV inhibitor) at levels similar to those measured for drug inhibition of multi-round DENV-1 infection. These results indicate that the DNA-based IRES-driven DENV-1 replicon may facilitate studies on viral replication and antiviral compound discovery.

  19. Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Services Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Cancer Vaccines On This Page What is the immune system? ... cells recognized by the immune system? What are vaccines? What are cancer vaccines? How do cancer preventive ...

  20. Leptospirosis vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the recent advancements of recombinant outer membrane protein (OMP vaccines, lipopolysaccharide (LPS vaccines, inactivated vaccines, attenuated vaccines and DNA vaccines against leptospirosis are reviewed. A comparison of these vaccines may lead to development of new potential methods to combat leptospirosis and facilitate the leptospirosis vaccine research. Moreover, a vaccine ontology database was built for the scientists working on the leptospirosis vaccines as a starting tool.

  1. Analysis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles packaged in different coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrud, Kurt I; Alterson, Kim D; Andrews, Chasity; Copp, Laura O; Lewis, Whitney C; Hubby, Bolyn; Patel, Deepa; Rayner, Jonathan O; Talarico, Todd; Smith, Jonathan F

    2008-07-16

    The Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus replicon system was used to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP) packaged with a number of different VEE-derived glycoprotein (GP) coats. The GP coat is believed to be responsible for the cellular tropism noted for VRP and it is possible that different VEE GP coats may have different affinities for cells. We examined VRP packaged in four different VEE GP coats for their ability to infect cells in vitro and to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. The VRP preparations were characterized to determine both infectious units (IU) and genome equivalents (GE) prior to in vivo analysis. VRP packaged with different VEE GP coats demonstrated widely varying GE/IU ratios based on Vero cell infectivity. BALB/c mice were immunized with the different VRP based on equal GE titers and the humoral and cellular responses to the expressed HIV gag gene measured. The magnitude of the immune responses measured in mice revealed small but significant differences between different GP coats when immunization was based on GE titers. We suggest that care should be taken when alternative coat proteins are used to package vector-based systems as the titers determined by cell culture infection may not represent accurate particle numbers and in turn may not accurately represent actual in vivo dose.

  2. Analysis of Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles packaged in different coats.

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    Kurt I Kamrud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE virus replicon system was used to produce virus-like replicon particles (VRP packaged with a number of different VEE-derived glycoprotein (GP coats. The GP coat is believed to be responsible for the cellular tropism noted for VRP and it is possible that different VEE GP coats may have different affinities for cells. We examined VRP packaged in four different VEE GP coats for their ability to infect cells in vitro and to induce both humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The VRP preparations were characterized to determine both infectious units (IU and genome equivalents (GE prior to in vivo analysis. VRP packaged with different VEE GP coats demonstrated widely varying GE/IU ratios based on Vero cell infectivity. BALB/c mice were immunized with the different VRP based on equal GE titers and the humoral and cellular responses to the expressed HIV gag gene measured. The magnitude of the immune responses measured in mice revealed small but significant differences between different GP coats when immunization was based on GE titers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We suggest that care should be taken when alternative coat proteins are used to package vector-based systems as the titers determined by cell culture infection may not represent accurate particle numbers and in turn may not accurately represent actual in vivo dose.

  3. Synthetic biology devices and circuits for RNA-based 'smart vaccines': a propositional review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andries, Oliwia; Kitada, Tasuku; Bodner, Katie; Sanders, Niek N; Weiss, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Nucleic acid vaccines have been gaining attention as an alternative to the standard attenuated pathogen or protein based vaccine. However, an unrealized advantage of using such DNA or RNA based vaccination modalities is the ability to program within these nucleic acids regulatory devices that would provide an immunologist with the power to control the production of antigens and adjuvants in a desirable manner by administering small molecule drugs as chemical triggers. Advances in synthetic biology have resulted in the creation of highly predictable and modular genetic parts and devices that can be composed into synthetic gene circuits with complex behaviors. With the recent advent of modified RNA gene delivery methods and developments in the RNA replicon platform, we foresee a future in which mammalian synthetic biologists will create genetic circuits encoded exclusively on RNA. Here, we review the current repertoire of devices used in RNA synthetic biology and propose how programmable 'smart vaccines' will revolutionize the field of RNA vaccination.

  4. Vaccine Hesitancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert M; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccine refusal received a lot of press with the 2015 Disneyland measles outbreak, but vaccine refusal is only a fraction of a much larger problem of vaccine delay and hesitancy. Opposition to vaccination dates back to the 1800 s, Edward Jenner, and the first vaccine ever. It has never gone away despite the public's growing scientific sophistication. A variety of factors contribute to modern vaccine hesitancy, including the layperson's heuristic thinking when it comes to balancing risks and benefits as well as a number of other features of vaccination, including falling victim to its own success. Vaccine hesitancy is pervasive, affecting a quarter to a third of US parents. Clinicians report that they routinely receive requests to delay vaccines and that they routinely acquiesce. Vaccine rates vary by state and locale and by specific vaccine, and vaccine hesitancy results in personal risk and in the failure to achieve or sustain herd immunity to protect others who have contraindications to the vaccine or fail to generate immunity to the vaccine. Clinicians should adopt a variety of practices to combat vaccine hesitancy, including a variety of population health management approaches that go beyond the usual call to educate patients, clinicians, and the public. Strategies include using every visit to vaccinate, the creation of standing orders or nursing protocols to provide vaccination without clinical encounters, and adopting the practice of stating clear recommendations. Up-to-date, trusted resources exist to support clinicians' efforts in adopting these approaches to reduce vaccine hesitancy and its impact.

  5. [Organization and maintenance features of IncP-7 naphthalene degradation plasmid pFME5 basic replicon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, O V; Kosheleva, I A; Boronin, A M

    2013-05-01

    A basic replicon of the naphthalene degradation plasmid pFME5 (80 kb, IncP-7) has been constructed and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of pFME5mini is almost identical to replicons of the pND6-1 subgroup, which was separated based on the reA-oriV homology in our previous work. The basic replicon of pFME5 is capable of replication and stable maintenance exclusively in Pseudomonas species. An analysis of the deletion mutation indicated that, in contrast to the parWAB region, the parC gene is not essential for the stability of pFME5mini and can be a common feature of IncP-7 replicons. We revealed that par-defective mutants of pFME5mini were slowly eliminated from the bacterial population in a nonselective medium compared to their pCAR1-based counterparts. Designed primers specific to the repA and parC genes can be used to detect IncP-7 plasmids, while primers specific to two variants of parA can be used for intragroup classification.

  6. Eradication of hepatitis C virus subgenomic replicon by interferon results in aberrant retinol-related protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Kazuko; Takaki, Akinobu; Kato, Nobuyuki; Ouchida, Mamoru; Kanzaki, Hirotaka; Yasunaka, Tetsuya; Shiraha, Hidenori; Miyake, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection induces several changes in hepatocytes, such as oxidative stress, steatosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Although considerable progress has been made during recent years, the mechanisms underlying these functions remain unclear. We employed proteomic techniques in HCV replicon-harboring cells to determine the effects of HCV replication on host-cell protein expression. We examined two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry to compare and identify differentially expressed proteins between HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring cells and their "cured" cells. One of the identified proteins was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blot analysis. Full-length HCV genome RNA replicating and cured cells were also assessed using ELISA. Replicon-harboring cells showed higher expression of retinal dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH-1), which converts retinol to retinoic acid, and the cured cells showed higher expression of retinol-binding protein (RBP), which transports retinol from the liver to target tissues. The alteration in RBP expression was also confirmed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. We conclude that protein expression profiling demonstrated that HCV replicon eradication affected retinol-related protein expression.

  7. Characterization of Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli by Plasmid Replicon Typing and Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Characterization of plasmids has particular clinical significance because genes encoding important traits such as antimicrobial resistance are frequently present in plasmids. Plasmid replicon typing is a multiplex PCR based method that can be used to classify 18 of the 26 known plasmid t...

  8. Eradication of Hepatitis C Virus Subgenomic Replicon by Interferon Results in Aberrant Retinol-Related Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koike,Kazuko

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection induces several changes in hepatocytes, such as oxidative stress, steatosis, and hepatocarcinogenesis. Although considerable progress has been made during recent years, the mechanisms underlying these functions remain unclear. We employed proteomic techniques in HCV replicon-harboring cells to determine the effects of HCV replication on host-cell protein expression. We examined two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and mass spectrometry to compare and identify differentially expressed proteins between HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring cells and their “cured” cells. One of the identified proteins was confirmed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and Western blot analysis. Full-length HCV genome RNA replicating and cured cells were also assessed using ELISA. Replicon-harboring cells showed higher expression of retinal dehydrogenase 1 (RALDH-1, which converts retinol to retinoic acid, and the cured cells showed higher expression of retinol-binding protein (RBP, which transports retinol from the liver to target tissues. The alteration in RBP expression was also confirmed by ELISA and Western blot analysis. We conclude that protein expression profiling demonstrated that HCV replicon eradication affected retinol-related protein expression.

  9. Mutations in HCV non-structural genes do not contribute to resistance to nitazoxanide in replicon-containing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Changsuek; Viswanathan, Prasanth; Rossignol, Jean-François; Korba, Brent

    2011-09-01

    Nitazoxanide (NTZ) exhibits potent antiviral activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in cell culture. Previously, HCV replicon-containing cell lines resistant to NTZ were selected, but transfer the HCV NTZ-resistance phenotype was not observed following transfection of whole cell RNA. To further explore the nature of the resistance of HCV to NTZ, full length HCV replicon sequences were obtained from two NTZ-resistant (NTZ-11, TIZ-9), and the parental (RP7) cell lines. Numerous nucleotide changes were observed in individual HCV genomes relative to the RP7 HCV consensus sequence, but no common mutations in the HCV non-structural genes or 3'-UTR were detected. A cluster of single nucleotide mutations was found within a 5-base portion of the 5'-UTR in 20/21 HCV replicon sequences from both resistant cell lines. Three mutations (5'-UTR G17A, G18A, C20U) were individually inserted into CON1 ('wild-type') HCV replicons, showed reduced replication (5 to 50-fold), but none conferred resistance to NTZ. RP7, NTZ-11, and TIZ-9 were cured of HCV genomes by serial passage under interferon. Transfection of cured NTZ-11 and TIZ-9 with either whole cell RNAs from RP7, NTZ-11, or TIZ-9, 'wild-type' or the 5'-UTR mutation-containing replicon RNAs exhibited an NTZ-resistance phenotype. TIZ (the active metabolite of NTZ) was found to be inactive against the activity of HCV polymerase, protease, and helicase in enzymatic assays. These data confirm previous speculations that HCV resistance to NTZ is not due to mutations in the virus, and demonstrate that HCV resistance and most likely the antiviral activity of TIZ are due to interactions with cellular target(s).

  10. Vaccines for gonorrhea: can we rise to the challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyan eZhu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses to the gonococcus after natural infection ordinarily result in little immunity to reinfection, due to antigenic variation of the gonococcus, and redirection or suppression of immune responses. Brinton and colleagues demonstrated that parenteral immunization of male human volunteers with a purified pilus vaccine gave partial protection against infection by the homologous strain. However, the vaccine failed in a clinical trial. Recent vaccine development efforts have focused on the female mouse model of genital gonococcal infection. Here we discuss the state of the field, including our unpublished data regarding efficacy in the mouse model of either viral replicon particle (VRP vaccines, or outer membrane vesicle (OMV vaccines. The OMV vaccines failed, despite excellent serum and mucosal antibody responses. Protection after a regimen consisting of a PorB-VRP prime plus recombinant PorB boost was correlated with apparent Th1, but not with antibody, responses. Protection probably was due to powerful adjuvant effects of the VRP vector. New tools including novel transgenic mice expressing human genes required for gonococcal infection should enable future research. Surrogates for immunity are needed. Increasing antimicrobial resistance trends among gonococci makes development of a vaccine more urgent.

  11. Molecular design, synthesis and cell based HCV replicon assay of novel benzoxazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M A H; Adel, M; Ismail, N S M; Abouzid, K A M

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus inhibitors based on benzoxazole scaffold were designed based on molecular modeling simulation study including docking into the NS5B polymerase active site. Several compounds showed significant high simulation docking scores relative to the assigned benzimidazole lead compound. The designed compounds were synthesized, structurally elucidated and their antiviral activity was evaluated through cell-based replicon in cultured Huh 5-2 cells. A number of the synthesized compounds showed significant inhibitory activity ranging from (52.2% inhibition up to 98% at<50 µg/mL). N-Benzyl-2-phenylbenzo[1,3]oxazole-5-carboxamide (8b) and N-Phenethyl-2-phenylbenzo[1,3] oxazole-5-carboxamide (8c) demonstrated genuine HCV inhibitory activity with EC50 values of 41.6 and 24.5 µg/mL respectively.

  12. DENGUE VACCINES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thisyakorn, Usa; Thisyakorn, Chule

    2015-01-01

    The uniqueness of the dengue viruses (DENVs) and the spectrum of disease resulting from infection have made dengue vaccine development difficult. Several vaccine candidates are currently being evaluated in clinical studies. The candidate currently at the most advanced clinical development stage, a live-attenuated tetravalent vaccine based on the chimeric yellow fever-dengue virus (CYD-TDV), has progressed to Phase 3 efficacy studies. Several other live-attenuated vaccines, as well as subunit, DNA, and purified inactivated vaccine candidates are at earlier stages of clinical development. Additional technological approaches, such as virus-vectored and Virus-Like Particles (VLP)-based vaccines are under evaluation in preclinical studies.

  13. Japanese encephalitis virus-based replicon RNAs/particles as an expression system for HIV-1 Pr55 Gag that is capable of producing virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sang-Im; Song, Byung-Hak; Koo, Yongbum; Jeon, Iksoo; Byun, Sung June; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Joo, Yi-Seok; Kim, Seok-Yong; Lee, Young-Min

    2009-09-01

    Ectopic expression of the structural protein Pr55(Gag) of HIV-1 has been limited by the presence of inhibitory sequences in the gag coding region that must normally be counteracted by HIV-1 Rev and RRE. Here, we describe a cytoplasmic RNA replicon based on the RNA genome of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that is capable of expressing HIV-1 gag without requiring Rev/RRE. This replicon system was constructed by deleting all three JEV structural protein-coding regions (C, prM, and E) from the 5'-proximal region of the genome and simultaneously inserting an HIV-1 gag expression cassette driven by the internal ribosome entry site of encephalomyocarditis virus into the 3'-proximal noncoding region of the genome. Transfection of this JEV replicon RNA led to expression of Pr55(Gag) in the absence of Rev/RRE in the cytoplasm of hamster BHK-21, human HeLa, and mouse NIH/3T3 cells. Production of the Pr55(Gag) derived from this JEV replicon RNA appeared to be increased by approximately 3-fold when compared to that based on an alphavirus replicon RNA. Biochemical and morphological analyses demonstrated that the Pr55(Gag) proteins were released into the culture medium in the form of virus-like particles. We also observed that the JEV replicon RNAs expressing the Pr55(Gag) could be encapsidated into single-round infectious JEV replicon particles when transfected into a stable packaging cell line that provided the three JEV structural proteins in trans. This ectopic expression of the HIV-1 Pr55(Gag) by JEV-based replicon RNAs/particles in diverse cell types may represent a useful molecular platform for various biological applications in medicine and industry.

  14. Construction and characterization of a stable subgenomic replicon system of a Brazilian dengue virus type 3 strain (BR DEN3 290-02).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosimann, Ana Luiza Pamplona; de Borba, Luana; Bordignon, Juliano; Mason, Peter W; dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause the most common arboviral disease afflicting men. Clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The mechanisms involved in the disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. The severity of the disease seems to be influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of DENV can be used to study viral replication mechanisms and evaluate the effects of antiviral drugs on viral replication. The objective was to generate and characterize biologically a replicon from a clinical isolate of DENV-3, as part of our studies to understand how this new isolate interacts with cells. To obtain this replicon several RT-PCR fragments encoding the non-structural proteins genes were cloned in high-copy vectors, and used to assemble the replicon in a BAC plasmid vector containing a synthetic DNA molecule encoding the 5' and 3' ends of a viral cDNA with a T7 DNA-dependent RNA polymerase promoter and a ribozyme. In vitro transcribed RNA recovered from this BAC plasmid was transfected into C6/36 mosquito cells, and dengue virus protein expression was assessed by indirect immunofluorescence using polyclonal antibodies. The results showed that the replicon was replicated efficiently in cells, demonstrating successful assembly of a DENV-3 replicon.

  15. The next generation recombinant human cytomegalovirus vaccine candidates-beyond gB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilja, Anders E; Mason, Peter W

    2012-11-19

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infects the majority of the global population and persists within the infected host for life; infection of healthy adults rarely leads to severe acute clinical symptoms. In contrast, HCMV is a leading infectious cause of congenital disease and a common cause of complications in transplant recipients. A vaccine to prevent HCMV disease in these populations is a widely recognized medical need. We review recent advances in our understanding of the candidate vaccine antigens and published clinical trial data for the four most recent HCMV vaccine candidates: a gB subunit adjuvanted with MF59, a DNA vaccine expressing gB and pp65, alphavirus replicon particles (VRPs) expressing gB and a pp65-IE1 fusion protein, and a pp65 peptide vaccine. The candidates are safe, although some adverse events were reported for an adjuvanted variant of the pp65 peptide vaccine. The gB/MF59 vaccine elicited strong humoral responses with limited durability. The gB/pp65 DNA vaccine elicited cellular immunity, and the pp65 peptide vaccine elicited modest cellular immunity, but only when formulated with an adjuvant. Only the VRP vaccine expressing gB and pp65-IE1 elicited both humoral and cellular immunity. The gB/MF59 vaccine showed a short-term 50% efficacy at preventing infection of seronegative women and significantly reduced viremia and need for antivirals in solid organ transplant recipients, and the gB/pp65 DNA vaccine showed signs of clinical benefit in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Importantly, the partial efficacy of the subunit and DNA vaccines is new evidence that both humoral and cellular immunity contribute to controlling HCMV-related disease. These data show the clinical feasibility of a recombinant HCMV vaccine. We discuss areas for potential improvements in the next generation of vaccine candidates.

  16. Rabies Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... high risk of exposure to rabies, such as veterinarians, animal handlers, rabies laboratory workers, spelunkers, and rabies biologics production workers should be offered rabies vaccine. The vaccine should also be considered for: (1) ...

  17. RNA Replicon Vaccine and Packaging System%RNA复制子疫苗及其包装系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李莉; 白凤玲; 杨冬; 逄大欣; 欧阳红生

    2005-01-01

    RNA复制子疫苗是一种基于RNA的复制子,能够进行自我复制的新型疫苗,保留了病毒的复制酶基因,结构基因由外源基因所代替,复制酶可控制载体RNA在胞质中高水平复制和外源基因高水平的表达.RNA复制子疫苗被包装成病毒样颗粒后,大大提高了RNA复制子的稳定性.近几年来,关于RNA复制子的包装系统发展迅速,并且许多包装系统都获得成功,大大提高了复制子疫苗的生物安全性和外源基因的高效表达性,具有很好的应用前景.

  18. Research Development of RNA Replicon-based Vaccines%RNA复制子疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冬; 欧阳松应; 王云龙; 欧阳红生

    2005-01-01

    最近兴起的RNA复制子疫苗,利用源自病毒的能够自主复制的RNA,其结构蛋白基因由外源抗原基因取代,保留趑了非结构蛋白(RNA复制酶)基因.RNA复制酶可使RNA载体在细胞质中高水平复制,并实现外源抗原基因的高水平表达,可同时诱导细胞免疫和体液免疫应答.大量双链RNA可诱导被感染细胞凋亡,宿主细胞的凋亡有利于免疫系统识别外源抗原.RNA复制子疫苗克服了传统疫苗和普通DNA疫苗存在的缺点,具有抗原表达效率高、安全性好、应用范围广等优点,因而被视为一种发展前景很好的疫苗形式.目前已对一些疾病模型基于复制子的治疗性和预防性疫苗进行了研究(涉及的对象包括病毒、肿瘤以及细菌毒素等),并对某些不足之处进行了改进.

  19. Edible vaccines.

    OpenAIRE

    Artnzen, C J

    1997-01-01

    Vaccines were the result of trial and error research until molecular biology and genetic engineering made possible the creation of of many new and improved vaccines. New vaccines need to be inexpensive, easily administered, and capable of being stored and transported without refrigeration; without these characteristics, developing countries find it difficult to adopt vaccination as the central strategy for preventing their most devastating diseases. The authors describe a promising approach t...

  20. Periodontal vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Ranjan Malhotra; Anoop Kapoor; Vishakha Grover; Aaswin Kaur Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Vaccine is the name applied generally to a substance of the nature of dead or attenuated living infectious material introduced into the body with the object of increasing its power to resist or get rid of a disease. Vaccines are generally prophylactic, i.e. they ameliorate the effects of future infection. One such vaccine considered here is the "Periodontal vaccine". Till date, no preventive modality exists for periodontal disease and treatment rendered is palliative. Thus, availability of pe...

  1. Replicon typing of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-15 among Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the environment, livestock and human interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurfluh, Katrin; Glier, Melinda; Hächler, Herbert; Stephan, Roger

    2015-07-15

    One of the currently most important antibiotic resistance mechanisms in Enterobacteriaceae is based on the production of ESBL enzymes that inactivate β-lactam antibiotics including cephalosporins and monobactams by hydrolyzing their β-lactam ring. In humans, the most prevalent ESBL enzyme type is encoded by blaCTX-M-15. CTX-M-15 producing enterobacterial strains were also frequently isolated from environmental samples including surface water and freshwater fish. Plasmids, which can be grouped in different plasmid incompatibility types, play a key role in the horizontal spread of these multidrug resistance genes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity of plasmids that carry blaCTX-M-15 genes among Enterobacteriaceae isolated at the environment, livestock and human interface. In total, 81 blaCTX-M-15-harboring isolates collected between 2009 and 2014 were tested for its ability to transfer blaCTX-M-15 by conjugation. These plasmids were further typed. Transfer of a single blaCTX-M-15-harboring plasmid was observed in 32 (39.5%) of the isolates. The most frequent replicon types detected among these plasmids are IncF-type plasmids (n=12) (mostly multi replicon plasmids with a combination of following replicons: IncFII, IncFIA and IncFIB), followed by IncI1 (n=8), IncK (n=3) and IncR (n=1). A noticeable number of plasmids (n=8) could not be assigned to any of the tested replicon types. Knowledge about the plasmid types circulating in bacterial populations is indispensable for understanding epidemiological dynamics and for establishing intervention strategies to stop further dissemination of particular plasmids.

  2. [Replication of the subgenomic hepatitis C virus replicon in the presence of the NS3 protease inhibitors: a stochastic model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanisenko, N V; Mishchenko, E L; Akberdin, I R; Demenkov, P S; Likhoshvai, V A; Kozlov, K N; Todorov, D I; Samsonova, M G; Samsonov, A M; Kolchanov, N A; Ivanisenko, V A

    2013-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) belongs to Flaviviridae family and causes hazardous liver diseases leading frequently to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is able to rapidly acquire drug resistance and for this reason there is currently no effective anti-HCV therapy in spite of appearance of new potential drugs. Mathematical models are relevant to predict the efficacy of potential drugs against virus or host targets. One of the promising targets for development of new drugs is the viral NS3 protease. Here we developed a stochastic model of the subgenomic HCV replicon replication in Huh-7 cells and in the presence of the NS3 protease inhibitors. Along with consideration of the stochastic nature of the subgenomic HCV replicon replication the model takes into account the existence and generation of main NS3 protease drug resistant mutants, namely BILN-2061 (A156T, D168V, R155Q), VX-950 (A156S, A156T, T54A) and SCH-503034 (A156T, A156S, T54A). The model reproduces well the viral RNA kinetics in the cell from the moment of the subgenomic HCV replicon transfection to steady state, as well as the viral RNA suppression kinetics in the presence of NS3 protease inhibitors BILN-2061, VX-950 and SCH-503034. We showed that the resistant mutants should be taken into account for the correct description of biphasic kinetics of the viral RNA suppression. The mutants selected in the presence of different inhibitor concentrations have maximal replication capacity in the given inhibitor concentration range. Our model can be used to interpret the results of the new anti-HCV drug testing in replicon systems, as well as to predict the efficacy of new potential drugs and optimize the regimen of their use.

  3. HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness HPV Vaccine KidsHealth > For Teens > HPV Vaccine Print A A A What's in this article? ... 11 or 12 through age 21 If needed, kids can get the vaccine starting at age 9. continue How Does the ...

  4. The combined use of alphavirus replicons and pseudoinfectious particles for the discovery of antivirals derived from natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delekta, Phillip C; Raveh, Avi; Larsen, Martha J; Schultz, Pamela J; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H; Miller, David J

    2015-06-01

    Alphaviruses are a prominent class of reemergent pathogens due to their globally expanding ranges, potential for lethality, and possible use as bioweapons. The absence of effective treatments for alphaviruses highlights the need for innovative strategies to identify antiviral agents. Primary screens that use noninfectious self-replicating RNAs, termed replicons, have been used to identify potential antiviral compounds for alphaviruses. Only inhibitors of viral genome replication, however, will be identified using replicons, which excludes many other druggable steps in the viral life cycle. To address this limitation, we developed a western equine encephalitis virus pseudoinfectious particle system that reproduces several crucial viral life cycle steps in addition to genome replication. We used this system to screen a library containing ~26,000 extracts derived from marine microbes, and we identified multiple bacterial strains that produce compounds with potential antiviral activity. We subsequently used pseudoinfectious particle and replicon assays in parallel to counterscreen candidate extracts, and followed antiviral activity during biochemical fractionation and purification to differentiate between inhibitors of viral entry and genome replication. This novel process led to the isolation of a known alphavirus entry inhibitor, bafilomycin, thereby validating the approach for the screening and identification of potential antiviral compounds.

  5. Characterization of the replicon from the lactococcal theta-replicating plasmid pJW563.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, A; Josephsen, J; von Wright, A; Vogensen, F K

    1995-09-01

    The replication region of the lactococcal plasmid pJW563 was localized to a 2.3-kb EcoRI fragment. This DNA fragment was sequenced ans a 1155-bp open reading frame, repB563, encoding a putative protein RepB563 of 385 amino acids was found. An AT-rich noncoding region, repA563, was found upstream of repB563. This segment included several direct and inverted repeats. A downstream 591-bp open reading frame, ORF X, which was not necessary for replication, was putatively translationally coupled to repB563, RepB563 supplied in trans could support replication of a plasmid containing repA563 and a truncated repB563. This observation suggests that RepB563 is a trans-acting replication protein, and repA563 the cis-acting origin of replication, repA563, repB563, and the beginning of ORF X showed high homology to similar regions in a family of lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids. The repA DNA sequences and the RepB amino acid sequences of the plasmids were aligned and the consensus sequences generated. The comparison revealed highly conserved areas among this family of plasmids. In addition, variable domains emerged, presumably having a plasmid specific function, pVS40 and pC1305 were plasmids with replication proteins showing high homology to RepB563. Despite this homology, replication from repA563 could not be supported by the pVS40 or pC1305 replication protein supplied in trans. Likewise the pJW563 protein could not support replication from the pVS40 origin. pJW563 was found to be compatible with the pVS40 and pC1305 replicons. The results indicate that pJW563 belongs to the widespread family of lactococcal theta-replicating pladmids. Despite the high homology between their replicons, the interaction between the replication origin and the protein is highly specific in many cases rendering the plasmids compatible.

  6. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  7. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated may go to the Infirmary (ground-floor, bldg. 57), with their vaccine, without a prior appointment. The vaccine can be reimbursed directly by Uniqa providing you attach the receipt and the prescription that you will receive from the Medical Service the day of your injection at the infirmary. Ideally, the vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2007 (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00). CERN staff aged 50 or over are recommended to have influenza vaccinations. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and those convalescing from serious medical problems or after serious surgical operations. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines for family members or retired staff members, who must contact their normal family doctor. Medical Service

  8. Periodontal vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Malhotra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine is the name applied generally to a substance of the nature of dead or attenuated living infectious material introduced into the body with the object of increasing its power to resist or get rid of a disease. Vaccines are generally prophylactic, i.e. they ameliorate the effects of future infection. One such vaccine considered here is the "Periodontal vaccine". Till date, no preventive modality exists for periodontal disease and treatment rendered is palliative. Thus, availability of periodontal vaccine would not only prevent and modulate periodontal disease, but also enhance the quality of life of people for whom periodontal treatment cannot be easily obtained. The aim of the research should be development of a multispecies vaccine targeting the four prime periodontal pathogens, viz. Porphyromonas gingivalis, T. forsythus, T. denticola and A. comitans. Success is still elusive in case of periodontal vaccine due to the complex etiopathogenesis of the disease.

  9. Immune responses in mice vaccinated with a suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the hemagglutinin glycoprotein from the peste des petits ruminants virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Guangqing; Shi, Lijun; Li, Wenchao; Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Jin, Hongyan; Xu, Binrui; Li, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), an acute and highly contagious disease, affects sheep, goats, and some small ruminants. The hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein of the PPR virus (PPRV) is considered important for inducing protective immune responses. In this study, a suicidal DNA vaccine based on the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was constructed and tested for its ability to induce immunogenicity in a mouse model. For this, the H gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV replicon vector. The resultant plasmid named pSCA1-H was then transfected into BHK-21 cells following which the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The pSCA1-H plasmid was then injected intramuscularly into BALB/c mice thrice at 2-week intervals. To evaluate the immunogenicity of pSCA1-H, specific antibodies and neutralizing antibodies against PPRV-H were measured using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a microneutralization test, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were also examined using a lymphocyte proliferation assay. The results showed that pSCA1-H could express the H protein in BHK-21 cells. Specific antibodies, neutralizing antibodies, and lymphocyte proliferation responses were all induced in mice. Thus, this suicidal DNA vaccine could be a promising new approach for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep sequencing uncovers numerous small RNAs on all four replicons of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilms, Ina; Overlöper, Aaron; Nowrousian, Minou; Sharma, Cynthia M; Narberhaus, Franz

    2012-04-01

    Agrobacterium species are capable of interkingdom gene transfer between bacteria and plants. The genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens consists of a circular and a linear chromosome, the At-plasmid and the Ti-plasmid, which harbors bacterial virulence genes required for tumor formation in plants. Little is known about promoter sequences and the small RNA (sRNA) repertoire of this and other α-proteobacteria. We used a differential RNA sequencing (dRNA-seq) approach to map transcriptional start sites of 388 annotated genes and operons. In addition, a total number of 228 sRNAs was revealed from all four Agrobacterium replicons. Twenty-two of these were confirmed by independent RNA gel blot analysis and several sRNAs were differentially expressed in response to growth media, growth phase, temperature or pH. One sRNA from the Ti-plasmid was massively induced under virulence conditions. The presence of 76 cis-antisense sRNAs, two of them on the reverse strand of virulence genes, suggests considerable antisense transcription in Agrobacterium. The information gained from this study provides a valuable reservoir for an in-depth understanding of sRNA-mediated regulation of the complex physiology and infection process of Agrobacterium.

  11. Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombining promote replicon dysfunction and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mann Jennifer K

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic code imposes a dilemma for cells. The DNA must be long enough to encode for the complexity of an organism, yet thin and flexible enough to fit within the cell. The combination of these properties greatly favors DNA collisions, which can knot and drive recombination of the DNA. Despite the well-accepted propensity of cellular DNA to collide and react with itself, it has not been established what the physiological consequences are. Results Here we analyze the effects of recombined and knotted plasmids in E. coli using the Hin site-specific recombination system. We show that Hin-mediated DNA knotting and recombination (i promote replicon loss by blocking DNA replication; (ii block gene transcription; and (iii cause genetic rearrangements at a rate three to four orders of magnitude higher than the rate for an unknotted, unrecombined plasmid. Conclusion These results show that DNA reactivity leading to recombined and knotted DNA is potentially toxic and may help drive genetic evolution.

  12. Mechanism of DNA Segregation in Prokaryotes: Replicon Pairing by parC of Plasmid R1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge; Lurz, Rudi; Gerdes, Kenn

    1998-07-01

    Prokaryotic chromosomes and plasmids encode partitioning systems that are required for DNA segregation at cell division. The systems are thought to be functionally analogous to eukaryotic centromeres and to play a general role in DNA segregation. The parA system of plasmid R1 encodes two proteins ParM and ParR, and a cis-acting centromere-like site denoted parC. The ParR protein binds to parC in vivo and in vitro. The ParM protein is an ATPase that interacts with ParR specifically bound to parC. Using electron microscopy, we show here that parC mediates efficient pairing of plasmid molecules. The pairing requires binding of ParR to parC and is stimulated by the ParM ATPase. The ParM mediated stimulation of plasmid pairing is dependent on ATP hydrolysis by ParM. Using a ligation kinetics assay, we find that ParR stimulates ligation of parC-containing DNA fragments. The rate-of-ligation was increased by wild type ParM protein but not by mutant ParM protein deficient in the ATPase activity. Thus, two independent assays show that parC mediates pairing of plasmid molecules in vitro. These results are consistent with the proposal that replicon pairing is part of the mechanism of DNA segregation in prokaryotes.

  13. Postsymbiotic plasmid acquisition and evolution of the repA1-replicon in Buchnera aphidicola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ham, Roeland C. H. J.; González-Candelas, Fernando; Silva, Francisco J.; Sabater, Beatriz; Moya, Andrés; Latorre, Amparo

    2000-01-01

    Buchnera aphidicola is an obligate, strictly vertically transmitted, bacterial symbiont of aphids. It supplies its host with essential amino acids, nutrients required by aphids but deficient in their diet of plant phloem sap. Several lineages of Buchnera show adaptation to their nutritional role in the form of plasmid-mediated amplification of key-genes involved in the biosynthesis of tryptophan (trpEG) and leucine (leuABCD). Phylogenetic analyses of these plasmid-encoded functions have thus far suggested the absence of horizontal plasmid exchange among lineages of Buchnera. Here, we describe three new Buchnera plasmids, obtained from species of the aphid host families Lachnidae and Pemphigidae. All three plasmids belong to the repA1 family of Buchnera plasmids, which is characterized by the presence of a repA1-replicon responsible for replication initiation. A comprehensive analysis of this family of plasmids unexpectedly revealed significantly incongruent phylogenies for different plasmid and chromosomally encoded loci. We infer from these incongruencies a case of horizontal plasmid transfer in Buchnera. This process may have been mediated by secondary endosymbionts, which occasionally undergo horizontal transmission in aphids. PMID:10984505

  14. Computational design and characterization of a temperature-sensitive plasmid replicon for gram positive thermophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson Daniel G

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Temperature-sensitive (Ts plasmids are useful tools for genetic engineering, but there are currently none compatible with the gram positive, thermophilic, obligate anaerobe, Clostridium thermocellum. Traditional mutagenesis techniques yield Ts mutants at a low frequency, and therefore requires the development of high-throughput screening protocols, which are also not available for this organism. Recently there has been progress in the development of computer algorithms which can predict Ts mutations. Most plasmids currently used for genetic modification of C. thermocellum are based on the replicon of plasmid pNW33N, which replicates using the RepB replication protein. To address this problem, we set out to create a Ts plasmid by mutating the gene coding for the RepB replication protein using an algorithm designed by Varadarajan et al. (1996 for predicting Ts mutants based on the amino-acid sequence of the protein. Results A library of 34 mutant plasmids was designed, synthesized and screened, resulting in 6 mutants which exhibited a Ts phenotype. Of these 6, the one with the most temperature-sensitive phenotype (M166A was compared with the original plasmid. It exhibited lower stability at 48°C and was completely unable to replicate at 55°C. Conclusions The plasmid described in this work could be useful in future efforts to genetically engineer C. thermocellum, and the method used to generate this plasmid may be useful for others trying to make Ts plasmids.

  15. 西尼罗病毒RNA复制子系统的建立与应用%Construction and identification of West Nile virus Chin-01 strain replicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张富军; 李晓峰; 曹飞; 赵慧; 邓永强; 朱舜亚; 姜涛; 秦鄂德; 秦成峰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To obtain a West Nile virus (WNV) RNA replicon efficiently expressing foreign proteins in cells. Methods CMV promoter within WNV replicon pWNrep was replaced with SP6 promoter, and Pac I restriction enzyme site was introduced to the immediate downstream of 3'UTR of WNV genome, yielding pSP6-WNrep. Then, the reporter genes enhanced green fluorescent protein ( eGFP) or Renilla luciferase ( R. luc) were inserted into the pSP6-WNrep, resulting in pSP6-WNrep/eGFP and pSP6-WNrep/R. luc respectively. The plasmids were linearized with Pac I and used as templates for in vitro transcription. The transcript RNA was transfected into BHK-21 cells. The expression level of GFP and luciferase activity were evaluated. Results and Conclusion The plasmids pSP6-WNrep, pSP6-WNrep/eGFP and pSP6-WNrep/R. luc were identified by restriction enzyme digestions and nucleotide sequencing. The expression of GFP could be observed in the transfected cells till 72 h. Additionally, luciferase signals continued to increase at 72 h post trans-fection. This research can facilitate the development of a single-round infectious WNV vaccine candidate.%目的 构建具有复制和表达活性的RNA形式的西尼罗病毒(WNV)复制子.方法 在DNA形式的WNV复制子pWNrep的基础上,将其CMV启动子替换成SP6启动子,并在3'UTR端引入Pac Ⅰ酶切位点,构建复制子克隆pSP6-WNrep.同时,将增强型绿色荧光蛋白(eGFP)和海肾荧光素酶(R.luc)报告基因分别插入上述复制子质粒中,获得含有报告基因的复制子pSP6-WNrep/eGFP和pSP6-WNrep/R.hc.将上述克隆线性化后进行体外转录,将转录体RNA转染BHK-21细胞,观察不同时间点绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)的活性和R.luc活性.结果与结论 获得了WNV复制子pSP6-WNrep、pSP6-WNrep/eGFP和pSP6-WNrep/R.luc,酶切和测序鉴定结果显示,序列与预期一致.将含有报告基因的复制子转染细胞72 h后仍能观察到荧光信号,R.luc的活性随时间延长而增强

  16. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  17. Flu vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor.CERN Medical Service

  18. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  19. FLU VACCINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical Service

  20. Flu Vaccination

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    People working on the CERN site who wish to be vaccinated against influenza may go to the Medical Service (ground floor, Bldg. 57) without an appointment (preferably between 14:00 and 16:00), PROVIDED THAT THEY BRING THEIR OWN VACCINE WITH THEM. Ideally, vaccination should take place between 1st October and 30th November 2006. The influenza vaccine is recommended for CERN staff aged 50 and over. Vaccination is particularly important for those suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney problems, for diabetics and for those convalescing from serious medical problems or major surgery. The Medical Service will not administer vaccines to family members or retired staff members, who must contact their family doctor. CERN Medical service

  1. Leptospirosis vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Li; Wang Zhijun; Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Leptospirosis is a serious infection disease caused by pathogenic strains of the Leptospira spirochetes, which affects not only humans but also animals. It has long been expected to find an effective vaccine to prevent leptospirosis through immunization of high risk humans or animals. Although some leptospirosis vaccines have been obtained, the vaccination is relatively unsuccessful in clinical application despite decades of research and millions of dollars spent. In this review, the...

  2. Replicon Particles of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus as a Reductionist Murine Model for Encephalitis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Whitmore, Alan C.; Konopka, Jennifer L.; Johnston, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) were used to model the initial phase of VEE-induced encephalitis in the mouse brain. VRP can target and infect cells as VEE, but VRP do not propagate beyond the first infected cell due to the absence of the structural genes. Direct intracranial inoculation of VRP into mice induced acute encephalitis with signs similar to the neuronal phase of wild-type VEE infection and other models of virus-induced encephalitis. Using the previously established VRP-mRNP tagging system, a new method to distinguish the host responses in infected cells from those in uninfected bystander cell populations, we detected a robust and rapid innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS) by infected neurons and uninfected bystander cells. Moreover, this innate immune response in the CNS compromised blood-brain barrier integrity, created an inflammatory response, and directed an adaptive immune response characterized by proliferation and activation of microglia cells and infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, in addition to CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that a naïve CNS has an intrinsic potential to induce an innate immune response that could be crucial to the outcome of the infection by determining the composition and dynamics of the adaptive immune response. Furthermore, these results establish a model for neurotropic virus infection to identify host and viral factors that contribute to invasion of the brain, the mechanism(s) whereby the adaptive immune response can clear the infection, and the role of the host innate response in these processes. PMID:19225006

  3. Venezuelan equine encephalitis replicon particles can induce rapid protection against foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-San Segundo, Fayna; Dias, Camila C A; Moraes, Mauro P; Weiss, Marcelo; Perez-Martin, Eva; Owens, Gary; Custer, Max; Kamrud, Kurt; de los Santos, Teresa; Grubman, Marvin J

    2013-05-01

    We have previously shown that delivery of the porcine type I interferon gene (poIFN-α/β) with a replication-defective human adenovirus vector (adenovirus 5 [Ad5]) can sterilely protect swine challenged with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 1 day later. However, the need of relatively high doses of Ad5 limits the applicability of such a control strategy in the livestock industry. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) empty replicon particles (VRPs) can induce rapid protection of mice against either homologous or, in some cases, heterologous virus challenge. As an alternative approach to induce rapid protection against FMDV, we have examined the ability of VRPs containing either the gene for green fluorescent protein (VRP-GFP) or poIFN-α (VRP-poIFN-α) to block FMDV replication in vitro and in vivo. Pretreatment of swine or bovine cell lines with either VRP significantly inhibited subsequent infection with FMDV as early as 6 h after treatment and for at least 120 h posttreatment. Furthermore, mice pretreated with either 10(7) or 10(8) infectious units of VRP-GFP and challenged with a lethal dose of FMDV 24 h later were protected from death. Protection was induced as early as 6 h after treatment and lasted for at least 48 h and correlated with induction of an antiviral response and production of IFN-α. By 6 h after treatment several genes were upregulated, and the number of genes and the level of induction increased at 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the chemokine IP-10, which is induced by IFN-α and VRP-GFP, is directly involved in protection against FMDV.

  4. Replicon particles of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus as a reductionist murine model for encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Alexandra; Whitmore, Alan C; Konopka, Jennifer L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-05-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) were used to model the initial phase of VEE-induced encephalitis in the mouse brain. VRP can target and infect cells as VEE, but VRP do not propagate beyond the first infected cell due to the absence of the structural genes. Direct intracranial inoculation of VRP into mice induced acute encephalitis with signs similar to the neuronal phase of wild-type VEE infection and other models of virus-induced encephalitis. Using the previously established VRP-mRNP tagging system, a new method to distinguish the host responses in infected cells from those in uninfected bystander cell populations, we detected a robust and rapid innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS) by infected neurons and uninfected bystander cells. Moreover, this innate immune response in the CNS compromised blood-brain barrier integrity, created an inflammatory response, and directed an adaptive immune response characterized by proliferation and activation of microglia cells and infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, in addition to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that a naïve CNS has an intrinsic potential to induce an innate immune response that could be crucial to the outcome of the infection by determining the composition and dynamics of the adaptive immune response. Furthermore, these results establish a model for neurotropic virus infection to identify host and viral factors that contribute to invasion of the brain, the mechanism(s) whereby the adaptive immune response can clear the infection, and the role of the host innate response in these processes.

  5. 重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫原性的分析%Immunogenicity of Recombinant PA4 Replicon Virus Particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马尧; 李娜; 余云舟; 孙志伟; 俞炜源

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To construct recombinant Semliki forest virus(SFV) replicon virus particles contained domain 4 of the protective antigen (PA4) from anthrax,and further study its immunogenicity. Methods: The recombinant virus particles (RVP) were prepared by cotranfecting the expression vector pSCAR-SPA4 with helper vector pSHCAR and expression of antigen PA4 was also confirmed by indirect imumofluorescence. Mice were immunized with RVP and antibody level of sera from mice was measured. Lymphocyte proliferate responses and cytokine levelswere measured after specifically stimulate splenocyte. Results: After immunization of mice,high antibody titer was measured. Specifically stimulated splenocytes with PA4 antigen can induce lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of IFN-γ and IL-4. Conclusion: Recombinant PA4 replicon virus particles vaccine can induce high titer antibody and cellular immunity response. The data presented in the report suggested that the recombinant PA4 replicon virus particles in this study may be developed into an alternative vaccine candidate for anthrax.%目的:构建携带炭疽毒素保护性抗原第四结构域(PA4)基因的重组Semliki森林病毒(SFV)复制子病毒颗粒,并对其免疫原性进行研究.方法:将编码炭疽PA4的SFV复制子DNA载体pSCAR-SPA4,与辅助SFV DNA载体pSHCAR共转染BHK21细胞,制备表达PA4的重组复制子病毒颗粒;用重组复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫小鼠,并采用ELISA法检测其血清抗体水平和细胞因子IFN-γ和IL-4.结果:免疫小鼠血清中检测到较高的抗体水平,免疫小鼠的脾淋巴细胞经特异性抗原刺激后产生了明显的T细胞增殖反应并分泌产生了IFN-γ和IL-4.结论:重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒疫苗免疫小鼠后能够产生特异性的抗体反应和细胞免疫反应.制备的重组PA4复制子病毒颗粒极有潜力作为人用炭疽候选疫苗,为进一步研究新型炭疽疫苗奠定了基础.

  6. Development and characterization of a replicon-based phenotypic assay for assessing HCV NS4B from clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajyaguru, Sonal; Yang, Huiling; Martin, Ross; Miller, Michael D; Mo, Hongmei

    2013-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B inhibitors have shown potent inhibition of HCV replication in vitro. To assess the effect of viral diversity on the susceptibility to NS4B inhibitors, genotype (GT)-specific GT1a and GT1b replicon shuttle vectors were designed and created for cloning HCV NS4B genes from clinical isolates. For the GT1b NS4B shuttle vector, the S2204I adaptive mutation was introduced in NS5A to improve replication due to the replacement of the K1846T adaptive mutation in NS4B with NS4B from the clinical isolates. In addition to the adaptive mutations, a newly identified Huh-7 cell line, Huh-7-1C, which is highly permissive for both GT1a and GT1b replication, was used to further enhance the replication levels. HCV NS4B gene from clinical isolates was amplified and inserted into the corresponding GT1a and GT1b modified lab strain chimeric replicons. GT1a and GT1b chimeric replicons expressing diverse NS4B genes from corresponding subtypes of clinical isolates replicated at highly efficient levels for phenotypic analysis. Due to natural variation in their amino acid residues in NS4B, these isolates displayed varying drug susceptibilities to an NS4B inhibitor. In mixed populations with wild-type, the sensitivity of resistance detection of NS4B resistant mutants H94R and V105M was between 20% and 80%. The chimeric shuttle vectors can be used to characterize the activity of antiviral drugs targeting NS4B from diverse natural clinical isolates and aid in the development of novel compounds against HCV NS4B.

  7. Replicon modes and stability of critical behaviour of disordered systems with respect to the continuous replica symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorenko, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    A field-theory approach is used to investigate the 'spin-glass effects' on the critical behaviour of systems with weak temperature-like quenched disorder. The renormalization group (RG) analysis of the effective Hamiltonian of a model with replica symmetry breaking (RSB) potentials of a general type is carried out in the two-loop approximation. The fixed point (FP) stability, recently found within the one-step RSB RG treatment, is further explored in terms of replicon eigenvalues. We find that the traditional FPs, which are usually considered to describe the disorder-induced universal critical behaviour, remain stable when the continuous RSB modes are taken into account.

  8. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  9. Seasonal Flu Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  10. Tracking the evolution of multiple in vitro hepatitis C virus replicon variants under protease inhibitor selection pressure by 454 deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbinnen, Thierry; Van Marck, Herwig; Vandenbroucke, Ina; Vijgen, Leen; Claes, Marijke; Lin, Tse-I; Simmen, Kenneth; Neyts, Johan; Fanning, Gregory; Lenz, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Resistance to hepatitis C virus (HCV) inhibitors targeting viral enzymes has been observed in in vitro replicon studies and during clinical trials. The factors determining the emergence of resistance and the changes in the viral quasispecies population under selective pressure are not fully understood. To assess the dynamics of variants emerging in vitro under various selective pressures with TMC380765, a potent macrocyclic HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor, HCV genotype 1b replicon-containing cells were cultured in the presence of a low, high, or stepwise-increasing TMC380765 concentration(s). HCV replicon RNA from representative samples thus obtained was analyzed using (i) population, (ii) clonal, and (iii) 454 deep sequencing technologies. Depending on the concentration of TMC380765, distinct mutational patterns emerged. In particular, culturing with low concentrations resulted in the selection of low-level resistance mutations (F43S and A156G), whereas high concentrations resulted in the selection of high-level resistance mutations (A156V, D168V, and D168A). Clonal and 454 deep sequencing analysis of the replicon RNA allowed the identification of low-frequency preexisting mutations possibly contributing to the mutational pattern that emerged. Stepwise-increasing TMC380765 concentrations resulted in the emergence and disappearance of multiple replicon variants in response to the changing selection pressure. Moreover, two different codons for the wild-type amino acids were observed at certain NS3 positions within one population of replicons, which may contribute to the emerging mutational patterns. Deep sequencing technologies enabled the study of minority variants present in the HCV quasispecies population present at baseline and during antiviral drug pressure, giving new insights into the dynamics of resistance acquisition by HCV.

  11. Attenuated and vectored vaccines protect nonhuman primates against Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Gosse, Leslie; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Tchitchek, Nicolas; Hallengärd, David; García-Arriaza, Juan; Meinke, Andreas; Esteban, Mariano; Merits, Andres

    2017-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is rapidly spreading across the globe, and millions are infected. Morbidity due to this virus is a serious threat to public health, but at present, there is no vaccine against this debilitating disease. We have recently developed a number of vaccine candidates, and here we have evaluated 3 of them in a nonhuman primate model. A single immunization with an attenuated strain of CHIKV (Δ5nsP3), a homologous prime-boost immunization with a DNA-launched RNA replicon encoding CHIKV envelope proteins (DREP-E), and a DREP-E prime followed by a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara encoding CHIKV capsid and envelope (MVA-CE) boost all induced protection against WT CHIKV infection. The attenuated Δ5nsP3 virus proved to be safe and did not show any clinical signs typically associated with WT CHIKV infections such as fever, skin rash, lymphopenia, or joint swelling. These vaccines are based on an East/Central/South African strain of Indian Ocean lineage, but they also generated neutralizing antibodies against an isolate of the Asian genotype that now is rapidly spreading across the Americas. These results form the basis for clinical development of an efficacious CHIKV vaccine that generates both humoral and cellular immunity with long-term immunological memory. PMID:28352649

  12. A suicidal DNA vaccine expressing the fusion protein of peste des petits ruminants virus induces both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Xiaolin; Jin, Hongyan; Liu, Guangqing; Pan, Ling; Wang, Guijun; Guo, Hao; Li, Gang; Li, Yongdong

    2015-12-01

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), a highly contagious disease induced by PPR virus (PPRV), affects sheep and goats. PPRV fusion (F) protein is important for the induction of immune responses against PPRV. We constructed a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon-vectored DNA vaccine ("suicidal DNA vaccine") and evaluated its immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. The F gene of PPRV was cloned and inserted into the SFV replicon-based vector pSCA1. The antigenicity of the resultant plasmid pSCA1/F was identified by indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting. BALB/c mice were then intramuscularly injected with pSCA1/F three times at 14-d intervals. Specific antibodies and virus-neutralizing antibodies against PPRV were quantified by indirect ELISA and microneutralization tests, respectively. Cell-mediated immune responses were examined by cytokine and lymphocyte proliferation assays. The pSCA1/F expressed F protein in vitro and induced specific and neutralizing antibody production, and lymphocyte proliferation in mice. Mice vaccinated with pSCA1/F had increased IL-2 and IL-10 levels after 24-h post first immunization. IFN-γ and TNF-α levels increased from that time point and gradually decreased thereafter. Thus, the Semliki Forest virus replicon-vectored DNA vaccine expressing the F protein of PPRV induced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in mice. This could be considered as a novel strategy for vaccine development against PPR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evolution of dinoflagellate unigenic minicircles and the partially concerted divergence of their putative replicon origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Cavalier-Smith, Thomas; Green, Beverley R

    2002-04-01

    gene transfer to the nucleus. One assumes differential gene deletion within a multicopy population of the resulting oligogenic circles. The other postulates active transposition of putative replicon origins and formation of minicircles by homologous recombination between them.

  14. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus Replicon High-Permissive and Low-Permissive Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Xin, Zhongshuai; Han, Wei; Fan, Jingjing; Yin, Bin; Wu, Shuzhen; Yang, Wei; Yuan, Jiangang; Qiang, Boqin; Sun, Wei; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the leading causes of severe hepatitis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCV replication and pathogenesis remain unclear. The development of the subgenome replicon model system significantly enhanced study of HCV. However, the permissiveness of the HCV subgenome replicon greatly differs among different hepatoma cell lines. Proteomic analysis of different permissive cell lines might provide new clues in understanding HCV replication. In this study, to detect potential candidates that might account for the differences in HCV replication. Label-free and iTRAQ labeling were used to analyze the differentially expressed protein profiles between Huh7.5.1 wt and HepG2 cells. A total of 4919 proteins were quantified in which 114 proteins were commonly identified as differentially expressed by both quantitative methods. A total of 37 differential proteins were validated by qRT-PCR. The differential expression of Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1), Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1), carboxylesterase 1 (CES1), vimentin, Proteasome activator complex subunit1 (PSME1), and Cathepsin B (CTSB) were verified by western blot. And over-expression of CTSB or knock-down of vimentin induced significant changes to HCV RNA levels. Additionally, we demonstrated that CTSB was able to inhibit HCV replication and viral protein translation. These results highlight the potential role of CTSB and vimentin in virus replication.

  15. Large plasmids of Escherichia coli and Salmonella encode highly diverse arrays of accessory genes on common replicon families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Laura E; Wireman, Joy; Hilliard, Valda C; Summers, Anne O

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are important in evolution and adaptation of host bacteria, yet we lack a comprehensive picture of their own natural variation. We used replicon typing and RFLP analysis to assess diversity and distribution of plasmids in the ECOR, SARA, SARB and SARC reference collections of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Plasmids, especially large (≥30 kb) plasmids, are abundant in these collections. Host species and genotype clearly impact plasmid prevalence; plasmids are more abundant in ECOR than SAR, but, within ECOR, subgroup B2 strains have the fewest large plasmids. The majority of large plasmids have unique RFLP patterns, suggesting high variation, even within dominant replicon families IncF and IncI1. We found only four conserved plasmid types within ECOR, none of which are widely distributed. Within SAR, conserved plasmid types are primarily serovar-specific, including a pSLT-like plasmid in 13 Typhimurium strains. Conservation of pSLT contrasts with variability of other plasmids, suggesting evolution of serovar-specific virulence plasmids is distinct from that of most enterobacterial plasmids. We sequenced a conserved serovar Heidelberg plasmid but did not detect virulence or antibiotic resistance genes. Our data illustrate the high degree of natural variation in large plasmids of E. coli and Salmonella, even among plasmids sharing backbone genes.

  16. Identification of the minimal replicon and the origin of replication of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkner, Silvia; Hinojosa, Mery Pina; Prangishvili, David; Lipps, Georg

    2014-10-01

    We have determined the minimal replicon of the crenarchaeal plasmid pRN1. It consists of 3097 base pairs amounting to 58% of the genome of pRN1. The minimal replicon comprises replication operon orf56/orf904 coding for a transcriptional repressor and the replication protein of pRN1. An upstream region of 64 bp that contains the promoter of the replication operon is essential as well as 166 bp of sequence downstream of the orf904 gene. This region contains a putative transcriptional terminator and a 100 nucleotides long stem-loop structure. Only the latter structure was shown to be required for replication. In addition replication was sustained when the stem-loop was displaced to another part of the pRN1 sequence. By mutational analysis we also find that the integrity of the stem-loop structure is required to maintain the replication of pRN1-derived constructs. As similar stem-loop structures are also present in other members of the pRN family, we suggest that this conserved structural element could be the origin of replication for the pRN plasmids. Further bioinformatic analysis revealed that the domain structure of the replication protein and the presence of a similar stem-loop structure as the putative replication origin are also found in several bacteriophages.

  17. Recombination of replicon and helper RNAs and the emergence of propagation-competent vectors upon Sindbis virus vector production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, Anna; Yongabi, Felicitas; Mäkinen, Kimmo; Wahlfors, Jarmo; Pellinen, Riikka

    2013-08-01

    Sindbis vectors have shown remarkable antitumor efficacy and tumor-targeting capacity in animal models and hold promise for cancer therapy. Different packaging systems are used to produce propagation-incompetent Sindbis vectors. However, the vectors produced using either DH-BB single helper RNA or split helper RNA can spread in permissive cell cultures. We investigated the mechanisms of vector spreading and show, here, that recombination occurs between the replicon and DH-BB helper RNA, leading to formation of the full-length virus genome. Split helper RNA may not completely prevent wild-type reversion, although the frequency is greatly reduced. Contrary to propagation of Sindbis DH-BB vectors, Sindbis split helper vectors were frequently able to spread without cytopathic effect (CPE), a feature that was linked to wild-type reversion. Our results support the hypothesis that the non-cytopathic local spreading constantly observed with Sindbis split helper vector results from unspecific packaging of helper RNAs into vector particles and co-infection with particles containing replicon and helper RNAs. Several malignant cell lines with defective interferon responses were found to be permissive for non-cytopathic spreading of the Sindbis split helper vector. Interferon-α suppressed the spreading providing a possible option to control the vector.

  18. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of the Hepatitis C Virus Replicon High-Permissive and Low-Permissive Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is one of the leading causes of severe hepatitis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HCV replication and pathogenesis remain unclear. The development of the subgenome replicon model system significantly enhanced study of HCV. However, the permissiveness of the HCV subgenome replicon greatly differs among different hepatoma cell lines. Proteomic analysis of different permissive cell lines might provide new clues in understanding HCV replication. In this study, to detect potential candidates that might account for the differences in HCV replication. Label-free and iTRAQ labeling were used to analyze the differentially expressed protein profiles between Huh7.5.1 wt and HepG2 cells. A total of 4919 proteins were quantified in which 114 proteins were commonly identified as differentially expressed by both quantitative methods. A total of 37 differential proteins were validated by qRT-PCR. The differential expression of Glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L1 (UCHL1, carboxylesterase 1 (CES1, vimentin, Proteasome activator complex subunit1 (PSME1, and Cathepsin B (CTSB were verified by western blot. And over-expression of CTSB or knock-down of vimentin induced significant changes to HCV RNA levels. Additionally, we demonstrated that CTSB was able to inhibit HCV replication and viral protein translation. These results highlight the potential role of CTSB and vimentin in virus replication.

  19. Tracing the antibody mediated acquired immunity by Foot and Mouth disease and Rift Valley Fever combined vaccine in pregnant ewes and their lambs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Mossad Gamal

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to provide adequate protection to ewes and their lambs against Foot and Mouth disease (FMD and Rift Valley Fever (RVF. Materials and Methods: A combined inactivated oil vaccine was prepared successfully. Such vaccine was found to be free from foreign contaminants, safe and potent as determined by quality control tests such as challenge protection percentage for FMD and mice ED50 for RVF. Vaccination of pregnant ewes with the prepared combined vaccine and determination of the antibody level via serum neutralization test (SNT and Enzyme Linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA in the vaccinated pregnant ewes and their lambs. Results: Vaccination of pregnant ewes revealed that these ewes exhibited high levels of specific antibodies against the included vaccine antigens (Foot and Mouth disease virus type A Iran O5, O PanAsia and SAT2/EGY/2012 and RVFV-ZH501. FMD antibodies recorded their peaks by the 10th week while those of RVF recorded their peaks by the 12th week post vaccination then all antibodies began to decrease gradually to reach their lowest protective titers for FMD by the 32nd week post vaccination and those for RVF by the 34th week post vaccination. Potency test of the prepared combined vaccine expressed as protection percentage of vaccinated sheep against target virulent FMD virus serotypes reflected a protection percentage of 80% against type O and SAT2 and 100% against A while for RVF, the mice ED50 was found to be 0.009 indicating the potency of the prepared vaccine. The antibody titer in serum and colostrum of vaccinated pregnant ewes at day of parturition (10-12 week post vaccination recorded a high titer against FMD serotype (O, serotype (A, serotype (SAT2 and against RVF. It was noticed that the colostrum antibody titers were slightly higher than those in the sera of vaccinated ewes at time of parturition. The newly born lambs from vaccinated ewes, exhibited good levels of maternal immunity against the

  20. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  1. Ear Infection and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an ENT Doctor Near You Ear Infection and Vaccines Ear Infection and Vaccines Patient Health Information News ... or may need reinsertion over time. What about vaccines? A vaccine is a preparation administered to stimulate ...

  2. Adults Need Vaccines, Too!

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Adult Vaccinations Adults Need Vaccines, Too! Past Issues / Summer 2015 Table of Contents ... of the millions of adults not receiving the vaccines you need? What vaccines do you need? All ...

  3. Vaccinations during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... X Home > Pregnancy > Prenatal care > Vaccinations and pregnancy Vaccinations and pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... date before you get pregnant. What is a vaccination? A vaccination is a shot that contains a ...

  4. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT ... to your doctor or pharmacist about the best flu vaccine option for you or your family.

  5. Antipneumococcal vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Vincenzo Zuccotti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP is a gram-positive bacterium with more than 90 known serotypes causing around 11% of all deaths worldwide in children aged 1-59 months. A new era in prevention of SP-related diseases started in at the beginning of 2000s when a 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 was recommended as the vaccine of choice in pediatric age. PCV7 dramatically reduced invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD among children with indirect effects noted among other age groups as well. However, thanks to a strict surveillance network, an increase in non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs causing IPD was noted worldwide and in late 2000s a new second generation vaccine (13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine-PCV13 with an expanded serotype coverage was licensed. Due to the lack of solid effectiveness data, up to know it is difficult to predict how the composition of NVTs will change after the large-scale introduction of PCV13 or whether the characteristics of the serotypes will change. Long-term surveillance of both IPD, pneumonia, acute otitis media and carriage will be crucial to ascertain whether these second generation vaccines are having the desired effect of reducing the incidence of diseases in the long term. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  6. Construction of a dengue virus type 4 reporter replicon and analysis of temperature-sensitive mutations in non-structural proteins 3 and 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L; Manzano, Mark Irvin M; Del Angel, Rosa M; Levis, Robin; Padmanabhan, R

    2010-11-01

    Replicon systems have been useful to study mechanisms of translation and replication of flavivirus RNAs. In this study, we constructed a dengue virus 4 replicon encoding a Renilla luciferase (R(luc)) reporter, and six single-residue substitution mutants were generated: L128F and S158P in the non-structural protein (NS) 3 protease domain gene, and N96I, N390A, K437R and M805I in the NS5 gene. The effects of these substitutions on viral RNA translation and/or replication were examined by measuring R(luc) activities in wild-type and mutant replicon RNA-transfected Vero cells incubated at 35, 37 and 39 °C. Our results show that none of the mutations affected translation of replicon RNAs; however, L128F and S158P of NS3 at 39°C, and N96I of NS5 at 37 and 39°C, presented temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotypes for replication. Furthermore, using in vitro methyltransferase assays, we identified that the N96I mutation in NS5 exhibited a ts phenotype for N7-methylation, but not for 2'-O-methylation.

  7. Proteome analysis of liver cells expressing a full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon and biopsy specimens of posttransplantation liver from HCV-infected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jon M; Diamond, Deborah L; Chan, Eric Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G; Carithers, Robert L; Smith, Richard D; Katze, Michael G

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large-scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full-length HCV replicon. We detected >4,200 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of HCV replicon-positive and -negative Huh-7.5 cells identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where a total of >1,500 proteins were detected from only 2 mug of liver biopsy protein digest using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting in the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  8. The RepA_N replicons of Gram-positive bacteria: a family of broadly distributed but narrow host range plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Keith E; Kwong, Stephen M; Firth, Neville; Francia, Maria Victoria

    2009-03-01

    The pheromone-responsive conjugative plasmids of Enterococcus faecalis and the multiresistance plasmids pSK1 and pSK41 of Staphylococcus aureus are among the best studied plasmids native to Gram-positive bacteria. Although these plasmids seem largely restricted to their native hosts, protein sequence comparison of their replication initiator proteins indicates that they are clearly related. Homology searches indicate that these replicons are representatives of a large family of plasmids and a few phage that are widespread among the low G+C Gram-positive bacteria. We propose to name this family the RepA_N family of replicons after the annotated conserved domain that the initiator protein contains. Detailed sequence comparisons indicate that the initiator protein phylogeny is largely congruent with that of the host, suggesting that the replicons have evolved along with their current hosts and that intergeneric transfer has been rare. However, related proteins were identified on chromosomal regions bearing characteristics indicative of ICE elements, and the phylogeny of these proteins displayed evidence of more frequent intergeneric transfer. Comparison of stability determinants associated with the RepA_N replicons suggests that they have a modular evolution as has been observed in other plasmid families.

  9. Temperature-sensitive mutations for live-attenuated Rift Valley fever vaccines: Implications from other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko eNishiyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF is a mosquito-borne zoonotic disease endemic to the African continent. RVF is characterized by high rate of abortions in ruminants and hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis or blindness in humans. RVF is caused by the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV: genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. Vaccination is the only known effective strategy to prevent the disease, but there are no licensed RVF vaccines available for humans. A live-attenuated vaccine candidate derived from the wild-type pathogenic Egyptian ZH548 strain, MP-12, has been conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 displays a temperature-sensitive (ts phenotype and does not replicate at 41oC. The ts mutation limits viral replication at a specific body temperature and may lead to an attenuation of the virus. Here we will review well-characterized ts mutations for RNA viruses, and further discuss the potential in designing novel live-attenuated vaccines for RVF.

  10. 登革病毒质粒型微复制子载体的构建和鉴定%Construction and identification of mini-DNA replicon vector on the basis of Dengue Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李木丽; 张凤娟; 尉研; 孙继国; 王焕琴; 吴萌; 梁国栋; 赵玉敏; 朱武洋

    2015-01-01

    Objective To construction and identification of mini-DNA replicon vector on the basis of Dengue virus.Methods Based on Dengue virus type 4 infectious clone p4,a cassette with the deletion of PrM-E gene and most of non-structure protein gene was constructed through OL-PCR.Then we constructed the mini-DNA micro replicon vector pcDEN-△ prME by inserting the cassette into the pCDNA3.1 (+),an eukaryotic expression vector.Results To identify and verify the packaging function of the mini replicon vector,the qualitative EGFP report gene and quantitative luciferase gene was respectively cloned into pcDEN-△prME,constrcuting engineering vector pcDEN-△prME-EGFP and pcDEN-△prME-GLUC.Transfection experiment results show that the mini replicon vector could successfully express EGFP reporter gene and sea renal luciferase report gene.Conclusion mini-DNA replicon vector pcDEN-△prME constructed in this study can express exogenous genes successfully,which only contains Dengue virus necessary cis element and NS5 key sequence missing most of the structure of genes at the same time,making the vector in simplifying experiments and greatly improve the capacity of the viral vector.This study provides a powerful tool for further research on Flavivirus antiviral drug screening and new vaccine development,and provides a new technical platform for molecular regulation mechanism of viral replication and translation.%目的 构建登革病毒质粒型微复制子载体,并对其功能进行鉴定.方法 以登革病毒4型感染性cDNA克隆p4为分子基础,通过融合PCR方法构建删除病毒结构基因和大部分非结构基因的表达盒,并将其克隆入真核表达载体pCDNA3.1(+)的CMV启动子下游以构建包含病毒复制和翻译必需顺式作用元件和NS5关键序列的质粒型微复制子载体pcDEN-△prME.结果 为验证微复制子载体的包装功能,将定性的绿色荧光蛋白报告基因和定量的海肾荧光素酶基因分别克隆至pcDEN-△pr

  11. Construction of a subgenomic CV-B3 replicon expressing emerald green fluorescent protein to assess viral replication of a cardiotropic enterovirus strain in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehbe, Michel; Huguenin, Antoine; Leveque, Nicolas; Semler, Bert L; Hamze, Monzer; Andreoletti, Laurent; Bouin, Alexis

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackieviruses B (CV-B) (Picornaviridae) are a common infectious cause of acute myocarditis in children and young adults, a disease, which is a precursor to 10-20% of chronic myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) cases. The mechanisms involved in the disease progression from acute to chronic myocarditis phase and toward the DCM clinical stage are not fully understood but are influenced by both viral and host factors. Subgenomic replicons of CV-B can be used to assess viral replication mechanisms in human cardiac cells and evaluate the effects of potential antiviral drugs on viral replication activities. Our objectives were to generate a reporter replicon from a cardiotropic prototype CV-B3/28 strain and to characterize its replication properties into human cardiac primary cells. To obtain this replicon, a cDNA plasmid containing the full CV-B3/28 genome flanked by a hammerhead ribozyme sequence and an MluI restriction site was generated and used as a platform for the insertion of sequences encoding emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP) in place of those encoding VP3. In vitro transcribed RNA from this plasmid was transfected into HeLa cells and human primary cardiac cells and was able to produce EmGFP and VP1-containing polypeptides. Moreover, non-structural protein biological activity was assessed by the specific cleavage of eIF4G1 by viral 2A(pro). Viral RNA replication was indirectly demonstrated by inhibition assays, fluoxetine was added to cell culture and prevented the EmGFP synthesis. Our results indicated that the EmGFP CV-B3 replicon was able to replicate and translate as well as the CV-B3/28 prototype strain. Our EmGFP CV-B3 replicon will be a valuable tool to readily investigate CV-B3 replication activities in human target cell models.

  12. Dual-Replicon Plasmids for Elimination of Resistant Plasmids%双复制子质粒消除耐药质粒的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫冰; 余克花; 黎帆; 李蓉; 宋矿余

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the eliminating effect of dual-replicon plasmids on resistant plasmids.Methods The dual-replicon plasmids pKT230-oriV were constructed and transferred into bacteria with resistant plasmids pRK290 through the transformation and conjugational trans-fer pathways.The eliminating effect of dual-replicon plasmids on resistant plasmids was ob-served.Results The bacteria were cultured for 5 generations after the transfer of dual-replicon plasmids,and resistant plasmids pRK290 in bacteria were eliminated.Conclusion The conjuga-tional transfer of dual-replicon plasmids is a pathway to eliminate resistant plasmids.%目的:观察双复制子质粒对耐药质粒的消除作用。方法构建双复制子质粒 pKT230-oriV,并通过转化或接合转移途径转入带有 pRK290质粒的细菌中,观察双复制子质粒对耐药质粒的消除作用。结果转入双复制子质粒菌培养5代后,细菌中的 pRK290耐药质粒被消除。结论双复制子利用接合转移途径是消除耐药质粒的一个途径。

  13. Construction of an infectious molecular clone of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype V and its derivative subgenomic replicon capable of expressing a foreign gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Abe, Makoto; Masuda, Michiaki

    2015-01-02

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) genotype V was originally isolated in Malaysia in 1952 and has long been restricted to the area. In 2009, sudden emergence of the genotype V in China and Korea was reported, suggesting expansion of its geographical distribution. Although studies on the genotype V are becoming more important, they have been limited partly due to lack of its infectious molecular clone. In this study, a plasmid carrying cDNA corresponding to the entire genome of JEV Muar strain, which belongs to genotype V, in the downstream of T7 promoter was constructed. Electroporation of viral RNA transcribed by T7 RNA polymerase (T7RNAP) in vitro from the plasmid led to production of progeny viruses both in mammalian and mosquito cells. Also, transfection of the infectious clone plasmid into mammalian cells expressing T7RNAP transiently or stably was demonstrated to generate infectious progenies. When the viral structural protein genes were partially deleted from the full-length cDNA, the subgenomic RNA transcribed in vitro from the modified plasmid was shown to replicate itself in mammalian cells as a replicon. The replicon carrying the firefly luciferase gene in place of the deleted structural protein genes was also shown to efficiently replicate itself and express luciferase in mammalian cells. Compared with the replicon derived from JEV genotype III (Nakayama strain), the genotype V-derived replicon appeared to be more tolerant to introduction of a foreign gene. The infectious clone and the replicons constructed in this study may serve as useful tools for characterizing JEV genotype V.

  14. Resistance studies of a dithiazol analogue, DBPR110, as a potential hepatitis C virus NS5A inhibitor in replicon systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Mei; Wang, Jing-Chyi; Hu, Han-Shu; Wu, Pei-Shan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Wu, Su-Ying; Yang, Chi-Chen; Yeh, Teng-Kuang; Hsu, Tsu-An; Jiaang, Weir-Torn; Chao, Yu-Sheng; Chern, Jyh-Haur; Yueh, Andrew

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, affects approximately 3% of the world's population and is becoming the leading cause of liver disease in the world. Therefore, the development of novel or more effective treatment strategies to treat chronic HCV infection is urgently needed. In our previous study, we identified a potential HCV NS5A inhibitor, BP008. After further systemic optimization, we discovered a more potent HCV inhibitor, DBPR110. DBPR110 reduced the reporter expression of the HCV1b replicon with a 50% effective concentration (EC(50)) and a selective index value of 3.9 ± 0.9 pM and >12,800,000, respectively. DBPR110 reduced HCV2a replicon activity with an EC(50) and a selective index value of 228.8 ± 98.4 pM and >173,130, respectively. Sequencing analyses of several individual clones derived from the DBPR110-resistant RNAs purified from cells harboring genotype 1b and 2a HCV replicons revealed that amino acid substitutions mainly within the N-terminal region (domain I) of NS5A were associated with decreased inhibitor susceptibility. P58L/T and Y93H/N in genotype 1b and T24A, P58L, and Y93H in the genotype 2a replicon were the key substitutions for resistance selection. In the 1b replicon, V153M, M202L, and M265V play a compensatory role in replication and drug resistance. Moreover, DBPR110 displayed synergistic effects with alpha interferon (IFN-α), an NS3 protease inhibitor, and an NS5B polymerase inhibitor. In summary, our results present an effective small-molecule inhibitor, DBPR110, that potentially targets HCV NS5A. DBPR110 could be part of a more effective therapeutic strategy for HCV in the future.

  15. Protective immune responses in rabbits induced by a suicidal DNA vaccine of the VP60 gene of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yingjie; Chen, Zongyan; Li, Chuanfeng; Meng, Chun; Wu, Run; Liu, Guangqing

    2013-03-01

    A suicidal DNA vaccine based on a Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon was evaluated for the development of a vaccine against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV). The VP60 gene of RHDV was cloned and inserted into pSCA1, an SFV DNA-based replicon vector. The resultant plasmid, pSCA/VP60, was transfected into BHK-21 cells, and the antigenicity of the expressed protein was confirmed using indirect immunofluorescence and a western blot assay. In addition, immunogenicity was studied in rabbits. Fifteen rabbits were injected intramuscularly twice with pSCA/VP60 at 2-week intervals. They were challenged with an RHDV isolate 2weeks after the second immunization. In all cases, anti-RHDV antibodies were detected by ELISA. Additionally, the lymphocyte proliferation response was tested by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide method, and neutralizing antibodies were measured by microneutralization tests. Our results showed that RHDV-specific antibodies and an RHDV-specific cell-mediated immune response were strongly induced in rabbits. Furthermore, all of the rabbits were protected against challenge with wild type RHDV. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the suicidal DNA vaccine is a promising vaccine candidate that facilitates the prevention of rabbit hemorrhagic disease caused by RHDV.

  16. Successful vaccination strategies that protect aged mice from lethal challenge from influenza virus and heterologous severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Timothy; Whitmore, Alan; Long, Kristin; Ferris, Martin; Rockx, Barry; Funkhouser, William; Donaldson, Eric; Gralinski, Lisa; Collier, Martha; Heise, Mark; Davis, Nancy; Johnston, Robert; Baric, Ralph S

    2011-01-01

    Newly emerging viruses often circulate as a heterogeneous swarm in wild animal reservoirs prior to their emergence in humans, and their antigenic identities are often unknown until an outbreak situation. The newly emerging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and reemerging influenza virus cause disproportionate disease in the aged, who are also notoriously difficult to successfully vaccinate, likely due to immunosenescence. To protect against future emerging strains, vaccine platforms should induce broad cross-reactive immunity that is sufficient to protect from homologous and heterologous challenge in all ages. From initial studies, we hypothesized that attenuated Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particle (VRP) vaccine glycoproteins mediated vaccine failure in the aged. We then compared the efficacies of vaccines bearing attenuated (VRP(3014)) or wild-type VEE glycoproteins (VRP(3000)) in young and aged mice within novel models of severe SARS-CoV pathogenesis. Aged animals receiving VRP(3000)-based vaccines were protected from SARS-CoV disease, while animals receiving the VRP(3014)-based vaccines were not. The superior protection for the aged observed with VRP(3000)-based vaccines was confirmed in a lethal influenza virus challenge model. While the VRP(3000) vaccine's immune responses in the aged were sufficient to protect against lethal homologous and heterologous challenge, our data suggest that innate defects within the VRP(3014) platform mediate vaccine failure. Exploration into the mechanism(s) of successful vaccination in the immunosenescent should aid in the development of successful vaccine strategies for other viral diseases disproportionately affecting the elderly, like West Nile virus, influenza virus, norovirus, or other emerging viruses of the future.

  17. Burkholderia xernovorans LB400 harbors a multi-replicon, 9.73-Mbp genome shaped for versatility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chain, Patrick S. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Denef, Vincent [University of California, Berkeley; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Vergez, Lisa [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Agullo, Loreine [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Reyes, Valeria Latorre [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Cordova, Macarena [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gomez, Luis [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Gonzalez, Myriam [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lao, Victoria [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Larimer, Frank W [ORNL; LiPuma, John J [University of Michigan; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar [Cardiff University, Wales; Malfatti, Stephanie [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Marx, Christopher J [Harvard University; Parnell, J Jacob [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ramette, Alban [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Seeger, Michael [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V; Smith, Daryl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Spilker, Theodore [University of Michigan; Sul, Woo Jun [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tsoi, Tamara V [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tiedje, James M. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2006-01-01

    Burkholderia xenovorans LB400 (LB400), a well studied, effective polychlorinated biphenyl-degrader, has one of the two largest known bacterial genomes and is the first nonpathogenic Burkholderia isolate sequenced. From an evolutionary perspective, we find significant differences in functional specialization between the three replicons of LB400, as well as a more relaxed selective pressure for genes located on the two smaller vs. the largest replicon. High genomic plasticity, diversity, and specialization within the Burkholderia genus are exemplified by the conservation of only 44% of the genes between LB400 and Burkholderia cepacia complex strain 383. Even among four B. xenovorans strains, genome size varies from 7.4 to 9.73 Mbp. The latter is largely explained by our findings that >20% of the LB400 sequence was recently acquired by means of lateral gene transfer. Although a range of genetic factors associated with in vivo survival and intercellular interactions are present, these genetic factors are likely related to niche breadth rather than determinants of pathogenicity. The presence of at least eleven 'central aromatic' and twenty 'peripheral aromatic' pathways in LB400, among the highest in any sequenced bacterial genome, supports this hypothesis. Finally, in addition to the experimentally observed redundancy in benzoate degradation and formaldehyde oxidation pathways, the fact that 17.6% of proteins have a better LB400 paralog than an ortholog in a different genome highlights the importance of gene duplication and repeated acquirement, which, coupled with their divergence, raises questions regarding the role of paralogs and potential functional redundancies in large-genome microbes.

  18. Infected dendritic cells are sufficient to mediate the adjuvant activity generated by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Daniel R; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert E; Barro, Mario

    2012-06-22

    Replicon particles derived from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) are infectious non-propagating particles which act as a safe and potent systemic, mucosal, and cellular adjuvant when delivered with antigen. VEE and VEE replicon particles (VRP) can target multiple cell types including dendritic cells (DCs). The role of these cell types in VRP adjuvant activity has not been previously evaluated, and for these studies we focused on the contribution of DCs to the response to VRP. By analysis of VRP targeting in the draining lymph node, we found that VRP induced rapid recruitment of TNF-secreting monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cells. VRP preferentially infected these inflammatory DCs as well as classical DCs and macrophages, with less efficient infection of other cell types. DC depletion suggested that the interaction of VRP with classical DCs was required for recruitment of inflammatory DCs, induction of high levels of many cytokines, and for stable transport of VRP to the draining lymph node. Additionally, in vitro-infected DCs enhanced antigen-specific responses by CD4 and CD8 T cells. By transfer of VRP-infected DCs into mice we showed that these DCs generated an inflammatory state in the draining lymph node similar to that achieved by VRP injection. Most importantly, VRP-infected DCs were sufficient to establish robust adjuvant activity in mice comparable to that produced by VRP injection. These findings indicate that VRP infect, recruit and activate both classical and inflammatory DCs, and those DCs become mediators of the VRP adjuvant activity. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Vaccination priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert; Baños, Ana; deBernardis, Chiara

    2003-02-01

    Selection of immunizations should be based on requirements and on risk of infection. According to the International Health Regulations, many countries require yellow fever vaccination and proof thereof as the International Certificate of vaccination. Additionally selected countries require proof of vaccination against cholera and meningococcal disease. A consultation for travel health advice is always an opportunity to ascertain that routine immunizations have been performed. Recommended immunizations often are more important for traveller's health than the required or routine ones. The most frequent vaccine preventable infection in non-immune travellers to developing countries is hepatitis A with an average incidence rate of 0.3% per month; in high risk backpackers or foreign-aid-volunteers this rate is 2.0%. Many immunizations are recommended for special risk groups only: there is a growing tendency in many countries to immunize all young travellers to developing countries against hepatitis B, as it is uncertain who will voluntarily or involuntarily get exposed. The attack rate of influenza in intercontinental travel is estimated to be 1%. Immunity against poliomyelitis remains essential for travel to Africa and parts of Asia. Many of the 0.2-0.4% who experience an animal bite are at risk of rabies. Typhoid fever is diagnosed with an incidence rate of 0.03% per month among travellers to the Indian subcontinent, North and West Africa (except Tunisia), and Peru, elsewhere this rate is 10-fold lower. Meningococcal disease, Japanese encephalitis, cholera and tuberculosis have been reported in travellers, but these infections are rare in this population. Although no travel health vaccine is cost beneficial, most professionals will offer protection against the frequent risks, while most would find it ridiculous to use all available vaccines in every traveller. It is essentially an arbitrary decision made on the risk level one wishes to recommend protection--but the

  20. Polio Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Resources Share Polio Vaccine What is polio?Poliomyelitis (polio, for short) is a serious illness that can cause paralysis (when you can't move your arms and legs) or even death. Polio is caused by a virus. The virus can be spread by drinking water ...

  1. Vexing Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Darcia Harris

    2004-01-01

    Schools play a key role in ensuring that children are being immunized against diseases, but conflicting research is making enforcement difficult. This article discusses a growing trend of vaccine avoidance and the endless supply of conflicting information and research about immunization safety. Despite the controversy, many people appear to accept…

  2. Rotavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including a severe allergy to latex. Babies with "severe combined immunodeficiency" (SCID) should not get rotavirus vaccine. Babies who have had a type of bowel blockage called "intussusception" should not get ... with moderate or severe diarrhea or vomiting. Check with your doctor if ...

  3. Valuing vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bärnighausen, Till; Bloom, David E.; Cafiero-Fonseca, Elizabeth T.; O’Brien, Jennifer Carroll

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination has led to remarkable health gains over the last century. However, large coverage gaps remain, which will require significant financial resources and political will to address. In recent years, a compelling line of inquiry has established the economic benefits of health, at both the individual and aggregate levels. Most existing economic evaluations of particular health interventions fail to account for this new research, leading to potentially sizable undervaluation of those interventions. In line with this new research, we set forth a framework for conceptualizing the full benefits of vaccination, including avoided medical care costs, outcome-related productivity gains, behavior-related productivity gains, community health externalities, community economic externalities, and the value of risk reduction and pure health gains. We also review literature highlighting the magnitude of these sources of benefit for different vaccinations. Finally, we outline the steps that need to be taken to implement a broad-approach economic evaluation and discuss the implications of this work for research, policy, and resource allocation for vaccine development and delivery. PMID:25136129

  4. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, George; Shi, Meng; Conteh, Solomon; Richie, Nancy; Banania, Glenna; Geneshan, Harini; Valencia, Anais; Singh, Priti; Aguiar, Joao; Limbach, Keith; Kamrud, Kurt I; Rayner, Jonathan; Smith, Jonathan; Bruder, Joseph T; King, C Richter; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Takeo, Satoru; Endo, Yaeta; Doolan, Denise L; Richie, Thomas L; Weiss, Walter R

    2009-08-10

    Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA), alphavirus replicons (VRP), attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad), or attenuated poxvirus (Pox). These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  5. Sterile protection against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys from a malaria vaccine: comparison of heterologous prime boost strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Jiang

    Full Text Available Using newer vaccine platforms which have been effective against malaria in rodent models, we tested five immunization regimens against Plasmodium knowlesi in rhesus monkeys. All vaccines included the same four P. knowlesi antigens: the pre-erythrocytic antigens CSP, SSP2, and erythrocytic antigens AMA1, MSP1. We used four vaccine platforms for prime or boost vaccinations: plasmids (DNA, alphavirus replicons (VRP, attenuated adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad, or attenuated poxvirus (Pox. These four platforms combined to produce five different prime/boost vaccine regimens: Pox alone, VRP/Pox, VRP/Ad, Ad/Pox, and DNA/Pox. Five rhesus monkeys were immunized with each regimen, and five Control monkeys received a mock vaccination. The time to complete vaccinations was 420 days. All monkeys were challenged twice with 100 P. knowlesi sporozoites given IV. The first challenge was given 12 days after the last vaccination, and the monkeys receiving the DNA/Pox vaccine were the best protected, with 3/5 monkeys sterilely protected and 1/5 monkeys that self-cured its parasitemia. There was no protection in monkeys that received Pox malaria vaccine alone without previous priming. The second sporozoite challenge was given 4 months after the first. All 4 monkeys that were protected in the first challenge developed malaria in the second challenge. DNA, VRP and Ad5 vaccines all primed monkeys for strong immune responses after the Pox boost. We discuss the high level but short duration of protection in this experiment and the possible benefits of the long interval between prime and boost.

  6. Varicella (Chickenpox) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ProQuad® (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine, Varicella Vaccine) ... up to about 1 person in 5) and measles-like rash (about 1 person in 20) than MMR and varicella vaccines given separately. Moderate Problems:Seizure (jerking or staring) ...

  7. Selection of replicon variants resistant to ACH-806, a novel hepatitis C virus inhibitor with no cross-resistance to NS3 protease and NS5B polymerase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wengang; Zhao, Yongsen; Fabrycki, Joanne; Hou, Xiaohong; Nie, Xingtie; Sanchez, Amy; Phadke, Avinash; Deshpande, Milind; Agarwal, Atul; Huang, Mingjun

    2008-06-01

    We have discovered a novel class of compounds active against hepatitis C virus (HCV), using a surrogate cellular system, HCV replicon cells. The leading compound in the series, ACH-806 (GS-9132), is a potent and specific inhibitor of HCV. The selection of resistance replicon variants against ACH-806 was performed to map the mutations conferring resistance to ACH-806 and to determine cross-resistance profiles with other classes of HCV inhibitors. Several clones emerged after the addition of ACH-806 to HCV replicon cells at frequencies and durations similar to that observed with NS3 protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors. Phenotypic analyses of these clones revealed that they are resistant to ACH-806 but remain sensitive to other classes of HCV inhibitors. Moreover, no significant change in the susceptibility to ACH-806 was found when the replicon cellular clones resistant to NS3 protease inhibitors and NS5B polymerase inhibitors were examined. Sequencing of the entire coding region of ACH-806-resistant replicon variants yielded several consensus mutations. Reverse genetics identified two single mutations in NS3, a cysteine-to-serine mutation at amino acid 16 and an alanine-to-valine mutation at amino acid 39, that are responsible for the resistance of the replicon variants to ACH-806. Both mutations are located at the N terminus of NS3 where extensive interactions with the central hydrophobic region of NS4A exist. These data provide evidence that ACH-806 inhibits HCV replication by a novel mechanism.

  8. Assessment of the effectiveness of a nuclear-launched TMV-based replicon as a tool for foreign gene expression in plants in comparison to direct gene expression from a nuclear promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Michal; Epel, Bernard L

    2006-02-01

    An environmentally safe Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV)-based expression replicon was constructed that lacks movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP), and which expresses the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene from a full CP subgenomic promoter. The TMV replicon, whose cDNA was positioned between an enhanced Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter (CaMV) and a self-cleaving hammerhead ribozyme with a downstream nopaline synthase gene polyadenylation signal [nos-poly(A)], was assessed for its effectiveness to accumulate GFP upon agroinfiltration into plant leaves compared to a control construct in which GFP was directly expressed from the enhanced CaMV 35S promoter. It was determined that individually expressing cells produced ca. 9-fold more GFP from the TMV-based replicon than from the enhanced 35S promoter. In contrast, GFP measurements from total leaf extracts determined that leaves infiltrated with the TMV-based replicon produced ca. 7-fold less GFP than the control construct. These apparently contradictory results can be explained by the low infectivity of the TMV-based replicon as it was found that the number of foci expressing GFP produced in leaves agroinfiltrated with the TMV-based replicon was ca. 66-fold lower than produced by the control.

  9. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  10. Encoded library technology screening of hepatitis C virus NS4B yields a small-molecule compound series with in vitro replicon activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arico-Muendel, Christopher; Zhu, Zhengrong; Dickson, Hamilton; Parks, Derek; Keicher, Jesse; Deng, Jianghe; Aquilani, Leah; Coppo, Frank; Graybill, Todd; Lind, Kenneth; Peat, Andrew; Thomson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To identify novel antivirals to the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein, we utilized encoded library technology (ELT), which enables purified proteins not amenable to standard biochemical screening methods to be tested against large combinatorial libraries in a short period of time. We tested NS4B against several DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries (DEL) and identified a single DEL feature that was subsequently progressed to off-DNA synthesis. The most active of the initial synthesized compounds had 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) of 50 to 130 nM in a NS4B radioligand binding assay and 300 to 500 nM in an HCV replicon assay. Chemical optimization yielded compounds with potencies as low as 20 nM in an HCV genotype 1b replicon assay, 500 nM against genotype 1a, and 5 μM against genotype 2a. Through testing against other genotypes and genotype 2a-1b chimeric replicons and from resistance passage using the genotype 1b replicon, we confirmed that these compounds were acting on the proposed first transmembrane region of NS4B. A single sequence change (F98L) was identified as responsible for resistance, and it was thought to largely explain the relative lack of potency of this series against genotype 2a. Unlike other published series that appear to interact with this region, we did not observe sensitivity to amino acid substitutions at positions 94 and 105. The discovery of this novel compound series highlights ELT as a valuable approach for identifying direct-acting antivirals to nonenzymatic targets.

  11. [Effects of the site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Li; Zhu, Wu-Yang; Fu, Shi-Hong; He, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Yu; Liang, Guo-Dong

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the effects of site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro on the characteristics of replicon vector derived from XJ-160 virus, a Sindbis virus (SINV) isolated in China. The mutant vector pBRep-726L, pBRep-726S, pBRep-726V or pBRep-726A was constructed by introducing nsP2-726Pro --> Leu, nsP2-726Pro --> Ser, nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala into XJ-160 viral replicon vector pBRepXJ respectively. To quantitatively and qualitatively determine the site-directed mutagenesis on the replicon, the recombinant plasmids expressing Neomycinr (Neo(r)), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or Renilla luciferase (R. luc) were constructed by cloning report genes into pBRepXJ or mutant XJ-160 vector respectively. And in vitro-synthesized RNA from expression vectors were electroporated into BHK-21 cells. Compared with the wild-type replicon, the mutation nsP2-726Pro --> Val or nsP2-726Pro --> Ala accelerated the processing of CPE on BHK-21 cells and simultaneously enhanced its self-replicating capacity. The mutant vector pBRep-726L with Leu substitution exhibited similar packaging capacity to that of pBRepXJ. In contrast, pBRep-726S exhibited a medium phenotype, including the process of CPE and the activity of R. luc expression in BHK-21 cells. The site-directed mutagenesis at nsP2-726Pro not only regulates directly XJ-160 virus vector-host cell interactions, but also plays an important role in its packaging capacity. All of these results lay a basis for researching the relation between the structure and function of alphavirus genome and developing alphavirus vector system with Chinese intellectual property.

  12. Proteome Analysis of Liver Cells Expressing a Full- Length Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Replicon and Biopsy Specimens of Posttransplantation Liver from HCV-Infected Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Chan, Eric Y.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Qian, Weijun; Stastna, Miroslava; Baas, Tracey; Camp, David G.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2005-06-01

    The development of a reproducible model system for the study of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has the potential to significantly enhance the study of virus-host interactions and provide future direction for modeling the pathogenesis of HCV. While there are studies describing global gene expression changes associated with HCV infection, changes in the proteome have not been characterized. We report the first large scale proteome analysis of the highly permissive Huh-7.5 cell line containing a full length HCV replicon. We detected > 4,400 proteins in this cell line, including HCV replicon proteins, using multidimensional liquid chromatographic (LC) separations coupled to mass spectrometry (MS). The set of Huh-7.5 proteins confidently identified is, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive yet reported for a human cell line. Consistent with the literature, a comparison of Huh-7.5 cells (+) and (-) the HCV replicon identified expression changes of proteins involved in lipid metabolism. We extended these analyses to liver biopsy material from HCV-infected patients where > 1,500 proteins were detected from 2 {micro}g protein lysate using the Huh-7.5 protein database and the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag strategy. These findings demonstrate the utility of multidimensional proteome analysis of the HCV replicon model system for assisting the determination of proteins/pathways affected by HCV infection. Our ability to extend these analyses to the highly complex proteome of small liver biopsies with limiting protein yields offers the unique opportunity to begin evaluating the clinical significance of protein expression changes associated with HCV infection.

  13. Structure and Immunogenicity of Alternative Forms of the Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Gag Protein Expressed Using Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicon Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L.

    2007-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-), or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infect...

  14. Your Baby's First Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Link Vaccines & Immunizations Immunization Schedules Your Child's First Vaccines Format: Select one PDF [335 KB] RTF [260 ... child will get one or more of these vaccines today: DTaP Hib Hepatitis B Polio PCV13 Why ...

  15. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  16. Vaccines Stop Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  17. Vaccines and Thimerosal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Thimerosal in Vaccines Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Thimerosal is ... harm. Thimerosal prevents the growth of bacteria in vaccines. Thimerosal is added to vials of vaccine that ...

  18. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines ... or her parents, and the doctor. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Meningococcal disease is caused by a ...

  19. Vaccines.gov

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by science, on vaccine safety. Are your child’s vaccines up to date? Getting all recommended vaccines on time can protect your child from serious diseases. Protect your community! Did you ...

  20. Vaccine-Preventable Disease Photos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Home | About | A-Z | Contact | Follow Vaccine Information You Need VACCINE BASICS Evaluating Online Health Information FAQs How Vaccines Work Importance of Vaccines Paying for Vaccines State Immunization Programs ...

  1. The tra locus of streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 mediates efficient transfer of a circular but not a linear version of the same replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Pettis, Gregg S

    2010-09-01

    Conjugal transfer of circular plasmids in Streptomyces involves a unique mechanism employing few plasmid-encoded loci and the transfer of double-stranded DNA by an as yet uncharacterized intercellular route. Efficient transfer of the circular streptomycete plasmid pIJ101 requires only two plasmid loci: the pIJ101 tra gene, and as a cis-acting function known as clt. Here, we compared the ability of the pIJ101 transfer apparatus to promote conjugal transfer of circular versus linear versions of the same replicon. While the pIJ101 tra locus readily transferred the circular form of the replicon, the linear version was transferred orders of magnitude less efficiently and all plasmids isolated from the transconjugants were circular, regardless of their original configuration in the donor. Additionally, relatively rare circularization of linear plasmids was detectable in the donor cells, which is consistent with the notion that this event was a prerequisite for transfer by TraB(pIJ101). Linear versions of this same replicon did transfer efficiently, in that configuration, from strains containing the conjugative linear plasmid SLP2. Our data indicate that functions necessary and sufficient for transfer of circular DNA were insufficient for transfer of a related linear DNA molecule. The results here suggest that the conjugation mechanisms of linear versus circular DNA in Streptomyces spp. are inherently different and/or that efficient transfer of linear DNA requires additional components.

  2. RNA-seq based transcriptome analysis of hepatitis E virus (HEV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) replicon transfected Huh-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagya, Neetu; Varma, Satya Pavan Kumar; Thakral, Deepshi; Joshi, Prashant; Durgapal, Hemlata; Panda, Subrat Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is as varied as they appear similar; while HBV causes an acute and/or chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma, HEV mostly causes an acute self-limiting disease. In both infections, host responses are crucial in disease establishment and/or virus clearance. In the wake of worsening prognosis described during HEV super-infection over chronic HBV hepatitis, we investigated the host responses by studying alterations in gene expression in liver cells (Huh-7 cell line) by transfection with HEV replicon only (HEV-only), HBV replicon only (HBV-only) and both HBV and HEV replicons (HBV+HEV). Virus replication was validated by strand-specific real-time RT-PCR for HEV and HBsAg ELISA of the culture supernatants for HBV. Indirect immunofluorescence for the respective viral proteins confirmed infection. Transcription profiling was carried out by RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis of the poly-A enriched RNA from the transfected cells. Averages of 600 million bases within 5.6 million reads were sequenced in each sample and ∼15,800 genes were mapped with at least one or more reads. A total of 461 genes in HBV+HEV, 408 in HBV-only and 306 in HEV-only groups were differentially expressed as compared to mock transfection control by two folds (preplicon transfected RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis to understand the host responses against HEV and HBV.

  3. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian; Tang, I-Ching

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at ~6.0.

  4. High level expression of the capsid protein of hepatitis E virus in diverse eukaryotic cells using the Semliki Forest virus replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, J; Meanger, J; Lambert, P; Li, F; Locarnini, S A; Anderson, D A

    1997-12-01

    The capsid protein of hepatitis E virus (HEV) is encoded by open reading frame 2 (ORF 2) and exhibits variable processing when expressed in insect and COS cells, but nothing is known of its processing in cells relevant to its replication. The full-length ORF 2 protein was expressed at high levels in mammalian cells by insertion of ORF 2 in the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon to generate rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. Expression of the capsid protein was detected readily by metabolic labelling and indirect immunofluorescence in BHK-21 cells transfected with RNA transcripts derived from rSFV/HEV ORF 2K. ORF 2 protein was also expressed at high levels in cells of diverse origin, including liver-derived cell lines Huh7 and HepG2, following infection with recombinant virus derived from cotransfection of BHK-21 cells with the rSFV/HEV ORF 2K and helper SFV replicon RNAs. The addition of hypertonic KCl during metabolic labelling reduced the level of host cell protein synthesis and enhanced the detection of intermediates in ORF 2 protein processing. The wide host range and high level expression directed by SFV replicon particles has particular utility in the analysis of cell-specific factors in the protein processing and assembly of non-cultivable viruses such as HEV.

  5. Effects of different replicons in conjugative plasmids on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression and n-butanol biosynthesis in Clostridium tyrobutyricum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mingrui; Du, Yinming; Jiang, Wenyan; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yang, Shang-Tian [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). William G. Lowrie Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Tang, I-Ching [Bioprocessing Innovative Company, Dublin, OH (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755 can produce butyric acid, acetic acid, and hydrogen as the main products from various carbon sources. In this study, C. tyrobutyricum was used as a host to produce n-butanol by expressing adhE2 gene under the control of a native thiolase promoter using four different conjugative plasmids (pMTL82151, 83151, 84151, and 85151) each with a different replicon (pBP1 from C. botulinum NCTC2916, pCB102 from C. butyricum, pCD6 from Clostridium difficile, and pIM13 from Bacillus subtilis). The effects of different replicons on transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, adhE2 expression and aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase activities, and butanol production by different mutants of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated. Among the four plasmids and replicons studied, pMTL82151 with pBP1 gave the highest transformation efficiency, plasmid stability, gene expression, and butanol biosynthesis. Butanol production from various substrates, including glucose, xylose, mannose, and mannitol were then investigated with the best mutant strain harboring adhE2 in pMTL82151. A high butanol titer of 20.5 g/L with 0.33 g/g yield and 0.32 g/L h productivity was obtained with mannitol as the substrate in batch fermentation with pH controlled at {proportional_to}6.0. (orig.)

  6. Antimicrobial resistance, integrons and plasmid replicon typing in multiresistant clinical Escherichia coli strains from Enugu State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chah, Kennedy F; Agbo, Ifeoma C; Eze, Didacus C; Somalo, Sergio; Estepa, Vanesa; Torres, Carmen

    2010-12-01

    Eleven multiresistant Escherichia coli strains of animal and human origin were assayed for the presence of antimicrobial resistance genes, integrons and associated gene cassettes, as well as plasmid content. Ciprofloxacin-resistant strains were screened for amino acid changes in GyrA and ParC proteins. The E. coli strains were found to harbor a variety of genes including cmlA, aac (3)-II, aac (3)-IV, aadA, strA-strB, tet (A), tet (B), bla(TEM), sul1, sul2 and sul3. Four of the eight int I1-positive strains were also positive for qacE Δ1 -sul1 region and the following gene cassettes were detected: dfrA7, dfrA12 + orfF + aadA2 and bla(OXA1)+ aadA1. Five strains contained class 1 integrons lacking the qacE Δ1 -sul1 region and they showed a single type of gene cassette arrangement (estX + psp + aadA2 + cmlA + aadA1 + qacH + IS440 + sul3). The two int I2-positive strains carried the same type of gene cassette arrangement (dfrA1 + sat + aadA1). The seven ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli strains exhibited a Ser-83-Leu substitution in GyrA protein and a Ser-80-Ile substitution in ParC protein; six of these strains presented an additional substitution in GyrA (Asp-87-Gly or Asp-87-Asn) and one strain in ParC (Glu-84-Gly). Eight different plasmid-replicon-types were detected among the 11 E. coli strains, IncF being the most frequent one detected, found in nine strains; other plasmid replicon types detected were IncX, IncI1, IncY, IncW, IncFIC, IncB/O, and IncK. Antimicrobial resistance in the E. coli strains studied was mediated by a variety of genes, some of them included in integrons, as well as by mutations gyr A and par C genes.

  7. A simple method for construction of pir+ Enterobacterial hosts for maintenance of R6K replicon plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kvitko Brian H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The R6K replicon is one of the best studied bacterial plasmid replicons. Replication of the R6K plasmid and derivatives harboring its γ origin of replication (oriR6Kγ is dependent on the pir gene-encoded π protein. Originally encoded by R6K, this protein is usually provided in trans in hosts engineered to support replication of plasmids harboring oriR6Kγ. In Escherichia coli this is commonly achieved by chromosomal integration of pir either via lysogenization with a λpir phage or homologous recombination at a pre-determined locus. Findings Current methods for construction of host strains for oriR6Kγ-containing plasmids involve procedures that do not allow selection for presence of the pir gene and require cumbersome and time-consuming screening steps. In this study, we established a mini-Tn7-based method for rapid and reliable construction of pir+ host strains. Using a curable mini-Tn7 delivery plasmid, pir expressing derivatives of several commonly used E. coli cloning and mobilizer strains were isolated using both the wild-type pir+ gene as well as the copy-up pir-116 allele. In addition, we isolated pir+ and pir-116 expressing derivatives of a clinical isolate of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In both E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, the presence of the pir+ wild-type or pir-116 alleles allowed the replication of oriR6Kγ-containing plasmids. Conclusions A mini-Tn7 system was employed for rapid and reliable engineering of E. coli and S. enterica serovar Typhimurium host strains for plasmids containing oriR6Kγ. Since mini-Tn7 elements transpose in most, if not all, Gram negative bacteria, we anticipate that with relatively minor modifications this newly established method will for the first time allow engineering of other bacterial species to enable replication of plasmids with oriR6Kγ.

  8. [Vaccination against mouse pox].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnel, H

    1985-01-01

    Attenuated MVA-strain of vaccinia virus has been efficient in the control of enzootic mousepox and in prophylactic vaccination. The virus has been used as a live vaccine for prophylactic and emergency vaccinations as well as for sanitation of populations. More than 100 000 vaccinations were carried out safely. Even after suspension of the obligatory vaccination of humans against smallpox the MVA-vaccine can be employed without risk and danger.

  9. Immunology Update: New Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, S Paul

    2016-11-01

    A new 9-valent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is effective against more cancer-causing HPV types than previous vaccines. HPV vaccine series started with previous vaccines can be completed with the 9-valent vaccine. Two new influenza vaccines are available for adults 65 years and older: a high-dose vaccine and an enhanced adjuvant vaccine. These elicit stronger antibody responses than standard-dose vaccines. Current guidelines specify no preference for the new versus standard-dose vaccines. Two new group B meningococcal vaccines are intended for use during outbreaks and for patients with asplenia, complement deficiencies, frequent occupational meningococcus exposure, or for patients who desire protection from type B meningococcus. These are not substitutes for the quadrivalent vaccine already in use. For pneumococcus, new recommendations state that 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) should be administered to patients 65 years and older, followed at least 1 year later by the polyvalent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23). For patients ages 19 to 64 years with immunocompromise and not previously vaccinated against pneumococcus, administration of these two vaccines should be separated by at least 8 weeks. Rotavirus vaccine is standard for infants at age 2 months. Also, there is a new cholera vaccine approved for use in the United States. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  10. Adjuvants for allergy vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moingeon, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    .... Aluminum hydroxide or calcium phosphate are broadly used as adjuvants for subcutaneous allergy vaccines, whereas commercial sublingual vaccines rely upon high doses of aqueous allergen extracts...

  11. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a combination product containing Haemophilus influenzae type b, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... combination product containing Diphtheria, Tetanus Toxoids, Acellular Pertussis, Hepatitis B, Polio Vaccine)

  12. Alphaviral vector-transduced dendritic cells are successful therapeutic vaccines against neu-overexpressing tumors in wild-type mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Timothy P; Burgents, Joseph E; Long, Brian; Ferrer, Ivana; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Tisch, Roland M; Johnston, Robert E; Serody, Jonathan S

    2007-09-04

    While dendritic cell (DC) vaccines can protect hosts from tumor challenge, their ability to effectively inhibit the growth of established tumors remains indeterminate. Previously, we have shown that human DCs transduced with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRPs) were potent stimulators of antigen-specific T cells in vitro. Therefore, we investigated the ability of VRP-transduced DCs (VRP-DCs) to induce therapeutic immunity in vivo against tumors overexpressing the neu oncoprotein. Transduction of murine DCs with VRPs resulted in high-level transgene expression, DC maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines. Vaccination with VRP-DCs expressing a truncated neu oncoprotein induced robust neu-specific CD8(+) T cell and anti-neu IgG responses. Furthermore, a single vaccination with VRP-DCs induced the regression of large established tumors in wild-type mice. Interestingly, depletion of CD4(+), but not CD8(+), T cells completely abrogated inhibition of tumor growth following vaccination. Taken together, our results demonstrate that VRP-DC vaccines induce potent immunity against established tumors, and emphasize the importance of the generation of both CD4(+) T cell and B cell responses for efficient tumor inhibition. These findings provide the rationale for future evaluation of VRP-DC vaccines in the clinical setting.

  13. Profiling of antimicrobial resistance and plasmid replicon types in β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Shin, Min-Kyung; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, 78 isolates of Escherichia coli isolated from Korean beef cattle farms were investigated for the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and/or AmpC β-lactamase. In the disc diffusion test with ampicillin, amoxicillin, cephalothin, ceftiofur, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefoxitin, 38.5% of the isolates showed resistance to all of ampicillin, amoxicillin, and cephalothin. The double disc synergy method revealed that none of the isolates produced ESBL or AmpC β-lactamases. DNA sequencing showed that all isolates encoded genes for TEM-1-type β-lactamase. Moreover, 78.2% of the isolates transferred the TEM-1-type β-lactamase gene via conjugation. In plasmid replicon typing of all donors, IncFIB and IncFIA were identified in 71.4% and 41.0% of plasmids, respectively. In transconjugants, IncFIB and IncFIA were the most frequent types detected (61.5% and 41.0%, respectively). Overall, the present study indicates that selection pressures of antimicrobials on β-lactamases in beef cattle may be low relative to other livestock animals in Korea. Moreover, to reduce selection pressure and dissemination of β-lactamase, the long-term surveillance of antimicrobial use in domestic beef cattle should be established.

  14. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3 genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimstad Espen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Salmonid alphavirus (SAV causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE. Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  15. Characterization of untranslated regions of the salmonid alphavirus 3 (SAV3) genome and construction of a SAV3 based replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Marius; Villoing, Stephane; Rimstad, Espen; Nylund, Are

    2009-10-27

    Salmonid alphavirus (SAV) causes disease in farmed salmonid fish and is divided into different genetic subtypes (SAV1-6). Here we report the cloning and characterization of the 5'- and 3'- untranslated regions (UTR) of a SAV3 isolated from Atlantic salmon in Norway. The sequences of the UTRs are very similar to those of SAV1 and SAV2, but single nucleotide polymorphisms are present, also in the 3' - conserved sequence element (3'-CSE). Prediction of the RNA secondary structure suggested putative stem-loop structures in both the 5'- and 3'-ends, similar to those of alphaviruses from the terrestrial environment, indicating that the general genome replication initiation strategy for alphaviruses is also utilized by SAV. A DNA replicon vector, pmSAV3, based upon a pVAX1 backbone and the SAV3 genome was constructed, and the SAV3 non-structural proteins were used to express a reporter gene controlled by the SAV3 subgenomic promoter. Transfection of pmSAV3 into CHSE and BF2 cell lines resulted in expression of the reporter protein, confirming that the cloned SAV3 replication apparatus and UTRs are functional in fish cells.

  16. Acute infection with venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles catalyzes a systemic antiviral state and protects from lethal virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Jennifer L; Thompson, Joseph M; Whitmore, Alan C; Webb, Drue L; Johnston, Robert E

    2009-12-01

    The host innate immune response provides a critical first line of defense against invading pathogens, inducing an antiviral state to impede the spread of infection. While numerous studies have documented antiviral responses within actively infected tissues, few have described the earliest innate response induced systemically by infection. Here, utilizing Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) replicon particles (VRP) to limit infection to the initially infected cells in vivo, a rapid activation of the antiviral response was demonstrated not only within the murine draining lymph node, where replication was confined, but also within distal tissues. In the liver and brain, expression of interferon-stimulated genes was detected by 1 to 3 h following VRP footpad inoculation, reaching peak expression of >100-fold over that in mock-infected animals. Moreover, mice receiving a VRP footpad inoculation 6, 12, or 24 h prior to an otherwise lethal VEE footpad challenge were completely protected from death, including a drastic reduction in challenge virus titers. VRP pretreatment also provided protection from intranasal VEE challenge and extended the average survival time following intracranial challenge. Signaling through the interferon receptor was necessary for antiviral gene induction and protection from VEE challenge. However, VRP pretreatment failed to protect mice from a heterologous, lethal challenge with vesicular stomatitis virus, yet conferred protection following challenge with influenza virus. Collectively, these results document a rapid modulation of the host innate response within hours of infection, capable of rapidly alerting the entire animal to pathogen invasion and leading to protection from viral disease.

  17. Vaccines and vaccinations. The strategic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R B

    2001-05-01

    The rapid proliferation of companion animal vaccines, advances in diagnostic and vaccine technology, and concerns over vaccine safety are clearly among the most important issues practicing veterinarians face as we enter the 21st century. Although many would argue that these are already issues, the future promises to be especially challenging as the vaccines we currently use and the protocols we recommend undergo unprecedented review.

  18. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  19. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor stabi

  20. Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) and Flu Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Flu Vaccines Vaccine Effectiveness Types of Flu Vaccine Flu Shot Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination ... Cell-Based Flu Vaccines Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccine Flu Vaccination by Jet Injector Adjuvant Vaccine Vaccine Virus ...

  1. Mucosal vaccination of fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2014-01-01

    Among the novel vaccination methods, mucosal vaccination seems to possess all the desired criteria. The chapter reviews the state-of-the-art knowledge regarding this type of vaccination with a focus on their uptake, immune stimulation, and where possible, discusses their potential as future vaccines

  2. History of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Stanley

    2014-08-26

    Vaccines have a history that started late in the 18th century. From the late 19th century, vaccines could be developed in the laboratory. However, in the 20th century, it became possible to develop vaccines based on immunologic markers. In the 21st century, molecular biology permits vaccine development that was not possible before.

  3. Nucleic Acid Vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Shan

    2004-01-01

    @@ Anew method of immunization was discovered in the early 1990s. Several research groups independently demonstrated that direct inoculation of DNA plasmids coding for a specific protein antigen could elicit immune responses against that antigen[1-4].Since in theory the mRNA molecules also have the potential to be translated into the protein antigen, this vaccination approach was officially named by WHO as the nucleic acid vaccination even though the term DNA vaccine has been used more commonly in the literature. This novel approach is considered the fourth generation of vaccines after live attenuated vaccines, killed or inactivated vaccines and recombinant protein based subunit vaccines.

  4. Vaccine adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follows, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Millions of adults are vaccinated annually against the seasonal influenza virus. An undetermined number of individuals will develop adverse events to the influenza vaccination. Those who suffer substantiated vaccine injuries, disabilities, and aggravated conditions may file a timely, no-fault and no-cost petition for financial compensation under the National Vaccine Act in the Vaccine Court. The elements of a successful vaccine injury claim are described in the context of a claim showing the seasonal influenza vaccination was the cause of Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  5. Vaccination in Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chettri, Jiwan Kumar

    significant losses in aquacultural enterprises but vaccination methods implemented since the 1990s have demonstrated their role as one of the most efficient disease control strategies. These have been particularly successful with regard to bacterial diseases in Norwegian salmon farming where multivalent...... vaccines have reduced the need for usage of antibiotics with more than 99 % since the 1980s. Fish can be vaccinated by three different administration routes: injection, immersion and oral vaccination. Injection vaccination (intraperitoneal injection of vaccine) is the most time consuming and labor...... intensive method, which however, provides the best protection of the fish. Immersion vaccination is used for immunization of a high number of small fish is cost-efficient and fast (30 sec immersion into vaccine). Oral vaccination (vaccine in feed) is the least efficient. As in higher vertebrates fish...

  6. A tetravalent alphavirus-vector based dengue vaccine provides effective immunity in an early life mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Syed Muaz; Tonkin, Daniel R; Mattocks, Melissa D; Snead, Andrew T; Johnston, Robert E; White, Laura J

    2014-07-07

    Dengue viruses (DENV1-4) cause 390 million clinical infections every year, several hundred thousand of which progress to severe hemorrhagic and shock syndromes. Preexisting immunity resulting from a previous DENV infection is the major risk factor for severe dengue during secondary heterologous infections. During primary infections in infants, maternal antibodies pose an analogous risk. At the same time, maternal antibodies are likely to prevent induction of endogenous anti-DENV antibodies in response to current live, attenuated virus (LAV) vaccine candidates. Any effective early life dengue vaccine has to overcome maternal antibody interference (leading to ineffective vaccination) and poor induction of antibody responses (increasing the risk of severe dengue disease upon primary infection). In a previous study, we demonstrated that a non-propagating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon expression vector (VRP), expressing the ectodomain of DENV E protein (E85), overcomes maternal interference in a BALB/c mouse model. We report here that a single immunization with a tetravalent VRP vaccine induced NAb and T-cell responses to each serotype at a level equivalent to the monovalent vaccine components, suggesting that this vaccine modality can overcome serotype interference. Furthermore, neonatal immunization was durable and could be boosted later in life to further increase NAb and T-cell responses. Although the neonatal immune response was lower in magnitude than responses in adult BALB/c mice, we demonstrate that VRP vaccines generated protective immunity from a lethal challenge after a single neonatal immunization. In summary, VRP vaccines expressing DENV antigens were immunogenic and protective in neonates, and hence are promising candidates for safe and effective vaccination in early life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccines against poverty

    OpenAIRE

    MacLennan, Calman A.; Saul, Allan

    2014-01-01

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vacc...

  8. Vaccine Effectiveness - How Well Does the Seasonal Flu Vaccine Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... flu viruses. What are the benefits of flu vaccination? While how well the flu vaccine works can ... older people have weaker immune responses to flu vaccination, should they still get vaccinated? Despite the fact ...

  9. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  10. The third replicon of members of the Burkholderia cepacia Complex, plasmid pC3, plays a role in stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Kirsty; Frauenknecht, Carmen; Freitag, Roman; Schwager, Stephan; Jenul, Christian; Vergunst, Annette; Carlier, Aurelien; Eberl, Leo

    2014-02-01

    The metabolically versatile Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) occupies a variety of niches, including the plant rhizosphere and the cystic fibrosis lung (where it is often fatal to the patient). Bcc members have multipartite genomes, of which the third replicon, pC3 (previously chromosome 3), has been shown to be a nonessential megaplasmid which confers virulence and both antifungal and proteolytic activity on several strains. In this study, pC3 curing was extended to cover strains of 16 of the 17 members of the Bcc, and the phenotypes conferred by pC3 were determined. B. cenocepacia strains H111, MCO-3, and HI2424 were previously cured of pC3; however, this had not proved possible in the epidemic strain K56-2. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this unexpected stability and found that efficient toxin-antitoxin systems are responsible for maintaining pC3 of strain K56-2. Identification of these systems allowed neutralization of the toxins and the subsequent deletion of K56-2pC3. The cured strain was found to exhibit reduced antifungal activity and was attenuated in both the zebrafish and the Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection. We used a PCR screening method to examine the prevalence of pC3 within 110 Bcc isolates and found that this replicon was absent in only four cases, suggesting evolutionary fixation. It is shown that plasmid pC3 increases the resistance of B. cenocepacia H111 to various stresses (oxidative, osmotic, high-temperature, and chlorhexidine-induced stresses), explaining the prevalence of this replicon within the Bcc.

  11. Transient replication of a hepatitis C virus genotype 1b replicon chimera encoding NS5A-5B from genotype 3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylefjord, Helen; Danielsson, Axel; Sedig, Susanne; Belda, Oscar; Wiktelius, Daniel; Vrang, Lotta; Targett-Adams, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Although hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a pathogen of global significance, experimental therapies in current clinical development include highly efficacious all-oral combinations of HCV direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). If approved for use, these new treatment regimens will impact dramatically upon our capacity to eradicate HCV in the majority of virus-infected patients. However, recent data from late-stage clinical evaluations demonstrated that individuals infected with HCV genotype (GT) 3 responded less well to all-oral DAA combinations than patients infected with other HCV GTs. In light of these observations, the present study sought to expand the number of molecular tools available to investigate small molecule-mediated inhibition of HCV GT3 NS5A and NS5B proteins in preclinical tissue-culture systems. Accordingly, a novel subgenomic HCV replicon chimera was created by utilizing a GT1b backbone modified to produce NS5A and NS5B proteins from a consensus sequence generated from HCV GT3a genomic sequences deposited online at the European Hepatitis C Virus database. This approach avoided the need to isolate and amplify HCV genomes from sera derived from HCV-infected patients. The replicon chimera, together with a version engineered to express NS5A encoding a Y93H mutation, demonstrated levels of replication in transient assays robust enough to assess accurate antiviral activities of inhibitors representing different HCV DAA classes. Thus, the replicon chimera represents a new simple molecular tool suitable for drug discovery programmes aimed at investigating, understanding, and improving GT3a activities of HCV DAAs targeting NS5A or NS5B.

  12. Modulation of replication efficacy of the hepatitis C virus replicon Con1 by site-directed mutagenesis of an NS4B aminoterminal basic leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, M-W; Susser, S; Welsch, C; Perner, D; Füller, C; Kronenberger, B; Herrmann, E; Zeuzem, S; Sarrazin, C

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is assumed to function as a membrane anchor and protein hub for the viral replication complex. The aim of the current work was to modulate HCV replication efficacy in the subgenomic Con1 replicon by mutations of specific sites within the aminoterminal-located basic leucine zipper (bZIP), a candidate motif for protein-protein interactions involving NS4B. Mutational sites and amino acid substitutes were determined by in-silico sequence analyses of the NS4B-bZIP motif in 357 isolates of HCV genotype 1b from the euHCVdB and LosAlamos database and consecutive analysis of conserved physico-chemical properties at bZIP specific positions. Mutants with predicted minor, medium or major reduction of replication efficacy were tested in the pFKI389neo/NS3-3'/ET plasmid replicon model. Four sites (L25, T29, V39 and W43) of crucial importance for bZIP-mediated protein interaction with predicted apolarity of respective amino acid positions were selected for mutational studies. Substitutes with physico-chemical properties matching the predicted requirements either well (T29A), moderately (L25W, V39W), or insufficiently (T29E, W43E) were associated with slightly improved, moderate and marked decreased replication efficacy, respectively. Spontaneous (T29G) and adaptive (A28G, E40G) mutations occurred in the T29E mutation isolate only and were associated with marked reduction of replication efficacy. The bZIP motif region of NS4B is crucial for RNA replication in the subgenomic Con1 replicon system. RNA replication efficacy can be modulated by site-directed mutagenesis at specific bZIP functional sites. New adaptive amino acid mutations were identified within the HCV NS4B protein.

  13. Unique plasmids generated via pUC replicon mutagenesis in an error-prone thermophile derived from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Jyumpei; Tanabiki, Misaki; Doi, Shohei; Kondo, Akihiko; Ohshiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Hirokazu

    2015-11-01

    The plasmid pGKE75-catA138T, which comprises pUC18 and the catA138T gene encoding thermostable chloramphenicol acetyltransferase with an A138T amino acid replacement (CATA138T), serves as an Escherichia coli-Geobacillus kaustophilus shuttle plasmid that confers moderate chloramphenicol resistance on G. kaustophilus HTA426. The present study examined the thermoadaptation-directed mutagenesis of pGKE75-catA138T in an error-prone thermophile, generating the mutant plasmid pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T responsible for substantial chloramphenicol resistance at 65°C. pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T contained no mutation in the catA138T gene but had two mutations in the pUC replicon, even though the replicon has no apparent role in G. kaustophilus. Biochemical characterization suggested that the efficient chloramphenicol resistance conferred by pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T is attributable to increases in intracellular CATA138T and acetyl-coenzyme A following a decrease in incomplete forms of pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T. The decrease in incomplete plasmids may be due to optimization of plasmid replication by RNA species transcribed from the mutant pUC replicon, which were actually produced in G. kaustophilus. It is noteworthy that G. kaustophilus was transformed with pGKE75(αβ)-catA138T using chloramphenicol selection at 60°C. In addition, a pUC18 derivative with the two mutations propagated in E. coli at a high copy number independently of the culture temperature and high plasmid stability. Since these properties have not been observed in known plasmids, the outcomes extend the genetic toolboxes for G. kaustophilus and E. coli.

  14. SH2 modified STAT1 induces HLA-I expression and improves IFN-γ signaling in IFN-α resistant HCV replicon cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bret Poat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have developed multiple stable cell lines containing subgenomic HCV RNA that are resistant to treatment with interferon alpha (IFN-α. Characterization of these IFN-α resistant replicon cells showed defects in the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of STAT1 and STAT2 proteins due to a defective Jak-STAT pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we have developed an alternative strategy to overcome interferon resistance in a cell culture model by improving intracellular STAT1 signaling. An engineered STAT1-CC molecule with double cysteine substitutions in the Src-homology 2 (SH2 domains of STAT1 (at Ala-656 and Asn-658 efficiently phosphorylates and translocates to the nucleus of IFN-resistant cells in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Transfection of a plasmid clone containing STAT1-CC significantly activated the GAS promoter compared to wild type STAT1 and STAT3. The activity of the engineered STAT1-CC is dependent upon the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 701, since the construct with a substituted phenylalanine residue at position 701 (STAT1-CC-Y701F failed to activate GAS promoter in the replicon cells. Intracellular expression of STAT1-CC protein showed phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in the resistant cell line after IFN-γ treatment. Transient transfection of STAT1-CC plasmid clone into an interferon resistant cell line resulted in inhibition of viral replication and viral clearance in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Furthermore, the resistant replicon cells transfected with STAT1-CC constructs significantly up regulated surface HLA-1 expression when compared to the wild type and Y to F mutant controls. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that modification of the SH2 domain of the STAT1 molecule allows for improved IFN-γ signaling through increased STAT1 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, HLA-1 surface expression, and prolonged interferon antiviral gene activation.

  15. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Kunjin virus replicons: an RNA-based, non-cytopathic viral vector system for protein production, vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Suhrbier, A.; Khromykh, A.A.

    2006-01-01

    The application of viral vectors for gene expression and delivery is rapidly evolving, with several entering clinical trials. However, a number of issues, including safety, gene expression levels, cell selectivity and antivector immunity, are driving the search for new vector systems. A number of re

  17. Vaccination: An Act of Love

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... benefits of vaccines. For this reason, we created Vaccination Week in the Americas to get vaccines to ... and no one gets left behind. Help the vaccination teams when they come to your town, your ...

  18. Nasal spray flu vaccine (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The flu vaccine can also be administered as a nasal spray instead of the usual injection method. It can be ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not ...

  19. Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Diabetes The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  20. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  1. Vaccines against poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Calman A; Saul, Allan

    2014-08-26

    With the 2010s declared the Decade of Vaccines, and Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 focused on reducing diseases that are potentially vaccine preventable, now is an exciting time for vaccines against poverty, that is, vaccines against diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 has helped better understand which vaccines are most needed. In 2012, US$1.3 billion was spent on research and development for new vaccines for neglected infectious diseases. However, the majority of this went to three diseases: HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis, and not neglected diseases. Much of it went to basic research rather than development, with an ongoing decline in funding for product development partnerships. Further investment in vaccines against diarrheal diseases, hepatitis C, and group A Streptococcus could lead to a major health impact in LMICs, along with vaccines to prevent sepsis, particularly among mothers and neonates. The Advanced Market Commitment strategy of the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) Alliance is helping to implement vaccines against rotavirus and pneumococcus in LMICs, and the roll out of the MenAfriVac meningococcal A vaccine in the African Meningitis Belt represents a paradigm shift in vaccines against poverty: the development of a vaccine primarily targeted at LMICs. Global health vaccine institutes and increasing capacity of vaccine manufacturers in emerging economies are helping drive forward new vaccines for LMICs. Above all, partnership is needed between those developing and manufacturing LMIC vaccines and the scientists, health care professionals, and policy makers in LMICs where such vaccines will be implemented.

  2. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vaccine Associated Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the cases of vaccine associated myocarditis have been following small pox vaccination. Reports have also been there after streptococcal pneumonia vaccine and influenza vaccine. In some cases, autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA used in the vaccine have been implicated. Exclusion of other causes is very important in the diagnostic process, especially that of acute coronary syndrome. Management is similar to that of other etiologies of myocarditis. These rare instances of myocarditis should not preclude one from taking necessary immunization for vaccine preventable diseases.

  4. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus replicon RNA synthesis by PSI-352938, a cyclic phosphate prodrug of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-2'-β-C-methylguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Angela M; Espiritu, Christine; Murakami, Eisuke; Zennou, Veronique; Bansal, Shalini; Micolochick Steuer, Holly M; Niu, Congrong; Keilman, Meg; Bao, Haiying; Bourne, Nigel; Veselenak, Ronald L; Reddy, P Ganapati; Chang, Wonsuk; Du, Jinfa; Nagarathnam, Dhanapalan; Sofia, Michael J; Otto, Michael J; Furman, Phillip A

    2011-06-01

    PSI-352938 is a novel cyclic phosphate prodrug of β-D-2'-deoxy-2'-α-fluoro-2'-β-C-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate that has potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vitro. The studies described here characterize the in vitro anti-HCV activity of PSI-352938, alone and in combination with other inhibitors of HCV, and the cross-resistance profile of PSI-352938. The effective concentration required to achieve 50% inhibition for PSI-352938, determined using genotype 1a-, 1b-, and 2a-derived replicons stably expressed in the Lunet cell line, were 0.20, 0.13, and 0.14 μM, respectively. The active 5'-triphosphate metabolite, PSI-352666, inhibited recombinant NS5B polymerase from genotypes 1 to 4 with comparable 50% inhibitory concentrations. In contrast, PSI-352938 did not inhibit the replication of hepatitis B virus or human immunodeficiency virus in vitro. PSI-352666 did not significantly affect the activity of human DNA and RNA polymerases. PSI-352938 and its cyclic phosphate metabolites did not affect the cyclic GMP-mediated activation of protein kinase G. Clearance studies using replicon cells demonstrated that PSI-352938 cleared cells of HCV replicon RNA and prevented replicon rebound. An additive to synergistic effect was observed when PSI-352938 was combined with other classes of HCV inhibitors, including alpha interferon, ribavirin, NS3/4A inhibitors, an NS5A inhibitor, and nucleoside/nucleotide and nonnucleoside inhibitors. Cross-resistance studies showed that PSI-352938 remained fully active against replicons containing the S282T or the S96T/N142T amino acid alteration. Replicons that contain mutations conferring resistance to various classes of nonnucleoside inhibitors also remained sensitive to inhibition by PSI-352938. PSI-352938 is currently being evaluated in a phase I clinical study in genotype 1-infected individuals.

  5. Allergic reactions to vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    Anaphylactic reactions to vaccines are rare but do occur, and have been reported for nearly every vaccine. And while the reaction rate per each dose of vaccine is low, this is a common clinical question due in large part to the enormous numbers of vaccines administered. Reactions are most often due to vaccine constituents rather than the microbial components of the vaccine, but in many instances, the specific ingredient triggering the reaction cannot be definitively identified. Evaluation of patients with suspected vaccine reactions should begin by determining whether the symptoms and timing of the reaction were consistent with a true allergic reaction, followed by an assessment to determine whether the patient needs further doses of the vaccine in question, or similar vaccines, in the future. Skin and serologic testing to vaccines and vaccine constituents can then be performed to further assess the potential cause of the reaction and to develop a plan for future immunizations. Specific guidelines for the administration of influenza vaccines to egg allergic patients have been revised to allow virtually all patients to receive this vaccine in a straightforward manner. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. MMR Vaccine (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attenuvax® Measles Vaccine ... R-Vax® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine) ... M-R® II (as a combination product containing Measles Vaccine, Mumps Vaccine, Rubella Vaccine)

  7. The HPV Vaccination Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following the release of a consensus statement from the NCI-Designated Cancer Centers urging HPV vaccination in the United States, Dr. Noel Brewer discusses the country’s low vaccination rates and how clinicians can help to improve them.

  8. Meningococcal Vaccine (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Your Child's Immunizations: Meningococcal Vaccines KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... vaccines are a good idea. Caring for Your Child After Immunization Your child might have a fever, soreness, and ...

  9. Vaccines and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Vaccines and Pregnancy Thursday, 01 September 2016 In every ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to vaccines may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  10. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  11. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Games, and the Internet Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  12. Adjuvants for malaria vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coler, R N; Carter, D; Friede, M; Reed, S G

    2009-09-01

    There is a renewed enthusiasm about subunit vaccines for malaria coincident with the formation of new alliances and partnerships raising international public awareness, attracting increased resources and the re-focusing of research programs on adjuvant development for infectious disease vaccines. It is generally accepted that subunit vaccines for malaria will require adjuvants to induce protective immune responses, and availability of suitable adjuvants has in the past been a barrier to the development of malaria vaccines. Several novel adjuvants are now in licensed products or in late stage clinical development, while several others are in the earlier development pipeline. Successful vaccine development requires knowing which adjuvants to use and knowing how to formulate adjuvants and antigens to achieve stable, safe, and immunogenic vaccines. For the majority of vaccine researchers this information is not readily available, nor is access to well-characterized adjuvants. In this minireview, we outline the current state of adjuvant research and development as it pertains to effective malaria vaccines.

  13. Vaccine Safety Datalink

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink is part of the National Immunization Program within the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and was started in recognition of gaps in the scientific knowledge of rare vaccine side effects.

  14. Generating memory with vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Flora; Galli, Grazia; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2009-08-01

    The goal of vaccination is to induce long-lasting protective immune memory. Although most vaccines induce good memory responses, the type of memory induced by different vaccines may be considerably different. In addition, memory responses to the same vaccine may be influenced by age, environmental and genetic factors. Results emerging from detailed and integrated profiling of immune-responses to natural infection or vaccination suggest that the type and duration of immune memory are largely determined by the magnitude and complexity of innate immune signals that imprint the acquired immune primary responses. Here we summarize results obtained from analyzing human immune memory responses to different types of vaccines. We will also discuss how extending clinical investigation to events occurring early after vaccination can help identify early predictive markers of protective memory and thus contribute to faster development of better and safer vaccines.

  15. Replicon properties of chromosomal DNA fibers and the duration of DNA synthesis of sunflower root-tip meristem cells at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van' t Hof, J.; Bjerknes, C.A.; Clinton, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA fiber autoradiography was used to examine the replicon properties of root-tip meristem cells of Helianthus annuus intact seedlings grown at temperatures from 10 to 38/sup 0/C and those of root-tip cells grown in vitro at 23/sup 0/. The average replicon size was approximately 22 ..mu..m and it did not change with temperature nor when the roots were grown in culture. The average fork rate was 6 ..mu..m/h at 10/sup 0/ and it rose gradually to 12 ..mu..m/h at 38/sup 0/. The responses of replication fork movement and of the duration of S to temperature were of three types: those in which change in fork rate was primarily (more than 90%) responsible for change in the duration of S, those in which the fork rate remained constant while S increased nearly twofold, and those in which the duration of S increased even though the replication forks were moving faster. The first type of response listed was observed at temperatures from 20 to 35/sup 0/, the second type listed was observed at 10 to 15/sup 0/, and the third, was produced at 38/sup 0/.

  16. Inhibition of hepatitis C virus RNA replication by short hairpin RNA synthesized by T7 RNA polymerase in hepatitis C virus subgenomic replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, Hiroyuki; Ujino, Saneyuki; Miyano-Kurosaki, Naoko; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Takaku, Hiroshi

    2006-05-12

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a cellular process that induces gene silencing by which small duplexes of RNA specifically target a homologous sequence for cleavage by cellular ribonucleases. Here, to test the RNAi method for blocking hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication, we created four short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the HCV internal ribosome entry site/Core gene transcript using T7 RNA polymerase. shRNA suppressed the replication of HCV RNA in the HCV replicon. On the other hand, short interfering RNAs synthesized using the T7 RNA polymerase system trigger a potent induction of interferon-alpha and -beta in a variety of cells. We examined whether the shRNAs synthesized using the T7 RNA polymerase system activated double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, 2'-5' oligoadenylate synthetase, or interferon-regulatory factor-3. Our results demonstrated that the T7-transcribed shRNA did not activate these proteins in Huh-7 cells and the HCV replicon. These shRNAs are a promising new strategy for anti-HCV gene therapeutics.

  17. Self-replicating Replicon-RNA Delivery to Dendritic Cells by Chitosan-nanoparticles for Translation In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C McCullough

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-amplifying replicon RNA (RepRNA possesses high potential for increasing antigen load within dendritic cells (DCs. The major aim of the present work was to define how RepRNA delivered by biodegradable, chitosan-based nanoparticulate delivery vehicles (nanogel-alginate (NGA interacts with DCs, and whether this could lead to translation of the RepRNA in the DCs. Although studies employed virus replicon particles (VRPs, there are no reports on biodegradable, nanoparticulate vehicle delivery of RepRNA. VRP studies employed cytopathogenic agents, contrary to DC requirements—slow processing and antigen retention. We employed noncytopathogenic RepRNA with NGA, demonstrating for the first time the efficiency of RepRNA association with nanoparticles, NGA delivery to DCs, and RepRNA internalization by DCs. RepRNA accumulated in vesicular structures, with patterns typifying cytosolic release. This promoted RepRNA translation, in vitro and in vivo. Delivery and translation were RepRNA concentration-dependent, occurring in a kinetic manner. Including cationic lipids with chitosan during nanoparticle formation enhanced delivery and translation kinetics, but was not required for translation of immunogenic levels in vivo. This work describes for the first time the characteristics associated with chitosan-nanoparticle delivery of self-amplifying RepRNA to DCs, leading to translation of encoded foreign genes, namely influenza virus hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein.

  18. Vaccines in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitali M Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a specific disease. More than two centuries have passed since the first successful vaccine for smallpox was developed. We′ve come a long way since. Today′s vaccines are among the 21 st century′s most successful and cost-effective public health tools for preventing diseases.

  19. Pharmacy management of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, H Eric

    2007-09-01

    Although standard vaccines have traditionally been granted full coverage in managed care, the recent introduction of several novel vaccine products has necessitated the revision of pharmacy management strategies throughout the nation. To review pharmacy management strategies for a number of emerging vaccines, with unique plan perspectives from SelectHealth, an Intermountain Healthcare company serving approximately 500,000 members in Utah. Because several recently introduced vaccines target previously unaddressed diseases and carry higher costs than traditional vaccines, several plans have adapted a novel approach to manage vaccine coverage on an individual product basis. At SelectHealth, recently introduced vaccines for rotavirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), herpes zoster, and human papillomavirus (HPV) have required special attention in terms of pharmacy management. After carefully weighing acquisition and administration costs, anticipated uptake and use, direct and indirect health care costs averted, and quality of life issues, plan leadership decided to cover many of the new vaccines (i.e., rotavirus, RSV, and herpes zoster) under a nonstandard vaccination benefit. However, because substantial cost savings and high use of the quadrivalent HPV vaccine was anticipated within SelectHealth, the plan decided to fully cover the product. Although they complicate traditional pharmacy management, novel vaccines provide clinical benefit that managed care organizations cannot ignore. One universal strategy will not suffice in managing all the different vaccines entering the market, and a tailored approach should be employed based on the individual characteristics and use of each product.

  20. Improving newcastle disease vaccination with homologous vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    All Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs) belong to a single serotype; however, current vaccine strains display important amino acid differences at the F and HN protein compared with virulent outbreak strains (vNDV). Previous studies have shown decreased viral shedding after challenge when vaccines were...

  1. Brucellosis vaccines for livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Zakia I; Pascual, David W

    2016-11-15

    Brucellosis is a livestock disease responsible for fetal loss due to abortions. Worldwide, this disease has profound economic and social impact by reducing the ability of livestock producers to provide an adequate supply of disease-free meat and dairy products. In addition to its presence in domesticated animals, brucellosis is harbored in a number of wildlife species creating new disease reservoirs, which adds to the difficulty of eradicating this disease. Broad and consistent use of the available vaccines would contribute in reducing the incidence of brucellosis. Unfortunately, this practice is not common. In addition, the current brucellosis vaccines cannot provide sterilizing immunity, and in certain circumstances, vaccinated livestock are not protected against co-mingling Brucella-infected wildlife. Given that these vaccines are inadequate for conferring complete protection for some vaccinated livestock, alternatives are being sought, and these include genetic modifications of current vaccines or their reformulations. Alternatively, many groups have sought to develop new vaccines. Subunit vaccines, delivered as a combination of soluble vaccine plus adjuvant or the heterologous expression of Brucella epitopes by different vaccine vectors are currently being tested. New live attenuated Brucella vaccines are also being developed and tested in their natural hosts. Yet, what is rarely considered is the route of vaccination which could improve vaccine efficacy. Since Brucella infections are mostly transmitted mucosally, mucosal delivery of a vaccine has the potential of eliciting a more robust protective immune response for improved efficacy. Hence, this review will examine these questions and provide the status of new vaccines for livestock brucellosis.

  2. Advances in FIV vaccine technology

    OpenAIRE

    Uhl, Elizabeth W.; Martin, Marcus; Coleman, James K.; Yamamoto, Janet K.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in vaccine technology are occurring in the molecular techniques used to develop vaccines and in the assessment of vaccine efficacy, allowing more complete characterization of vaccine-induced immunity correlating to protection. FIV vaccine development has closely mirrored and occasionally surpassed the development of HIV-1 vaccine, leading to first licensed technology. This review will discuss technological advances in vaccine designs, challenge infection assessment, and characterizat...

  3. Adjuvants for Animal Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakova, Yulia; Madera, Rachel; McVey, Scott; Schlup, John R; Shi, Jishu

    2017-06-15

    Vaccines are essential tools for the prevention and control of infectious diseases in animals. One of the most important steps in vaccine development is the selection of a suitable adjuvant. The focus of this review is the adjuvants used in vaccines for animals. We will discuss current commercial adjuvants and experimental formulations with attention to mineral salts, emulsions, bacterial-derived components, saponins, and several other immunoactive compounds. In addition, we will also examine the mechanisms of action for different adjuvants, examples of adjuvant combinations in one vaccine formulation, and challenges in the research and development of veterinary vaccine adjuvants.

  4. Vaccination for Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehen, Stephan; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant virus vaccines that express a limited number of epitopes are currently being developed to prevent disease by changing the relative balance between viral spread and the immune response. Some circumstances, however, were found in infections with a noncytopathic virus in which vaccination caused disease; sensitive parameters included the genetic background of the host, the time or dose of infection, and the constituents of the vaccine. Thus, immunopathologic damage by T cells may be an unwanted consequence of vaccination with the new types of peptide or recombinant vaccines that are being investigated for the human immunodeficiency viruses and other pathogens.

  5. Vaccinations for pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Geeta K; Heine, R Phillips

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, eradication and reduction of vaccine-preventable diseases through immunization has directly increased life expectancy by reducing mortality. Although immunization is a public priority, vaccine coverage among adult Americans is inadequate. The Institute of Medicine, the Community Preventive Services Task Force, and other public health entities have called for the development of innovative programs to incorporate adult vaccination into routine clinical practice. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well suited to serve as vaccinators of women in general and more specifically pregnant women. Pregnant women are at risk for vaccine-preventable disease-related morbidity and mortality and adverse pregnancy outcomes, including congenital anomalies, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, and low birth weight. In addition to providing direct maternal benefit, vaccination during pregnancy likely provides direct fetal and neonatal benefit through passive immunity (transplacental transfer of maternal vaccine-induced antibodies). This article reviews: 1) types of vaccines; 2) vaccines specifically recommended during pregnancy and postpartum; 3) vaccines recommended during pregnancy and postpartum based on risk factors and special circumstances; 4) vaccines currently under research and development for licensure for maternal-fetal immunization; and 5) barriers to maternal immunization and available patient and health care provider resources.

  6. Emerging Vaccine Informatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqun He

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine informatics is an emerging research area that focuses on development and applications of bioinformatics methods that can be used to facilitate every aspect of the preclinical, clinical, and postlicensure vaccine enterprises. Many immunoinformatics algorithms and resources have been developed to predict T- and B-cell immune epitopes for epitope vaccine development and protective immunity analysis. Vaccine protein candidates are predictable in silico from genome sequences using reverse vaccinology. Systematic transcriptomics and proteomics gene expression analyses facilitate rational vaccine design and identification of gene responses that are correlates of protection in vivo. Mathematical simulations have been used to model host-pathogen interactions and improve vaccine production and vaccination protocols. Computational methods have also been used for development of immunization registries or immunization information systems, assessment of vaccine safety and efficacy, and immunization modeling. Computational literature mining and databases effectively process, mine, and store large amounts of vaccine literature and data. Vaccine Ontology (VO has been initiated to integrate various vaccine data and support automated reasoning.

  7. Vaccines for allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2012-06-01

    Vaccines aim to establish or strengthen immune responses but are also effective for the treatment of allergy. The latter is surprising because allergy represents a hyper-immune response based on immunoglobulin E production against harmless environmental antigens, i.e., allergens. Nevertheless, vaccination with allergens, termed allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only disease-modifying therapy of allergy with long-lasting effects. New forms of allergy diagnosis and allergy vaccines based on recombinant allergen-derivatives, peptides and allergen genes have emerged through molecular allergen characterization. The molecular allergy vaccines allow sophisticated targeting of the immune system and may eliminate side effects which so far have limited the use of traditional allergen extract-based vaccines. Successful clinical trials performed with the new vaccines indicate that broad allergy vaccination is on the horizon and may help to control the allergy pandemic.

  8. [Vaccines and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Mariana Vide; Ramos, Vera Nobre; Tavares, Margarida; Moura, Paulo

    2011-12-01

    Routine vaccination is part of the pediatrics universe. In adulthood and particularly when women voluntarily access to medical care, immunization should be reviewed and updated. There are many doubts that generate in all health professionals anxiety and concern about the vaccination of a pregnant woman. This article aims to describe the immunological changes in pregnant women, to clarify the purpose of immunization during pregnancy, and to enumerate indications, contraindications and risks of vaccines of the Portuguese National Vaccine Plane and other vaccines against diseases with prevalence in other countries. Due to the medical and social impact of vaccination against seasonal influenza and influenza A (H1N1) in the winter of 2009, during an influenza (H1N1) pandemic flu, we make reference to the indications and vaccination against these infections in pregnancy.

  9. Immunogenicity of a recombinant Rift Valley fever MP-12-NSm deletion vaccine candidate in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, John C; Laughlin, Richard C; Lokugamage, Nandadeva; Wu, Jing; Pugh, Roberta; Kanani, Pooja; Adams, L Garry; Makino, Shinji; Peters, C J

    2013-10-09

    The safety and immunogenicity of an authentic recombinant (ar) of the live, attenuated MP-12 Rift Valley fever (RVF) vaccine virus with a large deletion of the NSm gene in the pre-Gn region of the M RNA segment (arMP-12ΔNSm21/384) was tested in 4-6 month old Bos taurus calves. Phase I of this study evaluated the neutralizing antibody response, measured by 80% plaque reduction neutralization (PRNT80), and clinical response of calves to doses of 1 × 10(1) through 1 × 10(7) plaque forming units (PFU) administered subcutaneously (s.c.). Phase II evaluated the clinical and neutralizing antibody response of calves inoculated s.c. or intramuscularly (i.m.) with 1 × 10(3), 1 × 10(4) or 1 × 10(5)PFU of arMP-12ΔNSm21/384. No significant adverse clinical events were observed in the animals in these studies. Of all specimens tested, only one vaccine viral isolate was recovered and that virus retained the introduced deletion. In the Phase I study, there was no statistically significant difference in the PRNT80 response between the dosage groups though the difference in IgG response between the 1 × 10(1)PFU group and the 1 × 10(5)PFU group was statistically significant (pvaccine with the 1 × 10(1)PFU dose group showing the least response. The Phase II study also showed no statistically significant difference in PRNT80 response between the dosage groups though the difference in RVFV-specific IgG values was significantly increased (pvaccine.

  10. Endemic Indian clones of Klebsiella pneumoniae-harbouring New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 on a hybrid plasmid replicon type: A case of changing New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase plasmid landscapes in India?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G K Subramanian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: blaNDM genes are MBL genes that confer resistance to carbapenems. Globally, they are associated with diverse clones and plasmids. In this study, we characterised three isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae-harbouring blaNDM1 from patients undergoing chronic haemodialysis and renal transplantation. Materials and Methods: 3 blaNDM1 -producing K. pneumoniae were isolated from end-stage renal disease patients undergoing haemodialysis and renal transplantation from a nephrology unit. All the three isolates were screened for clinically relevant resistant genes. Plasmid replicon content was analysed by polymerase chain reaction based replicon typing. Conjugation assays were done using azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53 as the recipient strain. Multilocus sequence typing and variable number tandem repeat typing were done to find the clonality. Replicon sequence based typing was attempted to find the diversity of replicon-associated sequences in IncHI3 plasmids. Results: All the 3 blaNDM positive isolates possessed the New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1 allele with an IncHI3 plasmid which was not transferable in one isolate. The isolates were found to be sequence type 14 (ST14; 2 nos and ST38 both of which were previously reported to be the NDM-producing K. pneumoniae STs prevalent in India. Replicon sequence analysis revealed limited sequence diversity within the repHI3 and repFIB locus. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of IncHI3, a newly assigned enterobacterial plasmid incompatibility group from India. This could either be a case of importation or a widely circulating NDM plasmid type in India.

  11. Current Ebola vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Groseth, Allison; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Ebolaviruses cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates, with case fatality rates of up to 90%. Currently, neither a specific treatment nor a vaccine licensed for use in humans is available. However, a number of vaccine candidates have been developed in the last decade that are highly protective in non-human primates, the gold standard animal model for Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Areas covered This review analyzes a number of scenarios for the use of ebolavirus vaccines, discusses the requirements for ebolavirus vaccines in these scenarios, and describes current ebolavirus vaccines. Among these vaccines are recombinant Adenoviruses, recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, recombinant Human Parainfluenza viruses and virus-like particles. Interestingly, one of these vaccine platforms, based on recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis viruses, has also demonstrated post-exposure protection in non-human primates. Expert opinion The most pressing remaining challenge is now to move these vaccine candidates forward into human trials and towards licensure. In order to achieve this, it will be necessary to establish the mechanisms and correlates of protection for these vaccines, and to continue to demonstrate their safety, particularly in potentially immunocompromised populations. However, already now there is sufficient evidence that, from a scientific perspective, a vaccine protective against ebolaviruses is possible. PMID:22559078

  12. The L, M, and S Segments of Rift Valley Fever Virus MP-12 Vaccine Independently Contribute to a Temperature-Sensitive Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shoko; Lokugamage, Nandadeva

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rift Valley fever (RVF) is endemic to Africa, and the mosquito-borne disease is characterized by “abortion storms” in ruminants and by hemorrhagic fever, encephalitis, and blindness in humans. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV; family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus) has a tripartite negative-stranded RNA genome (L, M, and S segments). A live-attenuated vaccine for RVF, the MP-12 vaccine, is conditionally licensed for veterinary use in the United States. MP-12 is fully attenuated by the combination of the partially attenuated L, M, and S segments. Temperature sensitivity (ts) limits viral replication at a restrictive temperature and may be involved with viral attenuation. In this study, we aimed to characterize the ts mutations for MP-12. The MP-12 vaccine showed restricted replication at 38°C and replication shutoff (100-fold or greater reduction in virus titer compared to that at 37°C) at 39°C in Vero and MRC-5 cells. Using rZH501 reassortants with either the MP-12 L, M, or S segment, we found that all three segments encode a temperature-sensitive phenotype. However, the ts phenotype of the S segment was weaker than that of the M or L segment. We identified Gn-Y259H, Gc-R1182G, L-V172A, and L-M1244I as major ts mutations for MP-12. The ts mutations in the L segment decreased viral RNA synthesis, while those in the M segment delayed progeny production from infected cells. We also found that a lack of NSs and/or 78kD/NSm protein expression minimally affected the ts phenotype. Our study revealed that MP-12 is a unique vaccine carrying ts mutations in the L, M, and S segments. IMPORTANCE Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral disease endemic to Africa, characterized by high rates of abortion in ruminants and severe diseases in humans. Vaccination is important to prevent the spread of disease, and a live-attenuated MP-12 vaccine is currently the only vaccine with a conditional license in the United States. This study determined the temperature

  13. Vaccine process technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsberg, Jessica O; Buckland, Barry

    2012-06-01

    The evolution of vaccines (e.g., live attenuated, recombinant) and vaccine production methods (e.g., in ovo, cell culture) are intimately tied to each other. As vaccine technology has advanced, the methods to produce the vaccine have advanced and new vaccine opportunities have been created. These technologies will continue to evolve as we strive for safer and more immunogenic vaccines and as our understanding of biology improves. The evolution of vaccine process technology has occurred in parallel to the remarkable growth in the development of therapeutic proteins as products; therefore, recent vaccine innovations can leverage the progress made in the broader biotechnology industry. Numerous important legacy vaccines are still in use today despite their traditional manufacturing processes, with further development focusing on improving stability (e.g., novel excipients) and updating formulation (e.g., combination vaccines) and delivery methods (e.g., skin patches). Modern vaccine development is currently exploiting a wide array of novel technologies to create safer and more efficacious vaccines including: viral vectors produced in animal cells, virus-like particles produced in yeast or insect cells, polysaccharide conjugation to carrier proteins, DNA plasmids produced in E. coli, and therapeutic cancer vaccines created by in vitro activation of patient leukocytes. Purification advances (e.g., membrane adsorption, precipitation) are increasing efficiency, while innovative analytical methods (e.g., microsphere-based multiplex assays, RNA microarrays) are improving process understanding. Novel adjuvants such as monophosphoryl lipid A, which acts on antigen presenting cell toll-like receptors, are expanding the previously conservative list of widely accepted vaccine adjuvants. As in other areas of biotechnology, process characterization by sophisticated analysis is critical not only to improve yields, but also to determine the final product quality. From a regulatory

  14. Vaccine herd effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyong; Johnstone, Jennie; Loeb, Mark

    2011-09-01

    Vaccination ideally protects susceptible populations at high risk for complications of the infection. However, vaccines for these subgroups do not always provide sufficient effectiveness. The herd effect or herd immunity is an attractive way to extend vaccine benefits beyond the directly targeted population. It refers to the indirect protection of unvaccinated persons, whereby an increase in the prevalence of immunity by the vaccine prevents circulation of infectious agents in susceptible populations. The herd effect has had a major impact in the eradication of smallpox, has reduced transmission of pertussis, and protects against influenza and pneumococcal disease. A high uptake of vaccines is generally needed for success. In this paper we aim to provide an update review on the herd effect, focusing on the clinical benefit, by reviewing data for specific vaccines.

  15. Vaccines and Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Bianchini, Sonia; Dellepiane, Rosa Maria; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The distinctive immune system characteristics of children with Kawasaki disease (KD) could suggest that they respond in a particular way to all antigenic stimulations, including those due to vaccines. Moreover, treatment of KD is mainly based on immunomodulatory therapy. These factors suggest that vaccines and KD may interact in several ways. These interactions could be of clinical relevance because KD is a disease of younger children who receive most of the vaccines recommended for infectious disease prevention. This paper shows that available evidence does not support an association between KD development and vaccine administration. Moreover, it highlights that administration of routine vaccines is mandatory even in children with KD and all efforts must be made to ensure the highest degree of protection against vaccine-preventable diseases for these patients. However, studies are needed to clarify currently unsolved issues, especially issues related to immunologic interference induced by intravenous immunoglobulin and biological drugs.

  16. Vaccination against seasonal flu

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    The Medical Service once again recommends you to get your annual flu vaccination for the year.   Vaccination is the most effective way of avoiding the illness and any serious consequences and protecting those around you. The flu can have especially serious consequences for people with chronic conditions (diabetes, cardio-vascular disease, etc.), pregnant women, infants, and people over 65 years of age. Remember, anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor) with their vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement by UNIQA. NB: The Medical Service cannot provide this vaccination service for family members or retired members of the personnel. For more information: • The "Seasonal flu" flyer by the Medical Service • Recommendations of the Swiss Federal Office of Public...

  17. Vaccination and neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Gkampeta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunization of children has been proven very effective in elimination of life threatening complications of many infectious diseases in developed countries. However, as vaccination-preventable infectious diseases and their complications have become rare, the interest focuses on immunization-related adverse reactions. Unfortunately, fear of vaccination-related adverse effects can led to decreased vaccination coverage and subsequent epidemics of infectious diseases. This review includes reports about possible side effects following vaccinations in children with neurological disorders and also published recommendations about vaccinating children with neurological disorders. From all international published data anyone can conclude that vaccines are safer than ever before, but the challenge remains to convey this message to society.

  18. Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Liver Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  19. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  20. Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Renal Disease and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... have immunity to this disease Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  1. What Vaccines Do You Need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics The Adult Vaccine Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are recommended for adults based on age, health ...

  2. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine that will ... in this video! /* // ** // */ Why Do We Need an HIV Vaccine? Today, more people living with HIV than ...

  3. Vaccination in food allergic patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Important potential food allergens in vaccines include egg and gelatin. Rare cases of ... rabies vaccine: purified chick embryo cell (PCEC) culture vaccine; human diploid cell ... found in MMR, varicella, influenza, typhoid, yellow fever, Japanese.

  4. The Latest in Vaccine Policies: Selected Issues in School Vaccinations, Healthcare Worker Vaccinations, and Pharmacist Vaccination Authority Laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barraza, Leila; Schmit, Cason; Hoss, Aila

    2017-03-01

    This paper discusses recent changes to state legal frameworks for mandatory vaccination in the context of school and healthcare worker vaccination. It then discusses state laws that allow pharmacists the authority to vaccinate.

  5. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  6. Influenza Vaccine, Inactivated or Recombinant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... die from flu, and many more are hospitalized.Flu vaccine can:keep you from getting flu, make flu ... inactivated or recombinant influenza vaccine?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children 6 months ...

  7. A vesicular stomatitis virus replicon-based bioassay for the rapid and sensitive determination of multi-species type I interferon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Berger Rentsch

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFN comprise a family of cytokines that signal through a common cellular receptor to induce a plethora of genes with antiviral and other activities. Recombinant IFNs are used for the treatment of hepatitis C virus infection, multiple sclerosis, and certain malignancies. The capability of type I IFN to suppress virus replication and resultant cytopathic effects is frequently used to measure their bioactivity. However, these assays are time-consuming and require appropriate biosafety containment. In this study, an improved IFN assay is presented which is based on a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV replicon encoding two reporter proteins, firefly luciferase and green fluorescent protein. The vector lacks the essential envelope glycoprotein (G gene of VSV and is propagated on a G protein-expressing transgenic cell line. Several mammalian and avian cells turned out to be susceptible to infection with the complemented replicon particles. Infected cells readily expressed the reporter proteins at high levels five hours post infection. When human fibroblasts were treated with serial dilutions of human IFN-β prior to infection, reporter expression was accordingly suppressed. This method was more sensitive and faster than a classical IFN bioassay based on VSV cytopathic effects. In addition, the antiviral activity of human IFN-λ (interleukin-29, a type III IFN, was determined on Calu-3 cells. Both IFN-β and IFN-λ were acid-stable, but only IFN-β was resistant to alkaline treatment. The antiviral activities of canine, porcine, and avian type I IFN were analysed with cell lines derived from the corresponding species. This safe bioassay will be useful for the rapid and sensitive quantification of multi-species type I IFN and potentially other antiviral cytokines.

  8. Existing antibacterial vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Natalia; Ravanfar, Parisa; Satyaprakash, Anita; Satyaprakah, Anita; Pillai, Sivaprabha; Creed, Rosella

    2009-01-01

    There are countless bacterial pathogens that cause disease in humans. Many of these bacterial infections not only cause significant morbidity and mortality in the human population but also cause a significant economic impact on society. Vaccines allow for reduction and potential eradication of such diseases. This article will review the currently approved antibacterial vaccines, which are vaccines for pertussis, tetanus, diphtheria, meningococcus, pneumococcus, Haemophilus influenza, cholera, typhoid, and anthrax.

  9. Underutilization of Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall K. Cheney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yearly influenza vaccination continues to be underutilized by those who would most benefit from it. The Health Belief Model was used to explain differences in beliefs about influenza vaccination among at-risk individuals resistant to influenza vaccination. Survey data were collected from 74 members of at-risk groups who were not vaccinated for influenza during the previous flu season. Accepting individuals were more likely to perceive flu as a threat to health and perceive access barriers, and cues to action were the most important influence on whether they plan to get vaccinated. In comparison, resistant individuals did not feel threatened by the flu, access barriers were not a problem, and they did not respond favorably to cues to action. Perceived threat, perceived access barriers, and cues to action were significantly associated with plans to be vaccinated for influenza in the next flu season. Participants who saw influenza as a threat to their health had 5.4 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated than those who did not. Participants reporting barriers to accessing influenza vaccination had 7.5 times the odds of reporting plans to be vaccinated. Those responding positively to cues to action had 12.2 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated in the next flu season than those who did not. Accepting and resistant individuals have significant differences in their beliefs, which require different intervention strategies to increase vaccination rates. These findings provide important information to researchers and practitioners working to increase influenza vaccination rates.

  10. Vaccines for Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Current medications for drug abuse have had only limited success. Anti-addiction vaccines to elicit antibodies that block the pharmacological effects of drugs have great potential for treating drug abuse. We review the status for two vaccines that are undergoing clinical trials (cocaine and nicotine) and two that are still in pre-clinical development (methamphetamine and heroin). We also outline the challenges and ethical concerns for anti-addiction vaccine development and their use as future therapeutics. PMID:22130115

  11. Developing vaccines against pandemic influenza.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, J M

    2001-01-01

    Pandemic influenza presents special problems for vaccine development. There must be a balance between rapid availability of vaccine and the safeguards to ensure safety, quality and efficacy of vaccine. Vaccine was developed for the pandemics of 1957, 1968, 1977 and for the pandemic alert of 1976. This experience is compared with that gained in developing vaccines for a possible H5N1 pandemic in 1997-1998. Our ability to mass produce influenza vaccines against a pandemic threat was well illust...

  12. Vaccines, our shared responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliusi, Sonia; Jain, Rishabh; Suri, Rajinder Kumar

    2015-05-05

    The Developing Countries Vaccine Manufacturers' Network (DCVMN) held its fifteenth annual meeting from October 27-29, 2014, New Delhi, India. The DCVMN, together with the co-organizing institution Panacea Biotec, welcomed over 240 delegates representing high-profile governmental and nongovernmental global health organizations from 36 countries. Over the three-day meeting, attendees exchanged information about their efforts to achieve their shared goal of preventing death and disability from known and emerging infectious diseases. Special praise was extended to all stakeholders involved in the success of polio eradication in South East Asia and highlighted challenges in vaccine supply for measles-rubella immunization over the coming decades. Innovative vaccines and vaccine delivery technologies indicated creative solutions for achieving global immunization goals. Discussions were focused on three major themes including regulatory challenges for developing countries that may be overcome with better communication; global collaborations and partnerships for leveraging investments and enable uninterrupted supply of affordable and suitable vaccines; and leading innovation in vaccines difficult to develop, such as dengue, Chikungunya, typhoid-conjugated and EV71, and needle-free technologies that may speed up vaccine delivery. Moving further into the Decade of Vaccines, participants renewed their commitment to shared responsibility toward a world free of vaccine-preventable diseases. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Vaccines and global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Brian; Salisbury, David; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2011-01-01

    Vaccines have made a major contribution to global health in recent decades but they could do much more. In November 2011, a Royal Society discussion meeting, ‘New vaccines for global health’, was held in London to discuss the past contribution of vaccines to global health and to consider what more could be expected in the future. Papers presented at the meeting reviewed recent successes in the deployment of vaccines against major infections of childhood and the challenges faced in developing vaccines against some of the world's remaining major infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), malaria and tuberculosis. The important contribution that development of more effective veterinary vaccines could make to global health was also addressed. Some of the social and financial challenges to the development and deployment of new vaccines were reviewed. The latter issues were also discussed at a subsequent satellite meeting, ‘Accelerating vaccine development’, held at the Kavli Royal Society International Centre. Delegates at this meeting considered challenges to the more rapid development and deployment of both human and veterinary vaccines and how these might be addressed. Papers based on presentations at the discussion meeting and a summary of the main conclusions of the satellite meeting are included in this issue of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. PMID:21893534

  14. Dengue virus vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauch, Lauren E; Shresta, Sujan

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in tropical and subtropical regions, causing hundreds of millions of infections each year. Infections range from asymptomatic to a self-limited febrile illness, dengue fever (DF), to the life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). The expanding of the habitat of DENV-transmitting mosquitoes has resulted in dramatic increases in the number of cases over the past 50 years, and recent outbreaks have occurred in the United States. Developing a dengue vaccine is a global health priority. DENV vaccine development is challenging due to the existence of four serotypes of the virus (DENV1-4), which a vaccine must protect against. Additionally, the adaptive immune response to DENV may be both protective and pathogenic upon subsequent infection, and the precise features of protective versus pathogenic immune responses to DENV are unknown, complicating vaccine development. Numerous vaccine candidates, including live attenuated, inactivated, recombinant subunit, DNA, and viral vectored vaccines, are in various stages of clinical development, from preclinical to phase 3. This review will discuss the adaptive immune response to DENV, dengue vaccine challenges, animal models used to test dengue vaccine candidates, and historical and current dengue vaccine approaches.

  15. Designing HER2 vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Teresa M; Fanger, Gary R; Hand, Susan; Gerard, Catherine; Bruck, Claudine; Cheever, Martin A

    2002-06-01

    HER2/neu is a compelling cancer vaccine candidate because it is overexpressed on some cancer cells relative to normal tissues, it is known to be immunogenic in both animal models and in humans, and it is already known to be targetable by the antibody component of the immune system in the form of monoclonal antibody therapy with trastuzumab. Vaccines offer the theoretical advantage of being able to elicit T-cell responses in addition to antibody responses. HER2 vaccines have been shown to provide benefit in animal models and to be immunogenic in humans. However, the optimal vaccine formulation is not yet known and the therapeutic efficacy of the vaccines in humans has not yet been evaluated. HER2 vaccine approaches currently being tested include peptide-based, DNA plasmid-based, and protein-based vaccines. Our group has developed and started testing a protein-based vaccine composed of both the extracellular domain of HER2 and the carboxyl terminal autophosphorylation portion of the intracellular domain. The extracellular domain was retained to provide for antibody targeting. The kinase domain of the intracellular domain was excluded because of its high degree of homology to other human kinases. The carboxyl terminal autophosphorylation domain was retained because it is the most unique and possibly most immunogenic portion of the HER2 molecule with the least homology to other members of the HER family. The vaccine, termed dHER2, is immunogenic in mice and primates. In animal models it can elicit CD8 and CD4 T-cell responses as well as antibody responses that suppress the growth of HER2-positive cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Vaccine trials are contemplated in patients with breast cancer that will determine whether the vaccine construct is similarly immunogenic in humans.

  16. Clinical development of Ebola vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya

    2015-09-01

    The ongoing outbreak of Ebola virus disease in West Africa highlighted the lack of a licensed drug or vaccine to combat the disease and has renewed the urgency to develop a pipeline of Ebola vaccines. A number of different vaccine platforms are being developed by assessing preclinical efficacy in animal models and expediting clinical development. Over 15 different vaccines are in preclinical development and 8 vaccines are now in different stages of clinical evaluation. These vaccines include DNA vaccines, virus-like particles and viral vectors such as live replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV), human and chimpanzee adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Recently, in preliminary results reported from the first phase III trial of an Ebola vaccine, the rVSV-vectored vaccine showed promising efficacy. This review charts this rapidly advancing area of research focusing on vaccines in clinical development and discusses the future opportunities and challenges faced in the licensure and deployment of Ebola vaccines.

  17. One health approach to Rift Valley fever vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1930s, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) spread across the African continent and invaded the Arabian Peninsula and several islands off the coast of Southeast Africa. The virus causes recurrent outbreaks in these regions, and its continued spread is of global concern. Next-gen

  18. One health approach to Rift Valley fever vaccine development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortekaas, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery in the 1930s, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) spread across the African continent and invaded the Arabian Peninsula and several islands off the coast of Southeast Africa. The virus causes recurrent outbreaks in these regions, and its continued spread is of global concern.

  19. Your child's first vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has ever had a severe reaction after any vaccination. A child who has a severe (life-threatening) allergy to ... in 1,000); fever over 105°F (1 child in 16,000). Serious Problems: ... These reports are extremely rare. Pneumococcal Vaccine Mild ...

  20. Conscientious Objection to Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Steve; Giubilini, Alberto; Walker, Mary Jean

    2017-03-01

    Vaccine refusal occurs for a variety of reasons. In this article we examine vaccine refusals that are made on conscientious grounds; that is, for religious, moral, or philosophical reasons. We focus on two questions: first, whether people should be entitled to conscientiously object to vaccination against contagious diseases (either for themselves or for their children); second, if so, to what constraints or requirements should conscientious objection (CO) to vaccination be subject. To address these questions, we consider an analogy between CO to vaccination and CO to military service. We argue that conscientious objectors to vaccination should make an appropriate contribution to society in lieu of being vaccinated. The contribution to be made will depend on the severity of the relevant disease(s), its morbidity, and also the likelihood that vaccine refusal will lead to harm. In particular, the contribution required will depend on whether the rate of CO in a given population threatens herd immunity to the disease in question: for severe or highly contagious diseases, if the population rate of CO becomes high enough to threaten herd immunity, the requirements for CO could become so onerous that CO, though in principle permissible, would be de facto impermissible.

  1. Towards universal influenza vaccines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce the considerable disease burden of seasonal influenza. Although seasonal influenza vaccines are effective, their performance in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals would benefit from improvement. Major problems related to the

  2. Trends in vaccine adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Lavelle, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvants are essential components of most clinically used vaccines. This is because the majority of nonliving vaccines are relatively poor inducers of adaptive immunity unless effective adjuvants are co-administered. Aluminum salts (alum) have been used as adjuvants with great success for almost a

  3. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Paz, Ziv; Israeli, Eitan; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-11-01

    Vaccines have been used for over 200 years and are the most effective way of preventing the morbidity and mortality associated with infections. Like other drugs, vaccines can cause adverse events, but unlike conventional medicines, which are prescribed to people who are ill, vaccines are administered to healthy individuals, thus increasing the concern over adverse reactions. Most side effects attributed to vaccines are mild, acute and transient; however, rare reactions such as hypersensitivity, induction of infection, and autoimmunity do occur and can be severe and even fatal. The rarity and subacute presentation of post-vaccination autoimmune phenomena means that ascertaining causality between these events can be difficult. Moreover, the latency period between vaccination and autoimmunity ranges from days to years. In this article, on the basis of published evidence and our own experience, we discuss the various aspects of the causal and temporal interactions between vaccines and autoimmune phenomena, as well as the possible mechanisms by which different components of vaccines might induce autoimmunity.

  4. Pricing of new vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bruce Y; McGlone, Sarah M

    2010-08-01

    New vaccine pricing is a complicated process that could have substantial long-standing scientific, medical, and public health ramifications. Pricing can have a considerable impact on new vaccine adoption and, thereby, either culminate or thwart years of research and development and public health efforts. Typically, pricing strategy consists of the following ten components: 1. Conduct a target population analysis; 2. Map potential competitors and alternatives; 3. Construct a vaccine target product profile (TPP) and compare it to projected or actual TPPs of competing vaccines; 4. Quantify the incremental value of the new vaccine's characteristics; 5. Determine vaccine positioning in the marketplace; 6. Estimate the vaccine price-demand curve; 7. Calculate vaccine costs (including those of manufacturing, distribution, and research and development); 8. Account for various legal, regulatory, third party payer, and competitor factors; 9. Consider the overall product portfolio; 10. Set pricing objectives; 11. Select pricing and pricing structure. While the biomedical literature contains some studies that have addressed these components, there is still considerable room for more extensive evaluation of this important area.

  5. Vaccines and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, M; Chiappini, E; Galli, L

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines have eradicated or controlled many infectious diseases, saving each year millions of lives and quality of life of many other millions of people. In spite of the success of vaccines over the last two centuries, parents (and also some health care workers) gloss over the devastating consequences of diseases, which are now avoided thanks to vaccines, and direct their attention to possible negative effects of immunization. Three immunological objections are raised: vaccines cause antigenic overload, natural immunity is safer and better than vaccine-induced immunity, and vaccines induce autoimmunity. The last point is examined in this review. Theoretically, vaccines could trigger autoimmunity by means of cytokine production, anti-idiotypic network, expression of human histocompatibility leukocyte antigens, modification of surface antigens and induction of novel antigens, molecular mimicry, bystander activation, epitope spreading, and polyclonal activation of B cells. There is strong evidence that none of these mechanisms is really effective in causing autoimmune diseases. Vaccines are not a source of autoimmune diseases. By contrast, absolute evidence exists that infectious agents can trigger autoimmune mechanisms and that they do cause autoimmune diseases.

  6. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  7. Single PA mutation as a high yield determinant of avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ilseob; Il Kim, Jin; Park, Sehee; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Lee, Joo-Yeon; Kim, Kisoon; Kang, Chun; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-01-01

    Human infection with an avian influenza virus persists. To prepare for a potential outbreak of avian influenza, we constructed a candidate vaccine virus (CVV) containing hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of a H5N1 virus and evaluated its antigenic stability after serial passaging in embryonated chicken eggs. The passaged CVV harbored the four amino acid mutations (R136K in PB2; E31K in PA; A172T in HA; and R80Q in M2) without changing its antigenicity, compared with the parental CVV. Notably, the passaged CVV exhibited much greater replication property both in eggs and in Madin-Darby canine kidney and Vero cells. Of the four mutations, the PA E31K showed the greatest effect on the replication property of reverse genetically-rescued viruses. In a further luciferase reporter, mini-replicon assay, the PA mutation appeared to affect the replication property by increasing viral polymerase activity. When applied to different avian influenza CVVs (H7N9 and H9N2 subtypes), the PA E31K mutation resulted in the increases of viral replication in the Vero cell again. Taken all together, our results suggest the PA E31K mutation as a single, substantial growth determinant of avian influenza CVVs and for the establishment of a high-yield avian influenza vaccine backbone. PMID:28084423

  8. Tattoo Delivery of a Semliki Forest Virus-Based Vaccine Encoding Human Papillomavirus E6 and E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie van de Wall

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is an attractive organ for immunization because of the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Intradermal delivery via tattooing has demonstrated superior vaccine immunogenicity of DNA vaccines in comparison to conventional delivery methods. In this study, we explored the efficacy of tattoo injection of a tumor vaccine based on recombinant Semliki Forest virus replicon particles (rSFV targeting human papillomavirus (HPV. Tattoo injection of rSFV particles resulted in antigen expression in both the skin and draining lymph nodes. In comparison with intramuscular injection, the overall antigen expression determined at the site of administration and draining lymph nodes was 10-fold lower upon tattoo injection. Delivery of SFV particles encoding the E6 and E7 antigens of human papillomavirus type 16 (SFVeE6,7 via tattooing resulted in HPV-specific cytotoxic T cells and in vivo therapeutic antitumor response. Strikingly, despite the observed lower overall transgene expression, SFVeE6,7 delivered via tattoo injection resulted in higher or equal levels of immune responses as compared to intramuscular injection. The intrinsic immunogenic potential of tattooing provides a benefit for immunotherapy based on an alphavirus.

  9. Against vaccine assay secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors.

  10. Against vaccine assay secrecy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Matthew; Hatchette, Todd F; Halperin, Scott A; Langley, Joanne M

    2015-01-01

    Increasing the transparency of the evidence base behind health interventions such as pharmaceuticals, biologics, and medical devices, has become a major point of critique, conflict, and policy focus in recent years. Yet the lack of publicly available information regarding the immunogenicity assays upon which many important, widely used vaccines are based has received no attention to date. In this paper we draw attention to this critical public health problem by reporting on our efforts to secure vaccine assay information in respect of 10 vaccines through Canada's access to information law. We argue, under Canadian law, that the public health interest in having access to the methods for these laboratory procedures should override claims by vaccine manufacturers and regulators that this information is proprietary; and, we call upon several actors to take steps to ensure greater transparency with respect to vaccine assays, including regulators, private firms, researchers, research institutions, research funders, and journal editors. PMID:25826194

  11. Vaccines and multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mailand, Mia Topsøe; Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2017-01-01

    Vaccinations are often the most effective tool against some disease known to mankind. This study offers a literature review on the role of vaccines regarding the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) and MS relapse. The method used in this study is a systematic literature review...... on the database PubMed. The study found no change in risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) after vaccination against hepatitis B virus, human papillomavirus, seasonal influenza, measles-mumps-rubella, variola, tetanus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), polio, or diphtheria. No change in risk of relapse...... was found for influenza. Further research is needed for the potential therapeutic use of the BCG vaccine in patients in risk of developing MS and for the preventive potential of the tetanus and diphtheria vaccine....

  12. Vaccine-Hesitant Justifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nathan J.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine-preventable diseases have re-emerged as more individuals have strayed from the recommended inoculation schedule. Previous work on vaccine hesitancy is generally limited to content analyses. Using grounded theory, this project examines vaccine debates on a prominent discussion board over a period of five years. Individuals generally justified opposition or hesitancy toward vaccines through personal experience and/or research, and the concepts of narrative persuasion and the conflation of expertise help describe the most prominent characteristics of such discourse. A consideration of online comments regarding vaccinations allows practitioners to not only become better prepared for patient concerns they might encounter, and but also become more familiar with the types of anecdotes and narratives that may be influential but left unspoken in face-to-face conversations. PMID:28508015

  13. Diseases and vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Blom; Almlund, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    between authorities, politicians, media and citizens. On the contrary, no broad commitment about the offer of a new pandemic vaccine to individuals from e.g. at-risk groups was reached. The vaccine was characterized by considerable uncertainty with regard to effects and side effects and many people...... considered the vaccine as risky and a threat more severe than the influenza. The health authorities? communication was more unclear on this question, confusion increased in the Danish population and more critical voices were raised. This uncertain communication about the vaccines? effects and side effects...... and the critical voices in the population are widespread in communication about vaccines in general and an increasing number of people are expressing skepticism and deselect this product. The communication processes are seen as a typical example of the difficulties of communicating science and risk and show how...

  14. Next generation vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2011-07-01

    In February this year, about 100 delegates gathered for three days in Vienna (Austria) for the Next Generation Vaccines conference. The meeting held in the Vienna Hilton Hotel from 23rd-25th February 2011 had a strong focus on biotech and industry. The conference organizer Jacob Fleming managed to put together a versatile program ranging from the future generation of vaccines to manufacturing, vaccine distribution and delivery, to regulatory and public health issues. Carefully selected top industry experts presented first-hand experience and shared solutions for overcoming the latest challenges in the field of vaccinology. The program also included several case study presentations on novel vaccine candidates in different stages of development. An interactive pre-conference workshop as well as interactive panel discussions during the meeting allowed all delegates to gain new knowledge and become involved in lively discussions on timely, interesting and sometimes controversial topics related to vaccines.

  15. Neisseria meningitidis B vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Gasparini, Roberto

    2011-09-01

    Invasive infections caused by Neisseria meningitidis are a serious public health problem worldwide and have a heavy economic impact. The incidence of invasive disease due to Neisseria meningitidis is highly variable according to geographical area and serogroup distribution. Since the introduction of vaccination programs with conjugated vaccine C in children and adolescents, most cases of invasive meningococcal disease in developed countries have been caused by meningococcus B. It is important to underline that invasive meningococcal disease will not be controlled until safe and effective vaccines for meningococcal B are available and widely used. The aims of this article are to describe the most recent developments in meningococcal B vaccines and to discuss how these vaccines can contribute to containing meningococcal disease.

  16. Vaccine safety--vaccine benefits: science and the public's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C B; Marcuse, E K

    2001-11-01

    The development of cowpox vaccination by Jenner led to the development of immunology as a scientific discipline. The subsequent eradication of smallpox and the remarkable effects of other vaccines are among the most important contributions of biomedical science to human health. Today, the need for new vaccines has never been greater. However, in developed countries, the public's fear of vaccine-preventable diseases has waned, and awareness of potential adverse effects has increased, which is threatening vaccine acceptance. To further the control of disease by vaccination, we must develop safe and effective new vaccines to combat infectious diseases, and address the public's concerns.

  17. The Vaccine Safety Datalink: successes and challenges monitoring vaccine safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Michael M; Gee, Julianne; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A; Lee, Grace M; Glanz, Jason M; Nordin, James D; Klein, Nicola P; Baxter, Roger; Naleway, Allison L; Jackson, Lisa A; Omer, Saad B; Jacobsen, Steven J; DeStefano, Frank

    2014-09-22

    The Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) is a collaborative project between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and 9 health care organizations. Established in 1990, VSD is a vital resource informing policy makers and the public about the safety of vaccines used in the United States. Large linked databases are used to identify and evaluate adverse events in over 9 million individuals annually. VSD generates rapid, important safety assessments for both routine vaccinations and emergency vaccination campaigns. VSD monitors safety of seasonal influenza vaccines in near-real time, and provided essential information on the safety of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 monovalent vaccine during the recent pandemic. VSD investigators have published important studies demonstrating that childhood vaccines are not associated with autism or other developmental disabilities. VSD prioritizes evaluation of new vaccines; searches for possible unusual health events after vaccination; monitors vaccine safety in pregnant women; and has pioneered development of biostatistical research methods.

  18. Vaccines for canine leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisa B. Palatnik-De-Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis is the third most important vector-borne disease worldwide. Visceral leishmaniasis (VL is a severe and frequently lethal protozoan disease of increasing incidence and severity due to infected human and dog migration, new geographical distribution of the insect due to global-warming, co-infection with immunosuppressive diseases and poverty. The disease is an anthroponosis in India and Central Africa and a canid zoonosis (ZVL in the Americas, the Middle East, Central Asia, China and the Mediterranean. The ZVL epidemic has been controlled by one or more measures including the culling of infected dogs, treatment of human cases and insecticidal treatment of homes and dogs. However, the use of vaccines is considered the most cost-effective control tool for human and canine disease. Since the severity of the disease is related to the generation of T-cell immunosuppression, effective vaccines should be capable of sustaining or enhancing the T-cell immunity. In this review we summarize the clinical and parasitological characteristics of ZVL with special focus on the cellular and humoral canine immune response and review state-of-the-art vaccine development against human and canine visceral leishmaniasis. Experimental vaccination against leishmaniasis has evolved from the practice of leishmanization with living parasites to vaccination with crude lysates, native parasite extracts to recombinant and DNA vaccination. Although more than 30 defined vaccines have been studied in laboratory models no human formulation has been licensed so far; however three second-generation canine vaccines have already been registered. As expected for a zoonotic disease, the recent preventive vaccination of dogs in Brazil has led to a reduction in the incidence of canine and human disease. The recent identification of several Leishmania proteins with T-cell epitopes anticipates development of a multiprotein vaccine that will be capable of protecting both humans

  19. PCR-based plasmid typing in Enterococcus faecium strains reveals widely distributed pRE25-, pRUM-, pIP501-and pHT beta-related replicons associated with glycopeptide resistance and stabilizing toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosvoll, T.C.S.; Pedersen, T.; Sletvold, H.;

    2010-01-01

    A PCR-based typing scheme was applied to identify plasmids in an epidemiologically and geographically diverse strain collection of Enterococcus faecium (n=93). Replicon types of pRE25 (n=56), pRUM (n=41), pIP501 (n=17) and pHT beta (n=14) were observed in 83% of the strains, while pS86, pCF10, p......RUM replicons (74%) than non-CC17 strains (2.2% and 35%, respectively). A prevalent genetic linkage between the pRUM-replicon type and axe-txe was demonstrated by cohybridization analyses. The vanA resistance determinant was associated with all four replicon types, but we also confirmed the genetic linkage...... of vanA to unknown transferable replicons. PCR-based replicon typing, linked to the detection of other important plasmid-encoded traits, seems to be a feasible tool for tracing disseminating resistance plasmids stably maintained in various environments....

  20. Parental knowledge of paediatric vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borràs Eva

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although routine vaccination is a major tool in the primary prevention of some infectious diseases, there is some reluctance in a proportion of the population. Negative parental perceptions of vaccination are an important barrier to paediatric vaccination. The aim of this study was to investigate parental knowledge of paediatric vaccines and vaccination in Catalonia. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional study was carried out in children aged Results An association was observed between greater vaccination coverage of the 4:4:4:3:1 schedule (defined as: 4 DTPa/w doses, 4 Hib doses, 4 OPV doses, 3 MenC doses and 1 MMR dose and maternal age >30 years (OR: 2.30; 95% CI: 1.20–4.43 and with a knowledge of vaccination score greater than the mean (OR: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.28–0.72. The score increased with maternal educational level and in parents of vaccinated children. A total of 20.47% of parents stated that vaccines could have undesirable consequences for their children. Of these, 23.26% had no specific information and 17.83% stated that vaccines can cause adverse reactions and the same percentage stated that vaccines cause allergies and asthma. Conclusion Higher vaccination coverage is associated with older maternal age and greater knowledge of vaccination. Vaccination coverage could be raised by improving information on vaccines and vaccination.

  1. [Present status of vaccines in 1989].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussey, M; Dabadie, A

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe 2 new vaccines now available in France: one is the GenHevac, an hepatitis B vaccine, the first virus recombinant vaccine; the other one is the Typhim Vi, a polysaccharide typhoid vaccine. Three other vaccines are currently used in foreign countries and will be soon available: the Hemophilus influenzae vaccine, the acellular pertussis vaccine and the varicella vaccine. Rotavirus and Cytomegalovirus vaccines are studied for their clinical efficacy.

  2. Technical Transformation of Biodefense Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    Biodefense vaccines are developed against a diverse group of pathogens. Vaccines were developed for some of these pathogens a long time ago but they are facing new challenges to move beyond the old manufacturing technologies. New vaccines to be developed against other pathogens have to determine whether to follow traditional vaccination strategies or to seek new approaches. Advances in basic immunology and recombinant DNA technology have fundamentally transformed the process of formulating a vaccine concept, optimizing protective antigens, and selecting the most effective vaccine delivery approach for candidate biodefense vaccines. PMID:19837293

  3. DNA vaccine: the miniature miracle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Kaliaperumal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA, the essential part of the life is making way in to new vaccine technology. Plasmid vectors from the bacteria have revolutionized the world of vaccine design by its new technology – DNA vaccines. Small portion of the nucleotides from the pathogen held under the control of promoter in a plasmid vector can be used as a vaccine. DNA vaccines alleviate the odds of the other vaccines by having good hold on both the faces of the immunity. The key to the success of DNA vaccine lies in the route of administration of the vaccine which can be done in many ways. Prime boost strategy is an approach used to boost the action of DNA vaccine. To date there are only four DNA vaccine available in the market. [Vet World 2013; 6(4.000: 228-232

  4. Depeptidization efforts on P[subscript 3]-P[prime subscript 2] [alpha]-ketoamide inhibitors of HCV NS3-4A serine protease: Effect on HCV replicon activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogen, Stephane L.; Ruan, Sumei; Liu, Rong; Agrawal, Sony; Pichardo, John; Prongay, Andrew; Baroudy, Bahige; Saksena, Anil K.; Girijavallabhan, Viyyoor; Njoroge, F. George (SPRI)

    2008-06-30

    Depeptidization efforts of the P{sub 3}-P{sub 2} region of P{sub 3} capped {alpha}-ketoamide inhibitor of HCV NS3 serine protease 1 are reported. We clearly established that N-methylation of the P{sub 2} nitrogen and modification of the P{prime}{sub 2} carboxylic acid terminus were essential for activity in the replicon assay.

  5. Establishment of a robust hepatitis C virus replicon cell line over-expressing P-glycoprotein that facilitates analysis of P-gp drug transporter effects on inhibitor antiviral activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Dennis; Falk, Paul; Yu, Fei; Zhai, Guangzhi; Quan, Yong; Faria, Teresa; Cao, Kai; Scola, Paul; McPhee, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is an active efflux pump affecting the pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles of drugs that are P-gp substrates. The Caco-2 bi-directional assay is widely used to identify drug-P-gp interactions in vitro. For molecules exhibiting non-classical drug properties however, ambiguous results limit its use in lead optimization. The goal of this study was to develop a robust cell-based assay system to directly measure the role of P-gp-driven efflux in reducing the potency of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication inhibitors. Vinblastine (Vin) was employed to select for a Vin-resistant HCV replicon (313-11) from the parental cell line (377-2). The 313-11 cell line was >50-fold resistant to Vin and over-expressed P-gp, as determined by Western immunoblots. Increased expression of P-gp was mediated by up-regulation of the MDR1 transcript. The reduced potency of different classes of HCV replication inhibitors in the 313-11 P-gp cell line was restored in the presence of known P-gp inhibitors. Addition of the P-gp inhibitor, tariquidar, increased the uptake of a radiolabeled HCV replication inhibitor by 14-fold in the 313-11 replicon cell line. Finally, a positive correlation was demonstrated between potency in the 313-11 replicon and the bi-directional Caco-2 efflux ratio for a panel of HCV protease inhibitors. In conclusion, a robust P-gp HCV replicon cell-based assay has been developed to measure the effect of the P-gp efflux pump on the potency of different classes of HCV replication inhibitors. This system establishes a direct correlation between antiviral activity and the effect of P-gp efflux in a single cell line.

  6. Priorities for the national vaccine plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Review of Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan; Institute of Medicine

    .... Priorities for the National Vaccine Plan examines the extraordinarily complex vaccine enterprise, from research and development of new vaccines to financing and reimbursement of immunization services...

  7. Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Vaccine Safety Smallpox Vaccine Safety Common Concerns Adjuvants Autism CDC Statement: 2004 Pediatrics Paper on MMR and Autism Fainting (Syncope) Febrile ...

  8. Flu vaccination in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Siettou

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In periods of seasonal influenza, during pandemic flu in the past and from recent experience that we have the emergence of influenza A (H1N1, pregnant compared with non-pregnant women are at increased risk to get sick and to develop serious complications up to mortality. Purpose: This paper examines the risks that arise for pregnant from contamination with the flu virus and the safety of influenza vaccination in pregnancy. Method: The method involves searching review and research studies in Pubmed data base mainly of the 2000 until 2009 and the words were used is pregnancy, flu vaccination, complications of the flu vaccination at the period of pregnancy. Results: Morbidity during periods of seasonal influenza in pregnant women is increased, while in times of pandemic are recorded fatalities. Based on this, specific recommendations have been made for a flu vaccination in pregnant women, both from the CDC, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the U.S. and other official bodies like the World Health Organization, according to that the constitution of influenza vaccine in the pregnancy is necessary, given that the probability of morbidity in this period is increased at 10%. Conclusions: The studies so far to influenza vaccination in pregnancy, do not record serious complications for pregnant women and infants. However more research needs to be done on the safety of influenza vaccination in pregnancy.

  9. Plasmid curing and the loss of grip--the 65-kb replicon of Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395 is required for biofilm formation, motility and the colonization of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Oliver; Michael, Victoria; Päuker, Orsola; Boedeker, Christian; Jogler, Christian; Rohde, Manfred; Petersen, Jörn

    2015-03-01

    Surface colonization is characteristic for a broad range of marine roseobacters and many strains have been isolated from biofilms, microbial mats and dinoflagellates. Phaeobacter inhibens DSM 17395, one of the best-studied representatives of the Roseobacter group, is an effective colonizer of marine surfaces, but the genetic basis of this trait is unknown. Based on the composition of its 65-kb RepA-I type plasmid that contains more than 20 genes for polysaccharide metabolism, including a rhamnose operon, which is required for O-antigen formation in Escherichia coli, it was hypothesized that this replicon was essential for surface attachment. Accordingly, a holistic approach was taken and the functional role of this extrachromosomal element in P. inhibens was investigated. Plasmid curing was performed with the homologous RepA-I replication system of Dinoroseobacter shibae DSM 16493(T). The Δ65-kb mutant completely lost its stickiness and could neither attach to artificial (glass, polystyrene) nor to natural surfaces (algae) and, consequently, its ability to form biofilms was impaired. Surprisingly, the mutant also lost the capacity for flagellar swimming motility required for surface colonization and the dispersal of biofilms. The data clearly showed that the 65-kb replicon of P. inhibens DSM 17395 was a genuine biofilm plasmid-mediating surface attachment. Homologous replicons are widely distributed among Rhodobacterales thus indicating the general importance of extrachromosomal elements for biofilm formation.

  10. Early life vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Uddbäck, Ida Elin Maria

    2016-01-01

    the first period of life and provide a pertinent alternative in infant vaccinology. To address this, infant mice were vaccinated with three different adenoviral vectors and the CD8+ T-cell response after early life vaccination was explored. We assessed the frequency, polyfunctionality and in vivo...... cytotoxicity of the elicited memory CD8+ T cells, as well as the potential of these cells to respond to secondary infections and confer protection. We further tested the impact of maternal immunity against our replication-deficient adenoviral vector during early life vaccination. Overall, our results indicate...

  11. Cellular based cancer vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Met, O; Svane, I M;

    2012-01-01

    Cancer vaccines designed to re-calibrate the existing host-tumour interaction, tipping the balance from tumor acceptance towards tumor control holds huge potential to complement traditional cancer therapies. In general, limited success has been achieved with vaccines composed of tumor...... in vitro migration via autocrine receptor-mediated endocytosis of CCR7. In the current review, we discuss optimal design of DC maturation focused on pre-clinical as well as clinical results from standard and polarized dendritic cell based cancer vaccines....

  12. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  13. Research toward Malaria Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Louis H.; Howard, Russell J.; Carter, Richard; Good, Michael F.; Nussenzweig, Victor; Nussenzweig, Ruth S.

    1986-12-01

    Malaria exacts a toll of disease to people in the Tropics that seems incomprehensible to those only familiar with medicine and human health in the developed world. The methods of molecular biology, immunology, and cell biology are now being used to develop an antimalarial vaccine. The Plasmodium parasites that cause malaria have many stages in their life cycle. Each stage is antigenically distinct and potentially could be interrupted by different vaccines. However, achieving complete protection by vaccination may require a better understanding of the complexities of B- and T-cell priming in natural infections and the development of an appropriate adjuvant for use in humans.

  14. Anti-addiction vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Orson, Frank M.

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts to eradicate it, addiction to both legal and illicit drugs continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. Anti-addiction vaccines can produce the antibodies to block the effects of these drugs on the brain, and have great potential to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with illicit drug intoxications. This review provides a current overview of anti-addiction vaccines that are under clinical trial and pre-clinical research evaluation. It also outlines the development challenges, ethical concerns, and likely future intervention for anti-addiction vaccines. PMID:22003367

  15. Meningococcal vaccine evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Bona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis worldwide. Although polysaccharide and glycoconjugate vaccines have been developed for serogroups A, C, Y and W-135, currently there are no broadly effective vaccines available for the prevention of meningococcal B disease. A general overview of the burden of the disease and the strains prevalence in the world with the focus in particular on the Italian situation is provided in this article, together with the vaccinations developed and under evaluation.

  16. Vaccine efficacy in senescent mice challenged with recombinant SARS-CoV bearing epidemic and zoonotic spike variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damon Deming

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV was identified as the etiological agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome, a disease characterized by severe pneumonia that sometimes results in death. SARS-CoV is a zoonotic virus that crossed the species barrier, most likely originating from bats or from other species including civets, raccoon dogs, domestic cats, swine, and rodents. A SARS-CoV vaccine should confer long-term protection, especially in vulnerable senescent populations, against both the 2003 epidemic strains and zoonotic strains that may yet emerge from animal reservoirs. We report the comprehensive investigation of SARS vaccine efficacy in young and senescent mice following homologous and heterologous challenge.Using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP expressing the 2003 epidemic Urbani SARS-CoV strain spike (S glycoprotein (VRP-S or the nucleocapsid (N protein from the same strain (VRP-N, we demonstrate that VRP-S, but not VRP-N vaccines provide complete short- and long-term protection against homologous strain challenge in young and senescent mice. To test VRP vaccine efficacy against a heterologous SARS-CoV, we used phylogenetic analyses, synthetic biology, and reverse genetics to construct a chimeric virus (icGDO3-S encoding a synthetic S glycoprotein gene of the most genetically divergent human strain, GDO3, which clusters among the zoonotic SARS-CoV. icGD03-S replicated efficiently in human airway epithelial cells and in the lungs of young and senescent mice, and was highly resistant to neutralization with antisera directed against the Urbani strain. Although VRP-S vaccines provided complete short-term protection against heterologous icGD03-S challenge in young mice, only limited protection was seen in vaccinated senescent animals. VRP-N vaccines not only failed to protect from homologous or heterologous challenge, but resulted in enhanced immunopathology with eosinophilic

  17. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  18. Vaccine safety controversies and the future of vaccination programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Guido; Duclos, Philippe; Margolis, Harold; Lavanchy, Daniel; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Meheus, André; Lambert, Paul-Henri; Emiroğlu, Nedret; Badur, Selim; Van Damme, Pierre

    2005-11-01

    In the years following the hepatitis B vaccination/multiple sclerosis controversy, a number of new issues regarding vaccine safety have been raised, in some cases leading to more debate and confusion. Against this background, an international group of experts was convened to review the current points of view concerning the use of thimerosal as a preservative and its potential risks; the suggested link between thimerosal-containing vaccines and acute lymphoblastic leukemia; the alleged association between aluminum-containing vaccines/macrophagic myofasciitis and general systemic complaints; a possible link between vaccination and autoimmune pathology; and a hypothetical link between measles-mumps-rubella vaccination and autism. At present, there are no data to conclude that childhood vaccines, and in particular hepatitis B vaccine, pose a serious health risk or justify a change in current immunization practice. However, vaccine "scares" continue to have an international impact on immunization coverage. Creating a positive environment for immunization can be achieved by repositioning the value of vaccines and vaccination, supported by evidence-based information. The role of international organizations, the media, and the industry in the implementation of communication strategies was discussed and the impact of litigation issues on vaccination was evaluated. The Viral Hepatitis Prevention Board confirms its commitment to current recommendations for universal and risk group hepatitis B vaccination and further encourages the conduct of vaccine safety studies and the dissemination of their results.

  19. EXPERIMENTAL MEASLES VACCINES: A RESEARCH TOOL IN VACCINATION EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Liashenko

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The review article considers different variants of measles vaccine that may be classified into two groups, i.e., vaccines that do not contain viable measles virus, and attenuated measles vaccines which could be employed in unusual manner.The first group includes DNA-vaccines, recombinant vaccine strains encoding synthesis of measles hemagglutinin and fusion protein, as well as peptide vaccines containing molecular fragments of these proteins. The mentioned variants of vaccines were effective in animal experiments, but they have not been tested in humans. The second group includes live attenuated mucosal measles vaccins applied in combination with immunomodulator(s, as aerosol and intranasally. Efficiency of these vaccines was tested and confirmed by immunization of children and adults. Mucosal measles vaccine induces local production of IgA measles antibodies, along with induced synthesis of circulating IgM and IgG antibodies against measles. The latter experimental variant could be a live attenuated measles vaccine containing some immunity-modulating agent. Elaboration of these variant was based on the known data about transient immunosuppressive activity of measles vaccine. An appropriate experimental variant represents a mixture of attenuated measles vaccine and synthetic immunomodulating agent (MP-2 peptide which protects T-lymphocytes from inhibitory effect of the measles virus. In present revue, some data are presented concerning the mechanisms of immunogenic activity and adverse effects of measles vaccines.

  20. Veterinary vaccines against toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiszczyńska-Sawicka, Elżbieta; Gatkowska, Justyna M; Grzybowski, Marcin M; Długońska, Henryka

    2014-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a cosmopolitan protozoan parasite that infects a wide range of mammal and bird species. Common infection leads to high economic (e.g., abortions in sheep) and human (e.g., congenital toxoplasmosis or neurotoxoplasmosis in humans) losses. With one exception (Toxovax for sheep), there are no vaccines to prevent human or animal toxoplasmosis. The paper presents the current state and challenges in the development of a vaccine against toxoplasmosis, designed for farm animals either bred for consumption or commonly kept on farms and involved in parasite transmission. So far, the trials have mostly revolved around conventional vaccines and, compared with the research using laboratory animals (mainly mice), they have not been very numerous. However, the results obtained are promising and could be a good starting point for developing an effective vaccine to prevent toxoplasmosis.

  1. Ingredients of Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quantities of mercury, aluminum, formaldehyde, human serum albumin, antibiotics, and yeast proteins in vaccines have not been found to be harmful in humans or experimental animals... Top of Page Related Pages Common Questions about ...

  2. [Development of new vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Romo, Fernando; Picazo, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Recent and important advances in the fields of immunology, genomics, functional genomics, immunogenetics, immunogenomics, bioinformatics, microbiology, genetic engineering, systems biology, synthetic biochemistry, proteomics, metabolomics and nanotechnology, among others, have led to new approaches in the development of vaccines. The better identification of ideal epitopes, the strengthening of the immune response due to new adjuvants, and the search of new routes of vaccine administration, are good examples of advances that are already a reality and that will favour the development of more vaccines, their use in indicated population groups, or its production at a lower cost. There are currently more than 130 vaccines are under development against the more wished (malaria or HIV), difficult to get (CMV or RSV), severe re-emerging (Dengue or Ebola), increasing importance (Chagas disease or Leishmania), and nosocomial emerging (Clostridium difficile or Staphylococcus aureus) infectious diseases. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  3. Smallpox vaccine revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriotti, Teri

    2002-12-01

    Smallpox is a serious contagious disease which is back in the public eye. Yet, most health care providers are unprepared for its return. Nurses will be key health care professionals in a smallpox outbreak or vaccination program.

  4. Antibacterials: A sweet vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundle, David

    2016-03-01

    Vaccination with a synthetic glycoconjugate, in combination with the administration of an inhibitor that blocks capsular polysaccharide synthesis in bacteria, could offer an alternative route to combat bacterial infections.

  5. Childhood Vaccine Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the MMR and Varicella vaccines at the same time. Now it does not express a preference for giving them separately or at the same time. Protects against chickenpox, a usually mild infectious disease ...

  6. Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Hepatitis B Vaccination Protection Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a pathogenic microorganism that can cause potentially life- threatening disease in humans. HBV infection is transmitted through exposure ...

  7. Vaccines against typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Carlos A; Borsutzky, Stefan; Griot-Wenk, Monika; Metcalfe, Ian C; Pearman, Jon; Collioud, Andre; Favre, Didier; Dietrich, Guido

    2006-05-01

    Because of high infectivity and significant disease burden, typhoid fever constitutes a major global health problem. Implementation of adequate food handling practices and establishment of safe water supplies are the cornerstone for the development of an effective prevention program. However, vaccination against typhoid fever remains an essential tool for the effective management of this disease. Currently, there are two well tolerated and effective licensed vaccines. One is based on defined subunit virulence (Vi) polysaccharide antigen and can be administered either intramuscularly or subcutaneously and the other is based on the use of live attenuated bacteria for oral administration. The advantages and disadvantages of the various approaches taken in the development of a vaccine against typhoid fever are discussed, along with the potential for future vaccine candidates.

  8. Tuberculosis vaccine types and timings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Ian M

    2015-03-01

    Traditionally, the design of new vaccines directed against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the most successful bacterial pathogen on the planet, has focused on prophylactic candidates that would be given to individuals while they are still young. It is becoming more apparent, however, that there are several types of vaccine candidates now under development that could be used under various conditions. Thus, in addition to prophylactic vaccines, such as recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG or BCG-boosting vaccines, other applications include vaccines that could prevent infection, vaccines that could be given in emergency situations as postexposure vaccines, vaccines that could be used to facilitate chemotherapy, and vaccines that could be used to reduce or prevent relapse and reactivation disease. These approaches are discussed here, including the type of immunity we are trying to specifically target, as well as the limitations of these approaches.

  9. Current status of rotavirus vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ching-Min Wang; Shou-Chien Chen; Kow-Tong Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rotaviruses remain the major cause of childhood diarrheal disease worldwide and of diarrheal deaths of infants and children in developing countries. The huge burden of childhood rotavirus-related diarrhea in the world continues to drive the remarkable pace of vaccine development. Data sources: Research articles were searched using terms "rotavirus" and "rotavirus vaccine" in MEDLINE and PubMed. Articles not published in the English language, articles without abstracts, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After preliminary screening, all articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of current vaccines and vaccination programs. Results: In this review of the global rotavirus vaccines and vaccination programs, the principles of rotavirus vaccine development and the efficacy of the currently licensed vaccines from both developed and developing countries were summarized. Conclusions: Rotavirus is a common cause of diarrhea in children in both developed and developing countries. Rotavirus vaccination is a cost-effective measure to prevent rotavirus diarrhea.

  10. Vaccines against cysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; de Aluja, Aline S; Hernández, Marisela; Rosas, Gabriela; Larralde, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Taenia solium cysticercosis is a major parasitic disease that seriously and frequently affects human health and economy in undeveloped countries. Since pigs are an indispensable intermediate host, it is conceivable to curb transmission by reducing pig cysticercosis through their effective vaccination. This article reviews current knowledge on the development vaccines against porcine cysticercosis. It highlights the development of several versions of S3Pvac aimed to increase effectiveness, reduce costs and increase feasibility by novel delivery systems and alternative routes of administration.

  11. Immunization responses against equine influenza virus (EIV) based on recombinant Alphavirus replicon plasmid expressing EIV hemagglutinin gene%马流感病毒血凝素基因甲病毒复制子重组表达质粒的构建及其免疫效力评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇铮; 郭巍; 孙元; 戚亭; 仇华吉; 相文华

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate DNA vaccination against equine influenza virus (EIV), the hemagglutinin (HA) genes of American and European H3N8 subtype EIV were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into a Semliki forest virus (SFV) replicon based plasmid of pSFV to construct the recombinant plasmid pSFV1CS-EIV-HA, respectively. The HA expressions were identified in the 293T cells transfected with the recombinant plasmid by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Furthermore, the specific HI antibody, IFN-γ or IL-4 level were detected in BALB/c mice immunized with either single or both of the recombinant plasmids. However, the virus was failed to detect in immunized BALB/c mice by the RT-PCR detection or the virus isolation. The results indicated that the recombinant plasmids possessed a capability for inducing effective immune responses in animals, which was a promising candidate DNA vaccine against EIV infection.%为评价马流感病毒(EIV) HA基因核酸免疫效果,本研究以甲病毒复制子载体pSFV1CS分别构建了表达EIV H3N8亚型的美洲型和欧洲型HA基因的重组真核表达质粒.并将其转染293T细胞,经间接免疫荧光鉴定表明HA基因获得表达;以重组质粒免疫的BALB/c鼠能够检测到特异性抗体产生,而且HI抗体水平持续升高,同时小鼠体内IFN-γ、IL-4分泌水平也有所升高.攻毒后小鼠表现轻度临床症状,但病毒分离和RT-PCR 均未检测到病毒.上述结果表明,该重组质粒pSFV1CS-EIV-HA具有良好的免疫原性并且可以诱导免疫动物产生较高免疫应答的能力.

  12. Epilepsy and vaccinations: Italian guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruna, Dario; Balestri, Paolo; Zamponi, Nelia; Grosso, Salvatore; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Romeo, Antonino; Franzoni, Emilio; Osti, Maria; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Longhi, Riccardo; Verrotti, Alberto

    2013-10-01

    Reports of childhood epilepsies in temporal association with vaccination have had a great impact on the acceptance of vaccination programs by health care providers, but little is known about this possible temporal association and about the types of seizures following vaccinations. For these reasons the Italian League Against Epilepsy (LICE), in collaboration with other Italian scientific societies, has decided to generate Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy. The aim of Guidelines on Vaccinations and Epilepsy is to present recent unequivocal evidence from published reports on the possible relationship between vaccines and epilepsy in order to provide information about contraindications and risks of vaccinations in patients with epilepsy. The following main issues have been addressed: (1) whether contraindications to vaccinations exist in patients with febrile convulsions, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies; and (2) whether any vaccinations can cause febrile seizures, epilepsy, and/or epileptic encephalopathies. Diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination and measles, mumps, and rubella vaccination (MMR) increase significantly the risk of febrile seizures. Recent observations and data about the relationships between vaccination and epileptic encephalopathy show that some cases of apparent vaccine-induced encephalopathy could in fact be caused by an inherent genetic defect with no causal relationship with vaccination.

  13. HPV vaccines: a controversial issue?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.F. Nicol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Controversy still exists over whether the benefits of the available HPV vaccines outweigh the risks and this has suppressed uptake of the HPV vaccines in comparison to other vaccines. Concerns about HPV vaccine safety have led some physicians, healthcare officials and parents to withhold the recommended vaccination from the target population. The most common reason for not administering the prophylactic HPV vaccines are concerns over adverse effects. The aim of this review is the assessment of peer-reviewed scientific data related to measurable outcomes from the use of HPV vaccines throughout the world with focused attention on the potential adverse effects. We found that the majority of studies continue to suggest a positive risk-benefit from vaccination against HPV, with minimal documented adverse effects, which is consistent with other vaccines. However, much of the published scientific data regarding the safety of HPV vaccines appears to originate from within the financially competitive HPV vaccine market. We advocate a more independent monitoring system for vaccine immunogenicity and adverse effects to address potential conflicts of interest with regular systematic literature reviews by qualified individuals to vigilantly assess and communicate adverse effects associated with HPV vaccination. Finally, our evaluation suggests that an expanded use of HPV vaccine into more diverse populations, particularly those living in low-resource settings, would provide numerous health and social benefits.

  14. Military Infectious Diseases Update on Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    development thrusts • Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) vaccines • Shigella vaccines • Campylobacter jejuni vaccines 2011 MHS Conference Vaccines...Injectisome extending from Shigella Injectisome Injectisome graphic 2011 MHS Conference  Campylobacter jejuni – Transmission: Foodborne – Inoculum

  15. Understanding Thimerosal, Mercury, and Vaccine Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fungus. It is used as a preservative for flu vaccines in multi-dose vials, to keep the vaccine ... as much as possible. • Today, except for some flu vaccines in multi-dose vials, no recommended childhood vaccines ...

  16. Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with HIV Infection The table below shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  17. Vaccinations for Adults with Hepatitis C Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Adults with Hepatitis C Infection This table shows which vaccinations you should have to protect your health if ... sure you and your healthcare provider keep your vaccinations up to date. Vaccine Do you need it? ...

  18. PTC725, an NS4B-Targeting Compound, Inhibits a Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3 Replicon, as Predicted by Genome Sequence Analysis and Determined Experimentally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graci, Jason D.; Jung, Stephen P.; Pichardo, John; Tong, Xiao; Gu, Zhengxian

    2016-01-01

    PTC725 is a small molecule NS4B-targeting inhibitor of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype (gt) 1 RNA replication that lacks activity against HCV gt2. We analyzed the Los Alamos HCV sequence database to predict susceptible/resistant HCV gt's according to the prevalence of known resistance-conferring amino acids in the NS4B protein. Our analysis predicted that HCV gt3 would be highly susceptible to the activity of PTC725. Indeed, PTC725 was shown to be active against a gt3 subgenomic replicon with a 50% effective concentration of ∼5 nM. De novo resistance selection identified mutations encoding amino acid substitutions mapping to the first predicted transmembrane region of NS4B, a finding consistent with results for PTC725 and other NS4B-targeting compounds against HCV gt1. This is the first report of the activity of an NS4B targeting compound against HCV gt3. In addition, we have identified previously unreported amino acid substitutions selected by PTC725 treatment which further demonstrate that these compounds target the NS4B first transmembrane region. PMID:27620477

  19. Overexpression and self-assembly of virus-like particles in Nicotiana benthamiana by a single-vector DNA replicon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ki-Beom; Lee, Jisu; Kang, Sebyung; Kim, Moonil; Mason, Hugh S; Jeon, Jae-Heung; Kim, Hyun-Soon

    2014-10-01

    Based on recent developments, virus-like particles (VLPs) are considered to be perfect candidates as nanoplatforms for applications in materials science and medicine. To succeed, mass production of VLPs and self-assembly into a correct form in plant systems are key factors. Here, we report expression of synthesized coat proteins of the three viruses, Brome mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, and Maize rayado fino virus, in Nicotiana benthamiana and production of self-assembled VLPs by transient expression system using agroinfiltration. Each coat protein was synthesized and cloned into a pBYR2fp single replicon vector. Target protein expression in cells containing p19 was fourfold higher than that of cells lacking p19. After agroinfiltration, protein expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and quantitative image analyzer. Quantitative analysis showed that BMVCP, CMVCP, and MRFVCP concentrations were 0.5, 1.0, and 0.8 mg · g(-1) leaf fresh weight, respectively. VLPs were purified by sucrose cushion ultracentrifugation and then analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggested that BMVCP and CMVCP proteins expressed in N. benthamiana leaves were able to correctly self-assemble into particles. Moreover, we evaluated internal cavity accessibility of VLPs to load foreign molecules. Finally, plant growth conditions after agroinfiltration are critical for increasing heterologous protein expression levels in a transient expression system.

  20. Sequence analysis and minimal replicon determination of a new haloarchaeal plasmid pHF2 isolated from Haloferax sp. strain Q22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoxing; Wang, Chuangming; Xiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    A new cryptic plasmid, pHF2 (2520 bp), was isolated from Haloferax sp. strain Q22 (CGMCC 1.15317), a haloarchaeal strain living in a subterranean halite deposit. Sequence analysis revealed that it is the smallest plasmid in the genus Haloferax so far, and three syntropic open reading frames (ORF1, ORF2, and ORF3) were identified on the same strand. ORF1 encodes a putative replication initiation protein (Rep). Three typical motifs (I, II, and III) were presented in the Rep proteins of rolling-circle replicating (RCR) plasmids. The amino acid sequence of the Rep protein is very similar to that of another haloarchaeal plasmid pNB101 in Natronobacterium sp. AS-7091 (coverage 97%, identity 56%). The minimal replicon (~1000 bp) of pHF2 was determined through the construction of a series of truncated plasmids. Interestingly, we also found that the incomplete rep gene still can drive plasmid replication. This plasmid has provided another valuable extra-chromosomal genetic resource, and deepened our knowledge in DNA replication.

  1. Structure and immunogenicity of alternative forms of the simian immunodeficiency virus gag protein expressed using Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecil, Chad; West, Ande; Collier, Martha; Jurgens, Christy; Madden, Victoria; Whitmore, Alan; Johnston, Robert; Moore, Dominic T; Swanstrom, Ronald; Davis, Nancy L

    2007-06-05

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) were engineered to express different forms of SIV Gag to compare expression in vitro, formation of intra- and extracellular structures and induction of humoral and cellular immunity in mice. The three forms examined were full-length myristylated SIV Gag (Gagmyr+), full-length Gag lacking the myristylation signal (Gagmyr-) or a truncated form of Gagmyr- comprising only the matrix and capsid domains (MA/CA). Comparison of VRP-infected primary mouse embryo fibroblasts, mouse L929 cells and primate Vero cells showed comparable expression levels for each protein, as well as extracellular virus-like particles (VRP-Gagmyr+) and distinctive cytoplasmic aggregates (VRP-Gagmyr-) with each cell type. VRP were used to immunize BALB/c mice, and immune responses were compared using an interferon (IFN)-gamma ELISPOT assay and a serum antibody ELISA. Although all three VRP generated similar levels of IFN-gamma-producing cells at 1 week post-boost, at 10 weeks post-boost the MA/CA-VRP-induced response was maintained at a significantly higher level relative to that induced by Gagmyr+-VRP. Antibody responses to MA/CA-VRP and Gagmyr+-VRP were not significantly different.

  2. Rationalizing vaccine injury compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Michelle M

    2008-01-01

    Legislation recently adopted by the United States Congress provides producers of pandemic vaccines with near-total immunity from civil lawsuits without making individuals injured by those vaccines eligible for compensation through the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program. The unusual decision not to provide an alternative mechanism for compensation is indicative of a broader problem of inconsistency in the American approach to vaccine-injury compensation policy. Compensation policies have tended to reflect political pressures and economic considerations more than any cognizable set of principles. This article identifies a set of ethical principles bearing on the circumstances in which vaccine injuries should be compensated, both inside and outside public health emergencies. A series of possible bases for compensation rules, some grounded in utilitarianism and some nonconsequentialist, are discussed and evaluated. Principles of fairness and reasonableness are found to constitute the strongest bases. An ethically defensible compensation policy grounded in these principles would make a compensation fund available to all individuals with severe injuries and to individuals with less-severe injuries whenever the vaccination was required by law or professional duty.

  3. Recombinant baculovirus displayed vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, Mookkan; Kwang, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of new sublineages of H5N1 influenza in Asia poses the greatest challenge in vaccine development for pre-pandemic preparedness. To overcome the antigenic diversity of H5N1 strains, multiple vaccine strains can be designed based on the distribution of neutralizing epitopes in the globular head of H5 hemagglutinin (HA). Recently, we selected two different HAs of H5N1 strains based on the neutralizing epitopes and reactivity with different neutralizing antibodies. The HAs of selected vaccine strains were individually expressed on the baculovirus envelope (bivalent-BacHA) with its native antigenic configuration. Further, oral delivery of live bivalent-BacHA elicited broadly reactive humoral, mucosal and cell-mediated immune responses and showed complete protection against antigenically distinct H5N1 strains in mice. The strategy for the vaccine strain selection, vaccine design and route of administration will provide an idea for development of a widely protective vaccine against highly pathogenic H5N1 for pre-pandemic preparedness. PMID:23941989

  4. [Vaccination for international travelers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrazola, M Pilar; Serrano, Almudena; López-Vélez, Rogelio

    2016-05-01

    Traveler's vaccination is one of the key strategies for the prevention of infectious diseases during international travel. The risk of acquiring an infectious disease is determined in each case by the characteristics of the traveler and the travel, so the pre-departure medical advice of the traveler must be individualized. The World Health Organization classifies travelerś vaccines into three groups. - Vaccines for routine use in national immunization programs: Haemophilus influenzae type b, hepatitis B, polio, measles-mumps-rubella, tetanus-diphtheria-whooping a cough, and chickenpox. - Vaccinations required by law in certain countries before to enter them: yellow fever, meningococcal disease and poliomyelitis. - Vaccines recommended depending on the circumstances: cholera, japanese encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, meningococcal disease, typhoid fever, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, rabies and BCG. This review is intended to introduce the reader to the field of international vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  6. Vaccination strategies against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, E

    2009-01-01

    Every year, Influenza virus infection is at the origin of substantial excess in morbidity and mortality in developed as well as developing countries. Influenza viruses undergo antigenic drift which cause annual replacement of strain included in classical trivalent vaccines. Less frequently, this virus can also undergo antigenic shift, which corresponds to a major antigenic change and can lead to an extra medical burden. Several vaccines have been made available to immunize individuals against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza viruses. For seasonal Influenza vaccines, live attenuated and classical inactivated trivalent vaccines have been licensed and are widely used. Additionally, several strategies are under investigations to improve further the efficacy of existing seasonal vaccines in children and elderly. These include the use of adjuvant, increase in antigen content, or alternative route of delivery. Similarly, several approaches have been licensed to address additional challenge posed by pandemic viruses. The different vaccination strategies used to maximise protection against seasonal as well as pandemic influenza will be reviewed and discussed in the perspective the current threat posed by the H1N1v pandemic Influenza.

  7. [Adverse ocular effects of vaccinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, T; Hengel, H

    2016-07-01

    Vaccinations are very effective measures for prevention of infections but are also associated with a long list of possible side effects. Adverse ocular effects following vaccination have been rarely reported or considered to be related to vaccinations. Conjunctivitis is a frequent sequel of various vaccinations. Oculorespiratory syndrome and serum sickness syndrome are considered to be related to influenza vaccinations. The risk of reactivation or initiation of autoimmune diseases (e. g. uveitis) cannot be excluded but has not yet been proven. Overall the benefit of vaccination outweighs the possible but very low risk of ocular side effects.

  8. HIV Vaccination, is Breakthrough Underway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Da-Yong; Wu, Hong-Ying; Lu, Ting-Ren; Xu, Bin; Ding, Jian

    2016-01-01

    After long defeats-almost no marked breakthrough in HIV vaccination campaign has been observed during the past two decades, and we still have not lost our faiths for the development of highly effective and low risk HIV vaccines. Many effective vaccines have been discovered and will certainly enter into the markets within the next 5 to 10 years. In order to promote HIV vaccine developments and clinical HIV therapeutic improvements, this perspective addresses the good and bad sides of currently available HIV vaccines, discusses many subjects of medical significance and finally provides up-to-date information in the field of HIV studies, in particular regarding vaccine developments and HIV pathogenesis.

  9. Increasing Childhood Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou J.; Hannibal, Kristin; Reis, Evelyn C.; Gallik, Gregory; Moehling, Krissy K.; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Allred, Norma J.; Wolfson, David H.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Since the 2008 inception of universal childhood influenza vaccination, national rates have risen more dramatically among younger children than older children and reported rates across racial/ethnic groups are inconsistent. Interventions may be needed to address age and racial disparities to achieve the recommended childhood influenza vaccination target of 70%. Purpose To evaluate an intervention to increase childhood influenza vaccination across age and racial groups. Methods In 2011–2012, 20 primary care practices treating children were randomly assigned to Intervention and Control arms of a cluster randomized controlled trial to increase childhood influenza vaccination uptake using a toolkit and other strategies including early delivery of donated vaccine, in-service staff meetings, and publicity. Results The average vaccination differences from pre-intervention to the intervention year were significantly larger in the Intervention arm (n=10 practices) than the Control arm (n=10 practices), for children aged 2–8 years (10.2 percentage points (pct pts) Intervention vs 3.6 pct pts Control) and 9–18 years (11.1 pct pts Intervention vs 4.3 pct pts Control, p<0.05), for non-white children (16.7 pct pts Intervention vs 4.6 pct pts Control, p<0.001), and overall (9.9 pct pts Intervention vs 4.2 pct pts Control, p<0.01). In multi-level modeling that accounted for person- and practice-level variables and the interactions among age, race and intervention, the likelihood of vaccination increased with younger age group (6–23 months), white race, commercial insurance, the practice’s pre-intervention vaccination rate, and being in the Intervention arm. Estimates of the interaction terms indicated that the intervention increased the likelihood of vaccination for non-white children in all age groups and white children aged 9–18 years. Conclusions A multi-strategy intervention that includes a practice improvement toolkit can significantly improve influenza

  10. Immune Interference After Sequential Alphavirus Vaccine Vaccinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    biological weapons by adversary governments and/or terrorists [4–9]. For veterinary use, there are live, attenuated and inactivated VEE vaccines as...Alphaviruses. In: Knife DM, Howley PM, editors. Fields virology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2007. p. 1023–67. [2] Kuhn RJ...Togaviridae: the viruses and their replication. In: Knife DM, Howley PM, editors. Fields virology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams

  11. Rhodococcus equi (Prescottella equi) vaccines; the future of vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, C; Vanniasinkam, T; Ndi, S; Barton, M D

    2015-09-01

    For decades researchers have been targeting prevention of Rhodococcus equi (Rhodococcus hoagui/Prescottella equi) by vaccination and the horse breeding industry has supported the ongoing efforts by researchers to develop a safe and cost effective vaccine to prevent disease in foals. Traditional vaccines including live, killed and attenuated (physical and chemical) vaccines have proved to be ineffective and more modern molecular-based vaccines including the DNA plasmid, genetically attenuated and subunit vaccines have provided inadequate protection of foals. Newer, bacterial vector vaccines have recently shown promise for R. equi in the mouse model. This article describes the findings of key research in R. equi vaccine development and looks at alternative methods that may potentially be utilised.

  12. Cancer Vaccines: A Brief Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sunil; Prendergast, George C

    2016-01-01

    Vaccine approaches for cancer differ from traditional vaccine approaches for infectious disease in tending to focus on clearing active disease rather than preventing disease. In this review, we provide a brief overview of different types of vaccines and adjuvants that have been investigated for the purpose of controlling cancer burdens in patients, some of which are approved for clinical use or in late-stage clinical trials, such as the personalized dendritic cell vaccine sipuleucel-T (Provenge) and the recombinant viral prostate cancer vaccine PSA-TRICOM (Prostvac-VF). Vaccines against human viruses implicated in the development and progression of certain cancers, such as human papillomavirus in cervical cancer, are not considered here. Cancers express "altered self" antigens that tend to induce weaker responses than the "foreign" antigens expressed by infectious agents. Thus, immune stimulants and adjuvant approaches have been explored widely. Vaccine types considered include autologous patient-derived immune cell vaccines, tumor antigen-expressing recombinant virus vaccines, peptide vaccines, DNA vaccines, and heterologous whole-cell vaccines derived from established human tumor cell lines. Opportunities to develop effective cancer vaccines may benefit from seminal recent advances in understanding how immunosuppressive barricades are erected by tumors to mediate immune escape. In particular, targeted ablation of these barricades with novel agents, such as the immune checkpoint drug ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4) approved recently for clinical use, may offer significant leverage to vaccinologists seeking to control and prevent malignancy.

  13. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Luísa Eça; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Results of Booster Vaccination in Children with Primary Vaccine Failure after Initial Varicella Vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakiv, Takao; Nishimura, Naoko; Gotoh, Kensei; Funahashi, Keiji; Yoshii, Hironori; Okuno, Yoshinobu

    2016-05-01

    In October 2014, the varicella vaccination policy in Japan was changed from a single voluntary inoculation to two routine inoculations. This paper reports the results of booster vaccination in children who did not show seroconversion after initial vaccination (i.e., primary vaccine failure : PVF) over a 7-year period prior to the introduction of routine varicella vaccination. Between November 2007 and May 2014, 273 healthy children aged between 1.1 and 14.5 years (median : 1.7 years) underwent varicella vaccination. Before and 4 to 6 weeks after vaccination, the antibody titers were measured using an immune adherence hemagglutination (IAHA) assay and a glycoprotein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (gpELISA). In addition, side reactions were examined during the four-week period after vaccination. Children who did not show IAHA seroconversion (PVF) were recommended to receive a booster vaccination, and the measurement of antibody titers and an assessment of side reactions were performed after the booster dose. In May 2015, a questionnaire was mailed to each of the 273 participants to investigate whether they had developed varicella and/or herpes zoster after vaccination. After initial vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 75% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 4.7, while the gpELISA seroconversion rate was 84% and the mean antibody titer (Log10) with seroconversion was 2.4. Among children with PVF, 54 received booster vaccination within 81 to 714 days (median : 139 days) after the initial vaccination. After booster vaccination, the IAHA seroconversion rate was 98% and the mean antibody titer (Log2) with seroconversion was 5.8. Both the seroconversion rate and the antibody titer were higher compared with the values after the initial vaccination (p vaccination, the gpELISA seropositive rate was 100% and the mean positive antibody titer (Log 10) was 3.6 ; similar results were obtained for the IAHA assay, with a significantly higher

  15. 75 FR 48712 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... beginning of the upcoming influenza vaccination season, the proposed materials included in this notice are... representative in the case of a child) receiving vaccines covered under the National Vaccine Injury Compensation... infection are highest among children. For most people, it lasts only a few days. It can cause: Fever...

  16. Evaluation of vaccine competition using HVT vector vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkey herpesvirus (HVT) has been widely used as a vaccine for Marek’s disease (MD) since the 1970s. Because HVT is a safe vaccine that is poorly sensitive to interference from maternally derived antibodies, it has seen rising use as a vector for vaccines developed for protection against other comm...

  17. Optimal vaccination choice, vaccination games, and rational exemption: an appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Piero; Posta, Pompeo Della; d'Onofrio, Alberto; Salinelli, Ernesto; Centrone, Francesca; Meo, Claudia; Poletti, Piero

    2009-12-10

    A threat for vaccination policies might be the onset of "rational" exemption, i.e. the family's decision not to vaccinate children after a seemingly rational comparison between the perceived risk of infection and the perceived risk of vaccine side effects. We study the implications of rational exemption by models of vaccination choice. By a simple model of individual choice we first prove the "elimination impossible" result in presence of informed families, i.e. aware of herd immunity, and suggest that limited information might explain patterns of universal vaccination. Next, we investigate vaccination choice in a game-theoretic framework for communities stratified into two groups, "pro" and "anti" vaccinators, having widely different perceived costs of infection and of vaccine side effects. We show that under informed families neither a Nash nor a Stackelberg behaviour (characterized, respectively, by players acting simultaneously and by an asymmetric situation with a "leader" and a "follower) allow elimination, unless "pro-vaccinators" assign no costs to vaccine side effects. Elimination turns out to be possible when cooperation is encouraged by a social planner, provided, however, he incorporates in the "social loss function" the preferences of anti-vaccinators only. This allows an interpretation of the current Italian vaccination policy.

  18. National Elk Refuge vaccination protocol

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Proposal by the State of Wyoming, Wyoming Game and Fish Department, to vaccinate elk on the National Elk Refuge. The proposal provides a protocol for vaccinating elk...

  19. Finding Your Adult Vaccination Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Button Past Emails CDC Features Is Your Adult Vaccination Record Up-To-Date? Language: English Español (Spanish) ... your medical history. Staying Up-To-Date on Vaccination is Important Every year thousands of adults in ...

  20. New Vaccines Help Protect You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues New Vaccines Help Protect You Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table ... this page please turn Javascript on. Important new vaccines have recently been approved for use and are ...

  1. Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose and throat. Whooping cough causes uncontrollable coughing. Vaccines can protect you from these diseases. In the U.S., there are four combination vaccines: DTaP prevents all three diseases. It is for ...

  2. The Flu Vaccine and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG The Flu Vaccine and Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs The ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ189, October 2015 PDF Format The Flu Vaccine and Pregnancy Pregnancy What is influenza (the flu)? ...

  3. Modern Technologies of Vaccine Production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L.I. Chernyshova; F.I. Lapiy

    2014-01-01

    .... The article says about modern technology of vaccines that need to know the doctor to objectively and accurately inform patients before vaccination, to answer a number of questions from patients...

  4. Vaccines for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Weinberger, Birgit; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the human population is posing serious challenges to research and to public health authorities in order to prevent diseases that more frequently affect the elderly, a portion of the population that will increase more and more in the coming years. While some vaccines exist and are used in the elderly to effectively fight against some infections (e.g. influenza, pneumococci, varicella-zoster virus, diphtheria, and tetanus), still a lot of work remains to be done to better adapt these vaccines and to develop new ones for this age group. The prevention of infectious diseases affecting the elderly can be successful only through a holistic approach. This approach will aim at the following: (1) a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to the senescence of the immune system, (2) a better and broader use of vaccines recommended for the elderly, (3) the use of vaccines currently considered only for other age groups and (4) actively priming the population when they are immunological competent, before the physiological waning of immune responsiveness may affect the beneficial effects of vaccination. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. HIV-1 vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Robb, Merlin L; Kim, Jerome H

    2014-01-01

    The development of a safe and effective preventive HIV-1 vaccine remains a public health priority. Despite scientific difficulties and disappointing results, HIV-1 vaccine clinical development has, for the first time, established proof-of-concept efficacy against HIV-1 acquisition and identified vaccine-associated immune correlates of risk. The correlate of risk analysis showed that IgG antibodies against the gp120 V2 loop correlated with decreased risk of HIV infection, while Env-specific IgA directly correlated with increased risk. The development of vaccine strategies such as improved envelope proteins formulated with potent adjuvants and DNA and vectors expressing mosaics, or conserved sequences, capable of eliciting greater breadth and depth of potentially relevant immune responses including neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, CD4+ and CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses, mucosal immune responses, and immunological memory, is now proceeding quickly. Additional human efficacy trials combined with other prevention modalities along with sustained funding and international collaboration remain key to bring an HIV-1 vaccine to licensure. PMID:24637946

  6. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    This year, as usual, the Medical Service is helping to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal flu is especially recommended for anyone who suffers from chronic pulmonary, cardio-vascular or kidney disease or diabetes, is recovering from a serious illness or major surgery, or is over 65 years of age. The flu virus is transmitted through the air and through contact with contaminated surfaces, so frequent hand-washing with soap and/or an antiseptic hand wash is of great importance. As soon as the first symptoms appear (fever above 38°, shivering, coughing, muscle and/or joint pains, generalised weakness), you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. Anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor), with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA...

  7. [Risks associated with vaccinations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loupi, E; Baudard, S; Debois, H; Pignato, F

    1998-10-01

    Since Jenner and Pasteur, various vaccines have been developed and administered in immunization program conducted by WHO in order to diminish the circulation of pathogenic agents and eradicate some diseases. Risks associated with immunization are revealed by the collection and assessment of adverse events reported after the use of these drugs. They vary according to the type of vaccines. With high rates of immunization and a low incidence of infectious diseases, adverse events receive increasing attention. Frequent and mostly expected adverse events are reported in clinical trials. Unexpected rare adverse events are reported after marketing authorization by spontaneous reporting and post marketing surveillance studies. Post marketing surveillance should be adapted to vaccines (vaccino-vigilance) and should take into account the risk linked to the disease they may protect against. Adverse events are often temporally associated with vaccines, that does not mean they are causally related. Specific studies should be conducted to assess the causal relationship between vaccines and post immunization adverse events. In order to reduce the risk associated with immunization, a strict follow-up of recommendations, warnings and contraindications in addition to appropriate information being delivered to both vaccinees and physicians are required.

  8. Economics of vaccines revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postma, Maarten J; Standaert, Baudouin A

    2013-05-01

    Performing a total health economic analysis of a vaccine newly introduced into the market today is a challenge when using the conventional cost-effectiveness analysis we normally apply on pharmaceutical products. There are many reasons for that, such as: the uncertainty in the total benefit (direct and indirect) to be measured in a population when using a cohort model; (1) appropriate rules about discounting the long-term impact of vaccines are absent jeopardizing therefore their value at the initial investment; (2) the presence of opposite contexts when introducing the vaccine in developed vs. the developing world with high benefits, low initial health care investment for the latter vs. marginal benefit and high cost for the former; with a corresponding paradox for the vaccine becoming very cost-effective in low income countries but rather medium in middle low to high middle income countries; (3) and the type of trial assessment for the newer vaccines is now often performed with immunogenicity reaction instead of clinical endpoints which still leaves questions on their real impact and their head-to-head comparison. (4.)

  9. Vaccine hesitancy and healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Pauline; Meurice, François; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Glismann, Steffen; Rosenthal, Susan L; Larson, Heidi J

    2016-12-20

    While most people vaccinate according to the recommended schedule, this success is challenged by individuals and groups who delay or refuse vaccines. The aim of this article is to review studies on vaccine hesitancy among healthcare providers (HCPs), and the influences of their own vaccine confidence and vaccination behaviour on their vaccination recommendations to others. The search strategy was developed in Medline and then adapted across several multidisciplinary mainstream databases including Embase Classic & Embase, and PschInfo. All foreign language articles were included if the abstract was available in English. A total of 185 articles were included in the literature review. 66% studied the vaccine hesitancy among HCPs, 17% analysed concerns, attitudes and/or behaviour of HCPs towards vaccinating others, and 9% were about evaluating intervention(s). Overall, knowledge about particular vaccines, their efficacy and safety, helped to build HCPs own confidence in vaccines and their willingness to recommend vaccines to others. The importance of societal endorsement and support from colleagues was also reported. In the face of emerging vaccine hesitancy, HCPs still remain the most trusted advisor and influencer of vaccination decisions. The capacity and confidence of HCPs, though, are stretched as they are faced with time constraints, increased workload and limited resources, and often have inadequate information or training support to address parents' questions. Overall, HCPs need more support to manage the quickly evolving vaccine environment as well as changing public, especially those who are reluctant or refuse vaccination. Some recommended strategies included strengthening trust between HCPs, health authorities and policymakers, through more shared involvement in the establishment of vaccine recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A brief history of vaccines & vaccination in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2014-04-01

    The challenges faced in delivering lifesaving vaccines to the targeted beneficiaries need to be addressed from the existing knowledge and learning from the past. This review documents the history of vaccines and vaccination in India with an objective to derive lessons for policy direction to expand the benefits of vaccination in the country. A brief historical perspective on smallpox disease and preventive efforts since antiquity is followed by an overview of 19 th century efforts to replace variolation by vaccination, setting up of a few vaccine institutes, cholera vaccine trial and the discovery of plague vaccine. The early twentieth century witnessed the challenges in expansion of smallpox vaccination, typhoid vaccine trial in Indian army personnel, and setting up of vaccine institutes in almost each of the then Indian States. In the post-independence period, the BCG vaccine laboratory and other national institutes were established; a number of private vaccine manufacturers came up, besides the continuation of smallpox eradication effort till the country became smallpox free in 1977. The Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) (1978) and then Universal Immunization Programme (UIP) (1985) were launched in India. The intervening events since UIP till India being declared non-endemic for poliomyelitis in 2012 have been described. Though the preventive efforts from diseases were practiced in India, the reluctance, opposition and a slow acceptance of vaccination have been the characteristic of vaccination history in the country. The operational challenges keep the coverage inequitable in the country. The lessons from the past events have been analysed and interpreted to guide immunization efforts.

  11. A brief history of vaccines & vaccination in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahariya, Chandrakant

    2014-01-01

    The challenges faced in delivering lifesaving vaccines to the targeted beneficiaries need to be addressed from the existing knowledge and learning from the past. This review documents the history of vaccines and vaccination in India with an objective to derive lessons for policy direction to expand the benefits of vaccination in the country. A brief historical perspective on smallpox disease and preventive efforts since antiquity is followed by an overview of 19th century efforts to replace variolation by vaccination, setting up of a few vaccine institutes, cholera vaccine trial and the discovery of plague vaccine. The early twentieth century witnessed the challenges in expansion of smallpox vaccination, typhoid vaccine trial in Indian army personnel, and setting up of vaccine institutes in almost each of the then Indian States. In the post-independence period, the BCG vaccine laboratory and other national institutes were established; a number of private vaccine manufacturers came up, besides the continuation of smallpox eradication effort till the country became smallpox free in 1977. The Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI) (1978) and then Universal Immunization Programme (UIP) (1985) were launched in India. The intervening events since UIP till India being declared non-endemic for poliomyelitis in 2012 have been described. Though the preventive efforts from diseases were practiced in India, the reluctance, opposition and a slow acceptance of vaccination have been the characteristic of vaccination history in the country. The operational challenges keep the coverage inequitable in the country. The lessons from the past events have been analysed and interpreted to guide immunization efforts. PMID:24927336

  12. A brief history of vaccines & vaccination in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The challenges faced in delivering lifesaving vaccines to the targeted beneficiaries need to be addressed from the existing knowledge and learning from the past. This review documents the history of vaccines and vaccination in India with an objective to derive lessons for policy direction to expand the benefits of vaccination in the country. A brief historical perspective on smallpox disease and preventive efforts since antiquity is followed by an overview of 19 th century efforts to replace variolation by vaccination, setting up of a few vaccine institutes, cholera vaccine trial and the discovery of plague vaccine. The early twentieth century witnessed the challenges in expansion of smallpox vaccination, typhoid vaccine trial in Indian army personnel, and setting up of vaccine institutes in almost each of the then Indian States. In the post-independence period, the BCG vaccine laboratory and other national institutes were established; a number of private vaccine manufacturers came up, besides the continuation of smallpox eradication effort till the country became smallpox free in 1977. The Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI (1978 and then Universal Immunization Programme (UIP (1985 were launched in India. The intervening events since UIP till India being declared non-endemic for poliomyelitis in 2012 have been described. Though the preventive efforts from diseases were practiced in India, the reluctance, opposition and a slow acceptance of vaccination have been the characteristic of vaccination history in the country. The operational challenges keep the coverage inequitable in the country. The lessons from the past events have been analysed and interpreted to guide immunization efforts.

  13. Needle-free influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Wilschut, Jan C.; Huckriede, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination is the cornerstone of influenza control in epidemic and pandemic situations. Influenza vaccines are typically given by intramuscular injection. However, needle-free vaccinations could offer several distinct advantages over intramuscular injections: they are pain-free, easier to distribut

  14. Clinical Impact of Vaccine Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Puja H; Daza, Alejandro Delgado; Livornese, Lawrence L

    2016-01-01

    The discovery and development of immunization has been a singular improvement in the health of mankind. This chapter reviews currently available vaccines, their historical development, and impact on public health. Specific mention is made in regard to the challenges and pursuit of a vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus as well as the unfounded link between autism and measles vaccination.

  15. Current scenario of malaria vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarnail Singh Braich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the deadliest infectious diseases that affects millions of people worldwide including India. As an addition to chemoprophylaxis and other antimalarial interventions malaria vaccine is under extensive research since decades. The vaccine development is more difficult to predict than drug development and presents a unique challenge as already there has been no vaccine effective against a parasite. Effective malaria vaccine could help eliminate and eradicate malaria; there are currently 63 vaccine candidates, 41 in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Vaccines are being designed to target pre-erythrocytic stages, erythrocytic stage or the sexual stages of Plasmodium taken up by a feeding mosquito, or the multiple stages. Two vaccines in preclinical and clinical development target P. falciparum; and the most advanced candidate is the pre-erythrocytic vaccine RTS,S which is in phase-III clinical trials. It is likely that world's first malaria vaccine will be available by 2015 at the country level. More efficacious second generation malaria vaccines are on the way to development. Safety, efficacy, cost and provision of the vaccine to all communities are major concerns in malaria vaccine issue. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2012; 1(2.000: 60-66

  16. Effective Vaccination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, L; Spears, W; Billings, L; Maxim, P

    2010-10-01

    We present a framework for modeling the spread of pathogens throughout a population and generating policies that minimize the impact of those pathogens on the population. This framework is used to study the spread of human viruses between cities via airplane travel. It combines agent-based simulation, mathematical analysis, and an Evolutionary Algorithm (EA) optimizer. The goal of this study is to develop tools that determine the optimal distribution of a vaccine supply in the model. Using plausible benchmark vaccine allocation policies of uniform and proportional distribution, we compared their effectiveness to policies found by the EA. We then designed and tested a new, more effective policy which increased the importance of vaccinating smaller cities that are flown to more often. This "importance factor" was validated using U.S. influenza data from the last four years.

  17. [About of vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Maria Luisa; Refolo, Pietro; González-Melado, Fermín J

    2012-01-01

    The debate over compulsory or merely recommended vaccination remains open, albeit latent, in those countries that have mandatory vaccine schedules. Despite the advantages of preventive immunization from the point of medical, economic and social features, it's clear, in the current status of medical ethics, that the exercise of patient autonomy calls for personal responsibility in the election of treatments and, in fact, the vaccines. Therefore, it is necessary to change the simple idea of prevention as , characteristic of a in order to pass to a preventative medicine concept that will be able to support the achievement of moral attitudes towards achieving the good for the individual and for the community. This is only possible from a wherever is possible to present an alternative between mandatory vs. recommendation from the concept of that, with the help of a series of measures, could combine the effective protection for the whole community with the responsible exercise of the personal autonomy.

  18. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... patterns that increase activation of the innate immune system. Importantly, viral-vectored vaccines that act through the induction of one or more of these factors also may benefit from cytokine coadministration and increased antigen presentation. In order to increase immunogenicity to the level achieved...

  19. Vaccines against Clostridium difficile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzzi, Rosanna; Adamo, Roberto; Scarselli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is recognized as a major cause of nosocomial diseases ranging from antibiotic related diarrhea to fulminant colitis. Emergence during the last 2 decades of C. difficile strains associated with high incidence, severity and lethal outcomes has increased the challenges for CDI treatment. A limited number of drugs have proven to be effective against CDI and concerns about antibiotic resistance as well as recurring disease solicited the search for novel therapeutic strategies. Active vaccination provides the attractive opportunity to prevent CDI, and intense research in recent years led to development of experimental vaccines, 3 of which are currently under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes recent achievements and remaining challenges in the field of C. difficile vaccines, and discusses future perspectives in view of newly-identified candidate antigens. PMID:24637887

  20. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not pr...

  1. Fundamentals of vaccine immunology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela S Clem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From a literature review of the current literature, this article provides an introduction to vaccine immunology including a primer on the components of the immune system, passive vs. active immunization, the mechanism(s by which immunizations stimulate(s immunity, and the types of vaccines available. Both the innate and adaptive immune subsystems are necessary to provide an effective immune response to an immunization. Further, effective immunizations must induce long-term stimulation of both the humoral and cell-mediated arms of the adaptive system by the production of effector cells and memory cells. At least seven different types of vaccines are currently in use or in development that produce this effective immunity and have contributed greatly to the prevention of infectious disease around the world.

  2. Vaccines against bluetongue in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Giovanni; MacLachlan, N James; Sanchez-Vizcaino, Jose-Manuel; Zientara, Stéphan

    2008-03-01

    After the incursion of bluetongue virus (BTV) into European Mediterranean countries in 1998, vaccination was used in an effort to minimize direct economic losses to animal production, reduce virus circulation and allow safe movements of animals from endemic areas. Vaccination strategies in different countries were developed according to their individual policies, the geographic distribution of the incurring serotypes of BTV and the availability of appropriate vaccines. Four monovalent modified live virus (MLV) vaccines were imported from South Africa and subsequently used extensively in both cattle and sheep. MLVs were found to be immunogenic and capable of generating strong protective immunity in vaccinated ruminants. Adverse side effects were principally evident in sheep. Specifically, some vaccinated sheep developed signs of clinical bluetongue with fever, facial oedema and lameness. Lactating sheep that developed fever also had reduced milk production. More severe clinical signs occurred in large numbers of sheep that were vaccinated with vaccine combinations containing the BTV-16 MLV, and the use of the monovalent BTV-16 MLV was discontinued as a consequence. Abortion occurred in sheep and cattle that received MLVs did not exceed 35 days, with the single notable exception of a cow vaccinated with a multivalent BTV-2, -4, -9 and -16 vaccine in which viraemia persisted at least 78 days. Viraemia of sufficient titre to infect Culicoides insects was observed transiently in MLV-vaccinated ruminants, and natural transmission of MLV strains has been confirmed. An inactivated vaccine was first developed against BTV-2 and used in the field. An inactivated vaccine against BTV-4 as well as a bivalent vaccine against serotypes 2 and 4 were subsequently developed and used in Corsica, Spain, Portugal and Italy. These inactivated vaccines were generally safe although on few occasions reactions occurred at the site of inoculation. Two doses of these BTV inactivated vaccines

  3. Controversies in vaccine mandates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantos, John D; Jackson, Mary Anne; Opel, Douglas J; Marcuse, Edgar K; Myers, Angela L; Connelly, Beverly L

    2010-03-01

    Policies that mandate immunization have always been controversial. The controversies take different forms in different contexts. For routine childhood immunizations, many parents have fears about both short- and long-term side effects. Parental worries change as the rate of vaccination in the community changes. When most children are vaccinated, parents worry more about side effects than they do about disease. Because of these worries, immunization rates go down. As immunization rates go down, disease rates go up, and parents worry less about side effects of vaccination and more about the complications of the diseases. Immunization rates then go up. For teenagers, controversies arise about the criteria that should guide policies that mandate, rather than merely recommend and encourage, certain immunizations. In particular, policy makers have questioned whether immunizations for human papillomavirus, or other diseases that are not contagious, should be required. For healthcare workers, debates have focused on the strength of institutional mandates. For years, experts have recommended that all healthcare workers be immunized against influenza. Immunizations for other infections including pertussis, measles, mumps, and hepatitis are encouraged but few hospitals have mandated such immunizations-instead, they rely on incentives and education. Pandemics present a different set of problems as people demand vaccines that are in short supply. These issues erupt into controversy on a regular basis. Physicians and policy makers must respond both in their individual practices and as advisory experts to national and state agencies. The articles in this volume will discuss the evolution of national immunization programs in these various settings. We will critically examine the role of vaccine mandates. We will discuss ways that practitioners and public health officials should deal with vaccine refusal. We will contrast responses of the population as a whole, within the

  4. The phenotypes of temperature-sensitive mini-RK2 replicons carrying mutations in the replication control gene trfA are suppressed nonspecifically by intragenic cop mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, K; Karunakaran, P; Blatny, J M; Valla, S

    1992-01-01

    The minimal replicon of the broad-host-range plasmid RK2 consists of the origin of vegetative replication (oriV) and a gene (trfA) encoding an essential replication protein that binds to short repeats in oriV. We report here the results of a DNA sequence analysis of seven unique mutants that are temperature sensitive for replication in Escherichia coli. The mutations (designated rts) were distributed throughout 40% of the downstream part of the trfA gene. Spontaneous revertants of the rts mutants were isolated, and further analysis of four such revertants demonstrated that the new phenotypes resulted from intragenic second-site copy up (cop) mutations. Subcloning experiments showed that all tested intragenic combinations of rts and cop mutations resulted in elimination or strong reduction of the temperature sensitivity of replication. This suppression was also observed under conditions where the mutant TrfA protein was provided in trans with respect to oriV, indicating that the reduction in temperature sensitivity could not be a TrfA protein dosage effect. The phenotypes of two of the cop mutants in Pseudomonas aeruginosa were analyzed; the results demonstrated that the mutants were either not functional or poorly functional in this host. The rts mutant plasmids were also reduced in their ability to replicate in P. aeruginosa, and the intragenic cop mutations did not improve the functionality of these mutants. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to current models of the mechanism of action of the TrfA protein. PMID:1400252

  5. Construction and use of a versatile set of broad-host-range cloning and expression vectors based on the RK2 replicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatny, J M; Brautaset, T; Winther-Larsen, H C; Haugan, K; Valla, S

    1997-01-01

    The plasmid vectors described in this report are derived from the broad-host-range RK2 replicon and can be maintained in many gram-negative bacterial species. The complete nucleotide sequences of all of the cloning and expression vectors are known. Important characteristics of the cloning vectors are as follows: a size range of 4.8 to 7.1 kb, unique cloning sites, different antibiotic resistance markers for selection of plasmid-containing cells, oriT-mediated conjugative plasmid transfer, plasmid stabilization functions, and a means for a simple method for modification of plasmid copy number. Expression vectors were constructed by insertion of the inducible Pu or Pm promoter together with its regulatory gene xylR or xylS, respectively, from the TOL plasmid of Pseudomonas putida. One of these vectors was used in an analysis of the correlation between phosphoglucomutase activity and amylose accumulation in Escherichia coli. The experiments showed that amylose synthesis was only marginally affected by the level of basal expression from the Pm promoter of the Acetobacter xylinum phosphoglucomutase gene (celB). In contrast, amylose accumulation was strongly reduced when transcription from Pm was induced. CelB was also expressed with a very high induction ratio in Xanthomonas campestris. These experiments showed that the A. xylinum celB gene could not complement the role of the bifunctional X. campestris phosphoglucomutase-phosphomannomutase gene in xanthan biosynthesis. We believe that the vectors described here are useful for cloning experiments, gene expression, and physiological studies with a wide range of bacteria and presumably also for analysis of gene transfer in the environment. PMID:9023917

  6. Characterization of the minimal replicon of a cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK plasmid and development of versatile Escherichia coli-D. radiodurans shuttle vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meima, R; Lidstrom, M E

    2000-09-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 12-kb fragment of the cryptic Deinococcus radiodurans SARK plasmid pUE10 was determined, in order to direct the development of small, versatile cloning systems for Deinococcus. Annotation of the sequence revealed 12 possible open reading frames. Among these are the repU and resU genes, the predicted products of which share similarity with replication proteins and site-specific resolvases, respectively. The products of both genes were demonstrated using an overexpression system in Escherichia coli. RepU was found to be required for replication, and ResU was found to be required for stable maintenance of pUE10 derivatives. Gel shift analysis using purified His-tagged RepU identified putative binding sites and suggested that RepU may be involved in both replication initiation and autoregulation of repU expression. In addition, a gene encoding a possible antirestriction protein was found, which was shown to be required for high transformation frequencies. The arrangement of the replication region and putative replication genes for this plasmid from D. radiodurans strain SARK is similar to that for plasmids found in Thermus but not to that for the 45.7-kb plasmid found in D. radiodurans strain R1. The minimal region required for autonomous replication in D. radiodurans was determined by sequential deletion of segments from the 12-kb fragment. The resulting minimal replicon, which consists of approximately 2.6 kb, was used for the construction of a shuttle vector for E. coli and D. radiodurans. This vector, pRAD1, is a convenient general-purpose cloning vector. In addition, pRAD1 was used to generate a promoter probe vector, and a plasmid containing lacZ and a Deinococcus promoter was shown to efficiently express LacZ.

  7. Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli from canine urinary tract infections tend to have commensal phylotypes, lower prevalence of virulence determinants and ampC-replicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Samuel; Gally, David L; Argyle, Sally A

    2014-03-14

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli is an emerging clinical challenge in domestic species. Treatment options in many cases are limited. This study characterized MDR E. coli isolates from urinary tract infections in dogs, collected between 2002 and 2011. Isolates were evaluated in terms of β-lactamase production, phylogenetic group, ST type, replicon type and virulence marker profile. Comparisons were made with antibiotic susceptible isolates also collected from dogs with urinary tract infections. AmpC β-lactamase was produced in 67% of the MDR isolates (12/18). Of these, 8 could be specifically attributed to the CMY-2 gene. None of the isolates tested in either group expressed ESBLs. Phylo-group distribution was as expected in the susceptible isolates, with an over representation of the pathogenic B2 phylo-group (67%). In contrast, the phylogenetic background for the MDR group was mixed, with representation of commensal phylo-groups A and B1. The B2 phylo-group represented the smallest proportion (A, B1, B2 or D was 28%, 22%, 11% and 33%, respectively). Virulence marker profiles, evaluated using Identibac(®) microarray, discriminated between the two groups. Marker sequences for a core panel of virulence determinants were identified in most of the susceptible isolates, but not in most of the MDR isolates. These findings indicate that for MDR isolates, plasmid-mediated AmpC is an important resistance mechanism, and while still capable of causing clinical disease, there is evidence for a shift towards phylogenetic groups of reduced inferred virulence potential. There was no evidence of zoonotic potential in either the susceptible or MDR urinary tract isolates in this study. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccine among HIV-infected adults: Conventional vaccine vs. intradermal vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yu Bin; Lee, Jacob; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Hee Jung; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported poor immune responses to conventional influenza vaccines in HIV-infected individuals. This study sought to elicit more potent immunogenicity in HIV-infected adults using an intradermal vaccine compared with a conventional intramuscular vaccine. This multicenter, randomized, controlled, open-label study was conducted at 3 university hospitals during the 2011/2012 pre-influenza season. Three vaccines were used in HIV-infected adults aged 18 – 60 years: an inactivated intramuscular vaccine (Agrippal), a reduced-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu9μg) and a standard-content intradermal vaccine (IDflu15μg). Serum hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies and INF-γ ELISpot assay were measured at the time of vaccination and 1 month after vaccination. Adverse events were recorded for 7 d. A total of 28 Agrippal, 30 IDflu9μg, and 28 IDflu15μg volunteers were included in this analysis. One month after vaccination, the GMTs and differences in INF-γ ELISpot assay results were similar among the 3 groups. Seroprotection rates, seroconversion rates and mean fold increases (MFI) among the 3 groups were also similar, at approximately 80%, 50–60% and 2.5 – 10.0, respectively. All three vaccines satisfied the CHMP criteria for the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains, but not those for the B strain. In univariate analysis, no demographic or clinical factors, including age, CD4+ T-cell counts, HIV viral load, ART status and vaccine type, were related to failure to achieve seroprotection. The three vaccines were all well-tolerated and all reported reactions were mild to moderate. However, there was a tendency toward a higher incidence of local and systemic reactions in the intradermal vaccine groups. The intradermal vaccine did not result in higher immunogenicity compared to the conventional intramuscular vaccine, even with increased antigen dose. PMID:26431466

  9. Communicating vaccine safety during the development and introduction of vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Sonali

    2015-01-01

    Vaccines are the best defense available against infectious diseases. Vaccine safety is of major focus for regulatory bodies, vaccine manufacturers, public health authorities, health care providers and the public as vaccines are often given to healthy children and adults as well as to pregnant woman. Safety assessment is critical at all stages of vaccine development. Effective, clear and consistent communication of the risks and benefits of vaccines and advocacy during all stages of clinical research (including the preparation, approvals, conduct of clinical trials through the post marketing phase) is critically important. This needs to be done for all major stakeholders (e.g. community members, Study Team, Health Care Providers, Ministry of Health, Regulators, Ethics Committee members, Public Health Authorities and Policy Makers). Improved stakeholder alignment would help to address some of the concerns that may affect the clinical research, licensing of vaccines and their wide-spread use in immunization programs around the world.

  10. Chinese vaccine products go global: vaccine development and quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Miao; Liang, Zhenglun; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Junzhi

    2015-05-01

    Through the continuous efforts of several generations, China has become one of the few countries in the world that is capable of independently addressing all the requirements by the Expanded Program on Immunization. Regulatory science is applied to continuously improve the vaccine regulatory system. Passing the prequalification by WHO has allowed Chinese vaccine products to go global. Chinese vaccine products not only secure disease prevention and control domestically but also serve the needs for international public health. This article describes the history of Chinese vaccine development, the current situation of Chinese vaccine industry and its contribution to the prevention and control of infectious diseases. We also share our experience of national quality control and vaccine regulation during the past decades. China's experience in vaccine development and quality control can benefit other countries and regions worldwide, including the developing countries.

  11. Vaccines for Canine Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Foroughi-Parvar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum is the obligatory intracellular parasite of mammalian macrophages and causes zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL. The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of ZVL is regarded as the most important potential risk for human infection. Thus the prevention of canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL is essential to stop the current increase of the Mediterranean visceral leishmaniasis. Recently considerable advances in achieving protective immunization of dogs and several important attempts for achieving an effective vaccine against CVL lead to attracting the scientists trust in its important role for eradication of ZVL. This paper highlights the recent advances in vaccination against canine visceral leishmaniasis from 2007 until now.

  12. Multiple Vaccinations: Friend or Foe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Sarah E.; Jensen, Shawn M.; Twitty, Chris; Bahjat, Keith; Hu, Hong-Ming; Urba, Walter J.; Fox, Bernard A.

    2013-01-01

    Few immunotherapists would accept the concept of a single vaccination inducing a therapeutic anti-cancer immune response in a patient with advanced cancer. But what is the evidence to support the “more-is-better” approach of multiple vaccinations? Since we are unaware of trials comparing the effect of a single vaccine versus multiple vaccinations on patient outcome, we considered that an anti-cancer immune response might provide a surrogate measure of the effectiveness of vaccination strategies. Since few large trials include immunological monitoring, the majority of information is gleaned from smaller trials in which an evaluation of immune responses to vaccine or tumor, before and at one or more times following the first vaccine was performed. In some studies there is convincing evidence that repeated administration of a specific vaccine can augment the immune response to antigens contained in the vaccine. In other settings multiple vaccinations can significantly reduce the immune response to one or more targets. Results from three large adjuvant vaccine studies support the potential detrimental effect of multiple vaccinations as clinical outcomes in the control arms were significantly better than that for treatment groups. Recent research has provided insights into mechanisms that are likely responsible for the reduced responses in the studies noted above, but supporting evidence from clinical specimens is generally lacking. Interpretation of these results is further complicated by the possibility that the dominant immune response may evolve to recognize epitopes not present in the vaccine. Nonetheless, the FDA-approval of the first therapeutic cancer vaccine and recent developments from preclinical models and clinical trials provide a substantial basis for optimism and a critical evaluation of cancer vaccine strategies. PMID:21952289

  13. Parents' vaccination comprehension and decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Julie S; de Bruin, Wändi Bruine; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2008-03-17

    We report on 30 in-depth mental models interviews with parents discussing vaccination for their children, both in general terms and in response to communications drawn from sources supporting and opposing vaccines. We found that even parents favourable to vaccination can be confused by the ongoing debate, leading them to question their choices. Many parents lack basic knowledge of how vaccines work, and do not find the standard information provided to them to be particularly helpful in explaining it. Those with the greatest need to know about vaccination seem most vulnerable to confusing information. Opportunities for education may be missed if paediatricians do not appreciate parents' specific information needs.

  14. Vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Marko; Montalvo, Enoch

    2007-01-08

    We present two cases of shoulder pain and weakness following influenza and pneumococcal vaccine injections provided high into the deltoid muscle. Based on ultrasound measurements, we hypothesize that vaccine injected into the subdeltoid bursa caused a periarticular inflammatory response, subacromial bursitis, bicipital tendonitis and adhesive capsulitis. Resolution of symptoms followed corticosteroid injections to the subacromial space, bicipital tendon sheath and glenohumeral joint, followed by physical therapy. We conclude that the upper third of the deltoid muscle should not be used for vaccine injections, and the diagnosis of vaccination-related shoulder dysfunction should be considered in patients presenting with shoulder pain following a vaccination.

  15. Pediatric vaccines on the horizon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chávez-Bueno, Susana; Stull, Terrence L

    2010-09-01

    Vaccines have saved the lives of millions of children and continue to be essential interventions to control infectious diseases among people of all ages. The list of recommended vaccines for children has expanded in recent years; however, many viral, bacterial and parasitic infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Improved vaccines to prevent Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis infections in children will soon be available. Recent scientific advances are being applied to design new childhood vaccines affording enhanced efficacy, safety and tolerability. Financial barriers and other obstacles to adequate vaccine access need to be eliminated to assure coverage for all children and adolescents.

  16. A defense of compulsory vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Jessica

    2014-03-01

    Vaccine refusal harms and risks harming innocent bystanders. People are not entitled to harm innocents or to impose deadly risks on others, so in these cases there is nothing to be said for the right to refuse vaccination. Compulsory vaccination is therefore justified because non-vaccination can rightly be prohibited, just as other kinds of harmful and risky conduct are rightly prohibited. I develop an analogy to random gunfire to illustrate this point. Vaccine refusal, I argue, is morally similar to firing a weapon into the air and endangering innocent bystanders. By re-framing vaccine refusal as harmful and reckless conduct my aim is to shift the focus of the vaccine debate from non-vaccinators' religious and refusal rights to everyone else's rights against being infected with contagious illnesses. Religious freedom and rights of informed consent do not entitle non-vaccinators to harm innocent bystanders, and so coercive vaccination requirements are permissible for the sake of the potential victims of the anti-vaccine movement.

  17. [Preventive vaccinations for medical personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwat, Klaus; Goedecke, Marcel; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-05-01

    Vaccinations are among the most efficient and important preventive medical procedures. Modern vaccines are well tolerated. In Germany there are no longer laws for mandatory vaccinations, either for the general public or for medical personnel. Vaccinations are now merely "officially recommended" by the top health authorities on the basis of recommendations from the Standing Committee on Vaccinations (STIKO) of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) according to § 20 para 3 of the Protection against Infection law (IfSG). The management of vaccine damage due to officially recommended vaccinations is guaranteed by the Federal States. Whereas vaccinations in childhood are generally considered to be a matter of course, the willingness to accept them decreases markedly with increasing age. In the medical sector vaccinations against, for example, hepatitis B are well accepted while other vaccinations against, for example, whooping cough or influenza are not considered to be so important. The fact that vaccinations, besides offering protection for the medical personnel, may also serve to protect the patients entrusted to medical care from nosocomial infections is often ignored. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Veterinary and human vaccine evaluation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Jones, T. J. D.; Edmond, K.; Gubbins, S.; Paton, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the universal importance of vaccines, approaches to human and veterinary vaccine evaluation differ markedly. For human vaccines, vaccine efficacy is the proportion of vaccinated individuals protected by the vaccine against a defined outcome under ideal conditions, whereas for veterinary vaccines the term is used for a range of measures of vaccine protection. The evaluation of vaccine effectiveness, vaccine protection assessed under routine programme conditions, is largely limited to human vaccines. Challenge studies under controlled conditions and sero-conversion studies are widely used when evaluating veterinary vaccines, whereas human vaccines are generally evaluated in terms of protection against natural challenge assessed in trials or post-marketing observational studies. Although challenge studies provide a standardized platform on which to compare different vaccines, they do not capture the variation that occurs under field conditions. Field studies of vaccine effectiveness are needed to assess the performance of a vaccination programme. However, if vaccination is performed without central co-ordination, as is often the case for veterinary vaccines, evaluation will be limited. This paper reviews approaches to veterinary vaccine evaluation in comparison to evaluation methods used for human vaccines. Foot-and-mouth disease has been used to illustrate the veterinary approach. Recommendations are made for standardization of terminology and for rigorous evaluation of veterinary vaccines. PMID:24741009

  19. Vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Karin Linda; Samuel, Miny; Wai, Kim Lay

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vaccination is recognized as the only practical measure for preventing Japanese encephalitis. Production shortage, costs, and issues of licensure impair vaccination programmes in many affected countries. Concerns over vaccine effectiveness and safety also have a negative impact...... on acceptance and uptake. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate vaccines for preventing Japanese encephalitis in terms of effectiveness, adverse events, and immunogenicity. SEARCH STRATEGY: In March 2007, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1......), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOSIS, and reference lists. We also attempted to contact corresponding authors and vaccine companies. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), including cluster-RCTs, comparing Japanese encephalitis vaccines with placebo (inert agent or unrelated vaccine...

  20. Ensuring safety of DNA vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessels Stephen

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 1990 a new approach for vaccination was invented involving injection of plasmid DNA in vivo, which elicits an immune response to the encoded protein. DNA vaccination can overcome most disadvantages of conventional vaccine strategies and has potential for vaccines of the future. However, today 15 years on, a commercial product still has not reached the market. One possible explanation could be the technique's failure to induce an efficient immune response in humans, but safety may also be a fundamental issue. This review focuses on the safety of the genetic elements of DNA vaccines and on the safety of the microbial host for the production of plasmid DNA. We also propose candidates for the vaccine's genetic elements and for its microbial production host that can heighten the vaccine's safety and facilitate its entry to the market.