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Sample records for replicative senescence model

  1. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

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    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  2. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... arrest. The biomarkers that characterize the path to an irreversible state of cell cycle arrest due to proliferative exhaustion may also be shared by other forms of senescence-inducing mechanisms. Validation of senescence markers is crucial in circumstances where quiescence or temporary growth arrest may...... be triggered or is thought to be induced. Pre-senescence biomarkers are also important to consider as their presence indicate that induction of aging processes is taking place. The bona fide pathway leading to replicative senescence that has been extensively characterized is a consequence of gradual reduction...

  3. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

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    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...

  4. Identification of 30 protein species involved in replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierick, Jean François; Kalume, Dário E; Wenders, Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of human proliferative cells to subcytotoxic stress triggers stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) which is characterized by many biomarkers of replicative senescence. Proteomic comparison of replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence indicates that, at the level...... of protein expression, stress-induced premature senescence and replicative senescence are different phenotypes sharing however similarities. In this study, we identified 30 proteins showing changes of expression level specific or common to replicative senescence and/or stress-induced premature senescence....... These changes affect different cell functions, including energy metabolism, defense systems, maintenance of the redox potential, cell morphology and transduction pathways....

  5. A comparison of oncogene-induced senescence and replicative senescence: implications for tumor suppression and aging.

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    Nelson, David M; McBryan, Tony; Jeyapalan, Jessie C; Sedivy, John M; Adams, Peter D

    2014-06-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable proliferation arrest associated with an altered secretory pathway, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. However, cellular senescence is initiated by diverse molecular triggers, such as activated oncogenes and shortened telomeres, and is associated with varied and complex physiological endpoints, such as tumor suppression and tissue aging. The extent to which distinct triggers activate divergent modes of senescence that might be associated with different physiological endpoints is largely unknown. To begin to address this, we performed gene expression profiling to compare the senescence programs associated with two different modes of senescence, oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) and replicative senescence (RS [in part caused by shortened telomeres]). While both OIS and RS are associated with many common changes in gene expression compared to control proliferating cells, they also exhibit substantial differences. These results are discussed in light of potential physiological consequences, tumor suppression and aging.

  6. Donor's age and replicative senescence favour the in-vitro mineralization potential of human fibroblasts.

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    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; Di Bari, Caterina; Cocconi, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2015-12-01

    Aberrant mineralization of soft connective tissues (ectopic calcification) may occur as a frequent age-related complication. Still, it remains unclear the role of mesenchymal cell donor's age and of replicative senescence on ectopic calcification. Therefore, the ability of cells to deposit in-vitro hydroxyapatite crystals and the expression of progressive ankylosis protein homolog (ANKH), ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1), tissue non specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and osteopontin (OPN) have been evaluated in human dermal fibroblasts derived from neonatal (nHDF) and adult (aHDF) donors (ex-vivo ageing model) or at low and high cumulative population doublings (CPD) up to replicative senescence (in-vitro ageing model). This study demonstrates that: 1) replicative senescence favours hydroxyapatite formation in cultured fibroblasts; 2) donor's age acts as a major modulator of the mineralizing potential of HDF, since nHDF are less prone than aHDF to induce calcification; 3) donor's age and replicative senescence play in concert synergistically increasing the calcification process; 4) the ANKH+ENPP1/TNAP ratio, being crucial for pyrophosphate/inorganic phosphate balance, is greatly influenced by donor's age, as well as by replicative senescence, and regulates mineral deposition; 5) OPN is only modulated by replicative senescence. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. ATM Couples Replication Stress and Metabolic Reprogramming during Cellular Senescence

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    Katherine M. Aird

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Replication stress induced by nucleotide deficiency plays an important role in cancer initiation. Replication stress in primary cells typically activates the cellular senescence tumor-suppression mechanism. Senescence bypass correlates with development of cancer, a disease characterized by metabolic reprogramming. However, the role of metabolic reprogramming in the cellular response to replication stress has been little explored. Here, we report that ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM plays a central role in regulating the cellular response to replication stress by shifting cellular metabolism. ATM inactivation bypasses senescence induced by replication stress triggered by nucleotide deficiency. This was due to restoration of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP levels through both upregulation of the pentose phosphate pathway via increased glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD activity and enhanced glucose and glutamine consumption. These phenotypes were mediated by a coordinated suppression of p53 and upregulation of c-MYC downstream of ATM inactivation. Our data indicate that ATM status couples replication stress and metabolic reprogramming during senescence.

  8. The Length of the Shortest Telomere as the Major Determinant of the Onset of Replicative Senescence

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    Xu, Zhou; Duc, Khanh Dao; Holcman, David; Teixeira, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The absence of telomerase in many eukaryotes leads to the gradual shortening of telomeres, causing replicative senescence. In humans, this proliferation barrier constitutes a tumor suppressor mechanism and may be involved in cellular aging. Yet the heterogeneity of the senescence phenotype has hindered the understanding of its onset. Here we investigated the regulation of telomere length and its control of senescence heterogeneity. Because the length of the shortest telomeres can potentially regulate cell fate, we focus on their dynamics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We developed a stochastic model of telomere dynamics built on the protein-counting model, where an increasing number of protein-bound telomeric repeats shift telomeres into a nonextendable state by telomerase. Using numerical simulations, we found that the length of the shortest telomere is well separated from the length of the others, suggesting a prominent role in triggering senescence. We evaluated this possibility using classical genetic analyses of tetrads, combined with a quantitative and sensitive assay for senescence. In contrast to mitosis of telomerase-negative cells, which produces two cells with identical senescence onset, meiosis is able to segregate a determinant of senescence onset among the telomerase-negative spores. The frequency of such segregation is in accordance with this determinant being the length of the shortest telomere. Taken together, our results substantiate the length of the shortest telomere as being the key genetic marker determining senescence onset in S. cerevisiae. PMID:23733785

  9. The involvement of epigenetic silencing of Foxa2 in cellular replicative and premature senescence induced by hydrogen peroxide.

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    Zhang, W; Ji, W; Yang, L; Yao, L; Wang, G; Xuan, A; Zhuang, Z

    2013-04-01

    Foxa2 is one member of the Foxa subfamily of winged helix/forkhead box (Fox) transcription factors which has been found to play important roles in multiple stages of mammalian life, beginning with early development, continuing during organogenesis, and finally in metabolism and homeostasis in the adult. To explore the involvement of Foxa2 and its epigenetic regulations in cellular senescence, we established the premature senescence model induced by hydrogen peroxide in comparison with replicative senescence. The mRNA level of Foxa2 was downregulated in both replicative and premature senescent cells. We further found the increased DNA methylation level and new methylation at CpG sites in the promoter with 43.6% of methylated CpG islands in premature senescence, while only 5.7% and 17.1% in young cells and replicative senescence separately. Moreover, we noted the alterations of histone modifications including decreased histone H3 acetylation, increased H4 (Lys-20) trimethylation at the Foxa2 CpG islands in the promoter in replicative or premature senescence, while decreased histone H3 (Lys-4) trimethylation across the transcription start regions in cellular senescence. Taken together, epigenetic silencing of Foxa2 is associated with an increased DNA methylation level and histone H4 (Lys-20) trimethylation, decreased histone H3 acetylation and histone H3 (Lys-4) trimethylation, involved in cellular replicative or premature senescence.

  10. Pathways of aging: comparative analysis of gene signatures in replicative senescence and stress induced premature senescence.

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    Kural, Kamil C; Tandon, Neetu; Skoblov, Mikhail; Kel-Margoulis, Olga V; Baranova, Ancha V

    2016-12-28

    In culturing normal diploid cells, senescence may either happen naturally, in the form of replicative senescence, or it may be a consequence of external challenges such as oxidative stress. Here we present a comparative analysis aimed at reconstruction of molecular cascades specific for replicative (RS) and stressinduced senescence (SIPS) in human fibroblasts. An involvement of caspase-3/keratin-18 pathway and serine/threonine kinase Aurora A/ MDM2 pathway was shared between RS and SIPS. Moreover, stromelysin/MMP3 and N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase enzyme MGAT1, which initiates the synthesis of hybrid and complex Nglycans, were identified as key orchestrating components in RS and SIPS, respectively. In RS only, Aurora-B driven cell cycle signaling was deregulated in concert with the suppression of anabolic branches of the fatty acids and estrogen metabolism. In SIPS, Aurora-B signaling is deprioritized, and the synthetic branches of cholesterol metabolism are upregulated, rather than downregulated. Moreover, in SIPS, proteasome/ubiquitin ligase pathways of protein degradation dominate the regulatory landscape. This picture indicates that SIPS proceeds in cells that are actively fighting stress which facilitates premature senescence while failing to completely activate the orderly program of RS. The promoters of genes differentially expressed in either RS or SIPS are unusually enriched by the binding sites for homeobox family proteins, with particular emphasis on HMX1, IRX2, HDX and HOXC13. Additionally, we identified Iroquois Homeobox 2 (IRX2) as a master regulator for the secretion of SPP1-encoded osteopontin, a stromal driver for tumor growth that is overexpressed by both RS and SIPS fibroblasts. The latter supports the hypothesis that senescence-specific de-repression of SPP1 aids in SIPS-dependent stromal activation. Reanalysis of previously published experimental data is cost-effective approach for extraction of additional insignts into the functioning of

  11. MicroRNA-33 promotes the replicative senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts by suppressing CDK6

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    Xu, Shun; Huang, Haijiao; Li, Nanhong; Zhang, Bing; Jia, Yubin; Yang, Yukun; Yuan, Yuan; Xiong, Xing-dong; Wang, Dengchuan; Zheng, Hui-ling [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China); Liu, Xinguang, E-mail: xgliu64@126.com [Institute of Aging Research, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Diagnostics, Dongguan (China); Institute of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang (China)

    2016-05-13

    MicroRNAs are a large class of tiny noncoding RNAs, which have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression, and thus are involved in multiple cellular processes, including cellular senescence. MicroRNA-33 has previously been established to exert crucial effect on cell proliferation, lipid metabolism and cholesterol metabolism. Nonetheless, the association between microRNA-33 and cellular senescence and its underlying molecular mechanism are far to be elucidated. The present study has attempted to probe into the effect of microRNA-33 on MEFs senescence. Our data unveiled that microRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEFs compared to the young MEFs, and ectopic expression of microRNA-33 promoted MEFs senescence, while knock-down of microRNA-33 exhibited a protective effect against senescence phenotype. Moreover, we verified CDK6 as a direct target of microRNA-33 in mouse. Silencing of CDK6 induced the premature senescence phenotype of MEFs similarly as microRNA-33, while enforced expression of CDK6 significantly reverse the senescence-induction effect of microRNA-33. Taken together, our results suggested that microRNA-33 enhanced the replicative senescence of MEFs potentially by suppressing CDK6 expression. -- Highlights: •MicroRNA-33 was dramatically down-regulated in senescent MEF cells. •Altered expression of microRNA-33 exerted a critical role in MEFs senescence. •MicroRNA-33 promoted the replicative senescence of MEFs via targeting of CDK6.

  12. Interplay between Selenium Levels and Replicative Senescence in WI-38 Human Fibroblasts: A Proteomic Approach

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    Ghania Hammad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenoproteins are essential components of antioxidant defense, redox homeostasis, and cell signaling in mammals, where selenium is found in the form of a rare amino acid, selenocysteine. Selenium, which is often limited both in food intake and cell culture media, is a strong regulator of selenoprotein expression and selenoenzyme activity. Aging is a slow, complex, and multifactorial process, resulting in a gradual and irreversible decline of various functions of the body. Several cellular aspects of organismal aging are recapitulated in the replicative senescence of cultured human diploid fibroblasts, such as embryonic lung fibroblast WI-38 cells. We previously reported that the long-term growth of young WI-38 cells with high (supplemented, moderate (control, or low (depleted concentrations of selenium in the culture medium impacts their replicative lifespan, due to rapid changes in replicative senescence-associated markers and signaling pathways. In order to gain insight into the molecular link between selenium levels and replicative senescence, in the present work, we have applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on 2-Dimensional Differential in-Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE to the study of young and presenescent cells grown in selenium-supplemented, control, or depleted media. Applying a restrictive cut-off (spot intensity ±50% and a p value < 0.05 to the 2D-DIGE analyses revealed 81 differentially expressed protein spots, from which 123 proteins of interest were identified by mass spectrometry. We compared the changes in protein abundance for three different conditions: (i spots varying between young and presenescent cells, (ii spots varying in response to selenium concentration in young cells, and (iii spots varying in response to selenium concentration in presenescent cells. Interestingly, a 72% overlap between the impact of senescence and selenium was observed in our proteomic results, demonstrating a strong interplay between

  13. Protein modification and replicative senescence of WI-38 human embryonic fibroblasts

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    Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Roepstorff, Peter

    2010-01-01

    reflects a preferential accumulation of damaged proteins within the mitochondria during cellular senescence. Accumulation of AGE-modified proteins could be explained by the senescence-associated decreased activity of glyoxalase-I, the major enzyme involved in the detoxification of the glycating agents...... methylglyoxal and glyoxal, in both cytosol and mitochondria. This finding suggests a role of detoxification systems in the age-related build-up of damaged proteins. Moreover, the oxidized protein repair system methionine sulfoxide reductase was more affected in the mitochondria than in the cytosol during......Summary Oxidized proteins as well as proteins modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and by glycation (AGE) have been shown to accumulate with aging in vivo and during replicative senescence in vitro. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins...

  14. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

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    Lu, Li, E-mail: luli7300@126.com [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Song, Wen-Hui [Department of Orthopaedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao [Department of Anatomy, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Ang [Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Department of Anatomy, University of Hong Kong Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yang, Wu-Lin, E-mail: wulinyoung@163.com [School of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC), Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR (Singapore)

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5.

  15. Ameliorating replicative senescence of human bone marrow stromal cells by PSMB5 overexpression

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    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Wei, Jiao-Long; Liu, Xue-Qin; Song, Wen-Hui; Yan, Ba-Yi; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Yang, Wu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PSMB5 overexpression restores the differentiation potential of aged hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression enhances the proteasomal activity of late-stage hBMSCs. • PSMB5 overexpression inhibits replicative senescence and improved cell viability. • PSMB5 overexpression promotes cell growth by upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. - Abstract: Multipotent human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) potentially serve as a source for cell-based therapy in regenerative medicine. However, in vitro expansion was inescapably accompanied with cell senescence, characterized by inhibited proliferation and compromised pluripotency. We have previously demonstrated that this aging process is closely associated with reduced 20S proteasomal activity, with down-regulation of rate-limiting catalytic β-subunits particularly evident. In the present study, we confirmed that proteasomal activity directly contributes to senescence of hBMSCs, which could be reversed by overexpression of the β5-subunit (PSMB5). Knocking down PSMB5 led to decreased proteasomal activity concurrent with reduced cell proliferation in early-stage hBMSCs, which is similar to the senescent phenotype observed in late-stage cells. In contrast, overexpressing PSMB5 in late-stage cells efficiently restored the normal activity of 20S proteasomes and promoted cell growth, possibly via upregulating the Cyclin D1/CDK4 complex. Additionally, PSMB5 could enhance cell resistance to oxidative stress, as evidenced by the increased cell survival upon exposing senescent hBMSCs to hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, PSMB5 overexpression retained the pluripotency of late-stage hBMSCs by facilitating their neural differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, our work reveals a critical role of PSMB5 in 20S proteasome-mediated protection against replicative senescence, pointing to a possible strategy for maintaining the integrity of culture-expanded hBMSCs by manipulating the expression of PSMB5

  16. Modulation of Cell Cycle Profile by Chlorella vulgaris Prevents Replicative Senescence of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

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    Tayyebeh Saberbaghi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the effects of Chlorella vulgaris (CV on replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs were investigated. Hot water extract of CV was used to treat HDFs at passages 6, 15, and 30 which represent young, presenescence, and senescence ages, respectively. The level of DNA damage was determined by comet assay while apoptosis and cell cycle profile were determined using FACSCalibur flow cytometer. Our results showed direct correlation between increased levels of damaged DNA and apoptosis with senescence in untreated HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle profile showed increased population of untreated senescent cells that enter G0/G1 phase while the cell population in S phase decreased significantly (P<0.05. Treatment with CV however caused a significant reduction in the level of damaged DNA and apoptosis in all age groups of HDFs (P<0.05. Cell cycle analysis showed that treatment with CV increased significantly the percentage of senescent HDFs in S phase and G2/M phases but decreased the population of cells in G0/G1 phase (P<0.05. In conclusion, hot water extract of Chlorella vulgaris effectively decreased the biomarkers of ageing, indicating its potential as an antiageing compound.

  17. A continuum mathematical model of endothelial layer maintenance and senescence

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    Friedman Avner

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The monolayer of endothelial cells (ECs lining the inner wall of blood vessels deteriorates as a person ages due to a complex interplay of a variety of causes including cell death arising from shear stress of blood flow and cellular oxidative stress, cellular senescence, and decreased rate of replacement of dead ECs by progenitor stem cells. Results A continuum mathematical model is developed to describe the dynamics of large EC populations of the endothelium using a system of differential equations for the number densities of cells of different generations starting from endothelial progenitors to senescent cells, as well as the densities of dead cells and the holes created upon clearing dead cells. Aging of cells is manifested in three ways, namely, losing the ability to divide when the Hayflick limit of 50 generations is reached, decreasing replication rate parameters and increasing death rate parameters as cells divide; due to the dependence of these rate parameters on cell generation, the model predicts a narrow distribution of cell densities peaking at a particular cell generation. As the chronological age of a person advances, the peak of the distribution – corresponding to the age of the endothelium – moves towards senescence correspondingly. However, computer simulations also demonstrate that sustained and enhanced stem cell homing can halt the aging process of the endothelium by maintaining a stationary cell density distribution that peaks well before the Hayflick limit. The healing rates of damaged endothelia for young, middle-aged, and old persons are compared and are found to be particularly sensitive to the stem cell homing parameter. Conclusion The proposed model describes the aging of the endothelium as being driven by cellular senescence, with a rate that does not necessarily correspond to the chronological aging of a person. It is shown that the age of the endothelium depends sensitively on the homing

  18. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Ameliorates Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms and Improves Replicative Senescence-Associated Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts

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    Shy Cian Khor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During aging, oxidative stress affects the normal function of satellite cells, with consequent regeneration defects that lead to sarcopenia. This study aimed to evaluate tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF modulation in reestablishing the oxidative status of myoblasts during replicative senescence and to compare the effects of TRF with other antioxidants (α-tocopherol (ATF and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. Primary human myoblasts were cultured to young, presenescent, and senescent phases. The cells were treated with antioxidants for 24 h, followed by the assessment of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression and activities, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione. Our data showed that replicative senescence increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in myoblasts. Treatment with TRF significantly diminished ROS production and decreased lipid peroxidation in senescent myoblasts. Moreover, the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD2, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1 was modulated by TRF treatment, with increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione peroxidase in senescent myoblasts. In comparison to ATF and NAC, TRF was more efficient in heightening the antioxidant capacity and reducing free radical insults. These results suggested that TRF is able to ameliorate antioxidant defense mechanisms and improves replicative senescence-associated oxidative stress in myoblasts.

  19. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Ameliorates Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms and Improves Replicative Senescence-Associated Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts.

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    Khor, Shy Cian; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah; Mohd Yusof, Yasmin Anum; Abdul Karim, Norwahidah; Makpol, Suzana

    2017-01-01

    During aging, oxidative stress affects the normal function of satellite cells, with consequent regeneration defects that lead to sarcopenia. This study aimed to evaluate tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) modulation in reestablishing the oxidative status of myoblasts during replicative senescence and to compare the effects of TRF with other antioxidants ( α -tocopherol (ATF) and N -acetyl-cysteine (NAC)). Primary human myoblasts were cultured to young, presenescent, and senescent phases. The cells were treated with antioxidants for 24 h, followed by the assessment of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression and activities, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione. Our data showed that replicative senescence increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and lipid peroxidation in myoblasts. Treatment with TRF significantly diminished ROS production and decreased lipid peroxidation in senescent myoblasts. Moreover, the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD2) , catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1) was modulated by TRF treatment, with increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione peroxidase in senescent myoblasts. In comparison to ATF and NAC, TRF was more efficient in heightening the antioxidant capacity and reducing free radical insults. These results suggested that TRF is able to ameliorate antioxidant defense mechanisms and improves replicative senescence-associated oxidative stress in myoblasts.

  20. Prostaglandin E2 promotes features of replicative senescence in chronically activated human CD8+ T cells.

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    Jennifer P Chou

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a pleiotropic immunomodulatory molecule, and its free radical catalyzed isoform, iso-PGE2, are frequently elevated in the context of cancer and chronic infection. Previous studies have documented the effects of PGE2 on the various CD4+ T cell functions, but little is known about its impact on cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes, the immune cells responsible for eliminating virally infected and tumor cells. Here we provide the first demonstration of the dramatic effects of PGE2 on the progression of human CD8+ T cells toward replicative senescence, a terminal dysfunctional state associated multiple pathologies during aging and chronic HIV-1 infection. Our data show that exposure of chronically activated CD8+ T cells to physiological levels of PGE2 and iso-PGE2 promotes accelerated acquisition of markers of senescence, including loss of CD28 expression, increased expression of p16 cell cycle inhibitor, reduced telomerase activity, telomere shortening and diminished production of key cytotoxic and survival cytokines. Moreover, the CD8+ T cells also produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species, suggesting that the resultant oxidative stress may have further enhanced telomere loss. Interestingly, we observed that even chronic activation per se resulted in increased CD8+ T cell production of PGE2, mediated by higher COX-2 activity, thus inducing a negative feedback loop that further inhibits effector function. Collectively, our data suggest that the elevated levels of PGE2 and iso-PGE2, seen in various cancers and HIV-1 infection, may accelerate progression of CD8+ T cells towards replicative senescence in vivo. Inhibition of COX-2 activity may, therefore, provide a strategy to counteract this effect.

  1. Infection susceptibility and immune senescence with advancing age replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice.

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    Xin, Lijun; Jiang, Tony T; Kinder, Jeremy M; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-12-01

    Aging confers increased susceptibility to common pathogens including influenza A virus. Despite shared vulnerability to infection with advancing age in humans and rodents, the relatively long time required for immune senescence to take hold practically restricts the use of naturally aged mice to investigate aging-induced immunological shifts. Here, we show accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice with spontaneous mutation in the nuclear scaffolding protein, lamin A, replicate infection susceptibility, and substantial immune cell shifts that occur with advancing age. Naturally aged (≥ 20 month) and 2- to 3-month-old Lmna(Dhe) mice share near identically increased influenza A susceptibility compared with age-matched Lmna(WT) control mice. Increased mortality and higher viral burden after influenza infection in Lmna(Dhe) mice parallel reduced accumulation of lung alveolar macrophage cells, systemic expansion of immune suppressive Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells, and skewed immune dominance among viral-specific CD8⁺T cells similar to the immunological phenotype of naturally aged mice. Thus, aging-induced infection susceptibility and immune senescence are replicated in accelerated aging Lmna(Dhe) mice. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Replicative senescence of mesenchymal stem cells: a continuous and organized process.

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    Wolfgang Wagner

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC comprise a promising tool for cellular therapy. These cells are usually culture expanded prior to their application. However, a precise molecular definition of MSC and the sequel of long-term in vitro culture are yet unknown. In this study, we have addressed the impact of replicative senescence on human MSC preparations. Within 43 to 77 days of cultivation (7 to 12 passages, MSC demonstrated morphological abnormalities, enlargement, attenuated expression of specific surface markers, and ultimately proliferation arrest. Adipogenic differentiation potential decreased whereas the propensity for osteogenic differentiation increased. mRNA expression profiling revealed a consistent pattern of alterations in the global gene expression signature of MSC at different passages. These changes are not restricted to later passages, but are continuously acquired with increasing passages. Genes involved in cell cycle, DNA replication and DNA repair are significantly down-regulated in late passages. Genes from chromosome 4q21 were over-represented among differentially regulated transcripts. Differential expression of 10 genes has been verified in independent donor samples as well as in MSC that were isolated under different culture conditions. Furthermore, miRNA expression profiling revealed an up-regulation of hsa-mir-371, hsa-mir-369-5P, hsa-mir-29c, hsa-mir-499 and hsa-let-7f upon in vitro propagation. Our studies indicate that replicative senescence of MSC preparations is a continuous process starting from the first passage onwards. This process includes far reaching alterations in phenotype, differentiation potential, global gene expression patterns, and miRNA profiles that need to be considered for therapeutic application of MSC preparations.

  3. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  4. Testing evolutionary models of senescence: traditional approaches and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Chloe; Conneely, Karen N

    2014-12-01

    From an evolutionary perspective, the existence of senescence is a paradox. Why has senescence not been more effectively selected against given its associated decreases in Darwinian fitness? Why does senescence exist and how has it evolved? Three major theories offer explanations: (1) the theory of mutation accumulation suggested by PB Medawar; (2) the theory of antagonistic pleiotropy suggested by GC Williams; and (3) the disposable soma theory suggested by TBL Kirkwood. These three theories differ in the underlying causes of aging that they propose but are not mutually exclusive. This paper compares the specific biological predictions of each theory and discusses the methods and results of previous empirical tests. Lifespan is found to be the most frequently used estimate of senescence in evolutionary investigations. This measurement acts as a proxy for an individual's rate of senescence, but provides no information on an individual's senescent state or "biological age" throughout life. In the future, use of alternative longitudinal measures of senescence may facilitate investigation of previously neglected aspects of evolutionary models, such as intra- and inter-individual heterogeneity in the process of aging. DNA methylation data are newly proposed to measure biological aging and are suggested to be particularly useful for such investigations.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 delays replicative senescence of human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micutkova, Lucia; Diener, Thomas; Li, Chen

    2011-01-01

    extracellular proteins with significantly different abundance in conditioned media from young and senescent fibroblasts. Among these was insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 (IGFBP-6), which was chosen for further analysis. When IGFBP-6 gene expression was downregulated, cell proliferation was inhibited...... and apoptotic cell death was increased. Furthermore, downregulation of IGFBP-6 led to premature entry into cellular senescence. Since IGFBP-6 overexpression increased cellular lifespan, the data suggest that IGFBP-6, in contrast to other IGF binding proteins, is a negative regulator of cellular senescence...

  6. The Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Is Superior to Tocopherol in Promoting Myogenic Differentiation in the Prevention of Replicative Senescence of Myoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shy Cian Khor

    Full Text Available Aging results in a loss of muscle mass and strength. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle mass through regenerative processes, which are impaired during aging. Vitamin E potentially ameliorates age-related phenotypes. Hence, this study aimed to determine the effects of the tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF and α-tocopherol (ATF in protecting myoblasts from replicative senescence and promoting myogenic differentiation. Primary human myoblasts were cultured into young and senescent stages and were then treated with TRF or ATF for 24 h, followed by an analysis of cell proliferation, senescence biomarkers, cellular morphology and differentiation. Our data showed that replicative senescence impaired the normal regenerative processes of myoblasts, resulting in changes in cellular morphology, cell proliferation, senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal expression, myogenic differentiation and myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs expression. Treatment with both TRF and ATF was beneficial to senescent myoblasts in reclaiming the morphology of young cells, improved cell viability and decreased SA-β-gal expression. However, only TRF treatment increased BrdU incorporation in senescent myoblasts, as well as promoted myogenic differentiation through the modulation of MRFs at the mRNA and protein levels. MYOD1 and MYOG gene expression and myogenin protein expression were modulated in the early phases of myogenic differentiation. In conclusion, the tocotrienol-rich fraction is superior to α-tocopherol in ameliorating replicative senescence-related aberration and promoting differentiation via modulation of MRFs expression, indicating vitamin E potential in modulating replicative senescence of myoblasts.

  7. Infrapatellar fat pad-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from osteoarthritis patients: In vitro genetic stability and replicative senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, Simona; Guidotti, Serena; Lilli, Nicoletta Libera; Cattini, Luca; Mariani, Erminia

    2017-05-01

    Different sources of mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered for regenerative medicine applications. Here we analyzed human adipose-derived stromal cells from infrapatellar fat pad (IFPSC) of osteoarthritis patients, representing a very interesting candidate for cartilage regeneration. No data are available concerning IFPSC stability after in vitro expansion. Indeed, replicative potential and multipotency progressively decrease during culture passages while DNA damage and cell senescence increase, thus possibly affecting clinical applications. To investigate whether in vitro expansion influences the genetic stability and replicative senescence of IFPSC, we performed long-term cultures and comparatively analyzed cells at different culture passages. Stromal vascular fraction was harvested from infrapatellar fat pad of 11 osteoarthritis patients undergoing knee replacement surgery. Cell recovery, growth kinetics, surface marker profile, and differentiation ability in inductive culture conditions were recorded. Genetic integrity maintenance was estimated by microsatellite instability analysis and mismatch repair gene expression, whereas telomere length and telomerase activity were assessed to evaluate replicative senescence. Anchorage-dependent growth was tested by soft agar culture. IFPSC displayed a phenotype similar to mesenchymal stromal cells from subcutaneous fat and showed differentiation ability. No microsatellite instability was documented even at advanced culture times in accordance to a sustained expression of mismatch repair genes, thus highlighting stability of short repeated sequences in the genome. No significant telomere attrition nor telomerase activity were documented during culture and cells did not lose anchorage-dependent growth ability. The presented data support the suitability and safety of in vitro expanded IFPSC from osteoarthritis patients for applications in regenerative medicine approaches. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society

  8. The mitochondrial lncRNA ASncmtRNA-2 is induced in aging and replicative senescence in Endothelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchessi, Valentina; Badi, Ileana; Bertolotti, Matteo; Nigro, Patrizia; D'Alessandra, Yuri; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Zanobini, Marco; Pompilio, Giulio; Raucci, Angela; Lauri, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Age-associated cardiovascular diseases are at least partially ascribable to vascular cell senescence. Replicative senescence (RS) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) are provoked respectively by endogenous (telomere erosion) and exogenous (H2O2, UV) stimuli resulting in cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2 phases. In both scenarios, mitochondria-derived ROS are important players in senescence initiation. We aimed to define whether a mtDNA-transcribed long-non-coding-RNA (lncRNA), ASncmtRNA-2, has a role in vascular aging and senescence. Aortas of old mice, characterized by increased senescence, showed an increment in ASncmtRNA-2 expression. In vitro analysis of Endothelial Cells (EC) and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMC) established that ASncmtRNA-2 is induced in EC, but not in VSMC, during RS. Surprisingly, ASncmtRNA-2 is not upregulated in two different EC SIPS scenarios, treated with H2O2 and UV. The p16 gene displayed similar ASncmtRNA-2 expression patterns, suggesting a possible co-regulation of the two genes. Interestingly, the expression of two miRNAs, hsa-miR-4485 and hsa-miR-1973, with perfect homology to the double strand region of ASncmtRNA-2 and originating at least in part from a mitochondrial transcript, was induced in RS, opening to the possibility that this lncRNA functions as a non-canonical precursor of these miRNAs. Cell cycle analysis of EC transiently over-expressing ASncmtRNA-2 revealed an accumulation of EC in the G2/M phase, but not in the G1 phase. We propose that ASncmtRNA-2 in EC might be involved in the RS establishment by participating in the cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, possibly through the production of hsa-miR-4485 and hsa-miR-1973. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Proximity of Cytomegalovirus-Specific CD8+T Cells to Replicative Senescence in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, John Joseph; Fudge, Neva Jennifer; Gallant, Maureen Elizabeth; Grant, Michael David

    2018-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively extends the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals; however, age-related morbidities have emerged as major clinical concerns. In this context, coinfection with cytomegalovirus (CMV) accelerates immune senescence and elevates risk for other age-related morbidities, possibly through increased inflammation. We investigated potential relationships between CMV memory inflation, immune senescence, and inflammation by measuring markers of inflammation and telomere lengths of different lymphocyte subsets in HIV-infected individuals seropositive for anti-CMV antibodies. Our study cohort consists mainly of middle aged men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexuals who are stable under long-term ART. Median levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and CRP were significantly higher in those coinfected with CMV. Lymphocyte telomere length in general correlated with age, but for 32/32 subjects tested, there was a consistent hierarchy of telomere lengths with CD8 + T cells' shorter than the general lymphocyte population, CD57 + CD8 + T cells' shorter than CD8 + T cells' and CMV-specific CD57 + CD8 + T cells' the shortest of all. Telomeres of HIV-specific CD8 + T cells were longer than those of CMV-specific CD8 + T cells in all cases tested and over 10 years, CMV-specific CD8 + T cell telomeres of two HIV-infected individuals eroded faster than those of HIV-specific CD8 + T cells. These data indicate that CMV-specific CD8 + T cells of HIV-infected individuals are the lymphocytes closest to telomere-imposed replicative senescence. Exhaustive proliferation of CMV-specific CD8 + T cells in HIV-infected individuals is a potential source of senescent lymphocytes affecting systemic immune function and inflammation.

  10. Cellular Senescence: A Translational Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. Kirkland

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence entails essentially irreversible replicative arrest, apoptosis resistance, and frequently acquisition of a pro-inflammatory, tissue-destructive senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP. Senescent cells accumulate in various tissues with aging and at sites of pathogenesis in many chronic diseases and conditions. The SASP can contribute to senescence-related inflammation, metabolic dysregulation, stem cell dysfunction, aging phenotypes, chronic diseases, geriatric syndromes, and loss of resilience. Delaying senescent cell accumulation or reducing senescent cell burden is associated with delay, prevention, or alleviation of multiple senescence-associated conditions. We used a hypothesis-driven approach to discover pro-survival Senescent Cell Anti-apoptotic Pathways (SCAPs and, based on these SCAPs, the first senolytic agents, drugs that cause senescent cells to become susceptible to their own pro-apoptotic microenvironment. Several senolytic agents, which appear to alleviate multiple senescence-related phenotypes in pre-clinical models, are beginning the process of being translated into clinical interventions that could be transformative.

  11. The profile of lysosomal exoglycosidases in replicative and stress-induced senescence in early passage human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Knaś

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the profiles of the exoglycosidases: N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase, β glucuronidase and β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in fibroblast culture undergoing replicative and stress-induced senescence. Half of the cell culture was grown in normal conditions, without the stressor, and the other half of the cell was treated with 0.15 mM tert-butylhydroperoxide. The activities of total N-acetyl-β-hexosoaminidase as well as β glucuronidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Marciniak et al. The activities of β galactosidase, α mannosidase and α fucosidase in the cell lysate were determined in duplicates using the method of Chatteriee et al. with the modification by Zwierz et al. The activities of the exoglycosidases examined, with the exception of β glucuronidase, showed a significant increase between individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. On each day of the experiment, in the cell lysate of stressed fibroblasts, the activities of exoglycosidases were significantly higher compared to the non-stressed cells. There were very strong correlations between SA-β-GAL staining and b galactosidase activity on individual days of the experiment in both non-stressed and stressed fibroblast cell culture. Replicative and stress-induced senescence results in significant changes to the level of lysosomal exoglycosidases, and results in enhanced lysosomal degradative capacity.

  12. [The definition of chemiluminescence intensity in experimental model of premature senescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavishnikova, S A; Arutiunian, A V; Ryzhak, G A

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic possibilities of chemiluminescence's intensity research for premature senescence prognosis are described in this article. The definition of chemiluminescence's intensity enables to reveal the individuals stable to processes of premature senescence in the model of acute radiation.

  13. Brief Report: Proteasomal Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Degradation Reduces the Immunosuppressive Potential of Clinical Grade-Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Undergoing Replicative Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Séverine; Dulong, Joëlle; Ménard, Cédric; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Meziere, Nadine; Isabelle, Bezier; Latour, Maëlle; Bescher, Nadège; Pedeux, Rémy; Bertheuil, Nicolas; Flecher, Erwan; Sensebé, Luc; Tarte, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Owing to their immunosuppressive properties, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow (BM-MSCs) or adipose tissue (ASCs) are considered a promising tool for cell therapy. However, important issues should be considered to ensure the reproducible production of efficient and safe clinical-grade MSCs. In particular, high expansion rate, associated with progressive senescence, was recently proposed as one of the parameters that could alter MSC functionality. In this study, we directly address the consequences of replicative senescence on BM-MSC and ASC immunomodulatory properties. We demonstrate that MSCs produced according to GMP procedures inhibit less efficiently T-cell, but not Natural Killer (NK)- and B-cell, proliferation after reaching senescence. Senescence-related loss-of-function is associated with a decreased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity in response to inflammatory stimuli. In particular, although STAT-1-dependent IDO expression is transcriptionally induced at a similar level in senescent and nonsenescent MSCs, IDO protein is specifically degraded by the proteasome in senescent ASCs and BM-MSCs, a process that could be reversed by the MG132 proteasome inhibitor. These data encourage the use of appropriate quality controls focusing on immunosuppressive mechanisms before translating clinical-grade MSCs in the clinic. Stem Cells 2017;35:1431-1436. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Adressing Replication and Model Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersberger, Bernd; Galia, Fabrice; Laursen, Keld

    innovation survey data for France, Germany and the UK, we conduct a ‘large-scale’ replication using the Bayesian averaging approach of classical estimators. Our method tests a wide range of determinants of innovation suggested in the prior literature, and establishes a robust set of findings on the variables...... which shape the introduction of new to the firm and new to the world innovations. We provide some implications for innovation research, and explore the potential application of our approach to other domains of research in strategic management.......Many fields of strategic management are subject to an important degree of model uncertainty. This is because the true model, and therefore the selection of appropriate explanatory variables, is essentially unknown. Drawing on the literature on the determinants of innovation, and by analyzing...

  15. A two-step model for senescence triggered by a single critically short telomere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Pauline; Luciano, Pierre; Runge, Kurt W

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. In the absence of a specific telomere elongation mechanism, their DNA shortens progressively with every round of replication, leading to replicative senescence. Here, we show that telomerase-deficient cells bearing a single, very shor...

  16. Stable cellular senescence is associated with persistent DDR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Marzia; Rossiello, Francesca; Mondello, Chiara; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon DNA damage generation to promote DNA repair and inhibit cell cycle progression in the presence of a lesion. Cellular senescence is a permanent cell cycle arrest characterized by persistent DDR activation. However, some reports suggest that DDR activation is a feature only of early cellular senescence that is then lost with time. This challenges the hypothesis that cellular senescence is caused by persistent DDR activation. To address this issue, we studied DDR activation dynamics in senescent cells. Here we show that normal human fibroblasts retain DDR markers months after replicative senescence establishment. Consistently, human fibroblasts from healthy aged donors display markers of DDR activation even three years in culture after entry into replicative cellular senescence. However, by extending our analyses to different human cell strains, we also observed an apparent DDR loss with time following entry into cellular senescence. This though correlates with the inability of these cell strains to survive in culture upon replicative or irradiation-induced cellular senescence. We propose a model to reconcile these results. Cell strains not suffering the prolonged in vitro culture stress retain robust DDR activation that persists for years, indicating that under physiological conditions persistent DDR is causally involved in senescence establishment and maintenance. However, cell strains unable to maintain cell viability in vitro, due to their inability to cope with prolonged cell culture-associated stress, show an only-apparent reduction in DDR foci which is in fact due to selective loss of the most damaged cells.

  17. Zmpste24-/- mouse model for senescent wound healing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Parag; Szpalski, Caroline; Soares, Marc; Davidson, Edward H; Knobel, Denis; Warren, Stephen M

    2012-12-01

    The graying of our population has motivated the authors to better understand age-related impairments in wound healing. To increase research throughput, the authors hypothesized that the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Zmpste24-deficient (Zmpste24(-/-)) mouse could serve as a model of senescent wound healing. Using a stented excisional wound closure model, the authors tested this hypothesis on 8-week-old male Zmpste24(-/-) mice (n = 25) and age-matched male C57BL/6J wild-type mice (n = 25). Wounds were measured photogrammetrically and harvested for immunohistochemistry, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and circulating vasculogenic progenitor cells were measured by flow cytometry. Zmpste24(-/-) mice had a significant delay in wound closure compared with wild-type mice during the proliferative/vasculogenic phase. Zmpste24(-/-) wounds had decreased proliferation, increased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels, increased proapoptotic signaling (i.e., p53, PUMA, BAX), decreased antiapoptotic signaling (i.e., Bcl-2), and increased DNA fragmentation. These changes correlated with decreased local vasculogenic growth factor expression, decreased mobilization of bone marrow-derived vasculogenic progenitor cells, and decreased new blood vessel formation. Age-related impairments in wound closure are multifactorial. The authors' data suggest that the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome Zmpste24(-/-) progeroid syndrome shares mechanistic overlap with normal aging and therefore might provide a uniquely informative model with which to study age-associated impairments in wound closure.

  18. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data.

  19. Uncoupling Oncogene-Induced Senescence (OIS) and DNA Damage Response (DDR) triggered by DNA hyper-replication: lessons from primary mouse embryo astrocytes (MEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Marcos; Costoya, José A; Arce, Víctor M

    2017-10-11

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a complex process, in which activation of oncogenic signals during early tumorigenesis results in a high degree of DNA replication stress. The ensuing response to the DNA damage produces a permanent G1 arrest that prevents unlimited cell proliferation and lessens the development of tumours. However, despite the role of OIS in the proliferative arrest resulting from an activating oncogenic-lesion has obtained wide support, there is also evidence indicating that cells may overcome oncogene-induced senescence under some circumstances. In this study, we have investigated the possibility that some of the assumptions on the role of DNA damage response (DDR) in triggering OIS may depend on the fact that most of the available data were obtained in mouse embryo fibroblast. By comparing the degree of OIS observed in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF) and mouse embryo astrocytes (MEA) obtained from the same individuals we have demonstrated that, despite truthful activation of DDR in both cell types, significant levels of OIS were only detected in MEF. Therefore, this uncoupling between OIS and DDR observed in astrocytes supports the intriguingly possibility that OIS is not a widespread response mechanism to DDR.

  20. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Emma L; Lane, James A E; Michalek, Ryan D; Karoly, Edward D; Parkinson, E Kenneth

    2016-12-07

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease.

  1. Factor Copula Models for Replicated Spatial Data

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel

    2016-12-19

    We propose a new copula model that can be used with replicated spatial data. Unlike the multivariate normal copula, the proposed copula is based on the assumption that a common factor exists and affects the joint dependence of all measurements of the process. Moreover, the proposed copula can model tail dependence and tail asymmetry. The model is parameterized in terms of a covariance function that may be chosen from the many models proposed in the literature, such as the Matérn model. For some choice of common factors, the joint copula density is given in closed form and therefore likelihood estimation is very fast. In the general case, one-dimensional numerical integration is needed to calculate the likelihood, but estimation is still reasonably fast even with large data sets. We use simulation studies to show the wide range of dependence structures that can be generated by the proposed model with different choices of common factors. We apply the proposed model to spatial temperature data and compare its performance with some popular geostatistics models.

  2. Modelling the Replication Management in Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezar TOADER

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the modern economy, the benefits of Web services are significant because they facilitates the activities automation in the framework of Internet distributed businesses as well as the cooperation between organizations through interconnection process running in the computer systems. This paper presents the development stages of a model for a reliable information system. This paper describes the communication between the processes within the distributed system, based on the message exchange, and also presents the problem of distributed agreement among processes. A list of objectives for the fault-tolerant systems is defined and a framework model for distributed systems is proposed. This framework makes distinction between management operations and execution operations. The proposed model promotes the use of a central process especially designed for the coordination and control of other application processes. The execution phases and the protocols for the management and the execution components are presented. This model of a reliable system could be a foundation for an entire class of distributed systems models based on the management of replication process.

  3. Senescence vs. sustenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Vaupel, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Humans, and many other species, suffer senescence: mortality increases and fertility decreases with adult age. Some species, however, enjoy sustenance: mortality and fertility remain constant. Here we develop simple but general evolutionary-demographic models to explain the conditions that favor...... senescence vs. sustenance. The models illustrate how mathematical demography can deepen understanding of the evolution of aging....

  4. Hepatoprotective Effects of Swimming Exercise against D-Galactose-Induced Senescence Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates whether a 12-week swimming exercise training can prevent liver damage or senescence associated biomarkers in an experimental aging model in rats. Twenty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: vehicle treatment with sedentary control (C, , aging induction with sedentary (A, , vehicle treatment with swimming exercise (SW, , and aging induction with swimming exercise (A + SW, . Rats in groups A and AS received intraperitoneal D-galactose injections (150 mg/kg/day for 12 weeks to induce aging. Rats in groups SW and A + SW were subjected to swimming exercise training for 12 weeks. Body weight, liver weight, epididymal fat mass, blood biochemistry, and liver pathology were performed at the end of the experiment. Hepatic senescence protein markers such as β-galactosidase, p53, and p21, as well as the inflammatory mediator, IL-6, were examined. The D-galactose-treated rats exhibited increases in AST and γ-GT plasma levels and β-galactosidase protein expression compared to the control group. Swimming exercise significantly reduced BW, epididymal fat mass, γ-GT activity, and p53, p21, and IL-6 protein levels compared to the aging group. These results suggest that a 12-week swimming exercise program suppresses senescence markers and downregulates inflammatory mediator in the liver tissues of D-galactose-induced aging rats.

  5. The case for negative senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaupel, James W; Baudisch, Annette; Dölling, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Negative senescence is characterized by a decline in mortality with age after reproductive maturity, generally accompanied by an increase in fecundity. Hamilton (1966) ruled out negative senescence: we adumbrate the deficiencies of his model. We review empirical studies of various plants and some...... kinds of animals that may experience negative senescence and conclude that negative senescence may be widespread, especially in indeterminate-growth species for which size and fertility increase with age. We develop optimization models of life-history strategies that demonstrate that negative senescence...

  6. A Cognitive Developmental Model of Rigidity in Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapsley, Daniel K.; Enright, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    The rigidity construct is reinterpreted in terms of the cognitive developmental approach. A review reveals both cognitive and developmental themes, with an emphasis on the structural and operational properties of rigidity. Notes weaknesses of previous approaches to rigidity and discusses implications and predictions from the proposed model.…

  7. Modeling HIV-1 intracellular replication: two simulation approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarrabi, N.; Mancini, E.; Tay, J.; Shahand, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Many mathematical and computational models have been developed to investigate the complexity of HIV dynamics, immune response and drug therapy. However, there are not many models which consider the dynamics of virus intracellular replication at a single level. We propose a model of HIV intracellular

  8. Sabin-to-Mahoney Transition Model of Quasispecies Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-05-31

    Qspp is an agent-based stochastic simulation model of the Poliovirus Sabin-to-Mahoney transition. This code simulates a cell-to-cell model of Poliovirus replication. The model tracks genotypes (virus genomes) as they are replicated in cells, and as the cells burst and release particles into the medium of a culture dish. An inoculum is then taken from the pool of virions and is used to inoculate cells on a new dish. This process repeats. The Sabin genotype comprises the initial inoculum. Nucleotide positions that match the Sabin1 (vaccine strain) and Mahoney (wild type) genotypes, as well as the neurovirulent phenotype (from the literature) are enumerated as constants.

  9. Mathematical models of HIV replication and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines how mathematical models have been helpful, and continue to be so, for obtaining insights into the in vivo dynamics of HIV infection. The review starts with a discussion of a basic mathematical model that has been frequently used to study HIV dynamics. Some crucial results are described, including the estimation of key parameters that characterize the infection, and the generation of influential theories which argued that in vivo virus evolution is a key player in HIV pathogenesis. Subsequently, more recent concepts are reviewed that have relevance for disease progression, including the multiple infection of cells and the direct cell-to-cell transmission of the virus through the formation of virological synapses. These are important mechanisms that can influence the rate at which HIV spreads through its target cell population, which is tightly linked to the rate at which the disease progresses towards AIDS.

  10. SIRT1 prevents replicative senescence of normal human umbilical cord fibroblast through potentiating the transcription of human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shuntaro; Ogawa, Kaori; Ikei, Takahiro; Udono, Miyako; Fujiki, Tsukasa; Katakura, Yoshinori

    2012-01-06

    SIRT1, the mammalian homolog of sirtuins, has emerged as a mediator of the beneficial effects of calorie restriction. Among them, we focused on the SIRT1-induced prevention of cellular senescence, and tried to reveal the molecular mechanisms that define the effects of SIRT1. Firstly in this study, we observed that overexpression of SIRT1 resulted in the prevention of cellular senescence of normal human umbilical cord fibroblast HUC-F2 cells. Here, we focused on the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene as a target of the SIRT1-induced prevention of cellular senescence. Results showed that SIRT1, SIRT1 activator, resveratrol, and SIRT1 activating condition, starved condition, increased the transcription of hTERT in HUC-F2 cells. Next, we found that SIRT1 increased hTERT transcription in a c-MYC-dependent manner, triggered the transcription of the c-MYC gene and increased the amount of c-MYC recruited to the hTERT promoter. Further, SIRT1 increased the transcriptional activation ability of c-MYC and correspondingly increased the amount of acetylated H4 histone at the hTERT promoter. All of these results indicated that SIRT1 activates hTERT transcription through the involvement of c-MYC, and suggested that this SIRT1-induced augmentation of hTERT transcription resulted in the extension of the cellular life span of HUC-F2 cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitric oxide prevents alveolar senescence and emphysema in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda E Boe

    Full Text Available Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME treatment induces arteriosclerosis and vascular senescence. Here, we report that the systemic inhibition of nitric oxide (NO production by L-NAME causes pulmonary emphysema. L-NAME-treated lungs exhibited both the structural (alveolar tissue destruction and functional (increased compliance and reduced elastance characteristics of emphysema development. Furthermore, we found that L-NAME-induced emphysema could be attenuated through both genetic deficiency and pharmacological inhibition of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1. Because PAI-1 is an important contributor to the development of senescence both in vitro and in vivo, we investigated whether L-NAME-induced senescence led to the observed emphysematous changes. We found that L-NAME treatment was associated with molecular and cellular evidence of premature senescence in mice, and that PAI-1 inhibition attenuated these increases. These findings indicate that NO serves to protect and defend lung tissue from physiological aging.

  12. Endothelial Senescence Contributes to Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction in an Aging Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevaert, Andreas B; Shakeri, Hadis; Leloup, Arthur J; Van Hove, Cor E; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Vrints, Christiaan J; Lemmens, Katrien; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2017-06-01

    Because of global aging, the prevalence of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) continues to rise. Although HFpEF pathophysiology remains incompletely understood, endothelial inflammation is stated to play a central role. Cellular senescence is a process of cellular growth arrest linked with aging and inflammation. We used mice with accelerated aging to investigate the role of cellular senescence in HFpEF development. Senescence-accelerated mice (SAM, n=18) and control mice with normal senescence (n=15) were fed normal chow or a high-fat, high-salt diet (WD). Vascular and cardiac function was assessed at 8, 16, and 24 weeks of age. At 24 weeks, both SAM on WD (SAM-WD) and SAM on regular diet displayed endothelial dysfunction, as evidenced by impaired acetylcholine-induced relaxation of aortic segments and reduced basal nitric oxide. At week 24, SAM-WD had developed HFpEF, characterized by diastolic dysfunction, left ventricular hypertrophy, left atrial dilatation, and interstitial fibrosis. Also, exercise capacity was reduced and lung weight increased. Cardiovascular inflammation and senescence were assessed by immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence staining of hearts and aortas. SAM-WD showed increased endothelial inflammation (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression) and increased endothelial senescence (acetyl-p53/CD31 costaining). The latter correlated with diastolic function and intercellular adhesion molecule 1 expression. SAM develop endothelial dysfunction. Adding a high-salt, high-fat diet accelerates endothelial senescence and instigates endothelial inflammation. This coincides with hemodynamic and structural changes typical of HFpEF. Targeting endothelial senescence could be a new therapeutic avenue in HFpEF. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Senescence induction; a possible cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondoh Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cellular immortalization is a crucial step during the development of human cancer. Primary mammalian cells reach replicative exhaustion after several passages in vitro, a process called replicative senescence. During such a state of permanent growth arrest, senescent cells are refractory to physiological proliferation stimuli: they have altered cell morphology and gene expression patterns, although they remain viable with preserved metabolic activity. Interestingly, senescent cells have also been detected in vivo in human tumors, particularly in benign lesions. Senescence is a mechanism that limits cellular lifespan and constitutes a barrier against cellular immortalization. During immortalization, cells acquire genetic alterations that override senescence. Tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes are closely involved in senescence, as their knockdown and ectopic expression confer immortality and senescence induction, respectively. By using high throughput genetic screening to search for genes involved in senescence, several candidate oncogenes and putative tumor suppressor genes have been recently isolated, including subtypes of micro-RNAs. These findings offer new perspectives in the modulation of senescence and open new approaches for cancer therapy.

  14. HDACs and the senescent phenotype of WI-38 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noonan Emily J

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Normal cells possess a limited proliferative life span after which they enter a state of irreversible growth arrest. This process, known as replicative senescence, is accompanied by changes in gene expression that give rise to a variety of senescence-associated phenotypes. It has been suggested that these gene expression changes result in part from alterations in the histone acetylation machinery. Here we examine the influence of HDAC inhibitors on the expression of senescent markers in pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells. Results Pre- and post-senescent WI-38 cells were treated with the HDAC inhibitors butyrate or trichostatin A (TSA. Following HDAC inhibitor treatment, pre-senescent cells increased p21WAF1 and β-galactosidase expression, assumed a flattened senescence-associated morphology, and maintained a lower level of proteasome activity. These alterations also occurred during normal replicative senescence of WI-38 cells, but were not accentuated further by HDAC inhibitors. We also found that HDAC1 levels decline during normal replicative senescence. Conclusion Our findings indicate that HDACs impact numerous phenotypic changes associated with cellular senescence. Reduced HDAC1 expression levels in senescent cells may be an important event in mediating the transition to a senescent phenotype.

  15. [Effects of Astragali Radix combined with Angelicae Sinensis Radix on the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells senescence model in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ke-Sheng; Chen, Ling-Bo; Huang, Xiao-Ping; Deng, Chang-Qing

    2017-11-01

    The aim is to study the effect and its mechanism of Astragalus Radix combined with Angelicae Sinensis Radix on the proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells(HSCs) in senescence model. After drug-containing plasma of rats was prepared via intragastric administration, HSCs of mice were cultured in vitro, and then they were divided into blank control group, model group, blank plasma group, Astragalus Radix + Angelicae Sinensis Radix 1∶1 group and 10∶1 group, Angelicae Sinensis Radix plasma group, and Astragalus Radix plasma group. HSCs senescence model was induced by using tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide(t-BHP), and intervened by drug-containing plasma. Cells senescence rate was tested by SA-β-galactosidase staining method; cell cycle distribution was determined by flow cytometry; Cyclin D1, P21, and P53 mRNA were measured with RT-PCR, and Cyclin D1 protein expression was measured by Western blot. Results showed that after being induced by t-BHP, senescence rate of HSCs was increased; cell proliferation ability was decreased; count of G₀/G₁ phase cells was increased; count of G₂/M+S phase cells was reduced; Cyclin D1 expression was down-regulated while P53, P21 expression was up-regulated, which were reversed by Astragalus Radix + Angelicae Sinensis Radix 1∶1 and 10∶1, single Angelicae Sinensis Radix, and single Astragalus Radix plasma. Furthermore, the above effects were most obvious in Astragalus Radix+Angelicae Sinensis Radix 1∶1 group. These results suggested that t-BHP can promote HSCs senescence and reduce cell proliferation ability. Angelicae Sinensis Radix, Astragalus Radix and their combinations can inhibit HSCs senescence, promote HSCs proliferation as well as cell cycle conversion; moreover, the effects of 1∶1 Astragalus Radix+Angelicae Sinensis Radix were strongest. The mechanisms may be related to up-regulating the expression of cell cycle positive regulator, down-regulating the expression of cell cycle negative regulator, thus promoting

  16. Exploiting tumor cell senescence in anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a physiological process of irreversible cell-cycle arrest that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes of aging. Whereas replicative senescence is associated with telomere attrition after repeated cell division, stress-induced premature senescence occurs in response to aberrant oncogenic signaling, oxidative stress, and DNA damage which is independent of telomere dysfunction. Recent evidence indicates that cellular senescence provides a barrier to tumorigenesis and is a determinant of the outcome of cancer treatment. However, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, which contributes to multiple facets of senescent cancer cells, may influence both cancer-inhibitory and cancer-promoting mechanisms of neighboring cells. Conventional treatments, such as chemo- and radiotherapies, preferentially induce premature senescence instead of apoptosis in the appropriate cellular context. In addition, treatment-induced premature senescence could compensate for resistance to apoptosis via alternative signaling pathways. Therefore, we believe that an intensive effort to understand cancer cell senescence could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving the efficacy of anticancer therapies. This review summarizes the current understanding of molecular mechanisms, functions, and clinical applications of cellular senescence for anticancer therapy. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 51-59] PMID:24411464

  17. Tissue formation and tissue engineering through host cell recruitment or a potential injectable cell-based biocomposite with replicative potential: Molecular mechanisms controlling cellular senescence and the involvement of controlled transient telomerase activation therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2015-12-01

    . Nuclear export is initiated by ROS-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 707 within hTERT by the Src kinase family. It might be presumed that protection of mitochondria against oxidative stress is an important telomere length-independent function for telomerase in cell survival. Biotechnology companies are focused on development of therapeutic telomerase vaccines, telomerase inhibitors, and telomerase promoter-driven cell killing in oncology, have a telomerase antagonist in late preclinical studies. Anti-aging medicine-oriented groups have intervened on the market with products working on telomerase activation for a broad range of degenerative diseases in which replicative senescence or telomere dysfunction may play an important role. Since oxidative damage has been shown to shorten telomeres in tissue culture models, the adequate topical, transdermal, or systemic administration of antioxidants (such as, patented ocular administration of 1% N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops in the treatment of cataracts) may be beneficial at preserving telomere lengths and delaying the onset or in treatment of disease in susceptible individuals. Therapeutic strategies toward controlled transient activation of telomerase are targeted to cells and replicative potential in cell-based therapies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [The senescence-accelerated oxys rats--a genetic model of premature aging and age-dependent degenerative diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosova, N G; Stefanova, N A; Korbolina, E E; Fursova, A Zh; Kozhevnikova, O S

    2014-01-01

    The genetic model of accelerated senescence and the associated diseases--the OXYS strain of rats--was created using selection and inbreeding of Wistar rats sensitive to cataractogenic effects of galactose. In the first 5 generations, the development of cataract was induced by galactose overconsumption, and after that, the rats were selected for early spontaneous cataract. Genetically linked with the latter was a set of features of accelerated senescence, which were inherited by the subsequent generations of the animals. At present, we have a 103rd generation of OXYS rats, who at young age develop retinopathy (similar to age-related macular degeneration in humans), osteoporosis, arterial hypertension, accelerated thymus involution, sarcopenia, and neurodegenerative changes in the brain (with the features characteristic of Alzheimer's disease), besides the cataract. This review discusses possible mechanisms of the accelerated senescence: the results of comparison of retinal transcriptomes between OXYS and Wistar(control) rats at different ages, studies of the markers of Alzheimer's disease in the retina and in certain brain regions, and the outcome of the efforts to develop congenic strains of animals via a transfer of several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) of chromosome 1 from OXYS to WAG rats that are associated with the signs of accelerated senescence. The uniqueness of OXYS rats lies in the complex composition of manifestations of the traits; accordingly, this rat model can be used not only for studies of the mechanisms of aging and pathogenesis of the age-related diseases but also for objective evaluation of new methods of treatment and prevention.

  19. Effects of bioactive compounds on senescence and components of senescence associated secretory phenotypes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mária, Janubová; Ingrid, Žitňanová

    2017-07-19

    Senescence is a permanent cell cycle arrest that is accompanied by changes in cell morphology and physiology occurring in vitro and in vivo. Senescence evolved as a beneficial response to damage promoting wound healing, limiting fibrosis, fighting against cancer and helping embryonic development. However, excessive accumulation of senescent cells is considered to play a substantial role in the development of aging-related diseases and other morphological and physiological changes associated with aging. Therefore, the aim of many researchers is to find out a way to eliminate senescent cells and improve the health condition of aging people. Bioactive compounds e.g. polyphenols, vitamins, phenols, carotenoids, ginsenosides, omega-3 fatty acids, and compounds isolated from algae (phloroglucinol, sargachromal) are known to affect important biological functions. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that they can protect different types of cells against stress induced senescence (SISP), delay replicative senescence, rejuvenate senescent cells and exert senolytic effects. This review summarizes how the biological compounds listed above affect cell morphology, cell proliferation, specific cell functions, the activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), the shortening of telomeres and reduction of telomerase activity, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation products, expression of antioxidant enzymes, expression of p53 and p21 - key effectors of cell cycle arrest leading to senescence - and expression of some key components of senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in replicative senescence, stress induced senescence (SISP) and under conditions which may lead to the development of senescence such as UV-A and UV-B irradiation of cells and the production of matrix metalloproteinases (a component of the SASP) in cells. Finally, future perspectives of this research are discussed.

  20. Replicability and models of priming: What a resource computation framework can tell us about expectations of replicability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cesario, J.; Jonas, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue that whether or not a replication attempt is informative is dependent on the accuracy of one's underlying model to explain the effect, as it is the explanatory model that enumerates the contingencies necessary for producing the effect. If the model is incorrect, then a

  1. Senescence is not inevitable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Owen; Vaupel, James W.

    2017-01-01

    trajectories exists. These empirical observations support theoretical work indicating that a wide range of mortality and fertility trajectories is indeed possible, including senescence, negligible senescence and even negative senescence (improvement). Although many mysteries remain in the field...

  2. Redox-Dependent Calcium-Mediated Signaling Networks that Control the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Akshaya

    Cellular senescence has evolved as a protective mechanism to arrest growth of cells with oncogenic potential. While senescent cells have lost the ability to divide, they remain metabolically active and adapt a deleterious senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP) central to the progression of several age-associated disease pathologies. The SASP is mechanistically regulated by the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1alpha) whose expression and activity is responsive to the senescence associated (SA) oxidant production and the accompanying disruption of calcium (Ca2+) homeostasis. Using primary IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts as a model of replicative senescence, we explored the molecular underpinnings driving Ca2+ dysregulation in senescent cells. We establish that the redox-responsive Transient Receptor Potential TRPC6 channel is compromised due to desensitization owing to SA increases in steady state hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. SA dysregulation of Ca2+ is also accompanied by loss of response to H2O2-induced Ca2+ influx that can be rescued with catalase pre-treatments. Senescent cells are also insensitive to Ca2+ entry induced by hyperforin, a specific activator of TRPC6, that can be restored by catalase pre-treatments, further suggesting redox regulation of TRPC6 in senescence. Inhibition of TRPC6 channel activity restores the ability of senescent cells to respond to peroxide-induced Ca2+ in addition to suppressing SASP gene expression. Furthermore, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling regulates SASP by means of modulating TRPC6 channel expression. Together, our findings provide compelling evidence that redox and mTOR-mediated regulation of TRPC6 channel modulate SASP gene expression. Further, the gain-of-function mutation of TRPC6 has pathological implications in several chronic pathologies and renders it a viable target in age-associated diseases.

  3. Preon Model and Family Replicated E_6 Unification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa V. Laperashvili

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previously we suggested a new preon model of composite quark-leptons and bosons with the 'flipped' $E_6imes widetilde{E_6}$ gauge symmetry group. We assumed that preons are dyons having both hyper-electric $g$ and hyper-magnetic $ilde g$ charges, and these preons-dyons are confined by hyper-magnetic strings which are an ${f N}=1$ supersymmetric non-Abelian flux tubes created by the condensation of spreons near the Planck scale. In the present paper we show that the existence of the three types of strings with tensions $T_k=k T_0$ $(k = 1,2,3$ producing three (and only three generations of composite quark-leptons, also provides three generations of composite gauge bosons ('hyper-gluons' and, as a consequence, predicts the family replicated $[E_6]^3$ unification at the scale $sim 10^{17}$ GeV. This group of unification has the possibility of breaking to the group of symmetry: $ [SU(3_C]^3imes [SU(2_L]^3imes [U(1_Y]^3 imes [U(1_{(B-L}]^3$ which undergoes the breakdown to the Standard Model at lower energies. Some predictive advantages of the family replicated gauge groups of symmetry are briefly discussed.

  4. A joint model for multivariate hierarchical semicontinuous data with replications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassahun-Yimer, Wondwosen; Albert, Paul S; Lipsky, Leah M; Nansel, Tonja R; Liu, Aiyi

    2017-01-01

    Longitudinal data are often collected in biomedical applications in such a way that measurements on more than one response are taken from a given subject repeatedly overtime. For some problems, these multiple profiles need to be modeled jointly to get insight on the joint evolution and/or association of these responses over time. In practice, such longitudinal outcomes may have many zeros that need to be accounted for in the analysis. For example, in dietary intake studies, as we focus on in this paper, some food components are eaten daily by almost all subjects, while others are consumed episodically, where individuals have time periods where they do not eat these components followed by periods where they do. These episodically consumed foods need to be adequately modeled to account for the many zeros that are encountered. In this paper, we propose a joint model to analyze multivariate hierarchical semicontinuous data characterized by many zeros and more than one replicate observations at each measurement occasion. This approach allows for different probability mechanisms for describing the zero behavior as compared with the mean intake given that the individual consumes the food. To deal with the potentially large number of multivariate profiles, we use a pairwise model fitting approach that was developed in the context of multivariate Gaussian random effects models with large number of multivariate components. The novelty of the proposed approach is that it incorporates: (1) multivariate, possibly correlated, response variables; (2) within subject correlation resulting from repeated measurements taken from each subject; (3) many zero observations; (4) overdispersion; and (5) replicate measurements at each visit time.

  5. Supplementary Material for: Factor Copula Models for Replicated Spatial Data

    KAUST Repository

    Krupskii, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new copula model that can be used with replicated spatial data. Unlike the multivariate normal copula, the proposed copula is based on the assumption that a common factor exists and affects the joint dependence of all measurements of the process. Moreover, the proposed copula can model tail dependence and tail asymmetry. The model is parameterized in terms of a covariance function that may be chosen from the many models proposed in the literature, such as the Matérn model. For some choice of common factors, the joint copula density is given in closed form and therefore likelihood estimation is very fast. In the general case, one-dimensional numerical integration is needed to calculate the likelihood, but estimation is still reasonably fast even with large data sets. We use simulation studies to show the wide range of dependence structures that can be generated by the proposed model with different choices of common factors. We apply the proposed model to spatial temperature data and compare its performance with some popular geostatistics models.

  6. Replication of surface features from a master model to an amorphous metallic article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William L.; Bakke, Eric; Peker, Atakan

    1999-01-01

    The surface features of an article are replicated by preparing a master model having a preselected surface feature thereon which is to be replicated, and replicating the preselected surface feature of the master model. The replication is accomplished by providing a piece of a bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy, contacting the piece of the bulk-solidifying amorphous metallic alloy to the surface of the master model at an elevated replication temperature to transfer a negative copy of the preselected surface feature of the master model to the piece, and separating the piece having the negative copy of the preselected surface feature from the master model.

  7. IGF Binding Protein-5 Induces Cell Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumihiro Sanada

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is the complex process of deterioration that drives the aging of an organism, resulting in the progressive loss of organ function and eventually phenotypic aging. Senescent cells undergo irreversible growth arrest, usually by inducing telomere shortening. Alternatively, senescence may also occur prematurely in response to various stress stimuli, such as oxidative stress, DNA damage, or activated oncogenes. Recently, it has been shown that IGF binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5 with the induction of the tumor suppressor p53 is upregulated during cellular senescence. This mechanism mediates interleukin-6/gp130-induced premature senescence in human fibroblasts, irradiation-induced premature senescence in human endothelial cells (ECs, and replicative senescence in human ECs independent of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and IGF-II. Additionally, a link between IGFBP-5, hyper-coagulation, and inflammation, which occur with age, has been implicated. Thus, IGFBP-5 seems to play decisive roles in controlling cell senescence and cell inflammation. In this review, we describe the accumulating evidence for this role of IGFBP-5 including our new finding.

  8. Business Model and Replication Study of BIG HIT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Guangling; Ravn Nielsen, Eva

    . The BIG HIT project is creating a replicable hydrogen territory in Orkney (An island archipelago six miles offshore from North of Mainland Scotland.) by implementing a fully integrated model of hydrogen production, storage, distribution of the hydrogen across Orkney and utilised for mobility, heat...... and power. The BIG HIT project will use otherwise curtailed electricity from one wind turbine on Shapinsay and one wind turbine and a tidal test sites on Eday, and use 1.5 MW of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) electrolyser to convert it into ~50 t pa of hydrogen. This will be used to provide heat...... and infrastructure investment and operation cost of electricity and water consumption. The functional unit is 1 kg hydrogen produced and consumed. The data collected from the project patterns and suppliers. The current analysis is based on the estimation of hydrogen production and consumption on both Shapinsay...

  9. Replication of urban innovations - prioritization of strategies for the replication of Dhaka's community-based decentralized composting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedla, Sudhakar

    2012-01-01

    Dhaka's community-based decentralized composting (DCDC) is a successful demonstration of solid waste management by adopting low-cost technology, local resources community participation and partnerships among the various actors involved. This paper attempts to understand the model, necessary conditions, strategies and their priorities to replicate DCDC in the other developing cities of Asia. Thirteen strategies required for its replication are identified and assessed based on various criteria, namely transferability, longevity, economic viability, adaptation and also overall replication. Priority setting by multi-criteria analysis by applying analytic hierarchy process revealed that immediate transferability without long-term and economic viability consideration is not advisable as this would result in unsustainable replication of DCDC. Based on the analysis, measures to ensure the product quality control; partnership among stakeholders (public-private-community); strategies to achieve better involvement of the private sector in solid waste management (entrepreneurship in approach); simple and low-cost technology; and strategies to provide an effective interface among the complementing sectors are identified as important strategies for its replication.

  10. Identification of Salvia haenkei as gerosuppressant agent by using an integrated senescence-screening assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matic, Ivana; Revandkar, Ajinkya; Chen, Jingjing; Bisio, Angela; Dall'Acqua, Stefano; Cocetta, Veronica; Brun, Paola; Mancino, Giorgio; Milanese, Martina; Mattei, Maurizio; Montopoli, Monica; Alimonti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stable cell cycle arrest that is the causative process of aging. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway is implicated in the control of cellular senescence and inhibitors of this pathway have been successfully used for life span prolongation experiments in mammals. PTEN is the major regulator of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and loss of PTEN promotes a senescence response termed PICS. Here we report a novel-screening assay, for the identification of compounds that block different types of senescence response. By testing a library of more than 3000 natural and chemical compounds in PTEN deficient cells we have found that an extract from Salvia haenkei (SH), a native plant of Bolivia is a potent inhibitor of PICS. SH also decreases replicative and UV-mediated senescence in human primary fibroblasts and in a model of in vitro reconstructed human epidermis. Mechanistically, SH treatment affects senescence driven by UV by interfering with IL1-ɑ signalling. Pre-clinical and clinical testing of this extract by performing toxicity and irritability evaluation in vitro also demonstrate the safety of SH extract for clinical use as anti-aging skin treatment. PMID:27922821

  11. Delayed Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Researcher Dr. Yi Li developed a technique to manipulate certain characteristics of plant growth such as anit-senescence. For example, the tobacco leaf was clipped from a transgenic plant (right), and a wildtype plant (left). During ground-based laboratory studies, both leaves were left in a darkened area for 4 months. When retrieved, the wildtype plant leaf was dried-out and the transgenic leaf remained fresh and green. A variation of this technology that involves manipulating plant hormones has been conducted in space-based studies on tomato plants through BioServe Space Technologies. The transport and distribution of auxin, an important plant hormone has shown to be influenced by microgravity, which could lead to improving the quality of fruits and vegetables grown on Earth.

  12. Long-Term Quiescent Fibroblast Cells Transit into Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthandan, Shiva; Priebe, Steffen; Hemmerich, Peter; Klement, Karolin; Diekmann, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is described to be a consequence of telomere erosion during the replicative life span of primary human cells. Quiescence should therefore not contribute to cellular aging but rather extend lifespan. Here we tested this hypothesis and demonstrate that cultured long-term quiescent human fibroblasts transit into senescence due to similar cellular mechanisms with similar dynamics and with a similar maximum life span as proliferating controls, even under physiological oxygen conditions. Both, long-term quiescent and senescent fibroblasts almost completely fail to undergo apoptosis. The transition of long-term quiescent fibroblasts into senescence is also independent of HES1 which protects short-term quiescent cells from becoming senescent. Most significantly, DNA damage accumulates during senescence as well as during long-term quiescence at physiological oxygen levels. We suggest that telomere-independent, potentially maintenance driven gradual induction of cellular senescence during quiescence is a counterbalance to tumor development. PMID:25531649

  13. Uncoupling the senescent phenotype from telomere shortening in hydrogen peroxide-treated fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, QM; Prowse, KR; Tu, VC; Purdom, S; Linskens, MHK; Chen, Qin M.; Prowse, Karen R.; Tu, Victoria C.

    2001-01-01

    Normal human cells have a limited replicative potential and inevitably reach replicative senescence in culture. Replicatively senescent cells show multiple molecular changes, some of which are related to the irreversible growth arrest in culture, whereas others resemble the changes occurring during

  14. Serum from calorie-restricted animals delays senescence and extends the lifespan of normal human fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cabo, Rafael; Liu, Lijuan; Ali, Ahmed; Price, Nathan; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Mingyi; Lakatta, Edward; Irusta, Pablo M

    2015-03-01

    The cumulative effects of cellular senescence and cell loss over time in various tissues and organs are considered major contributing factors to the ageing process. In various organisms, caloric restriction (CR) slows ageing and increases lifespan, at least in part, by activating nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylases of the sirtuin family. Here, we use an in vitro model of CR to study the effects of this dietary regime on replicative senescence, cellular lifespan and modulation of the SIRT1 signaling pathway in normal human diploid fibroblasts. We found that serum from calorie-restricted animals was able to delay senescence and significantly increase replicative lifespan in these cells, when compared to serum from ad libitum fed animals. These effects correlated with CR-mediated increases in SIRT1 and decreases in p53 expression levels. In addition, we show that manipulation of SIRT1 levels by either over-expression or siRNA-mediated knockdown resulted in delayed and accelerated cellular senescence, respectively. Our results demonstrate that CR can delay senescence and increase replicative lifespan of normal human diploid fibroblasts in vitro and suggest that SIRT1 plays an important role in these processes.

  15. The search for evolutionary developmental origins of aging in zebrafish: a novel intersection of developmental and senescence biology in the zebrafish model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    Senescence may be considered the antithesis of early development, but yet there may be factors and mechanisms in common between these two phenomena during the process of aging. We investigated whether any relationship exists between the regulatory mechanisms that function in early development and in senescence using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish and a useful model animal for genetic studies. We conducted experiments to isolate zebrafish mutants expressing an apparent senescence phenotype during embryogenesis (embryonic senescence). Some of the genes we thereby identified had already been associated with cellular senescence and chronological aging in other organisms, but many had not yet been linked to these processes. Complete loss-of-function of developmentally essential genes induce embryonic (or larval) lethality, whereas it seems like their partial loss-of-function (i.e., decrease-of-function by heterozygote or hypomorphic mutations) still remains sufficient to go through the early developmental process because of its adaptive plasticity or rather heterozygote advantage. However, in some cases, such partial loss-of-function of genes compromise normal homeostasis due to haploinsufficiency later in adult life having many environmental stress challenges. By contrast, any heterozygote-advantageous genes might gain a certain benefit(s) (much more fitness) by such partial loss-of-function later in life. Physiological senescence may evolutionarily arise from both genetic and epigenetic drifts as well as from losing adaptive developmental plasticity in face of stress signals from the external environment that interacts with functions of multiple genes rather than effects of only a single gene mutation or defect. Previously uncharacterized developmental genes may thus mediate the aging process and play a pivotal role in senescence. Moreover, unexpected senescence-related genes might also be involved in the early developmental process and

  16. Evolution of maternal effect senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorad, Jacob A; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-12

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton's evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton's age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species.

  17. An animal model of co-existing sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture in senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Chow, Simon Kwoon Ho; Leung, Kwok Sui; Lee, Ho Hin; Cheung, Wing Hoi

    2017-10-15

    Sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture are common aging-related musculoskeletal problems. Recent evidences report that osteoporotic fracture patients showed high prevalence of sarcopenia; however, current clinical practice basically does not consider sarcopenia in the treatment or rehabilitation of osteoporotic fracture. There is almost no report studying the relationship of the co-existing of sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture healing. In this study, we validated aged senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) as animal models of senile osteoporosis with/without sarcopenia. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the 5th lumbar and muscle testing of the two animal strains were measured to confirm the status of osteoporosis and sarcopenia, respectively. Closed fracture was created on the right femur of 8-month-old animals. Radiographs were taken weekly post-fracture. MicroCT and histology of the fractured femur were performed at week 2, 4 and 6 post-fracture, while mechanical test of both femora at week 4 and 6 post-fracture. Results showed that the callus of SAMR1 was significantly larger at week 2 but smaller at week 6 post-fracture than SAMP8. Mechanical properties were significantly better at week 4 post-fracture in SAMR1 than SAMP8, indicating osteoporotic fracture healing was delayed in sarcopenic SAMP8. This study validated an animal model of co-existing sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture, where a delayed fracture healing might be resulted in the presence of sarcopenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouchi, Rie [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Nakano, Ichiro [Department of Neurosurgery, Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1824 6th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35233 (United States); Seimiya, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hseimiya@jfcr.or.jp [Division of Molecular Biotherapy, Cancer Chemotherapy Center, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan); Laboratory of Molecular Target Therapy of Cancer, Department of Computational Biology and Medical Sciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-31 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-05

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  19. Senescence from glioma stem cell differentiation promotes tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouchi, Rie; Okabe, Sachiko; Migita, Toshiro; Nakano, Ichiro; Seimiya, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal brain tumor composed of heterogeneous cellular populations including glioma stem cells (GSCs) and differentiated non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs). While GSCs are involved in tumor initiation and propagation, NSGCs' role remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NSGCs undergo senescence and secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, boosting the GSC-derived tumor formation in vivo. We used a GSC model that maintains stemness in neurospheres, but loses the stemness and differentiates into NSGCs upon serum stimulation. These NSGCs downregulated telomerase, shortened telomeres, and eventually became senescent. The senescent NSGCs released pro-angiogenic proteins, including vascular endothelial growth factors and senescence-associated interleukins, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Conditioned medium from senescent NSGCs promoted proliferation of brain microvascular endothelial cells, and mixed implantation of GSCs and senescent NSGCs into mice enhanced the tumorigenic potential of GSCs. The senescent NSGCs seem to be clinically relevant, because both clinical samples and xenografts of GBM contained tumor cells that expressed the senescence markers. Our data suggest that senescent NSGCs promote malignant progression of GBM in part via paracrine effects of the secreted proteins. - Highlights: • Non-stem glioma cells (NSGCs) lose telomerase and eventually become senescent. • Senescent NSGCs secrete pro-angiogenic proteins, such as VEGFs, IL-6, and IL-8. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the growth of brain microvascular endothelial cells. • Senescent NSGCs enhance the tumorigenic potential of glioma stem cells in vivo.

  20. Tracking senescence-induced patterns in leaf litter leachate using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling and self-organizing maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K. I.; Levia, D. F.; Hudson, J. E.

    2017-09-01

    In autumn, the dissolved organic matter (DOM) contribution of leaf litter leachate to streams in forested watersheds changes as trees undergo resorption, senescence, and leaf abscission. Despite its biogeochemical importance, little work has investigated how leaf litter leachate DOM changes throughout autumn and how any changes might differ interspecifically and intraspecifically. Since climate change is expected to cause vegetation migration, it is necessary to learn how changes in forest composition could affect DOM inputs via leaf litter leachate. We examined changes in leaf litter leachate fluorescent DOM (FDOM) from American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) leaves in Maryland, Rhode Island, Vermont, and North Carolina and from yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) leaves from Maryland. FDOM in leachate samples was characterized by excitation-emission matrices (EEMs). A six-component parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was created to identify components that accounted for the majority of the variation in the data set. Self-organizing maps (SOM) compared the PARAFAC component proportions of leachate samples. Phenophase and species exerted much stronger influence on the determination of a sample's SOM placement than geographic origin. As expected, FDOM from all trees transitioned from more protein-like components to more humic-like components with senescence. Percent greenness of sampled leaves and the proportion of tyrosine-like component 1 were found to be significantly different between the two genetic beech clusters, suggesting differences in photosynthesis and resorption. Our results highlight the need to account for interspecific and intraspecific variations in leaf litter leachate FDOM throughout autumn when examining the influence of allochthonous inputs to streams.

  1. Stress-induced Premature Senescence (SIPS) : Influence of SIPS on Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Masatoshi, SUZUKI; David A., BOOTHMAN; Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Program in Cell Stress and Cancer Nanomedicine, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas; Laboratory of Molecular Stress Responses, Program in Cell Stress and Cancer Nanomedicine, Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas

    2008-01-01

    Replicative senescence is a fundamental feature in normal human diploid cells and results from dysfunctional telomeres at the Hayflick cell division limit. Ionizing radiation (IR) prematurely induces the same phenotypes as replicative senescence prior to the Hayflick limit. This process is known as stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS). Since the cell cycle is irreversibly arrested in SIPS-induced cells, even if they are stimulated by various growth factors, it is thought that SIPS is a ...

  2. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence.

  3. An advanced glycation end product (AGE)-receptor for AGEs (RAGE) axis restores adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes through modulation of p53 protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Abell, Allison Martorano; Moon, Yang Soo; Kim, Kee-Hong

    2012-12-28

    The impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes is a hallmark of adipose aging and aging-related adipose dysfunction. Although advanced glycation end products (AGEs) derived from both foods and endogenous nonenzymatic glycation and AGE-associated signaling pathways are known to play a key role in aging and its related diseases, the role of AGEs in adipose aging remains elusive. We show a novel pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in replicative senescent preadipocytes and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, as well as primary preadipocytes isolated from aged mice. Using glycated bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein of AGEs, we found that glycated BSA restores the impaired adipogenic potential of senescent preadipocytes in vitro and ex vivo. However, glycated BSA showed no effect on adipogenesis in nonsenescent preadipocytes. The AGE-induced receptor for AGE (RAGE) expression is required for the pro-adipogenic function of AGEs in senescent preadipocytes. RAGE is required for impairment of p53 expression and p53 function in regulating p21 expression in senescent preadipocytes. We also observed a direct binding between RAGE and p53 in senescent preadipocytes. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel pro-adipogenic function of the AGE-RAGE axis in p53-regulated adipogenesis of senescent preadipocytes, providing new insights into aging-dependent adiposity by diet-driven and/or endogenous glycated proteins.

  4. A dynamic replicator model of the players' bids in an oligopolistic electricity market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahraei-Ardakani, Mostafa; Rahimi-Kian, Ashkan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the replicator dynamics of the power suppliers' bids in an oligopolistic electricity market are derived for both the fixed and variable demand cases. The replicator dynamics stability analysis is also performed. The dynamics of the electricity markets are the results of players' decisions. The physical parameters of the power systems (such as the lines capacities, voltage limitations, etc.) also affect the market dynamics indirectly, through the changes in players' behaviors. Assuming rational players, an optimal bidding strategy for constructing the supply function (SF) of a generating firm is presented and based on that, the dynamics of the bid replicators are studied. Both fixed demands and price sensitive demands are taken into account. The replicator model is presented in the well-known state space structure. A case study is presented to show the applicability of the developed dynamic replicator bid model, and also to show how the Nash-SFE equilibrium evolves over time. (author)

  5. Immune senescence: relative contributions of age and cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mekker

    Full Text Available Immune senescence, defined as the age-associated dysregulation and dysfunction of the immune system, is characterised by impaired protective immunity and decreased efficacy of vaccines. Recent clinical, epidemiological and immunological studies suggest that Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection may be associated with accelerated immune senescence, possibly by restricting the naïve T cell repertoire. However, direct evidence whether and how CMV-infection is implicated in immune senescence is still lacking. In this study, we have investigated whether latent mouse CMV (MCMV infection with or without thymectomy (Tx alters antiviral immunity of young and aged mice. After infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV or Vaccinia virus, specific antiviral T cell responses were significantly reduced in old, old MCMV-infected and/or Tx mice compared to young mice. Importantly, control of LCMV replication was more profoundly impaired in aged MCMV-infected mice compared to age-matched MCMV-naïve or young mice. In addition, latent MCMV infection was associated with slightly reduced vaccination efficacy in old Tx mice. In contrast to the prevailing hypothesis of a CMV-mediated restriction of the naïve T cell repertoire, we found similar naïve T cell numbers in MCMV-infected and non-infected mice, whereas ageing and Tx clearly reduced the naïve T cell pool. Instead, MCMV-infection expanded the total CD8(+ T cell pool by a massive accumulation of effector memory T cells. Based on these results, we propose a new model of increased competition between CMV-specific memory T cells and any 'de novo' immune response in aged individuals. In summary, our results directly demonstrate in a mouse model that latent CMV-infection impairs immunity in old age and propagates immune senescence.

  6. YAP/TEAD-mediated transcription controls cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qi; Chen, Jing; Feng, Han; Peng, Shengyi; Adams, Ursula; Bai, Yujie; Huang, Li; Li, Ji; Huang, Junjian; Meng, Songshu; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2013-06-15

    Transcription coactivator Yes-associated protein (YAP) plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, we identify a new role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence. We find that the expression levels of YAP proteins decrease following the replication-induced cellular senescence in IMR90 cells. Silencing of YAP inhibits cell proliferation and induces premature senescence. In additional experiments, we observe that cellular senescence induced by YAP deficiency is TEAD- and Rb/p16/p53-dependent. Furthermore, we show that Cdk6 is a direct downstream target gene of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence, and the expression of Cdk6 is through the YAP-TEAD complex. Ectopic expression of Cdk6 rescued YAP knockdown-induced senescence. Finally, we find that downregulation of YAP in tumor cells increases senescence in response to chemotherapeutic agents, and YAP or Cdk6 expression rescues cellular senescence. Taken together, our findings define the critical role of YAP in the regulation of cellular senescence and provide a novel insight into a potential chemotherapeutic avenue for tumor suppression. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Ginsenoside Rg1 prevents cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in a rat model of D-galactose-induced aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiahong Zhu

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis continues throughout the lifetime in the hippocampus, while the rate declines with brain aging. It has been hypothesized that reduced neurogenesis may contribute to age-related cognitive impairment. Ginsenoside Rg1 is an active ingredient of Panax ginseng in traditional Chinese medicine, which exerts anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects. This study explores the neuroprotective effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the hippocampus of the D-gal (D-galactose induced aging rat model. Sub-acute aging was induced in male SD rats by subcutaneous injection of D-gal (120 mg/kg·d for 42 days, and the rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally or normal saline for 28 days after 14 days of D-gal injection. In another group, normal male SD rats were treated with ginsenoside Rg1 alone (20 mg/kg·d, intraperitoneally for 28 days. It showed that administration of ginsenoside Rg1 significantly attenuated all the D-gal-induced changes in the hippocampus, including cognitive capacity, senescence-related markers and hippocampal neurogenesis, compared with the D-gal-treated rats. Further investigation showed that ginsenoside Rg1 protected NSCs/NPCs (neural stem cells/progenitor cells shown by increased level of SOX-2 expression; reduced astrocytes activation shown by decrease level of Aeg-1 expression; increased the hippocampal cell proliferation; enhanced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase and SOD (Superoxide Dismutase; decreased the levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, which are the proinflammatory cytokines; increased the telomere lengths and telomerase activity; and down-regulated the mRNA expression of cellular senescence associated genes p53, p21Cip1/Waf1 and p19Arf in the hippocampus of aged rats. Our data provides evidence that ginsenoside Rg1 can improve cognitive ability, protect NSCs/NPCs and promote neurogenesis by enhancing the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory capacity in the

  8. Unbalanced Growth, Senescence and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polymenis, Michael; Kennedy, Brian K

    2017-01-01

    Usually, cells balance their growth with their division. Coordinating growth inputs with cell division ensures the proper timing of division when sufficient cell material is available and affects the overall rate of cell proliferation. At a very fundamental level, cellular replicative lifespan-defined as the number of times a cell can divide, is a manifestation of cell cycle control. Hence, control of mitotic cell divisions, especially when the commitment is made to a new round of cell division, is intimately linked to replicative aging of cells. In this chapter, we review our current understanding, and its shortcomings, of how unbalanced growth and division, can dramatically influence the proliferative potential of cells, often leading to cellular and organismal aging phenotypes. The interplay between growth and division also underpins cellular senescence (i.e., inability to divide) and quiescence, when cells exit the cell cycle but still retain their ability to divide.

  9. Characterization of the replication timing program of 6 human model cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djihad Hadjadj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During the S-phase, the DNA replication process is finely orchestrated and regulated by two programs: the spatial program that determines where replication will start in the genome (Cadoret et al. (2008 Oct 14, Cayrou et al. (2011 Sep, Picard et al. (2014 May 1 [1–3], and the temporal program that determines when during the S phase different parts of the genome are replicated and when origins are activated. The temporal program is so well conserved for each cell type from independent individuals [4] that it is possible to identify a cell type from an unknown sample just by determining its replication timing program. Moreover, replicative domains are strongly correlated with the partition of the genome into topological domains (determined by the Hi-C method, Lieberman-Aiden et al. (2009 Oct 9, Pope et al. (2014 Nov 20 [5,6]. On the one hand, replicative areas are well defined and participate in shaping the spatial organization of the genome for a given cell type. On the other hand, studies on the timing program during cell differentiation showed a certain plasticity of this program according to the stage of cell differentiation Hiratani et al. (2008 Oct 7, 2010 Feb [7,8]. Domains where a replication timing change was observed went through a nuclear re-localization. Thus the temporal program of replication can be considered as an epigenetic mark Hiratani and Gilbert (2009 Feb 16 [9]. We present the genomic data of replication timing in 6 human model cell lines: U2OS (GSM2111308, RKO (GSM2111309, HEK 293T (GSM2111310, HeLa (GSM2111311, MRC5-SV (GSM2111312 and K562 (GSM2111313. A short comparative analysis was performed that allowed us to define regions common to the 6 cell lines. These replication timing data can be taken into account when performing studies that use these model cell lines.

  10. Beryllium induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Shannon S A; Lehnert, Bruce E; Sharma, Sunil; Kindell, Susan M; Gary, Ronald K

    2007-07-01

    After cells have completed a sufficient number of cell divisions, they exit the cell cycle and enter replicative senescence. Here, we report that beryllium causes proliferation arrest with premature expression of the principal markers of senescence. After young presenescent human fibroblasts were treated with 3 microM BeSO(4) for 24 h, p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor mRNA increased by >200%. Longer periods of exposure caused mRNA and protein levels to increase for both p21 and p16(Ink4a), a senescence regulator that prevents pRb-mediated cell cycle progression. BeSO(4) also caused dose-dependent induction of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity (SA-beta-gal). Untreated cells had 48 relative fluorescence units (RFU)/microg/h of SA-beta-gal, whereas 3 microM BeSO(4) caused activity to increase to 84 RFU/microg/h. In chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, BeSO(4) caused p53 protein to associate with its DNA binding site in the promoter region of the p21 gene, indicating that p53 transcriptional activity is responsible for the large increase in p21 mRNA elicited by beryllium. Forced expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) rendered HFL-1 cells incapable of normal replicative senescence. However, there was no difference in the responsiveness of normal HFL-1 fibroblasts (IC(50) = 1.9 microM) and hTERT-immortalized cells (IC(50) = 1.7 microM) to BeSO(4) in a 9-day proliferation assay. The effects of beryllium resemble those of histone deacetylase-inhibiting drugs, which also cause large increases in p21. However, beryllium produced no changes in histone acetylation, suggesting that Be(2+) acts as a novel and potent pharmacological inducer of premature senescence.

  11. 17AAG Treatment Accelerates Doxorubicin Induced Cellular Senescence: Hsp90 Interferes with Enforced Senescence of Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upasana Sarangi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hsp90 chaperone has been identified as an attractive pharmacological target to combat cancer. However, some metastatic tumors either fail to respond to Hsp90 inhibition or show recovery necessitating irreversible therapeutic strategies. In response to this enforced senescence has been proposed as an alternate strategy. Here, we demonstrate that inhibiting Hsp90 with 17AAG sensitizes human neuroblastoma to DNA damage response mediated cellular senescence. Among individual and combination drug treatments, 17AAG pre-treatment followed by doxorubicin treatment exhibited senescence-like characteristics such as increased nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, cell cycle arrest, SA- β -gal staining and the perpetual increase in SAHF. Doxorubicin induced senescence signaling was mediated by p53-p21 CIP/WAF-1 and was accelerated in the absence of functional Hsp90. Sustained p16 INK4a and H3K4me3 expressions correlating with unaffected telomerase activation annulled replicative senescence and appraised stress induced senescence. Despite increases in [(ROSi] and [(Ca 2+ i], a concomitant increase in cellular antioxidant defense system suggested oxidation independent senescence activation. Sustained activation of survival (Akt and proliferative (ERK1/2 kinases fosters robustness of cells. Invigorating senescent cells with growth factor or snooping with mTOR or PI3 kinase inhibitors compromised cell survival but not senescence. Intriguingly, senescence-associated secretory factors from the senescence cells manifested established senescence in neuroblastoma, which offers clinical advantage to our approach. Our study discusses tumor selective functions of Hsp90 and discusses irrefutable strategies of Hsp90 inhibition in anticancer treatments.

  12. Optimization of Reference Genes for Normalization of Reverse Transcription Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Results in Senescence Study of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiaodong; Yao, Xinglei; Sun, Zhao; Han, Qin; Zhao, Robert Chunhua

    2016-09-15

    Recently, it has been suggested that cellular senescence is associated with stem cell exhaustion, which reduces the regenerative potential of tissues and contributes to aging and age-related diseases. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) attract a large amount of attention in stem cell research and regeneration medicine because they possess multiple advantages and senescent MSCs could be one of the most useful stem cell models in aging studies. It is important to quantitatively evaluate senescence markers to both identify and study the mechanisms involved in MSC senescence. Reverse transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is currently the most widely used tool to quantify the mRNA levels of markers. However, no report has demonstrated the optimal reference genes that should be used to normalize RT-qPCR in senescence studies of MSCs. In this study, we compared 16 commonly used reference genes (GAPDH, ACTB, RPL13A, TBP, B2M, GUSB, RPLPO, YWHAZ, RPS18, EEF1A1, ATP5F1, HPRT1, PGK1, TFRC, UBC, and PPIA) in proliferating or replicative-senescent human adipose-derived MSCs (hAD-MSCs) that were isolated from seven healthy donors aged 29-59 years old. Three algorithms (geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper) were used to determine the most optimal reference gene. The results showed that PPIA exhibited the most stable expression during senescence, while the widely used ACTB exhibited the lowest stability. We also confirmed that different reference genes lead to different evaluations of senescence markers. Our work ensures that results obtained from senescence studies of hAD-MSCs will be appropriately evaluated in both basic research and clinical trials.

  13. Multiple climate drivers accelerate Arctic plant community senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livensperger, C.; Steltzer, H.; Wallenstein, M. D.; Weintraub, M. N.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of seasonal phenology cues due to climate change has led to changes in the onset and duration of the growing season. While photoperiod often acts as an ultimate control on phenological events, recent studies have shown that environmental cues such as temperature and soil water content can modify the direction and rate of senescence processes. Warmer temperatures have resulted in an observed trend towards delayed senescence across temperate latitudes. However, Arctic regions are characterized by extreme seasonality and rapidly decreasing photoperiod, and consequently senescence may not shift as climate warms. We monitored the timing of Arctic plant community senescence for three years under the framework of an experimental manipulation that altered seasonal phenological cues through warming and earlier snowmelt. Alternative models of senescence were tested to determine if microclimate (air temperature, soil temperature, and soil moisture) or start of season phenology affect the timing and rate of community senescence. We found that all three microclimate predictors contributed to explaining variation in timing of senescence, suggesting that photoperiod is not the sole control on timing of senescence in Arctic plant communities. Rather, increased air and soil temperatures along with drier soil conditions, led to acceleration in the onset of senescence at a community level. Our data suggest that (1) multiple climate drivers predict timing of plant community senescence, and (2) climate change could result in a shorter peak season due to earlier onset of senescence, which would decrease the potential carbon uptake in moist acidic tundra.

  14. Mitochondria change dynamics and morphology during grapevine leaf senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ruberti

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is the last stage of development of an organ and is aimed to its ordered disassembly and nutrient reallocation. Whereas chlorophyll gradually degrades during senescence in leaves, mitochondria need to maintain active to sustain the energy demands of senescing cells. Here we analysed the motility and morphology of mitochondria in different stages of senescence in leaves of grapevine (Vitis vinifera, by stably expressing a GFP (green fluorescent protein reporter targeted to these organelles. Results show that mitochondria were less dynamic and markedly changed morphology during senescence, passing from the elongated, branched structures found in mature leaves to enlarged and sparse organelles in senescent leaves. Progression of senescence in leaves was not synchronous, since changes in mitochondria from stomata were delayed. Mitochondrial morphology was also analysed in grapevine cell cultures. Mitochondria from cells at the end of their growth curve resembled those from senescing leaves, suggesting that cell cultures might represent a useful model system for senescence. Additionally, senescence-associated mitochondrial changes were observed in plants treated with high concentrations of cytokinins. Overall, morphology and dynamics of mitochondria might represent a reliable senescence marker for plant cells.

  15. Dynamical role of the degree of intraspecific cooperation: A simple model for prebiotic replicators and ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontich, Ernest; Sardanyés, Josep

    2009-05-01

    We present a simple mean field model to analyze the dynamics of competition between two populations of replicators in terms of the degree of intraspecific cooperation (i.e., autocatalysis) in one of these populations. The first population can only replicate with Malthusian kinetics while the second one can reproduce with Malthusian or autocatalytic replication or with a combination of both reproducing strategies. The model consists of two coupled, nonlinear, autonomous ordinary differential equations. We investigate analytically and numerically the phase plane dynamics and the bifurcation scenarios of this ecologically coupled system, focusing on the outcome of competition for several degrees of intraspecific cooperation, σ, in the second population of replicators. We demonstrate that the dynamics of both populations can not be governed by a limit cycle, and also that once cooperation is considered, the topology of phase space does not allow for coexistence. Even for low values of the degree of intraspecific cooperation, for large enough autocatalytic replication rates, the second population of replicators is able to outcompete the first one, having a wide basin of attraction in state space. We characterize the same power law dependence between the outcompetition extinction times, τ, and the degree of intraspecific cooperation for both populations, given by τ˜ciσ-1. Our results suggest that, under some kinetic conditions, the appearance of autocatalysis might be favorable in a population of replicators growing with Malthusian kinetics competing with another population also reproducing exponentially.

  16. IL1-and TGF beta-Nox4 signaling, oxidative stress and DNA damage response are shared features of replicative, oncogene-induced, and drug-induced paracrine 'Bystander senescence'

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubáčková, Soňa; Krejčíková, Kateřina; Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 12 (2012), 932-951 ISSN 1945-4589 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GAP301/10/1525 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : senescence-associated secretome * DNA damage response * cytokines * JAK/STAT3 * TGF beta * NF kappa B * IL6 * IL beta * Nox4 * autocrine and paracrine signaling * tumor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.696, year: 2012

  17. Biomarkers of cell senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmi, Goberdhan P.; Campisi, Judith; Peacocke, Monica

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides a biomarker system for the in vivo and in vitro assessment of cell senescence. In the method of the present invention, .beta.-galactosidase activity is utilized as a means by which cell senescence may be assessed either in in vitro cell cultures or in vivo.

  18. Senescence Meets Dedifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yemima Givaty Rapp

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Senescence represents the final stage of leaf development but is often induced prematurely following exposure to biotic and abiotic stresses. Leaf senescence is manifested by color change from green to yellow (due to chlorophyll degradation or to red (due to de novo synthesis of anthocyanins coupled with chlorophyll degradation and frequently culminates in programmed death of leaves. However, the breakdown of chlorophyll and macromolecules such as proteins and RNAs that occurs during leaf senescence does not necessarily represent a one-way road to death but rather a reversible process whereby senescing leaves can, under certain conditions, re-green and regain their photosynthetic capacity. This phenomenon essentially distinguishes senescence from programmed cell death, leading researchers to hypothesize that changes occurring during senescence might represent a process of trans-differentiation, that is the conversion of one cell type to another. In this review, we highlight attributes common to senescence and dedifferentiation including chromatin structure and activation of transposable elements and provide further support to the notion that senescence is not merely a deterioration process leading to death but rather a unique developmental state resembling dedifferentiation.

  19. Using parallel factor analysis modeling (PARAFAC) and self-organizing maps to track senescence-induced patterns in leaf litter leachate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, K. I.; Levia, D. F., Jr.; Hudson, J. E.

    2017-12-01

    As trees undergo autumnal processes such as resorption, senescence, and leaf abscission, the dissolved organic matter (DOM) contribution of leaf litter leachate to streams changes. However, little research has investigated how the fluorescent DOM (FDOM) changes throughout the autumn and how this differs inter- and intraspecifically. Two of the major impacts of global climate change on forested ecosystems include altering phenology and causing forest community species and subspecies composition restructuring. We examined changes in FDOM in leachate from American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) leaves in Maryland, Rhode Island, Vermont, and North Carolina and yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) leaves from Maryland throughout three different phenophases: green, senescing, and freshly abscissed. Beech leaves from Maryland and Rhode Island have previously been identified as belonging to the same distinct genetic cluster and beech trees from Vermont and the study site in North Carolina from the other. FDOM in samples was characterized using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) and a six-component parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was created to identify components. Self-organizing maps (SOMs) were used to visualize variation and patterns in the PARAFAC component proportions of the leachate samples. Phenophase and species had the greatest influence on determining where a sample mapped on the SOM when compared to genetic clusters and geographic origin. Throughout senescence, FDOM from all the trees transitioned from more protein-like components to more humic-like ones. Percent greenness of the sampled leaves and the proportion of the tyrosine-like component 1 were found to significantly differ between the two genetic beech clusters. This suggests possible differences in photosynthesis and resorption between the two genetic clusters of beech. The use of SOMs to visualize differences in patterns of senescence between the different species and genetic

  20. p19ARF is a critical mediator of both cellular senescence and an innate immune response associated with MYC inactivation in mouse model of acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetil, Alper; Anchang, Benedict; Gouw, Arvin M.; Adam, Stacey J.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Parameswaran, Ramya; van Riggelen, Jan; Plevritis, Sylvia; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    MYC-induced T-ALL exhibit oncogene addiction. Addiction to MYC is a consequence of both cell-autonomous mechanisms, such as proliferative arrest, cellular senescence, and apoptosis, as well as non-cell autonomous mechanisms, such as shutdown of angiogenesis, and recruitment of immune effectors. Here, we show, using transgenic mouse models of MYC-induced T-ALL, that the loss of either p19ARF or p53 abrogates the ability of MYC inactivation to induce sustained tumor regression. Loss of p53 or p19ARF, influenced the ability of MYC inactivation to elicit the shutdown of angiogenesis; however the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded cellular senescence, as measured by SA-beta-galactosidase staining, increased expression of p16INK4A, and specific histone modifications. Moreover, comparative gene expression analysis suggested that a multitude of genes involved in the innate immune response were expressed in p19ARF wild-type, but not null, tumors upon MYC inactivation. Indeed, the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded the in situ recruitment of macrophages to the tumor microenvironment. Finally, p19ARF null-associated gene signature prognosticated relapse-free survival in human patients with ALL. Therefore, p19ARF appears to be important to regulating cellular senescence and innate immune response that may contribute to the therapeutic response of ALL. PMID:25784651

  1. SORBS2 and TLR3 induce premature senescence in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liesenfeld, Melanie; Mosig, Sandy; Funke, Harald; Jansen, Lars; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Backsch, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations are required for the progression of HPV-induced cervical precancers. A prerequisite for clonal expansion of cancer cells is unlimited proliferative capacity. In a cell culture model for cervical carcinogenesis loss of genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 were found to be associated with escape from senescence. Moreover, by LOH and I-FISH analyses a higher frequency of allele loss of these regions was also observed in cervical carcinomas as compared to CIN3. The aim of this study was to identify candidate senescence-related genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 which may contribute to clonal expansion at the transition of CIN3 to cancer. Microarray expression analyses were used to identify candidate genes down-regulated in cervical carcinomas as compared to CIN3. In order to relate these genes with the process of senescence their respective cDNAs were overexpressed in HPV16-immortalized keratinocytes as well as in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes using lentivirus mediated gene transduction. Overall fifteen genes located on chromosome 4q35→qter and chromosome 10p14-p15 were identified. Ten of these genes could be validated in biopsies by RT-PCR. Of interest is the novel finding that SORBS2 and TLR3 can induce senescence in primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes but not in HPV-immortalized cell lines. Intriguingly, the endogenous expression of both genes increases during finite passaging of primary keratinocytes in vitro. The relevance of the genes SORBS2 and TLR3 in the process of cellular senescence warrants further investigation. In ongoing experiments we are investigating whether this increase in gene expression is also characteristic of replicative senescence

  2. Replication/Implementation Model Field Test: Project SHAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilles, C. M.; Young, Rufus, Jr.

    This document reports findings of a study that evaluated the implementation model developed for Project SHAL, an "effective schools" reform model. Implemented in 1980 in Area I of the St. Louis Public School District (Missouri), Project SHAL is an acronym for the four original participating schools--Stowe, Hempstead, Arlington, and…

  3. Modelling protocells the emergent synchronization of reproduction and molecular replication

    CERN Document Server

    Serra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The monograph discusses models of synthetic protocells, which are cell-like structures obtained from non-living matter endowed with some rudimentary kind of metabolism and genetics, but much simpler than biological cells. They should grow and proliferate, generating offsprings that resemble in some way the parent protocells with some variation, so that selection may take place. Sustainable protocell populations have not yet been obtained experimentally and mathematical models are therefore extremely important to address key questions concerning their synthesis and behavior. Different protocell “architectures” have been proposed and high-level abstract models like those that are presented in this book are particularly relevant to gain a better understanding of the different properites. These models are able to treat all the major dynamical phenomena in a unified framework, so they can be seen as “virtual laboratories” for protocell research. Particular attention is paid to the problem of synchronizatio...

  4. [Replication of a computer model of auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente-Sandoval, C; Portillo, V; Fresán, A; Apiquian, R

    2005-01-01

    Abnormal synaptic pruning has been proposed by some authors as a theory to explain schizophrenia. It has been studied in different ways, some of which are computerized models. A PC computer with MATLAB version 5.3 and Neural Networks Toolbox programs were used. To reproduce the model we used Elman's network for neuronal unit and McGlashan and Hoffman's network. The corrected percentage of detection improved as synapses were prunned. It increased from 68% to 91 %, reaching the highest detection level when 60% of the synapses were eliminated. Detection capacity was reduced when synaptic elimination continued and the program started detecting words in the absence of input. This was considered as a hallucination. When pruning reached from 80% to 95%, hallucinations occurred more frequently. The computer simulation model provides a symptom formation model, and also a way of understanding pruning's adaptative utility. When the neuronal units were eliminated (instead of connections), there was only progressive worsening in word perception. This confirms the hypothesis proposed that schizophrenia pathophysiology underlies neuronal connections, not the neurons.

  5. 3D Spatially Resolved Models of the Intracellular Dynamics of the Hepatitis C Genome Replication Cycle

    KAUST Repository

    Knodel, Markus

    2017-10-02

    Mathematical models of virus dynamics have not previously acknowledged spatial resolution at the intracellular level despite substantial arguments that favor the consideration of intracellular spatial dependence. The replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) viral RNA (vRNA) occurs within special replication complexes formed from membranes derived from endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). These regions, termed membranous webs, are generated primarily through specific interactions between nonstructural virus-encoded proteins (NSPs) and host cellular factors. The NSPs are responsible for the replication of the vRNA and their movement is restricted to the ER surface. Therefore, in this study we developed fully spatio-temporal resolved models of the vRNA replication cycle of HCV. Our simulations are performed upon realistic reconstructed cell structures-namely the ER surface and the membranous webs-based on data derived from immunostained cells replicating HCV vRNA. We visualized 3D simulations that reproduced dynamics resulting from interplay of the different components of our models (vRNA, NSPs, and a host factor), and we present an evaluation of the concentrations for the components within different regions of the cell. Thus far, our model is restricted to an internal portion of a hepatocyte and is qualitative more than quantitative. For a quantitative adaption to complete cells, various additional parameters will have to be determined through further in vitro cell biology experiments, which can be stimulated by the results deccribed in the present study.

  6. Manipulating 3D-Printed and Paper Models Enhances Student Understanding of Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Lisa; Johannes, Kristen; Powers, Jackie; Silberglitt, Matt; Davenport, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding key concepts in molecular biology requires reasoning about molecular processes that are not directly observable and, as such, presents a challenge to students and teachers. We ask whether novel interactive physical models and activities can help students understand key processes in viral replication. Our 3D tangible models are…

  7. North Dakota's Experience with the Academy Model: A Successful Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tom; Clapper, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In this article, professors share how the district/university partnership model thriving at Kansas State University was successfully replicated in North Dakota, and was adapted to match their own department goals. While teacher leadership has become a theme among Kansas State academies, their model was created out of principal preparation efforts.…

  8. Testing the family replication-model through Bsup(O)-Bsup(-O) mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, A.; Pati, J.C.

    1985-07-01

    It is observed that the family-replication idea, proposed in the context of a minimal preon-model, necessarily implies a maximal mixing (i.e. ΔM>>GAMMA) either in the Bsub(s)sup(O)-B-barsub(s)sup(O) or the Bsub(d)sup(O)-B-barsub(d)sup(O) system, in contrast to the standard model. (author)

  9. Aging and atherosclerosis: mechanisms, functional consequences, and potential therapeutics for cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Julie C; Bennett, Martin

    2012-07-06

    Atherosclerosis is classed as a disease of aging, such that increasing age is an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is also associated with premature biological aging, as atherosclerotic plaques show evidence of cellular senescence characterized by reduced cell proliferation, irreversible growth arrest and apoptosis, elevated DNA damage, epigenetic modifications, and telomere shortening and dysfunction. Not only is cellular senescence associated with atherosclerosis, there is growing evidence that cellular senescence promotes atherosclerosis. This review examines the pathology of normal vascular aging, the evidence for cellular senescence in atherosclerosis, the mechanisms underlying cellular senescence including reactive oxygen species, replication exhaustion and DNA damage, the functional consequences of vascular cell senescence, and the possibility that preventing accelerated cellular senescence is a therapeutic target in atherosclerosis.

  10. MicroRNA-191 triggers keratinocytes senescence by SATB1 and CDK6 downregulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lena, A.M.; Mancini, M.; Rivetti di Val Cervo, P. [University of ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, Via Montpellier 1, Rome 00133 (Italy); Istituto Dermopatico dell' Immacolata-Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IDI-IRCCS), Laboratory of Biochemistry c/o Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Rome 00133 (Italy); Saintigny, G.; Mahe, C. [CHANEL Parfums Beaute, 135 av. Charles de Gaulle, F 92521, Neuilly/Seine (France); Melino, G., E-mail: gerry.melino@uniroma2.it [University of ' Tor Vergata' , Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, Via Montpellier 1, Rome 00133 (Italy); Istituto Dermopatico dell' Immacolata-Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IDI-IRCCS), Laboratory of Biochemistry c/o Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Rome 00133 (Italy); Association Cell Death and Differentiation c/o Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Rome 00133 (Italy); and others

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-191 expression is upregulated in senescencent human epidermal keratinocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-191 overexpression is sufficient per se to induce senescence in keratinocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SATB1 and CDK6 are downregulated in senescence and are direct miR-191 targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SATB1 and CDK6 silencing by siRNA triggers senescence in HEKn cells. -- Abstract: Keratinocyte replicative senescence has an important role in time-dependent changes of the epidermis, a tissue with high turnover. Senescence encompasses growth arrest during which cells remain metabolically active but acquire a typical enlarged, vacuolar and flattened morphology. It is also accompanied by the expression of endogenous senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase and specific gene expression profiles. MicroRNAs levels have been shown to be modulated during keratinocytes senescence, playing key roles in inhibiting proliferation and in the acquisition of senescent markers. Here, we identify miR-191 as an anti-proliferative and replicative senescence-associated miRNA in primary human keratinocytes. Its overexpression is sufficient per se to induce senescence, as evaluated by induction of several senescence-associated markers. We show that SATB1 and CDK6 3 Prime UTRs are two miR-191 direct targets involved in this pathway. Cdk6 and Satb1 protein levels decrease during keratinocytes replicative senescence and their silencing by siRNA is able to induce a G1 block in cell cycle, accompanied by an increase in senescence-associated markers.

  11. Replicates in high dimensions, with applications to latent variable graphical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kean Ming; Ning, Yang; Witten, Daniela M; Liu, Han

    2016-12-01

    In classical statistics, much thought has been put into experimental design and data collection. In the high-dimensional setting, however, experimental design has been less of a focus. In this paper, we stress the importance of collecting multiple replicates for each subject in this setting. We consider learning the structure of a graphical model with latent variables, under the assumption that these variables take a constant value across replicates within each subject. By collecting multiple replicates for each subject, we are able to estimate the conditional dependence relationships among the observed variables given the latent variables. To test the null hypothesis of conditional independence between two observed variables, we propose a pairwise decorrelated score test. Theoretical guarantees are established for parameter estimation and for this test. We show that our proposal is able to estimate latent variable graphical models more accurately than some existing proposals, and apply the proposed method to a brain imaging dataset.

  12. Comparable Senescence Induction in Three-dimensional Human Cartilage Model by Exposure to Therapeutic Doses of X-rays or C-ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Dounia Houria; Chevalier, François; Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel; Durantel, Florent; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Mann, Carl; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-05-01

    Particle therapy using carbon ions (C-ions) has been successfully used in the treatment of tumors resistant to conventional radiation therapy. However, the potential side effects to healthy cartilage exposed to lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions in the beam track before the tumor have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent of damage after C-ion irradiation in a 3-dimensional (3D) cartilage model close to human homeostasis. Primary human articular chondrocytes from a healthy donor were cultured in a collagen scaffold to construct a physioxic 3D cartilage model. A 2-dimensional (2D) culture was used as a reference. The cells were irradiated with a single dose of a monoenergetic C-ion beam with a LET of approximatively 30 keV/μm. This LET corresponds to the entrance channel of C-ions in the shallow healthy tissues before the spread-out Bragg peak (∼100 keV/μm) during hadron therapy protocols. The same dose of X-rays was used as a reference. Survival, cell death, and senescence assays were performed. As expected, in the 2D culture, C-ions were more efficient than X-rays in reducing cell survival with a relative biological effectiveness of 2.6. This correlated with stronger radiation-induced senescence (two-fold) but not with higher cell death induction. This differential effect was not reflected in the 3D culture. Both ionizing radiation types induced a comparable rate of senescence induction in the 3D model. The greater biological effectiveness of C-ions compared with low LET radiation when evaluated in treatment planning systems might be misevaluated using 2D culture experiments. Radiation-induced senescence is an important factor of potential cartilage attrition. The present data should encourage the scientific community to use relevant models and beams to improve the use of charged particles with better safety for patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparable Senescence Induction in Three-dimensional Human Cartilage Model by Exposure to Therapeutic Doses of X-rays or C-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamdi, Dounia Houria; Chevalier, François [Laboratoire d' Accueil et de Recherche avec les Ions Accélérés (LARIA), Institut de Radiobiologie Cellulaire et Moléculaire (IRCM), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale - DRF, Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Caen (France); Groetz, Jean-Emmanuel [UMR6249, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon (France); Durantel, Florent [UMR6252, Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique (CIMAP), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Caen (France); Thuret, Jean-Yves; Mann, Carl [FRE3377, Service de Biologie Intégrative et Génétique Moléculaire SBIGeM, Institut de Biologie et de Technologies de Saclay (iBiTec-S), Direction de la Recherche Fondamentale (DRF), Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Institut de Biologie Intégrative de la Cellule I2BC / Université Paris Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Particle therapy using carbon ions (C-ions) has been successfully used in the treatment of tumors resistant to conventional radiation therapy. However, the potential side effects to healthy cartilage exposed to lower linear energy transfer (LET) ions in the beam track before the tumor have not been evaluated. The aim of the present study was to assess the extent of damage after C-ion irradiation in a 3-dimensional (3D) cartilage model close to human homeostasis. Methods and Materials: Primary human articular chondrocytes from a healthy donor were cultured in a collagen scaffold to construct a physioxic 3D cartilage model. A 2-dimensional (2D) culture was used as a reference. The cells were irradiated with a single dose of a monoenergetic C-ion beam with a LET of approximatively 30 keV/μm. This LET corresponds to the entrance channel of C-ions in the shallow healthy tissues before the spread-out Bragg peak (∼100 keV/μm) during hadron therapy protocols. The same dose of X-rays was used as a reference. Survival, cell death, and senescence assays were performed. Results: As expected, in the 2D culture, C-ions were more efficient than X-rays in reducing cell survival with a relative biological effectiveness of 2.6. This correlated with stronger radiation-induced senescence (two-fold) but not with higher cell death induction. This differential effect was not reflected in the 3D culture. Both ionizing radiation types induced a comparable rate of senescence induction in the 3D model. Conclusions: The greater biological effectiveness of C-ions compared with low LET radiation when evaluated in treatment planning systems might be misevaluated using 2D culture experiments. Radiation-induced senescence is an important factor of potential cartilage attrition. The present data should encourage the scientific community to use relevant models and beams to improve the use of charged particles with better safety for patients.

  14. Modeling HIV-1 Latency in Primary T Cells Using a Replication-Competent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Laura J; Bonczkowski, Pawel; Spivak, Adam M; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Novis, Camille L; DePaula-Silva, Ana Beatriz; Malatinkova, Eva; Trypsteen, Wim; Bosque, Alberto; Vanderkerckhove, Linos; Planelles, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    HIV-1 latently infected cells in vivo can be found in extremely low frequencies. Therefore, in vitro cell culture models have been used extensively for the study of HIV-1 latency. Often, these in vitro systems utilize defective viruses. Defective viruses allow for synchronized infections and circumvent the use of antiretrovirals. In addition, replication-defective viruses cause minimal cytopathicity because they fail to spread and usually do not encode env or accessory genes. On the other hand, replication-competent viruses encode all or most viral genes and better recapitulate the nuances of the viral replication cycle. The study of latency with replication-competent viruses requires the use of antiretroviral drugs in culture, and this mirrors the use of antiretroviral treatment (ART) in vivo. We describe a model that utilizes cultured central memory CD4(+) T cells and replication-competent HIV-1. This method generates latently infected cells that can be reactivated using latency reversing agents in the presence of antiretroviral drugs. We also describe a method for the removal of productively infected cells prior to viral reactivation, which takes advantage of the downregulation of CD4 by HIV-1, and the use of a GFP-encoding virus for increased throughput.

  15. Planarians as a model of aging to study the interaction between stem cells and senescent cells in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M. Perrigue

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of stem cell pools and the accumulation of senescent cells in animal tissues are linked to aging. Planarians are invertebrate flatworms and are unusual in that their stem cells, called neoblasts, are constantly replacing old and dying cells. By eliminating neoblasts in worms via irradiation, the biological principles of aging are exposed in the absence of wound healing and regeneration, making planaria a powerful tool for aging research.

  16. Chronic induction of senescence marker in gamma-irradiation mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Min A; Jung, U Hee; Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Seol Hwa; Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Aging or senescence occurs at organ level as well as cell level. Most senescent cells are characterized by morphological changes into large, flat, and multinucleated phenotypes. Also senescence cells show a stable and long-term loss of proliferative capacity although viability and metabolic activity are maintained. The in vivo senescence or aging has been studied using various animal models. However, until now, the mechanisms of senescence or aging in vivo. Ionizing radiation (IR) is a well-known inducer of oxidative stress and DNA damage, which is one of the important causes of aging process. Therefore, in this study, we wanted to find out whether IR can induce or accelerate aging process in mice by investigating the long-term effects of IR on the various senescence markers in the tissues

  17. Protein Oxidative Damage at the Crossroads of Cellular Senescence, Aging, and Age-Related Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A. Baraibar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein damage mediated by oxidation, protein adducts formation with advanced glycated end products and with products of lipid peroxidation, has been implicated during aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegenerative diseases. Increased protein modification has also been described upon replicative senescence of human fibroblasts, a valid model for studying aging in vitro. However, the mechanisms by which these modified proteins could impact on the development of the senescent phenotype and the pathogenesis of age-related diseases remain elusive. In this study, we performed in silico approaches to evidence molecular actors and cellular pathways affected by these damaged proteins. A database of proteins modified by carbonylation, glycation, and lipid peroxidation products during aging and age-related diseases was built and compared to those proteins identified during cellular replicative senescence in vitro. Common cellular pathways evidenced by enzymes involved in intermediate metabolism were found to be targeted by these modifications, although different tissues have been examined. These results underscore the potential effect of protein modification in the impairment of cellular metabolism during aging and age-related diseases.

  18. Senescent Fibroblasts Promote Neoplastic Transformation of Partially Transformed Ovarian Epithelial Cells in a Three-dimensional Model of Early Stage Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Lawrenson

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most epithelial ovarian cancers are diagnosed postmenopausally, although the well-established epidemiological risk factors (parity, oral contraceptive use are premenopausal. We hypothesized that accumulation of senescent fibroblasts, together with concomitant loss of presenescent fibroblasts within the ovarian cortex, promotes initiation and early development of ovarian cancer from ovarian surface epithelial (OSE cells. To test this, we established immortalized OSE (IOSE cell lines that mimic early neoplastic transformation by overexpressing the CMYC oncogene (IOSECMYC and normal ovarian presenescent (PSN and senescent (SEN fibroblast cell lines. We then evaluated the ability of PSN and SEN fibroblasts to transform IOSE and IOSECMYC after coculture. SEN fibroblasts significantly enhanced neoplastic development of IOSECMYC cells; there was an up to 15-fold increase in migration of IOSECMYC cells cocultured with SEN fibroblasts compared with PSN fibroblasts. Conditioned medium from SEN fibroblasts promoted anchorage-independent growth of IOSECMYC cells. We studied fibroblast-epithelial cell interactions in heterotypic three-dimensional spheroid models. Dual immunohistochemical staining of spheroids for a proliferation marker (MIB-1 and cytokeratin-18 indicated that SEN fibroblasts induce approximately a five-fold increase in proliferation of IOSECMYC cells relative to cocultures with PSN fibroblasts. SEN, but not PSN fibroblasts, also induced nuclear atypia in epithelial cells in three-dimensional spheroids. These data suggest for the first time that the accumulation of senescent, or loss of presenescent fibroblasts, can promote neoplastic development of partially transformed OSE cells in vitro and illustrates the power of using three-dimensional heterotypic modeling to gain better insights into the etiology underlying the development of epithelial ovarian cancer.

  19. Senescence (ageing @ 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Nigam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ageing, also called as senescence, is one of the most complex, intrinsic, biological processes of growing older and resulting into reduced functional ability of the organism. Telomerase, environment, low calorie diets, free radicals, etc., are all believed to affect this ageing process. A number of genetic components of ageing have been identified using model organisms. Genes, mainly the sirtuins, regulate the ageing speed by indirection and controlling organism resistance to damages by exogenous and endogenous stresses. In higher organisms, ageing is likely to be regulated, in part, through the insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 pathway. Besides this, the induction of apoptosis in stem and progenitor cells, increased p53 activity, and autophagy is also thought to trigger premature organismal ageing. Ageing has also been shown to upregulate expression of inflammatory mediators in mouse adipose tissue. The understanding of pathophysiology of ageing over the past few years has posed tremendous challenges for the development of anti-ageing medicine for targeted therapy. Future research areas must include targeted role of systemic inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein and interleukin 6 and other biochemical and genetic studies including gene signaling pathways, gene microarray analysis, gene modulation, gene therapy, and development of animal/human models for potential therapeutic measures and evaluations.

  20. Establishing a coherent and replicable measurement model of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin R; Redshaw, Maggie

    2018-03-23

    The 10-item Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is an established screening tool for postnatal depression. Inconsistent findings in factor structure and replication difficulties have limited the scope of development of the measure as a multi-dimensional tool. The current investigation sought to robustly determine the underlying factor structure of the EPDS and the replicability and stability of the most plausible model identified. A between-subjects design was used. EPDS data were collected postpartum from two independent cohorts using identical data capture methods. Datasets were examined with confirmatory factor analysis, model invariance testing and systematic evaluation of relational and internal aspects of the measure. Participants were two samples of postpartum women in England assessed at three months (n = 245) and six months (n = 217). The findings showed a three-factor seven-item model of the EPDS offered an excellent fit to the data, and was observed to be replicable in both datasets and invariant as a function of time point of assessment. Some EPDS sub-scale scores were significantly higher at six months. The EPDS is multi-dimensional and a robust measurement model comprises three factors that are replicable. The potential utility of the sub-scale components identified requires further research to identify a role in contemporary screening practice. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The difference between LSMC and replicating portfolio in insurance liability modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelsser, Antoon; Schweizer, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Solvency II requires insurers to calculate the 1-year value at risk of their balance sheet. This involves the valuation of the balance sheet in 1 year's time. As for insurance liabilities, closed-form solutions to their value are generally not available, insurers turn to estimation procedures. While pure Monte Carlo simulation set-ups are theoretically sound, they are often infeasible in practice. Therefore, approximation methods are exploited. Among these, least squares Monte Carlo (LSMC) and portfolio replication are prominent and widely applied in practice. In this paper, we show that, while both are variants of regression-based Monte Carlo methods, they differ in one significant aspect. While the replicating portfolio approach only contains an approximation error, which converges to zero in the limit, in LSMC a projection error is additionally present, which cannot be eliminated. It is revealed that the replicating portfolio technique enjoys numerous advantages and is therefore an attractive model choice.

  2. Shadow Replication: An Energy-Aware, Fault-Tolerant Computational Model for Green Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Cui

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As the demand for cloud computing continues to increase, cloud service providers face the daunting challenge to meet the negotiated SLA agreement, in terms of reliability and timely performance, while achieving cost-effectiveness. This challenge is increasingly compounded by the increasing likelihood of failure in large-scale clouds and the rising impact of energy consumption and CO2 emission on the environment. This paper proposes Shadow Replication, a novel fault-tolerance model for cloud computing, which seamlessly addresses failure at scale, while minimizing energy consumption and reducing its impact on the environment. The basic tenet of the model is to associate a suite of shadow processes to execute concurrently with the main process, but initially at a much reduced execution speed, to overcome failures as they occur. Two computationally-feasible schemes are proposed to achieve Shadow Replication. A performance evaluation framework is developed to analyze these schemes and compare their performance to traditional replication-based fault tolerance methods, focusing on the inherent tradeoff between fault tolerance, the specified SLA and profit maximization. The results show that Shadow Replication leads to significant energy reduction, and is better suited for compute-intensive execution models, where up to 30% more profit increase can be achieved due to reduced energy consumption.

  3. Cellular senescence in the aging and diseased kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, F A; Falke, L L; Nguyen, T Q; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2017-12-19

    The program of cellular senescence is involved in both the G1 and G2 phase of the cell cycle, limiting G1/S and G2/M progression respectively, and resulting in prolonged cell cycle arrest. Cellular senescence is involved in normal wound healing. However, multiple organs display increased senescent cell numbers both during natural aging and after injury, suggesting that senescent cells can have beneficial as well as detrimental effects in organismal aging and disease. Also in the kidney, senescent cells accumulate in various compartments with advancing age and renal disease. In experimental studies, forced apoptosis induction through the clearance of senescent cells leads to better preservation of kidney function during aging. Recent groundbreaking studies demonstrate that senescent cell depletion through INK-ATTAC transgene-mediated or cell-penetrating FOXO4-DRI peptide induced forced apoptosis, reduced age-associated damage and dysfunction in multiple organs, in particular the kidney, and increased performance and lifespan. Senescence is also involved in oncology and therapeutic depletion of senescent cells by senolytic drugs has been studied in experimental and human cancers. Although studies with senolytic drugs in models of kidney injury are lacking, their dose limiting side effects on other organs suggest that targeted delivery might be needed for successful application of senolytic drugs for treatment of kidney disease. In this review, we discuss (i) current understanding of the mechanisms and associated pathways of senescence, (ii) evidence of senescence occurrence and causality with organ injury, and (iii) therapeutic strategies for senescence depletion (senotherapy) including targeting, all in the context of renal aging and disease.

  4. Oncogene-induced senescence is part of the tumorigenesis barrier imposed by DNA damage checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Rezaei, Nousin; Liontos, Michalis

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated the existence of tumorigenesis barriers that slow or inhibit the progression of preneoplastic lesions to neoplasia. One such barrier involves DNA replication stress, which leads to activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and thereby to apoptosis or cell cycle arrest......, whereas a second barrier is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence. The relationship between these two barriers, if any, has not been elucidated. Here we show that oncogene-induced senescence is associated with signs of DNA replication stress, including prematurely terminated DNA replication forks...... and senescence markers cosegregate closely. Thus, senescence in human preneoplastic lesions is a manifestation of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress and, together with apoptosis, provides a barrier to malignant progression....

  5. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)]10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is......, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions...... for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-04-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed.

  7. Senescence and nutrient remobilization in crop plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Per L

    2011-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Abstract Introduction The senescence process Degradation and transport Regulation of senescence Conclusions: the dilemma of senescence Reference......Summary This chapter contains sections titled: Abstract Introduction The senescence process Degradation and transport Regulation of senescence Conclusions: the dilemma of senescence Reference...

  8. Aberrant localization of lamin B receptor (LBR) in cellular senescence in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Rumi; En, Atsuki; Ukekawa, Ryo [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Miki, Kensuke [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan); Fujii, Michihiko, E-mail: mifuji@yokohama-cu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ayusawa, Dai [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, 22-2 Seto, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Ichiban Life Corporation, 1-1-7 Horai-cho, Naka-ku, Yokohama 231-0048 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    5-Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a thymidine analogue, induces cellular senescence in mammalian cells. BrdU induces cellular senescence probably through the regulation of chromatin because BrdU destabilizes or disrupts nucleosome positioning and decondenses heterochromatin. Since heterochromatin is tethered to the nuclear periphery through the interaction with the nuclear envelope proteins, we examined the localization of the several nuclear envelope proteins such as lamins, lamin-interacting proteins, nuclear pore complex proteins, and nuclear transport proteins in senescent cells. We have shown here that lamin B receptor (LBR) showed a change in localization in both BrdU-induced and replicative senescent cells.

  9. Barriers and facilitators to replicating an evidence-based palliative care model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E Maxwell; Jamison, Paula; Brumley, Richard; Enguídanos, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of the difficulties involved in replicating evidence- based interventions is well documented in the literature within the medical field. Promising research findings are often not translated into practice, and if they are, there is a significant time gap between study conclusion and practice adoption. The purpose of this article is to describe the barriers and facilitators encountered by two managed care organizations while replicating an evidence-based end of life in-home palliative care model. Using Diffusion of Innovation Theory as a theoretical framework, results from focus groups and interviews with the project's clinical, administrative and research teams are presented and recommendations made for improving translational efforts. The process of replicating the end of life in-home palliative care model clearly illustrated the key elements required for successfully diffusing innovation. These key elements include marketing and communication, leadership, organizational support and training and mentorship. This qualitative process study provides clear, real world perspectives of the myriad of challenges encountered in replicating an evidence-based project.

  10. 3D Printing of Intracranial Aneurysms Using Fused Deposition Modeling Offers Highly Accurate Replications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, A M J; Spallek, J; Brehmer, L; Buhk, J-H; Krause, D; Fiehler, J; Kemmling, A

    2016-01-01

    As part of a multicenter cooperation (Aneurysm-Like Synthetic bodies for Testing Endovascular devices in 3D Reality) with focus on implementation of additive manufacturing in neuroradiologic practice, we systematically assessed the technical feasibility and accuracy of several additive manufacturing techniques. We evaluated the method of fused deposition modeling for the production of aneurysm models replicating patient-specific anatomy. 3D rotational angiographic data from 10 aneurysms were processed to obtain volumetric models suitable for fused deposition modeling. A hollow aneurysm model with connectors for silicone tubes was fabricated by using acrylonitrile butadiene styrene. Support material was dissolved, and surfaces were finished by using NanoSeal. The resulting models were filled with iodinated contrast media. 3D rotational angiography of the models was acquired, and aneurysm geometry was compared with the original patient data. Reproduction of hollow aneurysm models was technically feasible in 8 of 10 cases, with aneurysm sizes ranging from 41 to 2928 mm(3) (aneurysm diameter, 3-19 mm). A high level of anatomic accuracy was observed, with a mean Dice index of 93.6% ± 2.4%. Obstructions were encountered in vessel segments of modeling is a promising technique, which allows rapid and precise replication of cerebral aneurysms. The porosity of the models can be overcome by surface finishing. Models produced with fused deposition modeling may serve as educational and research tools and could be used to individualize treatment planning. © 2016 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  11. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    lipids for energy production. Such changes reflect alterations in membrane composition and dysregulation of sphingolipids signaling during senescence. This study establishes a new concept connecting oxidative protein modifications with the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent...... is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells....... By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells...

  12. Senescence, Wound Healing and Cancer. The PAI-1 Connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Kortlever, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Prolonged propagation of primary diploid fibroblasts in culture activates an ageing process known as replicative senescence, which is considered to provide a barrier against oncogenic transformation. Remarkably, both cell autonomous tumor‑suppressive and cell nonautonomous tumor‑promoting effects of

  13. Fractional Response Models - A Replication Exercise of Papke and Wooldridge (1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Oberhofer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper replicates the estimates of a fractional response model for share data reported in the seminal paper of Leslie E. Papke and Jeffrey M. Wooldridge published in the Journal of Applied Econometrics 11(6, 1996, pp.619-632. We have been able to replicate all of the reported estimation results concerning the determinants of employee participation rates in 401(k pension plans using the standard routines provided in Stata. As an alternative, we estimate a two-part model that is capable of coping with the excessive number of boundary values equalling one in the data. The estimated marginal effects are similar to those derived in the paper. A small-scale Monte Carlo simulation exercise suggests that the RESET tests proposed by Papke and Wooldridge in their robust form are useful for detecting neglected non-linearities in small samples.

  14. Senescence in Fungi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 3. Senescence in Fungi. Anthony Deepak D'souza Ramesh Maheshwari. General Article Volume 7 Issue 3 March 2002 pp 51-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/03/0051-0055 ...

  15. Investigating the conformational stability of prion strains through a kinetic replication model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia Zampieri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins are known to misfold into a range of different aggregated forms, showing different phenotypic and pathological states. Understanding strain specificities is an important problem in the field of prion disease. Little is known about which PrP(Sc structural properties and molecular mechanisms determine prion replication, disease progression and strain phenotype. The aim of this work is to investigate, through a mathematical model, how the structural stability of different aggregated forms can influence the kinetics of prion replication. The model-based results suggest that prion strains with different conformational stability undergoing in vivo replication are characterizable in primis by means of different rates of breakage. A further role seems to be played by the aggregation rate (i.e. the rate at which a prion fibril grows. The kinetic variability introduced in the model by these two parameters allows us to reproduce the different characteristic features of the various strains (e.g., fibrils' mean length and is coherent with all experimental observations concerning strain-specific behavior.

  16. Resveratrol Attenuates Copper-Induced Senescence by Improving Cellular Proteostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Matos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper sulfate-induced premature senescence (CuSO4-SIPS consistently mimetized molecular mechanisms of replicative senescence, particularly at the endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis level. In fact, disruption of protein homeostasis has been associated to age-related cell/tissue dysfunction and human disorders susceptibility. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with proved antiaging properties under particular conditions. In this setting, we aimed to evaluate resveratrol ability to attenuate cellular senescence induction and to unravel related molecular mechanisms. Using CuSO4-SIPS WI-38 fibroblasts, resveratrol is shown to attenuate typical senescence alterations on cell morphology, senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, and cell proliferation. The mechanisms implicated in this antisenescence effect seem to be independent of senescence-associated genes and proteins regulation but are reliant on cellular proteostasis improvement. In fact, resveratrol supplementation restores copper-induced increased protein content, attenuates BiP level, and reduces carbonylated and polyubiquitinated proteins by autophagy induction. Our data provide compelling evidence for the beneficial effects of resveratrol by mitigating CuSO4-SIPS stressful consequences by the modulation of protein quality control systems. These findings highlight the importance of a balanced cellular proteostasis and add further knowledge on molecular mechanisms mediating resveratrol antisenescence effects. Moreover, they contribute to identifying specific molecular targets whose modulation will prevent age-associated cell dysfunction and improve human healthspan.

  17. Roles of Apoptosis and Cellular Senescence in Cancer and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerella, Claudia; Grandjenette, Cindy; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and aging are two similar processes representing the final outcome of timedependent accumulation of various irreversible dysfunctions, mainly caused by stress-induced DNA and cellular damages. Apoptosis and senescence are two types of cellular response to damages that are altered in both cancer and aging, albeit through different mechanisms. Carcinogenesis is associated with a progressive reduction in the ability of the cells to trigger apoptosis and senescence. In contrast, in aging tissues, there is an increased accumulation of senescent cells, and the nature of apoptosis deregulation varies depending on the tissue. Thus, the prevailing model suggests that apoptosis and cellular senescence function as two essential tumor-suppressor mechanisms, ensuring the health of the individual during early and reproductive stages of life, but become detrimental and promote aging later in life. The recent discovery that various anticancer agents, including canonical inducers of apoptosis, act also as inducers of cellular senescence indicates that pro-senescence strategies may have applications in cancer prevention therapy. Therefore, dissection of the mechanisms mediating the delicate balance between apoptosis and cellular senescence will be beneficial in the therapeutic exploitation of both processes in the development of future anticancer and anti-aging strategies, including minimizing the side effects of such strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the roles of apoptosis and cellular senescence in cancer and aging.

  18. Replicating Patient-Specific Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis With Functional 3D Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragiannis, Dimitrios; Jackson, Matthew S; Igo, Stephen R; Schutt, Robert C; Connell, Patrick; Grande-Allen, Jane; Barker, Colin M; Chang, Su Min; Reardon, Michael J; Zoghbi, William A; Little, Stephen H

    2015-10-01

    3D stereolithographic printing can be used to convert high-resolution computed tomography images into life-size physical models. We sought to apply 3D printing technologies to develop patient-specific models of the anatomic and functional characteristics of severe aortic valve stenosis. Eight patient-specific models of severe aortic stenosis (6 tricuspid and 2 bicuspid) were created using dual-material fused 3D printing. Tissue types were identified and segmented from clinical computed tomography image data. A rigid material was used for printing calcific regions, and a rubber-like material was used for soft tissue structures of the outflow tract, aortic root, and noncalcified valve cusps. Each model was evaluated for its geometric valve orifice area, echocardiographic image quality, and aortic stenosis severity by Doppler and Gorlin methods under 7 different in vitro stroke volume conditions. Fused multimaterial 3D printed models replicated the focal calcific structures of aortic stenosis. Doppler-derived measures of peak and mean transvalvular gradient correlated well with reference standard pressure catheters across a range of flow conditions (r=0.988 and r=0.978 respectively, P3D printing, we demonstrate that patient-specific models can replicate both the anatomic and functional properties of severe degenerative aortic valve stenosis. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Two different pathogenic mechanisms, dying-back axonal neuropathy and pancreatic senescence, are present in the YG8R mouse model of Friedreich’s ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Mollá

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Frataxin (FXN deficiency causes Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA, a multisystem disorder with neurological and non-neurological symptoms. FRDA pathophysiology combines developmental and degenerative processes of dorsal root ganglia (DRG, sensory nerves, dorsal columns and other central nervous structures. A dying-back mechanism has been proposed to explain the peripheral neuropathy and neuropathology. In addition, affected individuals have non-neuronal symptoms such as diabetes mellitus or glucose intolerance. To go further in the understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of neuropathy and diabetes associated with the disease, we have investigated the humanized mouse YG8R model of FRDA. By biochemical and histopathological studies, we observed abnormal changes involving muscle spindles, dorsal root axons and DRG neurons, but normal findings in the posterior columns and brain, which agree with the existence of a dying-back process similar to that described in individuals with FRDA. In YG8R mice, we observed a large number of degenerated axons surrounded by a sheath exhibiting enlarged adaxonal compartments or by a thin disrupted myelin sheath. Thus, both axonal damage and defects in Schwann cells might underlie the nerve pathology. In the pancreas, we found a high proportion of senescent islets of Langerhans in YG8R mice, which decreases the β-cell number and islet mass to pathological levels, being unable to maintain normoglycemia. As a whole, these results confirm that the lack of FXN induces different pathogenic mechanisms in the nervous system and pancreas in the mouse model of FRDA: dying back of the sensory nerves, and pancreatic senescence.

  20. Catastrophic Senescence of the Pacific Salmon Without Mutation-Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    We derive catastrophic senescence of the Pacific salmon from an aging model which was recently proposed by Stauffer. The model is based on the postulates of a minimum reproduction age and a maximal genetic lifespan. It allows for self-organization of a typical age of first reproduction and a typical age of death. Our Monte Carlo simulations of the population dynamics show that the model leads to catastrophic senescence for semelparous reproduction as it occurs in the case of salmon, to a more gradually increase of senescence for iteroparous reproduction.

  1. The rolling-circle melting-pot model for porcine circovirus DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stem-loop structure, formed by a pair of inverted repeats during DNA replication, is a conserved feature at the origin of DNA replication (Ori) among plant and animal viruses, bacteriophages and plasmids that replicate their genomes via the rolling-circle replication (RCR) mechanism. Porcine circo...

  2. Implementing three evidence-based program models: early lessons from the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Meredith; Layzer, Jean

    2014-03-01

    This article describes some of the early implementation challenges faced by nine grantees participating in the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Replication Study and their response to them. The article draws on information collected as part of a comprehensive implementation study. Sources include site and program documents; program officer reports; notes from site investigation, selection and negotiation; ongoing communications with grantees as part of putting the study into place; and semi-structured interviews with program staff. The issues faced by grantees in implementing evidence-based programs designed to prevent teen pregnancy varied by program model. Grantees implementing a classroom-based curriculum faced challenges in delivering the curriculum within the constraints of school schedules and calendars (program length and size of class). Grantees implementing a culturally tailored curriculum faced a series of challenges, including implementing the intervention as part of the regular school curriculum in schools with diverse populations; low attendance when delivered as an after-school program; and resistance on the part of schools to specific curriculum content. The third set of grantees, implementing a program in clinics, faced challenges in identifying and recruiting young women into the program and in retaining young women once they were in the program. The experiences of these grantees reflect some of the complexities that should be carefully considered when choosing to replicate evidence-based programs. The Teen Pregnancy Prevention replication study will provide important context for assessing the effectiveness of some of the more widely replicated evidence-based programs. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  3. The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance: A replication with adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2006-03-01

    The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance is a recent theoretical approach that includes a test of direct (peer, parental, and media factors) and mediational links (internalization of societal appearance standards, appearance comparison processes) as factors potentially leading to body dissatisfaction and eating disturbance. The theory was evaluated in the current study in a sample of 391 adolescent females. A structural equation model that evaluated the tripartite model replicated previous findings reported by Keery, van den Berg and Thompson (2004) [Keery, H., van den Berg, & Thompson, J. K. (2004). A test of the tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance in adolescent girls. Body Image: An International Journal of Research, 1, 237-251.]. Additionally, a second model extended these findings, suggesting that peer and media influences are more important than parental influences. The results are discussed in light of the need for prevention programs to incorporate formative influences and mediational processes in the construction of intervention strategies.

  4. Curcumin elevates sirtuin level but does not postpone in vitro senescence of human cells building the vasculature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, Wioleta; Suszek, Małgorzata; Wnuk, Maciej; Lewinska, Anna; Wasiak, Emilia; Sikora, Ewa; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that curcumin, a component of the turmeric that belongs to hormetins, possesses anti-aging propensity. This property of curcumin can be partially explained by its influence on the level of sirtuins. Previously, we have shown that relatively high (2.5-10 μM) doses of curcumin induce senescence of cancer cells and cells building the vasculature. In the present study we examined whether curcumin at low doses (0.1 and 1 μM) is able to delay cell senescence and upregulate the level of sirtuins in human cells building the vasculature, namely vascular smooth muscle (VSMC) and endothelial (EC) cells. To this end we used cells senescing in a replicative and premature manner. We showed that low doses of curcumin in case of VSMC neither postponed the replicative senescence nor protected from premature senescence induced by doxorubicin. Moreover, curcumin slightly accelerated replicative senescence of EC. Despite some fluctuations, a clear increasing tendency in the level of sirtuins was observed in curcumin-treated young, senescing or already senescent cells. Sirtuin activation could be caused by the activation of AMPK resulting from superoxide elevation and ATP reduction. Our results show that curcumin at low doses can increase the level of sirtuins without delaying senescence of VSMC. PMID:27034011

  5. [Immunological theory of senescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drela, Nadzieja

    2014-01-01

    Senescence can result from decreased potential of the immune system to respond to foreign and self antigens. The most common effect is the inhibition to destroy dying and cancer cells and the decrease of the immune response to pathogens. Aging is closely related to inflammatory phenotype, which facilitate the development of age-related diseases. The mammal immune system is highly organized and adapted to react to a wide range of antigens. According to the immunological theory, the causative agents of senescence are multilevel changes of development and functions of immune cells. Some of changes can be beneficial for the maintenance of homeostasis and lifespan in continuously changing endogenous environment and immune history of the organism.

  6. A model for family replication and a mechanism for mass hierarchy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pati, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    We suggest a flavon-chromon preon model possessing two preonic scales - Λsub(M)>>1 TeV and Λsub(H)approx.=1 TeV - associated with metacolor and hypercolor gauge forces respectively. The model exhibits two desirable features: (a) a mechanism for family replication, and (b) a new mechanism for interfamily mass hierarchy. With a minimal choice of the preonic fields, the model predicts four families (e, μ, tau and tau') tau being a replication of e and tau' of μ. Barring mixing, the e- and μ-families are bound by the metacolor force and have a small size approx.=Λsub(M) -1 , while the tau and the tau', which are composites of composites, are bound by the hypercolor force and have a relatively large size approx.=Λsub(H) -1 . The model predicts that the next-generation accelerators should discover (a) compositeness of quarks and leptons, primarily through family non-diagonal processes like (e - e + or qsub(e)anti qsub(e))->tau - tau + , qsub(b)anti qsub(b) or psub(t)anti qsub(t), and (b) a breakdown of e-μ-tau universality. It also predicts observable rare decays like tau->eγ and Ksub(L)->anti μe. (orig.)

  7. Assessing senescence patterns in populations of large mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaillard, J.-M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical models such as those of Gompertz and Weibull are commonly used to study senescence in survival for humans and laboratory or captive animals. For wild populations of vertebrates, senescence in survival has more commonly been assessed by fitting simple linear or quadratic relationships between survival and age. By using appropriate constraints on survival parameters in Capture-Mark-Recapture (CMR models, we propose a first analysis of the suitability of the Gompertz and the two-parameter Weibull models for describing aging-related mortality in free-ranging populations of ungulates. We first show how to handle the Gompertz and the two-parameter Weibull models in the context of CMR analyses. Then we perform a comparative analysis of senescence patterns in both sexes of two ungulate species highly contrasted according to the intensity of sexual selection. Our analyses provide support to the Gompertz model for describing senescence patterns in ungulates. Evolutionary implications of our results are discussed

  8. The tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance: a replication with a Japanese sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamiya, Yuko; Shroff, Hemal; Thompson, J Kevin

    2008-01-01

    To examine the tripartite influence model of body image and eating disturbance as a viable sociocultural explanation for the development of eating and body image problems with young Japanese females. A sample of 289 Japanese female undergraduates completed a variety of measures designed to index family, peer, and media influences, as well as levels of body dissatisfaction, eating disturbances, and self-esteem. The data were evaluated with structural equation modeling to test the tripartite model. Fit indices indicated a moderate fit to the overall tripartite model, replicating previous findings. This study suggests that the sociocultural variables found to influence body image and eating disturbances in Japan are similar to those observed with US samples. The implications for prevention and intervention programs are discussed.

  9. Senescent peritoneal mesothelium induces a pro-angiogenic phenotype in ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in a mouse xenograft model in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Naumowicz, Eryk; Maksin, Konstantin; Piotrowska, Hanna; Woźniak, Aldona; Szpurek, Dariusz; Książek, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    It is believed that senescent cells contribute to the progression of primary and metastatic tumors, however, the exact mechanisms of this activity remain elusive. In this report we show that senescent human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) alter the secretory profile of ovarian cancer cells (A2780, OVCAR-3, SKOV-3) by increasing the release of four angiogenic agents: CXCL1, CXCL8, HGF, and VEGF. Proliferation and migration of endothelial cells subjected to conditioned medium generated by: cancer cells modified by senescent HPMCs; cancer cells co-cultured with senescent HPMCs; and by early-passage HPMCs from aged donors, were markedly intensified. The same was the case for the vascularization, size and number of tumors that developed in the mouse peritoneum upon injection of ovarian cancer cells with senescent HPMCs. When the identified pro-angiogenic proteins were neutralized in conditioned medium from the cancer cells, both aspects of endothelial cell behavior intensified in vitro in response to senescent HPMCs were markedly reduced. The search for mediators of senescent HPMC activity using specific neutralizing antibodies and recombinant exogenous proteins showed that the intensified angiogenic potential of cancer cells was elicited by IL-6 and TGF-β1. At the transcriptional level, increased proliferation and migration of endothelial cells exposed to cancer cells modified by senescent HPMCs was regulated by HIF-1α, NF-κB/p50 and AP-1/c-Jun. Collectively, our findings indicate that senescent HPMCs may promote the progression of ovarian cancer cells by reprogramming their secretory phenotype towards increased production of pro-angiogenic agents and subsequent increase in the angiogenic capabilities of the vascular endothelium.

  10. Identification and characterization of secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced premature senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Jung, Seung Hee; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Jae Seon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Seong Gil [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated {beta} alactosidase positivity. Recently a large number of molecular phenotypes such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization have been also described. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence. Here, we show that senescent human breast cancer MCF7 cells promote the proliferation, invasion and migration of neighboring cells

  11. Cellular senescence in renal ageing and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturmlechner, I.; Durik, M.; Sieben, C.J.; Baker, D.J.; Deursen, J.M.A. van

    2017-01-01

    The senescence programme is implicated in diverse biological processes, including embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and repair, tumorigenesis, and ageing. Although in vivo studies of senescence are in their infancy, evidence suggesting that senescent cells are a heterogeneous cell type is

  12. Cellular senescence in renal ageing and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturmlechner, Ines; Durik, Matej; Sieben, Cynthia J.; Baker, Darren J.; van Deursen, Jan M.

    The senescence programme is implicated in diverse biological processes, including embryogenesis, tissue regeneration and repair, tumorigenesis, and ageing. Although in vivo studies of senescence are in their infancy, evidence suggesting that senescent cells are a heterogeneous cell type is

  13. A prototypical non-malignant epithelial model to study genome dynamics and concurrently monitor micro-RNAs and proteins in situ during oncogene-induced senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komseli, Eirini Stavroula; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Krejsgaard, Thorbjørn

    2018-01-01

    a short time frame under the light of natural selection and iii) it uses as an oncogenic signal, the replication licensing factor CDC6, implicated in both DNA replication and transcription when over-expressed, a characteristic that can be exploited to monitor RNA dynamics. Conclusions: Consequently, we...... demonstrate that our model is optimal for studying the molecular basis of epithelial carcinogenesis shedding light on the tumor-initiating events. The latter may reveal novel molecular targets with clinical benefit. Besides, since this method can be incorporated in a wide range of low, medium or high...

  14. COS-7-based model: methodological approach to study John Cunningham virus replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prezioso, C; Scribano, D; Rodio, D M; Ambrosi, C; Trancassini, M; Palamara, A T; Pietropaolo, V

    2018-02-05

    John Cunningham virus (JCV) is a human neurotropic polyomavirus whose replication in the Central Nervous System (SNC) induces the fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV propagation and PML investigation have been severely hampered by the lack of an animal model and cell culture systems to propagate JCV have been very limited in their availability and robustness. We previously confirmed that JCV CY strain efficiently replicated in COS-7 cells as demonstrated by the progressive increase of viral load by quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) during the time of transfection and that archetypal regulatory structure was maintained, although two characteristic point mutations were detected during the viral cycle. This short report is an important extension of our previous efforts in defining our reliable model culture system able to support a productive JCV infection.Supernatants collected from transfected cells have been used to infect freshly seeded COS-7 cell line. An infectious viral progeny was obtained as confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence assay. During infection, the archetype regulatory region was conserved.Importantly, in this study we developed an improved culture system to obtain a large scale production of JC virus in order to study the genetic features, the biology and the pathogenic mechanisms of JC virus that induce PML.

  15. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... increased DNA replication stress....

  16. Interaction Mortality: Senescence May Have Evolved because It Increases Lifespan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensink, M. J.; Wrycza, T. F.; Baudisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Given an extrinsic challenge, an organism may die or not depending on how the threat interacts with the organism's physiological state. To date, such interaction mortality has been only a minor factor in theoretical modeling of senescence. We describe a model of interaction mortality that does...... not involve specific functions, making only modest assumptions. Our model distinguishes explicitly between the physiological state of an organism and potential extrinsic, age-independent threats. The resulting mortality may change with age, depending on whether the organism's state changes with age. We find...... that depending on the physiological constraints, any outcome, be it 'no senescence' or 'high rate of senescence', can be found in any environment; that the highest optimal rate of senescence emerges for an intermediate physiological constraint, i.e. intermediate strength of trade-off; and that the optimal rate...

  17. Integration of multi-omics techniques and physiological phenotyping within a holistic phenomics approach to study senescence in model and crop plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Großkinsky, D.K.; Syaifullah, S. J.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 99 (2017), s. 1-20 ISSN 0022-0957 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : integrated approaches * multi-omics * phenomics * plant development * plant–environment interactions * plant phenotyping * plant physiology * plant senescence * senescence programme * systems biology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 5.830, year: 2016

  18. A heteroscedastic measurement error model for method comparison data with replicate measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarathna, Lakshika S; Choudhary, Pankaj K

    2015-03-30

    Measurement error models offer a flexible framework for modeling data collected in studies comparing methods of quantitative measurement. These models generally make two simplifying assumptions: (i) the measurements are homoscedastic, and (ii) the unobservable true values of the methods are linearly related. One or both of these assumptions may be violated in practice. In particular, error variabilities of the methods may depend on the magnitude of measurement, or the true values may be nonlinearly related. Data with these features call for a heteroscedastic measurement error model that allows nonlinear relationships in the true values. We present such a model for the case when the measurements are replicated, discuss its fitting, and explain how to evaluate similarity of measurement methods and agreement between them, which are two common goals of data analysis, under this model. Model fitting involves dealing with lack of a closed form for the likelihood function. We consider estimation methods that approximate either the likelihood or the model to yield approximate maximum likelihood estimates. The fitting methods are evaluated in a simulation study. The proposed methodology is used to analyze a cholesterol dataset. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes as i...

  20. Measuring senescence in human populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Jacob Jan Egbert

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, senescence is measured in human populations according to its definition of an increase in the risks of dysfunction, disease, and death with chronological age. Part I of this thesis investigates how a population’s senescence rate can be measured through the increase in mortality rate

  1. Linear mixed models for replication data to efficiently allow for covariate measurement error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Jonathan W; De Stavola, Bianca L; Frost, Chris

    2009-11-10

    It is well known that measurement error in the covariates of regression models generally causes bias in parameter estimates. Correction for such biases requires information concerning the measurement error, which is often in the form of internal validation or replication data. Regression calibration (RC) is a popular approach to correct for covariate measurement error, which involves predicting the true covariate using error-prone measurements. Likelihood methods have previously been proposed as an alternative approach to estimate the parameters in models affected by measurement error, but have been relatively infrequently employed in medical statistics and epidemiology, partly because of computational complexity and concerns regarding robustness to distributional assumptions. We show how a standard random-intercepts model can be used to obtain maximum likelihood (ML) estimates when the outcome model is linear or logistic regression under certain normality assumptions, when internal error-prone replicate measurements are available. Through simulations we show that for linear regression, ML gives more efficient estimates than RC, although the gain is typically small. Furthermore, we show that RC and ML estimates remain consistent even when the normality assumptions are violated. For logistic regression, our implementation of ML is consistent if the true covariate is conditionally normal given the outcome, in contrast to RC. In simulations, this ML estimator showed less bias in situations where RC gives non-negligible biases. Our proposal makes the ML approach to dealing with covariate measurement error more accessible to researchers, which we hope will improve its viability as a useful alternative to methods such as RC.

  2. The Song Remains the Same: A Replication and Extension of the MUSIC Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J.; Goldberg, Lewis R.; Stillwell, David J.; Kosinski, Michal; Gosling, Samuel D.; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    There is overwhelming anecdotal and empirical evidence for individual differences in musical preferences. However, little is known about what drives those preferences. Are people drawn to particular musical genres (e.g., rap, jazz) or to certain musical properties (e.g., lively, loud)? Recent findings suggest that musical preferences can be conceptualized in terms of five orthogonal dimensions: Mellow, Unpretentious, Sophisticated, Intense, and Contemporary (conveniently, MUSIC). The aim of the present research is to replicate and extend that work by empirically examining the hypothesis that musical preferences are based on preferences for particular musical properties and psychological attributes as opposed to musical genres. Findings from Study 1 replicated the five-factor MUSIC structure using musical excerpts from a variety of genres and subgenres and revealed musical attributes that differentiate each factor. Results from Studies 2 and 3 show that the MUSIC structure is recoverable using musical pieces from only the jazz and rock genres, respectively. Taken together, the current work provides strong evidence that preferences for music are determined by specific musical attributes and that the MUSIC model is a robust framework for conceptualizing and measuring such preferences. PMID:24825945

  3. The Song Remains the Same: A Replication and Extension of the MUSIC Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, Peter J; Goldberg, Lewis R; Stillwell, David J; Kosinski, Michal; Gosling, Samuel D; Levitin, Daniel J

    2012-12-01

    There is overwhelming anecdotal and empirical evidence for individual differences in musical preferences. However, little is known about what drives those preferences. Are people drawn to particular musical genres (e.g., rap, jazz) or to certain musical properties (e.g., lively, loud)? Recent findings suggest that musical preferences can be conceptualized in terms of five orthogonal dimensions: Mellow, Unpretentious, Sophisticated, Intense, and Contemporary (conveniently, MUSIC). The aim of the present research is to replicate and extend that work by empirically examining the hypothesis that musical preferences are based on preferences for particular musical properties and psychological attributes as opposed to musical genres. Findings from Study 1 replicated the five-factor MUSIC structure using musical excerpts from a variety of genres and subgenres and revealed musical attributes that differentiate each factor. Results from Studies 2 and 3 show that the MUSIC structure is recoverable using musical pieces from only the jazz and rock genres, respectively. Taken together, the current work provides strong evidence that preferences for music are determined by specific musical attributes and that the MUSIC model is a robust framework for conceptualizing and measuring such preferences.

  4. Implication of p53-dependent cellular senescence related gene, TARSH in tumor suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakoh, Takeshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Terauchi, Kunihiko; Sugimoto, Masataka; Ishigami, Akihito; Shimada, Jun-ichi; Maruyama, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    A novel target of NESH-SH3 (TARSH) was identified as a cellular senescence related gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) replicative senescence, the expression of which has been suppressed in primary clinical lung cancer specimens. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of TARSH involved in pulmonary tumorigenesis remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the reduction of TARSH gene expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) system robustly inhibited the MEFs proliferation with increase in senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) activity. Using p53 -/- MEFs, we further suggest that this growth arrest by loss of TARSH is evoked by p53-dependent p21 Cip1 accumulation. Moreover, we also reveal that TARSH reduction induces multicentrosome in MEFs, which is linked in chromosome instability and tumor development. These results suggest that TARSH plays an important role in proliferation of replicative senescence and may serve as a trigger of tumor development.

  5. Bacterial Intoxication Evokes Cellular Senescence with Persistent DNA Damage and Cytokine Signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blazkova, Hana; Krejcikova, Katerina; Moudry, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    features shared by cells undergoing replicative or premature cellular senescence. We conclude that analogous to oncogenic, oxidative and replicative stresses, bacterial intoxication represents another pathophysiological stimulus that induces premature senescence, an intrinsic cellular response that may...... to such intoxication are mechanistically incompletely understood. Here we show that both normal and cancer cells (BJ, IMR-90 and WI-38 fibroblasts, HeLa and U2-OS cell lines) that survive the acute phase of intoxication by Haemophilus ducreyi CDT possess the hallmarks of cellular senescence. This characteristic...... phenotype included persistently activated DNA damage signaling (detected as 53BP1/gammaH2AX-positive foci), enhanced senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity, expansion of PML nuclear compartments, and induced expression of several cytokines (especially interleukins IL-6, IL-8 and IL-24), overall...

  6. Animal models for the study of hepatitis C virus infection and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, Kristin L; Wu, Catherine H; Wu, George Y

    2012-06-21

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) hepatitis, initially termed non-A, non-B hepatitis, has become one of the leading causes of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. With the help of animal models, our understanding of the virus has grown substantially from the time of initial discovery. There is a paucity of available animal models for the study of HCV, mainly because of the selective susceptibility limited to humans and primates. Recent work has focused modification of animals to permit HCV entry, replication and transmission. In this review, we highlight the currently available models for the study of HCV including chimpanzees, tupaia, mouse and rat models. Discussion will include methods of model design as well as the advantages and disadvantages of each model. Particular focus is dedicated to knowledge of pathophysiologic mechanisms of HCV infection that have been elucidated through animal studies. Research within animal models is critically important to establish a complete understanding of HCV infection, which will ultimately form the basis for future treatments and prevention of disease.

  7. Immune activation and CD8+ T-cell differentiation towards senescence in HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Papagno

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Progress in the fight against the HIV/AIDS epidemic is hindered by our failure to elucidate the precise reasons for the onset of immunodeficiency in HIV-1 infection. Increasing evidence suggests that elevated immune activation is associated with poor outcome in HIV-1 pathogenesis. However, the basis of this association remains unclear. Through ex vivo analysis of virus-specific CD8(+ T-cells and the use of an in vitro model of naïve CD8(+ T-cell priming, we show that the activation level and the differentiation state of T-cells are closely related. Acute HIV-1 infection induces massive activation of CD8(+ T-cells, affecting many cell populations, not only those specific for HIV-1, which results in further differentiation of these cells. HIV disease progression correlates with increased proportions of highly differentiated CD8(+ T-cells, which exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence and probably indicate a decline in T-cell competence of the infected person. The differentiation of CD8(+ and CD4(+ T-cells towards a state of replicative senescence is a natural process. It can be driven by excessive levels of immune stimulation. This may be part of the mechanism through which HIV-1-mediated immune activation exhausts the capacity of the immune system.

  8. Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for the stochastic heterogeneity in telomere-dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F Passos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inherently stochastic process, and its hallmark is heterogeneity between organisms, cell types, and clonal populations, even in identical environments. The replicative lifespan of primary human cells is telomere dependent; however, its heterogeneity is not understood. We show that mitochondrial superoxide production increases with replicative age in human fibroblasts despite an adaptive UCP-2-dependent mitochondrial uncoupling. This mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by compromised [Ca(2+]i homeostasis and other indicators of a retrograde response in senescent cells. Replicative senescence of human fibroblasts is delayed by mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Uncoupling reduces mitochondrial superoxide generation, slows down telomere shortening, and delays formation of telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. This indicates mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as one of the causes of replicative senescence. By sorting early senescent (SES cells from young proliferating fibroblast cultures, we show that SES cells have higher ROS levels, dysfunctional mitochondria, shorter telomeres, and telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. We propose that mitochondrial ROS is a major determinant of telomere-dependent senescence at the single-cell level that is responsible for cell-to-cell variation in replicative lifespan.

  9. Assessing Religious Orientations: Replication and Validation of the Commitment-Reflectivity Circumplex (CRC Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L. Isaak

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Commitment-Reflectivity Circumplex (CRC model is a structural model of religious orientation that was designed to help organize and clarify measurement of foundational aspect of religiousness. The current study successfully replicated the CRC model using multidimensional scaling, and further evaluated the reliability, structure, and validity of their measures in both a university student sample (Study 1 and a nationally representative sample (Study 2. All 10 subscales of the Circumplex Religious Orientation Inventory (CROI demonstrated good reliability across both samples. A two-week test-retest of the CROI showed that the subscales are stable over time. A confirmatory factor analysis of the CROI in the representative adult sample demonstrated good model fit. Finally, the CROI’s validity was examined in relation to the Intrinsic, Extrinsic and Quest measures. Overall, the CROI appears to clarify much of the ambiguity inherent in the established scales by breaking down what were very broad orientations into very specific suborientations. The results suggest that the CRC model is applicable for diverse populations of adults. In addition, the CROI appears to be construct valid with good structural and psychometric properties across all 10 subscales.

  10. Conditionally replicating adenovirus expressing TIMP2 increases survival in a mouse model of disseminated ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry W Yang

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer remains difficult to treat mainly due to presentation of the disease at an advanced stage. Conditionally-replicating adenoviruses (CRAds are promising anti-cancer agents that selectively kill the tumor cells. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a novel CRAd (Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2 containing the CXCR4 promoter for selective viral replication in cancer cells together with TIMP2 as a therapeutic transgene, targeting the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs in a murine orthotopic model of disseminated ovarian cancer. An orthotopic model of ovarian cancer was established in athymic nude mice by intraperitonal injection of the human ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3-Luc, expressing luciferase. Upon confirmation of peritoneal dissemination of the cells by non-invasive imaging, mice were randomly divided into four treatment groups: PBS, Ad-ΔE1-TIMP2, Ad5/3-CXCR4, and Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2. All mice were imaged weekly to monitor tumor growth and were sacrificed upon reaching any of the predefined endpoints, including high tumor burden and significant weight loss along with clinical evidence of pain and distress. Survival analysis was performed using the Log-rank test. The median survival for the PBS cohort was 33 days; for Ad-ΔE1-TIMP2, 39 days; for Ad5/3-CXCR4, 52.5 days; and for Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2, 63 days. The TIMP2-armed CRAd delayed tumor growth and significantly increased survival when compared to the unarmed CRAd. This therapeutic effect was confirmed to be mediated through inhibition of MMP9. Results of the in vivo study support the translational potential of Ad5/3-CXCR4-TIMP2 for treatment of human patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

  11. Senescent mesenchymal stem cells promote colorectal cancer cells growth via galectin-3 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanju; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihua; Liu, Guangjin; Li, Yanqi; Wu, Xiaobing; Jing, Yongguang; Li, Haiyan; Wang, Guihua

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is linked to aging and tumorigenesis. The senescence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) may influence the tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis by secreting a variety of cytokines and growth factors. The conditioned media of adipose derived MSCs (AD-MSCs) stimulated the proliferation of human LoVo colorectal-cancer cells, and the replicative senescent MSCs had the more obvious effects in comparison to that of premature AD-MSCs. Analysis of the factors secreted in the MSCs culture media determined that senescent MSCs expressed and secreted high levels of galectin-3. Galectin-3 expression correlated with the stimulatory effect of senescent AD-MSCs on LoVo cells proliferation, as knockdown of galectin-3 in senescent AD-MSCs significantly reversed the effect of MSCs-mediated growth stimulation of LoVo cells. Furthermore, the simultaneous addition of recombinant galectin-3 to the co-culture systems partially restored the tumor-promoting effect of the senescent AD-MSCs. Analysis of the mechanisms of senescent MSCs and galectin-3 on LoVo cells signal transduction determined that senescent MSCs and exogenous galectin-3 promoted cell growth by activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK]1/2) pathway. Senescent MSCs may alter the tissue microenvironment and affect nearby malignant cells via cytokine secretion, and galectin-3 is an important mediator of senescent AD-MSC-mediated stimulation of colon cancer cell growth. Therefore, thorough assessment of AD-MSCs prior to their implementation in clinical practice is warranted.

  12. The Splicing Factor SRSF1 as a Marker for Endothelial Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Francisco Javier; Bernabéu, Carmelo

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor per se for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The senescence of the endothelial cells (ECs) that line the lumen of blood vessels is the cellular basis for these age-dependent vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and hypertension. During their lifespan, ECs may reach a stage of senescence by two different pathways; a replicative one derived from their preprogrammed finite number of cell divisions; and one induced by stress stimuli. Also, certain physiological stimuli, such as transforming growth factor-β, are able to modulate cellular senescence. Currently, the cellular aging process is being widely studied to identify novel molecular markers whose changes correlate with senescence. This review focuses on the regulation of alternative splicing mediated by the serine–arginine splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, or ASF/SF2) during endothelial senescence, a process that is associated with a differential subcellular localization of SRSF1, which typically exhibits a scattered distribution throughout the cytoplasm. Based on its senescence-dependent involvement in alternative splicing, we postulate that SRSF1 is a key marker of EC senescence, regulating the expression of alternative isoforms of target genes such as endoglin (ENG), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), tissue factor (T3), or lamin A (LMNA) that integrate in a common molecular senescence program. PMID:22470345

  13. Epifriedelanol from the root bark of Ulmus davidiana inhibits cellular senescence in human primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyo Hyun; Son, Jong-Keun; Jung, Bochan; Zheng, Mingshan; Kim, Jae-Ryong

    2011-03-01

    Since cellular senescence involves organismal aging as well as diverse diseases, aging intervention might contribute to inhibit the aging process as well as aging-associated diseases. We tried to search for effective compounds from the root bark of ULMUS DAVIDIANA that are able to inhibit cellular senescence in human fibroblasts (HDFs) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Twenty-two compounds from the root bark of U. DAVIDIANA were isolated and screened for their inhibitory effects on adriamycin-induced cellular senescence by measuring senescence-associated β-galatosidase (SA- β-gal) activity. Among twenty-two compounds isolated, epifriedelanol (3), ssioriside (15), and catechin-7-O- β-D-glucopyranoside (22) had inhibitory effects on adriamycin-induced cellular senescence in HDFs. Friedelin (2), epifriedelanol (3), and catechin-7-O- β-apiofuranoside (18) were active in HUVECs. In particular, epifriedelanol (3) suppressed adriamycin-induced cellular senescence as well as replicative senescence in HDFs and HUVECs. These results suggest that epifriedelanol (3) reduces cellular senescence in human primary cells and might be used to develop dietary supplements or cosmetics that modulate tissue aging or aging-associated diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. The splicing factor ASF/SF2 and intron retention as markers of endothelial senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Blanco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the major risk factor per se for the development of cardiovascular diseases. The senescence of endothelial cells, that line the lumen of blood vessels, is at the cellular basis of these age-dependent vascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis and hypertension. Along their lifespan, endothelial cells may reach the senescence stage by two different pathways, the replicative one derived from their finite number of divisions, and the one induced by stress stimuli. Also, certain physiological stimuli, such as TGF-β are able to modulate cellular senescence. Currently, the cellular aging process is being widely studied to identify novel molecular markers whose changes correlate with senescence. This review focuses on the regulation of alternative splicing mediated by the serine-arginine splicing factor 1 (SRSF1, or ASF/SF2 during endothelial senescence, a process that is associated with a differential subcellular localization of SRSF1, showing a scattered distribution throughout the cytoplasm. Based on its senescence-dependent involvement in alternative splicing, we postulate that SRSF1 is a key marker of endothelial cell senescence regulating the expression of alternative isoforms of target genes such as ENG, VEGFA, T3 or LMNA that integrate a common molecular senescence program.

  15. Identification of Secreted Proteins from Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescent MCF7 Cells Using Comparative Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Na Kyung; Kim, Han Na; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Lee, Jae Seon [Korea Institue of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chi, Seong Gil [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Cellular senescence was first described by Hayflick and Moorhead in 1961 who observed that cultures of normal human fibroblasts had a limited replicative potential and eventually became irreversibly arrest. The majority of senescent cells assume a characteristic flattened and enlarged morphological change, senescence associated beta-galactosidase positivity and over the years a large number of molecular phenotypes have been described, such as changes in gene expression, protein processing and chromatin organization. In contrast to apoptosis, senescence does not destroy the cells but leaves them metabolically and synthetically active and therefore able to affect their microenvironment. In particular, senescent fibroblasts and some cancer cells were found to secrete proteins with known or putative tumor-promoting functions such as growth factors or proteolytic enzymes. However, the knowledge about secreted proteins from senescent tumor cells and their functions to surrounding cells is still lacking. In this study, changes of senescence-associated secretory protein expression profile were observed in MCF7 human breast cancer cells exposed to gamma-ray radiation using two dimensional electrophoresis. Also, we identified up-regulated secretory proteins during ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence

  16. Overexpression of the novel senescence marker β-galactosidase (GLB1 in prostate cancer predicts reduced PSA recurrence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Wagner

    Full Text Available Senescence is a terminal growth arrest that functions as a tumor suppressor in aging and precancerous cells and is a response to selected anticancer compounds. Lysosomal-β-galactosidase (GLB1 hydrolyzes β-galactose from glycoconjugates and is the origin of senescence-associated β-gal activity (SA-β-gal. Using a new GLB1 antibody, senescence biology was investigated in prostate cancer (PCa tissues.In vitro characterization of GLB1 was determined in primary prostate epithelial cell cultures passaged to replicative senescence and in therapy-induced senescence in PCa lines using chemotherapeutic agents. FFPE tissue microarrays were subjected to immunofluorescent staining for GLB1, Ki67 and HP1γ and automated quantitative imaging initially using AQUA in exploratory samples and Vectra in a validation series.GLB1 expression accumulates in replicative and induced senescence and correlates with senescent morphology and P16 (CDKN2 expression. In tissue arrays, quantitative imaging detects increased GLB1 expression in high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN, known to contain senescent cells, and cancer compared to benign prostate tissues (p<0.01 and senescent cells contain low Ki67 and elevated HP1γ. Within primary tumors, elevated GLB1 associates with lower T stage (p=0.01, localized versus metastatic disease (p=0.0003 and improved PSA-free survival (p=0.03. Increased GLB1 stratifies better PSA-free survival in intermediate grade PCa (0.01. Tissues that elaborate higher GLB1 display increased uniformity of expression.Increased GLB1 is a valuable marker in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues for the senescence-like phenotype and associates with improved cancer outcomes. This protein addresses a lack of senescence markers and should be applicable to study the biologic role of senescence in other cancers.

  17. Senescence rates in patients with end-stage renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, J J E; Rozing, M P; Kramer, Ada

    2011-01-01

    The most frequently used model to describe the exponential increase in mortality rate over age is the Gompertz equation. Logarithmically transformed, the equation conforms to a straight line, of which the slope has been interpreted as the rate of senescence. Earlier, we proposed the derivative...... function of the Gompertz equation as a superior descriptor of senescence rate. Here, we tested both measures of the rate of senescence in a population of patients with end-stage renal disease. It is clinical dogma that patients on dialysis experience accelerated senescence, whereas those with a functional...... kidney transplant have mortality rates comparable to the general population. Therefore, we calculated the age-specific mortality rates for European patients on dialysis (n=274 221; follow-up=594 767 person-years), for European patients with a functioning kidney transplant (n=61 286; follow-up=345 024...

  18. Physiological and pathological consequences of cellular senescence

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Dominick G. A.; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence, a permanent state of cell cycle arrest accompanied by a complex phenotype, is an essential mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. In physiological conditions, senescent cells can be removed by the immune system, facilitating tumor suppression and wound healing. However, as we age, senescent cells accumulate in tissues, either because an aging immune system fails to remove them, the rate of senescent cell formation is elevated, or both. If senescent cells p...

  19. The impact of cellular senescence in skin ageing: A notion of mosaic and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutfaire, Marie; Bauwens, Emilie; Debacq-Chainiaux, Florence

    2017-10-15

    Cellular senescence is now recognized as one of the nine hallmarks of ageing. Recent data show the involvement of senescent cells in tissue ageing and some age-related diseases. Skin represents an ideal model for the study of ageing. Indeed, skin ageing varies between individuals depending on their chronological age but also on their exposure to various exogenous factors (mainly ultraviolet rays). If senescence traits can be detected with ageing in the skin, the senescent phenotype varies among the various skin cell types. Moreover, the origin of cellular senescence in the skin is still unknown, and multiple origins are possible. This reflects the mosaic of skin ageing. Senescent cells can interfere with their microenvironment, either via the direct secretion of factors (the senescence-associated secretory phenotype) or via other methods of communication, such as extracellular vesicles. Knowledge regarding the impact of cellular senescence on skin ageing could be integrated into dermatology research, especially to limit the appearance of senescent cells after photo(chemo)therapy or in age-related skin diseases. Therapeutic approaches include the clearance of senescent cells via the use of senolytics or via the cooperation with the immune system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  1. Density dependence triggers runaway selection of reduced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Seymour

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presence of exogenous mortality risks, future reproduction by an individual is worth less than present reproduction to its fitness. Senescent aging thus results inevitably from transferring net fertility into younger ages. Some long-lived organisms appear to defy theory, however, presenting negligible senescence (e.g., hydra and extended lifespans (e.g., Bristlecone Pine. Here, we investigate the possibility that the onset of vitality loss can be delayed indefinitely, even accepting the abundant evidence that reproduction is intrinsically costly to survival. For an environment with constant hazard, we establish that natural selection itself contributes to increasing density-dependent recruitment losses. We then develop a generalized model of accelerating vitality loss for analyzing fitness optima as a tradeoff between compression and spread in the age profile of net fertility. Across a realistic spectrum of senescent age profiles, density regulation of recruitment can trigger runaway selection for ever-reducing senescence. This novel prediction applies without requirement for special life-history characteristics such as indeterminate somatic growth or increasing fecundity with age. The evolution of nonsenescence from senescence is robust to the presence of exogenous adult mortality, which tends instead to increase the age-independent component of vitality loss. We simulate examples of runaway selection leading to negligible senescence and even intrinsic immortality.

  2. Cellular Senescence and Lung Function during Aging. Yin and Yang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2016-12-01

    Cellular senescence is a cell fate decision and stress response that entails a permanent arrest of cell proliferation coupled to a complex secretory phenotype. Senescent cells increase in number with age in most, if not all, mammalian tissues, including the airways and lungs. They also increase at greater than expected numbers, compared with age-matched controls, at sites of age-related pathologies such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder and emphysema. The senescence response is a double-edged sword. The proliferative arrest suppresses the development of cancer by preventing the propagation of stressed or damaged cells that are at risk for neoplastic transformation. However, this arrest can also curtail the proliferation of stem or progenitor cells and thus hamper tissue repair and regeneration. Similarly, the secretory phenotype can promote wound healing by transiently providing growth factors and the initial inflammatory stimulus that is required for tissue repair. However, when chronically present, the secretory phenotype of senescent cells can drive pathological inflammation, which contributes to a host of age-related pathologies, including cancer. There are now transgenes and prototype small molecules that can clear senescent cells, at least in mouse models, and thus improve health span and median life span. The next challenge will be to develop interventions and supplements that can abrogate the deleterious effects of senescent cells while preserving their beneficial effects.

  3. Cutthroat trout virus as a surrogate in vitro infection model for testing inhibitors of hepatitis E virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debing, Yannick; Winton, James; Neyts, Johan; Dallmeier, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the most important causes of acute hepatitis worldwide. Although most infections are self-limiting, mortality is particularly high in pregnant women. Chronic infections can occur in transplant and other immune-compromised patients. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis E has been reported with ribavirin and pegylated interferon-alpha, however severe side effects were observed. We employed the cutthroat trout virus (CTV), a non-pathogenic fish virus with remarkable similarities to HEV, as a potential surrogate for HEV and established an antiviral assay against this virus using the Chinook salmon embryo (CHSE-214) cell line. Ribavirin and the respective trout interferon were found to efficiently inhibit CTV replication. Other known broad-spectrum inhibitors of RNA virus replication such as the nucleoside analog 2′-C-methylcytidine resulted only in a moderate antiviral activity. In its natural fish host, CTV levels largely fluctuate during the reproductive cycle with the virus detected mainly during spawning. We wondered whether this aspect of CTV infection may serve as a surrogate model for the peculiar pathogenesis of HEV in pregnant women. To that end the effect of three sex steroids on in vitro CTV replication was evaluated. Whereas progesterone resulted in marked inhibition of virus replication, testosterone and 17β-estradiol stimulated viral growth. Our data thus indicate that CTV may serve as a surrogate model for HEV, both for antiviral experiments and studies on the replication biology of the Hepeviridae.

  4. Plant senescence and crop productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Per L.; Culetic, Andrea; Boschian, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a developmental process which in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive phase. Senescence might reduce crop yield when it is induced prematurely under adverse environmental conditions. This review covers the role of senescence for the productivity of crop plants. With the......Senescence is a developmental process which in annual crop plants overlaps with the reproductive phase. Senescence might reduce crop yield when it is induced prematurely under adverse environmental conditions. This review covers the role of senescence for the productivity of crop plants....... With the aim to enhance productivity, a number of functional stay-green cultivars have been selected by conventional breeding, in particular of sorghum and maize. In many cases, a positive correlation between leaf area duration and yield has been observed, although in a number of other cases, stay......-green cultivars do not display significant effects with regards to productivity. In several crops, the stay-green phenotype is observed to be associated with a higher drought resistance and a better performance under low nitrogen conditions. Among the approaches used to achieve stay-green phenotypes in transgenic...

  5. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Johan Petter; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen R; Øien, Dag-Inge; Moen, Asbjørn; Sletvold, Nina

    2016-11-16

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence-an increase in death rate with advancing age-is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32 year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment, for individuals under two types of land use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region. At older ages, senescence was evident only when accounting for a positive effect of reproductive investment on mortality. Our results demonstrate actuarial senescence as well as a survival-reproduction trade-off in plants, and indicate that environmental context may influence senescence rates. This knowledge is crucial for understanding the evolution of demographic senescence and for models of plant population dynamics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  7. Physiological and pathological consequences of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Dominick G A; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2014-11-01

    Cellular senescence, a permanent state of cell cycle arrest accompanied by a complex phenotype, is an essential mechanism that limits tumorigenesis and tissue damage. In physiological conditions, senescent cells can be removed by the immune system, facilitating tumor suppression and wound healing. However, as we age, senescent cells accumulate in tissues, either because an aging immune system fails to remove them, the rate of senescent cell formation is elevated, or both. If senescent cells persist in tissues, they have the potential to paradoxically promote pathological conditions. Cellular senescence is associated with an enhanced pro-survival phenotype, which most likely promotes persistence of senescent cells in vivo. This phenotype may have evolved to favor facilitation of a short-term wound healing, followed by the elimination of senescent cells by the immune system. In this review, we provide a perspective on the triggers, mechanisms and physiological as well as pathological consequences of senescent cells.

  8. Hormonal regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-10-15

    In addition to floral senescence and longevity, the control of leaf senescence is a major factor determining the quality of several cut flowers, including Lilium, in the commercial market. To better understand the physiological process underlying leaf senescence in this species, we evaluated: (i) endogenous variation in the levels of phytohormones during leaf senescence, (ii) the effects of leaf darkening in senescence and associated changes in phytohormones, and (iii) the effects of spray applications of abscisic acid (ABA) and pyrabactin on leaf senescence. Results showed that while gibberellin 4 (GA(4)) and salicylic acid (SA) contents decreased, that of ABA increased during the progression of leaf senescence. However, dark-induced senescence increased ABA levels, but did not affect GA(4) and SA levels, which appeared to correlate more with changes in air temperature and/or photoperiod than with the induction of leaf senescence. Furthermore, spray applications of pyrabactin delayed the progression of leaf senescence in cut flowers. Thus, we conclude that (i) ABA plays a major role in the regulation of leaf senescence in Lilium, (ii) darkness promotes leaf senescence and increases ABA levels, and (iii) exogenous applications of pyrabactin inhibit leaf senescence in Lilium, therefore suggesting that it acts as an antagonist of ABA in senescing leaves of cut lily flowers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical oscillations and Turing patterns in a generalized two-variable model of chemical self-replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutel, Kathleen M.; Peacock-López, Enrique

    2006-07-01

    Chemical self-replication of oligonucleotides and helical peptides show the so-called square root rate law. Based on this rate we extend our previous work on ideal replicators to include the square root rate and other possible nonlinearities, which we couple with an enzimatic sink. Although the nonlinearity is necessary for complex dynamics, the nature of the sink is the essential feature in the mechanism that allows temporal and spatial patterns. We obtain exact general relations for the Poincare-Adronov-Hopf and Turing bifurcations, and our generalized results include the Higgins, autocatalator, and templator models as specific cases.

  10. A microhomology-mediated break-induced replication model for the origin of human copy number variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Hastings

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome structural changes with nonrecurrent endpoints associated with genomic disorders offer windows into the mechanism of origin of copy number variation (CNV. A recent report of nonrecurrent duplications associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease identified three distinctive characteristics. First, the majority of events can be seen to be complex, showing discontinuous duplications mixed with deletions, inverted duplications, and triplications. Second, junctions at endpoints show microhomology of 2-5 base pairs (bp. Third, endpoints occur near pre-existing low copy repeats (LCRs. Using these observations and evidence from DNA repair in other organisms, we derive a model of microhomology-mediated break-induced replication (MMBIR for the origin of CNV and, ultimately, of LCRs. We propose that breakage of replication forks in stressed cells that are deficient in homologous recombination induces an aberrant repair process with features of break-induced replication (BIR. Under these circumstances, single-strand 3' tails from broken replication forks will anneal with microhomology on any single-stranded DNA nearby, priming low-processivity polymerization with multiple template switches generating complex rearrangements, and eventual re-establishment of processive replication.

  11. Senescence in fishes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D.

    1979-01-01

    A long-standing theory, that there is a fundamental difference in aging between fishes and higher vertebrates, is still alive in the minds of many. In 1932, Bidder proposed that aging was causatively related to the cessation of growth at sexual maturity. Fish, which continue to grow throughout their lives, would not age, and therefore were potentially immortal. His ideas were clearly disproven by Comfort, who established that the survival curves of a laboratory population of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, were very similar to those of a small mammal population under laboratory conditions. Recent data from field and laboratory studies, including histological evidence, amply confirm the occurrence of senescence in fishes. Natural death in fish has been associated with reproduction. There is good evidence for a number of species which shows that, with increasing size, the gonad forms a greater proportion of total body weight. In older, larger fish, extensive energy depletion for reproduction is suggested as an important factor in mortality. Reproductive modifications in older fish are also noted.

  12. Essential and non-essential DNA replication genes in the model halophilic Archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DasSarma Shiladitya

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information transfer systems in Archaea, including many components of the DNA replication machinery, are similar to those found in eukaryotes. Functional assignments of archaeal DNA replication genes have been primarily based upon sequence homology and biochemical studies of replisome components, but few genetic studies have been conducted thus far. We have developed a tractable genetic system for knockout analysis of genes in the model halophilic archaeon, Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, and used it to determine which DNA replication genes are essential. Results Using a directed in-frame gene knockout method in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, we examined nineteen genes predicted to be involved in DNA replication. Preliminary bioinformatic analysis of the large haloarchaeal Orc/Cdc6 family, related to eukaryotic Orc1 and Cdc6, showed five distinct clades of Orc/Cdc6 proteins conserved in all sequenced haloarchaea. Of ten orc/cdc6 genes in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, only two were found to be essential, orc10, on the large chromosome, and orc2, on the minichromosome, pNRC200. Of the three replicative-type DNA polymerase genes, two were essential: the chromosomally encoded B family, polB1, and the chromosomally encoded euryarchaeal-specific D family, polD1/D2 (formerly called polA1/polA2 in the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 genome sequence. The pNRC200-encoded B family polymerase, polB2, was non-essential. Accessory genes for DNA replication initiation and elongation factors, including the putative replicative helicase, mcm, the eukaryotic-type DNA primase, pri1/pri2, the DNA polymerase sliding clamp, pcn, and the flap endonuclease, rad2, were all essential. Targeted genes were classified as non-essential if knockouts were obtained and essential based on statistical analysis and/or by demonstrating the inability to isolate chromosomal knockouts except in the presence of a complementing plasmid copy of the gene. Conclusion The results showed that ten

  13. CAROTENOID CLEAVAGE DIOXYGENASE 7 modulates plant growth, reproduction, senescence, and determinate nodulation in the model legume Lotus japonicas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Novero, M.; Charnikhova, T.; Ferrandino, A.; Schubert, A.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Biofante, P.; Lovisolo, C.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are newly identified hormones that regulate multiple aspects of plant development, infection by parasitic weeds, and mutualistic symbiosis in the roots. In this study, the role of SLs was studied for the first time in the model plant Lotus japonicus using transgenic lines

  14. Leaf senescence and abiotic stresses share reactive oxygen species-mediated chloroplast degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna-Chopra, Renu

    2012-07-01

    Leaf senescence is a genetically programmed decline in various cellular processes including photosynthesis and involves the hydrolysis of macromolecules such as proteins, lipids, etc. It is governed by the developmental age and is induced or enhanced by environmental stresses such as drought, heat, salinity and others. Internal factors such as reproductive structures also influence the rate of leaf senescence. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is one of the earliest responses of plant cells under abiotic stresses and senescence. Chloroplasts are the main targets of ROS-linked damage during various environmental stresses and natural senescence as ROS detoxification systems decline with age. Plants adapt to environmental stresses through the process of acclimation, which involves less ROS production coupled with an efficient antioxidant defence. Chloroplasts are a major site of protein degradation, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is rapidly and selectively degraded during senescence and stress. The process of protein degradation is initiated by ROS and involves the action of proteolytic enzymes such as cysteine and serine proteases. The mechanism of Rubisco degradation still remains to be elucidated. The molecular understanding of leaf senescence was achieved through the characterization of senescence-associated genes and various senescence mutants of Arabidopsis, which is a suitable model plant showing monocarpic senescence. The regulation of senescence involves many regulatory elements composed of positive and negative elements to fine-tune the initiation and progression of senescence. This review gives an overview on chloroplast protein degradation during leaf senescence and abiotic stresses and also highlights the role of ROS management in both processes.

  15. Premature aging/senescence in cancer cells facing therapy: good or bad?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Llilians Calvo; Ghadaouia, Sabrina; Martinez, Aurélie; Rodier, Francis

    2016-02-01

    Normal and cancer cells facing their demise following exposure to radio-chemotherapy can actively participate in choosing their subsequent fate. These programmed cell fate decisions include true cell death (apoptosis-necroptosis) and therapy-induced cellular senescence (TIS), a permanent "proliferative arrest" commonly portrayed as premature cellular aging. Despite a permanent loss of proliferative potential, senescent cells remain viable and are highly bioactive at the microenvironment level, resulting in a prolonged impact on tissue architecture and functions. Cellular senescence is primarily documented as a tumor suppression mechanism that prevents cellular transformation. In the context of normal tissues, cellular senescence also plays important roles in tissue repair, but contributes to age-associated tissue dysfunction when senescent cells accumulate. Theoretically, in multi-step cancer progression models, cancer cells have already bypassed cellular senescence during their immortalization step (see hallmarks of cancer). It is then perhaps surprising to find that cancer cells often retain the ability to undergo TIS, or premature aging. This occurs because cellular senescence results from multiple signalling pathways, some retained in cancer cells, aiming to prevent cell cycle progression in damaged cells. Since senescent cancer cells persist after therapy and secrete an array of cytokines and growth factors that can modulate the tumor microenvironment, these cells may have beneficial and detrimental effects regarding immune modulation and survival of remaining proliferation-competent cancer cells. Similarly, while normal cells undergoing senescence are believed to remain indefinitely growth arrested, whether this is true for senescent cancer cells remains unclear, raising the possibility that these cells may represent a reservoir for cancer recurrence after treatment. This review discusses our current knowledge on cancer cell senescence and highlight questions

  16. In vivo study on the replicative model validity of sister chromatid exchanges production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    The sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) frequency determination has been used as index of damage to DNA, however the biological meaning of this event is still ignored. Different models in order to explain the mechanism of their formation have been proposed and they could be contained in two categories: a) those that consider that the SCE is produced by means of discreet lesions to the DNA and that they occur in the place of the lesion, and b) those that propose that the SCE is caused by a group of lesions and that therefore the place in which they occur could not be associated with a lesion in particular. The model of Painter (1980) belongs to this last group. It suggests that the region of the DNA where the clusters are united, is the only place in which the exchange of double chain could happen during the synthesis of the DNA and makes the prediction that since the x rays retard the beginning of the duplication, the pretreatment with ionizing radiation would reduce the frequency of SCE induced by agents capable to block the lengthening of the chain of DNA, that are the most efficient SCE inducers. The objective of the present work was to establish the validity of this replicative model for the SCE formation, based in its prediction. The effect of the unilateral preexposition of mouse to gamma radiation was determined on the SCE induction by Mitomycin C (MMC), in cells of the femoral bone marrow In vivo. This strategy allows to determine the effect of the pretreatment in the same organism, minimizing the variability of the response between individuals. There was not a significant variability between the frequencies of SCE, basal and induced by gamma radiation or MMC in the same organism. The animals that received the gamma radiation pretreatment, showed a reduction of approximately the 30 % in the frequency of SCE, assuming an additive effect of the radiation with the MMC. These results coincide with the prediction of the model of Painter, however it is not

  17. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  18. Oxidative stress and leaf senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Hatami

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescence is an important developmental process that leads to the cell death through highly regulated genetically controlled processes in plants. Biotic and abiotic Oxidative stresses can also artificially induce senescence and increase the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS specifically in chloroplast. One of the important oxidative stresses is paraquat that induces deviation of electron from photosynthesis electron chain and lead to the production of more ROS in chloroplast. Plants have evolved special adoptive mechanism to reallocate nutrient to reproductive and juvenile organs in senescence and different oxidative stresses. Rubisco seems to be the most abundant protein in plants and is involved in many changes during senescence. Results In the present study, the effects of ROS on Rubisco during senescence and oxidative stresses were evaluated by measuring photosynthesis factors such as net photosynthesis rate (Pn, stomatal conductance (G, evaporation rate (E, intra cellular CO2 concentration (Ci, fluorescence and total protein during three stages of development. Our results showed that in paraquat treated plants, CO2 assimilation is the most effective factor that refers to Rubisco damages. The highest correlation and regression coefficient belonged to Ci, while correlation coefficient between photosynthesis rate and total protein was much smaller. Conclusion It appears in the early stage of oxidative stresses such as exposing to paraquat, ROS has the most effect on Rubisco activity that induces more susceptibility to Rubisco specific protease. Moreover, Rubisco deactivation acts as an initiative signal for Rubisco degradation.

  19. Members of the barley NAC transcription factor gene family show differential co-regulation with senescence-associated genes during senescence of flag leaves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Michael W; Gregersen, Per L.

    2014-01-01

    activation of degradation processes in senescing barley leaf tissues. This picture was confirmed in a detailed quantitative reverse transcription–PCR (qRT–PCR) experiment, which also showed distinct gene expression patterns for different members of the NAC gene family, suggesting a group of ~15 out of the 47...... in the NAC transcription factor family during senescence of barley flag leaves was studied. Several members of the NAC transcription factor gene family were up-regulated during senescence in a microarray experiment, together with a large range of senescence-associated genes, reflecting the coordinated...... studied NAC genes to be important for signalling processes and for the execution of degradation processes during leaf senescence in barley. Seven models for DNA-binding motifs for NAC transcription factors were designed based on published motifs, and available promoter sequences of barley genes were...

  20. Role of galactose in cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzi, David J; Song, Meihua; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been proposed to play critical roles in tumor suppression and organismal aging, but the molecular mechanism of senescence remains incompletely understood. Here we report that a putative lysosomal carbohydrate efflux transporter, Spinster, induces cellular senescence in human primary fibroblasts. Administration of d-galactose synergistically enhanced Spinster-induced senescence and this synergism required the transporter activity of Spinster. Intracellular d-galactose is metabolized to galactose-1-phosphate by galactokinase. Galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts, which accumulate intracellular d-galactose, displayed increased baseline senescence. Senescence of galactokinase-deficient fibroblasts was further enhanced by d-galactose administration and was diminished by restoration of wild-type galactokinase expression. Silencing galactokinase in normal fibroblasts also induced senescence. These results suggest a role for intracellular galactose in the induction of cellular senescence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CANCER Escape from senescence boosts tumour growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Jan Paul

    2018-01-01

    Some chemotherapies block cancer growth by driving tumour cells into a state of cell-division arrest termed senescence. It emerges that such cells have a boosted capacity to drive tumour growth if they exit senescence

  2. Predatory senescence in ageing wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, D.R.; Smith, D.W.; Vucetich, J.A.; Mech, L.D.; Stahler, D.R.; Packer, C.

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics. ?? 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  3. Predatory senescence in aging wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNulty, Daniel R.; Smith, Douglas W.; Vucetich, John A.; Mech, L. David; Stahler, Daniel R.; Packer, Craig

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that ageing handicaps the ability of prey to escape predators, yet surprisingly little is known about how ageing affects the ability of predators to catch prey. Research into long-lived predators has assumed that adults have uniform impacts on prey regardless of age. Here we use longitudinal data from repeated observations of individually-known wolves (Canis lupus) hunting elk (Cervus elaphus) in Yellowstone National Park to demonstrate that adult predatory performance declines with age and that an increasing ratio of senescent individuals in the wolf population depresses the rate of prey offtake. Because this ratio fluctuates independently of population size, predatory senescence may cause wolf populations of equal size but different age structure to have different impacts on prey populations. These findings suggest that predatory senescence is an important, though overlooked, factor affecting predator-prey dynamics.

  4. Aging, Cellular Senescence, and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For most species, aging promotes a host of degenerative pathologies that are characterized by debilitating losses of tissue or cellular function. However, especially among vertebrates, aging also promotes hyperplastic pathologies, the most deadly of which is cancer. In contrast to the loss of function that characterizes degenerating cells and tissues, malignant (cancerous) cells must acquire new (albeit aberrant) functions that allow them to develop into a lethal tumor. This review discusses the idea that, despite seemingly opposite characteristics, the degenerative and hyperplastic pathologies of aging are at least partly linked by a common biological phenomenon: a cellular stress response known as cellular senescence. The senescence response is widely recognized as a potent tumor suppressive mechanism. However, recent evidence strengthens the idea that it also drives both degenerative and hyper-plastic pathologies, most likely by promoting chronic inflammation. Thus, the senescence response may be the result of antagonistically pleiotropic gene action. PMID:23140366

  5. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  6. Deacetylation of H4-K16Ac and heterochromatin assembly in senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Contrepois Kévin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a stress response of mammalian cells leading to a durable arrest of cell proliferation that has been implicated in tumor suppression, wound healing, and aging. The proliferative arrest is mediated by transcriptional repression of genes essential for cell division by the retinoblastoma protein family. This repression is accompanied by varying degrees of heterochromatin assembly, but little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms involved. Results We found that both deacetylation of H4-K16Ac and expression of HMGA1/2 can contribute to DNA compaction during senescence. SIRT2, an NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase, contributes to H4-K16Ac deacetylation and DNA compaction in human fibroblast cell lines that assemble striking senescence-associated heterochromatin foci (SAHFs. Decreased H4-K16Ac was observed in both replicative and oncogene-induced senescence of these cells. In contrast, this mechanism was inoperative in a fibroblast cell line that did not assemble extensive heterochromatin during senescence. Treatment of senescent cells with trichostatin A, a class I/II histone deacetylase inhibitor, also induced rapid and reversible decondensation of SAHFs. Inhibition of DNA compaction did not significantly affect the stability of the senescent state. Conclusions Variable DNA compaction observed during senescence is explained in part by cell-type specific regulation of H4 deacetylation and HMGA1/2 expression. Deacetylation of H4-K16Ac during senescence may explain reported decreases in this mark during mammalian aging and in cancer cells.

  7. Replication of Major Profile Patterns in Structural Equation Modeling: Effect of Bootstrapping in a Small Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Kang

    The effect of bootstrapping was studied by examining whether major profile patterns were replicated when sample sizes were reduced. Profile patterns estimated from the original sample (n=645) of the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of IntelligenceThird Edition (WPPSI-III) Standardization Data were considered major profiles. For bootstrapping,…

  8. Transgenic plants with altered senescence characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amasino, Richard M.; Gan, Susheng; Noh, Yoo-Sun

    2002-03-19

    The identification of senescence-specific promoters from plants is described. Using information from the first senescence-specific promoter, SAG12 from Arabidopsis, other homologous promoters from another plant have been identified. Such promoters may be used to delay senescence in commercially important plants.

  9. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Challis, Benjamin [Institute of Metabolic Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Shannon, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hoare, Matthew [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Heaney, Judith [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Foundation for Liver Research, Institute of Hepatology, London (United Kingdom); Alexander, Graeme J.M., E-mail: gja1000@doctors.org.uk [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance.

  10. Selective insulin resistance in hepatocyte senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aravinthan, Aloysious; Challis, Benjamin; Shannon, Nicholas; Hoare, Matthew; Heaney, Judith; Alexander, Graeme J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance has been described in association with chronic liver disease for decades. Hepatocyte senescence has been demonstrated in chronic liver disease and as many as 80% of hepatocytes show a senescent phenotype in advanced liver disease. The aim of this study was to understand the role of hepatocyte senescence in the development of insulin resistance. Senescence was induced in HepG2 cells via oxidative stress. The insulin metabolic pathway was studied in control and senescent cells following insulin stimulation. GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in HepG2 cells and human liver tissue. Further, GLUT2 and GLUT4 expressions were studied in three independent chronic liver disease cohorts. Signalling impairment distal to Akt in phosphorylation of AS160 and FoxO1 was evident in senescent HepG2 cells. Persistent nuclear localisation of FoxO1 was demonstrated in senescent cells despite insulin stimulation. Increased GLUT4 and decreased GLUT2 expressions were evident in senescent cells, human cirrhotic liver tissue and publically available liver disease datasets. Changes in GLUT expressions were associated with a poor clinical prognosis. In conclusion, selective insulin resistance is evident in senescent HepG2 cells and changes in GLUT expressions can be used as surrogate markers of hepatocyte senescence. - Highlights: • Senescent hepatocytes demonstrate selective insulin resistance. • GLUT changes act as markers of hepatocyte senescence and have prognostic value. • Study offers insight into long noticed intimacy of cirrhosis and insulin resistance

  11. Database Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Cristian MAZILU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available For someone who has worked in an environment in which the same database is used for data entry and reporting, or perhaps managed a single database server that was utilized by too many users, the advantages brought by data replication are clear. The main purpose of this paper is to emphasize those advantages as well as presenting the different types of Database Replication and the cases in which their use is recommended.

  12. A biologically inspired two-species exclusion model: effects of RNA polymerase motor traffic on simultaneous DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumendu; Mishra, Bhavya; Patra, Shubhadeep; Schadschneider, Andreas; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2018-04-01

    We introduce a two-species exclusion model to describe the key features of the conflict between the RNA polymerase (RNAP) motor traffic, engaged in the transcription of a segment of DNA, concomitant with the progress of two DNA replication forks on the same DNA segment. One of the species of particles (P) represents RNAP motors while the other (R) represents the replication forks. Motivated by the biological phenomena that this model is intended to capture, a maximum of two R particles only are allowed to enter the lattice from two opposite ends whereas the unrestricted number of P particles constitutes a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) in a segment in the middle of the lattice. The model captures three distinct pathways for resolving the co-directional as well as head-on collision between the P and R particles. Using Monte Carlo simulations and heuristic analytical arguments that combine exact results for the TASEP with mean-field approximations, we predict the possible outcomes of the conflict between the traffic of RNAP motors (P particles engaged in transcription) and the replication forks (R particles). In principle, the model can be adapted to experimental conditions to account for the data quantitatively.

  13. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  14. [Research progress of cellular senescence and senescent secretary phenotype in intervertebral disc degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zheng, Chenjingmei; Wu, Xiaotao

    2012-12-01

    To summarize the role of cellular senescence and senescent secretary phenotype in the intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Relevant articles that discussed the roles of cellular senescence in the IVD degeneration were extensively reviewed, and retrospective and comprehensive analysis was performed. The senescent phenomenon during IVD degeneration, senescent secretary phenotype of the disc cells, senescent pathways within the IVD microenvironment, as well as the anti-senescent approaches for IVD regeneration were systematically reviewed. During aging and degeneration, IVD cells gradually and/or prematurely undergo senescence by activating p53-p21-retinoblastoma (RB) or p161NK4A-RB senescent pathways. The accumulation of senescent cells not only decreases the self-renewal ability of IVD, but also deteriorates the disc microenvironment by producing more inflammatory cytokines and matrix degrading enzymes. More specific senescent biomarkers are required to fully understand the phenotype change of senescent disc cells during IVD degeneration. Molecular analysis of the senescent disc cells and their intracellular signaling pathways are needed to get a safer and more efficient anti-senescence strategy for IVD regeneration. Cellular senescence is an important mechanism by which IVD cells decrease viability and degenerate biological behaviors, which provide a new thinking to understand the pathogenesis of IVD degeneration.

  15. A biomarker that identifies senescent human cells in culture and in aging skin in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Lee, Xinhua; Basile, George; Acosta, Meileen; Scott, Glynis; Roskelley, Calvin; Medrano, Estela E.; Linskens, Maarten; Rubelj, Ivica; Pereira-Smith, Olivia; Peacocke, Monica; Campisi, Judith

    1995-01-01

    Normal somatic cells invariably enter a state of irreversibly arrested growth and altered function after a finite number of divisions. This process, termed replicative senescence, is thought to be a tumor-suppressive mechanism and an underlying cause of aging. There is ample evidence that escape

  16. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Mesut; Boe, Amanda E; Klyachko, Ekaterina A; Vaughan, Douglas E

    2014-09-01

    The average age of the US population continues to increase. Age is the most important determinant of disease and disability in humans, but the fundamental mechanisms of aging remain largely unknown. Many age-related diseases are associated with an impaired fibrinolytic system. Elevated plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels are reported in age-associated clinical conditions including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obesity and inflammation. PAI-1 levels are also elevated in animal models of aging. While the association of PAI-1 with physiological aging is well documented, it is only recently that its critical role in the regulation of aging and senescence has become evident. PAI-1 is synthesized and secreted in senescent cells and contributes directly to the development of senescence by acting downstream of p53 and upstream of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic deficiency of PAI-1 was shown to be protective against senescence and the aging-like phenotypes in kl/kl and N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester-treated wild-type mice. Further investigation into PAI-1's role in senescence and aging will likely contribute to the prevention and treatment of aging-related pathologies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Actuarial senescence in a long-lived orchid challenges our current understanding of ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgren, Johan; Colchero, Fernando; Jones, Owen

    2016-01-01

    The dominant evolutionary theory of actuarial senescence – an increase in death rate with advancing age – is based on the concept of a germ cell line that is separated from the somatic cells early in life. However, such a separation is not clear in all organisms. This has been suggested to explain...... the paucity of evidence for actuarial senescence in plants. We used a 32-year study of Dactylorhiza lapponica that replaces its organs each growing season, to test whether individuals of this tuberous orchid senesce. We performed a Bayesian survival trajectory analysis accounting for reproductive investment......, for individuals under two types of land-use, in two climatic regions. The mortality trajectory was best-approximated by a Weibull model, showing clear actuarial senescence. Rates of senescence in this model declined with advancing age, but were slightly higher in mown plots and in the more benign climatic region...

  18. Twist1 suppresses senescence programs and thereby accelerates and maintains mutant Kras-induced lung tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Phuoc T; Shroff, Emelyn H; Burns, Timothy F

    2012-01-01

    overexpressed in primary human lung tumors. The suppression of TWIST1 in human lung cancer cells also induced cellular senescence. Hence, TWIST1 is a critical regulator of cellular senescence programs, and the suppression of TWIST1 in human tumors may be an effective example of pro-senescence therapy....... mouse model and in human lung tumors that the inhibition of Twist1 restores a senescence program inducing the loss of a neoplastic phenotype. The Twist1 gene encodes for a transcription factor that is essential during embryogenesis. Twist1 has been suggested to play an important role during tumor...... progression. However, there is no in vivo evidence that Twist1 plays a role in autochthonous tumorigenesis. Through two novel transgenic mouse models, we show that Twist1 cooperates with Kras(G12D) to markedly accelerate lung tumorigenesis by abrogating cellular senescence programs and promoting...

  19. The inhibitory mechanism of Cordyceps sinensis on cigarette smoke extract-induced senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ailing; Wu, Jinxiang; Li, Aijun; Bi, Wenxiang; Liu, Tian; Cao, Liuzhao; Liu, Yahui; Dong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest induced either by telomere shortening (replicative senescence) or stress. The bronchial epithelial cell is often injured by inhaled toxic substances, such as cigarette smoke. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) induces senescence of bronchial epithelial cells; and Cordyceps sinensis mechanism of inhibition of CSE-induced cellular senescence. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells) cultured in vitro were treated with CSE and/or C. sinensis. p16, p21, and senescence-associated-galactosidase activity were used to detect cellular senescence with immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), PI3K/AKT/mTOR and their phosphorylated proteins were examined to testify the activation of signaling pathway by ROS fluorescent staining and Western blotting. Then, inhibitors of ROS and PI3K were used to further confirm the function of this pathway. Cellular senescence was upregulated by CSE treatment, and C. sinensis can decrease CSE-induced cellular senescence. Activation of ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was enhanced by CSE treatment, and decreased when C. sinensis was added. Blocking ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway can attenuate CSE-induced cellular senescence. CSE can induce cellular senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells, and ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway may play an important role in this process. C. sinensis can inhibit the CSE-induced senescence.

  20. The Biochemistry of Human Senescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 2. The Biochemistry of Human Senescence. B Ramachandra Murty. General Article Volume 11 Issue 2 February 2006 pp 17-26. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/011/02/0017-0026 ...

  1. The cell fate: senescence or quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, Menderes Yusuf; Izmirli, Muzeyyen; Gogebakan, Bulent

    2016-11-01

    Senescence and quiescence are frequently used as interchangeable terms in the literature unwittingly. Despite the fact that common molecules play role in decision of cell cycle arrest, senescent and quiescent cells have some distinctive phenotypes at both molecular and morphological levels. Thus, in this review we summarized the features of senescence and quiescence with respect to visual characteristics and prominent key molecules. A PubMed research was conducted for the key words; "senescence", "quiescence" and "cell cycle arrest". The results which are related to cell cycle control were selected. The selection criteria of the target articles used for this review included also key cell cycle molecules such as p53, pRB, p21, p16, mTOR, p27, etc. The results were not evaluated statistically. The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been claimed to be key molecule in switching on/off senescence/quiescence. Specifically, although maximal p53 activation blocks mTOR and causes quiescence, partial p53 activation sustains mTOR activity and causes senescence subsequently. In broader perspective, quiescence occurs due to lack of nutrition and growth factors whereas senescence takes place due to aging and serious DNA damages. Contrary to quiescence, senescence is a degenerative process ensuing a certain cell death. We highlighted several differences between senescence and quiescence and their key molecules in this review. Whereas quiescence (cell cycle arrest) is only one half of the senescence, the other half is growth stimulation which causes actual senescence phenotype.

  2. A new model to produce infectious hepatitis C virus without the replication requirement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Triyatni

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous constraints significantly hamper the experimental study of hepatitis C virus (HCV. Robust replication in cell culture occurs with only a few strains, and is invariably accompanied by adaptive mutations that impair in vivo infectivity/replication. This problem complicates the production and study of authentic HCV, including the most prevalent and clinically important genotype 1 (subtypes 1a and 1b. Here we describe a novel cell culture approach to generate infectious HCV virions without the HCV replication requirement and the associated cell-adaptive mutations. The system is based on our finding that the intracellular environment generated by a West-Nile virus (WNV subgenomic replicon rendered a mammalian cell line permissive for assembly and release of infectious HCV particles, wherein the HCV RNA with correct 5' and 3' termini was produced in the cytoplasm by a plasmid-driven dual bacteriophage RNA polymerase-based transcription/amplification system. The released particles preferentially contained the HCV-based RNA compared to the WNV subgenomic RNA. Several variations of this system are described with different HCV-based RNAs: (i HCV bicistronic particles (HCVbp containing RNA encoding the HCV structural genes upstream of a cell-adapted subgenomic replicon, (ii HCV reporter particles (HCVrp containing RNA encoding the bacteriophage SP6 RNA polymerase in place of HCV nonstructural genes, and (iii HCV wild-type particles (HCVwt containing unmodified RNA genomes of diverse genotypes (1a, strain H77; 1b, strain Con1; 2a, strain JFH-1. Infectivity was assessed based on the signals generated by the HCV RNA molecules introduced into the cytoplasm of target cells upon virus entry, i.e. HCV RNA replication and protein production for HCVbp in Huh-7.5 cells as well as for HCVwt in HepG2-CD81 cells and human liver slices, and SP6 RNA polymerase-driven firefly luciferase for HCVrp in target cells displaying candidate HCV surface receptors. HCV

  3. A new model to produce infectious hepatitis C virus without the replication requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triyatni, Miriam; Berger, Edward A; Saunier, Bertrand

    2011-04-01

    Numerous constraints significantly hamper the experimental study of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Robust replication in cell culture occurs with only a few strains, and is invariably accompanied by adaptive mutations that impair in vivo infectivity/replication. This problem complicates the production and study of authentic HCV, including the most prevalent and clinically important genotype 1 (subtypes 1a and 1b). Here we describe a novel cell culture approach to generate infectious HCV virions without the HCV replication requirement and the associated cell-adaptive mutations. The system is based on our finding that the intracellular environment generated by a West-Nile virus (WNV) subgenomic replicon rendered a mammalian cell line permissive for assembly and release of infectious HCV particles, wherein the HCV RNA with correct 5' and 3' termini was produced in the cytoplasm by a plasmid-driven dual bacteriophage RNA polymerase-based transcription/amplification system. The released particles preferentially contained the HCV-based RNA compared to the WNV subgenomic RNA. Several variations of this system are described with different HCV-based RNAs: (i) HCV bicistronic particles (HCVbp) containing RNA encoding the HCV structural genes upstream of a cell-adapted subgenomic replicon, (ii) HCV reporter particles (HCVrp) containing RNA encoding the bacteriophage SP6 RNA polymerase in place of HCV nonstructural genes, and (iii) HCV wild-type particles (HCVwt) containing unmodified RNA genomes of diverse genotypes (1a, strain H77; 1b, strain Con1; 2a, strain JFH-1). Infectivity was assessed based on the signals generated by the HCV RNA molecules introduced into the cytoplasm of target cells upon virus entry, i.e. HCV RNA replication and protein production for HCVbp in Huh-7.5 cells as well as for HCVwt in HepG2-CD81 cells and human liver slices, and SP6 RNA polymerase-driven firefly luciferase for HCVrp in target cells displaying candidate HCV surface receptors. HCV infectivity

  4. Analysis of Gene Expression in Human Dermal Fibroblasts Treated with Senescence-Modulating COX Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong A. Han

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that NS-398, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2–selective inhibitor, inhibited replicative cellular senescence in human dermal fibroblasts and skin aging in hairless mice. In contrast, celecoxib, another COX-2–selective inhibitor, and aspirin, a non-selective COX inhibitor, accelerated the senescence and aging. To figure out causal factors for the senescence-modulating effect of the inhibitors, we here performed cDNA microarray experiment and subsequent Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The data showed that several senescence-related gene sets were regulated by the inhibitor treatment. NS-398 up-regulated gene sets involved in the tumor necrosis factor β receptor pathway and the fructose and mannose metabolism, whereas it down-regulated a gene set involved in protein secretion. Celecoxib up-regulated gene sets involved in G2M checkpoint and E2F targets. Aspirin up-regulated the gene set involved in protein secretion, and down-regulated gene sets involved in RNA transcription. These results suggest that COX inhibitors modulate cellular senescence by different mechanisms and will provide useful information to understand senescence-modulating mechanisms of COX inhibitors.

  5. The Yin-Yang of DNA Damage Response: Roles in Tumorigenesis and Cellular Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Soo Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells are relatively stable, lacking proliferation capacity yet retaining metabolic activity. In contrast, cancer cells are rather invasive and devastating, with uncontrolled proliferative capacity and resistance to cell death signals. Although tumorigenesis and cellular senescence are seemingly opposite pathological events, they are actually driven by a unified mechanism: DNA damage. Integrity of the DNA damage response (DDR network can impose a tumorigenesis barrier by navigating abnormal cells to cellular senescence. Compromise of DDR, possibly due to the inactivation of DDR components, may prevent cellular senescence but at the expense of tumor formation. Here we provide an overview of the fundamental role of DDR in tumorigenesis and cellular senescence, under the light of the Yin-Yang concept of Chinese philosophy. Emphasis is placed on discussing DDR outcome in the light of in vivo models. This information is critical as it can help make better decisions for clinical treatments of cancer patients.

  6. NAC Transcription Factors of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and their Involvement in Leaf Senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    yielding cereal crops are generated. In cereals, the process of leaf senescence is of utmost relevance when discussing yield. It is during the senescence process that all nutrients are transported from the withering leaf to the developing grains. Furthermore, the timing of senescence determines...... the photosynthetically productive period of the crop plant. Improving the process of senescence by genetic means rather than by increasing the amount of fertiliser is one potential approach towards a higher sustainable productivity. In several species of plants, the NAC transcription factors have been shown to regulate...... parts of the senescence process. The specific aims of this study were therefore (1) to establish and characterise the NAC transcription factors of the model cereal crop barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) (2) to identify and study putative barley NAC transcription factors involved in the regulation of leaf...

  7. Herança da senescência retardada em milho Inheritance of the delayed senescence in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Fernandes Nassau Costa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar a herança da senescência retardada em milho. Foram realizados cruzamentos dialélicos parciais entre 50 linhagens e cinco testadores. Os 250 cruzamentos resultantes, além de seis híbridos comerciais utilizados como testemunhas, foram avaliados em oito ambientes, no delineamento látice simples 16x16, com duas repetições por ambiente. Os cruzamentos dialélicos foram analisados utilizando o método 4 do modelo 1 de Griffing, adaptado para múltiplos ambientes. A contribuição da capacidade geral de combinação (CGC para a expressão do caráter "stay-green" (69,06% foi maior que a da capacidade específica de combinação (CEC (30,94%, evidenciando que os efeitos aditivos são mais importantes que os efeitos não aditivos na expressão deste caráter. Tanto a CGC como a CEC interagiram significativamente com o ambiente, indicando que a seleção para este caráter deve ser realizada com base nas médias de experimentos em diversos ambientes.The objective of this research was to study the inheritance of delayed senescence in maize. Partial diallel crosses among 50 inbred lines and five testers were made. The 250 crosses, along with six commercial hybrids used as checks, were evaluated at eight environments in lattices 16x16 with two replications per environment. The diallel crosses were analyzed following the method 4 model 1 of Griffing, extended to multiple environments. The contribution of the general combining ability (CGA for the expression of the stay-green trait (69.06% was greater than the specific combining ability (SCA (30.94%, showing that additive effects are more important than non-additive effects for the expression of this trait. Both GCA and SCA interacted significantly with the environments, indicating that the selection for this trait should be based on the means across environments.

  8. Identification of novel senescence-associated genes in ionizing radiation-induced senescent carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Kim, Bong Cho; Han, Na Kyung; Hong, Mi Na; Park, Su Min; Yoo, Hee Jung [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chu, In Sun [Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Hee [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Cellular senescence is considered as a defense mechanism to prevent tumorigenesis. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces stress-induced premature senescence as well as apoptosis in various cancer cells. Senescent cells undergo functional and morphological changes including large and flattened cell shape, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}Gal) activity, and altered gene expressions. Even with the recent findings of several gene expression profiles and supporting functional data, it is obscure that mechanism of IR-induced premature senescence in cancer cells. We performed microarray analysis to identify the common regulated genes in ionizing radiation-induced prematurely senescent human carcinoma cell lines.

  9. Modelling of the isothermal replication of surface microstructures in polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    ) melt. A round PC or PS plate with a thickness of 3 mm and a diameter of 59 mm was placed between and at the centre of two squared steel plate. The bottom plate is equipped with a microstructured nickel insert, positioned 46 mm from the middle of the steel plate. The insert contained 10 parallel...... to the incoming molten plastic flow. Just before the flow-front of the melt reached the end of the inserts the polymer was frozen. The replicated PC and PS micro-structures were examined using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Uniaxial elongational viscosity and linear viscoelasticity were used...

  10. Copper accumulation in senescent cells: Interplay between copper transporters and impaired autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Masaldan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is characterized by irreversible growth arrest incurred through either replicative exhaustion or by pro-oncogenic cellular stressors (radioactivity, oxidative stress, oncogenic activation. The enrichment of senescent cells in tissues with age has been associated with tissue dyshomeostasis and age-related pathologies including cancers, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, etc. and metabolic disorders (e.g. diabetes. We identified copper accumulation as being a universal feature of senescent cells [mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF, human prostate epithelial cells and human diploid fibroblasts] in vitro. Elevated copper in senescent MEFs was accompanied by elevated levels of high-affinity copper uptake protein 1 (Ctr1, diminished levels of copper-transporting ATPase 1 (Atp7a (copper export and enhanced antioxidant defence reflected by elevated levels of glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 and glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1. The levels of intracellular copper were further increased in senescent MEFs cultured in copper supplemented medium and in senescent Mottled Brindled (Mobr MEFs lacking functional Atp7a. Finally, we demonstrated that the restoration/preservation of autophagic-lysosomal degradation in senescent MEFs following rapamycin treatment correlated with attenuation of copper accumulation in these cells despite a further decrease in Atp7a levels. This study for the first time establishes a link between Atp7a and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, and a requirement for both to effect efficient copper export. Such a connection between cellular autophagy and copper homeostasis is significant, as both have emerged as important facets of age-associated degenerative disease. Keywords: Senescence, Copper, Ageing, Homeostasis, Autophagy

  11. Calculating the Rate of Senescence From Mortality Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koopman, Jacob J E; Rozing, Maarten P; Kramer, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    , they do not fit mortality rates at young and old ages. Therefore, we developed a method to calculate senescence rates from the acceleration of mortality directly without modeling the mortality rates. We applied the different methods to age group-specific mortality data from the European Renal Association-European...

  12. PA-X protein decreases replication and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in cultured cells and mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiao-Qian; Sun, Ying-Feng; Ruan, Bao-Yang; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Qi; Yang, Hai-Ming; Wang, Shuai-Yong; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiu-Hui; Shan, Tong-Ling; Tong, Wu; Zhou, Yan-Jun; Li, Guo-Xin; Zheng, Hao; Tong, Guang-Zhi; Yu, Hai

    2017-06-01

    Swine influenza viruses have been circulating in pigs throughout world and might be potential threats to human health. PA-X protein is a newly discovered protein produced from the PA gene by ribosomal frameshifting and the effects of PA-X on the 1918 H1N1, the pandemic 2009 H1N1, the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 and the avian H9N2 influenza viruses have been reported. However, the role of PA-X in the pathogenesis of swine influenza virus is still unknown. In this study, we rescued the H1N1 wild-type (WT) classical swine influenza virus (A/Swine/Guangdong/1/2011 (H1N1)) and H1N1 PA-X deficient virus containing mutations at the frameshift motif, and compared their replication properties and pathogenicity of swine influenza virus in vitro and in vivo. Our results show that the expression of PA-X inhibits virus replication and polymerase activity in cultured cells and decreases virulence in mouse models. Therefore, our study demonstrates that PA-X protein acts as a negative virulence regulator for classical H1N1 swine influenza virus and decreases virulence by inhibiting viral replication and polymerase activity, deepening our understanding of the pathogenesis of swine influenza virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Young, Jacob S; Rashidi, Aida; Kane, J Robert; Panek, Wojciech K; Kanojia, Deepak; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system's response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs) in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

  14. A Comparative Study of Replication-Incompetent and -Competent Adenoviral Therapy-Mediated Immune Response in a Murine Glioma Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W. Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virotherapy is a treatment approach with increasing clinical relevance, as indicated by the marked survival benefit seen in animal models and its current exploration in human patients with cancer. The use of an adenovirus vector for this therapeutic modality is common, has significant clinical benefit in animals, and its efficacy has recently been linked to an anti-tumor immune response that occurs following tumor antigen presentation. Here, we analyzed the adaptive immune system’s response following viral infection by comparing replication-incompetent and replication-competent adenoviral vectors. Our findings suggest that cell death caused by replication-competent adenoviral vectors is required to induce a significant anti-tumor immune response and survival benefits in immunocompetent mice bearing intracranial glioma. We observed significant changes in the repertoire of immune cells in the brain and draining lymph nodes and significant recruitment of CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs in response to oncolytic adenoviral therapy, suggesting the active role of the immune system in anti-tumor response. Our data suggest that the response to oncolytic virotherapy is accompanied by local and systemic immune responses and should be taken in consideration in the future design of the clinical studies evaluating oncolytic virotherapy in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM.

  15. Senescence-like Phenotypes in Human Nevi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joselow, Andrew; Lynn, Darren; Terzian, Tamara; Box, Neil F.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell proliferation at the G1 stage of the cell cycle in which cells become refractory to growth stimuli. Senescence is a critical and potent defense mechanism that mammalian cells have to suppress tumors. While there are many ways to induce a senescence response, oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) remains key to inhibiting progression of cells that have acquired oncogenic mutations. In primary cells in culture, OIS induces a set of measurable phenotypic and behavioral changes, in addition to cell cycle exit. Senescence-associated β-Galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity is a main hallmark of senescent cells, along with morphological changes that may depend on the oncogene that is activated, or on the primary cell type. Characteristic cellular changes of senescence include increased size, flattening, multi-nucleation, and extensive vacuolation. At the molecular level, tumor suppressor genes such as p53 and p16INK4a may play a role in initiation or maintenance of OIS. Activation of a DNA damage response and a senescence-associated secretory phenotype could delineate the onset of senescence. Despite advances in our understanding of how OIS suppresses some tumor types, the in vivo role of OIS in melanocytic nevi and melanoma remains poorly understood and not validated. In an effort to stimulate research in this field, we review in this chapter the known markers of senescence and provide experimental protocols for their identification by immunofluorescent staining in melanocytic nevi and malignant melanoma. PMID:27812879

  16. Pseudolaric acid B induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma l929 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing hua; Liu, Chun yu; Zheng, Gui bin; Zhang, Li Ying; Yan, Ming hui; Zhang, Wen yan; Meng, Xian ying; Yu, Xiao fang

    2013-01-01

    PAB induced various cancer cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. But in cell line murine fibrosarcoma L929, PAB did not induce apoptosis, but autophagy, therefore it was thought by us as a good model to research the relationship of cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence bypass apoptosis. Inhibitory ratio was assessed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis. Phase contrast microscopy visualized cell morphology. Hoechst 33258 staining for nuclear change, propidium iodode (PI) staining for cell cycle, monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining for autophagy, and rodanmine 123 staining for mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were measured by fluorescence microscopy or flowcytometry. Apoptosis was determined by DNA ladder test. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity was detected by PKC assay kit. SA-β-galactosidase assay was used to detect senescence. Protein expression was examined by western blot. PAB inhibited L929 cell growth in time-and dose-dependent manner. At 12 h, 80 μmol/L PAB induced obvious mitotic arrest; at 24 h, PAB began to induce autophagy; at 36 h, cell-treated with PAB slip into G1 cell cycle; and 3 d PAB induced senescence. In time sequence PAB induced firstly cell cycle arrest, then autophagy, then slippage into G1 phase, lastly senescence. Senescent cells had high level of autophagy, inhibiting autophagy led to apoptosis, and no senescence. PAB activated PKC activity to induce cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence, inhibiting PKC activity suppressed cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence. PAB induced cell cycle arrest, autophagy and senescence in murine fibrosarcoma L929 cell through PKC.

  17. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  18. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Tanoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ions (Mg2+ are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency.

  19. Calculating the Rate of Senescence From Mortality Data: An Analysis of Data From the ERA-EDTA Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, Jacob J. E.; Rozing, Maarten P.; Kramer, Anneke; Abad, José M.; Finne, Patrik; Heaf, James G.; Hoitsma, Andries J.; de Meester, Johan M. J.; Palsson, Runolfur; Postorino, Maurizio; Ravani, Pietro; Wanner, Christoph; Jager, Kitty J.; van Bodegom, David; Westendorp, Rudi G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The rate of senescence can be inferred from the acceleration by which mortality rates increase over age. Such a senescence rate is generally estimated from parameters of a mathematical model fitted to these mortality rates. However, such models have limitations and underlying assumptions. Notably,

  20. Therapy-Induced Senescence in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ewald, Jonathan A.; Desotelle, Joshua A.; Wilding, George; Jarrard, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a response to nonlethal stress that results in persistent cytostasis with a distinct morphological and biochemical phenotype. The senescence phenotype, detected in tumors through the expression of mRNA and protein markers, can be generated in cancer cells lacking functional p53 and retinoblastoma protein. Current research suggests that therapy-induced senescence (TIS) represents a novel functional target that may improve cancer therapy. TIS can be induced in immortal an...

  1. Assessing Cell and Organ Senescence Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes de Jesus, Bruno; Blasco, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    A major goal in cancer and aging research is to discriminate the biochemical modifications that happen locally that could account for the healthiness or malignancy of tissues. Senescence is one general antiproliferative cellular process that acts as a strong barrier for cancer progression, playing a crucial role in aging. Here, we focus on the current methods to assess cellular senescence, discriminating the advantages and disadvantages of several senescence biomarkers. PMID:22723221

  2. PPARgamma Deficiency Counteracts Thymic Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ernszt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Thymic senescence contributes to increased incidence of infection, cancer and autoimmunity at senior ages. This process manifests as adipose involution. As with other adipose tissues, thymic adipose involution is also controlled by PPARgamma. This is supported by observations reporting that systemic PPARgamma activation accelerates thymic adipose involution. Therefore, we hypothesized that decreased PPARgamma activity could prevent thymic adipose involution, although it may trigger metabolic adverse effects. We have confirmed that both human and murine thymic sections show marked staining for PPARgamma at senior ages. We have also tested the thymic lobes of PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice. Supporting our working hypothesis both adult PPARgamma haplo-insufficient and null mice show delayed thymic senescence by thymus histology, thymocyte mouse T-cell recombination excision circle qPCR and peripheral blood naive T-cell ratio by flow-cytometry. Delayed senescence showed dose–response with respect to PPARgamma deficiency. Functional immune parameters were also evaluated at senior ages in PPARgamma haplo-insufficient mice (null mice do not reach senior ages due to metabolic adverse affects. As expected, sustained and elevated T-cell production conferred oral tolerance and enhanced vaccination efficiency in senior PPARgamma haplo-insufficient, but not in senior wild-type littermates according to ELISA IgG measurements. Of note, humans also show increased oral intolerance issues and decreased protection by vaccines at senior ages. Moreover, PPARgamma haplo-insufficiency also exists in human known as a rare disease (FPLD3 causing metabolic adverse effects, similar to the mouse. When compared to age- and metabolic disorder-matched other patient samples (FPLD2 not affecting PPARgamma activity, FPLD3 patients showed increased human Trec (hTrec values by qPCR (within healthy human range suggesting delayed thymic senescence, in accordance with

  3. Programmed cell senescence during mammalian embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Espín, Daniel; Cañamero, Marta; Maraver, Antonio; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Contreras, Julio; Murillo-Cuesta, Silvia; Rodríguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Varela-Nieto, Isabel; Ruberte, Jesús; Collado, Manuel; Serrano, Manuel

    2013-11-21

    Cellular senescence disables proliferation in damaged cells, and it is relevant for cancer and aging. Here, we show that senescence occurs during mammalian embryonic development at multiple locations, including the mesonephros and the endolymphatic sac of the inner ear, which we have analyzed in detail. Mechanistically, senescence in both structures is strictly dependent on p21, but independent of DNA damage, p53, or other cell-cycle inhibitors, and it is regulated by the TGF-β/SMAD and PI3K/FOXO pathways. Developmentally programmed senescence is followed by macrophage infiltration, clearance of senescent cells, and tissue remodeling. Loss of senescence due to the absence of p21 is partially compensated by apoptosis but still results in detectable developmental abnormalities. Importantly, the mesonephros and endolymphatic sac of human embryos also show evidence of senescence. We conclude that the role of developmentally programmed senescence is to promote tissue remodeling and propose that this is the evolutionary origin of damage-induced senescence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased TERRA levels and RNase H sensitivity are conserved hallmarks of post-senescent survivors in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misino, Stefano; Bonetti, Diego; Luke-Glaser, Sarah; Luke, Brian

    2018-02-16

    Cancer cells activate telomere maintenance mechanisms (TMMs) to bypass replicative senescence and achieve immortality by either upregulating telomerase or promoting homology-directed repair (HDR) at chromosome ends to maintain telomere length, the latter being referred to as ALT (Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres). In yeast telomerase mutants, the HDR-based repair of telomeres leads to the generation of 'survivors' that escape senescence and divide indefinitely. So far, yeast has proven to provide an accurate model to study the generation and maintenance of telomeres via HDR. Recently, it has been established that up-regulation of the lncRNA, TERRA (telomeric repeat-containing RNA), is a novel hallmark of ALT cells. Moreover, RNA-DNA hybrids are thought to trigger HDR at telomeres in ALT cells to maintain telomere length and function. Here we show that, also in established yeast type II survivors, TERRA levels are increased in an analogous manner to human ALT cells. The elevated TERRA levels are independent of yeast-specific subtelomeric structures, i.e. the presence or absence of Y' repetitive elements. Furthermore, we show that RNase H1 overexpression, which degrades the RNA moiety in RNA-DNA hybrids, impairs the growth of yeast survivors. We suggest that even in terms of TERRA regulation, yeast survivors serve as an accurate model that recapitulates many key features of human ALT cells. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. The SETD8/PR-Set7 Methyltransferase Functions as a Barrier to Prevent Senescence-Associated Metabolic Remodeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tanaka

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is an irreversible growth arrest that contributes to development, tumor suppression, and age-related conditions. Senescent cells show active metabolism compared with proliferating cells, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the SETD8/PR-Set7 methyltransferase, which catalyzes mono-methylation of histone H4 at lysine 20 (H4K20me1, suppresses nucleolar and mitochondrial activities to prevent cellular senescence. SETD8 protein was selectively downregulated in both oncogene-induced and replicative senescence. Inhibition of SETD8 alone was sufficient to trigger senescence. Under these states, the expression of genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs and ribosomal RNAs as well as the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor p16INK4A was increased, with a corresponding reduction of H4K20me1 at each locus. As a result, the loss of SETD8 concurrently stimulated nucleolar function and retinoblastoma protein-mediated mitochondrial metabolism. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that SETD8 acts as a barrier to prevent cellular senescence through chromatin-mediated regulation of senescence-associated metabolic remodeling.

  6. Irreparable telomeric DNA damage and persistent DDR signalling as a shared causative mechanism of cellular senescence and ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiello, Francesca; Herbig, Utz; Longhese, Maria Pia; Fumagalli, Marzia; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-06-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA repair and halts cell cycle. If damage is not resolved, cells can enter into an irreversible state of proliferative arrest called cellular senescence. Organismal ageing in mammals is associated with accumulation of markers of cellular senescence and DDR persistence at telomeres. Since the vast majority of the cells in mammals are non-proliferating, how do they age? Are telomeres involved? Also oncogene activation causes cellular senescence due to altered DNA replication and DDR activation in particular at the telomeres. Is there a common mechanism shared among apparently distinct types of cellular senescence? And what is the role of telomeric DNA damage? Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Retinoblastoma-binding Protein 4-regulated Classical Nuclear Transport Is Involved in Cellular Senescence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Akira; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Obuse, Chikashi; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Oka, Masahiro; Yoneda, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a fundamental cellular process in eukaryotic cells. Here, we demonstrated that retinoblastoma-binding protein 4 (RBBP4) functions as a novel regulatory factor to increase the efficiency of importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. RBBP4 accelerates the release of importin β1 from importin α via competitive binding to the importin β-binding domain of importin α in the presence of RanGTP. Therefore, it facilitates importin α/β-mediated nuclear import. We showed that the importin α/β pathway is down-regulated in replicative senescent cells, concomitant with a decrease in RBBP4 level. Knockdown of RBBP4 caused both suppression of nuclear transport and induction of cellular senescence. This is the first report to identify a factor that competes with importin β1 to bind to importin α, and it demonstrates that the loss of this factor can trigger cellular senescence. PMID:26491019

  8. Proteome oxidative carbonylation during oxidative stress-induced premature senescence of WI-38 human fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le Boulch, Marine; Ahmed, Emad K; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2018-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidatively damaged proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing, and is also a phenotypic feature shared by both replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence of human fibroblasts. Moreover, proteins that are building up as oxidized (i.e. the "Oxi......-proteome") during ageing and age-related diseases represent a restricted set of cellular proteins, indicating that certain proteins are more prone to oxidative carbonylation and subsequent intracellular accumulation. The occurrence of specific carbonylated proteins upon oxidative stress induced premature senescence...... of WI-38 human fibroblasts and their follow-up identification have been addressed in this study. Indeed, it was expected that the identification of these proteins would give insights into the mechanisms by which oxidatively damaged proteins could affect cellular function. Among these proteins, some...

  9. Replicable in vivo physiological and behavioral phenotypes of the Shank3B null mutant mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Silverman, Jill L; Super, Chloe E; Lammers, Stephen H T; Hameed, Mustafa Q; Modi, Meera E; Copping, Nycole A; Pride, Michael C; Smith, Daniel G; Rotenberg, Alexander; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Sahin, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous condition characterized by social, repetitive, and sensory behavioral abnormalities. No treatments are approved for the core diagnostic symptoms of ASD. To enable the earliest stages of therapeutic discovery and development for ASD, robust and reproducible behavioral phenotypes and biological markers are essential to establish in preclinical animal models. The goal of this study was to identify electroencephalographic (EEG) and behavioral phenotypes that are replicable between independent cohorts in a mouse model of ASD. The larger goal of our strategy is to empower the preclinical biomedical ASD research field by generating robust and reproducible behavioral and physiological phenotypes in animal models of ASD, for the characterization of mechanistic underpinnings of ASD-relevant phenotypes, and to ensure reliability for the discovery of novel therapeutics. Genetic disruption of the SHANK3 gene, a scaffolding protein involved in the stability of the postsynaptic density in excitatory synapses, is thought to be responsible for a relatively large number of cases of ASD. Therefore, we have thoroughly characterized the robustness of ASD-relevant behavioral phenotypes in two cohorts, and for the first time quantified translational EEG activity in Shank3B null mutant mice. In vivo physiology and behavioral assays were conducted in two independently bred and tested full cohorts of Shank3B null mutant ( Shank3B KO) and wildtype littermate control (WT) mice. EEG was recorded via wireless implanted telemeters for 7 days of baseline followed by 20 min of recording following pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) challenge. Behaviors relevant to the diagnostic and associated symptoms of ASD were tested on a battery of established behavioral tests. Assays were designed to reproduce and expand on the original behavioral characterization of Shank3B KO mice. Two or more corroborative tests were conducted within each

  10. Worker senescence and the sociobiology of aging in ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Ysabel Milton; Traniello, James F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Senescence, the decline in physiological and behavioral function with increasing age, has been the focus of significant theoretical and empirical research in a broad array of animal taxa. Preeminent among invertebrate social models of aging are ants, a diverse and ecologically dominant clade of eusocial insects characterized by reproductive and sterile phenotypes. In this review, we critically examine selection for worker lifespan in ants and discuss the relationship between functional senescence, longevity, task performance, and colony fitness. We did not find strong or consistent support for the hypothesis that demographic senescence in ants is programmed, or its corollary prediction that workers that do not experience extrinsic mortality die at an age approximating their lifespan in nature. We present seven hypotheses concerning how selection could favor extended worker lifespan through its positive relationship to colony size and predict that large colony size, under some conditions, should confer multiple and significant fitness advantages. Fitness benefits derived from long worker lifespan could be mediated by increased resource acquisition, efficient division of labor, accuracy of collective decision-making, enhanced allomaternal care and colony defense, lower infection risk, and decreased energetic costs of workforce maintenance. We suggest future avenues of research to examine the evolution of worker lifespan and its relationship to colony fitness, and conclude that an innovative fusion of sociobiology, senescence theory, and mechanistic studies of aging can improve our understanding of the adaptive nature of worker lifespan in ants. PMID:25530660

  11. HIV and drug abuse mediate astrocyte senescence in a β-catenin-dependent manner leading to neuronal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunjiang; Narasipura, Srinivas D; Richards, Maureen H; Hu, Xiu-Ti; Yamamoto, Bryan; Al-Harthi, Lena

    2017-10-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that cell senescence plays an important role in aging-associated diseases including neurodegenerative diseases. HIV leads to a spectrum of neurologic diseases collectively termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Drug abuse, particularly methamphetamine (meth), is a frequently abused psychostimulant among HIV+ individuals and its abuse exacerbates HAND. The mechanism by which HIV and meth lead to brain cell dysregulation is not entirely clear. In this study, we evaluated the impact of HIV and meth on astrocyte senescence using in vitro and several animal models. Astrocytes constitute up to 50% of brain cells and play a pivotal role in marinating brain homeostasis. We show here that HIV and meth induce significant senescence of primary human fetal astrocytes, as evaluated by induction of senescence markers (β-galactosidase and p16 INK 4A ), senescence-associated morphologic changes, and cell cycle arrest. HIV- and meth-mediated astrocyte senescence was also demonstrated in three small animal models (humanized mouse model of HIV/NSG-huPBMCs, HIV-transgenic rats, and in a meth administration rat model). Senescent astrocytes in turn mediated neuronal toxicity. Further, we show that β-catenin, a pro-survival/proliferation transcriptional co-activator, is downregulated by HIV and meth in human astrocytes and this downregulation promotes astrocyte senescence while induction of β-catenin blocks HIV- and meth-mediated astrocyte senescence. These studies, for the first time, demonstrate that HIV and meth induce astrocyte senescence and implicate the β-catenin pathway as potential therapeutic target to overcome astrocyte senescence. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. RAC3 more than a nuclear receptor coactivator: a key inhibitor of senescence that is downregulated in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Larrosa, P N; Ruíz Grecco, M; Mengual Gómez, D; Alvarado, C V; Panelo, L C; Rubio, M F; Alonso, D F; Gómez, D E; Costas, M A

    2015-10-15

    Receptor-associated coactivator 3 (RAC3) is a nuclear receptor coactivator usually overexpressed in tumors that exerts oncogenic functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Although as part of its oncogenic actions it was previously identified as an inhibitor of apoptosis and autophagy, its expression is required in order to preserve the pluripotency and embryonic stem cell self-renewal. In this work we investigated its role in cellular senescence. We found that RAC3 overexpression in the nontumoral HEK293 cells inhibits the premature senescence induced by hydrogen peroxide or rapamycin. The mechanism involves not only the inhibition of autophagy early induced by these stimuli in the pathway to senescence, but also the increase in levels and nuclear localization of both the cell cycle suppressors p53/p21 and the longevity promoters FOXO1A, FOXO3A and SIRT1. Furthermore, we found that RAC3 overexpression is required in order to maintain the telomerase activity. In tumoral HeLa cells its activity was inhibited by depletion of RAC3 inducing replicative senescence. Moreover, we demonstrated that in vivo, levels of RAC3 are downregulated in the liver from aged as compared with young rats, whereas the levels of p21 are increased, correlating with the expected senescent cell contents in aged tissues. A similar downregulation of RAC3 was observed in the premature and replicative senescence of human fetal WI-38 cells and premature senescence of hepatocyte HepG2 cell line. Taken together, all these results demonstrate that RAC3 is an inhibitor of senescence whose downregulation in aged individuals could be probably a tumor suppressor mechanism, avoiding the clonal expansion of risky old cells having damaged DNA.

  13. Changes in ultrastructure, protease and caspase-like activities during flower senescence in Lilium longiflorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelli, Riccardo; Lombardi, Lara; Rogers, Hilary J; Picciarelli, Piero; Lorenzi, Roberto; Ceccarelli, Nello

    2011-05-01

    The last phase of flower development is senescence during which nutrients are recycled to developing tissues. The ultimate fate of petal cells is cell death. In this study we used the ethylene-insensitive Lilium longiflorum as a model system to characterize Lily flower senescence from the physiological, biochemical and ultrastructural point of view. Lily flower senescence is highly predictable: it starts three days after flower opening, before visible signs of wilting, and ends with the complete wilting of the corolla within 10 days. The earliest events in L. longiflorum senescence include a fall in fresh and dry weight, fragmentation of nuclear DNA and cellular disruption. Mesophyll cell degradation is associated with vacuole permeabilization and rupture. Protein degradation starts later, coincident with the first visible signs of tepal senescence. A fall in total protein is accompanied by a rise in total proteases, and also by a rise of three classes of caspase-like activity with activities against YVAD, DEVD and VEID. The timing of the appearance of these caspase-like activities argues against their involvement in the regulation of the early stages of senescence, but their possible role in the regulation of the final stages of senescence and cell death is discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Extracellular cystatin SN and cathepsin B prevent cellular senescence by inhibiting abnormal glycogen accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Seok; Park, Soojong; Lee, Ki-Won; Madhi, Hamadi; Park, Sae Gwang; Lee, Hee Gu; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yoo, Jiyun; Dong Kim, Kwang

    2017-04-06

    Cystatin SN (CST1), a known inhibitor of cathepsin B (CatB), has important roles in tumor development. Paradoxically, CatB is a member of the cysteine cathepsin family that acts in cellular processes, such as tumor development and invasion. However, the relationship between CST1 and CatB, and their roles in tumor development are poorly understood. In this study, we observed that the knockdown of CST1 induced the activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, a marker of cellular senescence, and expression of senescence-associated secretory phenotype genes, including interleukin-6 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20, in MDA-MB-231 and SW480 cancer cells. Furthermore, CST1 knockdown decreased extracellular CatB activity, and direct CatB inhibition, using specific inhibitors or shCatB, induced cellular senescence. Reconstitution of CST1 restored CatB activity and inhibited cellular senescence in CST1 knockdown cells. CST1 knockdown or CatB inhibition increased glycogen synthase (GS) kinase 3β phosphorylation at serine 9, resulting in the activation of GS and the induction of glycogen accumulation associated with cellular senescence. Importantly, CST1 knockdown suppressed cancer cell proliferation, soft agar colony growth and tumor growth in a xenograft model. These results indicate that CST1-mediated extracellular CatB activity enhances tumor development by preventing cellular senescence. Our findings suggest that antagonists of CST1 or inhibitors of CatB are potential anticancer agents.

  15. Senescence as a novel mechanism involved in β-adrenergic receptor mediated cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongrong; Zhu, Baoling; Sun, Yan; Shi, Dandan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Youyi; Li, Zijian; Xue, Lixiang

    2017-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy used to be elucidated by biomechanical, stretch-sensitive or neurohumoral mechanisms. However, a series of hints have indicated that hypertrophy process simulates senescence program. However, further evidence need to be pursued. To verify this hypothesis and examine whether cardiac senescence is a novel mechanism of hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol, 2-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to isoproterenol infusion (0.25mg/kg/day) for 7 days by subcutaneous injection). Key characteristics of senescence (senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, lipofuscin, expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors) were examined in cardiac hypertrophy model. Senescence-like phenotype, such as increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, accumulation of lipofuscin and high levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (e.g. p16, p19, p21 and p53) was found along the process of cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac-specific transcription factor GATA4 increased in isoproterenol-treated cardiomyocytes as well. We further found that myocardial hypertrophy could be inhibited by resveratrol, an anti-aging compound, in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed for the first time that cardiac senescence is involved in the process of pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol. PMID:28783759

  16. Senescence in natural populations of animals: Widespread evidence and its implications for bio-gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussey, Daniel H.; Froy, Hannah; Lemaitre, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Austad, Steve N.

    2014-01-01

    That senescence is rarely, if ever, observed in natural populations is an oft-quoted fallacy within bio-gerontology. We identify the roots of this fallacy in the otherwise seminal works of Medawar and Comfort, and explain that under antagonistic pleiotropy or disposable soma explanations for the evolution of senescence there is no reason why senescence cannot evolve to be manifest within the life expectancies of wild organisms. The recent emergence of long-term field studies presents irrefutable evidence that senescence is commonly detected in nature. We found such evidence in 175 different animal species from 340 separate studies. Although the bulk of this evidence comes from birds and mammals, we also found evidence for senescence in other vertebrates and insects. We describe how high-quality longitudinal field data allow us to test evolutionary explanations for differences in senescence between the sexes and among traits and individuals. Recent studies indicate that genes, prior environment and investment in growth and reproduction influence aging rates in the wild. We argue that – with the fallacy that wild animals do not senesce finally dead and buried – collaborations between bio-gerontologists and field biologists can begin to test the ecological generality of purportedly ‘public’ mechanisms regulating aging in laboratory models. PMID:22884974

  17. Cellular Senescence Is Associated With Human Retinal Microaneurysm Formation During Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Luppo, Mariana; Catita, Joana; Ramos, David; Navarro, Marc; Carretero, Ana; Mendes-Jorge, Luísa; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura; Rodriguez-Baeza, Alfonso; Nacher, Victor; Ruberte, Jesus

    2017-06-01

    Microaneurysms are present in healthy old-age human retinas. However, to date, no age-related pathogenic mechanism has been implicated in their formation. Here, cellular senescence, a hallmark of aging and several age-related diseases, has been analyzed in the old-age human retina and in the retina of a progeric mouse. Retinas were obtained from 17 nondiabetic donors and from mice deficient in Bmi1. Cellular senescence was analyzed by immunohistochemistry, senescent-associated β-galactosidase activity assay, Sudan black B staining, conventional transmission electron microscopy, and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Neurons, but not neuroglia, and blood vessels undergo cellular senescence in the old-age human retina. The canonical senescence markers p16, p53, and p21 were up-regulated and coexisted with apoptosis in old-age human microaneurysms. Senescent endothelial cells were discontinuously covered by fibronectin, and p16 colocalized with the β1 subunit of fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin under the endothelial cellular membrane, suggesting anoikis as a mechanism involved in endothelial cell apoptosis. In a progeric mouse model deficient in Bmi1, where p21 was overexpressed, the retinal blood vessels displayed an aging phenotype characterized by enlarged caveolae and lipofuscin accumulation. Although mouse retina is not prone to develop microaneurysms, Bmi1-deficient mice presented abundant retinal microaneurysms. Together, these results uncover cellular senescence as a player during the formation of microaneurysms in old-age human retinas.

  18. Replication, refinement & reachability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas T.; Slaats, Tijs

    2018-01-01

    We explore the complexity of reachability and run-time refinement under safety and liveness constraints in event-based process models. Our study is framed in the DCR? process language, which supports modular specification through a compositional operational semantics. DCR? encompasses the “Dynamic...... Condition Response (DCR) graphs” declarative process model for analysis, execution and safe run-time refinement of process-aware information systems; including replication of sub-processes. We prove that event-reachability and refinement are np-hard for DCR? processes without replication...

  19. Replicating and extending a model of effects of universal preventive intervention during early adolescence on young adult substance misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoth, Richard; Trudeau, Linda; Redmond, Cleve; Shin, Chungyeol

    2016-10-01

    This brief report summarizes a replication and extension of a developmental outcome modeling study, by examining whether delayed substance initiation during adolescence, resulting from universal middle school preventive interventions, reduces problematic use in young adults Ages 25 and 27, up to 14.5 years after baseline. Participants were middle school students from 36 Iowa schools randomly assigned to the Strengthening Families Program plus Life Skills Training (SFP 10-14 + LST), LST-only, or a control condition. Self-report questionnaires originally were collected at 11 time points, through Age 22. A subsequent grant allowed for assessments at Ages 25 and 27, including measures of drunkenness, alcohol-related problems, cigarette use, illicit drug use (lifetime and frequency), marijuana use and prescription drug misuse. These outcomes were modeled as variables influenced by growth factors describing substance initiation during adolescence. Models included the effects of baseline risk, intervention condition assignment, and their interaction; risk-related moderation effects were examined and relative reduction rates were calculated for dichotomous variables. Model fits were good. Analyses showed significant or marginally significant indirect intervention effects on all outcomes, through effects on adolescent substance initiation growth factors. Intervention × Risk interaction effects favored the higher risk subsample, replicating earlier findings. Additional direct effects on young adult use were observed only for cigarette frequency. Relative reduction rates were larger for the higher risk subsamples, ranging from 3.9% to 36.2%. Universal preventive interventions implemented during early adolescence have the potential to decrease the rates of substance misuse and associated problems into young adulthood. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. McCoy cell line as a possible model containing CD4+ receptors for the study of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira Yeda L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have recently shown the use of recombinant rabies virus as potential vector-viral vaccine for HIV-1. The sequence homology between gp 120 and rabies virus glycoprotein has been reported. The McCoy cell line has therefore been used to show CD4+ or CD4+ like receptors. Samples of HIV-1 were isolated, when plasma of HIV-1 positive patients was inoculated in the McCoy cell line. The virus infection was then studied during successive virus passages. The proteins released in the extra cellular medium were checked for protein activity, by exposure to SDS Electrophoresis and blotting to nitro-cellulose filter, then reacting with sera of HIV positive and negative patients. Successive passages were performed, and showed viral replication, membrane permeabilization, the syncytium formation, and the cellular lysis (cytopathic effect. Flow cytometry analysis shows clear evidence that CD4+ receptors are present in this cell line, which enhances the likelihood of easy isolation and replication of HIV. The results observed allow the use of this cell line as a possible model for isolating HIV, as well as for carrying out studies of the dynamics of viral infection in several situations, including exposure to drugs in pharmacological studies, and possibly studies and analyses of the immune response in vaccine therapies.

  1. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A; Turner, Roberta L; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C; Reimche, Jennifer L; King, Lauren B; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W Edward; Ornelles, David A

    2015-03-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Replication of type 5 adenovirus promotes middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in the chinchilla model of otitis media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrah, Kyle A.; Turner, Roberta L.; Pang, Bing; Perez, Antonia C.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; King, Lauren B.; Wren, John; Gandhi, Uma; Swords, W. Edward; Ornelles, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenoviral infection is a major risk factor for otitis media. We hypothesized that adenovirus promotes bacterial ascension into the middle ear through the disruption of normal function in the Eustachian tubes due to inflammation-induced changes. An intranasal infection model of the chinchilla was used to test the ability of type 5 adenovirus to promote middle ear infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae. The hyperinflammatory adenovirus mutant dl327 and the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP were used to test the role of inflammation and viral replication, respectively, in promotion of pneumococcal middle ear infection. Precedent infection with adenovirus resulted in a significantly greater incidence of middle ear disease by S. pneumoniae as compared to nonadenovirus infected animals. Infection with the adenovirus mutant dl327 induced a comparable degree of bacterial ascension into the middle ear as did infection with the wild-type virus. By contrast, infection with the nonreplicating adenovirus mutant H5wt300ΔpTP resulted in less extensive middle ear infection compared to the wild-type adenovirus. We conclude that viral replication is necessary for adenoviral-induced pneumococcal middle ear disease. PMID:25251686

  3. Unmasking Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Senescent Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez-Segura, Alejandra; de Jong, Tristan V; Melov, Simon; Guryev, Victor; Campisi, Judith; Demaria, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a state of irreversibly arrested proliferation, often induced by genotoxic stress [1]. Senescent cells participate in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions, including tumor suppression [2], embryonic development [3, 4], tissue repair [5-8], and organismal

  4. Suppressing Cancer: The Importance of Being Senescent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campisi, Judith

    2005-07-01

    Cellular senescence permanently arrests the cell division cycle, and has long been thought to prevent the growth of cells at risk for transformation into cancer cells. Four new papers now provide evidence that cellular senescence indeed limits the development of malignant cancers in mice and humans.

  5. Physiology and molecular biology of petal senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    Petal senescence is reviewed, with the main emphasis on gene expression in relation to physiological functions. Autophagy seems to be the major mechanism for large-scale degradation of macromolecules, but it is still unclear if it contributes to cell death. Depending on the species, petal senescence

  6. Targeting senescence cells in pancreatic cancer | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cellular senescence is a programmed response to oncogenic (tumour-causing) stress that aims to halt the expansion of cells with malignant potential. It does this by stopping the proliferation of pre-cancerous lesions and recruitment of the immune system for their elimination. If these processes fail, senescent cells create ...

  7. Oncogenic senescence: a multi-functional perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, D.J.; Alimirah, F.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Campisi, J.; Hildesheim, J.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is defined as an irreversible growth arrest with the acquisition of a distinctive secretome. The growth arrest is a potent anticancer mechanism whereas the secretome facilitates wound healing, tissue repair, and development. The senescence response has also become increasingly

  8. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  9. The dual pathway model of overeating. Replication and extension with actual food consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwens, M.A.; Strien, T. van; Leeuwe, J.F.J. van; Staak, C.P.F. van der

    2009-01-01

    van Strien et al. [van Strien, T., Engels, R. C. M. E., van Leeuwe, J., Snoek, H. M. (2005). The Stice model of overeating: tests in clinical and non-clinical samples. Appetite, 45, 205–213] extended the negative affect pathway of Stice's dual pathway model of overeating Stice [Stice, E. (1994).

  10. The dual pathway model of overeating. Replication and extension with actual food consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwens, Machteld A; van Strien, T; Leeuwe, J.F.J.; van der Staak, C P F

    van Strien et al. [van Strien, T., Engels, R. C. M. E., van Leeuwe, J., Snoek, H. M. (2005). The Stice model of overeating: tests in clinical and non-clinical samples. Appetite, 45, 205-213] extended the negative affect pathway of Stice's dual pathway model of overeating Stice [Stice, E. (1994).

  11. Constraints on a preonic model for family replication from the anomalous magnetic moment of leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godbole, R.M.

    1986-07-01

    The additional contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon and the electron ((g-2) l ) in a recently suggested preonic model are considered. It is shown that the parameters in this model are severely restricted when the constraints coming from this analysis are combined with those obtained from the considerations of the quark-lepton mass matrices and mixing angles. (author)

  12. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  13. Inference Based on the Best-Fitting Model can Contribute to the Replication Crisis: Assessing Model Selection Uncertainty Using a Bootstrap Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubke, Gitta H.; Campbell, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Inference and conclusions drawn from model fitting analyses are commonly based on a single “best-fitting” model. If model selection and inference are carried out using the same data model selection uncertainty is ignored. We illustrate the Type I error inflation that can result from using the same data for model selection and inference, and we then propose a simple bootstrap based approach to quantify model selection uncertainty in terms of model selection rates. A selection rate can be interpreted as an estimate of the replication probability of a fitted model. The benefits of bootstrapping model selection uncertainty is demonstrated in a growth mixture analyses of data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, and a 2-group measurement invariance analysis of the Holzinger-Swineford data. PMID:28663687

  14. Possible Roles of Strigolactones during Leaf Senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Yamada

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is a complicated developmental process that involves degenerative changes and nutrient recycling. The progress of leaf senescence is controlled by various environmental cues and plant hormones, including ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, abscisic acid, cytokinins, and strigolactones. The production of strigolactones is induced in response to nitrogen and phosphorous deficiency. Strigolactones also accelerate leaf senescence and regulate shoot branching and root architecture. Leaf senescence is actively promoted in a nutrient-poor soil environment, and nutrients are transported from old leaves to young tissues and seeds. Strigolactones might act as important signals in response to nutrient levels in the rhizosphere. In this review, we discuss the possible roles of strigolactones during leaf senescence.

  15. DNA replication origins in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenfang eWu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins, is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB that are located adjacent to a replication initiator gene. Both the ORB sequence and the adjacent initiator gene are considerably diverse among different replication origins, while in silico and genetic analyses have indicated the specificity between the initiator genes and their cognate origins. These replicator-initiator pairings are reminiscent of the oriC-dnaA system in bacteria, and a model for the negative regulation of origin activity by a downstream cluster of ORB elements has been recently proposed in haloarchaea. Moreover, comparative genomic analyses have revealed that the mosaics of replicator-initiator pairings in archaeal chromosomes originated from the integration of extrachromosomal elements. This review summarizes the research progress in understanding of archaeal replication origins with particular focus on the utilization, control and evolution of multiple replication origins in haloarchaea.

  16. An evaluation of the Bayesian approach to fitting the N-mixture model for use with pseudo-replicated count data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribo, S.G.; Gray, B.R.; Liang, S.

    2011-01-01

    The N-mixture model proposed by Royle in 2004 may be used to approximate the abundance and detection probability of animal species in a given region. In 2006, Royle and Dorazio discussed the advantages of using a Bayesian approach in modelling animal abundance and occurrence using a hierarchical N-mixture model. N-mixture models assume replication on sampling sites, an assumption that may be violated when the site is not closed to changes in abundance during the survey period or when nominal replicates are defined spatially. In this paper, we studied the robustness of a Bayesian approach to fitting the N-mixture model for pseudo-replicated count data. Our simulation results showed that the Bayesian estimates for abundance and detection probability are slightly biased when the actual detection probability is small and are sensitive to the presence of extra variability within local sites.

  17. Role of ceramide in cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venable, M E; Lee, J Y; Smyth, M J; Bielawska, A; Obeid, L M

    1995-12-22

    Recently the sphingomyelin cycle, involving the hydrolysis of membrane sphingomyelin by an activated sphingomyelinase to generate ceramide, has emerged as a key pathway in cell differentiation and apoptosis in leukemic and other cell types. Here we investigate a role for this pathway in the senescence of WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts (HDF). We found that endogenous levels of ceramide increased considerably (4-fold) and specifically (compared with other lipids) as cells entered the senescent phase. Investigation of the mechanism of increased ceramide led to the discovery that neutral sphingomyelinase activity is elevated 8-10 fold in senescent cells. There were no changes in sphingomyelinase activity or ceramide levels as HDF entered quiescence following serum withdrawal or contact inhibition. Thus, the activation of the sphingomyelinase/ceramide pathway in HDF is due to senescence and supports the hypotheses that senescence represents a distinct program of cell development that can be differentiated from quiescence. Additional studies disclosed the ability of ceramide to induce a senescent phenotype. Thus, when exogenous ceramide (15 microM) was administered to young WI-38 HDF, it produced endogenous levels comparable to those observed in senescent cells (as determined by metabolic labeling studies). Ceramide concentrations of 10-15 microM inhibited the growth of young HDF and induced a senescent phenotype by its ability to inhibit DNA synthesis and mitogenesis. These concentrations of ceramide also induced retinoblastoma dephosphorylation and inhibited serum-induced AP-1 activation in young HDF, thus recapitulating basic biochemical and molecular changes of senescence. Sphingomyelinase and ceramide may thus be implicated as mediators of cellular senescence.

  18. Identifying the Minimum Model Features to Replicate Historic Morphodynamics of a Juvenile Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapiga, M. J.; Parker, G.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a quasi-2D morphodynamic delta model that improves on past models that require many simplifying assumptions, e.g. a single channel representative of a channel network, fixed channel width, and spatially uniform deposition. Our model is useful for studying long-term progradation rates of any generic micro-tidal delta system with specification of: characteristic grain size, input water and sediment discharges and basin morphology. In particular, we relax the assumption of a single, implicit channel sweeping across the delta topset in favor of an implicit channel network. This network, coupled with recent research on channel-forming Shields number, quantitative assessments of the lateral depositional length of sand (corresponding loosely to levees) and length between bifurcations create a spatial web of deposition within the receiving basin. The depositional web includes spatial boundaries for areas infilling with sands carried as bed material load, as well as those filling via passive deposition of washload mud. Our main goal is to identify the minimum features necessary to accurately model the morphodynamics of channel number, width, depth, and overall delta progradation rate in a juvenile delta. We use the Wax Lake Delta in Louisiana as a test site due to its rapid growth in the last 40 years. Field data including topset/island bathymetry, channel bathymetry, topset/island width, channel width, number of channels, and radial topset length are compiled from US Army Corps of Engineers data for 1989, 1998, and 2006. Additional data is extracted from a DEM from 2015. These data are used as benchmarks for the hindcast model runs. The morphology of Wax Lake Delta is also strongly affected by a pre-delta substrate that acts as a lower "bedrock" boundary. Therefore, we also include closures for a bedrock-alluvial transition and an excess shear rate-law incision model to estimate bedrock incision. The model's framework is generic, but inclusion of individual

  19. Matching allele dynamics and coevolution in a minimal predator-prey replicator model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanyes, Josep [Complex Systems Lab (ICREA-UPF), Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB-GRIB), Dr. Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: josep.sardanes@upf.edu; Sole, Ricard V. [Complex Systems Lab (ICREA-UPF), Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB-GRIB), Dr. Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona (Spain); Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Road, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    A minimal Lotka-Volterra type predator-prey model describing coevolutionary traits among entities with a strength of interaction influenced by a pair of haploid diallelic loci is studied with a deterministic time continuous model. We show a Hopf bifurcation governing the transition from evolutionary stasis to periodic Red Queen dynamics. If predator genotypes differ in their predation efficiency the more efficient genotype asymptotically achieves lower stationary concentrations.

  20. The load of short telomeres, estimated by a new method, Universal STELA, correlates with number of senescent cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Laila; Horn, Peer Bendix; Jensen, Uffe Birk

    2010-01-01

    Short telomeres are thought to trigger senescence, most likely through a single - or a group of few - critically shortened telomeres. Such short telomeres are thought to result from a combination of gradual linear shortening resulting from the end replication problem, reflecting the division hist...

  1. Robust option replication for a Black-Scholes model extended with nondeterministic trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, J.G.M.; Kloeden, P.E.

    1999-01-01

    Statistical analysis on various stocks reveals long range dependence behavior of the stock prices that is not consistent with the classical Black and Scholes model. This memory or nondeterministic trend behavior is often seen as a reflection of market sentiments and causes that the historical

  2. CSGene: a literature-based database for cell senescence genes and its application to identify critical cell aging pathways and associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, M; Chen, L; Qu, H

    2016-01-14

    Cell senescence is a cellular process in which normal diploid cells cease to replicate and is a major driving force for human cancers and aging-associated diseases. Recent studies on cell senescence have identified many new genetic components and pathways that control cell aging. However, there is no comprehensive resource for cell senescence that integrates various genetic studies and relationships with cell senescence, and the risk associated with complex diseases such as cancer is still unexplored. We have developed the first literature-based gene resource for exploring cell senescence genes, CSGene. We complied 504 experimentally verified genes from public data resources and published literature. Pathway analyses highlighted the prominent roles of cell senescence genes in the control of rRNA gene transcription and unusual rDNA repeat that constitute a center for the stability of the whole genome. We also found a strong association of cell senescence with HIV-1 infection and viral carcinogenesis that are mainly related to promoter/enhancer binding and chromatin modification processes. Moreover, pan-cancer mutation and network analysis also identified common cell aging mechanisms in cancers and uncovered a highly modular network structure. These results highlight the utility of CSGene for elucidating the complex cellular events of cell senescence.

  3. CENTRIOLE REPLICATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Ikuko; Gall, Joseph

    1966-01-01

    Sperm formation was studied in the fern, Marsilea, and the cycad, Zamia, with particular emphasis on the centrioles. In Marsilea, the mature sperm possesses over 100 flagella, the basal bodies of which have the typical cylindrical structure of centrioles. Earlier observations by light microscopy suggested that these centrioles arise by fragmentation of a body known as the blepharoplast. In the youngest spermatids the blepharoplast is a hollow sphere approximately 0.8 µ in diameter. Its wall consists of closely packed immature centrioles, or procentrioles. The procentrioles are short cylinders which progressively lengthen during differentiation of the spermatid. At the same time they migrate to the surface of the cell, where each of them puts out a flagellum. A blepharoplast is found at each pole of the spindle during the last antheridial mitosis, and two blepharoplasts are found in the cytoplasm before this mitosis. Blepharoplasts are also found in the preceding cell generation, but their ultimate origin is obscure. Before the last mitosis the blepharoplasts are solid, consisting of a cluster of radially arranged tubules which bear some structural similarity to centrioles. In Zamia, similar stages are found during sperm formation, although here the number of flagella on each sperm is close to 20,000 and the blepharoplast measures about 10 µ in diameter. These observations are discussed in relation to theories of centriole replication. PMID:5950730

  4. The inhibitory mechanism of Cordyceps sinensis on cigarette smoke extract-induced senescence in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu AL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ailing Liu,1,2,* Jinxiang Wu,1,* Aijun Li,2 Wenxiang Bi,3 Tian Liu,1 Liuzhao Cao,1 Yahui Liu,1 Liang Dong1 1Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Weihai Municipal Hospital, Weihai, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: Cellular senescence is a state of irreversible growth arrest induced either by telomere shortening (replicative senescence or stress. The bronchial epithelial cell is often injured by inhaled toxic substances, such as cigarette smoke. In the present study, we investigated whether exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE induces senescence of bronchial epithelial cells; and Cordyceps sinensis mechanism of inhibition of CSE-induced cellular senescence.Methods: Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE cells cultured in vitro were treated with CSE and/or C. sinensis. p16, p21, and senescence-associated-galactosidase activity were used to detect cellular senescence with immunofluorescence, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, PI3K/AKT/mTOR and their phosphorylated proteins were examined to testify the activation of signaling pathway by ROS fluorescent staining and Western blotting. Then, inhibitors of ROS and PI3K were used to further confirm the function of this pathway.Results: Cellular senescence was upregulated by CSE treatment, and C. sinensis can decrease CSE-induced cellular senescence. Activation of ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway was enhanced by CSE treatment, and decreased when C. sinensis was added. Blocking ROS/PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway can attenuate CSE-induced cellular senescence.Conclusion: CSE can induce cellular senescence in human bronchial

  5. Lagomorphs (rabbits, pikas and hares) do not use telomere-directed replicative aging in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Nicholas R; Elder, Frederick F B; Shay, Jerry W; Wright, Woodring E

    2005-01-01

    Telomere shortening is used for replicative aging in primates and ungulates but not rodents. We examined telomere biology in rabbits to expand the comparative biology of telomere-directed replicative senescence within mammals. The order Lagomorpha consists of two families; Leporidae and Ochotonidae. We examined telomere biology in species representing three leporid genera (European White Rabbit, Black-tailed Jack Rabbit, and Swamp Rabbit) and the monotypic ochotonid genus (North American Pika). Of the leporids one species was a laboratory strain and the others were wild caught. The leporids neither exhibited cellular senescence after sustained periods in culture nor displayed detectable telomerase activity. Continued culture was possible because of their extremely long telomeric arrays. Immunofluorescence showed robust telomere signals at chromosome ends and significant internal chromosomal staining in some instances. Pika was unique in displaying endogenous telomerase activity throughout time in culture. These results show that it is unlikely that lagomorphs use telomere shortening and replicative senescence as a tumor protective mechanism.

  6. Productively infected murine Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors define new animal models for studying and targeting KSHV oncogenesis and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany M Ashlock

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells.

  7. VarMixt: efficient variance modelling for the differential analysis of replicated gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmar, Paul; Robin, Stéphane; Daudin, Jean Jacques

    2005-02-15

    Identifying differentially regulated genes in experiments comparing two experimental conditions is often a key step in the microarray data analysis process. Many different approaches and methodological developments have been put forward, yet the question remains open. Varmixt is a powerful and efficient novel methodology for this task. It is based on a flexible and realistic variance modelling strategy. It compares favourably with other popular techniques (standard t-test, SAM and Cyber-T). The relevance of the approach is demonstrated with real-world and simulated datasets. The analysis strategy was successfully applied to both a 'two-colour' cDNA microarray and an Affymetrix Genechip. Strong control of false positive and false negative rates is proven in large simulation studies. The R package is freely available at http://www.inapg.inra.fr/ens_rech/mathinfo/recherche/mathematique/outil.html delmar@inapg.inra.fr http://www.inapg.inra.fr/ens_rech/mathinfo/recherche/mathematique/outil.html.

  8. AMPK induces vascular smooth muscle cell senescence via LKB1 dependent pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Young; Woo, Chang-Hoon [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Jin; Lee, Kwang Youn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Aging-associated Vascular Disease Research Center, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} An aging model was established by stimulating VSMC with adriamycin. {yields} Adriamycin increased p-LKB1, p-AMPK, p53 and p21 expressions. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK diminished SA-{beta}-gal staining and restored VSMC proliferation. {yields} p53 and p21 siRNA attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining in VSMC. {yields} p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK induced VSMC senescence. -- Abstract: Vascular cells have a limited lifespan with limited cell proliferation and undergo cellular senescence. The functional changes associated with cellular senescence are thought to contribute to age-related vascular disorders. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been discussed in terms of beneficial or harmful effects for aging-related diseases. However, the detailed functional mechanisms of AMPK are largely unclear. An aging model was established by stimulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) with adriamycin. Adriamycin progressively increased the mRNA and protein expressions of AMPK. The phosphorylation levels of LKB1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the upstream and downstream of AMPK, were dramatically increased by adriamycin stimulation. The expressions of p53 and p21, which contribute to vascular senescence, were also increased. Inhibition of AMPK diminished senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, and restored VSMC proliferation. Cytosolic translocation of LKB1 by adriamycin could be a mechanism for AMPK activation in senescence. Furthermore, p53 siRNA and p21 siRNA transfection attenuated adriamycin-induced SA-{beta}-gal staining. These results suggest that LKB1 dependent AMPK activation elicits VSMC senescence and p53-p21 pathway is a mediator of LKB1/AMPK-induced senescence.

  9. Nucleolus association of chromosomal domains is largely maintained in cellular senescence despite massive nuclear reorganisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dillinger

    Full Text Available Mammalian chromosomes are organized in structural and functional domains of 0.1-10 Mb, which are characterized by high self-association frequencies in the nuclear space and different contact probabilities with nuclear sub-compartments. They exhibit distinct chromatin modification patterns, gene expression levels and replication timing. Recently, nucleolus-associated chromosomal domains (NADs have been discovered, yet their precise genomic organization and dynamics are still largely unknown. Here, we use nucleolus genomics and single-cell experiments to address these questions in human embryonic fibroblasts during replicative senescence. Genome-wide mapping reveals 1,646 NADs in proliferating cells, which cover about 38% of the annotated human genome. They are mainly heterochromatic and correlate with late replicating loci. Using Hi-C data analysis, we show that interactions of NADs dominate interphase chromosome contacts in the 10-50 Mb distance range. Interestingly, only minute changes in nucleolar association are observed upon senescence. These spatial rearrangements in subdomains smaller than 100 kb are accompanied with local transcriptional changes. In contrast, large centromeric and pericentromeric satellite repeat clusters extensively dissociate from nucleoli in senescent cells. Accordingly, H3K9me3-marked heterochromatin gets remodelled at the perinucleolar space as revealed by immunofluorescence analyses. Collectively, this study identifies connections between the nucleolus, 3D genome structure, and cellular aging at the level of interphase chromosome organization.

  10. Overexpression of KLF4 promotes cell senescence through microRNA-203-survivin-p21 pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Ju; Xue, Liyan; Zhang, Guo; Hu, Chenfei; Wang, Zaozao; He, Shun; Chen, Lechuang; Ma, Kai; Liu, Xianghe; Zhao, Yahui; Lv, Ning; Liang, Shufang; Zhu, Hongxia; Xu, Ningzhi

    2016-01-01

    Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor and functions as a tumor suppressor or tumor promoter in different cancer types. KLF4 regulates many gene expression, thus affects the process of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Recently, KLF4 was reported to induce senescence during the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, but the exact mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we constructed two doxycycline-inducing KLF4 cell models, and demonstrated overexpression of KLF4 could promote cell senescence, detected by senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity assay. Then we confirmed that p21, a key effector of senescence, was directly induced by KLF4. KLF4 could also inhibit survivin, which could indirectly induce p21. By miRNA microarray, we found a series of miRNAs regulated by KLF4 and involved in senescence. We demonstrated that KLF4 could upregulate miR-203, and miR-203 contributed to senescence through miR-203-survivin-p21 pathway. Our results suggest that KLF4 could promote cell senescence through a complex network: miR-203, survivin, and p21, which were all regulated by overexpression of KLF4 and contributed to cell senescence. PMID:27531889

  11. Olive baboons: a non-human primate model for testing dengue virus type 2 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Iris; Gil, Lázaro; Castro, Jorge; Odoyo, Damián; Hitler, Rikoi; Munene, Elephas; Romero, Yaremis; Ochola, Lucy; Cosme, Karelia; Kariuki, Thomas; Guillén, Gerardo; Hermida, Lisset

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the use of a non-human primate, the olive baboon (Papio anubis), as a model of dengue infection. Olive baboons closely resemble humans genetically and physiologically and have been used extensively for assessing novel vaccine formulations. Two doses of dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) were tested in baboons: 10(3) and 10(4) pfu. Similarly, African green monkeys received the same quantity of virus and acted as positive controls. Following exposure, high levels of viremia were detected in both animal species. There was a trend to detect more days of viremia and more homogeneous viral titers in animals receiving the low viral dose. In addition, baboons infected with the virus generally exhibited positive virus isolation 1 day later than African green monkeys. Humoral responses consisting of antiviral and neutralizing antibodies were detected in all animals after infection. We conclude that baboons provide an alternative non-human primate species for experimental DENV-2 infection and we recommend their use for further tests of vaccines, administering the lowest dose assayed: 10(3) pfu. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of Cell Senescence in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krtolica, Ana

    2000-01-01

    .... Here, we report that both mouse and human immortal pre-malignant breast epithelial cell lines increase 2 to 5 times their proliferation in the presence of senescent, compared to presenescent, human fibroblasts...

  13. Role of Cell Senescence in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krtolica, Ana

    1999-01-01

    .... Here, we report that both mouse and human immortal pre-malignant breast epithelial cell lines show increased proliferation in the presence of senescent, compared to presenescent, human fibroblasts...

  14. Cellular senescence in aging and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Wei Seong; Brittberg, Mats; Farr, Jack; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Gomoll, Andreas H; Hui, James Hoi Po; Richardson, James B; Roberts, Sally; Spector, Myron

    2016-12-01

    - It is well accepted that age is an important contributing factor to poor cartilage repair following injury, and to the development of osteoarthritis. Cellular senescence, the loss of the ability of cells to divide, has been noted as the major factor contributing to age-related changes in cartilage homeostasis, function, and response to injury. The underlying mechanisms of cellular senescence, while not fully understood, have been associated with telomere erosion, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of cellular senescence, and the associated biological challenges in cartilage repair. In addition, we present novel strategies for modulation of cellular senescence that may help to improve cartilage regeneration in an aging population.

  15. Limited role of murine ATM in oncogene-induced senescence and p53-dependent tumor suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejo Efeyan

    Full Text Available Recent studies in human fibroblasts have provided a new general paradigm of tumor suppression according to which oncogenic signaling produces DNA damage and this, in turn, results in ATM/p53-dependent cellular senescence. Here, we have tested this model in a variety of murine experimental systems. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras in murine fibroblasts efficiently induced senescence but this occurred in the absence of detectable DNA damage signaling, thus suggesting a fundamental difference between human and murine cells. Moreover, lung adenomas initiated by endogenous levels of oncogenic K-Ras presented abundant senescent cells, but undetectable DNA damage signaling. Accordingly, K-Ras-driven adenomas were also senescent in Atm-null mice, and the tumorigenic progression of these lesions was only modestly accelerated by Atm-deficiency. Finally, we have examined chemically-induced fibrosarcomas, which possess a persistently activated DNA damage response and are highly sensitive to the activity of p53. We found that the absence of Atm favored genomic instability in the resulting tumors, but did not affect the persistent DNA damage response and did not impair p53-dependent tumor suppression. All together, we conclude that oncogene-induced senescence in mice may occur in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Regarding murine Atm, our data suggest that it plays a minor role in oncogene-induced senescence or in p53-dependent tumor suppression, being its tumor suppressive activity probably limited to the maintenance of genomic stability.

  16. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  17. Therapy-induced senescence in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Jonathan A; Desotelle, Joshua A; Wilding, George; Jarrard, David F

    2010-10-20

    Cellular senescence is a response to nonlethal stress that results in persistent cytostasis with a distinct morphological and biochemical phenotype. The senescence phenotype, detected in tumors through the expression of mRNA and protein markers, can be generated in cancer cells lacking functional p53 and retinoblastoma protein. Current research suggests that therapy-induced senescence (TIS) represents a novel functional target that may improve cancer therapy. TIS can be induced in immortal and transformed cancer cells by selected anticancer compounds or radiation, and accumulating data indicate that TIS may produce reduced toxicity-related side effects and increased tumor-specific immune activity. This review examines the current status of TIS-regulated mechanisms, agents, and senescence biomarkers with the goal of encouraging further development of this approach to cancer therapy. Remaining hurdles include the lack of efficient senescence-inducing agents and incomplete biological data on tumor response. The identification of additional compounds and other targeted approaches to senescence induction will further the development of TIS in the clinical treatment of cancer.

  18. Cellular senescence and the aging brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinta, Shankar J; Woods, Georgia; Rane, Anand; Demaria, Marco; Campisi, Judith; Andersen, Julie K

    2015-08-01

    Cellular senescence is a potent anti-cancer mechanism that arrests the proliferation of mitotically competent cells to prevent malignant transformation. Senescent cells accumulate with age in a variety of human and mouse tissues where they express a complex 'senescence-associated secretory phenotype' (SASP). The SASP includes many pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and proteases that have the potential to cause or exacerbate age-related pathology, both degenerative and hyperplastic. While cellular senescence in peripheral tissues has recently been linked to a number of age-related pathologies, its involvement in brain aging is just beginning to be explored. Recent data generated by several laboratories suggest that both aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases are accompanied by an increase in SASP-expressing senescent cells of non-neuronal origin in the brain. Moreover, this increase correlates with neurodegeneration. Senescent cells in the brain could therefore constitute novel therapeutic targets for treating age-related neuropathologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Ian J.; Reyes, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Elucidation of the process of DNA replication in mitochondria is in its infancy. For many years, maintenance of the mitochondrial genome was regarded as greatly simplified compared to the nucleus. Mammalian mitochondria were reported to lack all DNA repair systems, to eschew DNA recombination, and to possess but a single DNA polymerase, polymerase γ. Polγ was said to replicate mitochondrial DNA exclusively via one mechanism, involving only two priming events and a handful of proteins. In this “strand-displacement model,” leading strand DNA synthesis begins at a specific site and advances approximately two-thirds of the way around the molecule before DNA synthesis is initiated on the “lagging” strand. Although the displaced strand was long-held to be coated with protein, RNA has more recently been proposed in its place. Furthermore, mitochondrial DNA molecules with all the features of products of conventional bidirectional replication have been documented, suggesting that the process and regulation of replication in mitochondria is complex, as befits a genome that is a core factor in human health and longevity. PMID:23143808

  20. Perturbation of Ribosome Biogenesis Drives Cells into Senescence through 5S RNP-Mediated p53 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuho Nishimura

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP complex, consisting of RPL11, RPL5, and 5S rRNA, is implicated in p53 regulation under ribotoxic stress. Here, we show that the 5S RNP contributes to p53 activation and promotes cellular senescence in response to oncogenic or replicative stress. Oncogenic stress accelerates rRNA transcription and replicative stress delays rRNA processing, resulting in RPL11 and RPL5 accumulation in the ribosome-free fraction, where they bind MDM2. Experimental upregulation of rRNA transcription or downregulation of rRNA processing, mimicking the nucleolus under oncogenic or replicative stress, respectively, also induces RPL11-mediated p53 activation and cellular senescence. We demonstrate that exogenous expression of certain rRNA-processing factors rescues the processing defect, attenuates p53 accumulation, and increases replicative lifespan. To summarize, the nucleolar-5S RNP-p53 pathway functions as a senescence inducer in response to oncogenic and replicative stresses.

  1. A discontinuous RNA platform mediates RNA virus replication: building an integrated model for RNA-based regulation of viral processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plus-strand RNA viruses contain RNA elements within their genomes that mediate a variety of fundamental viral processes. The traditional view of these elements is that of local RNA structures. This perspective, however, is changing due to increasing discoveries of functional viral RNA elements that are formed by long-range RNA-RNA interactions, often spanning thousands of nucleotides. The plus-strand RNA genomes of tombusviruses exemplify this concept by possessing different long-range RNA-RNA interactions that regulate both viral translation and transcription. Here we report that a third fundamental tombusvirus process, viral genome replication, requires a long-range RNA-based interaction spanning approximately 3000 nts. In vivo and in vitro analyses suggest that the discontinuous RNA platform formed by the interaction facilitates efficient assembly of the viral RNA replicase. This finding has allowed us to build an integrated model for the role of global RNA structure in regulating the reproduction of a eukaryotic RNA virus, and the insights gained have extended our understanding of the multifunctional nature of viral RNA genomes.

  2. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-01-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247–51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington–DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered. (paper)

  3. Optimal therapies of a virus replication model with pharmacological delays based on reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yongzhen; Li, Changguo; Liang, Xiyin

    2017-11-01

    A short delay in the pharmacological effect on account of the time required for drug absorption, distribution, and penetration into target cells after application of any anti-viral drug, is defined by the pharmacological delay (Herz et al 1996 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 93 7247-51). In this paper, a virus replication model with Beddington-DeAngelis incidence rate and the pharmacological and intracellular delays is presented to describe the treatment to cure the virus infection. The optimal controls represent the efficiency of reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors in suppressing viral production and prohibiting new infections. Due to the fact that both the control and state variables contain delays, we derive a necessary conditions for our optimal problem. Based on these results, numerical simulations are implemented not only to show the optimal therapeutic schedules for different infection and release rates, but also to compare the effective of three treatment programs. Furthermore, comparison of therapeutic effects under different maximum tolerable dosages is shown. Our research indicates that (1) the proper and specific treatment program should be determined according to the infection rates of different virus particles; (2) the optimal combined drug treatment is the most efficient; (3) the appropriate proportion of medicament must be formulated during the therapy due to the non-monotonic relationship between maximum tolerable dosages and therapeutic effects; (4) the therapeutic effect is advantageous when the pharmacological delay is considered.

  4. Dialectic Antidotes to Critics of the Technology Acceptance Model: Conceptual, Methodological, and Replication Treatments for Behavioural Modelling in Technology-Mediated Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weng Marc Lim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The technology acceptance model (TAM is a prominent and parsimonious conceptual lens that is often applied for behavioural modelling in technology-mediated environments. However, TAM has received a great deal of criticism in recent years. This article aims to address some of the most pertinent issues confronting TAM through a rejoinder that offers dialectic antidotes—in the form of conceptual, methodological, and replication treatments—to support the continued use of TAM to understand the peculiarities of user interactions with technology in technology-mediated environments. In doing so, this article offers a useful response to a common but often inadequately answered question about how TAM can continue to be relevant for behavioural modelling in contemporary technology-mediated environments.

  5. The Biochemistry of Human Senescence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and mice and proceeding through cows, elephants and man, the resulting curve is almost perfectly matched by how well each animal's DNA can repair itself. Human DNA has the highest capability to repair itself [2]. A second evidence of DNA damage in the ageing process comes from experiments on replicative ageing.

  6. The Identification of Senescence-Specific Genes during the Induction of Senescence in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Schwarze

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Classic mechanisms of tumor response to chemotherapy include apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe. Recent studies have suggested that cellular senescence, a terminal proliferation arrest seen in vitro, may be invoked during the exposure of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. To identify markers associated specifically with the cellular senescence phenotype, we utilized expression data from cDNA microarray experiments identifying transcripts whose expression levels increased as human prostate epithelial cells progressed to senescence. When screened against other growth-inhibitory conditions, including quiescence, apoptosis, many of these transcripts were also upregulated, indicating that similar pathways occur between apoptosis, senescence. A senescent-like phenotype was then induced in several prostate cancer cell lines using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, doxorubicin, or Docetaxel. Treatment with these agents resulted in a significant increase in the induction of senescence-specific genes when compared to nonsenescent conditions. The performance of the panel was improved with fluorescence-activated cell sorting using PKH26 to isolate nonproliferating, viable, drug-treated populations, indicating that a heterogeneous response occurs with chemotherapy. We have defined an RNA-based gene panel that characterizes the senescent phenotype induced in cancer cells by drug treatment. These data also indicate that a panel of genes, rather than one marker, needs to be utilized to identify senescence.

  7. Is senescence-associated β-galactosidase a marker of neuronal senescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechota, Malgorzata; Sunderland, Piotr; Wysocka, Adrianna; Nalberczak, Maria; Sliwinska, Malgorzata A; Radwanska, Kasia; Sikora, Ewa

    2016-12-06

    One of the features of cellular senescence is the activity of senescence-associated- β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). The main purpose of this study was to evaluate this marker of senescence in aging neurons. We found that cortical neurons exhibited noticeable SA-β-gal activity quite early in culture. Many SA-β-gal-positive neurons were negative for another canonical marker of senescence, namely, double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). Moreover, DDR signalling triggered by low doses of doxorubicin did not accelerate the appearance of neuronal SA-β-gal. In vivo, we observed pronounced induction of SA-β-gal activity in the hippocampus of 24-month-old mice, which is consistent with previous findings and supports the view that at this advanced age neurons developed a senescence-like phenotype. Surprisingly however, relatively high SA-β-gal activity, probably unrelated to the senescence process, was also observed in much younger, 3-month-old mice. In conclusion, we propose that SA-β-gal activity in neurons cannot be attributed uniquely to cell senescence either in vitro or in vivo. Additionally, we showed induction of REST protein in aging neurons in long-term culture and we propose that REST could be a marker of neuronal senescence in vitro.

  8. Comparative Effects of Biodynes, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction, and Tocopherol in Enhancing Collagen Synthesis and Inhibiting Collagen Degradation in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence Model of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jam, Faidruz Azura; Ismail, Zahariah; Wan Ngah, Wan Zurinah

    2013-01-01

    Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF), and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P < 0.05). Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P < 0.05) with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P < 0.05). These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging. PMID:24396567

  9. Comparative Effects of Biodynes, Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction, and Tocopherol in Enhancing Collagen Synthesis and Inhibiting Collagen Degradation in Stress-Induced Premature Senescence Model of Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Makpol

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodynes, tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF, and tocopherol have shown antiaging properties. However, the combined effects of these compounds on skin aging are yet to be investigated. This study aimed to elucidate the skin aging effects of biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol on stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS model of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs by determining the expression of collagen and MMPs at gene and protein levels. Primary HDFs were treated with biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 exposure. The expression of COL1A1, COL3A1, MMP1, MMP2, MMP3, and MMP9 genes was determined by qRT-PCR. Type I and type III procollagen proteins were measured by Western blotting while the activities of MMPs were quantified by fluorometric Sensolyte MMP Kit. Our results showed that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol upregulated collagen genes and downregulated MMP genes (P<0.05. Type I procollagen and type III procollagen protein levels were significantly increased in response to biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol treatment (P<0.05 with reduction in MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 activities (P<0.05. These findings indicated that biodynes, TRF, and tocopherol effectively enhanced collagen synthesis and inhibited collagen degradation and therefore may protect the skin from aging.

  10. Intermittent Stem Cell Cycling Balances Self-Renewal and Senescence of the C. elegans Germ Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Cinquin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-renewing organs often experience a decline in function in the course of aging. It is unclear whether chronological age or external factors control this decline, or whether it is driven by stem cell self-renewal-for example, because cycling cells exhaust their replicative capacity and become senescent. Here we assay the relationship between stem cell cycling and senescence in the Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive system, defining this senescence as the progressive decline in "reproductive capacity," i.e. in the number of progeny that can be produced until cessation of reproduction. We show that stem cell cycling diminishes remaining reproductive capacity, at least in part through the DNA damage response. Paradoxically, gonads kept under conditions that preclude reproduction keep cycling and producing cells that undergo apoptosis or are laid as unfertilized gametes, thus squandering reproductive capacity. We show that continued activity is in fact beneficial inasmuch as gonads that are active when reproduction is initiated have more sustained early progeny production. Intriguingly, continued cycling is intermittent-gonads switch between active and dormant states-and in all likelihood stochastic. Other organs face tradeoffs whereby stem cell cycling has the beneficial effect of providing freshly-differentiated cells and the detrimental effect of increasing the likelihood of cancer or senescence; stochastic stem cell cycling may allow for a subset of cells to preserve proliferative potential in old age, which may implement a strategy to deal with uncertainty as to the total amount of proliferation to be undergone over an organism's lifespan.

  11. Telomere Dynamics in Immune Senescence and Exhaustion Triggered by Chronic Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Marcia; Nicot, Christophe

    2017-10-05

    The progressive loss of immunological memory during aging correlates with a reduced proliferative capacity and shortened telomeres of T cells. Growing evidence suggests that this phenotype is recapitulated during chronic viral infection. The antigenic volume imposed by persistent and latent viruses exposes the immune system to unique challenges that lead to host T-cell exhaustion, characterized by impaired T-cell functions. These dysfunctional memory T cells lack telomerase, the protein capable of extending and stabilizing chromosome ends, imposing constraints on telomere dynamics. A deleterious consequence of this excessive telomere shortening is the premature induction of replicative senescence of viral-specific CD8+ memory T cells. While senescent cells are unable to expand, they can survive for extended periods of time and are more resistant to apoptotic signals. This review takes a closer look at T-cell exhaustion in chronic viruses known to cause human disease: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B/C/D virus (HBV/HCV/HDV), human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), human papillomavirus (HPV), herpes simplex virus-1/2(HSV-1/2), and Varicella-Zoster virus (VZV). Current literature linking T-cell exhaustion with critical telomere lengths and immune senescence are discussed. The concept that enduring antigen stimulation leads to T-cell exhaustion that favors telomere attrition and a cell fate marked by enhanced T-cell senescence appears to be a common endpoint to chronic viral infections.

  12. Interaction of plant growth regulators and reactive oxygen species to regulate petal senescence in wallflowers (Erysimum linifolium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Faezah Mohd; Mariotti, Lorenzo; Spadafora, Natasha D; Price, Anna M; Picciarelli, Piero; Wagstaff, Carol; Lombardi, Lara; Rogers, Hilary

    2016-04-02

    In many species floral senescence is coordinated by ethylene. Endogenous levels rise, and exogenous application accelerates senescence. Furthermore, floral senescence is often associated with increased reactive oxygen species, and is delayed by exogenously applied cytokinin. However, how these processes are linked remains largely unresolved. Erysimum linifolium (wallflower) provides an excellent model for understanding these interactions due to its easily staged flowers and close taxonomic relationship to Arabidopsis. This has facilitated microarray analysis of gene expression during petal senescence and provided gene markers for following the effects of treatments on different regulatory pathways. In detached Erysimum linifolium (wallflower) flowers ethylene production peaks in open flowers. Furthermore senescence is delayed by treatments with the ethylene signalling inhibitor silver thiosulphate, and accelerated with ethylene released by 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid. Both treatments with exogenous cytokinin, or 6-methyl purine (which is an inhibitor of cytokinin oxidase), delay petal senescence. However, treatment with cytokinin also increases ethylene biosynthesis. Despite the similar effects on senescence, transcript abundance of gene markers is affected differentially by the treatments. A significant rise in transcript abundance of WLS73 (a putative aminocyclopropanecarboxylate oxidase) was abolished by cytokinin or 6-methyl purine treatments. In contrast, WFSAG12 transcript (a senescence marker) continued to accumulate significantly, albeit at a reduced rate. Silver thiosulphate suppressed the increase in transcript abundance both of WFSAG12 and WLS73. Activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes changed during senescence. Treatments that increased cytokinin levels, or inhibited ethylene action, reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, although auxin levels rose with senescence, treatments that delayed early senescence did not affect

  13. Transcriptional analyses of natural leaf senescence in maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an important biological process that contributes to grain yield in crops. To study the molecular mechanisms underlying natural leaf senescence, we harvested three different developmental ear leaves of maize, mature leaves (ML, early senescent leaves (ESL, and later senescent leaves (LSL, and analyzed transcriptional changes using RNA-sequencing. Three sets of data, ESL vs. ML, LSL vs. ML, and LSL vs. ESL, were compared, respectively. In total, 4,552 genes were identified as differentially expressed. Functional classification placed these genes into 18 categories including protein metabolism, transporters, and signal transduction. At the early stage of leaf senescence, genes involved in aromatic amino acids (AAAs biosynthetic process and transport, cellular polysaccharide biosynthetic process, and the cell wall macromolecule catabolic process, were up-regulated. Whereas, genes involved in amino acid metabolism, transport, apoptosis, and response to stimulus were up-regulated at the late stage of leaf senescence. Further analyses reveals that the transport-related genes at the early stage of leaf senescence potentially take part in enzyme and amino acid transport and the genes upregulated at the late stage are involved in sugar transport, indicating nutrient recycling mainly takes place at the late stage of leaf senescence. Comparison between the data of natural leaf senescence in this study and previously reported data for Arabidopsis implies that the mechanisms of leaf senescence in maize are basically similar to those in Arabidopsis. A comparison of natural and induced leaf senescence in maize was performed. Athough many basic biological processes involved in senescence occur in both types of leaf senescence, 78.07% of differentially expressed genes in natural leaf senescence were not identifiable in induced leaf senescence, suggesting that differences in gene regulatory network may exist between these two leaf senescence

  14. TNFα-senescence initiates a STAT-dependent positive feedback loop, leading to a sustained interferon signature, DNA damage, and cytokine secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandhaya-Pillai, Renuka; Miro-Mur, Francesc; Alijotas-Reig, Jaume; Tchkonia, Tamara; Kirkland, James L.; Schwartz, Simo

    2017-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a cell fate program that entails essentially irreversible proliferative arrest in response to damage signals. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), an important pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by some types of senescent cells, can induce senescence in mouse and human cells. However, downstream signaling pathways linking TNFα-related inflammation to senescence are not fully characterized. Using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a model, we show that TNFα induces permanent growth arrest and increases p21CIP1, p16INK4A, and SA-β-gal, accompanied by persistent DNA damage and ROS production. By gene expression profiling, we identified the crucial involvement of inflammatory and JAK/STAT pathways in TNFα-mediated senescence. We found that TNFα activates a STAT-dependent autocrine loop that sustains cytokine secretion and an interferon signature to lock cells into senescence. Furthermore, we show STAT1/3 activation is necessary for cytokine and ROS production during TNFα-induced senescence. However, inhibition of STAT1/3 did not rescue cells from proliferative arrest, but rather suppressed cell cycle regulatory genes and altered TNFα-induced senescence. Our findings suggest a positive feedback mechanism via the STAT pathway that sustains cytokine production and reveal a reciprocal regulatory role of JAK/STAT in TNFα-mediated senescence. PMID:29176033

  15. A Tripartite Amplification Loop Involving the Transcription Factor WRKY75, Salicylic Acid, and Reactive Oxygen Species Accelerates Leaf Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengru; Li, Zhonghai; Huang, Peixin; Li, Bosheng; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Guo, Hongwei

    2017-11-01

    Leaf senescence is a highly coordinated, complicated process involving the integration of numerous internal and environmental signals. Salicylic acid (SA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are two well-defined inducers of leaf senescence whose contents progressively and interdependently increase during leaf senescence via an unknown mechanism. Here, we characterized the transcription factor WRKY75 as a positive regulator of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. Knockdown or knockout of WRKY75 delayed age-dependent leaf senescence, while overexpression of WRKY75 accelerated this process. WRKY75 transcription is induced by age, SA, H 2 O 2 , and multiple plant hormones. Meanwhile, WRKY75 promotes SA production by inducing the transcription of SA INDUCTION-DEFICIENT2 ( SID2 ) and suppresses H 2 O 2 scavenging, partly by repressing the transcription of CATALASE2 ( CAT2 ). Genetic analysis revealed that the mutation of SID2 or an increase in catalase activity rescued the precocious leaf senescence phenotype evoked by WRKY75 overexpression. Based on these results, we propose a tripartite amplification loop model in which WRKY75, SA, and ROS undergo a gradual but self-sustained rise driven by three interlinking positive feedback loops. This tripartite amplification loop provides a molecular framework connecting upstream signals, such as age and plant hormones, to the downstream regulatory network executed by SA- and H 2 O 2 -responsive transcription factors during leaf senescence. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  16. Mitochondrial oxidative stress caused by Sod2 deficiency promotes cellular senescence and aging phenotypes in the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velarde, Michael C; Flynn, James M; Day, Nicholas U; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence arrests the proliferation of mammalian cells at risk for neoplastic transformation, and is also associated with aging. However, the factors that cause cellular senescence during aging are unclear. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to cause cellular senescence in culture, and accumulated molecular damage due to mitochondrial ROS has long been thought to drive aging phenotypesin vivo. Here, we test the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative stress can promote cellular senescence in vivo and contribute to aging phenotypes in vivo, specifically in the skin. We show that the number of senescent cells, as well as impaired mitochondrial (complex II) activity increase in naturally aged mouse skin. Using a mouse model of genetic Sod2 deficiency, we show that failure to express this important mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme also impairs mitochondrial complex II activity, causes nuclear DNA damage, and induces cellular senescence but not apoptosis in the epidermis. Sod2 deficiency also reduced the number of cells and thickness of the epidermis, while increasing terminal differentiation. Our results support the idea that mitochondrial oxidative stress and cellular senescence contribute to aging skin phenotypes in vivo.

  17. CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 Inhibits Leaf Senescence in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Leaf senescence is an integral part of plant development, and the timing and progressing rate of senescence could substantially affect the yield and quality of crops. It has been known that a circadian rhythm synchronized with external environmental cues is critical for the optimal coordination of various physiological and metabolic processes. However, the reciprocal interactions between the circadian clock and leaf senescence in plants remain unknown. Here, through measuring the physiological and molecular senescence related markers of several circadian components mutants, we found that CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 inhibits leaf senescence. Further molecular and genetic studies revealed that CCA1 directly activates GLK2 and suppresses ORE1 expression to counteract leaf senescence. As plants age, the expression and periodic amplitude of CCA1 declines and thus weakens the inhibition of senescence. Our findings reveal an age-dependent circadian clock component of the process of leaf senescence.

  18. Senescence-associated inflammatory responses: aging and cancer perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasry, Audrey; Ben-Neriah, Yinon

    2015-04-01

    Senescent cells, albeit not proliferating, are metabolically and transcriptionally active, thereby capable of affecting their microenvironment, notably via the production of inflammatory mediators. These mediators maintain and propagate the senescence process to neighboring cells, and then recruit immune cells for clearing senescent cells. Among the inflammatory cues are molecules with pronounced tumor-controlling properties, both growth and invasion factors and inhibitory factors, working directly or via recruited immune cells. These senescence-inflammatory effects also prevail within tumors, mediated by the senescent tumor cells and the senescent tumor stroma. Here, we review the course and impact of senescence-associated inflammatory responses in aging and cancer. We propose that controlling senescence-associated inflammation by targeting specific inflammatory mediators may have a beneficial therapeutic effect in treatment of cancer and aging-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Epigenetic Basis of Cellular Senescence and Its Implications in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacarelli, Timothy; Liu, Pingyu; Zhang, Rugang

    2017-11-24

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressive response that has become recognized as a major contributor of tissue aging. Senescent cells undergo a stable proliferative arrest that protects against neoplastic transformation, but acquire a secretory phenotype that has long-term deleterious effects. Studies are still unraveling the effector mechanisms that underlie these senescence responses with the goal to identify therapeutic interventions. Such effector mechanisms have been linked to the dramatic remodeling in the epigenetic and chromatin landscape that accompany cellular senescence. We discuss these senescence-associated epigenetic changes and their impact on the senescence phenotypes, notably the proliferative arrest and senescence associated secretory phenotype (SASP). We also explore possible epigenetic targets to suppress the deleterious effects of senescent cells that contribute towards aging.

  20. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  1. Modulation of the Senescence-Associated Inflammatory Phenotype in Human Fibroblasts by Olive Phenols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Menicacci

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Senescent cells display an increase in the secretion of growth factors, inflammatory cytokines and proteolytic enzymes, termed the “senescence-associated-secretory-phenotype” (SASP, playing a major role in many age-related diseases. The phenolic compounds present in extra-virgin olive oil are inhibitors of oxidative damage and have been reported to play a protective role in inflammation-related diseases. Particularly, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are the most abundant and more extensively studied. Pre-senescent human lung (MRC5 and neonatal human dermal (NHDF fibroblasts were used as cellular model to evaluate the effect of chronic (4–6 weeks treatment with 1 μM hydroxytyrosol (HT or 10 μM oleuropein aglycone (OLE on senescence/inflammation markers. Both phenols were effective in reducing β-galactosidase-positive cell number and p16 protein expression. In addition, senescence/inflammation markers such as IL-6 and metalloprotease secretion, and Ciclooxigenase type 2 (COX-2 and α-smooth-actin levels were reduced by phenol treatments. In NHDF, COX-2 expression, Nuclear Factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB protein level and nuclear localization were augmented with culture senescence and decreased by OLE and HT treatment. Furthermore, the inflammatory effect of Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα exposure was almost completely abolished in OLE- and HT-pre-treated NHDF. Thus, the modulation of the senescence-associated inflammatory phenotype might be an important mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of olive oil phenols.

  2. Potential for Low-Pathogenic Avian H7 Influenza A Viruses To Replicate and Cause Disease in a Mammalian Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Mark; Koçer, Zeynep A; Poulson, Rebecca L; Gabbard, Jon D; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Jones, Cheryl A; Friedman, Kimberly; Seiler, Jon; Danner, Angela; Kercher, Lisa; McBride, Ryan; Paulson, James C; Wentworth, David E; Krauss, Scott; Tompkins, Stephen M; Stallknecht, David E; Webster, Robert G

    2017-02-01

    H7 subtype influenza A viruses are widely distributed and have been responsible for human infections and numerous outbreaks in poultry with significant impact. Despite this, the disease-causing potential of the precursor low-pathogenic (LP) H7 viruses from the wild bird reservoir has not been investigated. Our objective was to assess the disease-causing potential of 30 LP H7 viruses isolated from wild avian species in the United States and Canada using the DBA/2J mouse model. Without prior mammalian adaptation, the majority of viruses, 27 (90%), caused mortality in mice. Of these, 17 (56.7%) caused 100% mortality and 24 were of pathogenicity similar to that of A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9), which is highly pathogenic in mice. Viruses of duck origin were more pathogenic than those of shorebird origin, as 13 of 18 (72.2%) duck origin viruses caused 100% mortality while 4 of 12 (33.3%) shorebird origin viruses caused 100% mortality, despite there being no difference in mean lung viral titers between the groups. Replication beyond the respiratory tract was also evident, particularly in the heart and brain. Of the 16 viruses studied for fecal shedding, 11 were detected in fecal samples. These viruses exhibited a strong preference for avian-type α2,3-linked sialic acids; however, binding to mammalian-type α2,6-linked sialic acids was also detected. These findings indicate that LP avian H7 influenza A viruses are able to infect and cause disease in mammals without prior adaptation and therefore pose a potential public health risk. Low-pathogenic (LP) avian H7 influenza A viruses are widely distributed in the avian reservoir and are the precursors of numerous outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses in commercial poultry farms. However, unlike highly pathogenic H7 viruses, the disease-causing potential of LP H7 viruses from the wild bird reservoir has not been investigated. To address this, we studied 30 LP avian H7 viruses isolated from wild avian species in the

  3. The benefits of aging: cellular senescence in normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garijo, Ainhoa; Steller, Herman

    2014-01-13

    Senescence is a form of cellular aging that limits the proliferative capacity of cells. Senescence can be triggered by different stress stimuli, such as DNA damage or oncogene activation. Two recent articles published in Cell have uncovered an unexpected role for cellular senescence during development, as a process that contributes to remodeling and patterning of the embryo. These findings are exciting and have important implications for the understanding of normal developmental and the evolutionary origin of senescence.

  4. Establishment of a mouse melanoma model system for the efficient infection and replication of human adenovirus type 5-based oncolytic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sujin; Kim, Joo-Hang; Kim, So Young; Kang, Dongxu; Je, Suyeon; Song, Jae J

    2014-10-24

    Due to poor adenoviral infectivity and replication in mouse tumor cell types compared with human tumor cell types, use of human-type adenoviral vectors in mouse animal model systems was limited. Here, we demonstrate enhanced infectivity and productive replication of adenovirus in mouse melanoma cells following introduction of both the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and E1B-55K genes. Introduction of CAR into B16BL6 or B16F10 cells increased the infectivity of GFP-expressing adenovirus; however, viral replication was unaffected. We demonstrated a dramatic increase of adenoviral replication (up to 100-fold) in mouse cells via E1B-55K expression and subsequent viral spreading in mouse tissue. These results reveal for the first time that human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5)-based oncolytic virus can be applied to immunocompetent mouse with the introduction of CAR and E1B-55K to syngenic mouse cell line. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drying Without Senescence in Resurrection Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Ashleigh Griffiths

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research into extreme drought tolerance in resurrection plants using species such as Craterostigma plantagineum, Craterostigma wilmsii, Xerophyta humilis, Tortula ruralis and Sporobolus stapfianus has provided some insight into the desiccation tolerance mechanisms utilized by these plants to allow them to persist under extremely adverse environmental conditions. Some of the mechanisms used to ensure cellular preservation during severe dehydration appear to be peculiar to resurrection plants. Apart from the ability to preserve vital cellular components during drying and rehydration, such mechanisms include the ability to down-regulate growth-related metabolism rapidly in response to changes in water availability, and the ability to inhibit dehydration-induced senescence programs enabling reconstitution of photosynthetic capacity quickly following a rainfall event. Currently, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that resurrection plants employ to avoid undergoing drought-related senescence during the desiccation process. To survive desiccation, dehydration in the perennial resurrection grass S. stapfianus must proceed slowly over a period of 7 days or more. Leaves detached from the plant before 60% relative water content (RWC is attained are desiccation-sensitive indicating that desiccation tolerance is conferred in vegetative tissue of S. stapfianus when the leaf RWC has declined to 60%. Whilst some older leaves remaining attached to the plant during dehydration will senesce, suggesting dehydration-induced senescence may be influenced by leaf age or the rate of dehydration in individual leaves, the majority of leaves do not senesce. Rather these leaves dehydrate to air-dryness and revive fully following rehydration. Hence it seems likely that there are genes expressed in younger leaf tissues of resurrection plants that enable suppression of drought-related senescence pathways. As very few studies have directly addressed this

  6. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in the in vitro ovarian stromal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Chuaire-Noack

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A growing biological research field is the cellular senescence, a mechanism that has been associated, under certain circumstances, withmalignant transformation. Given the high incidence of ovarian cancerand its main origin from the ovarian surface epithelium, as well asthe possibility that an epithelial-mesenchymal transition occurs, weevaluated both the in vitro growth of stromal fibroblasts from the ovarian cortex and their β-galactosidase activity at pH 6,enzyme whose expression is considered as a marker of replicativesenescence. Methods: 48 samples of ovarian cortical fibroblasts fromdonors without a history of cancer were serially cultured untilthe end of their replicative life. β-galactosidase activity at pH 6was quantified in each passage by the chemiluminiscent method. Ascontrol, we used ovarian epithelial cell cultures from the samedonors. The enzyme activity was also evaluated in fibroblastspreviously induced to senescence by exposure to hydrogen peroxide.Results: The analysis of the enzyme activity and the replicativecapacity taken together showed that the fibroblast cultures reachedthe senescent state at passages 4-5, as what happened with the control epithelial cells. Fibroblasts induced to senescence showed high variability in the values of enzymatic activity. Conclusions:The similarity between both types of cells in reaching the senescent state deserves to be taken into account in relation to theepithelialmesenchymal transition that has been proposed to explaintheir behavior in the genesis of cancer arising from ovarian surfaceepithelium. Low β-galactosidase activity values at pH 6 would suggestpossible inactivation of the response pathways to oxidative stress.

  7. The WRKY transcription factor family and senescence in switchgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Early aerial senescence in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) can significantly limit biomass yields. WRKY transcription factors that can regulate senescence could be used to reprogram senescence and enhance biomass yields. Methods: All potential WRKY genes present in the version 1.0 of the...

  8. Alkaline protease from senesced leaves of invasive weed Lantana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-17

    Dec 17, 2008 ... food and other biotechnology industries. Endoproteases were also isolated from alfalfa, oat and barley senesced leaves which are involved in the process of protein degradation during foliar senescence (Nieri et al., 1998;. Miller and Huffaker, 1981; Drivdahl and Thimann, 1977,. 1978). Senescing leaves ...

  9. Drying without senescence in resurrection plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Cara A.; Gaff, Donald F.; Neale, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    Research into extreme drought tolerance in resurrection plants using species such as Craterostigma plantagineum, C. wilmsii, Xerophyta humilis, Tortula ruralis, and Sporobolus stapfianus has provided some insight into the desiccation tolerance mechanisms utilized by these plants to allow them to persist under extremely adverse environmental conditions. Some of the mechanisms used to ensure cellular preservation during severe dehydration appear to be peculiar to resurrection plants. Apart from the ability to preserve vital cellular components during drying and rehydration, such mechanisms include the ability to down-regulate growth-related metabolism rapidly in response to changes in water availability, and the ability to inhibit dehydration-induced senescence programs enabling reconstitution of photosynthetic capacity quickly following a rainfall event. Extensive research on the molecular mechanism of leaf senescence in non-resurrection plants has revealed a multi-layered regulatory network operates to control programed cell death pathways. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms that resurrection plants employ to avoid undergoing drought-related senescence during the desiccation process. To survive desiccation, dehydration in the perennial resurrection grass S. stapfianus must proceed slowly over a period of 7 days or more. Leaves detached from the plant before 60% relative water content (RWC) is attained are desiccation-sensitive indicating that desiccation tolerance is conferred in vegetative tissue of S. stapfianus when the leaf RWC has declined to 60%. Whilst some older leaves remaining attached to the plant during dehydration will senesce, suggesting dehydration-induced senescence may be influenced by leaf age or the rate of dehydration in individual leaves, the majority of leaves do not senesce. Rather these leaves dehydrate to air-dryness and revive fully following rehydration. Hence it seems likely that there are genes expressed in

  10. Glutathione Peroxidase 3 Delivered by hiPSC-MSCs Ameliorated Hepatic IR Injury via Inhibition of Hepatic Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiang; Ng, Kevin Tak-Pan; Lian, Qizhou; Li, Chang Xian; Geng, Wei; Ling, Chang Chun; Yeung, Wai Ho; Ma, Yuen Yuen; Liu, Xiao Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Jiang; Yang, Xin Xiang; Lo, Chung Mau; Man, Kwan

    2018-01-01

    Background and Aims: Down-regulation of GPx3 accelerated hepatic senescence, which further caused overwhelming inflammation and severe liver graft injury. MSCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC-MSCs) have been developed as more efficient delivery vehicle with the property of injury tropism. Here, we aimed to explore the suppressive role of GPx3 in hepatic IR injury using novel delivery system of hiPSC-MSCs. Methods: The mice IR injury model with partial hepatectomy was established. The engineered hiPSC-MSCs delivering GPx3 was constructed. All the mice were segregated into three groups. hiPSC-MSC-GPx3, hiPSC-MSC-pCDH (vector control) or PBS were injected via portal vein after reperfusion. Liver injury was evaluated by histological and serological test. Hepatic apoptosis was detected by Tunel staining and remnant liver regeneration was assessed by Ki67 staining. The role of hepatic senescence in liver graft injury was evaluated in rat orthotopic liver transplantation model. The suppressive effect of GPx3 on hepatic senescence was examined in mice IR injury model and confirmed in vitro. Hepatic senescence was detected by SA-β-Gal and P 16/ink4a staining. Results: GPx3 can be successfully delivered by hiPSC-MSCs into liver tissues. Histological examination showed that hiPSC-MSC-GPx3 treatment significantly ameliorated hepatic IR injury post-operation. Significantly lower LDH (891.43±98.45 mU/mL, PIR injury model, hiPSC-MSC-GPx3 significantly suppressed hepatic senescence. In addition, rGPx3 inhibited cellular senescence of liver cells in a dose dependent manner. Four candidate genes (CD44, Nox4, IFNG, SERPERINB2) were identified to be responsible for suppressive effect of GPx3 on hepatic senescence. Conclusion: Engineered hiPSC-MSCs delivering GPx3 ameliorated hepatic IR injury via inhibition of hepatic senescence.

  11. Adiponectin Suppresses UVB-Induced Premature Senescence and hBD2 Overexpression in Human Keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MinJeong Kim

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed that adiponectin can suppress cellular inflammatory signaling pathways. This study aimed to elucidate the effect of adiponectin on the unregulated production of hBD2 in UVB-induced premature senescent keratinocytes. We constructed an in vitro model of premature senescent keratinocytes through repeated exposure to low energy UVB. After repeated low energy UVB exposure, there was significant generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and induction of senescence-associated markers, including senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity and expression of p16INK4a and histone H2AX. In addition, the present clinical study showed higher expression of hBD2 in sun-exposed skin of elderly group, and the overexpression of hBD2 was observed by c-Fos activation in vitro. Adiponectin has the ability to scavenge ROS and consequently inhibit MAPKs and SA-markers in UVB-exposed keratinocytes. An inhibitor study demonstrated that adiponectin downregulated hBD2 mRNA expression through suppression of the AP-1 transcription factor components c-Fos via inactivation of p38 MAPK. Collectively, the dysregulated production of hBD2 by the induction of oxidative stress was attenuated by adiponectin through the suppression of p38 and JNK/SAPK MAPK signaling in UVB-mediated premature senescent inducible conditions. These results suggest the feasibility of adiponectin as an anti-photoaging and anti-inflammatory agent in the skin.

  12. The uptake of apoptotic cells drives Coxiella burnetii replication and macrophage polarization: a model for Q fever endocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Benoit

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with valvulopathy have the highest risk to develop infective endocarditis (IE, although the relationship between valvulopathy and IE is not clearly understood. Q fever endocarditis, an IE due to Coxiella burnetii, is accompanied by immune impairment. Patients with valvulopathy exhibited increased levels of circulating apoptotic leukocytes, as determined by the measurement of active caspases and nucleosome determination. The binding of apoptotic cells to monocytes and macrophages, the hosts of C. burnetii, may be responsible for the immune impairment observed in Q fever endocarditis. Apoptotic lymphocytes (AL increased C. burnetii replication in monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages in a cell-contact dependent manner, as determined by quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence. AL binding induced a M2 program in monocytes and macrophages stimulated with C. burnetii as determined by a cDNA chip containing 440 arrayed sequences and functional tests, but this program was in part different in monocytes and macrophages. While monocytes that had bound AL released high levels of IL-10 and IL-6, low levels of TNF and increased CD14 expression, macrophages that had bound AL released high levels of TGF-beta1 and expressed mannose receptor. The neutralization of IL-10 and TGF-beta1 prevented the replication of C. burnetii due to the binding of AL, suggesting that they were critically involved in bacterial replication. In contrast, the binding of necrotic cells to monocytes and macrophages led to C. burnetii killing and typical M1 polarization. Finally, interferon-gamma corrected the immune deactivation induced by apoptotic cells: it prevented the replication of C. burnetii and re-directed monocytes and macrophages toward a M1 program, which was deleterious for C. burnetii. We suggest that leukocyte apoptosis associated with valvulopathy may be critical for the pathogenesis of Q fever endocarditis by deactivating immune cells and creating a

  13. Senescence in the aging process [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard GA Faragher

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ‘senescent’ cells has long been proposed to act as an ageing mechanism. These cells display a radically altered transcriptome and degenerative phenotype compared with their growing counterparts. Tremendous progress has been made in recent years both in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling entry into the senescent state and in the direct demonstration that senescent cells act as causal agents of mammalian ageing. The challenges now are to gain a better understanding of how the senescent cell phenotype varies between different individuals and tissues, discover how senescence predisposes to organismal frailty, and develop mechanisms by which the deleterious effects of senescent cells can be ameliorated.

  14. Senescence-associated heterochromatin foci are dispensable for cellular senescence, occur in a cell type- and insult-dependent manner, and follow expression of p16 (ink4a)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Košař, Martin; Bartkova, J.; Hubáčková, Soňa; Hodný, Zdeněk; Lukas, J.; Bartek, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2011), s. 457-468 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/08/1418; GA ČR GA301/08/0353 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : genotoxic and replicative stress * senescence-associated heterochromatin foci * DNA damage response Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.359, year: 2011

  15. Senescent Nephropathy: The New Renal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Aiello

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a condition characterized by progressive and irreversible deterioration of renal function due to the reduction of nephron mass for a period of at least three months. The prevalence of CKD is roughly 10% in the general population but increases with age, affecting more than one-third of people older than 65. Frailty is a condition usually found in elderly people, characterized by weakness, motility, and balance issues, with a declined ability to resist stressors leading to increased risks of adverse health outcomes including falls, fracture, hospitalization, institutionalization, disability, dependence, dementia, poor quality of life, and death. There is interdependence between CKD and normal ageing whereby CKD makes ageing more accelerated and pronounced (senescence, whereas senescence accelerates chronic nephropathy’s progression. Frailty status catalyzes this spiral, with renal and systemic consequences, phenomenon which can be named senescent nephropathy. In conclusion, senescent nephropathy is a new renal syndrome that should be taken into account, and we must try to handle its appearance and progression not only by applying nephron prevention measurements but also by diagnosis and treating frailty in the CKD population.

  16. Moderate-dose Regular Lifelong Alcohol Intake Changes the Intestinal Flora, Protects against Aging, and Keeps Spatial Memory in the Senescence-accelerated Mouse Prone 8 (SAMP8) Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Chikako; Oki, Yasuhiro; Mitani, Yutaka; Tsuchiya, Youichi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    Heavy and long-term alcohol consumption increase the risk of alcohol-related diseases. Epidemiological studies show moderate drinking reduces the risk of mortality, cardiovascular diseases, and brain infarction in the J-shaped or U-shaped curve effect. However, why moderate drinkers may be healthy and non-drinkers may be ill in diverse populations remains controversial. Herein, we examined the relationship between moderate/lifelong alcohol intake and aging, especially aging-related cognitive functions in senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) model.  Methods: SAMP8 model (5-week-old, male, n = 36), a model of age-related cognitive deficit, were group-housed (n = 6/cage) and provided free access to water (water group, n = 18) or 1% ethanol (EtOH group, n = 18, intake started when mice were 9 weeks old). The object recognition test (ORT) and object location test (OLT) were used to evaluate cognitive functions. The intestinal flora at the age of 87 weeks was analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP).  The lifespan of the EtOH-group mice was about 4 weeks longer than that of the water-group mice. In the EtOH group, spatial recognition impairment, assessed by OLT, was observed later (age, 73 weeks) than that in the water group (age, 52 weeks). The spinal curvature and skin conditions progressed significantly slower in the EtOH group than in the water group. Moreover, diarrhea symptoms only appeared in the water group, at the age of 82 weeks. The T-RFLP analysis of the intestinal flora indicated higher Lactobacillales order and lower Clostridium cluster XI in the EtOH group than in the water group, although those were extremely high in some mice close to death in both groups. Water-group mice with diarrhea presented significantly higher Clostridium cluster XI than did those without diarrhea (P = 0.017).  Moderate alcohol intake changes intestinal flora and positively affects aging of SAMP8 model.

  17. Replication stress in Mammalian cells and its consequences for mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelot, Camille; Magdalou, Indiana; Lopez, Bernard S

    2015-05-22

    The faithful transmission of genetic information to daughter cells is central to maintaining genomic stability and relies on the accurate and complete duplication of genetic material during each cell cycle. However, the genome is routinely exposed to endogenous and exogenous stresses that can impede the progression of replication. Such replication stress can be an early cause of cancer or initiate senescence. Replication stress, which primarily occurs during S phase, results in consequences during mitosis, jeopardizing chromosome segregation and, in turn, genomic stability. The traces of replication stress can be detected in the daughter cells during G1 phase. Alterations in mitosis occur in two types: 1) local alterations that correspond to breaks, rearrangements, intertwined DNA molecules or non-separated sister chromatids that are confined to the region of the replication dysfunction; 2) genome-wide chromosome segregation resulting from centrosome amplification (although centrosomes do not contain DNA), which amplifies the local replication stress to the entire genome. Here, we discuss the endogenous causes of replication perturbations, the mechanisms of replication fork restart and the consequences for mitosis, chromosome segregation and genomic stability.

  18. Aberrant mTOR activation in senescence and aging: A mitochondrial stress response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacarelli, Timothy; Azar, Ashley; Sell, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Unexpected activation of mTOR signaling, measured by ribosomal S6 phosphorylation or ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) activity, has been reported in aging-related settings. Evidence of elevated mTOR activity has been reported in the heart and muscle tissue in aged mice and humans, mouse models of progeria, and senescent human fibroblasts. We explore these reports and the possibility that activation of the mTOR/p70S6K kinase pathway may represent a ROS-mediated response to mitochondrial stress leading to the activation of senescence. This activation is a hallmark of both aged tissue and senescent human cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of NAP gene to manipulate leaf senescence in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Susheng; Guo, Yongfeng

    2013-04-16

    The present invention discloses transgenic plants having an altered level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-transgenic plant, where the transgenic plants display an altered leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-transgenic plant, as well as mutant plants comprising an inactivated NAP gene, where mutant plants display a delayed leaf senescence phenotype compared to that of a non-mutant plant. The present invention also discloses methods for delaying leaf senescence in a plant, as well as methods of making a mutant plant having a decreased level of NAP protein compared to that of a non-mutant plant, where the mutant plant displays a delayed leaf senescence phenotype relative to a non-mutant plant. Methods for causing precocious leaf senescence or promoting leaf senescence in a plant are also disclosed. Also disclosed are methods of identifying a candidate plant suitable for breeding that displays a delayed leaf senescence and/or enhanced yield phenotype.

  20. Molecular bases of cellular senescence: Hayflick phenomenon 50 years later

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Sosińska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal human somatic cells have strictly limited proliferative capacity and reach a state of senescence when it becomes exhausted. It is believed that senescence is a response to extensive and irreparable DNA injury, localized in telomeric and/or non-telomeric regions of the genome. Main cause of this damage is oxidative stress, increasing due to deteriorated function of mitochondria. Senescent cells accumulate in tissues during aging, which is causatively linked with the development of various pathologies in elderly individuals, including cancer. This paper, prepared exactly 50 years after Leonard Hayflick’s discovery of the relationship between cellular senescence and organismal aging is aimed at presenting the current knowledge about molecular determinants of senescence, with particular emphasis paid to the role of oxidative stress, effectors of senescence at the level of cell cycle, markers of this phenomenon, and the effect of senescent cells on the development of certain age-related diseases.

  1. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  2. Senescence and programmed cell death in plants: polyamine action mediated by transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Duca, Stefano; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Cai, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Research on polyamines (PAs) in plants laps a long way of about 50 years and many roles have been discovered for these aliphatic cations. PAs regulate cell division, differentiation, organogenesis, reproduction, dormancy-break and senescence, homeostatic adjustments in response to external stimuli and stresses. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of their multiple activities are still matter of research. PAs are present in free and bound forms and interact with several important cell molecules; some of these interactions may occur by covalent linkages catalyzed by transglutaminase (TGase), giving rise to "cationization" or cross-links among specific proteins. Senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) can be delayed by PAs; in order to re-interpret some of these effects and to obtain new insights into their molecular mechanisms, their conjugation has been revised here. The TGase-mediated interactions between proteins and PAs are the main target of this review. After an introduction on the characteristics of this enzyme, on its catalysis and role in PCD in animals, the plant senescence and PCD models in which TGase has been studied, are presented: the corolla of naturally senescing or excised flowers, the leaves senescing, either excised or not, the pollen during self-incompatible pollination, the hypersensitive response and the tuber storage parenchyma during dormancy release. In all the models examined, TGase appears to be involved by a similar molecular mechanism as described during apoptosis in animal cells, even though several substrates are different. Its effect is probably related to the type of PCD, but mostly to the substrate to be modified in order to achieve the specific PCD program. As a cross-linker of PAs and proteins, TGase is an important factor involved in multiple, sometimes controversial, roles of PAs during senescence and PCD.

  3. Sustained activation of DNA damage response in irradiated apoptosis-resistant cells induces reversible senescence associated with mTOR downregulation and expression of stem cell markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitikova, Zhanna V; Gordeev, Serguei A; Bykova, Tatiana V; Zubova, Svetlana G; Pospelov, Valery A; Pospelova, Tatiana V

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to genotoxic stress by activating the DNA damage response (DDR). When injury is severe or irreparable, cells induce apoptosis or cellular senescence to prevent transmission of the lesions to the daughter cells upon cell division. Resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of cancer that challenges the efficacy of cancer therapy. In this work, the effects of ionizing radiation on apoptosis-resistant E1A + E1B transformed cells were investigated to ascertain whether the activation of cellular senescence could provide an alternative tumor suppressor mechanism. We show that irradiated cells arrest cell cycle at G 2/M phase and resume DNA replication in the absence of cell division followed by formation of giant polyploid cells. Permanent activation of DDR signaling due to impaired DNA repair results in the induction of cellular senescence in E1A + E1B cells. However, irradiated cells bypass senescence and restore the population by dividing cells, which have near normal size and ploidy and do not express senescence markers. Reversion of senescence and appearance of proliferating cells were associated with downregulation of mTOR, activation of autophagy, mitigation of DDR signaling, and expression of stem cell markers.

  4. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung, E-mail: iklim@ajou.ac.kr

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  5. Quantifying Hg within ectomycorrhizal fruiting bodies, from emergence to senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Mina; Malloch, David W; Arp, Paul A

    2012-11-01

    Ectomycorrhizal fruiting bodies (basidiomata) collected from forested areas in southwestern New Brunswick were analyzed for total mercury, sulphur, nitrogen, and carbon concentrations (THg, TS, TN, and TC, respectively). This analysis was done for caps and stalks and by development stage (emergent, mature, senescent) across 27 species associated with five classes, eight families, and 13 genera. Across the species, THg correlated positively with TN and TS, thereby implying N as well as S mitigated transfer of Hg from the mycelia into the basidiomata, with THg ranging from 3 to 10 457 ppb. TS, TN, and TC varied from 0.07 to 1, 1 to 11, and 43 to 53 %, respectively. Cap and stalk THg, TS, TN, and TC were also correlated to one another, with mean stalk/cap ratios of 0.59, 0.76, 0.71, and 0.98, respectively. Soil availability indexed by THg, TS, TN, and TC within the forest floor contributed to basidiomatal THg as well. THg, THg/TS, and THg/N varied strongly by species. These variations involved: (i) no growth dilution and no volatilization (Group I), (ii) growth dilution only (Group II), (iii) growth dilution followed by loss during senescence (Group III), and (iv) growth dilution combined with loss from emergence onward (Group IV). Depending on species, TN and TS remained the same or declined from 100 % at emergence to about 80 and 70 % at senescence. Lack of THg decline for the Group I species would be due to HgS encapsulation. Reanalyzing the freeze-dried samples revealed that THg continued to drop during the first year of air-dry storage for the Group II, II, and IV species, but TS, TN, and TC remained stable. The results were quantified by way of best-fitted regression models. Copyright © 2012 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acetylshikonin from Zicao attenuates cognitive impairment and hippocampus senescence in d-galactose-induced aging mouse model via upregulating the expression of SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qisen; Zeng, Jiacheng; Su, Meiling; He, Yu; Zhu, Banghao

    2018-03-01

    Zicao acts as a pleiotropic medicine in various diseases due to its particular pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-oxidative, and wound healing effects. However, few studies have focused on the function in neurodegenerative diseases of Zicao. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Acetylshikonin (AS) from Zicao on the hippocampus of the d-galactose (d-gal)-induced sub-acute aging mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aging model was established in male Kunming mice by subcutaneous injection of d-gal (150 mg/kg/d) for 60 days, and the mice were given AS (270, 540 and 1080 mg/kg/d) or distilled water intragastrically for 30 days after 30 days of d-gal injection. The behavioral results test by Morris Water Maze (MWM) revealed that chronic AS treatment alleviated d-gal-induced learning and memory deficits compared with the d-gal-treated mice. In addition, AS also ameliorated the oxidative stress and neuroinflammation induced by d-gal through decreasing the level of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), malondialdehyde (MDA) and enhancing the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD). Moreover, western blot results showed that AS can up-regulate the expression of Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and inhibit d-gal-induced activation of p53/p21 signaling pathway in the hippocampus of mice. These results suggest that AS can execute the prevention and treatment of d-gal-induced brain aging by SIRT1/P53/P21 pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Human myotubes from myoblast cultures undergoing senescence exhibit defects in glucose and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan O; Just, Marlene; Rustan, Arild C

    2011-01-01

    that the observed metabolic defects accompany the induction of a senescent state. The main function of SCs is regeneration and skeletal muscle-build up. Thus, the metabolic defects observed during aging of SC-derived myotubes could have a role in sarcopenia, the gradual age-related loss of muscle mass and strength.......Adult stem cells are known to have a finite replication potential. Muscle biopsy-derived human satellite cells (SCs) were grown at different passages and differentiated to human myotubes in culture to analyze the functional state of various carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways...

  8. Prophylactic use of Ganoderma lucidum extract may inhibit Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication in a new mouse model of spontaneous latent tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan eQin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mouse model of spontaneous latent tuberculosis infection (LTBIthat mimics latent tuberculosis infection in humans is valuable for drug/vaccine development and the study of tuberculosis. However, most LTBI mouse models require interventions, and a spontaneous LTBI mouse model with a low bacterial load is difficult to establish. In this study, mice were IV-inoculated with 100 CFU Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, and a persistent LTBI was established with low bacterial loads (0.5~1.5log10 CFU in the lung; <4log10 CFU in the spleen. Histopathological changes in the lung, spleen, and liver were mild during the first 20 weeks post-inoculation. The model was used to demonstrate the comparative effects of prophylactic and therapeutic administration of Ganoderma lucidum extract (spores and spores lipid in preventing H37Rv replication in both lung and spleen. H37Rv was inhibited with prophylactic use of G. lucidum extract relative to that of the untreated control and therapy groups, and observed in the spleen as early as post-inoculation week 3. H37Rv infection in the therapy group was comparable to that of the untreated control mice. No significant mitigation of pathological changes was observed in either the prophylactic or therapeutic groups. Our results suggest that this LTBI model is an efficient means of testing anti-tuberculosis vaccines and drugs. The use of G. lucidum extract prior to M. tuberculosis infection may protect the host against bacterial replication to some extent.

  9. Unraveling the non-senescence phenomenon in Hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dańko, Maciej J; Kozłowski, Jan; Schaible, Ralf

    2015-10-07

    Unlike other metazoans, Hydra does not experience the distinctive rise in mortality with age known as senescence, which results from an increasing imbalance between cell damage and cell repair. We propose that the Hydra controls damage accumulation mainly through damage-dependent cell selection and cell sloughing. We examine our hypothesis with a model that combines cellular damage with stem cell renewal, differentiation, and elimination. The Hydra individual can be seen as a large single pool of three types of stem cells with some features of differentiated cells. This large stem cell community prevents "cellular damage drift," which is inevitable in complex conglomerate (differentiated) metazoans with numerous and generally isolated pools of stem cells. The process of cellular damage drift is based on changes in the distribution of damage among cells due to random events, and is thus similar to Muller's ratchet in asexual populations. Events in the model that are sources of randomness include budding, cellular death, and cellular damage and repair. Our results suggest that non-senescence is possible only in simple Hydra-like organisms which have a high proportion and number of stem cells, continuous cell divisions, an effective cell selection mechanism, and stem cells with the ability to undertake some roles of differentiated cells. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Use of two-part regression calibration model to correct for measurement error in episodically consumed foods in a single-replicate study design: EPIC case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogo, George O; van der Voet, Hilko; van't Veer, Pieter; Ferrari, Pietro; Leenders, Max; Muller, David C; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Bamia, Christina; Braaten, Tonje; Knüppel, Sven; Johansson, Ingegerd; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference measurements are required. Short-term reference measurements for foods that are not consumed daily contain excess zeroes that pose challenges in the calibration model. We adapted two-part regression calibration model, initially developed for multiple replicates of reference measurements per individual to a single-replicate setting. We showed how to handle excess zero reference measurements by two-step modeling approach, how to explore heteroscedasticity in the consumed amount with variance-mean graph, how to explore nonlinearity with the generalized additive modeling (GAM) and the empirical logit approaches, and how to select covariates in the calibration model. The performance of two-part calibration model was compared with the one-part counterpart. We used vegetable intake and mortality data from European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. In the EPIC, reference measurements were taken with 24-hour recalls. For each of the three vegetable subgroups assessed separately, correcting for error with an appropriately specified two-part calibration model resulted in about three fold increase in the strength of association with all-cause mortality, as measured by the log hazard ratio. Further found is that the standard way of including covariates in the calibration model can lead to over fitting the two-part calibration model. Moreover, the extent of adjusting for error is influenced by the number and forms of covariates in the calibration model. For episodically consumed foods, we advise researchers to pay special attention to response distribution, nonlinearity, and covariate inclusion in specifying the calibration model.

  11. Use of two-part regression calibration model to correct for measurement error in episodically consumed foods in a single-replicate study design: EPIC case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George O Agogo

    Full Text Available In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference measurements are required. Short-term reference measurements for foods that are not consumed daily contain excess zeroes that pose challenges in the calibration model. We adapted two-part regression calibration model, initially developed for multiple replicates of reference measurements per individual to a single-replicate setting. We showed how to handle excess zero reference measurements by two-step modeling approach, how to explore heteroscedasticity in the consumed amount with variance-mean graph, how to explore nonlinearity with the generalized additive modeling (GAM and the empirical logit approaches, and how to select covariates in the calibration model. The performance of two-part calibration model was compared with the one-part counterpart. We used vegetable intake and mortality data from European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC study. In the EPIC, reference measurements were taken with 24-hour recalls. For each of the three vegetable subgroups assessed separately, correcting for error with an appropriately specified two-part calibration model resulted in about three fold increase in the strength of association with all-cause mortality, as measured by the log hazard ratio. Further found is that the standard way of including covariates in the calibration model can lead to over fitting the two-part calibration model. Moreover, the extent of adjusting for error is influenced by the number and forms of covariates in the calibration model. For episodically consumed foods, we advise researchers to pay special attention to response distribution, nonlinearity, and covariate inclusion in specifying the calibration model.

  12. Use of Two-Part Regression Calibration Model to Correct for Measurement Error in Episodically Consumed Foods in a Single-Replicate Study Design: EPIC Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogo, George O.; van der Voet, Hilko; Veer, Pieter van’t; Ferrari, Pietro; Leenders, Max; Muller, David C.; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Bamia, Christina; Braaten, Tonje; Knüppel, Sven; Johansson, Ingegerd; van Eeuwijk, Fred A.; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference measurements are required. Short-term reference measurements for foods that are not consumed daily contain excess zeroes that pose challenges in the calibration model. We adapted two-part regression calibration model, initially developed for multiple replicates of reference measurements per individual to a single-replicate setting. We showed how to handle excess zero reference measurements by two-step modeling approach, how to explore heteroscedasticity in the consumed amount with variance-mean graph, how to explore nonlinearity with the generalized additive modeling (GAM) and the empirical logit approaches, and how to select covariates in the calibration model. The performance of two-part calibration model was compared with the one-part counterpart. We used vegetable intake and mortality data from European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. In the EPIC, reference measurements were taken with 24-hour recalls. For each of the three vegetable subgroups assessed separately, correcting for error with an appropriately specified two-part calibration model resulted in about three fold increase in the strength of association with all-cause mortality, as measured by the log hazard ratio. Further found is that the standard way of including covariates in the calibration model can lead to over fitting the two-part calibration model. Moreover, the extent of adjusting for error is influenced by the number and forms of covariates in the calibration model. For episodically consumed foods, we advise researchers to pay special attention to response distribution, nonlinearity, and covariate inclusion in specifying the calibration model. PMID:25402487

  13. Expression of Senescence-Associated microRNAs and Target Genes in Cellular Aging and Modulation by Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Gwee Sian Khee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidences highlight the implication of microRNAs as a posttranscriptional regulator in aging. Several senescence-associated microRNAs (SA-miRNAs are found to be differentially expressed during cellular senescence. However, the role of dietary compounds on SA-miRNAs remains elusive. This study aimed to elucidate the modulatory role of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF on SA-miRNAs (miR-20a, miR-24, miR-34a, miR-106a, and miR-449a and established target genes of miR-34a (CCND1, CDK4, and SIRT1 during replicative senescence of human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs. Primary cultures of HDFs at young and senescent were incubated with TRF at 0.5 mg/mL. Taqman microRNA assay showed significant upregulation of miR-24 and miR-34a and downregulation of miR-20a and miR-449a in senescent HDFs (P<0.05. TRF reduced miR-34a expression in senescent HDFs and increased miR-20a expression in young HDFs and increased miR-449a expression in both young and senescent HDFs. Our results also demonstrated that ectopic expression of miR-34a reduced the expression of CDK4 significantly (P<0.05. TRF inhibited miR-34a expression thus relieved its inhibition on CDK4 gene expression. No significant change was observed on the expression of CCND1, SIRT1, and miR-34a upstream transcriptional regulator, TP53. In conclusion tocotrienol-rich fraction prevented cellular senescence of human diploid fibroblasts via modulation of SA-miRNAs and target genes expression.

  14. Senescence-Associated Molecular and Epigenetic Alterations in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultures from Amniotic Fluid of Normal and Fetus-Affected Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jūratė Savickienė

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human amniotic-fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (AF-MSCs are interesting for their multilineage differentiation potential and wide range of therapeutic applications due to the ease of culture expansion. However, MSCs undergo replicative senescence. So far, the molecular mechanisms that underlie fetal diseases and cell senescence are still poorly understood. Here, we analyzed senescence-associated morphologic, molecular, and epigenetic characteristics during propagation of MSCs derived from AF of normal and fetus-affected pregnancy. AF-MSCs cultures from both cell sources displayed quite similar morphology and expression of specific cell surface (CD44, CD90, and CD105 and stemness (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1 markers but had interindividual variability in proliferation capability and time to reach senescence. Within passages 4 and 8, senescent cultures exhibited typical morphological features, senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, increased levels of p16, and decreased levels of miR-17 and miR-21 but showed differential expression of p21, p53, and ATM dependently on the onset of cell senescence. These differences correlated with changes in the level of chromatin modifiers (DNMT1 and HDAC1 and polycomb group proteins (EZH2, SUZ12, and BMI1 paralleling with changes in the expression of repressive histone marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 and stemness markers (Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Rex1. Therefore epigenetic factors are important for AF-MSCs senescence process that may be related with individuality of donor or a fetus malignancy status.

  15. Gut flora-dependent metabolite Trimethylamine-N-oxide accelerates endothelial cell senescence and vascular aging through oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yilang; Li, Dang; Zhao, Mingming; Liu, Changjie; Liu, Jia; Zeng, Aiping; Shi, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Si; Pan, Bing; Zheng, Lemin; Hong, Huashan

    2018-02-20

    Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), gut microbiota-dependent metabolites, has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the relationship between TMAO and vascular aging. Here, we observed a change in TMAO during the aging process and the effects of TMAO on vascular aging and endothelial cell (EC) senescence. We analyzed age-related plasma levels of TMAO in young adults (18-44 years old), older adults (≥ 65 years old), and 1-month-old, 3-month-old, 6-month-old and 10-month-old senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and age-matched senescence-accelerated mouse resistance 1 (SAMR1) models. We found that circulating TMAO increased with age both in humans and mice. Next, we observed that a TMAO treatment for 16 weeks induced vascular aging in SAMR1 mice and accelerated the process in SAMP8 mice, as measured by an upregulation of senescence markers including senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), p53, and p21, vascular dysfunction and remodeling. In vitro, we demonstrated that prolonged TMAO treatment induced senescence in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), characterized by reduced cell proliferation, increased expressions of senescence markers, stagnate G0/G1, and impaired cell migration. Furthermore, TMAO suppressed sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression and increased oxidative stress both in vivo and in vitro and then activated the p53/p21/Rb pathway resulting in increased p53, acetylation of p53, p21, and decreased CDK2, cyclinE1, and phosphorylation of Rb. In summary, these data suggest that elevated circulating TMAO during the aging process may deteriorate EC senescence and vascular aging, which is probably associated with repression of SIRT1 expression and increased oxidative stress, and, thus, the activation of the p53/p21/Rb pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J.; White, Thomas A.; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M.; Verzosa, Grace C.; Stout, Michael B.; Mazula, Daniel L.; Palmer, Allyson K.; Baker, Darren J.; Jensen, Michael D.; Torbenson, Michael S.; Miller, Jordan D.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M.; Kirkland, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16INK4a promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  17. Jun Dimerization Protein 2 Controls Senescence and Differentiation via Regulating Histone Modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chang Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor, Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2, binds directly to histones and DNAs and then inhibits the p300-mediated acetylation both of core histones and of reconstituted nucleosomes that contain JDP2 recognition DNA sequences. JDP2 plays a key role as a repressor of adipocyte differentiation by regulation of the expression of the gene C/EBPδ via inhibition of histone acetylation. Moreover, JDP2-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (JDP2−/− MEFs are resistant to replicative senescence. JDP2 inhibits the recruitment of polycomb repressive complexes (PRC1 and PRC2 to the promoter of the gene encoding p16Ink4a, resulting from the inhibition of methylation of lysine 27 of histone H3 (H3K27. Therefore, it seems that chromatin-remodeling factors, including the PRC complex controlled by JDP2, may be important players in the senescence program. The novel mechanisms that underline the action of JDP2 in inducing cellular senescence and suppressing adipocyte differentiation are reviewed.

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid promotes the induction of pluripotency in mouse fibroblasts by suppressing reprogramming-induced senescence stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yingying; Chen, Xi; Yu, Dehai [Stem Cell and Cancer Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130061 (China); Stanford University Medical School, Palo Alto Veterans Institute for Research, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Li, Tao [Stanford University Medical School, Palo Alto Veterans Institute for Research, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Cui, Jiuwei; Wang, Guanjun [Stem Cell and Cancer Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130061 (China); Hu, Ji-Fan, E-mail: jifan@stanford.edu [Stem Cell and Cancer Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130061 (China); Stanford University Medical School, Palo Alto Veterans Institute for Research, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Li, Wei, E-mail: jdyylw@163.com [Stem Cell and Cancer Center, First Affiliated Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130061 (China)

    2015-09-10

    Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) has been used to increase the reprogramming efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) from somatic cells, yet the specific molecular mechanisms underlying this effect is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that reprogramming with lentiviruses carrying the iPSC-inducing factors (Oct4-Sox2-Klf4-cMyc, OSKM) caused senescence in mouse fibroblasts, establishing a stress barrier for cell reprogramming. Administration of VPA protected cells from reprogramming-induced senescent stress. Using an in vitro pre-mature senescence model, we found that VPA treatment increased cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis through the suppression of the p16/p21 pathway. In addition, VPA also inhibited the G2/M phase blockage derived from the senescence stress. These findings highlight the role of VPA in breaking the cell senescence barrier required for the induction of pluripotency. - Highlights: • Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid enhances iPSC induction. • Valproic acid suppresses reprogramming-induced senescence stress. • Valproic acid downregulates the p16/p21 pathway in reprogramming. • This study demonstrates a new mechanistic role of valproic acid in enhancing reprogramming.

  19. Estrogen regulates stemness and senescence of bone marrow stromal cells to prevent osteoporosis via ERβ-SATB2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Geng; Xu, Rongyao; Zhang, Ping; Xiao, Tao; Fu, Yu; Zhang, Yuchao; Du, Yifei; Ye, Jinhai; Cheng, Jie; Jiang, Hongbing

    2018-05-01

    Decline of pluripotency in bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) associated with estrogen deficiency leads to a bone formation defect in osteoporosis. Special AT-rich sequence binding protein 2 (SATB2) is crucial for maintaining stemness and osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs. However, whether SATB2 is involved in estrogen-deficiency associated-osteoporosis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that estrogen mediated pluripotency and senescence of BMSCs, primarily through estrogen receptor beta (ERβ). BMSCs from the OVX rats displayed increased senescence and weaker SATB2 expression, stemness, and osteogenic differentiation, while estrogen could rescue these phenotypes. Inhibition of ERβ or ERα confirmed that SATB2 was associated with ERβ in estrogen-mediated pluripotency and senescence of BMSCs. Furthermore, estrogen mediated the upregulation of SATB2 through the induction of ERβ binding to estrogen response elements (ERE) located at -488 of the SATB2 gene. SATB2 overexpression alleviated senescence and enhanced stemness and osteogenic differentiation of OVX-BMSCs. SATB2-modified BMSCs transplantation could prevent trabecular bone loss in an ovariectomized rat model. Collectively, our study revealed the role of SATB2 in stemness, senescence, and osteogenesis of OVX-BMSCs. These results indicate that estrogen prevents osteoporosis by promoting stemness and osteogenesis, and inhibiting senescence of BMSCs through an ERβ-SATB2 pathway. Therefore, SATB2 is a novel anti-osteoporosis target gene. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A human-like senescence-associated secretory phenotype is conserved in mouse cells dependent on physiological oxygen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Coppé

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence irreversibly arrests cell proliferation in response to oncogenic stimuli. Human cells develop a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP, which increases the secretion of cytokines and other factors that alter the behavior of neighboring cells. We show here that "senescent" mouse fibroblasts, which arrested growth after repeated passage under standard culture conditions (20% oxygen, do not express a human-like SASP, and differ from similarly cultured human cells in other respects. However, when cultured in physiological (3% oxygen and induced to senesce by radiation, mouse cells more closely resemble human cells, including expression of a robust SASP. We describe two new aspects of the human and mouse SASPs. First, cells from both species upregulated the expression and secretion of several matrix metalloproteinases, which comprise a conserved genomic cluster. Second, for both species, the ability to promote the growth of premalignant epithelial cells was due primarily to the conserved SASP factor CXCL-1/KC/GRO-alpha. Further, mouse fibroblasts made senescent in 3%, but not 20%, oxygen promoted epithelial tumorigenesis in mouse xenographs. Our findings underscore critical mouse-human differences in oxygen sensitivity, identify conditions to use mouse cells to model human cellular senescence, and reveal novel conserved features of the SASP.

  1. Evidences for Chlorogenic Acid--A Major Endogenous Polyphenol Involved in Regulation of Ripening and Senescence of Apple Fruit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xi

    Full Text Available To learn how the endogenous polyphenols may play a role in fruit ripening and senescence, apple pulp discs were used as a model to study the influences of chlorogenic acid (CHA, a major polyphenol in apple pulp on fruit ripening and senescence. Apple ('Golden Delicious' pulp discs prepared from pre-climacteric fruit were treated with 50 mg L(-1 CHA and incubated in flasks with 10 mM MES buffer (pH 6.0, 11% sorbitol. Compared to the control samples, treatment with CHA significantly reduced ethylene production and respiration rate, and enhanced levels of firmness and soluble solids content of the pulp discs during incubation at 25°C. These results suggested that CHA could retard senescence of the apple pulp discs. Proteomics analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF revealed that the expressions of several key proteins correlated to fruit ripening and senescence were affected by the treatment with CHA. Further study showed that treating the pulp discs with CHA remarkably reduced levels of lipoxygenase, β-galactosidase, NADP-malic enzyme, and enzymatic activities of lipoxygenase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, all of which are known as promoters of fruit ripening and senescence. These results could provide new insights into the functions of endogenous phenolic compounds in fruit ripening and senescence.

  2. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  3. Characterizing the Final Steps of Chromosomal Replication at the Single-molecule Level in the Model System Escherichia coli

    KAUST Repository

    Elshenawy, Mohamed M.

    2015-12-01

    In the circular Escherichia coli chromosome, two replisomes are assembled at the unique origin of replication and drive DNA synthesis in opposite directions until they meet in the terminus region across from the origin. Despite the difference in rates of the two replisomes, their arrival at the terminus is synchronized through a highly specialized system consisting of the terminator protein (Tus) bound to the termination sites (Ter). This synchronicity is mediated by the polarity of the Tus−Ter complex that stops replisomes from one direction (non-permissive face) but not the other (permissive face). Two oppositely oriented clusters of five Tus–Ters that each block one of the two replisomes create a “replication fork trap” for the first arriving replisome while waiting for the late arriving one. Despite extensive biochemical and structural studies, the molecular mechanism behind Tus−Ter polar arrest activity remained controversial. Moreover, none of the previous work provided answers for the long-standing discrepancy between the ability of Tus−Ter to permanently stop replisomes in vitro and its low efficiency in vivo. Here, I spearheaded a collaborative project that combined single-molecule DNA replication assays, X-ray crystallography and binding studies to provide a true molecular-level understanding of the underlying mechanism of Tus−Ter polar arrest activity. We showed that efficiency of Tus−Ter is determined by a head-to-head kinetic competition between rate of strand separation by the replisome and rate of rearrangement of Tus−Ter interactions during the melting of the first 6 base pairs of Ter. This rearrangement maintains Tus’s strong grip on the DNA and stops the advancing replisome from breaking into Tus−Ter central interactions, but only transiently. We further showed how this kinetic competition functions within the context of two mechanisms to impose permanent fork stoppage. The rate-dependent fork arrest activity of Tus

  4. The mitochondrial genome in aging and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, Andrea; Pompilio, Giulio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C

    2014-11-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in organism functions due to the impairment of all organs. The deterioration of both proliferative tissues in liver, skin and the vascular system, as well as of largely post-mitotic organs, such as the heart and brain could be attributed at least in part to cell senescence. In this review we examine the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and mtDNA mutations in cell aging and senescence. Specifically, we address how p53 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity switch their roles from cytoprotective to detrimental and also examine the role of microRNAs in cell aging. The proposed role of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), both as mutating agents and as signalling molecules, underlying these processes is also described. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of candidate genes associated with leaf senescence in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Moschen

    Full Text Available Cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., an important source of edible vegetable oil, shows rapid onset of senescence, which limits production by reducing photosynthetic capacity under specific growing conditions. Carbon for grain filling depends strongly on light interception by green leaf area, which diminishes during grain filling due to leaf senescence. Transcription factors (TFs regulate the progression of leaf senescence in plants and have been well explored in model systems, but information for many agronomic crops remains limited. Here, we characterize the expression profiles of a set of putative senescence associated genes (SAGs identified by a candidate gene approach and sunflower microarray expression studies. We examined a time course of sunflower leaves undergoing natural senescence and used quantitative PCR (qPCR to measure the expression of 11 candidate genes representing the NAC, WRKY, MYB and NF-Y TF families. In addition, we measured physiological parameters such as chlorophyll, total soluble sugars and nitrogen content. The expression of Ha-NAC01, Ha-NAC03, Ha-NAC04, Ha-NAC05 and Ha-MYB01 TFs increased before the remobilization rate increased and therefore, before the appearance of the first physiological symptoms of senescence, whereas Ha-NAC02 expression decreased. In addition, we also examined the trifurcate feed-forward pathway (involving ORE1, miR164, and ethylene insensitive 2 previously reported for Arabidopsis. We measured transcription of Ha-NAC01 (the sunflower homolog of ORE1 and Ha-EIN2, along with the levels of miR164, in two leaves from different stem positions, and identified differences in transcription between basal and upper leaves. Interestingly, Ha-NAC01 and Ha-EIN2 transcription profiles showed an earlier up-regulation in upper leaves of plants close to maturity, compared with basal leaves of plants at pre-anthesis stages. These results suggest that the H. annuus TFs characterized in this work could

  6. Identification of candidate genes associated with leaf senescence in cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschen, Sebastian; Bengoa Luoni, Sofia; Paniego, Norma B; Hopp, H Esteban; Dosio, Guillermo A A; Fernandez, Paula; Heinz, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    Cultivated sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), an important source of edible vegetable oil, shows rapid onset of senescence, which limits production by reducing photosynthetic capacity under specific growing conditions. Carbon for grain filling depends strongly on light interception by green leaf area, which diminishes during grain filling due to leaf senescence. Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the progression of leaf senescence in plants and have been well explored in model systems, but information for many agronomic crops remains limited. Here, we characterize the expression profiles of a set of putative senescence associated genes (SAGs) identified by a candidate gene approach and sunflower microarray expression studies. We examined a time course of sunflower leaves undergoing natural senescence and used quantitative PCR (qPCR) to measure the expression of 11 candidate genes representing the NAC, WRKY, MYB and NF-Y TF families. In addition, we measured physiological parameters such as chlorophyll, total soluble sugars and nitrogen content. The expression of Ha-NAC01, Ha-NAC03, Ha-NAC04, Ha-NAC05 and Ha-MYB01 TFs increased before the remobilization rate increased and therefore, before the appearance of the first physiological symptoms of senescence, whereas Ha-NAC02 expression decreased. In addition, we also examined the trifurcate feed-forward pathway (involving ORE1, miR164, and ethylene insensitive 2) previously reported for Arabidopsis. We measured transcription of Ha-NAC01 (the sunflower homolog of ORE1) and Ha-EIN2, along with the levels of miR164, in two leaves from different stem positions, and identified differences in transcription between basal and upper leaves. Interestingly, Ha-NAC01 and Ha-EIN2 transcription profiles showed an earlier up-regulation in upper leaves of plants close to maturity, compared with basal leaves of plants at pre-anthesis stages. These results suggest that the H. annuus TFs characterized in this work could play important

  7. Efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in combination with radiation therapy in an orthotopic mouse prostate cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freytag, Svend O.; Paielli, Dell; Wing, Mark; Rogulski, Ken; Brown, Steve; Kolozsvary, Andy; Seely, John; Barton, Ken; Dragovic, Alek; Kim, Jae Ho

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of replication-competent adenovirus-mediated double suicide gene therapy in an adjuvant setting with external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in an experimental prostate cancer model in preparation for a Phase I clinical study in humans. Methods: For efficacy studies, i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumors were established in immune-deficient mice. Tumors were injected with the lytic, replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus containing a cytosine deaminase (CD)/herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) fusion gene. Two days later, mice were administered 1 week of 5-fluorocytosine + ganciclovir (GCV) prodrug therapy and fractionated doses of EBRT (trimodal therapy). Tumor control rate of trimodal therapy was compared to that of EBRT alone. For toxicology studies, immune-competent male mice received a single intraprostatic injection (10 10 vp) of the replication-competent Ad5-CD/TKrep adenovirus. Two days later, mice were administered 4 weeks of 5-fluorocytosine + GCV prodrug therapy and 56 Gy EBRT to the pelvic region. The toxicity of trimodal therapy was assessed by histopathologic analysis of major organs and clinical chemistries. Results: In both the i.m. DU145 and intraprostatic LNCaP C4-2 tumor models, trimodal therapy significantly improved primary tumor control beyond that of EBRT alone. In the DU145 model, trimodal therapy resulted in a tumor growth delay (70 days) that was more than twice that (32 days) of EBRT alone. Whereas EBRT failed to eradicate DU145 tumors, trimodal therapy resulted in 25% tumor cure. In the LNCaP C4-2 tumor model, EBRT slowed the growth of intraprostatic tumors, but resulted in no tumor cures, and 57% of the mice developed retroperitoneal lymph node metastases at 3 months. By contrast, trimodal therapy resulted in 44% tumor cure and reduced significantly the percentage (13%) of lymph node metastases relative to EBRT alone. Overall

  8. Inhibition of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in a lethal SARS-CoV BALB/c mouse model by stinging nettle lectin, Urtica dioica agglutinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaki, Yohichi; Wandersee, Miles K.; Smith, Aaron J.; Zhou, Yanchen; Simmons, Graham; Nelson, Nathan M.; Bailey, Kevin W.; Vest, Zachary G.; Li, Joseph K.-K.; Chan, Paul Kay-Sheung; Smee, Donald F.; Barnard, Dale L.

    2011-01-01

    Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) is a small plant monomeric lectin, 8.7 kDa in size, with an N-acetylglucosamine specificity that inhibits viruses from Nidovirales in vitro. In the current study, we first examined the efficacy of UDA on the replication of different SARS-CoV strains in Vero 76 cells. UDA inhibited virus replication in a dose-dependent manner and reduced virus yields of the Urbani strain by 90% at 1.1 ± 0.4 µg/ml in Vero 76 cells. Then, UDA was tested for efficacy in a lethal SARS-CoV-infected BALB/c mouse model. BALB/c mice were infected with two LD50 (575 PFU) of virus for 4 hours before the mice were treated intraperitoneally with UDA at 20, 10, 5 or 0 mg/kg/day for 4 days. Treatment with UDA at 5 mg/kg significantly protected the mice against a lethal infection with mouse-adapted SARS-CoV (p<0.001), but did not significantly reduce virus lung titers. All virus-infected mice receiving UDA treatments were also significantly protected against weight loss (p<0.001). UDA also effectively reduced lung pathology scores. At day 6 after virus exposure, all groups of mice receiving UDA had much lower lung weights than did the placebo-treated mice. Thus, our data suggest that UDA treatment of SARS infection in mice leads to a substantial therapeutic effect that protects mice against death and weight loss. Furthermore, the mode of action of UDA in vitro was further investigated using live SARS-CoV Urbani strain virus and retroviral particles pseudotyped with SARS-CoV spike (S). UDA specifically inhibited the replication of live SARS-CoV or SARS-CoV pseudotyped virus when added just before, but not after, adsorption. These data suggested that UDA likely inhibits SARS-CoV infection by targeting early stages of the replication cycle, namely, adsorption or penetration. In addition, we demonstrated that UDA neutralizes the virus infectivity, presumably by binding to the SARS-CoV spike (S) glycoprotein. Finally, the target molecule for inhibition of virus

  9. Markers of T Cell Senescence in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Xu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many countries are facing the aging of their population, and many more will face a similar obstacle in the near future, which could be a burden to many healthcare systems. Increased susceptibility to infections, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease, cancer as well as reduced efficacy of vaccination are important matters for researchers in the field of aging. As older adults show higher prevalence for a variety of diseases, this also implies higher risk of complications, including nosocomial infections, slower recovery and sequels that may reduce the autonomy and overall quality of life of older adults. The age-related effects on the immune system termed as “immunosenescence” can be exemplified by the reported hypo-responsiveness to influenza vaccination of the elderly. T cells, which belong to the adaptive arm of the immune system, have been extensively studied and the knowledge gathered enables a better understanding of how the immune system may be affected after acute/chronic infections and how this matters in the long run. In this review, we will focus on T cells and discuss the surface and molecular markers that are associated with T cell senescence. We will also look at the implications that senescent T cells could have on human health and diseases. Finally, we will discuss the benefits of having these markers for investigators and the future work that is needed to advance the field of T cell senescence markers.

  10. Telomere Dynamics in Immune Senescence and Exhaustion Triggered by Chronic Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Bellon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The progressive loss of immunological memory during aging correlates with a reduced proliferative capacity and shortened telomeres of T cells. Growing evidence suggests that this phenotype is recapitulated during chronic viral infection. The antigenic volume imposed by persistent and latent viruses exposes the immune system to unique challenges that lead to host T-cell exhaustion, characterized by impaired T-cell functions. These dysfunctional memory T cells lack telomerase, the protein capable of extending and stabilizing chromosome ends, imposing constraints on telomere dynamics. A deleterious consequence of this excessive telomere shortening is the premature induction of replicative senescence of viral-specific CD8+ memory T cells. While senescent cells are unable to expand, they can survive for extended periods of time and are more resistant to apoptotic signals. This review takes a closer look at T-cell exhaustion in chronic viruses known to cause human disease: Epstein–Barr virus (EBV, Hepatitis B/C/D virus (HBV/HCV/HDV, human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I, human papillomavirus (HPV, herpes simplex virus-1/2(HSV-1/2, and Varicella–Zoster virus (VZV. Current literature linking T-cell exhaustion with critical telomere lengths and immune senescence are discussed. The concept that enduring antigen stimulation leads to T-cell exhaustion that favors telomere attrition and a cell fate marked by enhanced T-cell senescence appears to be a common endpoint to chronic viral infections.

  11. Collagenase-resistant collagen promotes mouse aging and vascular cell senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaie, Faran; Yin, Hao; O'Neil, Caroline; Nong, Zengxuan; Watson, Alanna; Arpino, John-Michael; Chu, Michael W A; Wayne Holdsworth, David; Gros, Robert; Pickering, J Geoffrey

    2014-02-01

    Collagen fibrils become resistant to cleavage over time. We hypothesized that resistance to type I collagen proteolysis not only marks biological aging but also drives it. To test this, we followed mice with a targeted mutation (Col1a1(r/r) ) that yields collagenase-resistant type I collagen. Compared with wild-type littermates, Col1a1(r/r) mice had a shortened lifespan and developed features of premature aging including kyphosis, weight loss, decreased bone mineral density, and hypertension. We also found that vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the aortic wall of Col1a1(r/r) mice were susceptible to stress-induced senescence, displaying senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-ßGal) activity and upregulated p16(INK4A) in response to angiotensin II infusion. To elucidate the basis of this pro-aging effect, vascular SMCs from twelve patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery were cultured on collagen derived from Col1a1(r/r) or wild-type mice. This revealed that mutant collagen directly reduced replicative lifespan and increased stress-induced SA-ßGal activity, p16(INK4A) expression, and p21(CIP1) expression. The pro-senescence effect of mutant collagen was blocked by vitronectin, a ligand for αvß3 integrin that is presented by denatured but not native collagen. Moreover, inhibition of αvß3 with echistatin or with αvß3-blocking antibody increased senescence of SMCs on wild-type collagen. These findings reveal a novel aging cascade whereby resistance to collagen cleavage accelerates cellular aging. This interplay between extracellular and cellular compartments could hasten mammalian aging and the progression of aging-related diseases. © 2013 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Emerging roles of extracellular vesicles in cellular senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasugi, Masaki

    2018-02-01

    Cellular senescence is a cellular program that prevents the proliferation of cells at risk of neoplastic transformation. On the other hand, age-related accumulation of senescent cells promotes aging at least partially due to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, whereby cells secrete high levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and matrix metalloproteinases. Emerging evidence, however, indicates that extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of the effects of senescent cells on their microenvironment. Senescent cells secrete more EphA2 and DNA via EVs, which can promote cancer cell proliferation and inflammation, respectively. Extracellular vesicles secreted from DNA-damaged cells can also affect telomere regulation. Furthermore, it has now become clear that EVs actually play important roles in many aspects of aging. This review is intended to summarize these recent progresses, with emphasis on relationships between cellular senescence and EVs. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Cellular senescence in normal and premature lung aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartling, B

    2013-10-01

    The incidence of chronic respiratory diseases (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD) and interstitial lung diseases (e.g., pneumonia and lung fibrosis) increases with age. In addition to immune senescence, the accumulation of senescent cells directly in lung tissue might play a critical role in the increased prevalence of these pulmonary diseases. In the last couple of years, detailed studies have identified the presence of senescent cells in the aging lung and in diseased lungs of patients with COPD and lung fibrosis. Cellular senescence has been shown for epithelial cells of bronchi and alveoli as well as mesenchymal and vascular cells. Known risk factors for pulmonary diseases (cigarette smoke, air pollutions, bacterial infections, etc.) were identified in experimental studies as being possible mediators in the development of cellular senescence. The present findings indicate the importance of cellular senescence in normal lung aging and in premature aging of the lung in patients with COPD, lung fibrosis, and probably other respiratory diseases.

  14. Accelerated premature stress-induced senescence of young annulus fibrosus cells of rats by high glucose-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Soo; Park, Jong-Beom; Park, In-Joo; Park, Eun-Young

    2014-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is thought to be an important aetiological factor in intervertebral disc degeneration. A glucose-mediated increase of oxidative stress is a major causative factor in development of diseases associated with DM. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high glucose on mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress and senescence of young annulus fibrosus (AF) cells. AF cells were isolated from four-week-old young rats, cultured, and placed in either 10 % FBS (normal control) or 10 % FBS plus two different high glucose concentrations (0.1 M and 0.2 M) (experimental conditions) for one and three days. We identified and quantified the mitochondrial damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (oxidative stress). We also identified and quantified the occurrence of senescence and telomerase activity. Finally, the expressions of proteins were determined related to replicative senescence (p53-p21-pRB) and stress-induced senescence (p16-pRB). Two high glucoses enhanced the mitochondrial damage in young rat AF cells, which resulted in an excessive generation of ROS in a dose- and time-dependent manner for one and three days compared to normal control. Two high glucose concentrations increased the occurrence of senescence of young AF cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Telomerase activity declined in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Both high glucose treatments increased the expressions of p16 and pRB proteins in young rat AF cells for one and three days. However, compared to normal control, the expressions of p53 and p21 proteins were decreased in young rat AF cells treated with both high glucoses for one and three days. The present study demonstrated that high glucose-induced oxidative stress accelerates premature stress-induced senescence in young rat AF cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner rather than replicative senescence. These results suggest that prevention of excessive generation of oxidative stress by strict blood glucose

  15. ATM and ATR Activities Maintain Replication Fork Integrity during SV40 Chromatin Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A.; Li, Nancy Yan; Fanning, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Mutation of DNA damage checkpoint signaling kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) or ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) results in genomic instability disorders. However, it is not well understood how the instability observed in these syndromes relates to DNA replication/repair defects and failed checkpoint control of cell cycling. As a simple model to address this question, we have studied SV40 chromatin replication in infected cells in the presence of inhibitors of ATM and ATR activities. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and southern blotting of SV40 chromatin replication products reveal that ATM activity prevents accumulation of unidirectional replication products, implying that ATM promotes repair of replication-associated double strand breaks. ATR activity alleviates breakage of a functional fork as it converges with a stalled fork. The results suggest that during SV40 chromatin replication, endogenous replication stress activates ATM and ATR signaling, orchestrating the assembly of genome maintenance machinery on viral replication intermediates. PMID:23592994

  16. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16

    OpenAIRE

    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B.; Srivatsan, Eri S.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. Whil...

  17. Role of p53 in Mammary Epithelial Cell Senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    distribution among E.coli strains and other enteric bacteria . J. Bacteriol. 174: 4583-4593. 7. Dimri, G. P. and J. Campisi (1994) Altered profile of...J. and K. Y. Chen (1996) Regulation of dihydrofolate reductase and E2F genes in human diploid fibroblasts during senescence in culture. J. Cell...Premature Senescence in Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts To understand the role of Bmi-1–related PcG proteins in cellular senescence and proliferation, we

  18. An empirical test of evolutionary theories for reproductive senescence and reproductive effort in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkman, Amanda M; Arnold, Stevan J; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2007-04-07

    Evolutionary theory predicts that differential reproductive effort and rate of reproductive senescence will evolve under different rates of external mortality. We examine the evolutionary divergence of age-specific reproduction in two life-history ecotypes of the western terrestrial garter snake, Thamnophis elegans. We test for the signature of reproductive senescence (decreasing fecundity with age) and increasing reproductive effort with age (increasing reproductive productivity per gram female) in replicate populations of two life-history ecotypes: snakes that grow fast, mature young and have shorter lifespans, and snakes that grow slow, mature late and have long lives. The difference between life-history ecotypes is due to genetic divergence in growth rate. We find (i) reproductive success (live litter mass) increases with age in both ecotypes, but does so more rapidly in the fast-growth ecotype, (ii) reproductive failure increases with age in both ecotypes, but the proportion of reproductive failure to total reproductive output remains invariant, and (iii) reproductive effort remains constant in fast-growth individuals with age, but declines in slow-growth individuals. This illustration of increasing fecundity with age, even at the latest ages, deviates from standard expectations for reproductive senescence, as does the lack of increases in reproductive effort. We discuss our findings in light of recent theories regarding the phenomenon of increased reproduction throughout life in organisms with indeterminate growth and its potential to offset theoretical expectations for the ubiquity of senescence.

  19. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Hung, Jan-Jong, E-mail: petehung@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Pharmacology, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. {yields} Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. {yields} Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  20. Overexpression of HDAC1 induces cellular senescence by Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, Jian-Ying; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Overexpression of HDAC1 induces Sp1 deacetylation and raises Sp1/p300 complex formation to bind to PP2Ac promoter. → Overexpression of HDAC1 strongly inhibits the phosphorylation of pRb through up-regulation of PP2A. → Overexpressed HDAC1 restrains cell proliferaction and induces cell senescence though a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway. -- Abstract: Senescence is associated with decreased activities of DNA replication, protein synthesis, and cellular division, which can result in deterioration of cellular functions. Herein, we report that the growth and division of tumor cells were significantly repressed by overexpression of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 1 with the Tet-off induced system or transient transfection. In addition, HDAC1 overexpression led to senescence through both an accumulation of hypophosphorylated active retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and an increase in the protein level of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac). HDAC1 overexpression also increased the level of Sp1 deacetylation and elevated the interaction between Sp1 and p300, and subsequently that Sp1/p300 complex bound to the promoter of PP2Ac, thus leading to induction of PP2Ac expression. Similar results were obtained in the HDAC1-Tet-off stable clone. Taken together, these results indicate that HDAC1 overexpression restrained cell proliferation and induced premature senescence in cervical cancer cells through a novel Sp1/PP2A/pRb pathway.

  1. Target-derived trophic effect on skeletal muscle innervation in senescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messi, Maria Laura; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2003-02-15

    In the present work, we tested the hypothesis that target-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) prevents alterations in neuromuscular innervation in aging mammals. To explore this hypothesis, we studied senescent wild-type mice as a model of deficient IGF-1 secretion and signaling and S1S2 transgenic mice as a tool to investigate the role of sustained overexpression of IGF-1 in striated muscle in neuromuscular innervation. The analysis of the nerve terminal in extensor digitorum longus muscles from senescent mice showed that the decrease in the percentage of cholinesterase-stained zones (CSZ) exhibiting nerve terminal branching, number of nerve branches at the CSZ, and nerve branch points was partially or completely reversed by sustained overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle. Target-derived IGF-1 also prevented age-related decreases in the postterminal alpha-bungarotoxin immunostained area, as well as the reduction in the number and length of postsynaptic folds, and area and density of postsynaptic folds studied with electron microscopy. Overexpression of IGF-1 in skeletal muscle may account for the lack of age-dependent switch in muscle fiber type composition recorded in senescent mice. In summary, the use of the S1S2 IGF-1 transgenic mouse model allowed us to provide morphological evidence for the role of target-derived IGF-1 in spinal cord motor neurons in senescent mice.

  2. Tumor senescence and radioresistant tumor-initiating cells (TICs): let sleeping dogs lie!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarana, Gaetano; Bristow, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Preclinical data from cell lines and experimental tumors support the concept that breast cancer-derived tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are relatively resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy. This could be a major determinant of tumor recurrence following treatment. Increased clonogenic survival is observed in CD24-/low/CD44+ TICs derived from mammosphere cultures and is associated with (a) reduced production of reactive oxygen species, (b) attenuated activation of γH2AX and CHK2-p53 DNA damage signaling pathways, (c) reduced propensity for ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis, and (d) altered DNA double-strand or DNA single-strand break repair. However, recent data have shed further light on TIC radioresistance as irradiated TICs are resistant to tumor cell senescence following DNA damage. Taken together, the cumulative data support a model in which DNA damage signaling and repair pathways are altered in TICs and lead to an altered mode of cell death with unique consequences for long-term clonogen survival. The study of TIC senescence lays the foundation for future experiments in isogenic models designed to directly test the capacity for senescence and local control (that is, not solely local regression) and spontaneous metastases following treatment in vivo. The study also supports the targeting of tumor cell senescence pathways to increase TIC clonogen kill if the targeting also maintains the therapeutic ratio.

  3. Characterization of ovarian aging and reproductive senescence in vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Hannah M; Willson, Cynthia J; Silverstein, Marnie; Jorgensen, Matthew; Floyd, Edison; Kaplan, Jay R; Appt, Susan E

    2014-02-01

    Female vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus aethiops sabaeus) are used as an experimental model for chronic diseases relevant to women's health. However, reproductive senescence (menopause) has not yet been characterized for vervet monkeys. Here we describe the histologic, hormonal, and menstrual markers of reproductive senescence in vervet monkeys from the Wake Forest Vervet Research Colony. Ovaries from monkeys (age, 0 to 27 y) were serially sectioned (5 μm), stained, and photographed. In every 100th section, the numbers of primordial, primary, and secondary follicles were determined, and triplicate measurements were used to calculate mean numbers of follicles per ovary. Antimüllerian hormone (AMH), follicle stimulating hormone, and menstrual cycle length were measured in additional monkeys. Primordial follicles and AMH decreased significantly with age, and significant correlations between numbers of primordial and primary follicles and between numbers of primary and secondary follicles were noted. Histologic evaluation revealed that ovaries from 4 aged monkeys (older than 23 y) were senescent. One aged monkey transitioned to menopause, experiencing cycle irregularity over 4 y, eventual cessation of menses, and plasma AMH below the level of detection. Finally, with increasing age, the percentage of female vervets with offspring declined significantly. The present study provides insight into ovarian aging and reproductive senescence in vervet monkeys. Results highlight the importance of considering this nonhuman primate as a model to investigate the relationships between ovarian aging and chronic disease risk.

  4. Senescent cells: SASPected drivers of age-related pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadya, Yossi; Krizhanovsky, Valery

    2014-12-01

    The progression of physiological ageing is driven by intracellular aberrations including telomere attrition, genomic instability, epigenetic alterations and loss of proteostasis. These in turn damage cells and compromise their functionality. Cellular senescence, a stable irreversible cell-cycle arrest, is elicited in damaged cells and prevents their propagation in the organism. Under normal conditions, senescent cells recruit the immune system which facilitates their removal from tissues. Nevertheless, during ageing, tissue-residing senescent cells tend to accumulate, and might negatively impact their microenvironment via profound secretory phenotype with pro-inflammatory characteristics, termed senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Indeed, senescent cells are mostly abundant at sites of age-related pathologies, including degenerative disorders and malignancies. Interestingly, studies on progeroid mice indicate that selective elimination of senescent cells can delay age-related deterioration. This suggests that chronic inflammation induced by senescent cells might be a main driver of these pathologies. Importantly, senescent cells accumulate as a result of deficient immune surveillance, and their removal is increased upon the use of immune stimulatory agents. Insights into mechanisms of senescence surveillance could be combined with current approaches for cancer immunotherapy to propose new preventive and therapeutic strategies for age-related diseases.

  5. Senescence and apoptosis: dueling or complementary cell fates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Bennett G; Baker, Darren J; Kirkland, James L; Campisi, Judith; van Deursen, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    In response to a variety of stresses, mammalian cells undergo a persistent proliferative arrest known as cellular senescence. Many senescence-inducing stressors are potentially oncogenic, strengthening the notion that senescence evolved alongside apoptosis to suppress tumorigenesis. In contrast to apoptosis, senescent cells are stably viable and have the potential to influence neighboring cells through secreted soluble factors, which are collectively known as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). However, the SASP has been associated with structural and functional tissue and organ deterioration and may even have tumor-promoting effects, raising the interesting evolutionary question of why apoptosis failed to outcompete senescence as a superior cell fate option. Here, we discuss the advantages that the senescence program may have over apoptosis as a tumor protective mechanism, as well as non-neoplastic functions that may have contributed to its evolution. We also review emerging evidence for the idea that senescent cells are present transiently early in life and are largely beneficial for development, regeneration and homeostasis, and only in advanced age do senescent cells accumulate to an organism’s detriment. PMID:25312810

  6. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braeckman Bart P

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria" are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 ± 13 days (average ± standard deviation [SD] and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 ± 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 ± 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  7. Demographic analysis reveals gradual senescence in the flatworm Macrostomum lignano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Stijn; Willems, Maxime; Back, Patricia; Braeckman, Bart P; Borgonie, Gaetan

    2009-07-30

    Free-living flatworms ("Turbellaria") are appropriate model organisms to gain better insight into the role of stem cells in ageing and rejuvenation. Ageing research in flatworms is, however, still scarce. This is partly due to culture difficulties and the lack of a complete set of demographic data, including parameters such as median lifespan and age-specific mortality rate. In this paper, we report on the first flatworm survival analysis. We used the species Macrostomum lignano, which is an emerging model for studying the reciprocal influence between stem cells, ageing and rejuvenation. This species has a median lifespan of 205 +/- 13 days (average +/- standard deviation [SD]) and a 90th percentile lifespan of 373 +/- 32 days. The maximum lifespan, however, is more than 745 days, and the average survival curve is characterised by a long tail because a small number of individuals lives twice as long as 90% of the population. Similar to earlier observations in a wide range of animals, in M. lignano the age-specific mortality rate increases exponentially, but levels off at the oldest ages. To compare the senescence of M. lignano with that of other ageing models, we determined the mortality rate doubling time, which is 0.20 +/- 0.02 years. As a result, we can conclude that M. lignano shows gradual senescence at a rate similar to the vertebrate ageing models Rattus norvegicus and Mus musculus. We argue that M. lignano is a suitable model for ageing and rejuvenation research, and especially for the role of stem cells in these processes, due to its accessible stem cell system and regeneration capacity, and the possibility of combining stem cell studies with demographic analyses.

  8. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L. [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States); Xu, C. Wilson, E-mail: wxu@nvcancer.org [Nevada Cancer Institute, Las Vegas, NV 89135 (United States)

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular

  9. SMARCAL1 Resolves Replication Stress at ALT Telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Kelli E; Maréchal, Alexandre; Flynn, Rachel Litman

    2016-02-09

    Cancer cells overcome replicative senescence by exploiting mechanisms of telomere elongation, a process often accomplished by reactivation of the enzyme telomerase. However, a subset of cancer cells lack telomerase activity and rely on the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway, a recombination-based mechanism of telomere elongation. Although the mechanisms regulating ALT are not fully defined, chronic replication stress at telomeres might prime these fragile regions for recombination. Here, we demonstrate that the replication stress response protein SMARCAL1 is a critical regulator of ALT activity. SMARCAL1 associates with ALT telomeres to resolve replication stress and ensure telomere stability. In the absence of SMARCAL1, persistently stalled replication forks at ALT telomeres deteriorate into DNA double-strand breaks promoting the formation of chromosome fusions. Our studies not only define a role for SMARCAL1 in ALT telomere maintenance, but also demonstrate that resolution of replication stress is a crucial step in the ALT mechanism. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Human progenitor cells isolated from the developing cortex undergo decreased neurogenesis and eventual senescence following expansion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, Lynda S.; Prowse, Karen R.; Wallace, Kyle; Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Svendsen, Clive N.

    2006-01-01

    Isolation of a true self-renewing stem cell from the human brain would be of great interest as a reliable source of neural tissue. Here, we report that human fetal cortical cells grown in epidermal growth factor expressed low levels of telomerase and telomeres in these cultures shortened over time leading to growth arrest after 30 weeks. Following leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) supplementation, growth rates and telomerase expression increased. This was best demonstrated following cell cycle synchronization and staining for telomerase using immunocytochemistry. This increase in activity resulted in the maintenance of telomeres at approximately 7 kb for more than 60 weeks in vitro. However, all cultures displayed a lack of oligodendrotye production, decreases in neurogenesis over time and underwent replicative senescence associated with increased expression of p21 before 70 weeks in vitro. Thus, under our culture conditions, these cells are not stable, multipotent, telomerase expressing self-renewing stem cells. They may be more accurately described as human neural progenitor cells (hNPC) with limited lifespan and bi-potent potential (neurons/astrocytes). Interestingly, hNPC follow a course of proliferation, neuronal production and growth arrest similar to that seen during expansion and development of the human cortex, thus providing a possible model neural system. Furthermore, due to their high expansion potential and lack of tumorogenicity, these cells remain a unique and safe source of tissue for clinical transplantation

  11. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Lluïsa; Garcia-Just, Alba; Amat, Concepció; Polo, Javier; Moretó, Miquel; Pérez-Bosque, Anna

    2017-12-11

    Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging) which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP), which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB), and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8) at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1). Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer's patches (all, p response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  12. Transcriptome profiling of aging Drosophila photoreceptors reveals gene expression trends that correlate with visual senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Hana; Medina, Patrick; Cooper, Daphne A; Escobedo, Spencer E; Rounds, Jeremiah; Brennan, Kaelan J; Vincent, Christopher; Miura, Pedro; Doerge, Rebecca; Weake, Vikki M

    2017-11-21

    Aging is associated with functional decline of neurons and increased incidence of both neurodegenerative and ocular disease. Photoreceptor neurons in Drosophila melanogaster provide a powerful model for studying the molecular changes involved in functional senescence of neurons since decreased visual behavior precedes retinal degeneration. Here, we sought to identify gene expression changes and the genomic features of differentially regulated genes in photoreceptors that contribute to visual senescence. To identify gene expression changes that could lead to visual senescence, we characterized the aging transcriptome of Drosophila sensory neurons highly enriched for photoreceptors. We profiled the nuclear transcriptome of genetically-labeled photoreceptors over a 40 day time course and identified increased expression of genes involved in stress and DNA damage response, and decreased expression of genes required for neuronal function. We further show that combinations of promoter motifs robustly identify age-regulated genes, suggesting that transcription factors are important in driving expression changes in aging photoreceptors. However, long, highly expressed and heavily spliced genes are also more likely to be downregulated with age, indicating that other mechanisms could contribute to expression changes at these genes. Lastly, we identify that circular RNAs (circRNAs) strongly increase during aging in photoreceptors. Overall, we identified changes in gene expression in aging Drosophila photoreceptors that could account for visual senescence. Further, we show that genomic features predict these age-related changes, suggesting potential mechanisms that could be targeted to slow the rate of age-associated visual decline.

  13. The p53-reactivating small molecule RITA induces senescence in head and neck cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ching Chuang

    Full Text Available TP53 is the most commonly mutated gene in head and neck cancer (HNSCC, with mutations being associated with resistance to conventional therapy. Restoring normal p53 function has previously been investigated via the use of RITA (reactivation of p53 and induction of tumor cell apoptosis, a small molecule that induces a conformational change in p53, leading to activation of its downstream targets. In the current study we found that RITA indeed exerts significant effects in HNSCC cells. However, in this model, we found that a significant outcome of RITA treatment was accelerated senescence. RITA-induced senescence in a variety of p53 backgrounds, including p53 null cells. Also, inhibition of p53 expression did not appear to significantly inhibit RITA-induced senescence. Thus, this phenomenon appears to be partially p53-independent. Additionally, RITA-induced senescence appears to be partially mediated by activation of the DNA damage response and SIRT1 (Silent information regulator T1 inhibition, with a synergistic effect seen by combining either ionizing radiation or SIRT1 inhibition with RITA treatment. These data point toward a novel mechanism of RITA function as well as hint to its possible therapeutic benefit in HNSCC.

  14. DNA Virus Replication Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Melanie; Speiseder, Thomas; Dobner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Viruses employ a variety of strategies to usurp and control cellular activities through the orchestrated recruitment of macromolecules to specific cytoplasmic or nuclear compartments. Formation of such specialized virus-induced cellular microenvironments, which have been termed viroplasms, virus factories, or virus replication centers, complexes, or compartments, depends on molecular interactions between viral and cellular factors that participate in viral genome expression and replication and are in some cases associated with sites of virion assembly. These virus-induced compartments function not only to recruit and concentrate factors required for essential steps of the viral replication cycle but also to control the cellular mechanisms of antiviral defense. In this review, we summarize characteristic features of viral replication compartments from different virus families and discuss similarities in the viral and cellular activities that are associated with their assembly and the functions they facilitate for viral replication. PMID:24257611

  15. MicroRNA-34a regulation of endothelial senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Takashi; Yagi, Shusuke [Department of Medicine, Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, West Henrietta, NY 14586 (United States); Yamakuchi, Munekazu, E-mail: munekazu_yamakuchi@urmc.rochester.edu [Department of Medicine, Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, West Henrietta, NY 14586 (United States)

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} MicroRNA-34a (miR-34a) regulates senescence and cell cycle progression in endothelial cells. {yields} MiR-34a expression increases during endothelial cell senescence and in older mice. {yields} SIRT1 is a miR-34a target gene in endothelial cells. {yields} SIRT1 mediates the effects of miR-34a upon cell senescence in endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Endothelial senescence is thought to play a role in cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that endothelial microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate endothelial survival and senescence. We found that miR-34a is highly expressed in primary endothelial cells. We observed that miR-34a expression increases in senescent human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and in heart and spleen of older mice. MiR-34a over-expression induces endothelial cell senescence and also suppresses cell proliferation by inhibiting cell cycle progression. Searching for how miR-34a affects senescence, we discovered that SIRT1 is a target of miR-34a. Over-expressing miR-34a inhibits SIRT1 protein expression, and knocking down miR-34a enhances SIRT1 expression. MiR-34a triggers endothelial senescence in part through SIRT1, since forced expression of SIRT1 blocks the ability of miR-34a to induce senescence. Our data suggest that miR-34a contributes to endothelial senescence through suppression of SIRT1.

  16. Leaf senescence and nutrient remobilisation in barley and wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, P L; Holm, P B; Krupinska, K

    2008-01-01

    in degradative, metabolic and regulatory processes that could be used in future strategies aimed at modifying the senescence process. The breeding of crops for characters related to senescence processes, e.g. higher yields and better nutrient use efficiency, is complex. Such breeding has to cope with the dilemma...

  17. Cellular senescence drives age-dependent hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogrodnik, M. (Mikolaj); Miwa, S. (Satomi); Tchkonia, T. (Tamar); Tiniakos, D. (Dina); Wilson, C.L. (Caroline L.); Lahat, A. (Albert); Day, C.P. (Christoper P.); A.D. Burt (Alastair); Palmer, A. (Allyson); Anstee, Q.M. (Quentin M.); Grellscheid, S.N. (Sushma Nagaraja); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers; S. Barnhoorn (Sander); Mann, D.A. (Derek A.); Bird, T.G. (Thomas G.); W.P. Vermeij (Wilbert); Kirkland, J.L. (James L.); Passos, J.F. (João F.); Von Zglinicki, T. (Thomas); Jurk, D. (Diana)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) increases with age. Cellular senescence refers to a state of irreversible cell-cycle arrest combined with the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and mitochondrial dysfunction. Senescent cells contribute to age-related tissue

  18. Mitochondria in Cell Senescence: Is Mitophagy the Weakest Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolchuk, Viktor I; Miwa, Satomi; Carroll, Bernadette; von Zglinicki, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Cell senescence is increasingly recognized as a major contributor to the loss of health and fitness associated with aging. Senescent cells accumulate dysfunctional mitochondria; oxidative phosphorylation efficiency is decreased and reactive oxygen species production is increased. In this review we will discuss how the turnover of mitochondria (a term referred to as mitophagy) is perturbed in senescence contributing to mitochondrial accumulation and Senescence-Associated Mitochondrial Dysfunction (SAMD). We will further explore the subsequent cellular consequences; in particular SAMD appears to be necessary for at least part of the specific Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) and may be responsible for tissue-level metabolic dysfunction that is associated with aging and obesity. Understanding the complex interplay between these major senescence-associated phenotypes will help to select and improve interventions that prolong healthy life in humans. Data for this review were identified by searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, and references from relevant articles using the search terms "mitochondria AND senescence", "(autophagy OR mitophagy) AND senescence", "mitophagy AND aging" and related terms. Additionally, searches were performed based on investigator names. Abstracts and reports from meetings were excluded. Articles published in English between 1995 and 2017 were included. Articles were selected according to their relevance to the topic as perceived by the authors. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Therapeutic interventions for aging : The case of cellular senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto-Gamez, Abel; Demaria, Marco

    Organismal aging is a multifactorial process characterized by the onset of degenerative conditions and cancer. One of the key drivers of aging is cellular senescence, a state of irreversible growth arrest induced by many pro-tumorigenic stresses. Senescent cells accumulate late in life and at sites

  20. Cellular senescence and tumor promotion : Is aging the key?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loaiza, Natalia; Demaria, Marco

    The senescence response is a potent tumor suppressor mechanism characterized by an irreversible growth arrest in response to potentially oncogenic signals to prevent the proliferation of damaged cells. Late in life, some of the features of senescent cells seem to mediate the development of

  1. Senescence-associated intrinsic mechanisms of osteoblast dysfunctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha; Trinquier, Anne Marie-Pierre Emilie

    2011-01-01

    factors, and intrinsic mechanisms caused by the osteoblast cellular senescence. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the intrinsic senescence mechanisms affecting osteoblastic functions and how they can be targeted in order to abolish age-related osteoblastic dysfunction and bone loss...

  2. Global Reorganization of the Nuclear Landscape in Senescent Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamir Chandra

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF. However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs, somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation.

  3. Global reorganization of the nuclear landscape in senescent cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Tamir; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Wingett, Steven William; Kirschner, Kristina; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Andrews, Simon; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf

    2015-02-03

    Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Delay of Iris flower senescence by protease inhibitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pak, C.; Doorn, van W.G.

    2005-01-01

    asterisk inside a circle sign Visible senescence of the flag tepals in Iris x hollandica (cv. Blue Magic) was preceded by a large increase in endoprotease activity. Just before visible senescence about half of total endoprotease activity was apparently due to cysteine proteases, somewhat less than

  5. Cellular and molecular aspects of quinoa leaf senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Burrieza, Hernán Pablo; Rizzo, Axel Joel; Martínez-Tosar, Leandro Julián; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-09-01

    During leaf senescence, degradation of chloroplasts precede to changes in nuclei and other cytoplasmic organelles, RuBisCO stability is progressively lost, grana lose their structure, plastidial DNA becomes distorted and degraded, the number of plastoglobuli increases and abundant senescence-associated vesicles containing electronically dense particles emerge from chloroplasts pouring their content into the central vacuole. This study examines quinoa leaf tissues during development and senescence using a range of well-established markers of programmed cell death (PCD), including: morphological changes in nuclei and chloroplasts, degradation of RuBisCO, changes in chlorophyll content, DNA degradation, variations in ploidy levels, and changes in nuclease profiles. TUNEL reaction and DNA electrophoresis demonstrated that DNA fragmentation in nuclei occurs at early senescence, which correlates with induction of specific nucleases. During senescence, metabolic activity is high and nuclei endoreduplicate, peaking at 4C. At this time, TEM images showed some healthy nuclei with condensed chromatin and nucleoli. We have found that DNA fragmentation, induction of senescence-associated nucleases and endoreduplication take place during leaf senescence. This provides a starting point for further research aiming to identify key genes involved in the senescence of quinoa leaves. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Proteomic responses of switchgrass and prairie cordgrass to senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senescence in biofuel grasses is a critical issue because early senescence decreases potential biomass production by limiting aerial growth and development. 2-Dimensional,differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) followed by mass spectrometry of selected protein spots was used to evaluate differ...

  7. Cellular senescence and tumor promotion: Is aging the key?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loaiza, Natalia; Demaria, Marco

    2016-04-01

    The senescence response is a potent tumor suppressor mechanism characterized by an irreversible growth arrest in response to potentially oncogenic signals to prevent the proliferation of damaged cells. Late in life, some of the features of senescent cells seem to mediate the development of age-related pathologies, including cancer. In the present review, we present a summary of the current knowledge regarding the causes, effector pathways and cellular features of senescence. We also discuss how the senescence response, initially a tumor suppressor mechanism, turns into a tumor promoter apparently as a consequence of aging. We argue that three age-related phenomena--senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) dysregulation, decline in the immune system function and genomic instability--could contribute, independently or synergistically, to deteriorate the efficacy of the senescence response in stopping cancer. As a consequence, senescent cells could be considered premalignant cells, and targeting senescent cells could be a preventive and therapeutic strategy against cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. To grow old: regulatory role of ethylene in senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senescence is the final stage in the development of an organ or whole plant. It is a genetically programmed process controlled by both developmental and environmental signals. Age-related processes and signals underlie the onset of senescence in both organs (leaf, flower, and fruit) and the whole ...

  9. Cellular Senescence in Type 2 Diabetes: A Therapeutic Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Tchkonia, Tamara; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.; Chini, Eduardo N.; Xu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a fundamental aging mechanism that has been implicated in many age-related diseases and is a significant cause of tissue dysfunction. Accumulation of senescent cells occurs during aging and is also seen in the context of obesity and diabetes. Senescent cells may play a role in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis through direct impact on pancreatic β-cell function, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)-mediated tissue damage, and involvement in adipose tissue dysfunction. In turn, metabolic and signaling changes seen in diabetes, such as high circulating glucose, altered lipid metabolism, and growth hormone axis perturbations, can promote senescent cell formation. Thus, senescent cells might be part of a pathogenic loop in diabetes, as both a cause and consequence of metabolic changes and tissue damage. Therapeutic targeting of a basic aging mechanism such as cellular senescence may have a large impact on disease pathogenesis and could be more effective in preventing the progression of diabetes complications than currently available therapies that have limited impact on already existing tissue damage. Therefore, senescent cells and the SASP represent significant opportunities for advancement in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes and its complications. PMID:26106186

  10. Senescence and programmed cell death : substance or semantics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The terms senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) have led to some confusion. Senescence as visibly observed in, for example, leaf yellowing and petal wilting, has often been taken to be synonymous with the programmed death of the constituent cells. PCD also obviously refers to cells, which show

  11. The Pace and Shape of Senescence in Angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2013-01-01

    not senesce. We find that growth form relates to differences in pace, that is, life span, as woody plants are typically longer lived than nonwoody plants, while differences in shape, that is, whether or not angiosperms senesce, are related to ancestral history. 5. Synthesis: The age trajectory of mortality...

  12. Polyamines, peroxidase and proteins involved in the senescence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Senescence is the natural aging process at the cellular level or range of phenomena associated with this process. The objective of this review was to show the involvement of substances that may be related to senescence in plants, such as polyamines, peroxidase and proteins. These substances were related with the ...

  13. Dissecting the metabolic role of mitochondria during developmental leaf senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrobok, Daria; Law, Simon R.; Brouwer, Bas; Lindén, Pernilla; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Liebsch, Daniela; Narsai, Reena; Szal, Bozena; Moritz, Thomas; Rouhier, Nicolas; Whelan, James; Gardeström, Per; Keech, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in

  14. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, M.J.; White, T.A.; Evans, G.; Tonne, J.M.; Verzosa, G.C.; Stout, M.B.; Mazula, D.L.; Palmer, A.K.; Baker, D.J.; Jensen, M.D.; Torbenson, M.S.; Miller, J.D.; Ikeda, Y.; Tchkonia, T.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Kirkland, J.L.; LeBrasseur, N.K.

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the

  15. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new developments since 2006. In addition, we will cover the development of antivirals that interfere with human adenovirus (HAdV) replication and the impact of HAdV on human disease. PMID:23388625

  16. Study of Cotton Leaf Senescence Induced by Alternaria alternata Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wenwei; Zheng, Na; Zhai, Weibo; Qi, Fangjun

    2018-01-01

    Premature leaf senescence in cotton, which often happens during the mid to late growth period, has been occurring with an increasing frequency in many cotton-growing areas and causing serious reduction in yield and quality. One of the key factors causing cotton leaf senescence is the infection of Alternaria leaf spot pathogens (Alternaria species), which often happens when cotton plants encounter adverse environmental conditions, such as chilling stress and physiological impairment. Stressed cotton leaves are apt to be infected by Alternaria leaf spot pathogens (Alternaria alternata) because of the reduction in disease resistance, leading to the initiation of leaf senescence. Here we describe the induction of cotton leaf senescence by Alternaria alternata infection, including the evaluation of the disease index and measure of physiological impairment associated with cotton leaf senescence and analysis of possible molecular mechanism using microarray.

  17. Senescence and aging: Causes, consequences, and therapeutic avenues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Domhnall; Gil, Jesús

    2018-01-02

    Aging is the major risk factor for cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. Although we are far from understanding the biological basis of aging, research suggests that targeting the aging process itself could ameliorate many age-related pathologies. Senescence is a cellular response characterized by a stable growth arrest and other phenotypic alterations that include a proinflammatory secretome. Senescence plays roles in normal development, maintains tissue homeostasis, and limits tumor progression. However, senescence has also been implicated as a major cause of age-related disease. In this regard, recent experimental evidence has shown that the genetic or pharmacological ablation of senescent cells extends life span and improves health span. Here, we review the cellular and molecular links between cellular senescence and aging and discuss the novel therapeutic avenues that this connection opens. © 2018 McHugh and Gil.

  18. Control of senescence in rumex leaf discs by gibberellic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldthwaite, J J; Laetsch, W M

    1968-11-01

    The kinetics of chlorophyll and protein decomposition and the effect of gibberellic acid (GA) were examined in senescing leaf discs of Rumex crispus and R. obtusifolius. Loss of Rumex total chlorophyll proceeds at a slow rate for about 2 days followed by a period of rapid logarithmic decline. Chlorophyll b is lost at a slightly faster rate than chlorophyll a during senescence in discs as well as in situ. GA causes a complete cessation of net chlorophyll and protein degradation for several days in Rumex, in contrast to the incomplete senescence inhibition generally observed with cytokinins. GA is fully effective even when added at the middle of the logarithmic phase of chlorophyll loss. Senescence inhibition by GA is apparently gradually reversed upon GA removal. The cytokinins, kinetin and 6-benzylaminopurine, were also effective in Rumex leaf discs, indicating that the senescence retarding effect was not restricted to the gibberellins.

  19. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  20. Cell senescence: role in aging and age-related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Judith; Robert, Ladislas

    2014-01-01

    Cell senescence is one of the major paradigms of aging research. It started with the demonstration by L. Hayflick of the limited number of divisions by normal, nontransformed cells, not shown by transformed malignant cells, this processes being largely regulated by the telomere-telomerase system. A complete renewal of this discipline came from the demonstration that cells can enter senescence at any time by an anti-oncogene-triggered pathway, enabling them to escape malignancy. The senescent cell became a major actor of the aging process, among others, by the acquisition of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This chapter is devoted to the regulatory process involved in the acquisition of the senescent cell phenotype and its role in organismal aging.

  1. Evasion of Cell Senescence Leads to Medulloblastoma Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Tamayo-Orrego

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available How brain tumors progress from precancerous lesions to advanced cancers is not well understood. Using Ptch1+/− mice to study medulloblastoma progression, we found that Ptch1 loss of heterozygosity (LOH is an early event that is associated with high levels of cell senescence in preneoplasia. In contrast, advanced tumors have evaded senescence. Remarkably, we discovered that the majority of advanced medulloblastomas display either spontaneous, somatic p53 mutations or Cdkn2a locus inactivation. Consistent with senescence evasion, these p53 mutations are always subsequent to Ptch1 LOH. Introduction of a p53 mutation prevents senescence, accelerates tumor formation, and increases medulloblastoma incidence. Altogether, our results show that evasion of senescence associated with Ptch1 LOH allows progression to advanced tumors.

  2. Histone Chaperone Jun Dimerization Protein 2 (JDP2: Role in Cellular Senescence and Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chang Huang

    2010-10-01

    mechanisms that underlie the action of JDP2 in cellular aging and replicative senescence by mediating the dissociation of PRCs from the p16Ink4a/Arf locus are discussed.

  3. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  4. Replication and extension of a hierarchical model of social anxiety and depression: fear of positive evaluation as a key unique factor in social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    Wang, Hsu, Chiu, and Liang (2012, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 26, 215-224) recently proposed a hierarchical model of social interaction anxiety and depression to account for both the commonalities and distinctions between these conditions. In the present paper, this model was extended to more broadly encompass the symptoms of social anxiety disorder, and replicated in a large unselected, undergraduate sample (n = 585). Structural equation modeling (SEM) and hierarchical regression analyses were employed. Negative affect and positive affect were conceptualized as general factors shared by social anxiety and depression; fear of negative evaluation (FNE) and disqualification of positive social outcomes were operationalized as specific factors, and fear of positive evaluation (FPE) was operationalized as a factor unique to social anxiety. This extended hierarchical model explicates structural relationships among these factors, in which the higher-level, general factors (i.e., high negative affect and low positive affect) represent vulnerability markers of both social anxiety and depression, and the lower-level factors (i.e., FNE, disqualification of positive social outcomes, and FPE) are the dimensions of specific cognitive features. Results from SEM and hierarchical regression analyses converged in support of the extended model. FPE is further supported as a key symptom that differentiates social anxiety from depression.

  5. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  6. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J. G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence Hai-Chun Jing1,2, Lisa Anderson3, Marcel J.G. Sturre1, Jacques Hille1 and Paul P. Dijkwel1,* 1Molecular Biology of Plants, Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and

  7. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Jajic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2 has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment.

  8. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  9. Before senescence: the evolutionary demography of ontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitis, Daniel A

    2011-03-22

    The age-specific mortality curve for many species, including humans, is U-shaped: mortality declines with age in the developing cohort (ontogenescence) before increasing with age (senescence). The field of evolutionary demography has long focused on understanding the evolution of senescence while largely failing to address the evolution of ontogenescence. The current review is the first to gather the few available hypotheses addressing the evolution of ontogenescence, examine the basis and assumptions of each and ask what the phylogenetic extent of ontogenescence may be. Ontogenescence is among the most widespread of life-history traits, occurring in every population for which I have found sufficiently detailed data, in major groups throughout the eukaryotes, across many causes of death and many life-history types. Hypotheses seeking to explain ontogenescence include those based on kin selection, the acquisition of robustness, heterogeneous frailties and life-history optimization. I propose a further hypothesis, arguing that mortality drops with age because most transitions that could trigger the risks caused by genetic and developmental malfunctions are concentrated in early life. Of these hypotheses, only those that frame ontogenescence as an evolutionary by-product rather than an adaptation can explain the tremendous diversity of organisms and environments in which it occurs.

  10. Replicator dynamics in value chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Savin, Ivan; Vannuccini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The pure model of replicator dynamics though providing important insights in the evolution of markets has not found much of empirical support. This paper extends the model to the case of firms vertically integrated in value chains. We show that i) by taking value chains into account, the replicator...... dynamics may revert its effect. In these regressive developments of market selection, firms with low fitness expand because of being integrated with highly fit partners, and the other way around; ii) allowing partner's switching within a value chain illustrates that periods of instability in the early...... stage of industry life-cycle may be the result of an 'optimization' of partners within a value chain providing a novel and simple explanation to the evidence discussed by Mazzucato (1998); iii) there are distinct differences in the contribution to market selection between the layers of a value chain...

  11. Identification and characterization of contrasting sunflower genotypes to early leaf senescence process combining molecular and physiological studies (Helianthus annuus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gialdi, A I; Moschen, S; Villán, C S; López Fernández, M P; Maldonado, S; Paniego, N; Heinz, R A; Fernandez, P

    2016-09-01

    Leaf senescence is a complex mechanism ruled by multiple genetic and environmental variables that affect crop yields. It is the last stage in leaf development, is characterized by an active decline in photosynthetic rate, nutrients recycling and cell death. The aim of this work was to identify contrasting sunflower inbred lines differing in leaf senescence and to deepen the study of this process in sunflower. Ten sunflower genotypes, previously selected by physiological analysis from 150 inbred genotypes, were evaluated under field conditions through physiological, cytological and molecular analysis. The physiological measurement allowed the identification of two contrasting senescence inbred lines, R453 and B481-6, with an increase in yield in the senescence delayed genotype. These findings were confirmed by cytological and molecular analysis using TUNEL, genomic DNA gel electrophoresis, flow sorting and gene expression analysis by qPCR. These results allowed the selection of the two most promising contrasting genotypes, which enables future studies and the identification of new biomarkers associated to early senescence in sunflower. In addition, they allowed the tuning of cytological techniques for a non-model species and its integration with molecular variables. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Histological evidence of oxidative stress and premature senescence in preterm premature rupture of the human fetal membranes recapitulated in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ramkumar; Boldogh, Istvan; Hawkins, Hal K; Woodson, Michael; Polettini, Jossimara; Syed, Tariq Ali; Fortunato, Stephen J; Saade, George R; Papaconstantinou, John; Taylor, Robert N

    2014-06-01

    Preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes (pPROM) may lead to preterm births (PTBs). We investigated premature senescence of fetal membranes in women with pPROM and spontaneous PTB with intact membranes (membrane senescence phenotype by oxidative stress in vitro. IHC was performed for p53, p21, and phospho (p)-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as markers of senescence phenotype in pPROM, PTBs, and term births. Term fetal membranes were exposed to cigarette smoke extract to induce oxidative stress. Western blots documented p-p53 and p-p38 MAPK. Transmission electron microscopy assessed cellular morphologic features in clinical and cigarette smoke extract-treated membranes. A total of 80% of pPROM cells and >60% of term cells were positive for all three senescence phenotype markers, and concentrations were higher than in PTBs (P membranes from PTB and term birth pregnancies, whereas only membranes in vivo and after cigarette smoke extract treatment in vitro but was less apparent in PTBs. Histologic and biochemical resemblance of pPROM and term membranes suggests premature senescence of the membranes is a mechanistic feature in pPROM, and this can be phenocopied in an in vitro model. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Senescence of chondrocytes in aging articular cartilage: GADD45β mediates p21 expression in association with C/EBPβ in senescence-accelerated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Hirofumi; Sakakima, Harutoshi; Tsuchimochi, Kaneyuki; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Komiya, Setsuro; Goldring, Mary B; Ijiri, Kosei

    2011-04-15

    Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 45β (GADD45β) is expressed in normal and early osteoarthritic articular cartilage. We recently reported that GADD45β enhances CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ) activation in vitro. This study was undertaken in order to determine whether GADD45β is expressed with C/EBPβ in aging articular cartilage. We also investigated whether the synergistic expression of GADD45β and C/EBPβ may be involved in the mechanism of chondrocyte senescence. Senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP1) were used as a model of aging. GADD45β, C/EBPβ, and p21 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. A luciferase reporter assay using ATDC5 cells was performed in order to examine p21 as a target gene of the GADD45β/C/EBPβ cascade. GADD45β exhibited increased expression in the aging articular cartilage of SAMP1 mice compared to that in control mice. The co-localization of GADD45β and C/EBPβ was confirmed by double immunostaining. The synergistic mechanisms of GADD45β and C/EBPβ on the gene regulation of p21, a molecule related to cellular senescence, were verified by a p21-luciferase reporter assay. Co-expression of C/EBPβ and p21 was confirmed. These observations suggest that the synergism between GADD45β and C/EBPβ may play an important role in cellular senescence in the aging articular cartilage. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Different transcriptional profiling between senescent and non-senescent human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) by Omeprazole and Lansoprazole treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Piacenza, Francesco; Provinciali, Mauro; Maggio, Marcello G; Corsonello, Andrea; Lattanzio, Fabrizia

    2017-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that high dose and/or long term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events in older patients, but mechanisms underlying these detrimental effects are not known. Taking into account that the senescent endothelial cells have been implicated in the genesis or promotion of age-related cardiovascular disease, we hypothesized an active role of PPIs in senescent cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the changes in gene expression occurring in senescent and non-senescent human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) following Omeprazole (OPZ) or Lansoprazole (LPZ) treatment. Here, we show that atherogenic response is among the most regulated processes in PPI-treated HCAECs. PPIs induced down-regulation of anti-atherogenic chemokines (CXCL11, CXCL12 and CX3CL1) in senescent but not in non-senescent cells, while the same chemokines were up-regulated in untreated senescent cells. These findings support the hypothesis that up-regulated anti-atherogenic chemokines may represent a defensive mechanism against atherosclerosis during cellular senescence, and suggest that PPIs could activate pro-atherogenic pathways by changing the secretory phenotype of senescent HCAECs. Moreover, the genes coding for fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4) and piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 (PIEZO2) were modulated by PPIs treatment with respect to untreated cells. In conclusions, our results show that long-term and high dose use of PPI could change the secretory phenotype of senescent cells, suggesting one of the potential mechanisms by which use of PPI can increase adverse outcomes in older subjects.

  15. Senescent mouse cells fail to overtly regulate the HIRA histone chaperone and do not form robust Senescence Associated Heterochromatin Foci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enders Greg H

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular senescence is a permanent growth arrest that occurs in response to cellular stressors, such as telomere shortening or activation of oncogenes. Although the process of senescence growth arrest is somewhat conserved between mouse and human cells, there are some critical differences in the molecular pathways of senescence between these two species. Recent studies in human fibroblasts have defined a cell signaling pathway that is initiated by repression of a specific Wnt ligand, Wnt2. This, in turn, activates a histone chaperone HIRA, and culminates in formation of specialized punctate domains of facultative heterochromatin, called Senescence-Associated Heterochromatin Foci (SAHF, that are enriched in the histone variant, macroH2A. SAHF are thought to repress expression of proliferation-promoting genes, thereby contributing to senescence-associated proliferation arrest. We asked whether this Wnt2-HIRA-SAHF pathway is conserved in mouse fibroblasts. Results We show that mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and mouse skin fibroblasts, do not form robust punctate SAHF in response to an activated Ras oncogene or shortened telomeres. However, senescent MEFs do exhibit elevated levels of macroH2A staining throughout the nucleus as a whole. Consistent with their failure to fully activate the SAHF assembly pathway, the Wnt2-HIRA signaling axis is not overtly regulated between proliferating and senescent mouse cells. Conclusions In addition to the previously defined differences between mouse and human cells in the mechanisms and phenotypes associated with senescence, we conclude that senescent mouse and human fibroblasts also differ at the level of chromatin and the signaling pathways used to regulate chromatin. These differences between human and mouse senescence may contribute to the increased propensity of mouse fibroblasts (and perhaps other mouse cell types to become immortalized and transformed, compared to human cells.

  16. A validation test for Adagio through replication of Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw JAS3D models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Byoung Yoon

    2013-06-01

    JAS3D, a three dimensional iterative solid mechanics code, has been used for structural analyses for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve system since the 1990s. JAS3D is no longer supported by Sandia National Laboratories, and has been replaced by Adagio. To validate the transition from JAS3D to Adagio, the existing JAS3D input decks and user subroutines for Bayou Choctaw and Big Hill models were converted for use with Adagio. The calculation results from the Adagio runs are compared to the JAS3D. Since the Adagio results are very similar to the JAS3D results, Adagio is judged to be performing satisfactorily.

  17. Senescent phenotypes of skin fibroblasts from patients with Tangier disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Fumihiko; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Ikegami, Chiaki; Sandoval, Jose C.; Oku, Hiroyuki; Yuasa-Kawase, Miyako; Tsubakio-Yamamoto, Kazumi; Koseki, Masahiro; Masuda, Daisaku; Tsujii, Ken-ichi; Ishigami, Masato; Nishida, Makoto; Shimomura, Iichiro; Hori, Masatsugu; Yamashita, Shizuya

    2007-01-01

    Tangier disease (TD) is characterized by a deficiency of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in plasma and patients with TD have an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Recently, we reported that fibroblasts from TD exhibited large and flattened morphology, which is often observed in senescent cells. On the other hand, data have accumulated to show the relationship between cellular senescence and development of atherosclerotic CAD. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether TD fibroblasts exhibited cellular senescence. The proliferation of TD fibroblasts was gradually decreased at population doubling level (PDL) ∼10 compared with control cells. TD cells practically ceased proliferation at PDL ∼30. DNA synthesis was markedly decreased in TD fibroblasts. TD cells exhibited a higher positive rate for senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal), which is one of the biomarkers of cellular senescence in vitro. These data showed that TD cells reached cellular senescence at an earlier PDL compared with controls. Although, there was no difference in the telomere length of fibroblasts between TD and controls at the earlier passage (PDL 6), the telomere length of TD cells was shorter than that of controls at the late passage (PDL 25). Taken together, the current study demonstrates that the late-passaged TD fibroblasts showed senescent phenotype in vitro, which might be related to the increased cardiovascular manifestations in TD patients

  18. Density-gradient centrifugation enables the purification of cultured corneal endothelial cells for cell therapy by eliminating senescent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Naoki; Kusakabe, Ayaka; Hirano, Hiroatsu; Inoue, Ryota; Okazaki, Yugo; Nakano, Shinichiro; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Koizumi, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    The corneal endothelium is essential for maintaining corneal transparency; therefore, corneal endothelial dysfunction causes serious vision loss. Tissue engineering-based therapy is potentially a less invasive and more effective therapeutic modality. We recently started a first-in-man clinical trial of cell-based therapy for treating corneal endothelial dysfunction in Japan. However, the senescence of corneal endothelial cells (CECs) during the serial passage culture needed to obtain massive quantities of cells for clinical use is a serious technical obstacle preventing the push of this regenerative therapy to clinical settings. Here, we show evidence from an animal model confirming that senescent cells are less effective in cell therapy. In addition, we propose that density-gradient centrifugation can eliminate the senescent cells and purify high potency CECs for clinical use. This simple technique might be applicable for other types of cells in the settings of regenerative medicine. PMID:26443440

  19. Proteolytic activity during senescence of plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    Although information has rapidly developed concerning the intracellular localization of plant proteins, relatively few reports concern the intracellular location of endo- and exo-proteolytic activities. Relatively few proteases have been purified, characterized, and associated with a specific cellular location. With the exception of the processing proteases involved in transport of proteins across membranes, little progress has yet been made concerning determination of in vivo products of specific proteases. Information on the turnover of individual proteins and the assessment of rate-limiting steps in pathways as proteins are turned over is steadily appearing. Since chloroplasts are the major site of both protein synthesis and, during senescence, degradation, it was important to show unambiguously that chloroplasts can degrade their own constituents. Another important contribution was to obtain evidence that the chloroplasts contain proteases capable of degrading their constituents. This work has been more tenuous because of the low activities found and the possibility of contamination by vacuolar enzymes during the isolation of organelles. The possible targeting of cytoplasmic proteins for degradation by facilitating their transport into vacuoles is a field which hopefully will develop more rapidly in the future. Information on targeting of proteins for degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub) degradation pathway is developing rapidly. Future research must determine how much unity exists across the different eukaryotic systems. At present, it has important implications for protein turnover in plants, since apparently Ub is involved in the degradation of phytochrome. Little information has been developed regarding what triggers increased proteolysis with the onset of senescence, although it appears to involve protein synthesis. Thus far, the evidence indicates that the complement of proteases prior to senescence is sufficient to carry out the observed protein

  20. Differential replicative ability of clinical dengue virus isolates in an immunocompetent C57BL/6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Veridiana Ester; dos Santos-Junior, Nilton Nascimento; Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio; Soares, Adriana Moreira; Lourencini, Rafael; Trabuco, Amanda Cristina; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2015-09-29

    Several experimental animal models have been used to study the pathogenesis of dengue disease; however, most of the studies used laboratory-adapted viruses, which lack the virulence of viruses circulating in humans. The aim of this study was to analyze the ability of clinical Dengue virus (DENV) isolates (D2/BR/RP/RMB/09 and D3/BR/SL3/02) to infect immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice. Two strategies of intraperitoneal infection, which were based on the concept of the antibody dependent enhancement phenomenon, were used. In one strategy, the animals were inoculated with macrophages infected in vitro with dengue viruses, which were incubated with enhancing antibodies, and in the other strategy, the animals were inoculated with a complex of enhancing antibodies and dengue viruses. The D3/BR/SL3/08 isolate showed a higher ability of infection (virus RNA was more frequently detected in the serum and in several organs) in the experimental model compared to both the D2/BR/RP/RMB/2009 isolate and a laboratory adapted DENV-1 strain (Mochizuki strain), regardless of the infection strategy used. The main features of the D3/BR/SL3/08 isolate were its neuroinvasiveness and the induction of an extended period of viremia. Enhancing antibodies did not influence on the infection of animals when macrophages were used, but the level of viremia was increased when they were used as a complex with a D3/BR/SL3/02 isolate. We showed that DENV isolates could infect immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, which have has been previously used to study some aspect of dengue disease when infected with laboratory adapted strains. DENV genome was detected in the same organs found in humans when autopsy and biopsy samples were analyzed, showing that C57BL/6 mice reproduce some aspects of the DENV tropism observed in humans. The main difference observed between the D3/BR/SL3/02 and D2/BR/RP/RMB/2009 clinical isolates was the neuroinvasive ability of the first one. Neuroinvasiveness has been described in some DENV

  1. Animal Mitochondrial DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Grzegorz L.; Oliveira, Marcos T.; Kaguni, Laurie S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in the field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication highlight the diversity of both the mechanisms utilized and the structural and functional organization of the proteins at mtDNA replication fork, despite the simplicity of the animal mtDNA genome. DNA polymerase γ, mtDNA helicase and mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein- the key replisome proteins, have evolved distinct structural features and biochemical properties. These appear to be correlated with mtDNA genomic features in different metazoan taxa and with their modes of DNA replication, although a substantial integrative research is warranted to establish firmly these links. To date, several modes of mtDNA replication have been described for animals: rolling circle, theta, strand-displacement, and RITOLS/bootlace. Resolution of a continuing controversy relevant to mtDNA replication in mammals/vertebrates will have a direct impact on the mechanistic interpretation of mtDNA-related human diseases. Here we review these subjects, integrating earlier and recent data to provide a perspective on the major challenges for future research. PMID:27241933

  2. Age distributions of Greenlandic dwarf shrubs support concept of negligible actuarial senescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dahlgren, J. P.; Rizzi, S.; Schweingruber, F. H.; Hellmann, L.; Büntgen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2016), č. článku e01521. ISSN 2150-8925 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.20.0248 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : actuarial senescence * age distribution * age structure * Arctic dwarf shrubs * dendroecology * individual survival * mortality * penalized composite link model * plant aging * shrub demography Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.490, year: 2016

  3. Contrasting patterns of cytokinins between years in senescing aspen leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Edlund, E.; Novák, Ondřej; Karady, M.; Ljung, K.; Jansson, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2017), s. 622-634 ISSN 0140-7791 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : leaf senescence * arabidopsis-thaliana * autumn senescence * gene-expression * populus-trichocarpa * mass-spectrometry * tobacco plants * translocation * biosynthesis * identification * autumn senescence * gene expression * metabolism * Populus tremula * profiling Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany Impact factor: 6.173, year: 2016

  4. Influences of sex and activity level on physiological changes in individual adult sockeye salmon during rapid senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Kimberly A; Hinch, Scott G; Healey, Michael C; Patterson, David A; Larsson, Stefan; Farrell, Anthony P

    2010-01-01

    A noninvasive biopsy protocol was used to sample plasma and gill tissue in individual sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) during the critical life stage associated with spawning-arrival at a spawning channel through senescence to death several days later. Our main objective was to characterize the physiological changes associated with rapid senescence in terms of the physiological stress/cortisol hypersecretion model and the energy exhaustion model. Salmon lived an average of 5 d in the spawning channel, during which time there were three major physiological trends that were independent of sexual status: a large increase in plasma indicators of stress and exercise (i.e., lactate and cortisol), a decrease in the major plasma ions (i.e., Cl(-) and Na(+)) and osmolality, and a decrease in gross somatic energy reserves. Contrary to a generalized stress response, plasma glucose decreased in approximately 2/3 of the fish after arrival, as opposed to increasing. Furthermore, plasma cortisol levels at spawning-ground arrival were not correlated with the degree of ionoregulatory changes during rapid senescence. One mechanism of mortality in some fish may involve the exhaustion of energy reserves, resulting in the inability to mobilize plasma glucose. Sex had a significant modulating effect on the degree of physiological change. Females exhibited a greater magnitude of change for gross somatic energy, osmolality, and plasma concentrations of Cl(-), Na(+), cortisol, testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone, 17,20beta-progesterone, and estradiol. The activity level of an individual on the spawning grounds appeared to influence the degree of some physiological changes during senescence. For example, males that received a greater frequency of attacks exhibited larger net decreases in plasma 11-ketotestosterone while on the spawning grounds. These results suggest that rapid senescence on spawning grounds is influenced by multiple physiological processes and perhaps behavior. This study

  5. Resveratrol prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence and proliferative dysfunction by activating the AMPK-FOXO3 cascade in cultured primary human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Ido

    Full Text Available The aging process is perceived as resulting from a combination of intrinsic factors such as changes in intracellular signaling and extrinsic factors, most notably environmental stressors. In skin, the relationship between intrinsic changes and keratinocyte function is not clearly understood. Previously, we found that increasing the activity of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK suppressed senescence in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-treated human primary keratinocytes, a model of oxidative stress-induced cellular aging. Using this model in the present study, we observed that resveratrol, an agent that increases the activities of both AMPK and sirtuins, ameliorated two age-associated phenotypes: cellular senescence and proliferative dysfunction. In addition, we found that treatment of keratinocytes with Ex527, a specific inhibitor of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, attenuated the ability of resveratrol to suppress senescence. In keeping with the latter observation, we noted that compared to non-senescent keratinocytes, senescent cells lacked SIRT1. In addition to these effects on H2O2-induced senescence, resveratrol also prevented the H2O2-induced decrease in proliferation (as indicated by 3H-thymidine incorporation in the presence of insulin. This effect was abrogated by inhibition of AMPK but not SIRT1. Compared to endothelium, we found that human keratinocytes expressed relatively high levels of Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3, a downstream target of both AMPK and SIRT1. Treatment of keratinocytes with resveratrol transactivated FOXO3 and increased the expression of its target genes including catalase. Resveratrol's effects on both senescence and proliferation disappeared when FOXO3 was knocked down. Finally, we performed an exploratory study which showed that skin from humans over 50 years old had lower AMPK activity than skin from individuals under age 20. Collectively, these findings suggest that the effects of resveratrol on keratinocyte senescence and proliferation

  6. Senescing sexual ornaments recover after a sabbatical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velando, Alberto; Drummond, Hugh; Torres, Roxana

    2010-04-23

    Somatic deterioration in ageing animals may arise from allocation of resources to reproduction at the expense of repair and maintenance. Thus, accumulated reproductive effort is likely to progressively limit the expression of sexual ornaments at older ages. We analysed the effect of age and reproductive effort on the sexual attractiveness (foot colour) of male blue-footed boobies. Using a long-term dataset, we found that, as animals age and accumulate reproductive events, the expression of foot colour deteriorates. In addition, after non-breeding events males displayed more colourful feet compared with males that reproduced the year before, suggesting that sabbatical years facilitate recovery. Our results indirectly support the idea that allocation of resources to reproduction limits sexual attractiveness and that animals could cope with the negative effects of senescence on sexual ornaments by skipping some breeding events.

  7. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  8. Registered Replication Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwmeester, S.; Verkoeijen, P. P.J.L.; Aczel, B.

    2017-01-01

    In an anonymous 4-person economic game, participants contributed more money to a common project (i.e., cooperated) when required to decide quickly than when forced to delay their decision (Rand, Greene & Nowak, 2012), a pattern consistent with the social heuristics hypothesis proposed by Rand...... and colleagues. The results of studies using time pressure have been mixed, with some replication attempts observing similar patterns (e.g., Rand et al., 2014) and others observing null effects (e.g., Tinghög et al., 2013; Verkoeijen & Bouwmeester, 2014). This Registered Replication Report (RRR) assessed...... the size and variability of the effect of time pressure on cooperative decisions by combining 21 separate, preregistered replications of the critical conditions from Study 7 of the original article (Rand et al., 2012). The primary planned analysis used data from all participants who were randomly assigned...

  9. Impact of senescence-associated secretory phenotype and its potential as a therapeutic target for senescence-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sugiko; Kawamoto, Shimpei; Ohtani, Naoko; Hara, Eiji

    2017-04-01

    "Cellular senescence" is a state in which cells undergo irreversible cell cycle arrest in response to a variety of cellular stresses. Once cells senesce, they are strongly resistant to any mitogens, including oncogenic stimuli. Therefore, cellular senescence has been assumed to be a potent anticancer mechanism. Although irreversible cell-cycle arrest is traditionally considered the major characteristic of senescent cells, recent studies have revealed some additional functions. Most noteworthy is the increased secretion of various secretory proteins, such as inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and MMPs, into the surrounding extracellular fluid. These newly recognized senescent phenotypes, termed senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs), reportedly contribute to tumor suppression, wound healing, embryonic development, and even tumorigenesis promotion. Thus, SASPs appear to be beneficial or deleterious, depending on the biological context. As senescent cells are known to accumulate during the aging process in vivo, it is quite possible that their accumulation in aged tissues promotes age-associated functional decline and various diseases, including cancers, at least to some extent. Here, we focus on and discuss the functional and regulatory network of SASPs toward opening up new possibilities for controlling aging and aging-associated diseases. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  10. Transcriptional profile of genes involved in ascorbate glutathione cycle in senescing leaves for an early senescence leaf (esl) rice mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaowei; Su, Da; Lei, Bingting; Wang, Fubiao; Geng, Wei; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fangmin

    2015-03-15

    To clarify the complex relationship between ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle and H2O2-induced leaf senescence, the genotype-dependent difference in some senescence-related physiological parameters and the transcript levels and the temporal patterns of genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle during leaf senescence were investigated using two rice genotypes, namely, the early senescence leaf (esl) mutant and its wild type. Meanwhile, the triggering effect of exogenous H2O2 on the expression of OsAPX genes was examined using detached leaves. The results showed that the esl mutant had higher H2O2 level than its wild type at the initial stage of leaf senescence. At transcriptional level, the association of expression of various genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle with leaf senescence was isoform dependent. For OsAPXs, the transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes (OsAPX1 and OsAPX2), thylakoid-bound OsAPX8, chloroplastic OsAPX7 and peroxisomal OsAPX4 exhibited remarkable genotype-dependent variation in their expression levels and temporal patterns during leaf senescence, there were significantly increasing transcripts of OsAXP1 and OsAPX7, severely repressed transcripts of OsAPX4 and OsAPX8 for the esl rice at the initial leaf senescence. In contrast, the repressing transcript of OsAPX8 was highly sensitive to the increasing H2O2 level in the senescing rice leaves, while higher H2O2 concentration resulted in the enhancing transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes, OsAPX7 transcript was greatly variable with different H2O2 concentrations and incubating duration, suggesting that the different OsAPXs isoforms played a complementary role in perceiving and scavenging H2O2 accumulation at various H2O2 concentrations during leaf senescence. Higher H2O2 level, increased AsA level, higher activities of APX and glutathione reductase (GR), and relatively stable GSH content during the entire sampling period in the leaves of esl mutant implied that a close interrelationship existed

  11. Accelerated aging in HIV/AIDS: novel biomarkers of senescent human CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer P Chou

    Full Text Available Clinical evaluation of immune reconstitution and health status during HIV-1 infection and anti-retroviral therapy (ART is largely based on CD4+ T cell counts and viral load, measures that fail to take into account the CD8+ T cell subset, known to show features of accelerated aging in HIV disease. Here, we compare adenosine deaminase (ADA, glucose uptake receptor 1 (GLUT1, and leucine-rich repeat neuronal 3 (LRRN3 to CD38 expression and telomerase activity, two strong predictors of HIV disease progression. Our analysis revealed that reduced ADA, telomerase activity and LRRN3 gene expression were significantly associated with high CD38 and HLA-DR in CD8+ T cells, with % ADA+ cells being the most robust predictor of CD8+ T cell activation. Our results suggest that ADA, LRRN3 and telomerase activity in CD8+ T cells may serve as novel, clinically relevant biomarkers of immune status in HIV-1 infection, specifically by demonstrating the degree to which CD8+ T cells have progressed to the end stage of replicative senescence. Since chronological aging itself leads to the accumulation of senescent CD8+ T cells, the prolonged survival and resultant increased age of the HIV+ population may synergize with the chronic immune activation to exacerbate both immune decline and age-associated pathologies. The identification and future validation of these new biomarkers may lead to fresh immune-based HIV treatments.

  12. Azelaic acid reduced senescence-like phenotype in photo-irradiated human dermal fibroblasts: possible implication of PPARγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briganti, Stefania; Flori, Enrica; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Kovacs, Daniela; Camera, Emanuela; Ludovici, Matteo; Cardinali, Giorgia; Picardo, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Azelaic acid (AzA) has been used for the treatment for inflammatory skin diseases, such as acne and rosacea. Interestingly, an improvement in skin texture has been observed after long-time treatment with AzA. We previously unrevealed that anti-inflammatory activity of AzA involves a specific activation of PPARγ, a nuclear receptor that plays a relevant role in inflammation and even in ageing processes. As rosacea has been considered as a photo-aggravated disease, we investigated the ability of AzA to counteract stress-induced premature cell senescence (SIPS). We employed a SIPS model based on single exposure of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) to UVA and 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA), previously reported to activate a senescence-like phenotype, including long-term growth arrest, flattened morphology and increased synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). We found that PUVA-treated HDFs grown in the presence of AzA maintained their morphology and reduced MMP-1 release and SA-β-galactosidase-positive cells. Moreover, AzA induced a reduction in ROS generation, an up-modulation of antioxidant enzymes and a decrease in cell membrane lipid damages in PUVA-treated HDFs. Further evidences of AzA anti-senescence effect were repression of p53 and p21, increase in type I pro-collagen and abrogation of the enhanced expression of growth factors, such as HGF and SCF. Interestingly, PUVA-SIPS showed a decreased activation of PPARγ and AzA counteracted this effect, suggesting that AzA effect involves PPARγ modulation. All together these data showed that AzA interferes with PUVA-induced senescence-like phenotype and its ability to activate PPAR-γ provides relevant insights into the anti-senescence mechanism. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Identification of a Selective G1-Phase Benzimidazolone Inhibitor by a Senescence-Targeted Virtual Screen Using Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Bilsland

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is a barrier to tumorigenesis in normal cells, and tumor cells undergo senescence responses to genotoxic stimuli, which is a potential target phenotype for cancer therapy. However, in this setting, mixed-mode responses are common with apoptosis the dominant effect. Hence, more selective senescence inducers are required. Here we report a machine learning–based in silico screen to identify potential senescence agonists. We built profiles of differentially affected biological process networks from expression data obtained under induced telomere dysfunction conditions in colorectal cancer cells and matched these to a panel of 17 protein targets with confirmatory screening data in PubChem. We trained a neural network using 3517 compounds identified as active or inactive against these targets. The resulting classification model was used to screen a virtual library of ~2M lead-like compounds. One hundred and forty-seven virtual hits were acquired for validation in growth inhibition and senescence-associated β-galactosidase assays. Among the found hits, a benzimidazolone compound, CB-20903630, had low micromolar IC50 for growth inhibition of HCT116 cells and selectively induced senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity in the entire treated cell population without cytotoxicity or apoptosis induction. Growth suppression was mediated by G1 blockade involving increased p21 expression and suppressed cyclin B1, CDK1, and CDC25C. In addition, the compound inhibited growth of multicellular spheroids and caused severe retardation of population kinetics in long-term treatments. Preliminary structure-activity and structure clustering analyses are reported, and expression analysis of CB-20903630 against other cell cycle suppressor compounds suggested a PI3K/AKT-inhibitor–like profile in normal cells, with different pathways affected in cancer cells.

  14. Senescent vs. non-senescent cells in the human annulus in vivo: Cell harvest with laser capture microdissection and gene expression studies with microarray analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Jane A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Senescent cells are well-recognized in the aging/degenerating human disc. Senescent cells are viable, cannot divide, remain metabolically active and accumulate within the disc over time. Molecular analysis of senescent cells in tissue offers a special challenge since there are no cell surface markers for senescence which would let one use fluorescence-activated cell sorting as a method for separating out senescent cells. Methods We employed a novel laser capture microdissection (LCM design to selectively harvest senescent and non-senescent annulus cells in paraffin-embedded tissue, and compared their gene expression with microarray analysis. LCM was used to separately harvest senescent and non-senescent cells from 11 human annulus specimens. Results Microarray analysis revealed significant differences in expression levels in senescent cells vs non-senescent cells: 292 genes were upregulated, and 321 downregulated. Genes with established relationships to senescence were found to be significantly upregulated in senescent cells vs. non-senescent cells: p38 (MPAK14, RB-Associated KRAB zinc finger, Discoidin, CUB and LCCL domain, growth arrest and DNA-damage inducible beta, p28ING5, sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 and somatostatin receptor 3; cyclin-dependent kinase 8 showed significant downregulation in senescent cells. Nitric oxidase synthase 1, and heat shock 70 kDa protein 6, both of which were significantly down-regulated in senescent cells, also showed significant changes. Additional genes related to cytokines, cell proliferation, and other processes were also identified. Conclusions Our LCM-microarray analyses identified a set of genes associated with senescence which were significantly upregulated in senescent vs non-senescent cells in the human annulus. These genes include p38 MAP kinase, discoidin, inhibitor of growth family member 5, and growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible beta. Other genes, including genes

  15. Redox control of senescence and age-related disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshaya Chandrasekaran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The signaling networks that drive the aging process, associated functional deterioration, and pathologies has captured the scientific community's attention for decades. While many theories exist to explain the aging process, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS provides a signaling link between engagement of cellular senescence and several age-associated pathologies. Cellular senescence has evolved to restrict tumor progression but the accompanying senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP promotes pathogenic pathways. Here, we review known biological theories of aging and how ROS mechanistically control senescence and the aging process. We also describe the redox-regulated signaling networks controlling the SASP and its important role in driving age-related diseases. Finally, we discuss progress in designing therapeutic strategies that manipulate the cellular redox environment to restrict age-associated pathology.

  16. Redox control of senescence and age-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Akshaya; Idelchik, Maria Del Pilar Sosa; Melendez, J Andrés

    2017-04-01

    The signaling networks that drive the aging process, associated functional deterioration, and pathologies has captured the scientific community's attention for decades. While many theories exist to explain the aging process, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) provides a signaling link between engagement of cellular senescence and several age-associated pathologies. Cellular senescence has evolved to restrict tumor progression but the accompanying senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) promotes pathogenic pathways. Here, we review known biological theories of aging and how ROS mechanistically control senescence and the aging process. We also describe the redox-regulated signaling networks controlling the SASP and its important role in driving age-related diseases. Finally, we discuss progress in designing therapeutic strategies that manipulate the cellular redox environment to restrict age-associated pathology. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Therapeutic interventions for aging: the case of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Gamez, Abel; Demaria, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Organismal aging is a multifactorial process characterized by the onset of degenerative conditions and cancer. One of the key drivers of aging is cellular senescence, a state of irreversible growth arrest induced by many pro-tumorigenic stresses. Senescent cells accumulate late in life and at sites of age-related pathologies, where they contribute to disease onset and progression through complex cell and non-cell autonomous effects. Here, we summarize the mechanisms by which cellular senescence can promote aging, and we offer an extensive description of current potential pharmacological interventions for senescent cells, highlighting limitations and suggesting alternatives. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The Pace and Shape of Senescence in Angiosperms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baudisch, Annette; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen

    2013-01-01

    1. Demographic senescence, the decay in fertility and increase in the risk of mortality with age, is one of the most striking phenomena in ecology and evolution. Comparative studies of senescence patterns of plants are scarce, and consequently, little is known about senescence and its determinants...... in the plant kingdom. 2. Senescence patterns of mortality can be classified by distinguishing between two metrics: pace and shape. The pace of mortality captures the speed at which life proceeds and can be measured by life expectancy, while the shape of mortality captures whether mortality increases...... (‘senescence’), decreases (‘negative senescence’) or remains constant over age (‘negligible senescence’). 3. We extract mortality trajectories from ComPADRe III, a data base that contains demographic information for several hundred plant species. We apply age-from-stage matrix decomposition methods to obtain...

  19. HIV-associated cellular senescence: A contributor to accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Justin; Torres, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    Due to the advent of antiretroviral therapy HIV is no longer a terminal disease and the HIV infected patients are becoming increasingly older. While this is a major success, with increasing age comes an increased risk for disease. The age-related comorbidities that HIV infected patients experience suggest that they suffer from accelerated aging. One possible contributor to this accelerated aging is cellular senescence, an age-associated response that can occur prematurely in response to stress, and that is emerging as a contributor to disease and aging. HIV patients experience several stressors such as the virus itself, antiretroviral drugs and to a lesser extent, substance abuse that can induce cellular senescence. This review summarizes the current knowledge of senescence induction in response to these stressors and their relation to the comorbidities in HIV patients. Cellular senescence may be a possible therapeutic target for these comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution of Replication Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  1. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  2. Restoration of Mitochondrial NAD+Levels Delays Stem Cell Senescence and Facilitates Reprogramming of Aged Somatic Cells.

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    Son, Myung Jin; Kwon, Youjeong; Son, Taekwon; Cho, Yee Sook

    2016-12-01

    The fundamental tenet that aging is irreversible has been challenged by the development of reprogramming technology that can restore molecular and cellular age by reversing the progression of aging. The use of cells from aged individuals as sources for reprogramming or transplantation creates a major barrier in stem cell therapy with respect to cell quality and quantity. Here, we investigated the molecular features underlying senescence and rejuvenation during aged cell reprogramming and identified novel factors that can overcome age-associated barriers. Enzymes, such as nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 3 (NMNAT3), that control mitochondrial NAD + levels appear to be susceptible to aging. In aged cells, mitochondrial NAD + levels decrease, accompanied by reduced SIRT3 activity; these changes severely impede cell fate transition. However, in cells collected from aged p16 knockout mice, which exhibit delayed cellular senescence, no changes in NNT or NMNAT3 expression were found. Importantly, restoring mitochondrial NAD + levels by overexpressing NNT and NMNAT3 enhanced reprogramming efficiency of aged somatic cells and extended the lifespan of human mesenchymal stem cells by delaying replicative senescence. These results demonstrate that maintenance of mitochondrial NAD + levels is critical for reversing the mechanisms of aging and ensuring that cells collected from aged individuals are of high quality. Stem Cells 2016;34:2840-2851. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Reprogramming suppresses premature senescence phenotypes of Werner syndrome cells and maintains chromosomal stability over long-term culture.

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    Akira Shimamoto

    Full Text Available Werner syndrome (WS is a premature aging disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and cancer predisposition. Mutations in WRN are responsible for the disease and cause telomere dysfunction, resulting in accelerated aging. Recent studies have revealed that cells from WS patients can be successfully reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. In the present study, we describe the effects of long-term culture on WS iPSCs, which acquired and maintained infinite proliferative potential for self-renewal over 2 years. After long-term cultures, WS iPSCs exhibited stable undifferentiated states and differentiation capacity, and premature upregulation of senescence-associated genes in WS cells was completely suppressed in WS iPSCs despite WRN deficiency. WS iPSCs also showed recapitulation of the phenotypes during differentiation. Furthermore, karyotype analysis indicated that WS iPSCs were stable, and half of the descendant clones had chromosomal profiles that were similar to those of parental cells. These unexpected properties might be achieved by induced expression of endogenous telomerase gene during reprogramming, which trigger telomerase reactivation leading to suppression of both replicative senescence and telomere dysfunction in WS cells. These findings demonstrated that reprogramming suppressed premature senescence phenotypes in WS cells and WS iPSCs could lead to chromosomal stability over the long term. WS iPSCs will provide opportunities to identify affected lineages in WS and to develop a new strategy for the treatment of WS.

  4. LHCb Data Replication During SC3

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    Smith, A

    2006-01-01

    LHCb's participation in LCG's Service Challenge 3 involves testing the bulk data transfer infrastructure developed to allow high bandwidth distribution of data across the grid in accordance with the computing model. To enable reliable bulk replication of data, LHCb's DIRAC system has been integrated with gLite's File Transfer Service middleware component to make use of dedicated network links between LHCb computing centres. DIRAC's Data Management tools previously allowed the replication, registration and deletion of files on the grid. For SC3 supplementary functionality has been added to allow bulk replication of data (using FTS) and efficient mass registration to the LFC replica catalog.Provisional performance results have shown that the system developed can meet the expected data replication rate required by the computing model in 2007. This paper details the experience and results of integration and utilisation of DIRAC with the SC3 transfer machinery.

  5. Cellular senescence and tumor suppressor gene p16.

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    Rayess, Hani; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2012-04-15

    Cellular senescence is an irreversible arrest of cell growth. Biochemical and morphological changes occur during cellular senescence, including the formation of a unique cellular morphology such as flattened cytoplasm. Function of mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes are affected resulting in the inhibition of lysosomal and proteosomal pathways. Cellular senescence can be triggered by a number of factors including, aging, DNA damage, oncogene activation and oxidative stress. While the molecular mechanism of senescence involves p16 and p53 tumor suppressor genes and telomere shortening, this review is focused on the mechanism of p16 control. The p16-mediated senescence acts through the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway inhibiting the action of the cyclin dependant kinases leading to G1 cell cycle arrest. Rb is maintained in a hypophosphorylated state resulting in the inhibition of transcription factor E2F1. Regulation of p16 expression is complex and involves epigenetic control and multiple transcription factors. PRC1 (Pombe repressor complex (1) and PRC2 (Pombe repressor complex (2) proteins and histone deacetylases play an important role in the promoter hypermethylation for suppressing p16 expression. While transcription factors YY1 and Id1 suppress p16 expression, transcription factors CTCF, Sp1 and Ets family members activate p16 transcription. Senescence occurs with the inactivation of suppressor elements leading to the enhanced expression of p16. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  6. Gene pathways that delay Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive senescence.

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    Meng C Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reproductive senescence is a hallmark of aging. The molecular mechanisms regulating reproductive senescence and its association with the aging of somatic cells remain poorly understood. From a full genome RNA interference (RNAi screen, we identified 32 Caenorhabditis elegans gene inactivations that delay reproductive senescence and extend reproductive lifespan. We found that many of these gene inactivations interact with insulin/IGF-1 and/or TGF-β endocrine signaling pathways to regulate reproductive senescence, except nhx-2 and sgk-1 that modulate sodium reabsorption. Of these 32 gene inactivations, we also found that 19 increase reproductive lifespan through their effects on oocyte activities, 8 of them coordinate oocyte and sperm functions to extend reproductive lifespan, and 5 of them can induce sperm humoral response to promote reproductive longevity. Furthermore, we examined the effects of these reproductive aging regulators on somatic aging. We found that 5 of these gene inactivations prolong organismal lifespan, and 20 of them increase healthy life expectancy of an organism without altering total life span. These studies provide a systemic view on the genetic regulation of reproductive senescence and its intersection with organism longevity. The majority of these newly identified genes are conserved, and may provide new insights into age-associated reproductive senescence during human aging.

  7. Autophagy and senescence: a partnership in search of definition.

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    Gewirtz, David A

    2013-05-01

    Autophagy and senescence share a number of characteristics, which suggests that both responses could serve to collaterally protect the cell from the toxicity of external stress such as radiation and chemotherapy and internal forms of stress such as telomere shortening and oncogene activation. Studies of oncogene activation in normal fibroblasts as well as exposure of tumor cells to chemotherapy have indicated that autophagy and senescence are closely related but not necessarily interdependent responses; specifically, interference with autophagy delays but does not abrogate senescence. The literature relating to this topic is inconclusive, with some reports appearing to be consistent with a direct relationship between autophagy and senescence and others indicative of an inverse relationship. Before this question can be resolved, additional studies will be necessary where autophagy is clearly inhibited by genetic silencing and where the temporal responses of both autophagy and senescence are monitored, preferably in cells that are intrinsically incapable of apoptosis or where apoptosis is suppressed. Understanding the nature of this relationship may provide needed insights relating to cytoprotective as well as potential cytotoxic functions of both autophagy and senescence.

  8. Analysis of nodule senescence in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using laser microdissection, real-time PCR, and ACC immunolocalization.

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    Serova, Tatiana A; Tikhonovich, Igor A; Tsyganov, Viktor E

    2017-05-01

    A delay in the senescence of symbiotic nodules could prolong active nitrogen fixation, resulting in improved crop yield and a reduced need for chemical fertilizers. The molecular genetic mechanisms underlying nodule senescence have not been extensively studied with a view to breeding varieties with delayed nodule senescence. In such studies, plant mutants with the phenotype of premature degradation of symbiotic structures are useful models to elucidate the genetic basis of nodule senescence. Using a dataset from transcriptome analysis of Medicago truncatula Gaertn. nodules and previous studies on pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules, we developed a set of molecular markers based on genes that are known to be activated during nodule senescence. These genes encode cysteine proteases, a thiol protease, a bZIP transcription factor, enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene (ACS2 for ACC synthase and ACO1 for ACC oxidase) and ABA (AO3 for aldehyde oxidase), and an enzyme involved in catabolism of gibberellins (GA 2-oxidase). We analyzed the transcript levels of these genes in the nodules of two pea wild-types (cv. Sparkle and line Sprint-2) and two mutant lines, one showing premature nodule senescence (E135F (sym13)) and one showing no morphological signs of symbiotic structure degradation (Sprint-2Fix - (sym31)). Real-time PCR analyses revealed that all of the selected genes showed increased transcript levels during nodule aging in all phenotypes. Remarkably, at 4 weeks after inoculation (WAI), the transcript levels of all analyzed genes were significantly higher in the early senescent nodules of the mutant line E135F (sym13) and in nodules of the mutant Sprint-2Fix - (sym31) than in the active nitrogen-fixing nodules of wild-types. In contrast, the transcript levels of the same genes of both wild-types were significantly increased only at 6 WAI. We evaluated the expression of selected markers in the different histological nodule zones of pea cv. Sparkle and its

  9. Antiproliferative Effect of the Isoquinoline Alkaloid Papaverine in Hepatocarcinoma HepG-2 Cells — Inhibition of Telomerase and Induction of Senescence

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    Sakineh Kazemi Noureini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells are often immortal through up-regulation of the hTERT gene, which encodes the catalytic subunit of a special reverse transcriptase to overcome end-replication problem of chromosomes. This study demonstrates that papaverine, an isoquinoline alkaloid from the Papaveraceae, can overcome telomerase dependent immortality of HepG-2 cells that was used as a model of hepatocarcinoma. Although this alkaloid does not directly interact with telomeric sequences, papaverine inhibits telomerase through down-regulation of hTERT, which was analysed using thermal FRET and qRT-PCR, respectively. The IC50 values for the reduction of both telomerase activity and hTERT expression was 60 µM, while IC50 for cytotoxicity was 120 µM. Repeated treatments of the cells with very low non-toxic concentrations of papaverine resulted in growth arrest and strong reduction of population doublings after 40 days. This treatment induced senescent morphology in HepG-2 cells, which was evaluated by beta-galactosidase staining. Altogether, papaverine can be regarded as a promising model compound for drug design targeting cancer development.

  10. Cellular senescence in aging and age-related disease: from mechanisms to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Bennett G; Durik, Matej; Baker, Darren J; van Deursen, Jan M

    2015-12-01

    Cellular senescence, a process that imposes permanent proliferative arrest on cells in response to various stressors, has emerged as a potentially important contributor to aging and age-related disease, and it is an attractive target for therapeutic exploitation. A wealth of information about senescence in cultured cells has been acquired over the past half century; however, senescence in living organisms is poorly understood, largely because of technical limitations relating to the identification and characterization of senescent cells in tissues and organs. Furthermore, newly recognized beneficial signaling functions of senescence suggest that indiscriminately targeting senescent cells or modulating their secretome for anti-aging therapy may have negative consequences. Here we discuss current progress and challenges in understanding the stressors that induce senescence in vivo, the cell types that are prone to senesce, and the autocrine and paracrine properties of senescent cells in the contexts of aging and age-related diseases as well as disease therapy.

  11. Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection: The Relation between Hepatitis B Antigen Expression, Telomere Length, Senescence, Inflammation and Fibrosis.

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    Phaedra M Tachtatzis

    Full Text Available Chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection can lead to the development of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We hypothesized that HBV might accelerate hepatocyte ageing and investigated the effect of HBV on hepatocyte cell cycle state and biological age. We also investigated the relation between inflammation, fibrosis and cell cycle phase.Liver samples from patients with chronic HBV (n = 91, normal liver (n = 55 and regenerating liver (n = 15 were studied. Immunohistochemistry for cell cycle phase markers and HBV antigens was used to determine host cell cycle phase. Hepatocyte-specific telomere length was evaluated by quantitative fluorescent in-situ hybridization (Q-FISH in conjunction with hepatocyte nuclear area and HBV antigen expression. The effects of induced cell cycle arrest and induced cellular senescence on HBV production were assessed in vitro.13.7% hepatocytes in chronic HBV had entered cell cycle, but expression of markers for S, G2 and M phase was low compared with regenerating liver. Hepatocyte p21 expression was increased (10.9% in chronic HBV and correlated with liver fibrosis. Mean telomere length was reduced in chronic HBV compared to normal. However, within HBV-affected livers, hepatocytes expressing HBV antigens had longer telomeres. Telomere length declined and hepatocyte nuclear size increased as HBV core antigen (HBcAg expression shifted from the nucleus to cytoplasm. Nuclear co-expression of HBcAg and p21 was not observed. Cell cycle arrest induced in vitro was associated with increased HBV production, in contrast to in vitro induction of cellular senescence, which had no effect.Chronic HBV infection was associated with hepatocyte G1 cell cycle arrest and accelerated hepatocyte ageing, implying that HBV induced cellular senescence. However, HBV replication was confined to biologically younger hepatocytes. Changes in the cellular location of HBcAg may be related to the onset of cellular senescence.

  12. The Contribution of Cytomegalovirus Infection to Immune Senescence Is Set by the Infectious Dose

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    Redeker, Anke; Remmerswaal, Ester B. M.; van der Gracht, Esmé T. I.; Welten, Suzanne P. M.; Höllt, Thomas; Koning, Frits; Cicin-Sain, Luka; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; van Lier, René A. W.; van Unen, Vincent; Arens, Ramon

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections and accelerated immune senescence is controversial. Whereas some studies reported a CMV-associated impaired capacity to control heterologous infections at old age, other studies could not confirm this. We hypothesized that these discrepancies might relate to the variability in the infectious dose of CMV occurring in real life. Here, we investigated the influence of persistent CMV infection on immune perturbations and specifically addressed the role of the infectious dose on the contribution of CMV to accelerated immune senescence. We show in experimental mouse models that the degree of mouse CMV (MCMV)-specific memory CD8+ T cell accumulation and the phenotypic T cell profile are directly influenced by the infectious dose, and data on HCMV-specific T cells indicate a similar connection. Detailed cluster analysis of the memory CD8+ T cell development showed that high-dose infection causes a differentiation pathway that progresses faster throughout the life span of the host, suggesting a virus–host balance that is influenced by aging and infectious dose. Importantly, short-term MCMV infection in adult mice is not disadvantageous for heterologous superinfection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). However, following long-term CMV infection the strength of the CD8+ T cell immunity to LCMV superinfection was affected by the initial CMV infectious dose, wherein a high infectious dose was found to be a prerequisite for impaired heterologous immunity. Altogether our results underscore the importance of stratification based on the size and differentiation of the CMV-specific memory T cell pools for the impact on immune senescence, and indicate that reduction of the latent/lytic viral load can be beneficial to diminish CMV-associated immune senescence. PMID:29367854

  13. The Contribution of Cytomegalovirus Infection to Immune Senescence Is Set by the Infectious Dose

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    Anke Redeker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections and accelerated immune senescence is controversial. Whereas some studies reported a CMV-associated impaired capacity to control heterologous infections at old age, other studies could not confirm this. We hypothesized that these discrepancies might relate to the variability in the infectious dose of CMV occurring in real life. Here, we investigated the influence of persistent CMV infection on immune perturbations and specifically addressed the role of the infectious dose on the contribution of CMV to accelerated immune senescence. We show in experimental mouse models that the degree of mouse CMV (MCMV-specific memory CD8+ T cell accumulation and the phenotypic T cell profile are directly influenced by the infectious dose, and data on HCMV-specific T cells indicate a similar connection. Detailed cluster analysis of the memory CD8+ T cell development showed that high-dose infection causes a differentiation pathway that progresses faster throughout the life span of the host, suggesting a virus–host balance that is influenced by aging and infectious dose. Importantly, short-term MCMV infection in adult mice is not disadvantageous for heterologous superinfection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV. However, following long-term CMV infection the strength of the CD8+ T cell immunity to LCMV superinfection was affected by the initial CMV infectious dose, wherein a high infectious dose was found to be a prerequisite for impaired heterologous immunity. Altogether our results underscore the importance of stratification based on the size and differentiation of the CMV-specific memory T cell pools for the impact on immune senescence, and indicate that reduction of the latent/lytic viral load can be beneficial to diminish CMV-associated immune senescence.

  14. Interactive effects of senescence and natural disturbance on the annual survival probabilities of snail kites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Brian E.; Martin, J.; Kendall, William L.; Cattau, Christopher E.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2010-01-01

    Individuals in wild populations face risks associated with both intrinsic (i.e. aging) and external (i.e. environmental) sources of mortality. Condition-dependent mortality occurs when there is an interaction between such factors; however, few studies have clearly demonstrated condition-dependent mortality and some have even argued that condition-dependent mortality does not occur in wild avian populations. Using large sample sizes (2084 individuals, 3746 re-sights) of individual-based longitudinal data collected over a 33 year period (1976-2008) on multiple cohorts, we used a capture-mark-recapture framework to model age-dependent survival in the snail kite Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus population in Florida. Adding to the growing amount of evidence for actuarial senescence in wild populations, we found evidence of senescent declines in survival probabilities in adult kites. We also tested the hypothesis that older kites experienced condition-dependent mortality during a range-wide drought event (2000-2002). The results provide convincing evidence that the annual survival probability of senescent kites was disproportionately affected by the drought relative to the survival probability of prime-aged adults. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of condition-dependent mortality to be demonstrated in a wild avian population, a finding which challenges recent conclusions drawn in the literature. Our study suggests that senescence and condition-dependent mortality can affect the demography of wild avian populations. Accounting for these sources of variation may be particularly important to appropriately compute estimates of population growth rate, and probabilities of quasi-extinctions.

  15. Dietary Animal Plasma Proteins Improve the Intestinal Immune Response in Senescent Mice

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    Lluïsa Miró

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased life expectancy has promoted research on healthy aging. Aging is accompanied by increased non-specific immune activation (inflammaging which favors the appearance of several disorders. Here, we study whether dietary supplementation with spray-dried animal plasma (SDP, which has been shown to reduce the activation of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT in rodents challenged by S. aureus enterotoxin B (SEB, and can also prevent the effects of aging on immune system homeostasis. We first characterized GALT in a mouse model of accelerated senescence (SAMP8 at different ages (compared to mice resistant to accelerated senescence; SAMR1. Second, we analyzed the SDP effects on GALT response to an SEB challenge in SAMP8 mice. In GALT characterization, aging increased the cell number and the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph nodes and Peyer’s patches (all, p < 0.05, as well as the expression of IL-6 and TNF-α in intestinal mucosa (both, p < 0.05. With respect to GALT response to the SEB challenge, young mice showed increased expression of intestinal IL-6 and TNF-α, as well as lymphocyte recruitment and activation (all, p < 0.05. However, the immune response of senescent mice to the SEB challenge was weak, since SEB did not change cell recruitment or the percentage of activated Th lymphocytes. Mice supplemented with SDP showed improved capacity to respond to the SEB challenge, similar to the response of the young mice. These results indicate that senescent mice have an impaired mucosal immune response characterized by unspecific GALT activation and a weak specific immune response. SDP supplementation reduces non-specific basal immune activation, allowing for the generation of specific responses.

  16. Tumor stroma with senescence-associated secretory phenotype in steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Jee San Lee

    Full Text Available Senescence secretome was recently reported to promote liver cancer in an obese mouse model. Steatohepatitic hepatocellular carcinoma (SH-HCC, a new variant of HCC, has been found in metabolic syndrome patients, and pericellular fibrosis, a characteristic feature of SH-HCC, suggests that alteration of the tumor stroma might play an important role in SH-HCC development. Clinicopathological characteristics and tumor stroma showing senescence and senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP were investigated in 21 SH-HCCs and 34 conventional HCCs (C-HCCs. The expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, p21Waf1/Cif1, γ-H2AX, and IL-6 was investigated by immunohistochemistry or immunofluorescence. SH-HCCs were associated with older age, higher body mass index, and a higher incidence of metabolic syndrome, compared to C-HCC (P <0.05, all. The numbers of α-SMA-positive cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs (P = 0.049 and α-SMA-positive CAFs co-expressing p21Waf1/Cif1 (P = 0.038, γ-H2AX (P = 0.065, and IL-6 (P = 0.048 were greater for SH-HCCs than C-HCCs. Additionally, non-tumoral liver from SH-HCCs showed a higher incidence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and a higher number of α-SMA-positive stellate cells expressing γ-H2AX and p21Waf1/Cif1 than that from C-HCCs (P <0.05, all. In conclusion, SH-HCCs are considered to occur more frequently in metabolic syndrome patients. Therein, senescent and damaged CAFs, as well as non-tumoral stellate cells, expressing SASP including IL-6 may contribute to the development of SH-HCC.

  17. Senescence-Inflammatory Regulation of Reparative Cellular Reprogramming in Aging and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Javier A; Alarcón, Tomás

    2017-01-01

    The inability of adult tissues to transitorily generate cells with functional stem cell-like properties is a major obstacle to tissue self-repair. Nuclear reprogramming-like phenomena that induce a transient acquisition of epigenetic plasticity and phenotype malleability may constitute a reparative route through which human tissues respond to injury, stress, and disease. However, tissue rejuvenation should involve not only the transient epigenetic reprogramming of differentiated cells, but also the committed re-acquisition of the original or alternative committed cell fate. Chronic or unrestrained epigenetic plasticity would drive aging phenotypes by impairing the repair or the replacement of damaged cells; such uncontrolled phenomena of in vivo reprogramming might also generate cancer-like cellular states. We herein propose that the ability of senescence-associated inflammatory signaling to regulate in vivo reprogramming cycles of tissue repair outlines a threshold model of aging and cancer. The degree of senescence/inflammation-associated deviation from the homeostatic state may delineate a type of thresholding algorithm distinguishing beneficial from deleterious effects of in vivo reprogramming. First, transient activation of NF-κB-related innate immunity and senescence-associated inflammatory components (e.g., IL-6) might facilitate reparative cellular reprogramming in response to acute inflammatory events. Second, para-inflammation switches might promote long-lasting but reversible refractoriness to reparative cellular reprogramming. Third, chronic senescence-associated inflammatory signaling might lock cells in highly plastic epigenetic states disabled for reparative differentiation. The consideration of a cellular reprogramming-centered view of epigenetic plasticity as a fundamental element of a tissue's capacity to undergo successful repair, aging degeneration or malignant transformation should provide challenging stochastic insights into the current

  18. Possible role of metal ionophore against zinc induced cognitive dysfunction in D-galactose senescent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Kanchan; Majeed, Abu Bakar Abdul; Prakash, Atish

    2016-06-01

    Metal ionophores are considered as potential anti-dementia agents, and some are currently undergoing clinical trials. Many metals are known to accumulate and distribute abnormally in the aging brain. Alterations in zinc metal homeostasis in the glutaminergic synapse could contribute to ageing and the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was designed to investigate the effect of metal ionophores on long term administration of zinc in D-galactose induced senescent mice. The ageing model was established by combined administration of zinc and D-galactose to mice for 6 weeks. A novel metal ionophore, PBT-2 was given daily to zinc-induced d-galactose senescent mice. The cognitive behaviour of mice was monitored using the Morris Water Maze. The anti-oxidant status and amyloidogenic activity in the ageing mouse was measured by determining mito-oxidative parameters and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain. Systemic administration of both zinc and D-galactose significantly produced memory deficits, mito-oxidative damage, heightened acetylcholinesterase enzymatic ac