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Sample records for replication transcription repair

  1. Coordinating repair of oxidative DNA damage with transcription and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, P.K.

    2003-01-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) preferentially removes DNA lesions from template strands of active genes. Defects in TCR, which acts both on lesions removed by nucleotide excision repair (NER) and on oxidative lesions removed by base excision repair (BER), underlie the fatal developmental disorder Cockayne syndrome. Although its detailed mechanism remains unknown, TCR involves recognition of a stalled RNA polymerase (RNAP), removal or remodeling of RNAP to allow access to the lesion, and recruitment of repair enzymes. At a minimum, these early steps require a non-enzymatic function of the multifunctional repair protein XPG, the CSB protein with ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling activity, and the TFIIH complex (including the XPB and XPD helicases) that is also required for basal transcription initiation and NER. XPG exists in the cell in a complex with TFIIH, and in vitro evidence has suggested that it interacts with CSB. To address the mechanism of TCR, we are characterizing protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions of XPG. We show that XPG preferentially binds to double-stranded DNA containing bubbles resembling in size the unpaired regions associated with transcription. Two distinct domains of XPG are required for the observed strong binding specificity and stability. XPG both interacts directly with CSB and synergistically binds with it to bubble DNA, and it strongly stimulates the bubble DNA-dependent ATPase activity of CSB. Significantly for TCR, XPG also interacts directly with RNAP II, binds both the protein and nucleic acid components (the R-loop) of a stalled RNA polymerase, and forms a ternary complex with CSB and the stalled RNAP. These results are consistent with the model that XPG and CSB jointly interact with the DNA/chromatin structure in the vicinity of the stalled transcriptional apparatus and with the transcriptional machinery itself to remodel the chromatin and either move or remodel the blocked RNA polymerase to expose the lesion

  2. DNA replication and repair in Tilapia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yew, F.H.; Chang, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation on a cell line established from the warm water fish Tilapia has been assessed by measuring the rate of DNA synthesis, excision repair, post-replication repair and cell survival. The cells tolerate ultraviolet radiation better than mammalian cells with respect to DNA synthesis, post-replication repair and cell survival. They are also efficient in excision repair, which in other fish cell lines has been found to be at a low level or absent. Their response to the inhibitors hydroxyurea and 1-β-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine is less sensitive than that of other cell lines, yet the cells seem to have very small pools of DNA precursor. (author)

  3. Chromatin challenges during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Rocha, Walter; Verreault, Alain

    2007-01-01

    Inheritance and maintenance of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are central for eukaryotic life. To orchestrate DNA-replication and -repair processes in the context of chromatin is a challenge, both in terms of accessibility and maintenance of chromatin organization. To meet...... the challenge of maintenance, cells have evolved efficient nucleosome-assembly pathways and chromatin-maturation mechanisms that reproduce chromatin organization in the wake of DNA replication and repair. The aim of this Review is to describe how these pathways operate and to highlight how the epigenetic...... landscape may be stably maintained even in the face of dramatic changes in chromatin structure....

  4. Modes of DNA repair and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.; Kondo, S.

    1979-01-01

    Modes of DNA repair and replication require close coordination as well as some overlap of enzyme functions. Some classes of recovery deficient mutants may have defects in replication rather than repair modes. Lesions such as the pyrimidine dimers produced by ultraviolet light irradiation are the blocks to normal DNA replication in vivo and in vitro. The DNA synthesis by the DNA polymerase 1 of E. coli is blocked at one nucleotide away from the dimerized pyrimidines in template strands. Thus, some DNA polymerases seem to be unable to incorporate nucleotides opposite to the non-pairing lesions in template DNA strands. The lesions in template DNA strands may block the sequential addition of nucleotides in the synthesis of daughter strands. Normal replication utilizes a constitutive ''error-free'' mode that copies DNA templates with high fidelity, but which may be totally blocked at a lesion that obscures the appropriate base pairing specificity. It might be expected that modified replication system exhibits generally high error frequency. The error rate of DNA polymerases may be controlled by the degree of phosphorylation of the enzyme. Inducible SOS system is controlled by recA genes that also control the pathways for recombination. It is possible that SOS system involves some process other than the modification of a blocked replication apparatus to permit error-prone transdimer synthesis. (Yamashita, S.)

  5. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with replication protein A and maintains genome stability during replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausing, Emanuel; Mayer, Andreas; Chanarat, Sittinan

    2010-01-01

    Multiple DNA-associated processes such as DNA repair, replication, and recombination are crucial for the maintenance of genome integrity. Here, we show a novel interaction between the transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 and replication protein A (RPA), the eukaryotic single-stranded DNA......-binding protein with functions in DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Bur1 interacted via its C-terminal domain with RPA, and bur1-¿C mutants showed a deregulated DNA damage response accompanied by increased sensitivity to DNA damage and replication stress as well as increased levels of persisting Rad52...... foci. Interestingly, the DNA damage sensitivity of an rfa1 mutant was suppressed by bur1 mutation, further underscoring a functional link between these two protein complexes. The transcription elongation factor Bur1-Bur2 interacts with RPA and maintains genome integrity during DNA replication stress....

  6. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose...... RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells....

  7. Repair replication in replicating and nonreplicating DNA after irradiation with uv light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slor, H.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1978-06-01

    Ultraviolet light induces more pyrimidine dimers and more repair replication in DNA that replicates within 2 to 3 h of irradiation than in DNA that does not replicate during this period. This difference may be due to special conformational changes in DNA and chromatin that might be associated with semiconservative DNA replication.

  8. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A.; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A.; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E.; Scicchitano, David A.

    2016-01-01

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N6-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N6-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. PMID:26559971

  9. Chromosome biology: conflict management for replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2013-03-04

    A recent study has uncovered a new mechanism that attenuates DNA replication during periods of heightened gene expression to avoid collisions between replication and transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Role of the Transcriptional Response to DNA Replication Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Anna E; de Bruin, Robertus A M

    2017-03-02

    During DNA replication many factors can result in DNA replication stress. The DNA replication stress checkpoint prevents the accumulation of replication stress-induced DNA damage and the potential ensuing genome instability. A critical role for post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, in the replication stress checkpoint response has been well established. However, recent work has revealed an important role for transcription in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. In this review, we will provide an overview of current knowledge of the cellular response to DNA replication stress with a specific focus on the DNA replication stress checkpoint transcriptional response and its role in the prevention of replication stress-induced DNA damage.

  11. The Role of the Transcriptional Response to DNA Replication Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlihy, Anna E.; de Bruin, Robertus A.M.

    2017-01-01

    During DNA replication many factors can result in DNA replication stress. The DNA replication stress checkpoint prevents the accumulation of replication stress-induced DNA damage and the potential ensuing genome instability. A critical role for post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, in the replication stress checkpoint response has been well established. However, recent work has revealed an important role for transcription in the cellular response to DNA replication stress. In this review, we will provide an overview of current knowledge of the cellular response to DNA replication stress with a specific focus on the DNA replication stress checkpoint transcriptional response and its role in the prevention of replication stress-induced DNA damage. PMID:28257104

  12. DNA replication and post-replication repair in U.V.-sensitive mouse neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavin, M.F.; McCombe, P.; Kidson, C.

    1976-01-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells differentiated when grown in the absence of serum; differentiation was reversed on the addition of serum. Differentiated cells were more sensitive to U.V.-radiation than proliferating cells. Whereas addition of serum to differentiated neuroblastoma cells normally resulted in immediate, synchronous entry into S phase, irradiation just before the addition of serum resulted in a long delay in the onset of DNA replication. During this lag period, incorporated 3 H-thymidine appeared in the light density region of CsCl gradients, reflecting either repair synthesis or abortive replication. Post-replication repair (gap-filling) was found to be present in proliferating cells and at certain times in differentiated cells. It is suggested that the sensitivity of differentiated neuroblastoma cells to U.V.-radiation may have been due to ineffective post-replication repair or to deficiencies in more than one repair mechanism, with reduction in repair capacity beyond a critical threshold. (author)

  13. Structural aspects of DNA in its replication and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Pal, B.C.; Foote, R.S.; Bates, R.C.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Snow, E.T.; Wobbe, C.R.; Morse, C.C.; Snyder, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    The research objective of this laboratory is to investigate the structure of DNA, the mechanism of DNA replication and its regulation, and the mechanism and role of repair of the altered DNA in the expression of heritable changes. This research has two broad aims, namely investigation of (a) the regulation of DNA replication in mammals, using parvovirus DNA as a model system and (b) the role of DNA repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis induced by simple alkylating mutagens

  14. The mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in mitochondrial base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Maynard, Scott; Bayne, Anne-Cécile V

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is an essential component of mitochondrial nucleoids. TFAM plays an important role in mitochondrial transcription and replication. TFAM has been previously reported to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER) in vitro but NER has not yet been detected i...

  15. X-ray repair replication in L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y.C.; Byfield, J.E.; Bennett, L.R.; Chan, P.Y.M.

    1974-01-01

    Repair replication has been studied in detail in mouse L1210 leukemia cells. A method of identifying and quantitating repair replication using a pre- and postradiation block of normal replication with cytosine arabinoside is illustrated. The method derived does not require isolation of DNA per se and appears to be satisfactory for screening for inhibitors of repair replication. Repair replication can be demonstrated at doses in the 1000-rad range in bromouridine deoxyriboside-substituted cells and at slightly higher doses in nonsubstituted cells. Drugs that are known to bind to DNA inhibit this x-ray-induced repair replication. Drugs with these properties may be identified by the methods described and compared quantitatively in their ability to inhibit this type of x-ray damage. Since these phenomena can be demonstrated for low radiation doses and at drug concentrations attainable in vivo during human cancer chemotherapy this class of anticancer agent may be worthy of closer study. Application to the L1210 leukemia system should permit comparison of in vitro and in vivo drug effects in the context of the extensive in vivo pharmacological data already available for L1210 cells. (U.S.)

  16. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway in Replication Stress and DNA Crosslink Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew JK.; Huang, Tony T.

    2013-01-01

    Interstand crosslinks (ICLs) are DNA lesions where the bases of opposing DNA strands are covalently linked, inhibiting critical cellular processes such as transcription and replication. Chemical agents that generate ICLs cause chromosomal abnormalities including breaks, deletions and rearrangements, making them highly genotoxic compounds. This toxicity has proven useful for chemotherapeutic treatment against a wide variety of cancer types. The majority of our understanding of ICL repair in humans has been uncovered thorough analysis of the rare genetic disorder Fanconi anemia, in which patients are extremely sensitive to crosslinking agents. Here, we discuss recent insights into ICL repair gained through new ICL repair assays and highlight the role of the Fanconi Anemia repair pathway during replication stress. PMID:22744751

  17. Repair replication in permeabilized Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masker, W.E.; Simon, T.J.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    We have examined the modes of DNA synthesis in Escherichia coli strains made permeable to nucleoside triphosphates by treatment with toluene. In this quasi in vitro system, polymerase-I-deficient mutants exhibit a nonconservative mode of synthesis with properties expected for the resynthesis step of excision-repair. This uv-stimulated DNA synthesis can be performed by either DNA polymerase II or III and it also requires the uvrA gene product. It requires the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates; but, in contrast to the semiconservative mode, the ATP requirement can be partially satisfied by other nucleoside triphosphates. The ATP-dependent recBC nuclease is not involved. The observed uv-stimulated mode of DNA synthesis may be part of an alternate excision-repair mechanism which supplements or complements DNA-polymerase-I-dependent repair in vivo

  18. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Transcription-coupled DNA Repair Abrogate the Impact of DNA Damage on Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Aditi; Burns, John A; Gandolfi, Alberto; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Geacintov, Nicholas E; Scicchitano, David A

    2016-01-08

    DNA adducts derived from carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benzo[c]phenanthrene (B[c]Ph) impede replication and transcription, resulting in aberrant cell division and gene expression. Global nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) are among the DNA repair pathways that evolved to maintain genome integrity by removing DNA damage. The interplay between global NER and TCR in repairing the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-derived DNA adducts (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA, which is subject to NER and blocks transcription in vitro, and (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA, which is a poor substrate for NER but also blocks transcription in vitro, was tested. The results show that both adducts inhibit transcription in human cells that lack both NER and TCR. The (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA lesion exhibited no detectable effect on transcription in cells proficient in NER but lacking TCR, indicating that NER can remove the lesion in the absence of TCR, which is consistent with in vitro data. In primary human cells lacking NER, (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N(6)-dA exhibited a deleterious effect on transcription that was less severe than in cells lacking both pathways, suggesting that TCR can repair the adduct but not as effectively as global NER. In contrast, (+)-trans-anti-B[c]Ph-N(6)-dA dramatically reduces transcript production in cells proficient in global NER but lacking TCR, indicating that TCR is necessary for the removal of this adduct, which is consistent with in vitro data showing that it is a poor substrate for NER. Hence, both global NER and TCR enhance the recovery of gene expression following DNA damage, and TCR plays an important role in removing DNA damage that is refractory to NER. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The relationship of transcription and repair of radioinduced DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.; Igusheva, O.A.

    1997-01-01

    The data are discussed which has become a basement of such important findings as involvement of transcription into repair or existence of transcription-coupling repair factors. Thymine glycols which are appear under ionizing radiation exposure, are repaired preferentially in transcribed DNA. In present review the preferential repair of ionizing radiation-induced singlestrand breaks (SSBa) in transcribed DNA of human cells. Discontinuous distribution of DNA repair along hole genome has a grate role in biological processes

  20. Effects of Replication and Transcription on DNA Structure-Related Genetic Instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M

    2017-01-05

    Many repetitive sequences in the human genome can adopt conformations that differ from the canonical B-DNA double helix (i.e., non-B DNA), and can impact important biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, recombination, telomere maintenance, viral integration, transposome activation, DNA damage and repair. Thus, non-B DNA-forming sequences have been implicated in genetic instability and disease development. In this article, we discuss the interactions of non-B DNA with the replication and/or transcription machinery, particularly in disease states (e.g., tumors) that can lead to an abnormal cellular environment, and how such interactions may alter DNA replication and transcription, leading to potential conflicts at non-B DNA regions, and eventually result in genetic stability and human disease.

  1. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...only allow entirely new investigations into the replication of these viruses, but also how this method can be applied to any virus with a known...localization, TurboFISH, hemorrhagic fever virus replication 1. Introduction RNA FISH was developed as a method to visualize cellular RNA by binding a

  2. Repair replication in cultured normal and transformed human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1976-01-01

    Repair replication in response to ultraviolet irradiation has been studied in normal human diploid fibroblast cultures, W138, and an SV40 transformant, VA13. Quantitative comparisons have been made using the combined isotopic and density labelling method for assaying repair replication. No significant difference was found in the amount of repair replication performed, its dose response, or the time course between growing and confluent W138 cells, early passage and senescent cells, or normal W138 cells and the transformed VA13 cells. When [ 3 H]dThd was employed as the isotopic label in the presence of a 30-200 fold excess of unlabelled BrdUrd apparent differences in repair replication were seen between W138 cells shortly after subcultivation and cells which had been allowed to reach confluence. These differences were the same over a wide dose range and regardless of the passage number of the cells, but could be influenced by using different serum lots. The differences were not seen, however, when [ 3 H]BrdUrd provided the isotopic label; thus they reflect either impurities in the [ 3 H]dThd or a slight discrimination by some cellular process

  3. RAD51 interconnects between DNA replication, DNA repair and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Souparno; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Abdisalaam, Salim; Su, Fengtao; Raj, Prithvi; Dozmorov, Igor; Mishra, Ritu; Wakeland, Edward K; Ghose, Subroto; Mukherjee, Shibani; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2017-05-05

    RAD51, a multifunctional protein, plays a central role in DNA replication and homologous recombination repair, and is known to be involved in cancer development. We identified a novel role for RAD51 in innate immune response signaling. Defects in RAD51 lead to the accumulation of self-DNA in the cytoplasm, triggering a STING-mediated innate immune response after replication stress and DNA damage. In the absence of RAD51, the unprotected newly replicated genome is degraded by the exonuclease activity of MRE11, and the fragmented nascent DNA accumulates in the cytosol, initiating an innate immune response. Our data suggest that in addition to playing roles in homologous recombination-mediated DNA double-strand break repair and replication fork processing, RAD51 is also implicated in the suppression of innate immunity. Thus, our study reveals a previously uncharacterized role of RAD51 in initiating immune signaling, placing it at the hub of new interconnections between DNA replication, DNA repair, and immunity. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Separation of replication and transcription domains in nucleoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, E; Borkovec, J; Kováčik, L; Svidenská, S; Schröfel, A; Skalníková, M; Švindrych, Z; Křížek, P; Ovesný, M; Hagen, G M; Juda, P; Michalová, K; Cardoso, M C; Cmarko, D; Raška, I

    2014-12-01

    In mammalian cells, active ribosomal genes produce the 18S, 5.8S and 28S RNAs of ribosomal particles. Transcription levels of these genes are very high throughout interphase, and the cell needs a special strategy to avoid collision of the DNA polymerase and RNA polymerase machineries. To investigate this problem, we measured the correlation of various replication and transcription signals in the nucleoli of HeLa, HT-1080 and NIH 3T3 cells using a specially devised software for analysis of confocal images. Additionally, to follow the relationship between nucleolar replication and transcription in living cells, we produced a stable cell line expressing GFP-RPA43 (subunit of RNA polymerase I, pol I) and RFP-PCNA (the sliding clamp protein) based on human fibrosarcoma HT-1080 cells. We found that replication and transcription signals are more efficiently separated in nucleoli than in the nucleoplasm. In the course of S phase, separation of PCNA and pol I signals gradually increased. During the same period, separation of pol I and incorporated Cy5-dUTP signals decreased. Analysis of single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) images indicated that transcriptionally active FC/DFC units (i.e. fibrillar centers with adjacent dense fibrillar components) did not incorporate DNA nucleotides. Taken together, our data show that replication of the ribosomal genes is spatially separated from their transcription, and FC/DFC units may provide a structural basis for that separation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Formation and repair of DNA-protein cross-links (DPCs) in newly replicated DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, S.; Friedman, L.R.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    DPCs preferentially involve proteins of the nuclear matrix, the site of replication and transcription. To elucidate the relationship with replication, the formation and repair of DPCs has been studied in newly replicated DNA. Log-phase V79 cells were pulsed with /sup 3/H-TdR (10-20 μCi/ml) for 30-90 sec at 22 0 followed by up to a 60 min chase at 37 0 . Irradiation (0-100 Gy) immediately after the pulse increases the labeled DNA in DPCs with a dose-dependence that is unaffected by the initial level of labeled DPC or by chase time. When cells are irradiated before the pulse, DNA synthesis is inhibited; however, release of pulse-labeled DPCs appears normal. The data suggest that during replication, DNA is cross-linked to (matrix) protein, contributing to background DPCs

  6. DNA intercalator stimulates influenza transcription and virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poon Leo LM

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza A virus uses its host transcription machinery to facilitate viral RNA synthesis, an event that is associated with cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAPII. In this study, various RNAPII transcription inhibitors were used to investigate the effect of RNAPII phosphorylation status on viral RNA transcription. A low concentration of DNA intercalators, such as actinomycin D (ActD, was found to stimulate viral polymerase activity and virus replication. This effect was not observed in cells treated with RNAPII kinase inhibitors. In addition, the loss of RNAPIIa in infected cells was due to the shift of nonphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIa to hyperphosphorylated RNAPII (RNAPIIo.

  7. Modeling Ebola Virus Genome Replication and Transcription with Minigenome Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cressey, Tessa; Brauburger, Kristina; Mühlberger, Elke

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the minigenome system for Ebola virus (EBOV), which reconstitutes EBOV polymerase activity in cells and can be used to model viral genome replication and transcription. This protocol comprises all steps including cell culture, plasmid preparation, transfection, and luciferase reporter assay readout.

  8. Porcine circovirus: transcription and rolling-circle DNA replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review summarizes the molecular studies pertaining to porcine circovirus (PCV) transcription and DNA replication. The genome of PCV is circular, single-stranded DNA and contains 1759-1768 nucleotides. Both the genome-strand (packaged in the virus particle) and the complementary-strand (synthesi...

  9. Mammalian RAD52 Functions in Break-Induced Replication Repair of Collapsed DNA Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Sotirios K; Kamileri, Irene; Lugli, Natalia; Evangelou, Konstantinos; Da-Ré, Caterina; Huber, Florian; Padayachy, Laura; Tardy, Sebastien; Nicati, Noemie L; Barriot, Samia; Ochs, Fena; Lukas, Claudia; Lukas, Jiri; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G; Scapozza, Leonardo; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2016-12-15

    Human cancers are characterized by the presence of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress (DRS), making them dependent on repair pathways such as break-induced replication (BIR) for damaged DNA replication forks. To better understand BIR, we performed a targeted siRNA screen for genes whose depletion inhibited G1 to S phase progression when oncogenic cyclin E was overexpressed. RAD52, a gene dispensable for normal development in mice, was among the top hits. In cells in which fork collapse was induced by oncogenes or chemicals, the Rad52 protein localized to DRS foci. Depletion of Rad52 by siRNA or knockout of the gene by CRISPR/Cas9 compromised restart of collapsed forks and led to DNA damage in cells experiencing DRS. Furthermore, in cancer-prone, heterozygous APC mutant mice, homozygous deletion of the Rad52 gene suppressed tumor growth and prolonged lifespan. We therefore propose that mammalian RAD52 facilitates repair of collapsed DNA replication forks in cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. H4K20me0 marks post-replicative chromatin and recruits the TONSL–MMS22L DNA repair complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saredi, Giulia; Huang, Hongda; Hammond, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    After DNA replication, chromosomal processes including DNA repair and transcription take place in the context of sister chromatids. While cell cycle regulation can guide these processes globally, mechanisms to distinguish pre- and post-replicative states locally remain unknown. Here we reveal...

  11. DNA replication and repair of Tilapia cells: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.D.; Yew, F.H.

    1988-01-01

    TO-2 is a fish cell line derived from the Tilapia ovary. It grows over a wide range of temperature (15-34 0 C). We report the effects of temperature on DNA replication and u.v. repair in TO-2 cells. When the cells were moved from 31 0 C to the sublethal high temperature of 37 0 C, the rate of DNA synthesis first decreased to 60%, then speedy recovery soon set in, and after 8h at 37 0 C the rate of DNA synthesis overshot the 31 0 C control level by 180%. When moved to low temperature (18 0 C) Tilapia cells also showed an initial suppression of DNA synthesis before settling at 30% of the control level. U.V. reduced but could not block DNA synthesis completely. The inhibition was overcome in 3h at 37, 31 and 25 0 C, but not at 18 0 C. Initiation of nascent DNA synthesis was blocked at 4Jm -2 in TO-2 cells compared with ≤ 1Jm -2 in mammalian cells. After 9Jm -2 u.v. irradiation, low molecular weight DNA replication intermediates started to accumulate. TO-2 cells showed low levels of u.v.-induced excision repair. (author)

  12. DNA repair and its coupling to DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. [UV, x ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    This review article with 184 references presents the view that mammalian cells have one major repair system, excision repair, with many branches (nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, crosslink repair, etc.) and a multiplicity of enzymes. Any particular carcinogen makes a spectrum of damaged sites and each kind of damage may be repaired by one or more branches of excision repair. Excision repair is rarely complete, except at very low doses, and eukaryotic cells survive and replicate DNA despite the presence of unrepaired damage. An alteration in a specific biochemical pathway seen in damaged or mutant cells will not always be the primary consequence of damage or of the biochemical defect of the cells. Detailed kinetic data are required to understand comprehensively the various facets of excision repair and replication. Correlation between molecular events of repair and cytological and cellular changes such as chromosomal damage, mutagenesis, transformation, and carcinogenesis are also rudimentary.

  13. Cockayne syndrome: defective repair of transcription?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Gool (Alain); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); E. Citterio (Elisabetta); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the past years, it has become increasingly evident that basal metabolic processes within the cell are intimately linked and influenced by one another. One such link that recently has attracted much attention is the close interplay between nucleotide excision DNA repair and

  14. Transcriptional and physiological changes during Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivation from non-replicating persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peicheng Du

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can persist for years in the hostile environment of the host in a non-replicating or slowly replicating state. While active disease predominantly results from reactivation of a latent infection, the molecular mechanisms of M. tuberculosis reactivation are still poorly understood. We characterized the physiology and global transcriptomic profiles of M. tuberculosis during reactivation from hypoxia-induced non-replicating persistence. We found that M. tuberculosis reactivation upon reaeration was associated with a lag phase, in which the recovery of cellular physiological and metabolic functions preceded the resumption of cell replication. Enrichment analysis of the transcriptomic dynamics revealed changes to many metabolic pathways and transcription regulons/subnetworks that orchestrated the metabolic and physiological transformation in preparation for cell division. In particular, we found that M. tuberculosis reaeration lag phase is associated with down-regulation of persistence-associated regulons/subnetworks, including DosR, MprA, SigH, SigE and ClgR, as well as metabolic pathways including those involved in the uptake of lipids and their catabolism. More importantly, we identified a number of up-regulated transcription regulons and metabolic pathways, including those involved in metal transport and remobilization, second messenger-mediated responses, DNA repair and recombination, and synthesis of major cell wall components. We also found that inactivation of the major alternative sigma factors SigE or SigH disrupted exit from persistence, underscoring the importance of the global transcriptional reprogramming during M. tuberculosis reactivation. Our observations suggest that M. tuberculosis lag phase is associated with a global gene expression reprogramming that defines the initiation of a reactivation process.

  15. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Zhang, Chen; Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (plife cycle.

  16. Transcription Restores DNA Repair to Heterochromatin, Determining Regional Mutation Rates in Cancer Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in cancer are more frequent in heterochromatic and late-replicating regions of the genome. We report that regional disparities in mutation density are virtually abolished within transcriptionally silent genomic regions of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCCs arising in an XPC−/− background. XPC−/− cells lack global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER, thus establishing differential access of DNA repair machinery within chromatin-rich regions of the genome as the primary cause for the regional disparity. Strikingly, we find that increasing levels of transcription reduce mutation prevalence on both strands of gene bodies embedded within H3K9me3-dense regions, and only to those levels observed in H3K9me3-sparse regions, also in an XPC-dependent manner. Therefore, transcription appears to reduce mutation prevalence specifically by relieving the constraints imposed by chromatin structure on DNA repair. We model this relationship among transcription, chromatin state, and DNA repair, revealing a new, personalized determinant of cancer risk.

  17. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Zhao

    Full Text Available A DNA-binding protein (DBP [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05, indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01. The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01. The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle.

  18. DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells: the nature of replicon inhibition and post-replication repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doniger, J.

    1978-01-01

    DNA replication in ultraviolet light irradiated Chinese hamster cells was studied using techniques of DNA fiber autoradiography and alkaline sucrose sedimentation. Bidirectionally growing replicons were observed in the autoradiograms independent of the irradiation conditions. After a dose of 5 J/m 2 at 254 nm the rate of fork progression was the same as in unirradiated cells, while the rate of replication was reduced by 50%. After a dose of 10J/m 2 the rate of fork progression was reduced 40%, while the replication rate was only 25% of normal. Therefore, at low doses of ultraviolet light irradiation, the inhibition of DNA replication is due to reduction in the number of functioning replicons, while at higher doses the rate of fork progression is also slowed. Those replicons which no longer function after irradiation are blocked in fork movement rather than replicon initiation. After irradiation, pulse label was first incorporated into short nascent strands, the average size of which was approximately equal to the distance between pyrimidine dimers. Under conditions where post-replication repair occurs these short strands were eventually joined into larger pieces. Finally, the data show that slowing post-replication repair with caffeine does not slow fork movement. The results presented here support the post-replication repair model of 'gapped synthesis' and rule out a major role for 'replicative bypass'. (author)

  19. Transcription-replication conflicts at chromosomal fragile sites—consequences in M phase and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Vibe Hallundbæk; Lisby, Michael

    2017-01-01

    transcription and replication patterns. At the same time, these chromosomal fragile sites engage in aberrant DNA structures in mitosis. Here, we discuss the mechanistic details of transcription–replication conflicts including putative scenarios for R-loop-induced replication inhibition to understand how...... transcription–replication conflicts transition from S phase into various aberrant DNA structures in mitosis....

  20. Repair of human DNA in molecules that replicate or remain unreplicated following ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.

    1980-01-01

    The extent of DNA replication, the incidence of uv induced pyrimidine dimers and the repair replication observed after their excision was monitored in human fibroblasts uv irradiated with single or split uv doses. The excision repair processes were measured in molecules that remained unreplicated or in those that replicated after the latter uv irradiation. Less DNA replication was observed after a split as opposed to single uv irradiation. Furthermore, a split dose did not modify the excision parameters measured after a single irradiation, regardless of whether the DNA had replicated or not

  1. Repair of DNA in replicated and unreplicated portions of the human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, R.

    1979-01-01

    Portions of the human genome that have replicated after ultraviolet light irradiation and those that remain unreplicated have both been examined for the distribution of pyrimidine dimers and the extent of repair replication following their removal. The data indicate that the number of unrepaired dimers and the extent of repair replication seen after their excision are equal in the replicated and unreplicated DNA. Furthermore, the daughter strand of replicated DNA is larger than the average interdimer distance found in the parental strand. Hence, DNA replication in normal human fibroblasts is clearly capable of getting past pyrimidine dimers, and a preferential repair of such lesions in DNA that is about to be or has been replicated does not operate to any visible extent in these cells. (author)

  2. Inhibition of DNA replication and repair by anthralin or danthron in cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.M.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1982-01-01

    The comparative effects of the tumor promoter anthralin and its analog, danthron, on semiconservative DNA replication and DNA repair synthesis were studied in cultured human cells. Bromodeoxyuridine was used as density label together with 3 H-thymidine to distinguish replication from repair synthesis in isopycnic CsCl gradients. Anthralin at 1.1 microgram inhibited replication in T98G cells by 50%. In cells treated with 0.4 or 1.3 microM anthralin and additive effect was observed on the inhibition of replication by ultraviolet light (254 nm). In cells irradiated with 20 J/m2, 2.3 microM anthralin was required to inhibit repair synthesis by 50%. Thus there was no selective inhibitory effect of anthralin on repair synthesis. Danthron exhibited no detectable effect on either semiconservative replication or repair synthesis at concentrations below about 5.0 microM. Neither compound stimulated repair synthesis in the absence of ultraviolet irradiation. Thus, anthralin and danthron do not appear to react with DNA to form adducts that are subject to excision repair. Although both compounds appear to intercalate into supercoiled DNA in vitro to a limited extent, the degree of unwinding introduced by the respective drugs does not correlate with their relative effects on DNA synthesis in vivo. Therefore the inhibitory effect of anthralin on DNA replication and repair synthesis in T98G cells does not appear to result from the direct interaction of the drug with DNA

  3. Transcription and replication result in distinct epigenetic marks following repression of early gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Kallestad, Les; Woods, Emily; Christensen, Kendra; Gefroh, Amanda; Balakrishnan, Lata; Milavetz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Simian Virus 40 (SV40) early transcription is repressed when the product of early transcription, T-antigen, binds to its cognate regulatory sequence, Site I, in the promoter of the SV40 minichromosome. Because SV40 minichromosomes undergo replication and transcription potentially repression could occur during active transcription or during DNA replication. Since repression is frequently epigenetically marked by the introduction of specific forms of methylated histone H3, we characterized th...

  4. Shaping the landscape of the Escherichia coli chromosome: replication-transcription encounters in cells with an ectopic replication origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Darja; Taylor, Toni; Smith, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Each cell division requires the unwinding of millions of DNA base pairs to allow chromosome duplication and gene transcription. As DNA replication and transcription share the same template, conflicts between both processes are unavoidable and head-on collisions are thought to be particularly...

  5. The DNA replication checkpoint directly regulates MBF-dependent G1/S transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-10-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G(1)/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G(1)/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G(1)/S transcriptional program during replication stress. We propose a mechanism for this regulation, based on in vitro phosphorylation of the Cdc10 subunit of MBF by the Cds1 replication-checkpoint kinase. Replacement of two potential phosphorylation sites with phosphomimetic amino acids suffices to promote the checkpoint transcriptional program, suggesting that Cds1 phosphorylation directly regulates MBF-dependent transcription. The conservation of MBF between fission and budding yeast, and recent results implicating MBF as a target of the budding yeast replication checkpoint, suggests that checkpoint regulation of the MBF transcription factor is a conserved strategy for coping with replication stress. Furthermore, the structural and regulatory similarity between MBF and E2F, the metazoan G(1)/S transcription factor, suggests that this checkpoint mechanism may be broadly conserved among eukaryotes.

  6. DNA replication and repair in Tilapia cells. 1. The effect of ultraviolet radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew, F.H.; Chang, L.M. (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China))

    1984-12-01

    The effect of ultraviolet radiation on a cell line established from the warm water fish Tilapia has been assessed by measuring the rate of DNA synthesis, excision repair, post-replication repair and cell survival. The cells tolerate ultraviolet radiation better than mammalian cells with respect to DNA synthesis, post-replication repair and cell survival. They are also efficient in excision repair, which in other fish cell lines has been found to be at a low level or absent. Their response to the inhibitors hydroxyurea and 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine is less sensitive than that of other cell lines, yet the cells seem to have very small pools of DNA precursor.

  7. Interplay of DNA repair with transcription: from structures to mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaconescu, Alexandra M; Artsimovitch, Irina; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2012-12-01

    Many DNA transactions are crucial for maintaining genomic integrity and faithful transfer of genetic information but remain poorly understood. An example is the interplay between nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription, also known as transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR). Discovered decades ago, the mechanisms for TCR have remained elusive, not in small part due to the scarcity of structural studies of key players. Here we summarize recent structural information on NER/TCR factors, focusing on bacterial systems, and integrate it with existing genetic, biochemical, and biophysical data to delineate the mechanisms at play. We also review emerging, alternative modalities for recruitment of NER proteins to DNA lesions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. RFWD3-Dependent Ubiquitination of RPA Regulates Repair at Stalled Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Andrew E H; Wang, David C; Willis, Nicholas A; Boardman, Alexander P; Hajdu, Ildiko; Adeyemi, Richard O; Lowry, Elizabeth; Gygi, Steven P; Scully, Ralph; Elledge, Stephen J

    2015-10-15

    We have used quantitative proteomics to profile ubiquitination in the DNA damage response (DDR). We demonstrate that RPA, which functions as a protein scaffold in the replication stress response, is multiply ubiquitinated upon replication fork stalling. Ubiquitination of RPA occurs on chromatin, involves sites outside its DNA binding channel, does not cause proteasomal degradation, and increases under conditions of fork collapse, suggesting a role in repair at stalled forks. We demonstrate that the E3 ligase RFWD3 mediates RPA ubiquitination. RFWD3 is necessary for replication fork restart, normal repair kinetics during replication stress, and homologous recombination (HR) at stalled replication forks. Mutational analysis suggests that multisite ubiquitination of the entire RPA complex is responsible for repair at stalled forks. Multisite protein group sumoylation is known to promote HR in yeast. Our findings reveal a similar requirement for multisite protein group ubiquitination during HR at stalled forks in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mismatch Repair Balances Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Replication Fidelity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    Rev Mol Cell Biol 7: 335–346. 7. Li GM (2008) Mechanisms and functions of DNA mismatch repair. Cell Res 18: 85–98. 8. Pavlov YI, Mian IM, Kunkel TA...11: 165–170. 41. Li F, Tian L, Gu L, Li GM (2009) Evidence that nucleosomes inhibit mismatch repair in eukaryotic cells. J Biol Chem 284: 33056–33061

  10. Differential effect of ionizing radiation on transcription in repair-deficient and repair-proficient mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, G.P.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine in vivo changes in total transcription and in the expression of the c-fos gene following whole-body exposure of mice to JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Radiation repair-deficient (wst/wst) and -proficient (wst/., C57BL/6 x C3H F1) mice were exposed to JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons calibrated to deliver a gut dose of 50 cGy. Animals were sacrificed less than 10 or at 60 min postirradiation, and gut tissues were removed for study. Our results revealed that, in repair-proficient mice, an immediate depression (relative to untreated control) in total transcription was evident that continued through 1 h postirradiation. Conversely, radiation-sensitive wst/wst mice displayed doubled transcription levels postirradiation. Expression of c-fos was consistently depressed following radiation exposure in control and wst/wst mice. However, the depression of c-fos mRNA was delayed in wst/wst mice relative to controls. These results demonstrate abnormal regulation of transcription and of c-fos mRNA accumulation in repair-deficient wasted mice following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, this work documents rapid total transcriptional depression in normal mice following radiation exposure

  11. Bacteriophage T5 encodes a homolog of the eukaryotic transcription coactivator PC4 implicated in recombination-dependent DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigemann, Birthe; Schulz, Annina; Werten, Sebastiaan

    2013-11-15

    The RNA polymerase II cofactor PC4 globally regulates transcription of protein-encoding genes through interactions with unwinding DNA, the basal transcription machinery and transcription activators. Here, we report the surprising identification of PC4 homologs in all sequenced representatives of the T5 family of bacteriophages, as well as in an archaeon and seven phyla of eubacteria. We have solved the crystal structure of the full-length T5 protein at 1.9Å, revealing a striking resemblance to the characteristic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding core domain of PC4. Intriguing novel structural features include a potential regulatory region at the N-terminus and a C-terminal extension of the homodimerisation interface. The genome organisation of T5-related bacteriophages points at involvement of the PC4 homolog in recombination-dependent DNA replication, strongly suggesting that the protein corresponds to the hitherto elusive replicative ssDNA-binding protein of the T5 family. Our findings imply that PC4-like factors intervene in multiple unwinding-related processes by acting as versatile modifiers of nucleic acid conformation and raise the possibility that the eukaryotic transcription coactivator derives from ancestral DNA replication, recombination and repair factors. © 2013.

  12. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro, E-mail: junkom@med.tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Ikehata, Hironobu [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Mori, Toshio [Radioisotope Research Center, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Nara 634-8521 (Japan); Ono, Tetsuya [Department of Cell Biology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2012-03-10

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  13. Fully functional global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts and compromised transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in condensed mitotic chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komura, Jun-ichiro; Ikehata, Hironobu; Mori, Toshio; Ono, Tetsuya

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, chromatin is highly condensed, and activities such as transcription and semiconservative replication do not occur. Consequently, the condensed condition of mitotic chromatin is assumed to inhibit DNA metabolism by impeding the access of DNA-transacting proteins. However, about 40 years ago, several researchers observed unscheduled DNA synthesis in UV-irradiated mitotic chromosomes, suggesting the presence of excision repair. We re-examined this subject by directly measuring the removal of UV-induced DNA lesions by an ELISA and by a Southern-based technique in HeLa cells arrested at mitosis. We observed that the removal of (6-4) photoproducts from the overall genome in mitotic cells was as efficient as in interphase cells. This suggests that global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully functional during mitosis, and that the DNA in mitotic chromatin is accessible to proteins involved in this mode of DNA repair. Nevertheless, not all modes of DNA repair seem fully functional during mitosis. We also observed that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers from the dihydrofolate reductase and c-MYC genes in mitotic cells was very slow. This suggests that transcription-coupled repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers is compromised or non-functional during mitosis, which is probably the consequence of mitotic transcriptional repression. -- Highlights: ► Global genome repair of (6-4) photoproducts is fully active in mitotic cells. ► DNA in condensed mitotic chromatin does not seem inaccessible or inert. ► Mitotic transcriptional repression may impair transcription-coupled repair.

  14. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian; Wang, Junguo; Miki, Daisuke; Xia, Ran; Yu, Wenxiang; He, Junna; Zheng, Zhimin; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gonga, Zhizhong

    2010-01-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  15. DNA replication factor C1 mediates genomic stability and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Qian

    2010-07-01

    Genetic screening identified a suppressor of ros1-1, a mutant of REPRESSOR OF SILENCING1 (ROS1; encoding a DNA demethylation protein). The suppressor is a mutation in the gene encoding the largest subunit of replication factor C (RFC1). This mutation of RFC1 reactivates the unlinked 35S-NPTII transgene, which is silenced in ros1 and also increases expression of the pericentromeric Athila retrotransposons named transcriptional silent information in a DNA methylationindependent manner. rfc1 is more sensitive than the wild type to the DNA-damaging agent methylmethane sulphonate and to the DNA inter- and intra- cross-linking agent cisplatin. The rfc1 mutant constitutively expresses the G2/M-specific cyclin CycB1;1 and other DNA repair-related genes. Treatment with DNA-damaging agents mimics the rfc1 mutation in releasing the silenced 35S-NPTII, suggesting that spontaneously induced genomic instability caused by the rfc1 mutation might partially contribute to the released transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The frequency of somatic homologous recombination is significantly increased in the rfc1 mutant. Interestingly, ros1 mutants show increased telomere length, but rfc1 mutants show decreased telomere length and reduced expression of telomerase. Our results suggest that RFC1 helps mediate genomic stability and TGS in Arabidopsis thaliana. © 2010 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  16. Repair and replication of DNA in hereditary (bilateral) retinoblastoma cells after X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Char, D.; Charles, W.C.; Rand, N.

    1982-01-01

    Fibroblasts from patients with hereditary retinoblastoma reportedly exhibit increased sensitivity to killing by X-rays. Although some human syndromes with similar or greater hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents (e.g., X-rays, ultraviolet light, and chemical carcinogens), such as xeroderma pigmentosum, are deficient in DNA repair, most do not have such clearly demonstrable defects in repair. Retinoblastoma cells appear to be normal in repairing single-strand breaks and performing repair replication after X-irradiation and also in synthesizing poly(adenosine diphosphoribose). Semiconservative DNA replication in these cells, however, is slightly more resistant than normal after X-irradiation, suggesting that continued replication of damaged parental DNA could contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. This effect is small, however, and may be a consequence rather than a cause of the fundamental enzymatic abnormality in retinoblastoma that causes the tumorigenesis

  17. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of nucleotide excision repair genes in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefkofsky, Hailey B. [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Veloso, Artur [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bioinformatics Program, Department of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ljungman, Mats, E-mail: ljungman@umich.edu [Translational Oncology Program, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Department of Environmental Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes DNA helix-distorting lesions induced by UV light and various chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. These lesions efficiently block the elongation of transcription and need to be rapidly removed by transcription-coupled NER (TC-NER) to avoid the induction of apoptosis. Twenty-nine genes have been classified to code for proteins participating in nucleotide excision repair (NER) in human cells. Here we explored the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of these NER genes across 13 human cell lines using Bru-seq and BruChase-seq, respectively. Many NER genes are relatively large in size and therefore will be easily inactivated by UV-induced transcription-blocking lesions. Furthermore, many of these genes produce transcripts that are rather unstable. Thus, these genes are expected to rapidly lose expression leading to a diminished function of NER. One such gene is ERCC6 that codes for the CSB protein critical for TC-NER. Due to its large gene size and high RNA turnover rate, the ERCC6 gene may act as dosimeter of DNA damage so that at high levels of damage, ERCC6 RNA levels would be diminished leading to the loss of CSB expression, inhibition of TC-NER and the promotion of cell death.

  18. H4K20me0 marks post-replicative chromatin and recruits the TONSL₋MMS22L DNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saredi, Giulia; Huang, Hongda; Hammond, Colin M.; Alabert, Constance; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Forne, Ignasi; Reverón-Gómez, Nazaret; Foster, Benjamin M.; Mlejnkova, Lucie; Bartke, Till; Cejka, Petr; Mailand, Niels; Imhof, Axel; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Groth, Anja [UCopenhagen; (MSKCC); (ICL); (LMU); (Zurich)

    2016-06-22

    Here, we report that after DNA replication, chromosomal processes including DNA repair and transcription take place in the context of sister chromatids. While cell cycle regulation can guide these processes globally, mechanisms to distinguish pre- and post-replicative states locally remain unknown. In this paper we reveal that new histones incorporated during DNA replication provide a signature of post-replicative chromatin, read by the human TONSL–MMS22L1, 2, 3, 4 homologous recombination complex. We identify the TONSL ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) as a reader of histone H4 tails unmethylated at K20 (H4K20me0), which are specific to new histones incorporated during DNA replication and mark post-replicative chromatin until the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Accordingly, TONSL–MMS22L binds new histones H3–H4 both before and after incorporation into nucleosomes, remaining on replicated chromatin until late G2/M. H4K20me0 recognition is required for TONSL–MMS22L binding to chromatin and accumulation at challenged replication forks and DNA lesions. Consequently, TONSL ARD mutants are toxic, compromising genome stability, cell viability and resistance to replication stress. Finally, together, these data reveal a histone-reader-based mechanism for recognizing the post-replicative state, offering a new angle to understand DNA repair with the potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  19. Replication stress activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Ying, Songmin; Bjerregaard, Victoria A

    2015-01-01

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress has been implicated as a driver of tumorigenesis. Many chromosomal rearrangements characteristic of human cancers originate from specific regions of the genome called common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are difficult-to-replicate loci that manifest as gaps...... into mitotic prophase triggers the recruitment of MUS81 to CFSs. The nuclease activity of MUS81 then promotes POLD3-dependent DNA synthesis at CFSs, which serves to minimize chromosome mis-segregation and non-disjunction. We propose that the attempted condensation of incompletely duplicated loci in early...... mitosis serves as the trigger for completion of DNA replication at CFS loci in human cells. Given that this POLD3-dependent mitotic DNA synthesis is enhanced in aneuploid cancer cells that exhibit intrinsically high levels of chromosomal instability (CIN(+)) and replicative stress, we suggest...

  20. Replicative Stress Induces Intragenic Transcription of the ASE1 Gene that Negatively Regulates Ase1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    McKnight, Kelly; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yanchang

    2014-01-01

    Intragenic transcripts initiate within the coding region of a gene, thereby producing shorter mRNAs and proteins. Although intragenic transcripts are widely expressed [1], their role in the functional regulation of genes remains largely unknown. In budding yeast, DNA replication stress activates the S-phase checkpoint that stabilizes replication forks and arrests cells in S-phase with a short spindle [2-4]. When yeast cells were treated with hydroxyurea (HU) to block DNA synthesis and induce ...

  1. Effects of integration and replication on transcription of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeang, K. T.; Berkhout, B.; Dropulic, B.

    1993-01-01

    The activity of a promoter is influenced by chromosomal and cell cycle/replication context. We analyzed the influences of integration and replication on transcription of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 long terminal repeat (LTR). We found that one requirement for Tat trans-activated

  2. uvsF RFC1, the large subunit of replication factor C in Aspergillus nidulans, is essential for DNA replication, functions in UV repair and is upregulated in response to MMS-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafer, Etta; Chae, Suhn-Kee

    2008-09-01

    uvsF201 was the first highly UV-sensitive repair-defective mutation isolated in Aspergillus nidulans. It showed epistasis only with postreplication repair mutations, but caused lethal interactions with many other repair-defective strains. Unexpectedly, closest homology of uvsF was found to the large subunit of human DNA replication factor RFC that is essential for DNA replication. Sequencing of the uvsF201 region identified changes at two close base pairs and the corresponding amino acids in the 5'-region of uvsF(RFC1). This viable mutant represents a novel and possibly important type. Additional sequencing of the uvsF region confirmed a mitochondrial ribosomal protein gene, mrpA(L16), closely adjacent, head-to-head with a 0.2kb joint promoter region. MMS-induced transcription of both the genes, but especially uvsF(RFC1), providing evidence for a function in DNA damage response.

  3. Photosensitized UVA-Induced Cross-Linking between Human DNA Repair and Replication Proteins and DNA Revealed by Proteomic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320–400 nm) interacts with chromophores present in human cells to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that damage both DNA and proteins. ROS levels are amplified, and the damaging effects of UVA are exacerbated if the cells are irradiated in the presence of UVA photosensitizers such as 6-thioguanine (6-TG), a strong UVA chromophore that is extensively incorporated into the DNA of dividing cells, or the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Both DNA-embedded 6-TG and ciprofloxacin combine synergistically with UVA to generate high levels of ROS. Importantly, the extensive protein damage induced by these photosensitizer+UVA combinations inhibits DNA repair. DNA is maintained in intimate contact with the proteins that effect its replication, transcription, and repair, and DNA–protein cross-links (DPCs) are a recognized reaction product of ROS. Cross-linking of DNA metabolizing proteins would compromise these processes by introducing physical blocks and by depleting active proteins. We describe a sensitive and statistically rigorous method to analyze DPCs in cultured human cells. Application of this proteomics-based analysis to cells treated with 6-TG+UVA and ciprofloxacin+UVA identified proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, and gene expression among those most vulnerable to cross-linking under oxidative conditions. PMID:27654267

  4. Conflict Resolution in the Genome: How Transcription and Replication Make It Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2016-12-01

    The complex machineries involved in replication and transcription translocate along the same DNA template, often in opposing directions and at different rates. These processes routinely interfere with each other in prokaryotes, and mounting evidence now suggests that RNA polymerase complexes also encounter replication forks in higher eukaryotes. Indeed, cells rely on numerous mechanisms to avoid, tolerate, and resolve such transcription-replication conflicts, and the absence of these mechanisms can lead to catastrophic effects on genome stability and cell viability. In this article, we review the cellular responses to transcription-replication conflicts and highlight how these inevitable encounters shape the genome and impact diverse cellular processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Replication and Transcription of Eukaryotic DNA in Esherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, John F.; Cohen, Stanley N.; Chang, Annie C. Y.; Boyer, Herbert W.; Goodman, Howard M.; Helling, Robert B.

    1974-01-01

    Fragments of amplified Xenopus laevis DNA, coding for 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA and generated by EcoRI restriction endonuclease, have been linked in vitro to the bacterial plasmid pSC101; and the recombinant molecular species have been introduced into E. coli by transformation. These recombinant plasmids, containing both eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA, replicate stably in E. coli. RNA isolated from E. coli minicells harboring the plasmids hybridizes to amplified X. laevis rDNA. Images PMID:4600264

  6. RTEL1 contributes to DNA replication and repair and telomere maintenance.

    OpenAIRE

    Uringa, E.-J.; Lisaingo, K.; Pickett, H. A.; Brind'Amour, J.; Rohde, J.-H.; Zelensky, A.; Essers, J.; Lansdorp, P. M.

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTelomere maintenance and DNA repair are important processes that protect the genome against instability. mRtel1, an essential helicase, is a dominant factor setting telomere length in mice. In addition, mRtel1 is involved in DNA double-strand break repair. The role of mRtel1 in telomere maintenance and genome stability is poorly understood. Therefore we used mRtel1-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells to examine the function of mRtel1 in replication, DNA repair, recombination, and...

  7. Transcriptionally Driven DNA Replication Program of the Human Parasite Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Lombraña

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Faithful inheritance of eukaryotic genomes requires the orchestrated activation of multiple DNA replication origins (ORIs. Although origin firing is mechanistically conserved, how origins are specified and selected for activation varies across different model systems. Here, we provide a complete analysis of the nucleosomal landscape and replication program of the human parasite Leishmania major, building on a better evolutionary understanding of replication organization in Eukarya. We found that active transcription is a driving force for the nucleosomal organization of the L. major genome and that both the spatial and the temporal program of DNA replication can be explained as associated to RNA polymerase kinetics. This simple scenario likely provides flexibility and robustness to deal with the environmental changes that impose alterations in the genetic programs during parasitic life cycle stages. Our findings also suggest that coupling replication initiation to transcription elongation could be an ancient solution used by eukaryotic cells for origin maintenance.

  8. RTEL1 contributes to DNA replication and repair and telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uringa, Evert-Jan; Lisaingo, Kathleen; Pickett, Hilda A; Brind'Amour, Julie; Rohde, Jan-Hendrik; Zelensky, Alex; Essers, Jeroen; Lansdorp, Peter M

    2012-07-01

    Telomere maintenance and DNA repair are important processes that protect the genome against instability. mRtel1, an essential helicase, is a dominant factor setting telomere length in mice. In addition, mRtel1 is involved in DNA double-strand break repair. The role of mRtel1 in telomere maintenance and genome stability is poorly understood. Therefore we used mRtel1-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells to examine the function of mRtel1 in replication, DNA repair, recombination, and telomere maintenance. mRtel1-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells showed sensitivity to a range of DNA-damaging agents, highlighting its role in replication and genome maintenance. Deletion of mRtel1 increased the frequency of sister chromatid exchange events and suppressed gene replacement, demonstrating the involvement of the protein in homologous recombination. mRtel1 localized transiently at telomeres and is needed for efficient telomere replication. Of interest, in the absence of mRtel1, telomeres in embryonic stem cells appeared relatively stable in length, suggesting that mRtel1 is required to allow extension by telomerase. We propose that mRtel1 is a key protein for DNA replication, recombination, and repair and efficient elongation of telomeres by telomerase.

  9. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jennifer S.; Baird, Brandon J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo. PMID:22941641

  10. DNA replication initiator Cdc6 also regulates ribosomal DNA transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shijiao; Xu, Xiaowei; Wang, Guopeng; Lu, Guoliang; Xie, Wenbing; Tao, Wei; Zhang, Hongyin; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2016-04-01

    RNA-polymerase-I-dependent ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription is fundamental to rRNA processing, ribosome assembly and protein synthesis. However, how this process is initiated during the cell cycle is not fully understood. By performing a proteomic analysis of transcription factors that bind RNA polymerase I during rDNA transcription initiation, we identified that the DNA replication initiator Cdc6 interacts with RNA polymerase I and its co-factors, and promotes rDNA transcription in G1 phase in an ATPase-activity-dependent manner. We further showed that Cdc6 is targeted to the nucleolus during late mitosis and G1 phase in a manner that is dependent on B23 (also known as nucleophosmin, NPM1), and preferentially binds to the rDNA promoter through its ATP-binding domain. Overexpression of Cdc6 increases rDNA transcription, whereas knockdown of Cdc6 results in a decreased association of both RNA polymerase I and the RNA polymerase I transcription factor RRN3 with rDNA, and a reduction of rDNA transcription. Furthermore, depletion of Cdc6 impairs the interaction between RRN3 and RNA polymerase I. Taken together, our data demonstrate that Cdc6 also serves as a regulator of rDNA transcription initiation, and indicate a mechanism by which initiation of rDNA transcription and DNA replication can be coordinated in cells. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. True Lies: The Double Life of the Nucleotide Excision Repair Factors in Transcription and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Le May

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a major DNA repair pathway in eukaryotic cells. NER removes structurally diverse lesions such as pyrimidine dimers, arising upon UV irradiation or bulky chemical adducts, arising upon exposure to carcinogens and some chemotherapeutic drugs. NER defects lead to three genetic disorders that result in predisposition to cancers, accelerated aging, neurological and developmental defects. During NER, more than 30 polypeptides cooperate to recognize, incise, and excise a damaged oligonucleotide from the genomic DNA. Recent papers reveal an additional and unexpected role for the NER factors. In the absence of a genotoxic attack, the promoters of RNA polymerases I- and II-dependent genes recruit XPA, XPC, XPG, and XPF to initiate gene expression. A model that includes the growth arrest and DNA damage 45α protein (Gadd45α and the NER factors, in order to maintain the promoter of active genes under a hypomethylated state, has been proposed but remains controversial. This paper focuses on the double life of the NER factors in DNA repair and transcription and describes the possible roles of these factors in the RNA synthesis process.

  12. Transcriptional repression is epigenetically marked by H3K9 methylation during SV40 replication

    OpenAIRE

    Kallestad, Les; Christensen, Kendra; Woods, Emily; Milavetz, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Background We have recently shown that T-antigen binding to Site I results in the replication-dependent introduction of H3K9me1 into SV40 chromatin late in infection. Since H3K9me2 and H3K9me3 are also present late in infection, we determined whether their presence was also related to the status of ongoing transcription and replication. Transcription was either inhibited with 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidizole (DRB) or stimulated with sodium butyrate and the effects on histone m...

  13. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Emerging critical roles of Fe-S clusters in DNA replication and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Ishida, Justin P.; Tainer, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-S clusters are partners in the origin of life that predate cells, acetyl-CoA metabolism, DNA, and the RNA world. The double helix solved the mystery of DNA replication by base pairing for accurate copying. Yet, for genome stability necessary to life, the double helix has equally important implications for damage repair. Here we examine striking advances that uncover Fe-S cluster roles both in copying the genetic sequence by DNA polymerases and in crucial repair processes for genome maintenance, as mutational defects cause cancer and degenerative disease. Moreover, we examine an exciting, controversial role for Fe-S clusters in a third element required for life – the long-range coordination and regulation of replication and repair events. By their ability to delocalize electrons over both Fe and S centers, Fe-S clusters have unbeatable features for protein conformational control and charge transfer via double-stranded DNA that may fundamentally transform our understanding of life, replication, and repair. PMID:25655665

  15. Direct non transcriptional role of NF-Y in DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Belluti, Silvia; Miotto, Benoit; Neusiedler, Julia; Dolfini, Diletta; Drac, Marjorie; Basile, Valentina; Schwob, Etienne; Mantovani, Roberto; Blow, J Julian; Imbriano, Carol

    2016-04-01

    NF-Y is a heterotrimeric transcription factor, which plays a pioneer role in the transcriptional control of promoters containing the CCAAT-box, among which genes involved in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and DNA damage response. The knock-down of the sequence-specific subunit NF-YA triggers defects in S-phase progression, which lead to apoptotic cell death. Here, we report that NF-Y has a critical function in DNA replication progression, independent from its transcriptional activity. NF-YA colocalizes with early DNA replication factories, its depletion affects the loading of replisome proteins to DNA, among which Cdc45, and delays the passage from early to middle-late S phase. Molecular combing experiments are consistent with a role for NF-Y in the control of fork progression. Finally, we unambiguously demonstrate a direct non-transcriptional role of NF-Y in the overall efficiency of DNA replication, specifically in the DNA elongation process, using a Xenopus cell-free system. Our findings broaden the activity of NF-Y on a DNA metabolism other than transcription, supporting the existence of specific TFs required for proper and efficient DNA replication. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA replication and repair of Tilapia cells: Pt. 2. Effects of temperature on DNA replication and ultraviolet repair in Tilapia ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.D.; Yew, F.H.

    1988-02-01

    TO-2 is a fish cell line derived from the Tilapia ovary. It grows over a wide range of temperature (15-34/sup 0/C). We report the effects of temperature on DNA replication and u.v. repair in TO-2 cells. When the cells were moved from 31/sup 0/C to the sublethal high temperature of 37/sup 0/C, the rate of DNA synthesis first decreased to 60%, then speedy recovery soon set in, and after 8h at 37/sup 0/C the rate of DNA synthesis overshot the 31/sup 0/C control level by 180%. When moved to low temperature (18/sup 0/C) Tilapia cells also showed an initial suppression of DNA synthesis before settling at 30% of the control level. U.V. reduced but could not block DNA synthesis completely. The inhibition was overcome in 3h at 37, 31 and 25/sup 0/C, but not at 18/sup 0/C. Initiation of nascent DNA synthesis was blocked at 4Jm/sup -2/ in TO-2 cells compared with less than or equal to 1Jm/sup -2/ in mammalian cells. After 9Jm/sup -2/ u.v. irradiation, low molecular weight DNA replication intermediates started to accumulate. TO-2 cells showed low levels of u.v.-induced excision repair.

  17. New discoveries linking transcription to DNA repair and damage tolerance pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan E; Walker, Graham C

    2011-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the transcription elongation factor NusA is associated with all elongating RNA polymerases where it functions in transcription termination and antitermination. Here, we review our recent results implicating NusA in the recruitment of DNA repair and damage tolerance mechanisms to sites of stalled transcription complexes.

  18. p53 Maintains Genomic Stability by Preventing Interference between Transcription and Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Qiao Xin Yeo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor maintains genomic stability, typically acting through cell-cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. We discovered a function of p53 in preventing conflicts between transcription and replication, independent of its canonical roles. p53 deficiency sensitizes cells to Topoisomerase (Topo II inhibitors, resulting in DNA damage arising spontaneously during replication. Topoisomerase IIα (TOP2A-DNA complexes preferentially accumulate in isogenic p53 mutant or knockout cells, reflecting an increased recruitment of TOP2A to regulate DNA topology. We propose that p53 acts to prevent DNA topological stress originating from transcription during the S phase and, therefore, promotes normal replication fork progression. Consequently, replication fork progression is impaired in the absence of p53, which is reversed by transcription inhibition. Pharmacologic inhibition of transcription also attenuates DNA damage and decreases Topo-II-DNA complexes, restoring cell viability in p53-deficient cells. Together, our results demonstrate a function of p53 that may underlie its role in tumor suppression.

  19. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  20. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David; Michoud, Gregoire; Mosbach, Valentine; Dujon, Bernard; Richard, Guy-Franck

    2016-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  1. Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Branttie, Jean; Slaughter, Kerri Beth; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-12-15

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes significant upper and lower respiratory disease in all age groups worldwide. The virus possesses a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 13.3 kb encapsidated by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (N), giving rise to helical nucleocapsids. In addition, copies of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large RNA polymerase (L) decorate the viral nucleocapsids. After viral attachment, endocytosis, and fusion mediated by the viral glycoproteins, HMPV nucleocapsids are released into the cell cytoplasm. To visualize the subsequent steps of genome transcription and replication, a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was established to detect different viral RNA subpopulations in infected cells. The FISH probes were specific for detection of HMPV positive-sense RNA (+RNA) and viral genomic RNA (vRNA). Time course analysis of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells infected with HMPV revealed the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) from early times postinfection. HMPV IBs were shown to be cytoplasmic sites of active transcription and replication, with the translation of viral proteins being closely associated. Inclusion body formation was consistent with an actin-dependent coalescence of multiple early replicative sites. Time course quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis suggested that the coalescence of inclusion bodies is a strategy to efficiently replicate and transcribe the viral genome. These results provide a better understanding of the steps following HMPV entry and have important clinical implications. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered pathogen that affects human populations of all ages worldwide. Reinfections are common throughout life, but no vaccines or antiviral treatments are currently available. In this work, a spatiotemporal analysis of HMPV replication and transcription in bronchial epithelial cell-derived immortal cells was performed. HMPV was shown to

  2. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng; Ding, Feng; Lin, Qiang; Zhang, Lingfang; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhang; Hu, Songnian; Yu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  3. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  4. Effects of aphidicolin on repair replication and induced chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeeland, A.A. van; Filon, A.R.; Natarajan, A.T.; Bussmann, C.J.M.; Degrassi, F.; Kesteren-van Leeuwen, A.C. van; Palitti, F.; Rome Univ.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of aphidicolin, an inhibitor of polymerase α, on UV-induced repair replication in human skin fibroblasts, as well as in HeLa cells, was determined. In growing fibroblasts and in HeLa cells, aphidicolin had a potentiating effect on UV-induced repair replication, whereas in fibroblasts grown to confluency, aphidicolin had an inhibitory effect. This inhibitory effect was stronger when measured in the presence of hydroxyurea. In HeLa cells the presence of both aphidicolin and hydroxyurea also had an inhibitory effect, but in the presence of hydroxyurea alone, UV-induced repair replication was enhanced. The results of these studies can be explained on the basis of differences in deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pool sizes in growing and confluent cells. Post-treatment of X-irradiated human lymphocytes in the G 0 and G 1 stages with aphidicolin increased the frequencies of X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations. Such an increase was not observed in G 1 cells of CHO after similar treatment with X-rays and aphidicolin. However, treatment with aphidicolin, in the G 2 stage, increased the frequencies of induced chromatid breaks. The significance of these results is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Absence of specificity in inhibition of DNA repair replication by DNA-binding agents, cocarcinogens, and steroids in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Painter, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Although many chemicals, including cocarcinogens, DNA-binding agents, and steroids, inhibit repair replication of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA in human lymphocytes and proliferating cells in culture, none of these chemicals is specific. Our results show that all the chemicals we tested inhibit normal DNA synthesis as much as or more than they inhibit repair replication. There is thus no evidence in our results to support the hypothesis that cocarcinogens are specific inhibitors of DNA repair or that any of the chemicals studied might be useful adjuncts to tumor therapy merely because of specific inhibition of radiation repair mechanisms

  6. P-body proteins regulate transcriptional rewiring to promote DNA replication stress resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loll-Krippleber, Raphael; Brown, Grant W

    2017-09-15

    mRNA-processing (P-) bodies are cytoplasmic granules that form in eukaryotic cells in response to numerous stresses to serve as sites of degradation and storage of mRNAs. Functional P-bodies are critical for the DNA replication stress response in yeast, yet the repertoire of P-body targets and the mechanisms by which P-bodies promote replication stress resistance are unknown. In this study we identify the complete complement of mRNA targets of P-bodies during replication stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment. The key P-body protein Lsm1 controls the abundance of HHT1, ACF4, ARL3, TMA16, RRS1 and YOX1 mRNAs to prevent their toxic accumulation during replication stress. Accumulation of YOX1 mRNA causes aberrant downregulation of a network of genes critical for DNA replication stress resistance and leads to toxic acetaldehyde accumulation. Our data reveal the scope and the targets of regulation by P-body proteins during the DNA replication stress response.P-bodies form in response to stress and act as sites of mRNA storage and degradation. Here the authors identify the mRNA targets of P-bodies during DNA replication stress, and show that P-body proteins act to prevent toxic accumulation of these target transcripts.

  7. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Kishkevich, Anastasiya; Deegan, Rachel S; Keszthelyi, Andrea; Folkes, Lisa; Kearsey, Stephen E; De León, Nagore; Soriano, Ignacio; de Bruin, Robertus Antonius Maria; Carr, Antony M; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2017-09-12

    Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB) binding factor (MBF)-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Set2 Methyltransferase Facilitates DNA Replication and Promotes Genotoxic Stress Responses through MBF-Dependent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Chun Pai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modification through histone H3 lysine 36 methylation by the SETD2 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining genome stability. Here, we describe a role for Set2-dependent H3K36 methylation in facilitating DNA replication and the transcriptional responses to both replication stress and DNA damage through promoting MluI cell-cycle box (MCB binding factor (MBF-complex-dependent transcription in fission yeast. Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF-dependent ribonucleotide reductase (RNR expression, reduced deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP synthesis, altered replication origin firing, and a checkpoint-dependent S-phase delay. Accordingly, prolonged S phase in the absence of Set2 is suppressed by increasing dNTP synthesis. Furthermore, H3K36 is di- and tri-methylated at these MBF gene promoters, and Set2 loss leads to reduced MBF binding and transcription in response to genotoxic stress. Together, these findings provide new insights into how H3K36 methylation facilitates DNA replication and promotes genotoxic stress responses in fission yeast.

  9. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication oriS influences origin-dependent DNA replication and flanking gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    The VZV genome has two origins of DNA replication (oriS), each of which consists of an AT-rich sequence and three origin binding protein (OBP) sites called Box A, C and B. In these experiments, the mutation in the core sequence CGC of the Box A and C not only inhibited DNA replication but also inhibited both ORF62 and ORF63 expression in reporter gene assays. In contrast the Box B mutation did not influence DNA replication or flanking gene transcription. These results suggest that efficient DNA replication enhances ORF62 and ORF63 transcription. Recombinant viruses carrying these mutations in both sites and one with a deletion of the whole oriS were constructed. Surprisingly, the recombinant virus lacking both copies of oriS retained the capacity to replicate in melanoma and HELF cells suggesting that VZV has another origin of DNA replication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New paradigms in the repair of oxidative damage in human genome: mechanisms ensuring repair of mutagenic base lesions during replication and involvement of accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Arijit; Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-05-01

    Oxidized bases in the mammalian genome, which are invariably mutagenic due to their mispairing property, are continuously induced by endogenous reactive oxygen species and more abundantly after oxidative stress. Unlike bulky base adducts induced by UV and other environmental mutagens in the genome that block replicative DNA polymerases, oxidatively damaged bases such as 5-hydroxyuracil, produced by oxidative deamination of cytosine in the template strand, do not block replicative polymerases and thus need to be repaired prior to replication to prevent mutation. Following up our earlier studies, which showed that the Nei endonuclease VIII like 1 (NEIL1) DNA glycosylase, one of the five base excision repair (BER)-initiating enzymes in mammalian cells, has enhanced expression during the S-phase and higher affinity for replication fork-mimicking single-stranded (ss) DNA substrates, we recently provided direct experimental evidence for NEIL1's role in replicating template strand repair. The key requirement for this event, which we named as the 'cow-catcher' mechanism of pre-replicative BER, is NEIL1's non-productive binding (substrate binding without product formation) to the lesion base in ss DNA template to stall DNA synthesis, causing fork regression. Repair of the lesion in reannealed duplex is then carried out by NEIL1 in association with the DNA replication proteins. NEIL1 (and other BER-initiating enzymes) also interact with several accessory and non-canonical proteins including the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U and Y-box-binding protein 1 as well as high mobility group box 1 protein, whose precise roles in BER are still obscure. In this review, we have discussed the recent advances in our understanding of oxidative genome damage repair pathways with particular focus on the pre-replicative template strand repair and the role of scaffold factors like X-ray repairs cross-complementing protein 1 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and other accessory

  11. In vitro-reconstituted nucleoids can block mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farge, Géraldine; Mehmedovic, Majda; Baclayon, Marian; van den Wildenberg, Siet M J L; Roos, Wouter H; Gustafsson, Claes M; Wuite, Gijs J L; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-07-10

    The mechanisms regulating the number of active copies of mtDNA are still unclear. A mammalian cell typically contains 1,000-10,000 copies of mtDNA, which are packaged into nucleoprotein complexes termed nucleoids. The main protein component of these structures is mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM). Here, we reconstitute nucleoid-like particles in vitro and demonstrate that small changes in TFAM levels dramatically impact the fraction of DNA molecules available for transcription and DNA replication. Compaction by TFAM is highly cooperative, and at physiological ratios of TFAM to DNA, there are large variations in compaction, from fully compacted nucleoids to naked DNA. In compacted nucleoids, TFAM forms stable protein filaments on DNA that block melting and prevent progression of the replication and transcription machineries. Based on our observations, we suggest that small variations in the TFAM-to-mtDNA ratio may be used to regulate mitochondrial gene transcription and DNA replication. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Transcriptionally Driven DNA Replication Program of the Human Parasite Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombraña, Rodrigo; Álvarez, Alba; Fernández-Justel, José Miguel; Almeida, Ricardo; Poza-Carrión, César; Gomes, Fábia; Calzada, Arturo; Requena, José María; Gómez, María

    2016-08-09

    Faithful inheritance of eukaryotic genomes requires the orchestrated activation of multiple DNA replication origins (ORIs). Although origin firing is mechanistically conserved, how origins are specified and selected for activation varies across different model systems. Here, we provide a complete analysis of the nucleosomal landscape and replication program of the human parasite Leishmania major, building on a better evolutionary understanding of replication organization in Eukarya. We found that active transcription is a driving force for the nucleosomal organization of the L. major genome and that both the spatial and the temporal program of DNA replication can be explained as associated to RNA polymerase kinetics. This simple scenario likely provides flexibility and robustness to deal with the environmental changes that impose alterations in the genetic programs during parasitic life cycle stages. Our findings also suggest that coupling replication initiation to transcription elongation could be an ancient solution used by eukaryotic cells for origin maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The transcription fidelity factor GreA impedes DNA break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Priya; Sepúlveda, Leonardo A; Halliday, Jennifer A; Liu, Jingjing; Núñez, María Angélica Bravo; Golding, Ido; Rosenberg, Susan M; Herman, Christophe

    2017-10-12

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks and must function even on actively transcribed DNA. Because break repair prevents chromosome loss, the completion of repair is expected to outweigh the transcription of broken templates. However, the interplay between DNA break repair and transcription processivity is unclear. Here we show that the transcription factor GreA inhibits break repair in Escherichia coli. GreA restarts backtracked RNA polymerase and hence promotes transcription fidelity. We report that removal of GreA results in markedly enhanced break repair via the classic RecBCD-RecA pathway. Using a deep-sequencing method to measure chromosomal exonucleolytic degradation, we demonstrate that the absence of GreA limits RecBCD-mediated resection. Our findings suggest that increased RNA polymerase backtracking promotes break repair by instigating RecA loading by RecBCD, without the influence of canonical Chi signals. The idea that backtracked RNA polymerase can stimulate recombination presents a DNA transaction conundrum: a transcription fidelity factor that compromises genomic integrity.

  14. ATM is required for the repair of Topotecan-induced replication-associated double-strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köcher, Sabrina; Spies-Naumann, Anja; Kriegs, Malte; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dornreiter, Irena

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: DNA replication is a promising target for anti-cancer therapies. Therefore, the understanding of replication-associated DNA repair mechanisms is of great interest. One key factor of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is the PIK kinase Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) but it is still unclear whether ATM is involved in the repair of replication-associated DSBs. Here, we focused on the involvement of ATM in homology-directed repair (HDR) of indirect DSBs associated with replication. Material and methods: Experiments were performed using ATM-deficient and -proficient human cells. Replication-associated DSBs were induced with Topotecan (TPT) and compared with γ-irradiation (IR). Cell survival was measured by clonogenic assay. Overall DSB repair and HDR were evaluated by detecting residual γH2AX/53BP1 and Rad51 foci, respectively. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry and protein expression by Western blot. Results: ATM-deficiency leads to enhanced numbers of residual DSBs, resulting in a pronounced S/G2-block and decreased survival upon TPT-treatment. In common with IR, persisting Rad51 foci were detected following TPT-treatment. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that ATM is essentially required for the completion of HR-mediated repair of TPT-induced DSBs formed indirectly at replication forks

  15. Effect of specific enzyme inhibitors on replication, total genome DNA repair and on gene-specific DNA repair after UV irradiation in CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.C.; Stevsner, Tinna; Bohr, Vilhelm A. (National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD (USA). Division of Cancer Treatment, Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology); Mattern, M.R. (Smith Kline Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (USA). Department of Biomolecular Discovery)

    1991-09-01

    The effects were studied of some specific enzyme inhibitors on DNA repair and replication after UV damage in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The DNA repair was studied at the level of the average, overall genome and also in the active dihydrofolate reductase gene. Replication was measured in the overall genome. The inhibitors were tested of DNA poly-merase {alpha} and {delta} (aphidicolin), of poly(ADPr) polymerase (3-aminobenzamide), of ribonucleotide reductase (hydroxyurea), of topo-isomerase I (camptothecin), and of topoisomerase II (merbarone, VP-16). In addition, the effects were tested of the potential topoisomerase I activator, {beta}-lapachone. All of these compounds inhibited genome replication and all topoisomerase inhibitors affected the overall genome repair; {beta}-lapachone stimulated it. None of these compounds had any effect on the gene-specific repair. (author). 36 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs.

  16. Involvement of DNA gyrase in replication and transcription of bacteriophage T7 DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Wyngaert, M.A.; Hinkle, D.C.

    1979-01-01

    Growth of bacteriophage T7 is inhibited by the antibiotic coumermycin A 1 , an inhibitor of the Escherichia coli DNA gyrase. Since growth of the phage is insensitive to the antibiotic in strains containing a coumermycin-resistent DNA gyrase, this enzyme appears to be required for phage growth. We have investigated the effect of coumermycin on the kinetics of DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis during T7 infection. DNA synthesis is completely inhibited by the antibiotic. In addition, coumermycin significantly inhibits transcription of late but not early genes. Thus, E. coli DNA gyrase may play an important role in transcription as well as in replication of T7 DNA

  17. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Gaston; Speroni, Juliana; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Prives, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents [es

  18. The Fanconi anemia pathway promotes replication-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipscheer, Puck; Räschle, Markus; Smogorzewska, Agata; Enoiu, Milica; Ho, The Vinh; Schärer, Orlando D; Elledge, Stephen J; Walter, Johannes C

    2009-12-18

    Fanconi anemia is a human cancer predisposition syndrome caused by mutations in 13 Fanc genes. The disorder is characterized by genomic instability and cellular hypersensitivity to chemicals that generate DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs). A central event in the activation of the Fanconi anemia pathway is the mono-ubiquitylation of the FANCI-FANCD2 complex, but how this complex confers ICL resistance remains enigmatic. Using a cell-free system, we showed that FANCI-FANCD2 is required for replication-coupled ICL repair in S phase. Removal of FANCD2 from extracts inhibits both nucleolytic incisions near the ICL and translesion DNA synthesis past the lesion. Reversal of these defects requires ubiquitylated FANCI-FANCD2. Our results show that multiple steps of the essential S-phase ICL repair mechanism fail when the Fanconi anemia pathway is compromised.

  19. In Situ Tagged nsp15 Reveals Interactions with Coronavirus Replication/Transcription Complex-Associated Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah Athmer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronavirus (CoV replication and transcription are carried out in close proximity to restructured endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in replication/transcription complexes (RTC. Many of the CoV nonstructural proteins (nsps are required for RTC function; however, not all of their functions are known. nsp15 contains an endoribonuclease domain that is conserved in the CoV family. While the enzymatic activity and crystal structure of nsp15 are well defined, its role in replication remains elusive. nsp15 localizes to sites of RNA replication, but whether it acts independently or requires additional interactions for its function remains unknown. To begin to address these questions, we created an in situ tagged form of nsp15 using the prototypic CoV, mouse hepatitis virus (MHV. In MHV, nsp15 contains the genomic RNA packaging signal (P/S, a 95-bp RNA stem-loop structure that is not required for viral replication or nsp15 function. Utilizing this knowledge, we constructed an internal hemagglutinin (HA tag that replaced the P/S. We found that nsp15-HA was localized to discrete perinuclear puncta and strongly colocalized with nsp8 and nsp12, both well-defined members of the RTC, but not the membrane (M protein, involved in virus assembly. Finally, we found that nsp15 interacted with RTC-associated proteins nsp8 and nsp12 during infection, and this interaction was RNA independent. From this, we conclude that nsp15 localizes and interacts with CoV proteins in the RTC, suggesting it plays a direct or indirect role in virus replication. Furthermore, the use of in situ epitope tags could be used to determine novel nsp-nsp interactions in coronaviruses.

  20. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role...

  1. In situ enzymology of DNA replication and ultraviolet-induced DNA repair synthesis in permeable human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresler, S.; Frattini, M.G.; Robinson-Hill, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    Using permeable diploid human fibroblasts, the authors have studied the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate concentration dependences of ultraviolet- (UV-) induced DNA repair synthesis and semiconservative DNA replication. In both cell types (AG1518 and IMR-90) examined, the apparent K m values for dCTP, dGTP, and dTTP for DNA replication were between 1.2 and 2.9 μM. For UV-induced DNA repair synthesis, the apparent K m values were substantially lower, ranging from 0.11 to 0.44 μM for AG1518 cells and from 0.06 to 0.24 μM for IMR-90 cells. Recent data implicate DNA polymerase δ in UV-induced repair synthesis and suggest that DNA polymerases α and δ are both involved in semiconservative replication. They measured K m values for dGTP and dTTP for polymerases α and δ, for comparison with the values for replication and repair synthesis. The deoxyribonucleotide K m values for DNA polymerase δ are much greater than the K m values for UV-induced repair synthesis, suggesting that when polymerase δ functions in DNA repair, its characteristics are altered substantially either by association with accessory proteins or by direct posttranslational modification. In contrast, the deoxyribonucleotide binding characteristics of the DNA replication machinery differ little from those of the isolated DNA polymerases. The K m values for UV-induced repair synthesis are 5-80-fold lower than deoxyribonucleotide concentrations that have been reported for intact cultured diploid human fibroblasts. For replication, however, the K m for dGTP is only slightly lower than the average cellular dGTP concentration that has been reported for exponentially growing human fibroblasts. This finding is consistent with the concept that nucleotide compartmentation is required for the attainment of high rates of DNA replication in vivo

  2. Inhibition of DNA replication, DNA repair synthesis, and DNA polymerases α and δ by butylphenyl deoxyguanosine triphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreslor, S.L.; Frattini, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    Semiconservative DNA replication in growing mammalian cells and ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA repair synthesis in nongrowing mammalian cells are mediated by one or both of the aphidicolin-sensitive DNA polymerases, α and/or δ. They have studied the inhibition of replication and repair synthesis in permeable human cells by N 2 (p-n-butylphenyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine-5'-triphosphate (BuPh dGTP), an agent which inhibits polymerase α strongly and polymerase δ weakly. Both processes are inhibited by BuPh-dGTP in competition with dGTP. The K/sub i/'s are, for replication, 2-3 μM and, for repair synthesis, 3-4 μM, consistent with the involvement of the same DNA polymerase in both processes. Inhibition of isolated human polymerase α by BuPh-dGTP is also competitive with dGTP, but the K/sub i/ is approximately 10 nM, several hundred-fold lower than the K/sub i/'s of replication and repair synthesis. Isolated polymerase δ is inhibited by BuPh-dGTP at doses similar to those which inhibit replication and repair synthesis, however, attempts to determine the K/sub i/ of polymerase δ were hampered by the finding that the dependence of δ activity on deoxyribunucleotide concentration is parabolic at low doses. This behavior differs from the behavior of polymerase α and of cellular DNA replication and repair synthesis, all of which show a simple, hyperbolic relationship between activity and deoxyribonucleotide concentration. Thus, inhibition of DNA replication and UV induced DNA repair synthesis by BuPh dGTP is quantitatively similar to DNA polymerase δ, but some other characteristics of the cellular processes are more similar to those of polymerase α

  3. Transcription coupled repair deficiency protects against human mutagenesis and carcinogenesis: Personal Reflections on the 50th anniversary of the discovery of xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaver, James E

    2017-10-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients who lack the main damage recognition protein for global genome repair (GGR), XPC, have greatly increased skin cancer rates and elevated mutation frequencies originating from unrepaired ultraviolet photoproducts in the nontranscribed regions of the genome and in nontranscribed strands of expressed genes. But they show no increased mutations in transcribed strands. In contrast, cancer is absent from Cockayne syndrome (CS) patients that have defective transcription coupled repair (TCR) despite severe photosensitivity, CS patients remarkably show no elevation of UV induced mutagenesis implying that defective TCR may be protective against mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Mutation avoidance in CS is postulated to occur through arrested transcription that generates a tripled stranded R loop consisting of DNA double strands and a nascent mRNA strand. R loops result in S phase apoptosis or activation of ATM kinase that causes a delay in DNA replication until TCR, or transcript cleavage by TFIIS or RNAaseH, relieves the transcription block. Resumption of replication then occurs on repaired DNA without concomitant mutagenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  5. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  6. Human-Phosphate-Binding-Protein inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candolfi Ermanno

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Human Phosphate-Binding protein (HPBP is a serendipitously discovered lipoprotein that binds phosphate with high affinity. HPBP belongs to the DING protein family, involved in various biological processes like cell cycle regulation. We report that HPBP inhibits HIV-1 gene transcription and replication in T cell line, primary peripherical blood lymphocytes and primary macrophages. We show that HPBP is efficient in naïve and HIV-1 AZT-resistant strains. Our results revealed HPBP as a new and potent anti HIV molecule that inhibits transcription of the virus, which has not yet been targeted by HAART and therefore opens new strategies in the treatment of HIV infection.

  7. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  8. Fibre autoradiography of repair and replication in DNA from single cells: the effect of DNA synthesis inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ockey, C.H.

    1982-04-01

    DNA fibre autoradiography, after incorporation of high specific activity /sup 3/H-thymidine and /sup 3/H-deoxycytidine, has been used to investigate repair in DNA fibres from single cells following UV, or methyl-methane sulphonate (MMS) treatment. Asynchronously growing human fibroblasts, leucocytes, and HeLa cells at different phases of the cell cycle have been investigated. Isotope incorporation in repair could be differentiated from that involved in replication by the distribution and density of silver grains along the DNA fibres. Grain distribution due to repair was continuous over long stretches of the fibres and was at a low density, occasionally interspersed with short slightly denser segments. Replication labelling on the other hand, was dense and usually in short tandem segments. Repair labelling was of a similar overall density in fibres from a single cell, but differed in intensity from cell to cell. In mutagen treated Go (leucocytes) of G/sub 1/ (HeLa cells), repair labelling was not increased by the presence of the DNA inhibitors, hydroxyurea (HU) or 5-fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR). Repair was not detectable in S cells however without the use of these inhibitors to reduce endogenous nucleoside production. FUdR enhanced the repair labelling in S cells only slightly, while HU increased it beyond that observed in UV irradiated, HU treated, G/sub 1/ cells. The intensity of repair labelling in fibres from mutagen treated S cells appears to be proportional to the degree of reduction of DNA chain elongation in replicons.

  9. Effects of DNA polymerase inhibitors on replicative and repair DNA synthesis in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, T.; Nakamura, H.; Tsutsui, Y.; Nishiyama, Y.; Yoshida, S.

    1982-01-01

    Aphidicolin specifically inhibits eukaryotic DNA polymerase α, while 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (d 2 TTP) inhibits DNA polymerase ν and ν but not α. 1-ν-D-Arabinofuranosylcytosine 5'-triphosphate (araCTP) inhibits both DNA polymerase α and ν although to a different extent. Here we measured the effects of these inhibitors on repair DNA synthesis of U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells by two different methods. Firstly, aphidicolin, 1-ν-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC, a precursor of araCTP) and 2',3'-dideoxythimidine (d 2 Thd, a precursor of d 2 TTP) were added directly to the culture medium. In this case, aphidicolin and araC strongly inhibited replicative DNA synthesis of HeLa cells, and they also inhibited repair synthesis after U.V.-irradiation but to a much lesser extent. In contrast, high concentrations of d 2 Thd inhibited repair DNA synthesis to a higher extent than replicative DNA synthesis. Secondly, the active form of inhibitor, d 2 TTP, was microinjected directly into cytoplasm or nuclei or U.V.-irradiated HeLa cells. Microinjection of d 2 TTP effectively inhibited repair synthesis. The microinjection of d 2 TTP, into either cytoplasm or nucleus, strongly inhibited replicative synthesis. These results might indicate that multiple DNA polymerases are involved in repair synthesis as well as in replicative synthesis

  10. E2F1 and p53 Transcription Factors as Accessory Factors for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Johnson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many of the biochemical details of nucleotide excision repair (NER have been established using purified proteins and DNA substrates. In cells however, DNA is tightly packaged around histones and other chromatin-associated proteins, which can be an obstacle to efficient repair. Several cooperating mechanisms enhance the efficiency of NER by altering chromatin structure. Interestingly, many of the players involved in modifying chromatin at sites of DNA damage were originally identified as regulators of transcription. These include ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers, histone modifying enzymes and several transcription factors. The p53 and E2F1 transcription factors are well known for their abilities to regulate gene expression in response to DNA damage. This review will highlight the underappreciated, transcription-independent functions of p53 and E2F1 in modifying chromatin structure in response to DNA damage to promote global NER.

  11. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  12. Replication Protein A (RPA) deficiency activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seok-Won; Jung, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Min

    2016-09-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway regulates DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair. Despite our greater understanding of the role of FA in ICL repair, its function in the preventing spontaneous genome instability is not well understood. Here, we show that depletion of replication protein A (RPA) activates the FA pathway. RPA1 deficiency increases chromatin recruitment of FA core complex, leading to FANCD2 monoubiquitination (FANCD2-Ub) and foci formation in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Importantly, ATR depletion, but not ATM, abolished RPA1 depletion-induced FANCD2-Ub, suggesting that ATR activation mediated FANCD2-Ub. Interestingly, we found that depletion of hSSB1/2-INTS3, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, induces FANCD2-Ub, like RPA1 depletion. More interestingly, depletion of either RPA1 or INTS3 caused increased accumulation of DNA damage in FA pathway deficient cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that RPA deficiency induces activation of the FA pathway in an ATR-dependent manner, which may play a role in the genome maintenance.

  13. DNA-binding polarity of human replication protein A positions nucleases in nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, W L; Appeldoorn, E; Sugasawa, K; Weterings, E; Jaspers, N G; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1998-08-15

    The human single-stranded DNA-binding replication A protein (RPA) is involved in various DNA-processing events. By comparing the affinity of hRPA for artificial DNA hairpin structures with 3'- or 5'-protruding single-stranded arms, we found that hRPA binds ssDNA with a defined polarity; a strong ssDNA interaction domain of hRPA is positioned at the 5' side of its binding region, a weak ssDNA-binding domain resides at the 3' side. Polarity appears crucial for positioning of the excision repair nucleases XPG and ERCC1-XPF on the DNA. With the 3'-oriented side of hRPA facing a duplex ssDNA junction, hRPA interacts with and stimulates ERCC1-XPF, whereas the 5'-oriented side of hRPA at a DNA junction allows stable binding of XPG to hRPA. Our data pinpoint hRPA to the undamaged strand during nucleotide excision repair. Polarity of hRPA on ssDNA is likely to contribute to the directionality of other hRPA-dependent processes as well.

  14. Replicative bypass repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA of mammalian cells: caffeine sensitive and caffeine resistant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Tatsumi, M.

    1976-01-01

    Replicative bypass repair of UV damage to DNA was studied in a wide variaty of human, mouse and hamster cells in culture. Survival curve analysis revealed that in established cell lines (mouse L, Chinese hamster V79, HeLa S3 and SV40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), post-UV caffeine treatment potentiated cell killing by reducing the extrapolation number and mean lethal UV fluence (Do). In the Do reduction as the result of random inactivation by caffeine of sensitive repair there were marked clonal differences among such cell lines, V79 being most sensitive to caffeine potentiation. However, other diploid cell lines (normal human, excision-defective XP and Syrian hamster) exhibited no obvious reduction in Do by caffeine. In parallel, alkaline sucrose sedimentation results showed that the conversion of initially smaller segments of DNA synthesized after irradiation with 10 J/m 2 to high-molecular-weight DNA was inhibited by caffeine in transformed XP cells, but not in the diploid human cell lines. Exceptionally, diploid XP variants had a retarded ability of bypass repair which was drastically prevented by caffeine, so that caffeine enhanced the lethal effect of UV. Neutral CsCl study on the bypass repair mechanism by use of bromodeoxyuridine for DNA synthesis on damaged template suggests that the pyrimodine dimer acts as a block to replication and subsequently it is circumvented presumably by a new process involving replicative bypassing following strand displacement, rather than by gap-filling de novo. This mechanism worked similarly in normal and XP cells, whether or not caffeine was present, indicating that excision of dimer is not always necessary. However, replicative bypassing became defective in XP variant and transformed XP cells when caffeine was present. It appears, therefore, that the replicative bypass repair process is either caffeine resistant or sensitive, depending on the cell type used, but not necessarily on the excision repair capability

  15. Analysis of mutagenic DNA repair in a thermoconditional mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. IV. Influence of DNA replication and excision repair on REV2 dependent UV-mutagenesis and repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siede, W.; Eckardt, F.

    1986-01-01

    A double mutant being thermoconditionally defective in mutation induction as well as in repair of pre-lethal UV-induced DNA damage (rev2ts) and deficient in excision repair (rad3-2) was studied in temperature-shift experiments. The influence of inhibitors of DNA replication (hydroxyurea, aphidicolin) was determined. Additionally, an analysis of the dose-response pattern of mutation induction (mutation kinetics) at several ochre alleles was carried out. It was concluded that the UV-inducible REV2 dependent mutagenic repair process is not induced in excision-deficient cells. In excision-deficient cells, REV2 dependent mutation fixation is slow and mostly post-replicative though not dependent on DNA replication. The REV2 mediated mutagenic process could be separated from the repair function.

  16. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone binding by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription coupling factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the

  17. Cloning and characterization of p52, the fifth subunit of the core of transcription/repair factor TFIIH.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Marinoni; R. Roy (Richard); W. Vermeulen (Wim); P. Miniou; Y. Lutz; G. Weeda (Geert); T. Seroz; D.M. Gomez (Denise Molina); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a multiprotein factor involved in transcription and DNA repair and is implicated in DNA repair/transcription deficiency disorders such as xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and trichothiodystrophy. Eight out of the nine genes encoding the subunits forming TFIIH have

  18. TFIIH with inactive XPD helicase functions in transcription initiation but is defective in DNA repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); U. Fiedler; W. Vermeulen (Wim); F. Coin (Frédéric); R.D. Wood (Richard); H.T.M. Timmers (Marc); G. Weeda (Geert); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); S.J. Araú jo; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractTFIIH is a multisubunit protein complex involved in RNA polymerase II transcription and nucleotide excision repair, which removes a wide variety of DNA lesions including UV-induced photoproducts. Mutations in the DNA-dependent ATPase/helicase subunits of TFIIH, XPB and

  19. Curaxin CBL0100 Blocks HIV-1 Replication and Reactivation through Inhibition of Viral Transcriptional Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Jean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, predominantly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, remains incurable. The barrier to a cure lies in the virus' ability to establish a latent infection in HIV/AIDS patients. Unsurprisingly, efforts for a sterilizing cure have focused on the “shock and kill” strategy using latency-reversing agents (LRAs to complement cART in order to eliminate these latent reservoirs. However, this method faces numerous challenges. Recently, the “block and lock” strategy has been proposed. It aims to reinforce a deep state of latency and prevent sporadic reactivation (“blip” of HIV-1 using latency-promoting agents (LPAs for a functional cure. Our studies of curaxin 100 (CBL0100, a small-molecule targeting the facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT complex, show that it blocks both HIV-1 replication and reactivation in in vitro and ex vivo models of HIV-1. Mechanistic investigation elucidated that CBL0100 preferentially targets HIV-1 transcriptional elongation and decreases the occupancy of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II and FACT at the HIV-1 promoter region. In conclusion, CBL0100 is a newly identified inhibitor of HIV-1 transcription that can be used as an LPA in the “block and lock” cure strategy.

  20. Transcription-induced DNA supercoiling: New roles of intranucleosomal DNA loops in DNA repair and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, N S; Pestov, N A; Kulaeva, O I; Clark, D J; Studitsky, V M

    2016-05-26

    RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription through chromatin is accompanied by formation of small intranucleosomal DNA loops. Pol II captured within a small loop drives accumulation of DNA supercoiling, facilitating further transcription. DNA breaks relieve supercoiling and induce Pol II arrest, allowing detection of DNA damage hidden in chromatin structure.

  1. Two familial ALS proteins function in prevention/repair of transcription-associated DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah J; Mordes, Daniel A; Cameron, Lisa A; Neuberg, Donna S; Landini, Serena; Eggan, Kevin; Livingston, David M

    2016-11-29

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive motor neuron dysfunction disease that leads to paralysis and death. There is currently no established molecular pathogenesis pathway. Multiple proteins involved in RNA processing are linked to ALS, including FUS and TDP43, and we propose a disease mechanism in which loss of function of at least one of these proteins leads to an accumulation of transcription-associated DNA damage contributing to motor neuron cell death and progressive neurological symptoms. In support of this hypothesis, we find that FUS or TDP43 depletion leads to increased sensitivity to a transcription-arresting agent due to increased DNA damage. Thus, these proteins normally contribute to the prevention or repair of transcription-associated DNA damage. In addition, both FUS and TDP43 colocalize with active RNA polymerase II at sites of DNA damage along with the DNA damage repair protein, BRCA1, and FUS and TDP43 participate in the prevention or repair of R loop-associated DNA damage, a manifestation of aberrant transcription and/or RNA processing. Gaining a better understanding of the role(s) that FUS and TDP43 play in transcription-associated DNA damage could shed light on the mechanisms underlying ALS pathogenesis.

  2. Transcriptional profiling differences for articular cartilage and repair tissue in equine joint surface lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stromberg Arnold J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Full-thickness articular cartilage lesions that reach to the subchondral bone yet are restricted to the chondral compartment usually fill with a fibrocartilage-like repair tissue which is structurally and biomechanically compromised relative to normal articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate transcriptional differences between chondrocytes of normal articular cartilage and repair tissue cells four months post-microfracture. Methods Bilateral one-cm2 full-thickness defects were made in the articular surface of both distal femurs of four adult horses followed by subchondral microfracture. Four months postoperatively, repair tissue from the lesion site and grossly normal articular cartilage from within the same femorotibial joint were collected. Total RNA was isolated from the tissue samples, linearly amplified, and applied to a 9,413-probe set equine-specific cDNA microarray. Eight paired comparisons matched by limb and horse were made with a dye-swap experimental design with validation by histological analyses and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Results Statistical analyses revealed 3,327 (35.3% differentially expressed probe sets. Expression of biomarkers typically associated with normal articular cartilage and fibrocartilage repair tissue corroborate earlier studies. Other changes in gene expression previously unassociated with cartilage repair were also revealed and validated by RT-qPCR. Conclusion The magnitude of divergence in transcriptional profiles between normal chondrocytes and the cells that populate repair tissue reveal substantial functional differences between these two cell populations. At the four-month postoperative time point, the relative deficiency within repair tissue of gene transcripts which typically define articular cartilage indicate that while cells occupying the lesion might be of mesenchymal origin, they have not recapitulated differentiation to

  3. Post-irradiation replication and repair in UV-irradiated cells of Proteus mirabilis depends on protein synthesis and a functioning rec+ gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofemeister, J.

    1977-01-01

    The amount of and the molecular weight of newly synthesized DNA (piDNA) as well as its repair after UV irradiation in excision-proficient strains of P.mirabilis and E.coli K12 have been compared. A fraction of post-replication repair (PRR) in P.mirabilis is found to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis after UV irradiation. Pre-irradiation by UV and pre-treatment with nalidixic acid increase the efficiency of post-irradiation replication and PRR even in the presence of chloramphenicol. An inducible repair function in P.mirabilis is supposed to stimulate post-irradiation replication and repair. (author)

  4. Post-irradiation replication and repair in uv-irradiated cells of Proteus mirabilis depends on protein synthesis and a functioning rec/sup +/ gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofemeister, J [Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Gatersleben. Zentralinstitut fuer Genetik und Kulturpflanzenforschung

    1977-02-28

    The amount of and the molecular weight of newly synthesized DNA (piDNA) as well as its repair after uv irradiation in excision-proficient strains of P.mirabilis and E.coli K12 have been compared. A fraction of post-replication repair (PRR) in P.mirabilis is found to be dependent on de novo protein synthesis after uv irradiation. Pre-irradiation by uv and pre-treatment with nalidixic acid increase the efficiency of post-irradiation replication and PRR even in the presence of chloramphenicol. An inducible repair function in P.mirabilis is supposed to stimulate post-irradiation replication and repair.

  5. Two sides of the same coin: TFIIH complexes in transcription and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhovmer, Alexander; Oksenych, Valentyn; Coin, Frédéric

    2010-04-13

    TFIIH is organized into a seven-subunit core associated with a three-subunit Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) module. TFIIH has roles in both transcription initiation and DNA repair. During the last 15 years, several studies have been conducted to identify the composition of the TFIIH complex involved in DNA repair. Recently, a new technique combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting resolved the hidden nature of the TFIIH complex participating in DNA repair. Following the recruitment of TFIIH to the damaged site, the CAK module is released from the core TFIIH, and the core subsequently associates with DNA repair factors. The release of the CAK is specifically driven by the recruitment of the DNA repair factor XPA and is required to promote the incision/excision of the damaged DNA. Once the DNA lesions have been repaired, the CAK module returns to the core TFIIH on the chromatin, together with the release of the repair factors. These data highlight the dynamic composition of a fundamental cellular factor that adapts its subunit composition to the cell needs.

  6. Two Sides of the Same Coin: TFIIH Complexes in Transcription and DNA Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhovmer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available TFIIH is organized into a seven-subunit core associated with a three-subunit Cdk-activating kinase (CAK module. TFIIH has roles in both transcription initiation and DNA repair. During the last 15 years, several studies have been conducted to identify the composition of the TFIIH complex involved in DNA repair. Recently, a new technique combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and western blotting resolved the hidden nature of the TFIIH complex participating in DNA repair. Following the recruitment of TFIIH to the damaged site, the CAK module is released from the core TFIIH, and the core subsequently associates with DNA repair factors. The release of the CAK is specifically driven by the recruitment of the DNA repair factor XPA and is required to promote the incision/excision of the damaged DNA. Once the DNA lesions have been repaired, the CAK module returns to the core TFIIH on the chromatin, together with the release of the repair factors. These data highlight the dynamic composition of a fundamental cellular factor that adapts its subunit composition to the cell needs.

  7. ATR-p53 restricts homologous recombination in response to replicative stress but does not limit DNA interstrand crosslink repair in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M Sirbu

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is required for the restart of collapsed DNA replication forks and error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, unscheduled or hyperactive HR may lead to genomic instability and promote cancer development. The cellular factors that restrict HR processes in mammalian cells are only beginning to be elucidated. The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the suppression of HR though it has remained unclear why p53, as the guardian of the genome, would impair an error-free repair process. Here, we show for the first time that p53 downregulates foci formation of the RAD51 recombinase in response to replicative stress in H1299 lung cancer cells in a manner that is independent of its role as a transcription factor. We find that this downregulation of HR is not only completely dependent on the binding site of p53 with replication protein A but also the ATR/ATM serine 15 phosphorylation site. Genetic analysis suggests that ATR but not ATM kinase modulates p53's function in HR. The suppression of HR by p53 can be bypassed under experimental conditions that cause DSB either directly or indirectly, in line with p53's role as a guardian of the genome. As a result, transactivation-inactive p53 does not compromise the resistance of H1299 cells to the interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Altogether, our data support a model in which p53 plays an anti-recombinogenic role in the ATR-dependent mammalian replication checkpoint but does not impair a cell's ability to use HR for the removal of DSB induced by cytotoxic agents.

  8. Coevolution between Nuclear-Encoded DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair Genes and Plastid Genome Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Ruhlman, Tracey A; Sabir, Jamal S M; Blazier, John Chris; Weng, Mao-Lun; Park, Seongjun; Jansen, Robert K

    2016-02-17

    Disruption of DNA replication, recombination, and repair (DNA-RRR) systems has been hypothesized to cause highly elevated nucleotide substitution rates and genome rearrangements in the plastids of angiosperms, but this theory remains untested. To investigate nuclear-plastid genome (plastome) coevolution in Geraniaceae, four different measures of plastome complexity (rearrangements, repeats, nucleotide insertions/deletions, and substitution rates) were evaluated along with substitution rates of 12 nuclear-encoded, plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes from 27 Geraniales species. Significant correlations were detected for nonsynonymous (dN) but not synonymous (dS) substitution rates for three DNA-RRR genes (uvrB/C, why1, and gyrA) supporting a role for these genes in accelerated plastid genome evolution in Geraniaceae. Furthermore, correlation between dN of uvrB/C and plastome complexity suggests the presence of nucleotide excision repair system in plastids. Significant correlations were also detected between plastome complexity and 13 of the 90 nuclear-encoded organelle-targeted genes investigated. Comparisons revealed significant acceleration of dN in plastid-targeted genes of Geraniales relative to Brassicales suggesting this correlation may be an artifact of elevated rates in this gene set in Geraniaceae. Correlation between dN of plastid-targeted DNA-RRR genes and plastome complexity supports the hypothesis that the aberrant patterns in angiosperm plastome evolution could be caused by dysfunction in DNA-RRR systems. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Achieving Precision Death with Cell-Cycle Inhibitors that Target DNA Replication and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aimee Bence; McNeely, Samuel C; Beckmann, Richard P

    2017-07-01

    All cancers are characterized by defects in the systems that ensure strict control of the cell cycle in normal tissues. The consequent excess tissue growth can be countered by drugs that halt cell division, and, indeed, the majority of chemotherapeutics developed during the last century work by disrupting processes essential for the cell cycle, particularly DNA synthesis, DNA replication, and chromatid segregation. In certain contexts, the efficacy of these classes of drugs can be impressive, but because they indiscriminately block the cell cycle of all actively dividing cells, their side effects severely constrain the dose and duration with which they can be administered, allowing both normal and malignant cells to escape complete growth arrest. Recent progress in understanding how cancers lose control of the cell cycle, coupled with comprehensive genomic profiling of human tumor biopsies, has shown that many cancers have mutations affecting various regulators and checkpoints that impinge on the core cell-cycle machinery. These defects introduce unique vulnerabilities that can be exploited by a next generation of drugs that promise improved therapeutic windows in patients whose tumors bear particular genomic aberrations, permitting increased dose intensity and efficacy. These developments, coupled with the success of new drugs targeting cell-cycle regulators, have led to a resurgence of interest in cell-cycle inhibitors. This review in particular focuses on the newer strategies that may facilitate better therapeutic targeting of drugs that inhibit the various components that safeguard the fidelity of the fundamental processes of DNA replication and repair. Clin Cancer Res; 23(13); 3232-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Relationship between DNA replication and DNA repair in human lymphocytes proliferating in vitro in the presence and in absence of mutagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyfter, K.; Wielgosz, M.Sz.; Kujawski, M.; Jaloszynski, P.; Zajaczek, S.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of mutagens on DNA replication and DNA repair were studied in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) obtained from 21 healthy subjects, 2 samples from healthy heterozygote of ''Xeroderma pigmentosum'' (XP) and 2 samples from patient with clinically recognised XP. Inter-individual variations were found in DNA replication and in the level of spontaneous DNA repair measured under standard culture condition. Exposure of human PBL proliferating in vitro to B(a)P was followed by a partial inhibition of replicative DNA synthesis in all subjects and by an induction of DNA repair in healthy subjects. In XP patients DNA repair synthesis remained at the level attributed to spontaneous DNA repair. The response to mutagen varied individually. Results were analysed statistically. It was established that the studied indices of DNA synthesis correlate well with each other. The highest correlation was found between the levels of spontaneous and B(a)P-induced DNA repair. It is concluded that the level of spontaneous DNA repair is predictive for an estimation of cells ability to repair DNA damage. Inter-individual variations in the inhibition of DNA replication and in DNA repair synthesis are also dependent on the type of mutagen as shown by effects of other mutagens. Different effects of mutagen exposure on the inhibition of DNA replicative synthesis and induction of DNA repair can be explained by genetically controlled differences in the activity of enzymes responsible for mutagen processing and lesion removal. (author). 37 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Phage T4 endonuclease V stimulates DNA repair replication in isolated nuclei from ultraviolet-irradiated human cells, including xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.A.; Hanawalt, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The repair mode of DNA replication has been demonstrated in isolated nuclei from uv-irradiated human cells. Nuclei are incubated in a mixture containing [ 3 H]thymidine triphosphate and bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate in a 1:5 ratio. The 3 H at the density of parental DNA in alkaline CsCl density gradients is then a measure of repair. In nuclei prepared from WI38 cells 30 min after irradiation, repair replication is uv-dependent and proceeds at approximately the in vivo rate for 5 min. Repair replication is reduced in irradiated nuclei or in nuclei prepared immediately after irradiation. It is Mg 2+ -dependent and stimulated by added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. No repair replication is observed in nuclei from xeroderma pigmentosum (complementation group A) cells. However, upon addition of coliphage T4 endonuclease V, which specifically nicks DNA containing pyrimidine dimers, repair replication is observed in nuclei from irradiated xeroderma pigmentosum cells and is stimulated in WI38 nuclei. The reaction then persists for an hour and is dependent upon added ATP and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The repair label is in stretches of roughly 35 nucleotides, as it is in intact cells. Added pancreatic DNase does not promote uv-dependent repair synthesis. Our results support the view that xeroderma pigmentosum (group A) cells are defective in the incision step of the DNA excision repair pathway, and demonstrate the utility of this system for probing DNA repair mechanisms

  12. Mediator MED23 Links Pigmentation and DNA Repair through the Transcription Factor MITF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Min; Chen, Kun; Yao, Xiao; Xu, Yichi; Yao, Jiaying; Yan, Jun; Shao, Zhen; Wang, Gang

    2017-08-22

    DNA repair is related to many physiological and pathological processes, including pigmentation. Little is known about the role of the transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex in DNA repair and pigmentation. Here, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 plays an important role in coupling UV-induced DNA repair to pigmentation. The loss of Med23 specifically impairs the pigmentation process in melanocyte-lineage cells and in zebrafish. Med23 deficiency leads to enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER) and less DNA damage following UV radiation because of the enhanced expression and recruitment of NER factors to chromatin for genomic stability. Integrative analyses of melanoma cells reveal that MED23 controls the expression of a melanocyte master regulator, Mitf, by modulating its distal enhancer activity, leading to opposing effects on pigmentation and DNA repair. Collectively, the Mediator MED23/MITF axis connects DNA repair to pigmentation, thus providing molecular insights into the DNA damage response and skin-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Engineered zinc-finger transcription factors inhibit the replication and transcription of HBV in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Wang, Junxia; Xu, Dengfeng; Bai, Huili; Zhang, Yangli; Zhang, Yuhong; Li, Xiaosong

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, an artificial zinc-finger transcription factor eukaryotic expression vector specifically recognizing and binding to the hepatitis B virus (HBV) enhancer (Enh) was constructed, which inhibited the replication and expression of HBV DNA. The HBV EnhI‑specific pcDNA3.1‑artificial transcription factor (ATF) vector was successfully constructed, and then transformed or injected into HepG2.2.15 cells and HBV transgenic mice, respectively. The results demonstrated that the HBV EnhI (1,070‑1,234 bp)‑specific ATF significantly inhibited the replication and transcription of HBV DNA in vivo and in vitro. The HBV EnhI‑specific ATF may be a meritorious component of progressive combination therapies for eliminating HBV DNA in infected patients. A radical cure for chronic HBV infection may become feasible by using this bioengineering technology.

  14. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  15. Distinct properties of hexameric but functionally conserved Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcription-repair coupling factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Swayam; Rao, Desirazu N; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2011-04-29

    Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) is involved in correcting UV-induced damage and other road-blocks encountered in the transcribed strand. Mutation frequency decline (Mfd) is a transcription repair coupling factor, involved in repair of template strand during transcription. Mfd from M. tuberculosis (MtbMfd) is 1234 amino-acids long harboring characteristic modules for different activities. Mtbmfd complemented Escherichia coli mfd (Ecomfd) deficient strain, enhanced survival of UV irradiated cells and increased the road-block repression in vivo. The protein exhibited ATPase activity, which was stimulated ∼1.5-fold in the presence of DNA. While the C-terminal domain (CTD) comprising amino acids 630 to 1234 showed ∼2-fold elevated ATPase activity than MtbMfd, the N-terminal domain (NTD) containing the first 433 amino acid residues was able to bind ATP but deficient in hydrolysis. Overexpression of NTD of MtbMfd led to growth defect and hypersensitivity to UV light. Deletion of 184 amino acids from the C-terminal end of MtbMfd (MfdΔC) increased the ATPase activity by ∼10-fold and correspondingly exhibited efficient translocation along DNA as compared to the MtbMfd and CTD. Surprisingly, MtbMfd was found to be distributed in monomer and hexamer forms both in vivo and in vitro and the monomer showed increased susceptibility to proteases compared to the hexamer. MfdΔC, on the other hand, was predominantly monomeric in solution implicating the extreme C-terminal region in oligomerization of the protein. Thus, although the MtbMfd resembles EcoMfd in many of its reaction characteristics, some of its hitherto unknown distinct properties hint at its species specific role in mycobacteria during transcription-coupled repair.

  16. Distinct properties of hexameric but functionally conserved Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcription-repair coupling factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swayam Prabha

    Full Text Available Transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER is involved in correcting UV-induced damage and other road-blocks encountered in the transcribed strand. Mutation frequency decline (Mfd is a transcription repair coupling factor, involved in repair of template strand during transcription. Mfd from M. tuberculosis (MtbMfd is 1234 amino-acids long harboring characteristic modules for different activities. Mtbmfd complemented Escherichia coli mfd (Ecomfd deficient strain, enhanced survival of UV irradiated cells and increased the road-block repression in vivo. The protein exhibited ATPase activity, which was stimulated ∼1.5-fold in the presence of DNA. While the C-terminal domain (CTD comprising amino acids 630 to 1234 showed ∼2-fold elevated ATPase activity than MtbMfd, the N-terminal domain (NTD containing the first 433 amino acid residues was able to bind ATP but deficient in hydrolysis. Overexpression of NTD of MtbMfd led to growth defect and hypersensitivity to UV light. Deletion of 184 amino acids from the C-terminal end of MtbMfd (MfdΔC increased the ATPase activity by ∼10-fold and correspondingly exhibited efficient translocation along DNA as compared to the MtbMfd and CTD. Surprisingly, MtbMfd was found to be distributed in monomer and hexamer forms both in vivo and in vitro and the monomer showed increased susceptibility to proteases compared to the hexamer. MfdΔC, on the other hand, was predominantly monomeric in solution implicating the extreme C-terminal region in oligomerization of the protein. Thus, although the MtbMfd resembles EcoMfd in many of its reaction characteristics, some of its hitherto unknown distinct properties hint at its species specific role in mycobacteria during transcription-coupled repair.

  17. Mfd translocase is necessary and sufficient for transcription-coupled repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebali, Ogun; Sancar, Aziz; Selby, Christopher P

    2017-11-10

    Nucleotide excision repair in Escherichia coli is stimulated by transcription, specifically in the transcribed strand. Previously, it was shown that this transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is mediated by the Mfd translocase. Recently, it was proposed that in fact the majority of TCR in E. coli is catalyzed by a second pathway ("backtracking-mediated TCR") that is dependent on the UvrD helicase and the guanosine pentaphosphate (ppGpp) alarmone/stringent response regulator. Recently, we reported that as measured by the excision repair-sequencing (XR-seq), UvrD plays no role in TCR genome-wide. Here, we tested the role of ppGpp and UvrD in TCR genome-wide and in the lacZ operon using the XR-seq method, which directly measures repair. We found that the mfd mutation abolishes TCR genome-wide and in the lacZ operon. In contrast, the relA - spoT - mutant deficient in ppGpp synthesis carries out normal TCR. We conclude that UvrD and ppGpp play no role in TCR in E. coli . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Mediator links transcription and DNA repair by facilitating Rad2/XPG recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyboulet, Fanny; Cibot, Camille; Eychenne, Thomas; Neil, Helen; Alibert, Olivier; Werner, Michel; Soutourina, Julie

    2013-12-01

    Mediator is a large multiprotein complex conserved in all eukaryotes. The crucial function of Mediator in transcription is now largely established. However, we found that this complex also plays an important role by connecting transcription with DNA repair. We identified a functional contact between the Med17 Mediator subunit and Rad2/XPG, the 3' endonuclease involved in nucleotide excision DNA repair. Genome-wide location analyses revealed that Rad2 is associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II)- and Pol III-transcribed genes and telomeric regions in the absence of exogenous genotoxic stress. Rad2 occupancy of Pol II-transcribed genes is transcription-dependent. Genome-wide Rad2 occupancy of class II gene promoters is well correlated with that of Mediator. Furthermore, UV sensitivity of med17 mutants is correlated with reduced Rad2 occupancy of class II genes and concomitant decrease of Mediator interaction with Rad2 protein. Our results suggest that Mediator is involved in DNA repair by facilitating Rad2 recruitment to transcribed genes.

  19. At the intersection of non-coding transcription, DNA repair, chromatin structure, and cellular senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke eOhsawa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well accepted that non-coding RNAs play a critical role in regulating gene expression. Recent paradigm-setting studies are now revealing that non-coding RNAs, other than microRNAs, also play intriguing roles in the maintenance of chromatin structure, in the DNA damage response, and in adult human stem cell aging. In this review, we will discuss the complex inter-dependent relationships among non-coding RNA transcription, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and adult stem cell senescence. DNA damage-induced non-coding RNAs transcribed in the vicinity of the DNA break regulate recruitment of the DNA damage machinery and DNA repair efficiency. We will discuss the correlation between non-coding RNAs and DNA damage repair efficiency and the potential role of changing chromatin structures around double-strand break sites. On the other hand, induction of non-coding RNA transcription from the repetitive Alu elements occurs during human stem cell aging and hinders efficient DNA repair causing entry into senescence. We will discuss how this fine balance between transcription and genomic instability may be regulated by the dramatic changes to chromatin structure that accompany cellular senescence.

  20. Nuclear DNA replication and repair in parasites of the genus Leishmania: Exploiting differences to develop innovative therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzcanga, Graciela; Lara, Eliana; Gutiérrez, Fernanda; Beaty, Doyle; Beske, Timo; Teran, Rommy; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Pasero, Philippe; Benítez, Washington; Poveda, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a common tropical disease that affects mainly poor people in underdeveloped and developing countries. This largely neglected infection is caused by Leishmania spp, a parasite from the Trypanosomatidae family. This parasitic disease has different clinical manifestations, ranging from localized cutaneous to more harmful visceral forms. The main limitations of the current treatments are their high cost, toxicity, lack of specificity, and long duration. Efforts to improve treatments are necessary to deal with this infectious disease. Many approved drugs to combat diseases as diverse as cancer, bacterial, or viral infections take advantage of specific features of the causing agent or of the disease. Recent evidence indicates that the specific characteristics of the Trypanosomatidae replication and repair machineries could be used as possible targets for the development of new treatments. Here, we review in detail the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and repair regulation in trypanosomatids of the genus Leishmania and the drugs that could be useful against this disease.

  1. Rift valley fever virus nonstructural protein NSs promotes viral RNA replication and transcription in a minigenome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Peters, C J; Makino, Shinji

    2005-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which belongs to the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae, has a tripartite negative-strand genome (S, M, and L segments) and is an important mosquito-borne pathogen for domestic animals and humans. We established an RVFV T7 RNA polymerase-driven minigenome system in which T7 RNA polymerase from an expression plasmid drove expression of RNA transcripts for viral proteins and minigenome RNA transcripts carrying a reporter gene between both termini of the M RNA segment in 293T cells. Like other viruses of the Bunyaviridae family, replication and transcription of the RVFV minigenome required expression of viral N and L proteins. Unexpectedly, the coexpression of an RVFV nonstructural protein, NSs, with N and L proteins resulted in a significant enhancement of minigenome RNA replication. Coexpression of NSs protein with N and L proteins also enhanced minigenome mRNA transcription in the cells expressing viral-sense minigenome RNA transcripts. NSs protein expression increased the RNA replication of minigenomes that originated from S and L RNA segments. Enhancement of minigenome RNA synthesis by NSs protein occurred in cells lacking alpha/beta interferon (IFN-alpha/beta) genes, indicating that the effect of NSs protein on minigenome RNA replication was unrelated to a putative NSs protein-induced inhibition of IFN-alpha/beta production. Our finding that RVFV NSs protein augmented minigenome RNA synthesis was in sharp contrast to reports that Bunyamwera virus (genus Bunyavirus) NSs protein inhibits viral minigenome RNA synthesis, suggesting that RVFV NSs protein and Bunyamwera virus NSs protein have distinctly different biological roles in viral RNA synthesis.

  2. Transcription-coupled repair of UV damage in the halophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantial, Nicole; Dumpe, Jarrod; Pietrosimone, Kathryn; Baltazar, Felicia; Crowley, David J

    2016-05-01

    Transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is a subpathway of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in which excision repair proteins are targeted to RNA polymerase-arresting lesions located in the transcribed strand of active genes. TCR has been documented in a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic organisms but has yet to be observed in the Archaea. We used Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and Haloferax volcanii to determine if TCR occurs in the halophilic archaea. Following UV irradiation of exponentially growing cultures, we quantified the rate of repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the two strands of the rpoB2B1A1A2 and the trpDFEG operons of Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 and the pts operon of H. volcanii through the use of a Southern blot assay and strand-specific probes. TCR was observed in all three operons and was dependent on the NER gene uvrA in Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, but not in H. volcanii. The halophilic archaea likely employ a novel mechanism for TCR in which an as yet unknown coupling factor recognizes the arrested archaeal RNA polymerase complex and recruits certain NER proteins to complete the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Viral DNA Replication Orientation and hnRNPs Regulate Transcription of the Human Papillomavirus 18 Late Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Liu, Haibin; Ge, Hui; Ajiro, Masahiko; Sharma, Nishi R; Meyers, Craig; Morozov, Pavel; Tuschl, Thomas; Klar, Amar; Court, Donald; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2017-05-30

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is tightly linked to keratinocyte differentiation. Although expression of viral early genes is initiated immediately upon virus infection of undifferentiated basal cells, viral DNA amplification and late gene expression occur only in the mid to upper strata of the keratinocytes undergoing terminal differentiation. In this report, we show that the relative activity of HPV18 TATA-less late promoter P 811 depends on its orientation relative to that of the origin (Ori) of viral DNA replication and is sensitive to the eukaryotic DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. Additionally, transfected 70-nucleotide (nt)-long single-strand DNA oligonucleotides that are homologous to the region near Ori induce late promoter activity. We also found that promoter activation in raft cultures leads to production of the late promoter-associated, sense-strand transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs) and splice-site small RNAs (spliRNAs). Finally, a cis -acting AAGTATGCA core element that functions as a repressor to the promoter was identified. This element interacts with hnRNP D0B and hnRNP A/B factors. Point mutations in the core prevented binding of hnRNPs and increased the promoter activity. Confirming this result, knocking down the expression of both hnRNPs in keratinocytes led to increased promoter activity. Taking the data together, our study revealed the mechanism of how the HPV18 late promoter is regulated by DNA replication and host factors. IMPORTANCE It has been known for decades that the activity of viral late promoters is associated with viral DNA replication among almost all DNA viruses. However, the mechanism of how DNA replication activates the viral late promoter and what components of the replication machinery are involved remain largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the P 811 promoter region of HPV18 and demonstrated that its activation depends on the orientation of DNA replication. Using single

  4. Effect of the uvr D3 mutation on ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA-repair replication in Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, K.M.; Smith, K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Ultraviolet-radiation-induced DNA-repair replication was measured in wild-type, polA1, uvrD3, and polA1 uvrD3 strains of Escherichia coli K 12. A large stimulation of repair replication was observed in the uvrD3 strain, compared to the wild-type and polA1 strains. This enhanced repair replication was reduced in the polA1 uvrD3 strain. Therefore, a uvrD3 mutation appears to affect the amount of repair replication performed by DNA polymerase I. In the polA1 strain, there also appears to be an effect of the uvrD3 mutation on the amount of repair replication performed by DNA polymerase III (and/or II). The enhanced repair replication observed for the uvrD3 strains appears to be in response to the enhanced DNA degradation observed for these strains. (orig.)

  5. Double silencing of relevant genes suggests the existence of the direct link between DNA replication/repair and central carbon metabolism in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Aneta; Fornalewicz, Karolina; Mocarski, Łukasz; Łyżeń, Robert; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2018-04-15

    Genetic evidence for a link between DNA replication and glycolysis has been demonstrated a decade ago in Bacillus subtilis, where temperature-sensitive mutations in genes coding for replication proteins could be suppressed by mutations in genes of glycolytic enzymes. Then, a strong influence of dysfunctions of particular enzymes from the central carbon metabolism (CCM) on DNA replication and repair in Escherichia coli was reported. Therefore, we asked if such a link occurs only in bacteria or it is a more general phenomenon. Here, we demonstrate that effects of silencing (provoked by siRNA) of expression of genes coding for proteins involved in DNA replication and repair (primase, DNA polymerase ι, ligase IV, and topoisomerase IIIβ) on these processes (less efficient entry into the S phase of the cell cycle and decreased level of DNA synthesis) could be suppressed by silencing of specific genes of enzymes from CMM. Silencing of other pairs of replication/repair and CMM genes resulted in enhancement of the negative effects of lower expression levels of replication/repair genes. We suggest that these results may be proposed as a genetic evidence for the link between DNA replication/repair and CMM in human cells, indicating that it is a common biological phenomenon, occurring from bacteria to humans. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. RTEL1 contributes to DNA replication and repair and telomere maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uringa, Evert-Jan; Lisaingo, Kathleen; Pickett, Hilda A.; Brind'Amour, Julie; Rohde, Jan-Hendrik; Zelensky, Alex; Essers, Jeroen; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    Telomere maintenance and DNA repair are important processes that protect the genome against instability. mRtel1, an essential helicase, is a dominant factor setting telomere length in mice. In addition, mRtel1 is involved in DNA double-strand break repair. The role of mRtel1 in telomere maintenance

  7. RTEL1 contributes to DNA replication and repair and telomere maintenance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa; K. Lisaingo (Kathleen); H.A. Pickett (Hilda); J. Brind'Amour (Julie); J.-H. Rohde (Jan-Hendrik); A. Zelensky (Alexander); J. Essers (Jeroen); P.M. Lansdorp (Peter)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractTelomere maintenance and DNA repair are important processes that protect the genome against instability. mRtel1, an essential helicase, is a dominant factor setting telomere length in mice. In addition, mRtel1 is involved in DNA double-strand break repair. The role of mRtel1 in telomere

  8. Epigenetic Studies Point to DNA Replication/Repair Genes as a Basis for the Heritable Nature of Long Term Complications in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Leontovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic memory (MM is defined as the persistence of diabetic (DM complications even after glycemic control is pharmacologically achieved. Using a zebrafish diabetic model that induces a MM state, we previously reported that, in this model, tissue dysfunction was of a heritable nature based on cell proliferation studies in limb tissue and this correlated with epigenetic DNA methylation changes that paralleled alterations in gene expression. In the current study, control, DM, and MM excised fin tissues were further analyzed by MeDIP sequencing and microarray techniques. Bioinformatics analysis of the data found that genes of the DNA replication/DNA metabolism process group (with upregulation of the apex1, mcm2, mcm4, orc3, lig1, and dnmt1 genes were altered in the DM state and these molecular changes continued into MM. Interestingly, DNA methylation changes could be found as far as 6–13 kb upstream of the transcription start site for these genes suggesting potential higher levels of epigenetic control. In conclusion, DNA methylation changes in members of the DNA replication/repair process group best explain the heritable nature of cell proliferation impairment found in the zebrafish DM/MM model. These results are consistent with human diabetic epigenetic studies and provide one explanation for the persistence of long term tissue complications as seen in diabetes.

  9. Chromatin associated mechanisms in base excision repair - nucleosome remodeling and DNA transcription, two key players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Hervé; Di Mascio, Paolo; Cadet, Jean; Dimitrov, Stefan; Angelov, Dimitar

    2017-06-01

    Genomic DNA is prone to a large number of insults by a myriad of endogenous and exogenous agents. The base excision repair (BER) is the major mechanism used by cells for the removal of various DNA lesions spontaneously or environmentally induced and the maintenance of genome integrity. The presence of persistent DNA damage is not compatible with life, since abrogation of BER leads to early embryonic lethality in mice. There are several lines of evidences showing existence of a link between deficient BER, cancer proneness and ageing, thus illustrating the importance of this DNA repair pathway in human health. Although the enzymology of BER mechanisms has been largely elucidated using chemically defined DNA damage substrates and purified proteins, the complex interplay of BER with another vital process like transcription or when DNA is in its natural state (i.e. wrapped in nucleosome and assembled in chromatin fiber is largely unexplored. Cells use chromatin remodeling factors to overcome the general repression associated with the nucleosomal organization. It is broadly accepted that energy-dependent nucleosome remodeling factors disrupt histones-DNA interactions at the expense of ATP hydrolysis to favor transcription as well as DNA repair. Importantly, unlike transcription, BER is not part of a regulated developmental process but represents a maintenance system that should be efficient anytime and anywhere in the genome. In this review we will discuss how BER can deal with chromatin organization to maintain genetic information. Emphasis will be placed on the following challenging question: how BER is initiated within chromatin? Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15(PAF) regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15(PAF)-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP...... the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding....... free and PCNA-bound p15(PAF) binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15(PAF) acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along...

  11. The role of genes controlling the replication and cell division in the repair of radiation damage in Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhestyanikov, V D; Svetlova, M P; Tomilin, N V; Savel' eva, G E [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii

    1975-01-01

    Mutations in genes controlling the replication (dnaEsup(ts), dnaBsup(ts), dnaGsup(ts) and cell division (lon) in Escherichia coli prevent the rejoining of the gamma radiation-induced single-strand breaks (dnaE in combination with polA1 mutation and dnaG at the restrictive temperature) and effective postreplication DNA repair in UV-irradiated cells (dnaG at the non-permissive temperature and lon mutation) and decrease the survival of UV- and gamma-irradiated bacteria.

  12. Differences in the stimulation of repair replication by 3-aminobenzamide in lymphoblastoid cells damaged by methylmethanesulfonate or ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleaver, J.E.; Morgan, W.F.

    1987-09-01

    Human lymphoblastoid cells damaged by u.v. light accumulated DNA breaks in the presence of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea at a frequency similar to that of cells damaged by methylmethanesulfonate. 3-Aminobenzamide (1 mM) reduced the net strand-break frequency detected after either kind of damage. Repair replication, however, was stimulated only in methylmethanesulfonate-damaged cells. This stimulation is therefore not related directly to the DNA strand-break frequencies and concomitant poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, but depends on some other cellular response specific to alkylating agents.

  13. Single Cell Analysis of Human RAD18-Dependent DNA Post-Replication Repair by Alkaline Bromodeoxyuridine Comet Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mórocz, Mónika; Gali, Himabindu; Raskó, István; Downes, C. Stephen; Haracska, Lajos

    2013-01-01

    Damage to DNA can block replication progression resulting in gaps in the newly synthesized DNA. Cells utilize a number of post-replication repair (PRR) mechanisms such as the RAD18 controlled translesion synthesis or template switching to overcome the discontinuities formed opposite the DNA lesions and to complete DNA replication. Gaining more insights into the role of PRR genes promotes better understanding of DNA damage tolerance and of how their malfunction can lead to increased genome instability and cancer. However, a simple and efficient method to characterise gene specific PRR deficiencies at a single cell level has not been developed. Here we describe the so named BrdU comet PRR assay to test the contribution of human RAD18 to PRR at a single cell level, by which we kinetically characterized the consequences of the deletion of human RAD18 on the replication of UV-damaged DNA. Moreover, we demonstrate the capability of our method to evaluate PRR at a single cell level in unsynchronized cell population. PMID:23936422

  14. Human FEN1 Expression and Solubility Patterson in DNA Replication and Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrier, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Flap endo-/exonuclease (FEN1) is a highly conserved protein shown to be one of 10 essential human proteins required for the production of form I DNA following DNA replication from the simian virus 40 (SV40...

  15. Wolbachia Blocks Viral Genome Replication Early in Infection without a Transcriptional Response by the Endosymbiont or Host Small RNA Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Rainey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia can protect insects against viral infection, and is being introduced into mosquito populations in the wild to block the transmission of arboviruses that infect humans and are a major public health concern. To investigate the mechanisms underlying this antiviral protection, we have developed a new model system combining Wolbachia-infected Drosophila melanogaster cell culture with the model mosquito-borne Semliki Forest virus (SFV; Togaviridae, Alphavirus. Wolbachia provides strong antiviral protection rapidly after infection, suggesting that an early stage post-infection is being blocked. Wolbachia does appear to have major effects on events distinct from entry, assembly or exit as it inhibits the replication of an SFV replicon transfected into the cells. Furthermore, it causes a far greater reduction in the expression of proteins from the 3' open reading frame than the 5' non-structural protein open reading frame, indicating that it is blocking the replication of viral RNA. Further to this separation of the replicase proteins and viral RNA in transreplication assays shows that uncoupling of viral RNA and replicase proteins does not overcome Wolbachia's antiviral activity. This further suggests that replicative processes are disrupted, such as translation or replication, by Wolbachia infection. This may occur by Wolbachia mounting an active antiviral response, but the virus did not cause any transcriptional response by the bacterium, suggesting that this is not the case. Host microRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in protection, but again we found that host cell miRNA expression was unaffected by the bacterium and neither do our findings suggest any involvement of the antiviral siRNA pathway. We conclude that Wolbachia may directly interfere with early events in virus replication such as translation of incoming viral RNA or RNA transcription, and this likely involves an intrinsic (as opposed to

  16. A reversible histone H3 acetylation cooperates with mismatch repair and replicative polymerases in maintaining genome stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Y Kadyrova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutations are a major driving force of evolution and genetic disease. In eukaryotes, mutations are produced in the chromatin environment, but the impact of chromatin on mutagenesis is poorly understood. Previous studies have determined that in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rtt109-dependent acetylation of histone H3 on K56 is an abundant modification that is introduced in chromatin in S phase and removed by Hst3 and Hst4 in G2/M. We show here that the chromatin deacetylation on histone H3 K56 by Hst3 and Hst4 is required for the suppression of spontaneous gross chromosomal rearrangements, base substitutions, 1-bp insertions/deletions, and complex mutations. The rate of base substitutions in hst3Δ hst4Δ is similar to that in isogenic mismatch repair-deficient msh2Δ mutant. We also provide evidence that H3 K56 acetylation by Rtt109 is important for safeguarding DNA from small insertions/deletions and complex mutations. Furthermore, we reveal that both the deacetylation and acetylation on histone H3 K56 are involved in mutation avoidance mechanisms that cooperate with mismatch repair and the proofreading activities of replicative DNA polymerases in suppressing spontaneous mutagenesis. Our results suggest that cyclic acetylation and deacetylation of chromatin contribute to replication fidelity and play important roles in the protection of nuclear DNA from diverse spontaneous mutations.

  17. Re-initiation repair in bacteriophage T4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupido, M.

    1981-01-01

    Irradiation of bacteriophage T4 with ultraviolet light induces the formation of pyrimidine dimers in its DNA. These dimers hamper replication of DNA and, to a lesser extent, transcription of DNA after its infection of bacteria. A number of pathways enable phage T4 to multiply dimer-containing DNA. One of these pathways has been named replication repair and is described in this thesis. The properties of two phage strains, unable to perform replication repair, have been studied to obtain a picture of the repair process. The mutations in these strains that affect replication repair have been located on the genomic map of T4. (Auth.)

  18. Interaction between FMDV Lpro and transcription factor ADNP is required for viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) leader protease (Lpro) inhibits host translation and transcription affecting the expression of several factors involved in innate immunity. In this study, we have identified the host transcription factor ADNP (activity dependent neuroprotective protein) as an ...

  19. Knockdown of RMI1 impairs DNA repair under DNA replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Fang, Lianying; Kong, Yangyang; Xiao, Changyan; Yang, Mengmeng; Du, Li-Qing; Liu, Qiang

    2017-12-09

    RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1) forms a conserved BTR complex with BLM, Topo IIIα, and RMI2, and its absence causes genome instability. It has been revealed that RMI1 localizes to nuclear foci with BLM and Topo IIIα in response to replication stress, and that RMI1 functions downstream of BLM in promoting replication elongation. However, the precise functions of RMI1 during replication stress are not completely understood. Here we report that RMI1 knockdown cells are hypersensitive to hydroxyurea (HU). Using comet assay, we show that RMI1 knockdown cells exhibit accumulation of broken DNAs after being released from HU treatment. Moreover, we demonstrate that RMI1 facilitates the recovery from activated checkpoint and resuming the cell cycle after replicative stress. Surprisingly, loss of RMI1 results in a failure of RAD51 loading onto DNA damage sites. These findings reveal the importance of RMI1 in response to replication stress, which could explain the molecular basis for its function in maintaining genome integrity. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kub5-Hera, the human Rtt103 homolog, plays dual functional roles in transcription termination and DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Julio C; Richard, Patricia; Rommel, Amy; Fattah, Farjana J; Motea, Edward A; Patidar, Praveen L; Xiao, Ling; Leskov, Konstantin; Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Hittelman, Walter N; Chiang, Cheng-Ming; Manley, James L; Boothman, David A

    2014-04-01

    Functions of Kub5-Hera (In Greek Mythology Hera controlled Artemis) (K-H), the human homolog of the yeast transcription termination factor Rtt103, remain undefined. Here, we show that K-H has functions in both transcription termination and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. K-H forms distinct protein complexes with factors that repair DSBs (e.g. Ku70, Ku86, Artemis) and terminate transcription (e.g. RNA polymerase II). K-H loss resulted in increased basal R-loop levels, DSBs, activated DNA-damage responses and enhanced genomic instability. Significantly lowered Artemis protein levels were detected in K-H knockdown cells, which were restored with specific K-H cDNA re-expression. K-H deficient cells were hypersensitive to cytotoxic agents that induce DSBs, unable to reseal complex DSB ends, and showed significantly delayed γ-H2AX and 53BP1 repair-related foci regression. Artemis re-expression in K-H-deficient cells restored DNA-repair function and resistance to DSB-inducing agents. However, R loops persisted consistent with dual roles of K-H in transcription termination and DSB repair.

  1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mms1 channels repair of perturbed replication into Rhp51 independent homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejrup-Hansen, Rasmus; Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Miyabe, Izumi

    2011-01-01

    -like protein, Rtt101/Cul8, a potential paralog of Cullin 4. We performed epistasis analysis between ¿mms1 and mutants of pathways with known functions in genome integrity, and measured the recruitment of homologous recombination proteins to blocked replication forks and recombination frequencies. We show that......-specific replication fork barrier and that, in a ¿mms1 strain, Rad22(Rad52) and RPA recruitment to blocked forks are reduced, whereas Rhp51 recruitment is unaffected. In addition, Mms1 appears to specifically promote chromosomal rearrangements in a recombination assay. These observations suggest that Mms1 acts...... is particularly important when a single strand break is converted into a double strand break during replication. Genetic data connect Mms1 to a Mus81 and Rad22(Rad52) dependent, but Rhp51 independent, branch of homologous recombination. This is supported by results demonstrating that Mms1 is recruited to a site...

  2. Human FEN1 Expression and Solubility Patterson in DNA Replication and Repair

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carrier, Richard

    1999-01-01

    .... I show that human FEN1 mRNA and protein levels increase in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with peak mRNA and protein levels attained coincident with S phase DNA replication in both primary and transformed cells...

  3. Transcriptional and Posttranslational Regulation of Nucleotide Excision Repair: The Guardian of the Genome against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Min Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation from sunlight represents a constant threat to genome stability by generating modified DNA bases such as cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD and pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4 photoproducts (6-4PP. If unrepaired, these lesions can have deleterious effects, including skin cancer. Mammalian cells are able to neutralize UV-induced photolesions through nucleotide excision repair (NER. The NER pathway has multiple components including seven xeroderma pigmentosum (XP proteins (XPA to XPG and numerous auxiliary factors, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR protein kinase and RCC1 like domain (RLD and homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT domain containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (HERC2. In this review we highlight recent data on the transcriptional and posttranslational regulation of NER activity.

  4. Structural basis for the initiation of eukaryotic transcription-coupled DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Lahiri, Indrajit; Wang, Wei; Wier, Adam; Cianfrocco, Michael A; Chong, Jenny; Hare, Alissa A; Dervan, Peter B; DiMaio, Frank; Leschziner, Andres E; Wang, Dong

    2017-11-30

    Eukaryotic transcription-coupled repair (TCR) is an important and well-conserved sub-pathway of nucleotide excision repair that preferentially removes DNA lesions from the template strand that block translocation of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB, also known as ERCC6) protein in humans (or its yeast orthologues, Rad26 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhp26 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is among the first proteins to be recruited to the lesion-arrested Pol II during the initiation of eukaryotic TCR. Mutations in CSB are associated with the autosomal-recessive neurological disorder Cockayne syndrome, which is characterized by progeriod features, growth failure and photosensitivity. The molecular mechanism of eukaryotic TCR initiation remains unclear, with several long-standing unanswered questions. How cells distinguish DNA lesion-arrested Pol II from other forms of arrested Pol II, the role of CSB in TCR initiation, and how CSB interacts with the arrested Pol II complex are all unknown. The lack of structures of CSB or the Pol II-CSB complex has hindered our ability to address these questions. Here we report the structure of the S. cerevisiae Pol II-Rad26 complex solved by cryo-electron microscopy. The structure reveals that Rad26 binds to the DNA upstream of Pol II, where it markedly alters its path. Our structural and functional data suggest that the conserved Swi2/Snf2-family core ATPase domain promotes the forward movement of Pol II, and elucidate key roles for Rad26 in both TCR and transcription elongation.

  5. A transgenic mouse marking live replicating cells reveals in vivo transcriptional program of proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Moran, Maya

    2012-01-01

    Most adult mammalian tissues are quiescent, with rare cell divisions serving to maintain homeostasis. At present, the isolation and study of replicating cells from their in vivo niche typically involves immunostaining for intracellular markers of proliferation, causing the loss of sensitive biolo...

  6. How Human Papillomavirus Replication and Immune Evasion Strategies Take Advantage of the Host DNA Damage Repair Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Valentina; Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Trento, Elisabetta; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Cavallo, Ilaria; Pontone, Martina; Pimpinelli, Fulvia; Mariani, Luciano; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2017-12-19

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex signalling network activated when DNA is altered by intrinsic or extrinsic agents. DDR plays important roles in genome stability and cell cycle regulation, as well as in tumour transformation. Viruses have evolved successful life cycle strategies in order to ensure a chronic persistence in the host, virtually avoiding systemic sequelae and death. This process promotes the periodic shedding of large amounts of infectious particles to maintain a virus reservoir in individual hosts, while allowing virus spreading within the community. To achieve such a successful lifestyle, the human papilloma virus (HPV) needs to escape the host defence systems. The key to understanding how this is achieved is in the virus replication process that provides by itself an evasion mechanism by inhibiting and delaying the host immune response against the viral infection. Numerous studies have demonstrated that HPV exploits both the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ataxia-telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) DDR pathways to replicate its genome and maintain a persistent infection by downregulating the innate and cell-mediated immunity. This review outlines how HPV interacts with the ATM- and ATR-dependent DDR machinery during the viral life cycle to create an environment favourable to viral replication, and how the interaction with the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) protein family and the deregulation of the Janus kinase (JAK)-STAT pathways may impact the expression of interferon-inducible genes and the innate immune responses.

  7. Radiation-induced cross-link DNA damages: synthesis, measurement and insertion into oligonucleotides for replication and enzymatic repair studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellon, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the synthesis, measurement and study of the biological impact of radio-induced DNA double damages. In the first part, the author reports the study of the reactivity and fate of the 5-(2'-desoxy-uridilyl)methyl radical which is one of the intermediates formed by oxidizing photo-sensitisation of thymine. The next part reports results of the formation and measurement of double damages of isolated and cellular DNA, notably in the case of γ irradiation. The third part reports the study of in vitro replication of one of the double damages. The behaviour of different polymerases with respect to the damage is reported. Finally, the modified oligonucleotide has been used as a substrate to highlight possible activities of enzymatic repair for this type of cross-link damages by purified proteins or proteins present within cellular extracts [fr

  8. Lingering single-strand breaks trigger Rad51-independent homology-directed repair of collapsed replication forks in the polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase mutant of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arancha Sanchez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The DNA repair enzyme polynucleotide kinase/phosphatase (PNKP protects genome integrity by restoring ligatable 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini at single-strand breaks (SSBs. In humans, PNKP mutations underlie the neurological disease known as MCSZ, but these individuals are not predisposed for cancer, implying effective alternative repair pathways in dividing cells. Homology-directed repair (HDR of collapsed replication forks was proposed to repair SSBs in PNKP-deficient cells, but the critical HDR protein Rad51 is not required in PNKP-null (pnk1Δ cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Here, we report that pnk1Δ cells have enhanced requirements for Rad3 (ATR/Mec1 and Chk1 checkpoint kinases, and the multi-BRCT domain protein Brc1 that binds phospho-histone H2A (γH2A at damaged replication forks. The viability of pnk1Δ cells depends on Mre11 and Ctp1 (CtIP/Sae2 double-strand break (DSB resection proteins, Rad52 DNA strand annealing protein, Mus81-Eme1 Holliday junction resolvase, and Rqh1 (BLM/WRN/Sgs1 DNA helicase. Coupled with increased sister chromatid recombination and Rad52 repair foci in pnk1Δ cells, these findings indicate that lingering SSBs in pnk1Δ cells trigger Rad51-independent homology-directed repair of collapsed replication forks. From these data, we propose models for HDR-mediated tolerance of persistent SSBs with 3' phosphate in pnk1Δ cells.

  9. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, R; Delmas, O; Morin, B; Graham, S C; De Lamballerie, X; Laubert, C; Coutard, B; Grimes, J M; Neyts, J; Owens, R J; Brandt, B W; Gorbalenya, A; Tucker, P; Stuart, D I; Canard, B; Bourhy, H

    2010-08-01

    Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehensive structural characterization of the replicative machinery. The contribution of VIZIER programme was of several orders. First, it contributed substantially to research aimed at understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of rhabdoviruses. This diversity was then used to obtain further structural information on the proteins involved in replication. Two strategies were used to produce recombinant proteins by expression of both full length or domain constructs in either E. coli or insect cells, using the baculovirus system. In both cases, parallel cloning and expression screening at small-scale of multiple constructs based on different viruses including the addition of fusion tags, was key to the rapid generation of expression data. As a result, some progress has been made in the VIZIER programme towards dissecting the multi-functional L protein into components suitable for structural and functional studies. However, the phosphoprotein polymerase co-factor and the structural matrix protein, which play a number of roles during viral replication and drives viral assembly, have both proved much more amenable to structural biology. Applying the multi-construct/multi-virus approach central to protein production processes in VIZIER has yielded new structural information which may ultimately be exploitable in the derivation of novel ways of intervening in viral replication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. RECQ5 helicase promotes resolution of conflicts between replication and transcription in human cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Václav; Dobrovolná, Jana; Hühn, D.; Fryzelkova, Jana; Bartek, Jiří; Janščák, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 214, č. 4 (2016), s. 401-415 ISSN 0021-9525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05743S; GA MŠk LH14037 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : rna-polymerase-ii * fragile sites * homologous recombination * genome instability * dna-replication * genes * fork * protein * stress * brca1 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.955, year: 2016

  11. In vitro-reconstituted nucleoids can block mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, Géraldine; Mehmedovic, Majda; Baclayon, Marian; van den Wildenberg, Siet M J L; Roos, Wouter H; Gustafsson, Claes M; Wuite, Gijs J L; Falkenberg, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating the number of active copies of mtDNA are still unclear. A mammalian cell typically contains 1,000-10,000 copies of mtDNA, which are packaged into nucleoprotein complexes termed nucleoids. The main protein component of these structures is mitochondrial transcription factor A

  12. Genome-Wide Search for Competing Endogenous RNAs Responsible for the Effects Induced by Ebola Virus Replication and Transcription Using a trVLP System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Yi Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how infected cells respond to Ebola virus (EBOV and how this response changes during the process of viral replication and transcription are very important for establishing effective antiviral strategies. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide screen to identify long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, circular RNAs (circRNAs, micro RNAs (miRNAs, and mRNAs differentially expressed during replication and transcription using a tetracistronic transcription and replication-competent virus-like particle (trVLP system that models the life cycle of EBOV in 293T cells. To characterize the expression patterns of these differentially expressed RNAs, we performed a series cluster analysis, and up- or down-regulated genes were selected to establish a gene co-expression network. Competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA networks based on the RNAs responsible for the effects induced by EBOV replication and transcription in human cells, including circRNAs, lncRNAs, miRNAs, and mRNAs, were constructed for the first time. Based on these networks, the interaction details of circRNA-chr19 were explored. Our results demonstrated that circRNA-chr19 targeting miR-30b-3p regulated CLDN18 expression by functioning as a ceRNA. These findings may have important implications for further studies of the mechanisms of EBOV replication and transcription. These RNAs potentially have important functions and may be promising targets for EBOV therapy.

  13. Transcriptional Changes during Naturally Acquired Zika Virus Infection Render Dendritic Cells Highly Conducive to Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoming; Hua, Stephane; Chen, Hsiao-Rong; Ouyang, Zhengyu; Einkauf, Kevin; Tse, Samantha; Ard, Kevin; Ciaranello, Andrea; Yawetz, Sigal; Sax, Paul; Rosenberg, Eric S; Lichterfeld, Mathias; Yu, Xu G

    2017-12-19

    Although dendritic cells are among the human cell population best equipped for cell-intrinsic antiviral immune defense, they seem highly susceptible to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV). Using highly purified myeloid dendritic cells isolated from individuals with naturally acquired acute infection, we here show that ZIKV induces profound perturbations of transcriptional signatures relative to healthy donors. Interestingly, we noted a remarkable downregulation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes and innate immune sensors, suggesting that ZIKV can actively suppress interferon-dependent immune responses. In contrast, several host factors known to support ZIKV infection were strongly upregulated during natural ZIKV infection; these transcripts included AXL, the main entry receptor for ZIKV; SOCS3, a negative regulator of ISG expression; and IDO-1, a recognized inducer of regulatory T cell responses. Thus, during in vivo infection, ZIKV can transform the transcriptome of dendritic cells in favor of the virus to render these cells highly conducive to ZIKV infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Architecture of the human and yeast general transcription and DNA repair factor TFIIH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Cimermancic, Peter; Viswanath, Shruthi; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Kim, Bong; Dehecq, Marine; Raman, Vishnu; Greenberg, Charles H.; Pellarin, Riccardo; Sali, Andrej; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Hahn, Steven; Ranish, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Summary TFIIH is essential for both RNA polymerase II transcription and DNA repair, and mutations in TFIIH can result in human disease. Here, we determine the molecular architecture of human and yeast TFIIH by an integrative approach using chemical crosslinking/mass spectrometry (CXMS) data, biochemical analyses, and previously published electron microscopy maps. We identified four new conserved “topological regions” that function as hubs for TFIIH assembly and more than 35 conserved topological features within TFIIH, illuminating a network of interactions involved in TFIIH assembly and regulation of its activities. We show that one of these conserved regions, the p62/Tfb1 Anchor region, directly interacts with the DNA helicase subunit XPD/Rad3 in native TFIIH and is required for the integrity and function of TFIIH. We also reveal the structural basis for defects in patients with Xeroderma pigmentosum and Trichothiodystrophy, with mutations found at the interface between the p62 Anchor region and the XPD subunit. PMID:26340423

  15. Morphological correlates of genital HPV infection: Viral replication, transcription and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, C.P.; Friedman, D.; Nuovo, G.; Silverstein, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Current studies indicate a strong correlation between specific morphological changes and the presence of certain HPV strains in precancerous squamous epithelium of the cervix, vulva and vagina. HPV type 16 is the most commonly detected HPV type in cervical lesions in our experience, and 85% of these lesions exhibit some morphological features associated with aneuploid epithelium (CIN). However, over 50% of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA exhibit, in addition, foci of epithelium indistinguishable from condyloma, although in our experience, only one HPV type(16) is detected in the majority of these lesions. DNA-DNA in situ hybridization analysis of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA has demonstrated nucleic acids in areas resembling both condyloma and CIN, with the greatest concentration in mature cells containing cytoplasmic maturation. Ten percent of lesions containing HPV 16 produce detectable capsid antigens, and we have confirmed the presence of these antigens in the same areas which hybridize in-situ for HPV DNA. Recent studies using biotin and S-35 labeled RNa probes constructed in GEM-1 vectors indicate that early HPV genes are expressed primarily in the upper (more mature) regions of the neoplastic epithelium. Thus maturation appears to exert a positive influence on a variety of HPV functions in neoplastic epithelium, including DNA replication, early and late gene expression. It is possible that patterns of gene expression may vary between lesions associated with different HPV types or different morphologies. This possibility is being explored

  16. BRD4 Phosphorylation Regulates HPV E2-Mediated Viral Transcription, Origin Replication, and Cellular MMP-9 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shwu-Yuan Wu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modification can modulate protein conformation and alter binding partner recruitment within gene regulatory regions. Here, we report that bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4, a transcription co-factor and chromatin regulator, uses a phosphorylation-induced switch mechanism to recruit E2 protein encoded by cancer-associated human papillomavirus (HPV to viral early gene and cellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 promoters. Enhanced MMP-9 expression, induced upon keratinocyte differentiation, occurs via BRD4-dependent recruitment of active AP-1 and NF-κB to their target sequences. This is triggered by replacement of AP-1 family members JunB and JunD by c-Jun and by re-localization of NF-κB from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. In addition, BRD4 phosphorylation is critical for E2- and origin-dependent HPV DNA replication. A class of phospho-BRD4-targeting compounds, distinct from the BET bromodomain inhibitors, effectively blocks BRD4 phosphorylation-specific functions in transcription and factor recruitment.

  17. Nickel induces transcriptional down-regulation of DNA repair pathways in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Susan E; Scanlon, Christine D; Hegan, Denise C; Sulkowski, Parker L; Glazer, Peter M

    2017-06-01

    The heavy metal nickel is a known carcinogen, and occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been implicated in human lung and nasal cancers. Unlike many other environmental carcinogens, however, nickel does not directly induce DNA mutagenesis, and the mechanism of nickel-related carcinogenesis remains incompletely understood. Cellular nickel exposure leads to signaling pathway activation, transcriptional changes and epigenetic remodeling, processes also impacted by hypoxia, which itself promotes tumor growth without causing direct DNA damage. One of the mechanisms by which hypoxia contributes to tumor growth is the generation of genomic instability via down-regulation of high-fidelity DNA repair pathways. Here, we find that nickel exposure similarly leads to down-regulation of DNA repair proteins involved in homology-dependent DNA double-strand break repair (HDR) and mismatch repair (MMR) in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic human lung cells. Functionally, nickel induces a defect in HDR capacity, as determined by plasmid-based host cell reactivation assays, persistence of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and cellular hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation. Mechanistically, we find that nickel, in contrast to the metalloid arsenic, acutely induces transcriptional repression of HDR and MMR genes as part of a global transcriptional pattern similar to that seen with hypoxia. Finally, we find that exposure to low-dose nickel reduces the activity of the MLH1 promoter, but only arsenic leads to long-term MLH1 promoter silencing. Together, our data elucidate novel mechanisms of heavy metal carcinogenesis and contribute to our understanding of the influence of the microenvironment on the regulation of DNA repair pathways. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides for repair and replication studies of single and double radio-induced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several oxidative processes induce the formation of DNA lesions. In order to evaluate the biological and structural significance of such damage, several DNA lesions were inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides at defined sites. The research work aimed at describing the preparation of oligonucleotides t hat contained DNA damage and the evaluation of the biological properties of the lesions. A first part described the incorporation of radiation-induced lesions, namely (5'S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and (5'S,5S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-2'-desoxyuridine into oligonucleotides. The modified DNA fragments were characterised by several spectroscopic and biochemical analyses including ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS, CLHP and enzymatic digestions. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase and Klenow exo fragment, the pyrimidine cyclo-nucleosides were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Then, repair studies by ADN N glycosylases, operating in the base excision repair pathway, have shown that the anhydro-nucleoside lesions were not recognised nor excised by Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, yNtg1 yNtg2 and yOgg1. Interestingly, the Latococcus lactis Fpg protein recognises (formation of a non covalent complex) but do not excise the damage. The incorporation into oligonucleotides of the (5R*) and (5S*) diastereoisomers of 1-[2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]-5-hydroxy-hydantoin, generated by several oxidative processes was then described. In vitro DNA replication assays using modified oligonucleotides matrix showed a lethal potential of the latter base damage. Repair studies by ADN N-glycosylases showed that the damage was substrate for Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Fpg-L1. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the Michaelis kinetics constants were found to be affected by the presence of the damage. MALDI-TOF MS was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotides cleavage by the

  19. DNA polymerase I is required for premeiotic DNA replication and sporulation but not for X-ray repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, M.E.; Wittrup, K.D.; Bailey, J.E.; Campbell, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    We have used a set of seven temperature-sensitive mutants in the DNA polymerase I gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate the role of DNA polymerase I in various aspects of DNA synthesis in vivo. Previously, we showed that DNA polymerase I is required for mitotic DNA replication. Here we extend our studies to several stages of meiosis and repair of X-ray-induced damage. We find that sporulation is blocked in all of the DNA polymerase temperature-sensitive mutants and that premeiotic DNA replication does not occur. Commitment to meiotic recombination is only 2% of wild-type levels. Thus, DNA polymerase I is essential for these steps. However, repair of X-ray-induced single-strand breaks is not defective in the DNA polymerase temperature-sensitive mutants, and DNA polymerase I is therefore not essential for repair of such lesions. These results suggest that DNA polymerase II or III or both, the two other nuclear yeast DNA polymerases for which roles have not yet been established, carry out repair in the absence of DNA polymerase I, but that DNA polymerase II and III cannot compensate for loss of DNA polymerase I in meiotic replication and recombination. These results do not, however, rule out essential roles for DNA polymerase II or III or both in addition to that for DNA polymerase I

  20. Genetic instability associated with loop or stem–loop structures within transcription units can be independent of nucleotide excision repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John A; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Cartularo, Laura; Berens, Christian; Scicchitano, David A

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are found throughout the genome, and under some conditions can change in length over time. Germline and somatic expansions of trinucleotide repeats are associated with a series of severely disabling illnesses, including Huntington's disease. The underlying mechanisms that effect SSR expansions and contractions have been experimentally elusive, but models suggesting a role for DNA repair have been proposed, in particular the involvement of transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TCNER) that removes transcription-blocking DNA damage from the transcribed strand of actively expressed genes. If the formation of secondary DNA structures that are associated with SSRs were to block RNA polymerase progression, TCNER could be activated, resulting in the removal of the aberrant structure and a concomitant change in the region's length. To test this, TCNER activity in primary human fibroblasts was assessed on defined DNA substrates containing extrahelical DNA loops that lack discernible internal base pairs or DNA stem–loops that contain base pairs within the stem. The results show that both structures impede transcription elongation, but there is no corresponding evidence that nucleotide excision repair (NER) or TCNER operates to remove them. PMID:29474673

  1. Influence of some radioprotective and radiosensitizing compounds on the replicative and repair induced DNA synthesis of rats spleen cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goette, A.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cysteine, dithiothreitol, N-ethylmaleimide, cytosinearabinoside, ethidiumbromide, bleomycine and diethyldithiocarbamate on the replicative and repair induced DNA synthesis in vitro was tested by using rats spleen cells. Besides the incorporation of a labeled DNA precursor (TdR- 3 H) the sedimentation of DNA in sucrose gradients was inquired. With respect to the DNA synthesis an uniform mechanism of action for the radioprotective substances can't be seen. Thymocytes and spleen cells seem to possess different systems of repair; this may be an explanation for their different sensibility against ionizing radiation. (orig./MG) [de

  2. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, J.; Sancar, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. The authors here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription

  3. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  4. Clinical heterogeneity within xeroderma pigmentosum associated with mutations in the DNA repair and transcription gene ERCC3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermeulen, W.; Kleijer, W.J.; Bootsma, D.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; Weeda, G. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Scott, R.J.; Rodgers, S.; Mueller, H.J. (Univ. Hospital, Basel (Switzerland)); Cole, J.; Arlett, C.F. (Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom))

    1994-02-01

    The human DNA excision repair gene ERCC3 specifically corrects the nucleotide excision repair (NER) defect of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group B. In addition to its function in NER, the ERCC3 DNA helicase was recently identified as one of the components of the human BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor complex, which is required for initiation of transcription of class II genes. To date, a single patient (XP11BE) has been assigned to this XP group B (XP-B), with the remarkable conjunction of two autosomal recessive DNA repair deficiency disorders: XP and Cockayne syndrome (CS). The intriguing involvement of the ERCC3 protein in the vital process of transcription may provide an explanation for the rarity, severity, and wide spectrum of clinical features in this complementation group. Here the authors report the identification of two new XP-B patients: XPCS1BA and XPCS2BA (siblings), by microneedle injection of the cloned ERCC3 repair gene as well as by cell hybridization. Molecular analysis of the ERCC3 gene in both patients revealed a single base substitution causing a missense mutation in a region that is completely conserved in yeast, Drosophila, mouse, and human ERCC3. As in patient XP11BE, the expression of only one allele (paternal) is detected. The mutation causes a virtually complete inactivation of the NER function of the protein. Despite this severe NER defect, both patients display a late onset of neurologic impairment, mild cutaneous symptoms, and a striking absence of skin tumors even at an age of >40 years. Analysis of the frequency of hprt[sup [minus

  5. Non-canonical CRL4A/4B(CDT2 interacts with RAD18 to modulate post replication repair and cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sertic

    Full Text Available The Cullin-4(CDT2 E3 ubiquitin ligase plays an essential role in DNA replication origin licensing directing degradation of several licensing factors at the G1/S transition in order to prevent DNA re-replication. Recently a RAD18-independent role of Cullin-4(CDT2 in PCNA monoubiquitylation has been proposed. In an effort to better understand the function of Cullin-4(CDT2 E3 ubiquitin ligase in mammalian Post-Replication Repair during an unperturbed S-phase, we show that down-regulation of Cullin-4(CDT2 leads to two distinguishable independent phenotypes in human cells that unveil at least two independent roles of Cullin-4(CDT2 in S-phase. Apart from the re-replication preventing activity, we identified a non-canonical Cullin-4(CDT2 complex, containing both CUL4A and CUL4B, associated to the COP9 signalosome, that controls a RAD18-dependent damage avoidance pathway essential during an unperturbed S-phase. Indeed, we show that the non-canonical Cullin-4A/4B(CDT2 complex binds to RAD18 and it is required to modulate RAD18 protein levels onto chromatin and the consequent dynamics of PCNA monoubiquitylation during a normal S-phase. This function prevents replication stress, ATR hyper-signaling and, ultimately, apoptosis. A very similar PRR regulatory mechanism has been recently described for Spartan. Our findings uncover a finely regulated process in mammalian cells involving Post-Replication Repair factors, COP9 signalosome and a non-canonical Cullin4-based E3 ligase which is essential to tolerate spontaneous damage and for cell survival during physiological DNA replication.

  6. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  7. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  8. The genetic defect in Cockayne syndrome is associated with a defect in repair of UV-induced DNA damage in transcriptionally active DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venema, J.; Mullenders, L.H.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mayne, L.V.

    1990-01-01

    Cells from patients with Cockayne syndrome (CS) are hypersensitive to UV-irradiation but have an apparently normal ability to remove pyrimidine dimers from the genome overall. We have measured the repair of pyrimidine dimers in defined DNA sequences in three normal and two CS cell strains. When compared to a nontranscribed locus, transcriptionally active genes were preferentially repaired in all three normal cell strains. There was no significant variation in levels of repair between various normal individuals or between two constitutively expressed genes, indicating that preferential repair may be a consistent feature of constitutively expressed genes in human cells. Neither CS strain, from independent complementation groups, was able to repair transcriptionally active DNA with a similar rate and to the same extent as normal cells, indicating that the genetic defect in CS lies in the pathway for repair of transcriptionally active DNA. These results have implications for understanding the pleiotropic clinical effects associated with disorders having defects in the repair of DNA damage. In particular, neurodegeneration appears to be associated with the loss of preferential repair of active genes and is not simply correlated with reduced levels of overall repair

  9. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Yu; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Lee, Yueh-Luen; Lai, Yi-Hua; Chen, Jeremy J W; Wu, Wen-Lin; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P; Su, Wang-Lin; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2012-01-01

    The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular) are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD) as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  10. Spermine attenuates the action of the DNA intercalator, actinomycin D, on DNA binding and the inhibition of transcription and DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Yu Wang

    Full Text Available The anticancer activity of DNA intercalators is related to their ability to intercalate into the DNA duplex with high affinity, thereby interfering with DNA replication and transcription. Polyamines (spermine in particular are almost exclusively bound to nucleic acids and are involved in many cellular processes that require nucleic acids. Until now, the effects of polyamines on DNA intercalator activities have remained unclear because intercalation is the most important mechanism employed by DNA-binding drugs. Herein, using actinomycin D (ACTD as a model, we have attempted to elucidate the effects of spermine on the action of ACTD, including its DNA-binding ability, RNA and DNA polymerase interference, and its role in the transcription and replication inhibition of ACTD within cells. We found that spermine interfered with the binding and stabilization of ACTD to DNA. The presence of increasing concentrations of spermine enhanced the transcriptional and replication activities of RNA and DNA polymerases, respectively, in vitro treated with ActD. Moreover, a decrease in intracellular polyamine concentrations stimulated by methylglyoxal-bis(guanylhydrazone (MGBG enhanced the ACTD-induced inhibition of c-myc transcription and DNA replication in several cancer cell lines. The results indicated that spermine attenuates ACTD binding to DNA and its inhibition of transcription and DNA replication both in vitro and within cells. Finally, a synergistic antiproliferative effect of MGBG and ACTD was observed in a cell viability assay. Our findings will be of significant relevance to future developments in combination with cancer therapy by enhancing the anticancer activity of DNA interactors through polyamine depletion.

  11. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Olga; Luo, Tao; Dos Vultos, Tiago; Kremer, Kristin; Murray, Alan; Namouchi, Amine; Jackson, Céline; Rauzier, Jean; Bifani, Pablo; Warren, Rob; Rasolofo, Voahangy; Mei, Jian; Gao, Qian; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2011-01-20

    The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R) genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs). A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10), which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  12. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes.A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant.We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  13. Olean-18-ene triterpenoids from Celastraceae species inhibit HIV replication targeting NF-kB and Sp1 dependent transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Alex A; Muñóz, Alejandro; Torres-Romero, David; Bedoya, Luis M; Perestelo, Nayra R; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Alcamí, José; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2012-06-01

    In the present study we report the isolation of nine new olean-18-ene triterpenes (1-9), along with three known ones (10-12), from Cassine xylocarpa and Maytenus jelskii. Their stereostructures have been elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques (COSY, ROESY, HSQC and HMBC), and spectrometric methods. The natural compounds and derivatives 13-15 have been tested for their potential as inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication. Five compounds from this series displayed potent antiviral activity with IC(50)s in the micromolar range (1, 3, 4, 7 and 8) being 1 and 8 the most active compounds. The target of these compounds was different from antiretroviral drugs currently licensed as they act as inhibitors of enhancer-dependent transcription. The structure-activity relationships were established based on the regiosubstitution and oxidation degree of the triterpene scaffold, revealing that these aspects were able to modulate the selectivity and intensity of HIV inhibition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. p44 and p34 subunits of the BTF2/TFIIH transcription factor have homologies with SSL1, a yeast protein involved in DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Humbert; H. van Vuuren; Y. Lutz; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); V. Moncollin

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 (TFIIH) transcription factor is a multisubunit protein involved in transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II (B) as well as in DNA repair. In addition to the previously characterized p62 and p89/ERCC3 subunits, we have cloned two other subunits of BTF2, p44 and p34.

  15. Transcription and recombination: when RNA meets DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Andrés; Gaillard, Hélène

    2014-08-01

    A particularly relevant phenomenon in cell physiology and proliferation is the fact that spontaneous mitotic recombination is strongly enhanced by transcription. The most accepted view is that transcription increases the occurrence of double-strand breaks and/or single-stranded DNA gaps that are repaired by recombination. Most breaks would arise as a consequence of the impact that transcription has on replication fork progression, provoking its stalling and/or breakage. Here, we discuss the mechanisms responsible for the cross talk between transcription and recombination, with emphasis on (1) the transcription-replication conflicts as the main source of recombinogenic DNA breaks, and (2) the formation of cotranscriptional R-loops as a major cause of such breaks. The new emerging questions and perspectives are discussed on the basis of the interference between transcription and replication, as well as the way RNA influences genome dynamics. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  16. An Approach to Detect and Study DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Transcript RNA Using a Spliced-Antisense RNA Template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Havva; Storici, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    A double-strand break (DSB) is one of the most dangerous DNA lesion, and its repair is crucial for genome stability. Homologous recombination is considered the safest way to repair a DNA DSB and requires an identical or nearly identical DNA template, such as a sister chromatid or a homologous chromosome for accurate repair. Can transcript RNA serve as donor template for DSB repair? Here, we describe an approach that we developed to detect and study DNA repair by transcript RNA. Key features of the method are: (i) use of antisense (noncoding) RNA as template for DSB repair by RNA, (ii) use of intron splicing to distinguish the sequence of the RNA template from that of the DNA that generates the RNA template, and (iii) use of a trans and cis system to study how RNA repairs a DSB in homologous but distant DNA or in its own DNA, respectively. This chapter provides details on how to use a spliced-antisense RNA template to detect and study DSB repair by RNA in trans or cis in yeast cells. Our approach for detection of DSB repair by RNA in cells can be applied to cell types other than yeast, such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or other eukaryotic cells. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA repair helicase: a component of BTF2 (TFIIH) basic transcription factor. (research article)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Schaeffer; R. Roy (Richard); S. Humbert; V. Moncollin; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); P. Chambon; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe human BTF2 basic transcription factor (also called TFIIH), which is similar to the delta factor in rat and factor b in yeast, is required for class II gene transcription. A strand displacement assay was used to show that highly purified preparation of BTF2 had an adenosine

  18. Bypass of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside by DNA polymerase β during DNA replication and base excision repair leads to nucleotide misinsertions and DNA strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhongliang; Xu, Meng; Lai, Yanhao; Laverde, Eduardo E; Terzidis, Michael A; Masi, Annalisa; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Liu, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    5',8-Cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides including 5',8-cyclo-dA (cdA) and 5',8-cyclo-dG (cdG) are induced by hydroxyl radicals resulting from oxidative stress such as ionizing radiation. 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside lesions are repaired by nucleotide excision repair with low efficiency, thereby leading to their accumulation in the human genome and lesion bypass by DNA polymerases during DNA replication and base excision repair (BER). In this study, for the first time, we discovered that DNA polymerase β (pol β) efficiently bypassed a 5'R-cdA, but inefficiently bypassed a 5'S-cdA during DNA replication and BER. We found that cell extracts from pol β wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited significant DNA synthesis activity in bypassing a cdA lesion located in replication and BER intermediates. However, pol β knock-out cell extracts exhibited little DNA synthesis to bypass the lesion. This indicates that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a cdA lesion during DNA replication and BER. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pol β inserted both a correct and incorrect nucleotide to bypass a cdA at a low concentration. Nucleotide misinsertion was significantly stimulated by a high concentration of pol β, indicating a mutagenic effect induced by pol β lesion bypass synthesis of a 5',8-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleoside. Moreover, we found that bypass of a 5'S-cdA by pol β generated an intermediate that failed to be extended by pol β, resulting in accumulation of single-strand DNA breaks. Our study provides the first evidence that pol β plays an important role in bypassing a 5',8-cyclo-dA during DNA replication and repair, as well as new insight into mutagenic effects and genome instability resulting from pol β bypassing of a cdA lesion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hoechst 33258 dye generates DNA-protein cross-links during ultraviolet light-induced photolysis of bromodeoxyuridine in replicated and repaired DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Xicang; Morgan, W.F.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1986-08-01

    Substitution of bromodeoxyuridine for thymidine in the DNA of mammalian cells sensitizes them to a range of wavelengths of ultraviolet light. Cells are also sensitized to photochemical reactions involving dyes such as Hoechst 33258, which is used to produce differential staining of chromatids according to their bromodeoxyuridine content. Irradiation with 313 nm light of human and hamster cells containing bromodeoxyuridine in their DNA produced single-strand breaks but no DNA-protein cross-links. Irradiation with 360 nm light in the presence of Hoechst 33258 produced extensive DNA-protein cross-linkage as well as single-strand breaks. These cross-links were observed in DNA containing bromodeoxyuridine incorporated by either semiconservative or repair replication. When the protein was removed with proteinase K, bromodeoxyuridine in repair patches after irradiation by doses of ultraviolet (254 nm) light as low as 0.26 J/m/sup 2/ could readily be detected. Hoechst 33258-mediated photolysis, therefore, provides a sensitive new technique for measuring repair replication after ultraviolet light irradiation.

  20. Abnormal recovery of DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated cell cultures of Drosophila melanogaster which are defective in DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, T.C.; Boyd, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    Cell cultures prepared from embryos of a control stock of Drosophila melanogaster respond to ultraviolet light with a decline and subsequent recovery both of thymidine incorporation and in the ability to synthesize nascent DNA in long segments. Recovery of one or both capacities is absent or diminished in irradiated cells from ten nonallelic mutants that are defective in DNA repair and from four of five nonallelic mutagen-sensitive mutants that exhibit normal repair capabilities. Recovery of thymidine incorporation is not observed in nine of ten DNA repair-defective mutants. On the other hand, partial or complete recovery of incorporation is observed in all but one repair-proficient mutagen-sensitive mutant. (orig./AJ) [de

  1. A Rapid Screen for Host-Encoded miRNAs with Inhibitory Effects against Ebola Virus Using a Transcription- and Replication-Competent Virus-Like Particle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs may become efficient antiviral agents against the Ebola virus (EBOV targeting viral genomic RNAs or transcripts. We previously conducted a genome-wide search for differentially expressed miRNAs during viral replication and transcription. In this study, we established a rapid screen for miRNAs with inhibitory effects against EBOV using a tetracistronic transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particle (trVLP system. This system uses a minigenome comprising an EBOV leader region, luciferase reporter, VP40, GP, VP24, EBOV trailer region, and three noncoding regions from the EBOV genome and can be used to model the life cycle of EBOV under biosafety level (BSL 2 conditions. Informatic analysis was performed to select up-regulated miRNAs targeting the coding regions of the minigenome with the highest binding energy to perform inhibitory effect screening. Among these miRNAs, miR-150-3p had the most significant inhibitory effect. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blot, and double fluorescence reporter experiments demonstrated that miR-150-3p inhibited the reproduction of trVLPs via the regulation of GP and VP40 expression by directly targeting the coding regions of GP and VP40. This novel, rapid, and convenient screening method will efficiently facilitate the exploration of miRNAs against EBOV under BSL-2 conditions.

  2. Efficient replication of the in vitro transcripts from cloned cDNA of tomato black ring virus satellite RNA requires the 48K satellite RNA-encoded protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, O; Oncino, C; Fritsch, C

    1993-06-01

    Tomato black ring virus isolate L supports the multiplication of a large satellite RNA of 1376 nt which has no common features with the two genomic RNAs except for the terminal motif 5' VPg UUGAAAA and a 3' poly(A) tail. The TBRV sat-RNA contains an ORF for a protein of 48K which is translated both in vitro and in vivo. To determine the function of the 48K protein we have studied the effect of different mutations introduced in the ORF of the cDNA clone on the capacity of transcripts to multiply in Chenopodium quinoa plants or protoplasts when inoculated along with the genomic RNAs. Transcripts in which nucleotides have been substituted within the 5' proximal region of the ORF multiplied poorly even when the modification conserved the 48K protein sequence, suggesting that this portion of the ORF contains cis-acting RNA sequences. Transcripts with alterations in the internal region of the ORF retained their multiplication capacity provided the mutation did not destroy the ORF or modify the length of the protein expressed. The absence of multiplication in plants of transcripts unable to express the 48K protein and their inability to replicate in protoplasts suggest strongly that the sat-RNA translation product itself is implicated in the replication of sat-RNA.

  3. Role of DNA Repair Factor Xeroderma Pigmentosum Protein Group C in Response to Replication Stress As Revealed by DNA Fragile Site Affinity Chromatography and Quantitative Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresova, Lucie; Vesela, Eva; Chamrad, Ivo; Voller, Jiri; Yamada, Masayuki; Furst, Tomas; Lenobel, Rene; Chroma, Katarina; Gursky, Jan; Krizova, Katerina; Mistrik, Martin; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-12-02

    Replication stress (RS) fuels genomic instability and cancer development and may contribute to aging, raising the need to identify factors involved in cellular responses to such stress. Here, we present a strategy for identification of factors affecting the maintenance of common fragile sites (CFSs), which are genomic loci that are particularly sensitive to RS and suffer from increased breakage and rearrangements in tumors. A DNA probe designed to match the high flexibility island sequence typical for the commonly expressed CFS (FRA16D) was used as specific DNA affinity bait. Proteins significantly enriched at the FRA16D fragment under normal and replication stress conditions were identified using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture-based quantitative mass spectrometry. The identified proteins interacting with the FRA16D fragment included some known CFS stabilizers, thereby validating this screening approach. Among the hits from our screen so far not implicated in CFS maintenance, we chose Xeroderma pigmentosum protein group C (XPC) for further characterization. XPC is a key factor in the DNA repair pathway known as global genomic nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER), a mechanism whose several components were enriched at the FRA16D fragment in our screen. Functional experiments revealed defective checkpoint signaling and escape of DNA replication intermediates into mitosis and the next generation of XPC-depleted cells exposed to RS. Overall, our results provide insights into an unexpected biological role of XPC in response to replication stress and document the power of proteomics-based screening strategies to elucidate mechanisms of pathophysiological significance.

  4. CEBPG transcription factor correlates with antioxidant and DNA repair genes in normal bronchial epithelial cells but not in individuals with bronchogenic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullins, D'Anna N; Crawford, Erin L; Khuder, Sadik A; Hernandez, Dawn-Alita; Yoon, Youngsook; Willey, James C

    2005-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of bronchogenic carcinoma (BC), yet only 10–15% of heavy smokers develop BC and it is likely that this variation in risk is, in part, genetically determined. We previously reported a set of antioxidant genes for which transcript abundance was lower in normal bronchial epithelial cells (NBEC) of BC individuals compared to non-BC individuals. In unpublished studies of the same NBEC samples, transcript abundance values for several DNA repair genes were correlated with these antioxidant genes. From these data, we hypothesized that antioxidant and DNA repair genes are co-regulated by one or more transcription factors and that inter-individual variation in expression and/or function of one or more of these transcription factors is responsible for inter-individual variation in risk for BC. The putative transcription factor recognition sites common to six of the antioxidant genes were identified through in silico DNA sequence analysis. The transcript abundance values of these transcription factors (n = 6) and an expanded group of antioxidant and DNA repair genes (n = 16) were measured simultaneously by quantitative PCR in NBEC of 24 non-BC and 25 BC individuals. CEBPG transcription factor was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with eight of the antioxidant or DNA repair genes in non-BC individuals but not in BC individuals. In BC individuals the correlation with CEBPG was significantly (p < 0.01) lower than that of non-BC individuals for four of the genes (XRCC1, ERCC5, GSTP1, and SOD1) and the difference was nearly significant for GPX1. The only other transcription factor correlated with any of these five target genes in non-BC individuals was E2F1. E2F1 was correlated with GSTP1 among non-BC individuals, but in contrast to CEBPG, there was no significant difference in this correlation in non-BC individuals compared to BC individuals. We conclude that CEBPG is the transcription factor primarily responsible for regulating

  5. Decreased transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair capacity is associated with increased p53- and MLH1-independent apoptosis in response to cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubbert, Lawton J; Smith, Jennifer M; McKay, Bruce C

    2010-01-01

    One of the most commonly used classes of anti-cancer drugs presently in clinical practice is the platinum-based drugs, including cisplatin. The efficacy of cisplatin therapy is often limited by the emergence of resistant tumours following treatment. Cisplatin resistance is multi-factorial but can be associated with increased DNA repair capacity, mutations in p53 or loss of DNA mismatch repair capacity. RNA interference (RNAi) was used to reduce the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) capacity of several prostate and colorectal carcinoma cell lines with specific defects in p53 and/or DNA mismatch repair. The effect of small inhibitory RNAs designed to target the CSB (Cockayne syndrome group B) transcript on TC-NER and the sensitivity of cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined. These prostate and colon cancer cell lines were initially TC-NER proficient and RNAi against CSB significantly reduced their DNA repair capacity. Decreased TC-NER capacity was associated with an increase in the sensitivity of tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, even in p53 null and DNA mismatch repair-deficient cell lines. The present work indicates that CSB and TC-NER play a prominent role in determining the sensitivity of tumour cells to cisplatin even in the absence of p53 and DNA mismatch repair. These results further suggest that CSB represents a potential target for cancer therapy that may be important to overcome resistance to cisplatin in the clinic

  6. MOF Suppresses Replication Stress and Contributes to Resolution of Stalled Replication Forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Pandita, Raj K; Singh, Mayank; Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Hambarde, Shashank; Ramnarain, Deepti; Charaka, Vijaya; Ahmed, Kazi Mokim; Hunt, Clayton R; Pandita, Tej K

    2018-03-15

    The human MOF (hMOF) protein belongs to the MYST family of histone acetyltransferases and plays a critical role in transcription and the DNA damage response. MOF is essential for cell proliferation; however, its role during replication and replicative stress is unknown. Here we demonstrate that cells depleted of MOF and under replicative stress induced by cisplatin, hydroxyurea, or camptothecin have reduced survival, a higher frequency of S-phase-specific chromosome damage, and increased R-loop formation. MOF depletion decreased replication fork speed and, when combined with replicative stress, also increased stalled replication forks as well as new origin firing. MOF interacted with PCNA, a key coordinator of replication and repair machinery at replication forks, and affected its ubiquitination and recruitment to the DNA damage site. Depletion of MOF, therefore, compromised the DNA damage repair response as evidenced by decreased Mre11, RPA70, Rad51, and PCNA focus formation, reduced DNA end resection, and decreased CHK1 phosphorylation in cells after exposure to hydroxyurea or cisplatin. These results support the argument that MOF plays an important role in suppressing replication stress induced by genotoxic agents at several stages during the DNA damage response. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. SIRT3 restricts HBV transcription and replication via epigenetic regulation of cccDNA involving SUV39H1 and SETD1A histone methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ji-Hua; Hu, Jie-Li; Cheng, Sheng-Tao; Yu, Hai-Bo; Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Yang, Yong-Feng; Huang, Ying; Liu, Yi; Chen, Wei-Xian; Cai, Xue-Fei; Tang, Hua; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Wen-Lu; Liu, Xiang; Long, Quan-Xin; Zhou, Li; Tao, Na-Na; Zhou, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Qiu-Xia; Ren, Fang; He, Lin; Gong, Rui; Huang, Ai-Long; Chen, Juan

    2018-04-06

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Maintenance of the covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) which serves as a template for HBV RNA transcription is responsible for the failure of eradicating chronic HBV during current antiviral therapy. cccDNA is assembled with cellular histone proteins into chromatin, but little is known about the regulation of HBV chromatin by histone posttranslational modifications. In this study, we identified SIRT3 as a host factor restricting HBV transcription and replication by screening seven members of Sirtuin family which is the class III histone deacetylase. Ectopic SIRT3 expression significantly reduced total HBV RNAs, 3.5-kb RNA as well as replicative intermediate DNA in HBV-infected HepG2-NTCP cells and PHH. In contrast, gene silencing of SIRT3 promoted HBV transcription and replication. Mechanistic study found nuclear SIRT3 was recruited to the HBV cccDNA, where it deacetylated histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9). Importantly, occupancy of SIRT3 onto cccDNA could increase the recruitment of histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 to cccDNA and decrease recruitment of SETD1A, leading to a marked increase of H3K9me3 and a decrease of H3K4me3 on cccDNA. Moreover, SIRT3-mediated HBV cccDNA transcriptional repression involved decreased binding of host RNA polymerase II and transcription factor YY1 to cccDNA. Finally, viral protein HBx could relieve SIRT3-mediated cccDNA transcriptional repression by inhibiting both SIRT3 expression and its recruitment to cccDNA. SIRT3 is a novel host factor epigenetically restricting HBV cccDNA transcription by acting cooperatively with histone methyltransferase. These data provided a rational for the use of SIRT3 activators in the prevention or treatment of HBV infection. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  8. Ddx19 links mRNA nuclear export with progression of transcription and replication and suppresses genomic instability upon DNA damage in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodroj, Dana; Serhal, Kamar; Maiorano, Domenico

    2017-09-03

    The DEAD-box Helicase 19 (Ddx19) gene codes for an RNA helicase involved in both mRNA (mRNA) export from the nucleus into the cytoplasm and in mRNA translation. In unperturbed cells, Ddx19 localizes in the cytoplasm and at the cytoplasmic face of the nuclear pore. Here we review recent findings related to an additional Ddx19 function in the nucleus in resolving RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops) generated during collision between transcription and replication, and upon DNA damage. Activation of a DNA damage response pathway dependent upon the ATR kinase, a major regulator of replication fork progression, stimulates translocation of the Ddx19 protein from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. Only nuclear Ddx19 is competent to resolve R-loops, and down regulation of Ddx19 expression induces DNA double strand breaks only in proliferating cells. Overall these observations put forward Ddx19 as an important novel mediator of the crosstalk between transcription and replication.

  9. Conserved XPB Core Structure and Motifs for DNA Unwinding:Implications for Pathway Selection of Transcription or ExcisionRepair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Li; Arval, Andrew S.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Iwai, Shigenori; Hanaoka, Fumio; Tainer, John A.

    2005-04-01

    The human xeroderma pigmentosum group B (XPB) helicase is essential for transcription, nucleotide excision repair, and TFIIH functional assembly. Here, we determined crystal structures of an Archaeoglobus fulgidus XPB homolog (AfXPB) that characterize two RecA-like XPB helicase domains and discover a DNA damage recognition domain (DRD), a unique RED motif, a flexible thumb motif (ThM), and implied conformational changes within a conserved functional core. RED motif mutations dramatically reduce helicase activity, and the DRD and ThM, which flank the RED motif, appear structurally as well as functionally analogous to the MutS mismatch recognition and DNA polymerase thumb domains. Substrate specificity is altered by DNA damage, such that AfXPB unwinds dsDNA with 3' extensions, but not blunt-ended dsDNA, unless it contains a lesion, as shown for CPD or (6-4) photoproducts. Together, these results provide an unexpected mechanism of DNA unwinding with Implications for XPB damage verification in nucleotide excision repair.

  10. Regulation of human histone gene expression: transcriptional and posttranscriptional control in the coupling of histone messenger RNA stability with DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumbach, L.L.; Stein, G.S.; Stein, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    The extent to which transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation contributes to the coupling of histone gene expression and DNA replication was examined during the cell cycle in synchronized HeLa S3 cells. Rates of transcription were determined in vitro in isolated nuclei. A 3-5-fold increase in cell cycle dependent histone gene transcription was observed in early S phase, prior to the peak of DNA synthesis. This result is consistent with a previous determination of histone mRNA synthesis in intact cells. The transcription of these genes did not change appreciably after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment, although Northern blot analysis indicated that cellular levels of histone mRNA decreased rapidly in the presence of the drug. Total cellular levels of histone mRNA closely parallel the rate of DNA synthesis as a function of cell cycle progression, reaching a maximal 20-fold increase as compared with non S phase levels. This DNA synthesis dependent accumulation of histone mRNA occurs predominantly in the cytoplasm and appears to be mediated primarily by control of histone mRNA stability. Changes in nuclear histone mRNA levels were less pronounced. These combined observations suggest that both transcriptional regulation and posttranscriptional regulation contribute toward control of the cell cycle dependent accumulation of histone mRNA during S phase, while the stability of histone mRNA throughout S phase and the selective turnover of histone mRNAs, either at the natural termination of S phase or following inhibition of DNA synthesis, are posttranscriptionally regulated

  11. The absence of caffeine inhibition of post-replication repair in excision deficient strains of Escherichia coli B and K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulley, C.M.; Johnson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of caffeine on postreplication repair, as seen in alkaline sucrose gradients, conjugation, and ultraviolet light (UV) survival, was studied in excision deficient strains of Escherichia coli K12 and B. A caffeine concentration of 2 mg/ml was chosen for the study which did not inhibit colony formation. Both E. coli K12 AB2500 and E. coli B WWP2 were more sensitive to UV when plated on caffeine plates. Conjugation was not inhibited in the E. coli K12 strain; however, the same procedure confirmed caffeine inhibition in the E. coli B strain. Caffeine did not inhibit postreplication repair in either strain, as determined by sedimentation profile studies of DNA on alkaline sucrose gradients. No strand breakage or degradation was observed in parental or post-UV replicated DNA for as long as 50 min incubation in caffeine. Thus caffeine concentrations that inhibited two recA gene product related phenomena did not cause immediate changes in size of DNA or inhibit the rate of a DNA gap generating postreplication type of DNA repair

  12. Homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 compete for binding to the same site on PCNA: a potential mechanism to co-ordinate DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warbrick, E; Lane, D P; Glover, D M; Cox, L S

    1997-05-15

    Following genomic damage, the cessation of DNA replication is co-ordinated with onset of DNA repair; this co-ordination is essential to avoid mutation and genomic instability. To investigate these phenomena, we have analysed proteins that interact with PCNA, which is required for both DNA replication and repair. One such protein is p21Cip1, which inhibits DNA replication through its interaction with PCNA, while allowing repair to continue. We have identified an interaction between PCNA and the structure specific nuclease, Fen1, which is involved in DNA replication. Deletion analysis suggests that p21Cip1 and Fen1 bind to the same region of PCNA. Within Fen1 and its homologues a small region (10 amino acids) is sufficient for PCNA binding, which contains an 8 amino acid conserved PCNA-binding motif. This motif shares critical residues with the PCNA-binding region of p21Cip1. A PCNA binding peptide from p21Cip1 competes with Fen1 peptides for binding to PCNA, disrupts the Fen1-PCNA complex in replicating cell extracts, and concomitantly inhibits DNA synthesis. Competition between homologous regions of Fen1 and p21Cip1 for binding to the same site on PCNA may provide a mechanism to co-ordinate the functions of PCNA in DNA replication and repair.

  13. Disruption of Runx1 and Runx3 Leads to Bone Marrow Failure and Leukemia Predisposition due to Transcriptional and DNA Repair Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsia Qiuxia Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The RUNX genes encode transcription factors involved in development and human disease. RUNX1 and RUNX3 are frequently associated with leukemias, yet the basis for their involvement in leukemogenesis is not fully understood. Here, we show that Runx1;Runx3 double-knockout (DKO mice exhibited lethal phenotypes due to bone marrow failure and myeloproliferative disorder. These contradictory clinical manifestations are reminiscent of human inherited bone marrow failure syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA, caused by defective DNA repair. Indeed, Runx1;Runx3 DKO cells showed mitomycin C hypersensitivity, due to impairment of monoubiquitinated-FANCD2 recruitment to DNA damage foci, although FANCD2 monoubiquitination in the FA pathway was unaffected. RUNX1 and RUNX3 interact with FANCD2 independently of CBFβ, suggesting a nontranscriptional role for RUNX in DNA repair. These findings suggest that RUNX dysfunction causes DNA repair defect, besides transcriptional misregulation, and promotes the development of leukemias and other cancers.

  14. Effect of exposure to 2.45 GHz microwave on DNA repair genes transcription in cultured cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrin, A.; Bachelet, C.; Fournier, C.; Peinnequin, A.; Leveque, P.; Collin, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, in vitro, the effect of 2.45 GHz continuous (C.W.) and pulsed (P.W.) electromagnetic field exposure combined with a known mutagen on the induction of enzymes implicated in the DNA repair pathway. Microwaves do not create bonds breaks within molecules and there is no clear hypothesis for a possible mechanism supporting a biological action. Nevertheless, an indirect influence of microwaves during an intermediary step of the complex sequence of events involved in mutagenesis cannot yet be excluded. Highly sensitive real-time R.T.q.P.C.R. was used to monitor transcriptional variations of DNA repair genes. The experiments were carried out using the monocyte human cell line T.H.P.1 with the genotoxic compound 4- nitro-quinoline-N-oxide (4-N.Q.O.). The carrier frequency was 2.45 GHz C.W. and P.W. (1 khz repetition time, 10 % duty cycle) with the same power density corresponding to an average specific absorption rate (S.A.R.) value of 0.19 W/kg in the biological samples. Non exposed (sham) and exposed (P.W. and C.W.) cell culture plates were incubated simultaneously in three identical incubators in the presence of 4-N.Q.O., under shaking, at 37 Celsius degrees. Specially designed incubators were integrated in three identical anechoic chambers equipped with waveguide antennas. Care was taken to increase the reproducibility of the experiments and to avoid false positive or misinterpretation of the results. The presence or the absence of the electromagnetic field was the only difference between the sham and exposed assays. The different exposure conditions were applied alternatively in the three anechoic chambers in order to avoid cage effects. The temperature inside the cell plates was measured with an optic fiber probe (Luxtron). Numerical dosimetry was calculated using the Finite Difference Time Domain method. A time-scaled form of the heat transfer equation allowed to calculate the temperature distribution inside the petri dishes

  15. MGMT DNA repair gene promoter/enhancer haplotypes alter transcription factor binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meixiang; Cross, Courtney E; Speidel, Jordan T; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2016-10-01

    The O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) protein removes O 6 -alkyl-guanine adducts from DNA. MGMT expression can thus alter the sensitivity of cells and tissues to environmental and chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. Previously, we defined the haplotype structure encompassing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the MGMT promoter/enhancer (P/E) region and found that haplotypes, rather than individual SNPs, alter MGMT promoter activity. The exact mechanism(s) by which these haplotypes exert their effect on MGMT promoter activity is currently unknown, but we noted that many of the SNPs comprising the MGMT P/E haplotypes are located within or in close proximity to putative transcription factor binding sites. Thus, these haplotypes could potentially affect transcription factor binding and, subsequently, alter MGMT promoter activity. In this study, we test the hypothesis that MGMT P/E haplotypes affect MGMT promoter activity by altering transcription factor (TF) binding to the P/E region. We used a promoter binding TF profiling array and a reporter assay to evaluate the effect of different P/E haplotypes on TF binding and MGMT expression, respectively. Our data revealed a significant difference in TF binding profiles between the different haplotypes evaluated. We identified TFs that consistently showed significant haplotype-dependent binding alterations (p ≤ 0.01) and revealed their role in regulating MGMT expression using siRNAs and a dual-luciferase reporter assay system. The data generated support our hypothesis that promoter haplotypes alter the binding of TFs to the MGMT P/E and, subsequently, affect their regulatory function on MGMT promoter activity and expression level.

  16. PRMT5 restricts hepatitis B virus replication through epigenetic repression of covalently closed circular DNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Jieliang; Wu, Min; Zhang, Xiaonan; Zhang, Min; Yue, Lei; Li, Yaming; Liu, Jiangxia; Li, Baocun; Shen, Fang; Wang, Yang; Bai, Lu; Protzer, Ulrike; Levrero, Massimo; Yuan, Zhenghong

    2017-08-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. The covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) minichromosome, which serves as the template for the transcription of viral RNAs, plays a key role in viral persistence. While accumulating evidence suggests that cccDNA transcription is regulated by epigenetic machinery, particularly the acetylation of cccDNA-bound histone 3 (H3) and H4, the potential contributions of histone methylation and related host factors remain obscure. Here, by screening a series of methyltransferases and demethylases, we identified protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) as an effective restrictor of HBV transcription and replication. In cell culture-based models for HBV infection and in liver tissues of patients with chronic HBV infection, we found that symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on cccDNA was a repressive marker of cccDNA transcription and was regulated by PRMT5 depending on its methyltransferase domain. Moreover, PRMT5-triggered symmetric dimethylation of arginine 3 on H4 on the cccDNA minichromosome involved an interaction with the HBV core protein and the Brg1-based human SWI/SNF chromatin remodeler, which resulted in down-regulation of the binding of RNA polymerase II to cccDNA. In addition to the inhibitory effect on cccDNA transcription, PRMT5 inhibited HBV core particle DNA production independently of its methyltransferase activity. Further study revealed that PRMT5 interfered with pregenomic RNA encapsidation by preventing its interaction with viral polymerase protein through binding to the reverse transcriptase-ribonuclease H region of polymerase, which is crucial for the polymerase-pregenomic RNA interaction. PRMT5 restricts HBV replication through a two-part mechanism including epigenetic suppression of cccDNA transcription and interference with pregenomic RNA encapsidation; these findings improve the understanding of epigenetic regulation of HBV transcription and host

  17. Codon and amino acid usage in two major human pathogens of genus Bartonella--optimization between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control and cost minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sabyasachi; Paul, Sandip; Chatterjee, Sanjib; Dutta, Chitra

    2005-01-01

    Intra-genomic variation in synonymous codon and amino acid usage in two human pathogens Bartonella henselae and B. quintana has been carried out through multivariate analysis. Asymmetric mutational bias, coupled with replicational-transcriptional selection, has been identified as the prime selection force behind synonymous codon selection--a characteristic of the genus Bartonella, not exhibited by any other alpha-proteobacterial genome. Distinct codon usage patterns and low synonymous divergence values between orthologous sequences of highly expressed genes from the two Bartonella species indicate that there exists a residual intra-strand synonymous codon bias in the highly expressed genes, possibly operating at the level of translation. In the case of amino acid usage, the mean hydropathy level and aromaticity are the major sources of variation, both having nearly equal impact, while strand-specific mutational pressure and gene expressivity strongly influence the inter-strand variations. In both species under study, the highly expressed gene products tend not to contain heavy and/or aromatic residues, following the cost-minimization hypothesis in spite of their intracellular lifestyle. The codon and amino acid usage in these two human pathogens are, therefore, consequences of a complex balance between replicational-transcriptional selection, translational control, protein hydropathy and cost minimization.

  18. DNA-Binding Properties of African Swine Fever Virus pA104R, a Histone-Like Protein Involved in Viral Replication and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frouco, Gonçalo; Freitas, Ferdinando B; Coelho, João; Leitão, Alexandre; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2017-06-15

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) codes for a putative histone-like protein (pA104R) with extensive sequence homology to bacterial proteins that are implicated in genome replication and packaging. Functional characterization of purified recombinant pA104R revealed that it binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) over a wide range of temperatures, pH values, and salt concentrations and in an ATP-independent manner, with an estimated binding site size of about 14 to 16 nucleotides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the arginine located in pA104R's DNA-binding domain, at position 69, was found to be relevant for efficient DNA-binding activity. Together, pA104R and ASFV topoisomerase II (pP1192R) display DNA-supercoiling activity, although none of the proteins by themselves do, indicating that the two cooperate in this process. In ASFV-infected cells, A104R transcripts were detected from 2 h postinfection (hpi) onward, reaching a maximum concentration around 16 hpi. pA104R was detected from 12 hpi onward, localizing with viral DNA replication sites and being found exclusively in the Triton-insoluble fraction. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown experiments revealed that pA104R plays a critical role in viral DNA replication and gene expression, with transfected cells showing lower viral progeny numbers (up to a reduction of 82.0%), lower copy numbers of viral genomes (-78.3%), and reduced transcription of a late viral gene (-47.6%). Taken together, our results strongly suggest that pA104R participates in the modulation of viral DNA topology, probably being involved in viral DNA replication, transcription, and packaging, emphasizing that ASFV mutants lacking the A104R gene could be used as a strategy to develop a vaccine against ASFV. IMPORTANCE Recently reintroduced in Europe, African swine fever virus (ASFV) causes a fatal disease in domestic pigs, causing high economic losses in affected countries, as no vaccine or treatment is currently

  19. Cellular corepressor TLE2 inhibits replication-and-transcription- activator-mediated transactivation and lytic reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiheng; Liu, Yunhua; Liang, Deguang; Wang, Zhuo; Robertson, Erle S; Lan, Ke

    2010-02-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is essential and sufficient to initiate lytic reactivation. RTA activates its target genes through direct binding with high affinity to its responsive elements or by interaction with cellular factors, such as RBP-Jkappa, Ap-1, C/EBP-alpha, and Oct-1. In this study, we identified transducin-like enhancer of split 2 (TLE2) as a novel RTA binding protein by using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human spleen cDNA library. The interaction between TLE2 and RTA was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) binding and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that TLE2 and RTA were colocalized in the same nuclear compartment in KSHV-infected cells. This interaction recruited TLE2 to RTA bound to its recognition sites on DNA and repressed RTA auto-activation and transactivation activity. Moreover, TLE2 also inhibited the induction of lytic replication and virion production driven by RTA. We further showed that the Q (Gln-rich), SP (Ser-Pro-rich), and WDR (Trp-Asp repeat) domains of TLE2 and the Pro-rich domain of RTA were essential for this interaction. RBP-Jkappa has been shown previously to bind to the same Pro-rich domain of RTA, and this binding can be subject to competition by TLE2. In addition, TLE2 can form a complex with RTA to access the cognate DNA sequence of the RTA-responsive element at different promoters. Intriguingly, the transcription level of TLE2 could be upregulated by RTA during the lytic reactivation process. In conclusion, we identified a new RTA binding protein, TLE2, and demonstrated that TLE2 inhibited replication and transactivation mediated by RTA. This provides another potentially important mechanism for maintenance of KSHV viral latency through interaction with a host protein.

  20. Enhanced radiosensitivity of cultured fibroblasts from ataxia telangiectasia heterozygotes manifested by defective colony-forming ability and reduced DNA repair replication after hypoxic γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, M.C.; Anderson, A.K.; Smith, B.P.; Smith, P.J.

    1979-01-01

    We have measured the sensitivity to γ-ray inactivation of diploid skin fibroblasts cultured from 10 persons in four families with ataxia telangiectasia (AT). Persons heterozygous for AT, including parents of afflicted patients, are not as yet detectable by any specific clinical or laboratory marker but are believed to constitute a substantial portion of the middle-aged cancer population. In one AT family, fibroblast strains from both parents exhibited a colony-forming ability after hypoxic irradiation which was intermediate between that displayed by five control strains from normal children and that from the affected child. In the remaining three families, cultures from only one parent were available; one parental strain displayed an intermediate survival capacity as above, whereas the other two responded normally. The homozygous recessive strains from the five afflicted children in the four families were all equally hypersensitive to hypoxic γ-ray inactivation. The three presumed AT heterozygous strains that displayed intermediate rayiosensitivity also carried out γ-rad-induced DNA repair replication to an extent intermediate between those in normals and AT homozygotes. These findings suggest that a numerically significant, cancer-prone subpopulation of humans carrying one normal and one abnormal AT gene may also be moderately sensitive to lethal effects of hypoxic γ-rays due to a defect in the enzymatic repair of DNA

  1. Decreased transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair capacity is associated with increased p53- and MLH1-independent apoptosis in response to cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Jennifer M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most commonly used classes of anti-cancer drugs presently in clinical practice is the platinum-based drugs, including cisplatin. The efficacy of cisplatin therapy is often limited by the emergence of resistant tumours following treatment. Cisplatin resistance is multi-factorial but can be associated with increased DNA repair capacity, mutations in p53 or loss of DNA mismatch repair capacity. Methods RNA interference (RNAi was used to reduce the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER capacity of several prostate and colorectal carcinoma cell lines with specific defects in p53 and/or DNA mismatch repair. The effect of small inhibitory RNAs designed to target the CSB (Cockayne syndrome group B transcript on TC-NER and the sensitivity of cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis was determined. Results These prostate and colon cancer cell lines were initially TC-NER proficient and RNAi against CSB significantly reduced their DNA repair capacity. Decreased TC-NER capacity was associated with an increase in the sensitivity of tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis, even in p53 null and DNA mismatch repair-deficient cell lines. Conclusion The present work indicates that CSB and TC-NER play a prominent role in determining the sensitivity of tumour cells to cisplatin even in the absence of p53 and DNA mismatch repair. These results further suggest that CSB represents a potential target for cancer therapy that may be important to overcome resistance to cisplatin in the clinic.

  2. Roles of Rad51 protein in homologous recombination in mammalian cells: relation with repair, replication and cell cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, S.

    2001-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a fundamental process, allowing a faithful repair. In mammalian, MmRAD51, which is the homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ScRAD51 key protein for HR, is an essential gene. This work is based on the characterisation of viable hyper and hypo-recombinant cell lines specifically affected in the Rad51 pathway. By expressing wild type and dominant negative forms of MmRad51, we demonstrated that Rad51 pathway participates to the repair by HR to induced DNA damages. However, inhibition of the Rad 51 pathway does not affect cell viability, spontaneously or after irradiation, whereas, radiation induced HR is inhibited. In the presence of DNA damages during late S and G2/M phase, inhibition of Rad51 pathway induced chromosomal aberrations, leading to a transient arrest in mitosis. This arrest is associated with an increased of cell death. However, a fraction of cells can escape from this transient arrest by forming tetraploid cells, associated with an absence of chromalid separation. Thus, in response to impaired Rad51 pathway, mitotic checkpoints seems to play an essential role. In line with this, we showed that the essential function of Rad51 is p53-dependent, which is in agreement with the role of p53 in tetraploidy inhibition. Our results suggest that the Rad51 protein could participate to the control of mitotic checkpoints and thus to the maintenance of genetic stability. This function could involve other Rad51 partners such as the tumour suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and p53. (author) [fr

  3. Dynamic regulation of genes involved in mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription during mouse brown fat cell differentiation and recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murholm, Maria; Dixen, Karen; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brown adipocytes are specialised in dissipating energy through adaptive thermogenesis, whereas white adipocytes are specialised in energy storage. These essentially opposite functions are possible for two reasons relating to mitochondria, namely expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1...... and brown fat, brown adipose tissue fractions and in selected adipose tissues during cold exposure. We find a massive induction of the majority of such genes during brown adipocyte differentiation and recruitment, e.g. of the mitochondrial transcription factors A (Tfam) and B2 (Tfb2m), whereas only a subset...

  4. Drosophila S2 cells are non-permissive for vaccinia virus DNA replication following entry via low pH-dependent endocytosis and early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zain Bengali

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV, a member of the chordopox subfamily of the Poxviridae, abortively infects insect cells. We have investigated VACV infection of Drosophila S2 cells, which are useful for protein expression and genome-wide RNAi screening. Biochemical and electron microscopic analyses indicated that VACV entry into Drosophila S2 cells depended on the VACV multiprotein entry-fusion complex but appeared to occur exclusively by a low pH-dependent endocytic mechanism, in contrast to both neutral and low pH entry pathways used in mammalian cells. Deep RNA sequencing revealed that the entire VACV early transcriptome, comprising 118 open reading frames, was robustly expressed but neither intermediate nor late mRNAs were made. Nor was viral late protein synthesis or inhibition of host protein synthesis detected by pulse-labeling with radioactive amino acids. Some reduction in viral early proteins was noted by Western blotting. Nevertheless, synthesis of the multitude of early proteins needed for intermediate gene expression was demonstrated by transfection of a plasmid containing a reporter gene regulated by an intermediate promoter. In addition, expression of a reporter gene with a late promoter was achieved by cotransfection of intermediate genes encoding the late transcription factors. The requirement for transfection of DNA templates for intermediate and late gene expression indicated a defect in viral genome replication in VACV-infected S2 cells, which was confirmed by direct analysis. Furthermore, VACV-infected S2 cells did not support the replication of a transfected plasmid, which occurs in mammalian cells and is dependent on all known viral replication proteins, indicating a primary restriction of DNA synthesis.

  5. DNA replication and the repair of DNA strand breaks in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Terminal report, August 1, 1978-March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, E.N.; Evans, T.E.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclei isolated from Physarum are able to replicate approximately 15% of the total genome in a manner which is qualitatively similar to the DNA replication process occurring in the intact organism. Such nuclei, however, are defective in the joining of Okazaki intermediates in vitro. Two DNA polymerase species, isolated from nuclei or intact plasmodia of this organism, can be separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Total DNA polymerase activity is low in nuclei isolated during mitosis. A heat-stable glycoprotein material present in aqueous nuclear extracts stimulates DNA synthesis in well-washed nuclei. A sub-nuclear preparation active in DNA synthesis in vitro has been obtained from isolated nuclei of Physarum. Radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks are rejoined in intact plasmodia and isolated nuclei of Physarum in a cell cycle-dependent manner. This phenomenon does not appear to be due to an intrinsic difference in nuclear DNA endonuclease activity at different times of the mitotic cycle. DNA strand breaks and repair induced by the carcinogen 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide is similar in several respects to that resulting from exposure of the organism to ionizing radiation. Temperature sensitive strains of Physarum have been constructed and preliminary genetical and biochemical characterizations have been carried out. Two of the strains appear to be conditionally defective in DNA metabolism. An isogenic ploidal series of amoebae has been prepared and characterized as to uv and ionizing radiation sensitivity (in terms of cell survival). There is a direct relationship between ploidy and resistance to uv whereas ploidal change does not appear to affect the response to ionizing radiation

  6. The lytic origin of herpesvirus papio is highly homologous to Epstein-Barr virus ori-Lyt: evolutionary conservation of transcriptional activation and replication signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryon, J J; Fixman, E D; Houchens, C; Zong, J; Lieberman, P M; Chang, Y N; Hayward, G S; Hayward, S D

    1993-01-01

    Herpesvirus papio (HVP) is a B-lymphotropic baboon virus with an estimated 40% homology to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We have cloned and sequenced ori-Lyt of herpesvirus papio and found a striking degree of nucleotide homology (89%) with ori-Lyt of EBV. Transcriptional elements form an integral part of EBV ori-Lyt. The promoter and enhancer domains of EBV ori-Lyt are conserved in herpesvirus papio. The EBV ori-Lyt promoter contains four binding sites for the EBV lytic cycle transactivator Zta, and the enhancer includes one Zta and two Rta response elements. All five of the Zta response elements and one of the Rta motifs are conserved in HVP ori-Lyt, and the HVP DS-L leftward promoter and the enhancer were activated in transient transfection assays by the EBV Zta and Rta transactivators. The EBV ori-Lyt enhancer contains a palindromic sequence, GGTCAGCTGACC, centered on a PvuII restriction site. This sequence, with a single base change, is also present in the HVP ori-Lyt enhancer. DNase I footprinting demonstrated that the PvuII sequence was bound by a protein present in a Raji nuclear extract. Mobility shift and competition assays using oligonucleotide probes identified this sequence as a binding site for the cellular transcription factor MLTF. Mutagenesis of the binding site indicated that MLTF contributes significantly to the constitutive activity of the ori-Lyt enhancer. The high degree of conservation of cis-acting signal sequences in HVP ori-Lyt was further emphasized by the finding that an HVP ori-Lyt-containing plasmid was replicated in Vero cells by a set of cotransfected EBV replication genes. The central domain of EBV ori-Lyt contains two related AT-rich palindromes, one of which is partially duplicated in the HVP sequence. The AT-rich palindromes are functionally important cis-acting motifs. Deletion of these palindromes severely diminished replication of an ori-Lyt target plasmid. Images PMID:8389916

  7. Stimulation of pancreatic beta-cell replication by incretins involves transcriptional induction of cyclin D1 via multiple signalling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedrichsen, Birgitte N; Neubauer, Nicole; Lee, Ying C

    2006-01-01

    pathways leading to mitosis by incretins and cytokines, respectively. The response to both GLP-1 and GIP was completely blocked by the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89. In addition, the phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor wortmannin and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor...... and we have previously demonstrated hGH-induced cyclin D2 expression in the insulinoma cell line, INS-1. GLP-1 time-dependently induced the cyclin D1 mRNA and protein levels in INS-1E, whereas the cyclin D2 levels were unaffected. However, minor effect of GLP-1 stimulation was observed on the cyclin D3 m......RNA levels. Transient transfection of a cyclin D1 promoter-luciferase reporter construct into islet monolayer cells or INS-1 cells revealed approximately a 2-3 fold increase of transcriptional activity in response to GLP-1 and GIP, and a 4-7 fold increase in response to forskolin. However, treatment...

  8. DNA replication and the repair of DNA strand breaks in nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Progress report, September 1, 1977--July 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, E.N.; Nygaard, O.F.; Kuncio, G.

    1978-01-01

    Isolated nuclei and intact plasmodia of Physarum contain a heat-stable stimulator of nuclear DNA replication. This substance has been purified extensively and found to contain both protein and carbohydrate. The molecular weight, estimated by gel filtration, is ca. 30,000 d. The purified material does not exhibit DNA polymerase or DNase activity, and does not stimulate DNA polymerase activity per se. In the presence of the stimulatory factor, DNA chain elongation occurs at an elevated rate, and continues for a longer time than in its absence, but G 2 nuclei are not stimulated to initiate DNA synthesis. Double-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of irradiated plasmodia are repaired in vitro to a greater extent following nuclear isolation during G 2 , and the DNA of unirradiated plasmodia is less susceptible to double-strand breakage during cell-free nuclear incubation, than is the DNA of S-phase nuclei. This correlation suggests a common basis for both observations, for example an increase in deoxyribonuclease activity or a decrease in DNA ligase activity during the S period. This, in turn, may account for the cell cycle-dependent sensitivity of this organism, in terms of mitotic delay, to ionizing radiation

  9. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  10. A human homolog of the yeast nucleotide excision repair gene MMS19 interacts with transcription repair factor TFIIH through the XPB and XPD helicases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Seroz; G.S. Winkler (Sebastiaan); J. Auriol; R.A. Verhage; W. Vermeulen (Wim); B. Smit (Bep); J. Brouwer (Jaap); A.P.M. Eker (André); G. Weeda (Geert); J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide excision repair (NER) removes UV-induced photoproducts and numerous other DNA lesions in a highly conserved 'cut-and-paste' reaction that involves approximately 25 core components. In addition, several other proteins have been identified which are dispensable for NER in vitro

  11. Engagement of Components of DNA-Break Repair Complex and NFκB in Hsp70A1A Transcription Upregulation by Heat Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Joyita; Mukherjee, Pooja; Ali, Asif; Poddar, Soumita; Pal, Mahadeb

    2017-01-01

    An involvement of components of DNA-break repair (DBR) complex including DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) in transcription regulation in response to distinct cellular signalling has been revealed by different laboratories. Here, we explored the involvement of DNA-PK and PARP-1 in the heat shock induced transcription of Hsp70A1A. We find that inhibition of both the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKc), and Ku70, a regulatory subunit of DNA-PK holo-enzyme compromises transcription of Hsp70A1A under heat shock treatment. In immunoprecipitation based experiments we find that Ku70 or DNA-PK holoenzyme associates with NFκB. This NFκB associated complex also carries PARP-1. Downregulation of both NFκB and PARP-1 compromises Hsp70A1A transcription induced by heat shock treatment. Alteration of three bases by site directed mutagenesis within the consensus κB sequence motif identified on the promoter affected inducibility of Hsp70A1A transcription by heat shock treatment. These results suggest that NFκB engaged with the κB motif on the promoter cooperates in Hsp70A1A activation under heat shock in human cells as part of a DBR complex including DNA-PK and PARP-1.

  12. Fanconi anaemia and the repair of Watson and Crick DNA crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottemann, Molly C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2013-01-17

    The function of Fanconi anaemia proteins is to maintain genomic stability. Their main role is in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks, which, by covalently binding the Watson and the Crick strands of DNA, impede replication and transcription. Inappropriate repair of interstrand crosslinks causes genomic instability, leading to cancer; conversely, the toxicity of crosslinking agents makes them a powerful chemotherapeutic. Fanconi anaemia proteins can promote stem-cell function, prevent tumorigenesis, stabilize replication forks and inhibit inaccurate repair. Recent advances have identified endogenous aldehydes as possible culprits of DNA damage that may induce the phenotypes seen in patients with Fanconi anaemia.

  13. Repair-modification of radiodamaged genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpe, P.; Institute of Experimental Medicine, Rome; Eremenko, T.

    1995-01-01

    It is proposed that through repair-modification, the modified base 5mC may have facilitated the divergent evolution of coding (hypomethylated exon) and uncoding (hypermethylated promoter and intron) sequences in eukaryotic genes. The radioinduced repair patches appearing in regions lacking 5mC are fully reconstructed by excision-repair, whereas those appearing in regions containing 5mC are incompletely reconstructed by this conventional mechanism. Such a second class of repair patches may, however, become fully reconstructed, in the S phase, by repair-modification. In fact, while DNA polymerase β - which is a key enzyme of excision-repair - is active through the whole interphase. DNA methylase - which is responsible for post-synthetic DNA modification - is essentially active in S. Uncoupling of these two enzyme systems, outside S, might explain why in unsynchronised cells repair patches of non-replicating strands are hypomethylated when compared with specific methylation of replicating strands. In other words, excision-repair would always be able to re-establish the primary ATGC language of both damaged unmethylated and methylated regions, while repair-modification would be able to re-establish the modified ATGC(5mC) language of the damaged methylated regions, only in S, but not in G 1 or G 2 . In these two phases, when DNA methylation is inversely correlated with pre-mRNA transcription (as in the case of many tissue-specific genes), such demethylation might induce a silent transcriptional unit to become active. (Author)

  14. Contribution of transcription-coupled DNA repair to MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strains deficient in functional AlkB protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrzesiński, Michał; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Sikora, Anna; Mielecki, Damian; Chojnacka, Aleksandra; Kozłowski, Marek; Krwawicz, Joanna; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta

    2010-06-01

    In Escherichia coli the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) induces defense systems (adaptive and SOS responses), DNA repair pathways, and mutagenesis. We have previously found that AlkB protein induced as part of the adaptive (Ada) response protects cells from the genotoxic and mutagenic activity of MMS. AlkB is a non-heme iron (II), alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase that oxidatively demethylates 1meA and 3meC lesions in DNA, with recovery of A and C. Here, we studied the impact of transcription-coupled DNA repair (TCR) on MMS-induced mutagenesis in E. coli strain deficient in functional AlkB protein. Measuring the decline in the frequency of MMS-induced argE3-->Arg(+) revertants under transient amino acid starvation (conditions for TCR induction), we have found a less effective TCR in the BS87 (alkB(-)) strain in comparison with the AB1157 (alkB(+)) counterpart. Mutation in the mfd gene encoding the transcription-repair coupling factor Mfd, resulted in weaker TCR in MMS-treated and starved AB1157 mfd-1 cells in comparison to AB1157 mfd(+), and no repair in BS87 mfd(-) cells. Determination of specificity of Arg(+) revertants allowed to conclude that MMS-induced 1meA and 3meC lesions, unrepaired in bacteria deficient in AlkB, are the source of mutations. These include AT-->TA transversions by supL suppressor formation (1meA) and GC-->AT transitions by supB or supE(oc) formation (3meC). The repair of these lesions is partly Mfd-dependent in the AB1157 mfd-1 and totally Mfd-dependent in the BS87 mfd-1 strain. The nucleotide sequence of the mfd-1 allele shows that the mutated Mfd-1 protein, deprived of the C-terminal translocase domain, is unable to initiate TCR. It strongly enhances the SOS response in the alkB(-)mfd(-) bacteria but not in the alkB(+)mfd(-) counterpart. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functional characterization of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus late gene transcription and genome replication factors in the non-permissive insect cell line SF-21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berretta, Marcelo F.; Deshpande, Mandar; Crouch, Erin A.; Passarelli, A. Lorena

    2006-01-01

    We compared the abilities of late gene transcription and DNA replication machineries of the baculoviruses Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori NPV (BmNPV) in SF-21 cells, an insect-derived cell line permissive for AcMNPV infection. It has been well established that 19 AcMNPV late expression factors (lefs) stimulate substantial levels of late gene promoter activity in SF-21 cells. Thus, we constructed a set of clones containing the BmNPV homologs of the AcMNPV lefs under control of the constitutive Drosophila heat shock 70 protein promoter and tested their ability to activate an AcMNPV late promoter-reporter gene cassette in SF-21 cells. We tested the potential of individual or predicted functional groups of BmNPV lefs to successfully replace the corresponding AcMNPV gene(s) in transient late gene expression assays. We found that most, but not all, BmNPV lefs were able to either fully or partially substitute for the corresponding AcMNPV homolog in the context of the remaining AcMNPV lefs with the exception of BmNPV p143, ie-2, and p35. BmNPV p143 was unable to support late gene expression or be imported into the nucleus of cells in the presence of the AcMNPV or the BmNPV LEF-3, a P143 nuclear shuttling factor. Our results suggest that host-specific factors may affect the function of homologous proteins

  16. Transcriptional profiling reveals molecular signatures associated with HIV permissiveness in Th1Th17 cells and identifies Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma as an intrinsic negative regulator of viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that primary Th1Th17 cells are highly permissive to HIV-1, whereas Th1 cells are relatively resistant. Molecular mechanisms underlying these differences remain unknown. Results Exposure to replication competent and single-round VSV-G pseudotyped HIV strains provide evidence that superior HIV replication in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells was regulated by mechanisms located at entry and post-entry levels. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling identified transcripts upregulated (n = 264) and downregulated (n = 235) in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells (p-value Th17 (nuclear receptors, trafficking, p38/MAPK, NF-κB, p53/Ras, IL-23) vs. Th1 cells (proteasome, interferon α/β). Differentially expressed genes were classified into biological categories using Gene Ontology. Th1Th17 cells expressed typical Th17 markers (IL-17A/F, IL-22, CCL20, RORC, IL-26, IL-23R, CCR6) and transcripts functionally linked to regulating cell trafficking (CEACAM1, MCAM), activation (CD28, CD40LG, TNFSF13B, TNFSF25, PTPN13, MAP3K4, LTB, CTSH), transcription (PPARγ, RUNX1, ATF5, ARNTL), apoptosis (FASLG), and HIV infection (CXCR6, FURIN). Differential expression of CXCR6, PPARγ, ARNTL, PTPN13, MAP3K4, CTSH, SERPINB6, PTK2, and ISG20 was validated by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and/or confocal microscopy. The nuclear receptor PPARγ was preferentially expressed by Th1Th17 cells. PPARγ RNA interference significantly increased HIV replication at levels post-entry and prior HIV-DNA integration. Finally, the activation of PPARγ pathway via the agonist Rosiglitazone induced the nuclear translocation of PPARγ and a robust inhibition of viral replication. Conclusions Thus, transcriptional profiling in Th1Th17 vs. Th1 cells demonstrated that HIV permissiveness is associated with a superior state of cellular activation and limited antiviral properties and identified PPARγ as an intrinsic negative regulator of viral replication. Therefore, triggering PPARγ pathway via non

  17. The Canonical Immediate Early 3 Gene Product pIE611 of Mouse Cytomegalovirus Is Dispensable for Viral Replication but Mediates Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Viral Gene Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattay, Stephanie; Trilling, Mirko; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Hengel, Hartmut; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh

    2015-08-01

    Transcription of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate early ie1 and ie3 is controlled by the major immediate early promoter/enhancer (MIEP) and requires differential splicing. Based on complete loss of genome replication of an MCMV mutant carrying a deletion of the ie3-specific exon 5, the multifunctional IE3 protein (611 amino acids; pIE611) is considered essential for viral replication. Our analysis of ie3 transcription resulted in the identification of novel ie3 isoforms derived from alternatively spliced ie3 transcripts. Construction of an IE3-hemagglutinin (IE3-HA) virus by insertion of an in-frame HA epitope sequence allowed detection of the IE3 isoforms in infected cells, verifying that the newly identified transcripts code for proteins. This prompted the construction of an MCMV mutant lacking ie611 but retaining the coding capacity for the newly identified isoforms ie453 and ie310. Using Δie611 MCMV, we demonstrated the dispensability of the canonical ie3 gene product pIE611 for viral replication. To determine the role of pIE611 for viral gene expression during MCMV infection in an unbiased global approach, we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to delineate pIE611-dependent changes of the MCMV proteome. Interestingly, further analysis revealed transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional regulation of MCMV gene products by pIE611. Cytomegaloviruses are pathogenic betaherpesviruses persisting in a lifelong latency from which reactivation can occur under conditions of immunosuppression, immunoimmaturity, or inflammation. The switch from latency to reactivation requires expression of immediate early genes. Therefore, understanding of immediate early gene regulation might add insights into viral pathogenesis. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate early 3 protein (611 amino acids; pIE611) is considered essential for viral replication. The identification of novel protein isoforms derived from alternatively spliced ie3 transcripts prompted

  18. Concordant and opposite roles of DNA-PK and the "facilitator of chromatin transcription" (FACT in DNA repair, apoptosis and necrosis after cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calkins Anne S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum-containing chemotherapy produces specific DNA damage and is used to treat several human solid tumors. Tumors initially sensitive to platinum-based drugs frequently become resistant. Inhibition of DNA repair is a potential strategy to enhance cisplatin effectiveness. After cisplatin treatment, a balance between repair and apoptosis determines whether cancer cells proliferate or die. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK binds to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs through its Ku subunits and initiates non-homologous end joining. Inhibition of DNA-PK sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin killing. The goal of this study is to elucidate the mechanism underlying the effects of DNA-PK on cisplatin sensitivity. Results Silencing the expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK (DNA-PKcs increased sensitivity to cisplatin and decreased the appearance of γH2AX after cisplatin treatment. We purified DNA-PK by its Ku86 subunit and identified interactors by tandem mass spectrometry before and after cisplatin treatment. The structure specific recognition protein 1 (SSRP1, Spt16 and γH2AX appeared in the Ku86 complex 5 hours after cisplatin treatment. SSRP1 and Spt16 form the facilitator of chromatin transcription (FACT. The cisplatin-induced association of FACT with Ku86 and γH2AX was abrogated by DNase treatment. In living cells, SSRP1 and Ku86 were recruited at sites of DSBs induced by laser beams. Silencing SSRP1 expression increased sensitivity to cisplatin and decreased γH2AX appearance. However, while silencing SSRP1 in cisplatin-treated cells increased both apoptosis and necrosis, DNA-PKcs silencing, in contrast, favored necrosis over apoptosis. Conclusions DNA-PK and FACT both play roles in DNA repair. Therefore both are putative targets for therapeutic inhibition. Since DNA-PK regulates apoptosis, silencing DNA-PKcs redirects cells treated with cisplatin toward necrosis. Silencing FACT however, allows both apoptosis and

  19. PRC1 Prevents Replication Stress during Chondrogenic Transit Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Spaapen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Transit amplification (TA, a state of combined, rapid proliferative expansion and differentiation of stem cell-descendants, remains poorly defined at the molecular level. The Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1 protein BMI1 has been localized to TA compartments, yet its exact role in TA is unclear. PRC1 proteins control gene expression, cell proliferation and DNA-damage repair. Coordination of such DNA-templated activities during TA is predicted to be crucial to support DNA replication and differentiation-associated transcriptional programming. We here examined whether chondrogenesis provides a relevant biological context for synchronized coordination of these chromatin-based tasks by BMI1. Taking advantage of a prominently featuring TA-phase during chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo, we here report that TA is completely dependent on intact PRC1 function. BMI1-depleted chondrogenic progenitors rapidly accumulate double strand DNA breaks during DNA replication, present massive non-H3K27me3-directed transcriptional deregulation and fail to undergo chondrogenic TA. Genome-wide accumulation of Topoisomerase 2α and Geminin suggests a model in which PRC1 synchronizes replication and transcription during rapid chondrogenic progenitor expansion. Our combined data reveals for the first time a vital cell-autonomous role for PRC1 during chondrogenesis. We provide evidence that chondrocyte hyper-replication and hypertrophy represent a unique example of programmed senescence in vivo. These findings provide new perspectives on PRC1 function in development and disease.

  20. Selective recruitment of nuclear factors to productively replicating herpes simplex virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Jill A; DeLuca, Neal A

    2015-05-01

    Much of the HSV-1 life cycle is carried out in the cell nucleus, including the expression, replication, repair, and packaging of viral genomes. Viral proteins, as well as cellular factors, play essential roles in these processes. Isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND) was developed to label and purify cellular replication forks. We adapted aspects of this method to label viral genomes to both image, and purify replicating HSV-1 genomes for the identification of associated proteins. Many viral and cellular factors were enriched on viral genomes, including factors that mediate DNA replication, repair, chromatin remodeling, transcription, and RNA processing. As infection proceeded, packaging and structural components were enriched to a greater extent. Among the more abundant proteins that copurified with genomes were the viral transcription factor ICP4 and the replication protein ICP8. Furthermore, all seven viral replication proteins were enriched on viral genomes, along with cellular PCNA and topoisomerases, while other cellular replication proteins were not detected. The chromatin-remodeling complexes present on viral genomes included the INO80, SWI/SNF, NURD, and FACT complexes, which may prevent chromatinization of the genome. Consistent with this conclusion, histones were not readily recovered with purified viral genomes, and imaging studies revealed an underrepresentation of histones on viral genomes. RNA polymerase II, the mediator complex, TFIID, TFIIH, and several other transcriptional activators and repressors were also affinity purified with viral DNA. The presence of INO80, NURD, SWI/SNF, mediator, TFIID, and TFIIH components is consistent with previous studies in which these complexes copurified with ICP4. Therefore, ICP4 is likely involved in the recruitment of these key cellular chromatin remodeling and transcription factors to viral genomes. Taken together, iPOND is a valuable method for the study of viral genome dynamics during infection and

  1. Selective recruitment of nuclear factors to productively replicating herpes simplex virus genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill A Dembowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Much of the HSV-1 life cycle is carried out in the cell nucleus, including the expression, replication, repair, and packaging of viral genomes. Viral proteins, as well as cellular factors, play essential roles in these processes. Isolation of proteins on nascent DNA (iPOND was developed to label and purify cellular replication forks. We adapted aspects of this method to label viral genomes to both image, and purify replicating HSV-1 genomes for the identification of associated proteins. Many viral and cellular factors were enriched on viral genomes, including factors that mediate DNA replication, repair, chromatin remodeling, transcription, and RNA processing. As infection proceeded, packaging and structural components were enriched to a greater extent. Among the more abundant proteins that copurified with genomes were the viral transcription factor ICP4 and the replication protein ICP8. Furthermore, all seven viral replication proteins were enriched on viral genomes, along with cellular PCNA and topoisomerases, while other cellular replication proteins were not detected. The chromatin-remodeling complexes present on viral genomes included the INO80, SWI/SNF, NURD, and FACT complexes, which may prevent chromatinization of the genome. Consistent with this conclusion, histones were not readily recovered with purified viral genomes, and imaging studies revealed an underrepresentation of histones on viral genomes. RNA polymerase II, the mediator complex, TFIID, TFIIH, and several other transcriptional activators and repressors were also affinity purified with viral DNA. The presence of INO80, NURD, SWI/SNF, mediator, TFIID, and TFIIH components is consistent with previous studies in which these complexes copurified with ICP4. Therefore, ICP4 is likely involved in the recruitment of these key cellular chromatin remodeling and transcription factors to viral genomes. Taken together, iPOND is a valuable method for the study of viral genome dynamics

  2. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  3. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyaji E.N.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2 that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, possibly indicating a defect in preferential repair of actively transcribed genes, and a slower cell proliferation rate, including a longer S-phase. This phenotype reinforces the present notion that control of key mechanisms in cell metabolism, such as cell cycle control, repair, transcription and cell death, can be linked.

  4. Systems-wide RNAi analysis of CASP8AP2/FLASH shows transcriptional deregulation of the replication-dependent histone genes and extensive effects on the transcriptome of colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummon, Amanda B; Pitt, Jason J; Camps, Jordi; Emons, Georg; Skube, Susan B; Huppi, Konrad; Jones, Tamara L; Beissbarth, Tim; Kramer, Frank; Grade, Marian; Difilippantonio, Michael J; Ried, Thomas; Caplen, Natasha J

    2012-01-04

    Colorectal carcinomas (CRC) carry massive genetic and transcriptional alterations that influence multiple cellular pathways. The study of proteins whose loss-of-function (LOF) alters the growth of CRC cells can be used to further understand the cellular processes cancer cells depend upon for survival. A small-scale RNAi screen of ~400 genes conducted in SW480 CRC cells identified several candidate genes as required for the viability of CRC cells, most prominently CASP8AP2/FLASH. To understand the function of this gene in maintaining the viability of CRC cells in an unbiased manner, we generated gene specific expression profiles following RNAi. Silencing of CASP8AP2/FLASH resulted in altered expression of over 2500 genes enriched for genes associated with cellular growth and proliferation. Loss of CASP8AP2/FLASH function was significantly associated with altered transcription of the genes encoding the replication-dependent histone proteins as a result of the expression of the non-canonical polyA variants of these transcripts. Silencing of CASP8AP2/FLASH also mediated enrichment of changes in the expression of targets of the NFκB and MYC transcription factors. These findings were confirmed by whole transcriptome analysis of CASP8AP2/FLASH silenced cells at multiple time points. Finally, we identified and validated that CASP8AP2/FLASH LOF increases the expression of neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), a protein recently linked to regulation of the AKT1/ß-catenin pathway. We have used unbiased RNAi based approaches to identify and characterize the function of CASP8AP2/FLASH, a protein not previously reported as required for cell survival. This study further defines the role CASP8AP2/FLASH plays in the regulating expression of the replication-dependent histones and shows that its LOF results in broad and reproducible effects on the transcriptome of colorectal cancer cells including the induction of expression of the recently described tumor suppressor gene NEFH.

  5. Strong minor groove base conservation in sequence logos implies DNA distortion or base flipping during replication and transcription initiation | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbed "Tom's T" by Dhruba Chattoraj, the unusually conserved thymine at position +7 in bacteriophage P1 plasmid RepA DNA binding sites rises above repressor and acceptor sequence logos. The T appears to represent base flipping prior to helix opening in this DNA replication initation protein.

  6. Base excision repair in Archaea: back to the future in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Stefano; Tell, Gianluca

    2014-09-01

    Together with Bacteria and Eukarya, Archaea represents one of the three domain of life. In contrast with the morphological difference existing between Archaea and Eukarya, these two domains are closely related. Phylogenetic analyses confirm this evolutionary relationship showing that most of the proteins involved in DNA transcription and replication are highly conserved. On the contrary, information is scanty about DNA repair pathways and their mechanisms. In the present review the most important proteins involved in base excision repair, namely glycosylases, AP lyases, AP endonucleases, polymerases, sliding clamps, flap endonucleases, and ligases, will be discussed and compared with bacterial and eukaryotic ones. Finally, possible applications and future perspectives derived from studies on Archaea and their repair pathways, will be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is a powerful method that explores the DNA interaction properties of proteins involved in a wide range of fundamental biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, and repair. We use optical tweezers to capture and stretch a single DNA molecule in the presence of proteins that bind DNA and alter its mechanical properties. We quantitatively characterize the DNA binding mechanisms of proteins in order to provide a detailed understanding of their function. In this work, we focus on proteins involved in replication of Escherichia coli (E. coli ), endogenous eukaryotic retrotransposons Ty3 and LINE-1, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). DNA polymerases replicate the entire genome of the cell, and bind both double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during DNA replication. The replicative DNA polymerase in the widely-studied model system E. coli is the DNA polymerase III subunit alpha (DNA pol III alpha). We use optical tweezers to determine that UmuD, a protein that regulates bacterial mutagenesis through its interactions with DNA polymerases, specifically disrupts alpha binding to ssDNA. This suggests that UmuD removes alpha from its ssDNA template to allow DNA repair proteins access to the damaged DNA, and to facilitate exchange of the replicative polymerase for an error-prone translesion synthesis (TLS) polymerase that inserts nucleotides opposite the lesions, so that bacterial DNA replication may proceed. This work demonstrates a biophysical mechanism by which E. coli cells tolerate DNA damage. Retroviruses and retrotransposons reproduce by copying their RNA genome into the nuclear DNA of their eukaryotic hosts. Retroelements encode proteins called nucleic acid chaperones, which rearrange nucleic acid secondary structure and are therefore required for successful replication. The chaperone activity of these proteins requires strong binding affinity for both single- and double-stranded nucleic

  8. DNA repair in human cells: Methods for the determination of calmodulin involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charp, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Exposure of DNA to either physical or chemical agents can result in the formation of a number of different lesions which must be repaired enzymatically in order for DNA to carry on normal replication and transcription. In most cases, the enzymes involved in this repair of damaged DNA include endonucleases, exonucleases, glycosylases, polymerases, and ligases. Each group of enzymes is involved in precise steps in DNA repair. Exposure to physical agents such as ultraviolet light (UV) at a wavelength of 254 nm is repaired by two distinct and different mechanisms. One mode of enzymatic repair of pyrimidine dimers is accomplished in situ by photoreactivation of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers by photoreactivating light. The second mode of enzymatic repair is the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers involving several different enzymes including endonuclease, exonuclease, and DNA ligase. A summary of the sequence of enzymatic steps involved is shown. It has been observed that specific drugs which bind to and alter the action of calmodulin in cells block DNA synthesis. This suggests that calmodulin may play a role both in normal DNA replication and repair. Others using an indirect method measuring the degree of DNA nucleoid sedimentation, showed that the specific anti-calmodulin agent W-13 slowed the rate of DNA repair. Others showed that DNA synthesis in T51B rat liver cells could be blocked with the addition of either chlorpromazine or trifluoperazine

  9. Distributional Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Beare, Brendan K.

    2009-01-01

    Suppose that X and Y are random variables. We define a replicating function to be a function f such that f(X) and Y have the same distribution. In general, the set of replicating functions for a given pair of random variables may be infinite. Suppose we have some objective function, or cost function, defined over the set of replicating functions, and we seek to estimate the replicating function with the lowest cost. We develop an approach to estimating the cheapest replicating function that i...

  10. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... breakage, and, ultimately, cell death. Despite many years of intensive research into the molecular underpinnings of the eukaryotic replication checkpoint, the mechanisms underlying the dismal consequences of its failure remain enigmatic. A recent development offers a unifying model in which the replication...... checkpoint guards against global exhaustion of rate-limiting replication regulators. Here we discuss how such a mechanism can prevent catastrophic genome disruption and suggest how to harness this knowledge to advance therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells that inherently proliferate under...

  11. Evaluation of genome damage and transcription profile of DNA damage/repair response genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soren, D.C.; Saini, Divyalakshmi; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-01-01

    Humans are exposed to various physical and chemical mutagens in their life time. Physical mutagens, like ionizing radiation (IR), may induce adverse effect at high acute dose exposures in human cells. However, there are inconsistent results on the effect of low dose radiation exposure in human cells. There are a variety of DNA damage endpoints to evaluate the effect of low dose radiation in human cells. DNA damage response (DDR) may lead to changes in expression profile of many genes. In the present study, an attempt has been made to evaluate genome damage at low dose IR exposure in human blood lymphocytes. Cytochalasin blocked micronuclei (CBMN) assay has been used to determine the frequency of micronuclei in binucleated cells in PBMCs exposed to IR. Transcription profile of ATM, P53, GADD45A, CDKN1A, TRF1 and TRF2 genes was studied using real time quantitative PCR. Venous blood samples collected from 10 random healthy donors were irradiated with different doses of γ-radiation ( 137 Cs) along with sham irradiated control. Whole blood culture was set up using microculture technique. Blood samples were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin, and CBMN assay was performed. An average of 2,500 binucleated cells was scored for each dose point. For gene expression analysis, total RNA was isolated, cDNA was prepared, and gene expression analysis for ATM, P53, CDKN1A, GADD45A, TRF1 and TRF2 was done using real time PCR. Our results revealed no significant increase in the frequency of MN up to 100 mGy as compared to control. However, no significant alteration in gene expression profile was observed. In conclusion, no significant dose response was observed at the frequency of MN as well as the expression profile of DDR/repair genes, suggesting low dose radiation did not induce significant DNA damage at these acute dose exposures. (author)

  12. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  13. Systems-wide RNAi analysis of CASP8AP2/FLASH shows transcriptional deregulation of the replication-dependent histone genes and extensive effects on the transcriptome of colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hummon Amanda B

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal carcinomas (CRC carry massive genetic and transcriptional alterations that influence multiple cellular pathways. The study of proteins whose loss-of-function (LOF alters the growth of CRC cells can be used to further understand the cellular processes cancer cells depend upon for survival. Results A small-scale RNAi screen of ~400 genes conducted in SW480 CRC cells identified several candidate genes as required for the viability of CRC cells, most prominently CASP8AP2/FLASH. To understand the function of this gene in maintaining the viability of CRC cells in an unbiased manner, we generated gene specific expression profiles following RNAi. Silencing of CASP8AP2/FLASH resulted in altered expression of over 2500 genes enriched for genes associated with cellular growth and proliferation. Loss of CASP8AP2/FLASH function was significantly associated with altered transcription of the genes encoding the replication-dependent histone proteins as a result of the expression of the non-canonical polyA variants of these transcripts. Silencing of CASP8AP2/FLASH also mediated enrichment of changes in the expression of targets of the NFκB and MYC transcription factors. These findings were confirmed by whole transcriptome analysis of CASP8AP2/FLASH silenced cells at multiple time points. Finally, we identified and validated that CASP8AP2/FLASH LOF increases the expression of neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH, a protein recently linked to regulation of the AKT1/ß-catenin pathway. Conclusions We have used unbiased RNAi based approaches to identify and characterize the function of CASP8AP2/FLASH, a protein not previously reported as required for cell survival. This study further defines the role CASP8AP2/FLASH plays in the regulating expression of the replication-dependent histones and shows that its LOF results in broad and reproducible effects on the transcriptome of colorectal cancer cells including the induction of

  14. Transcription and DNA Damage: Holding Hands or Crossing Swords?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Giuseppina; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-10-27

    Transcription has classically been considered a potential threat to genome integrity. Collision between transcription and DNA replication machinery, and retention of DNA:RNA hybrids, may result in genome instability. On the other hand, it has been proposed that active genes repair faster and preferentially via homologous recombination. Moreover, while canonical transcription is inhibited in the proximity of DNA double-strand breaks, a growing body of evidence supports active non-canonical transcription at DNA damage sites. Small non-coding RNAs accumulate at DNA double-strand break sites in mammals and other organisms, and are involved in DNA damage signaling and repair. Furthermore, RNA binding proteins are recruited to DNA damage sites and participate in the DNA damage response. Here, we discuss the impact of transcription on genome stability, the role of RNA binding proteins at DNA damage sites, and the function of small non-coding RNAs generated upon damage in the signaling and repair of DNA lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA repair: Dynamic defenders against cancer and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, Jill O.; Cooper, Priscilla K.

    2006-04-01

    (UV) component of sunlight. NER can be divided into two classes based on where the repair occurs. NER occurring in DNA that is not undergoing transcription (i.e., most of the genome) is called global genome repair (GGR or GGNER), while NER taking place in the transcribed strand of active genes is called transcription-coupled repair (TCR or TC-NER). We will explore NER in more detail below. Mismatch repair (MMR) is another type of excision repair that specifically removes mispaired bases resulting from replication errors. DNA damage can also result in breaks in the DNA backbone, in one or both strands. Single-strand breaks (SSBs) are efficiently repaired by a mechanism that shares common features with the later steps in BER. Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially devastating since by definition there is no intact complementary strand to serve as a template for repair, and even one unrepaired DSB can be lethal [3]. In cells that have replicated their DNA prior to cell division, the missing information can be supplied by the duplicate copy, or sister chromatid, and DSBs in these cells are faithfully repaired by homologous recombination involving the exchange of strands of DNA between the two copies. However, most cells in the body are non-dividing, and in these cells the major mechanism for repairing DSBs is by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), which as the name implies involves joining two broken DNA ends together without a requirement for homologous sequence and which therefore has a high potential for loss of genetic information.

  16. The cutting edges in DNA repair, licensing, and fidelity: DNA and RNA repair nucleases sculpt DNA to measure twice, cut once.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutakawa, Susan E; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Tainer, John A

    2014-07-01

    To avoid genome instability, DNA repair nucleases must precisely target the correct damaged substrate before they are licensed to incise. Damage identification is a challenge for all DNA damage response proteins, but especially for nucleases that cut the DNA and necessarily create a cleaved DNA repair intermediate, likely more toxic than the initial damage. How do these enzymes achieve exquisite specificity without specific sequence recognition or, in some cases, without a non-canonical DNA nucleotide? Combined structural, biochemical, and biological analyses of repair nucleases are revealing their molecular tools for damage verification and safeguarding against inadvertent incision. Surprisingly, these enzymes also often act on RNA, which deserves more attention. Here, we review protein-DNA structures for nucleases involved in replication, base excision repair, mismatch repair, double strand break repair (DSBR), and telomere maintenance: apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), Endonuclease IV (Nfo), tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase (TDP2), UV Damage endonuclease (UVDE), very short patch repair endonuclease (Vsr), Endonuclease V (Nfi), Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), exonuclease 1 (Exo1), RNase T and Meiotic recombination 11 (Mre11). DNA and RNA structure-sensing nucleases are essential to life with roles in DNA replication, repair, and transcription. Increasingly these enzymes are employed as advanced tools for synthetic biology and as targets for cancer prognosis and interventions. Currently their structural biology is most fully illuminated for DNA repair, which is also essential to life. How DNA repair enzymes maintain genome fidelity is one of the DNA double helix secrets missed by James Watson and Francis Crick, that is only now being illuminated though structural biology and mutational analyses. Structures reveal motifs for repair nucleases and mechanisms whereby these enzymes follow the old carpenter adage: measure twice, cut once. Furthermore, to measure

  17. Metabolic modulation of mammalian DNA excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrader, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    First, ultraviolet light (UVL)- and dimethylsulfate (DMS)-induced excision repair was examined in quiescent and lectin-stimulated bovine lymphocytes. Upon mitogenic stimulation, UVL-induced repair increased by a factor of 2 to 3, and reached this maximum 2 days before the onset of DNA replication. However, DMS-induced repair increased sevenfold in parallel with DNA replication. Repair patch sizes were smaller for DMS-induced damage reflecting patches of 7 nucleotides in quiescent lymphocytes compared to 20 nucleotides induced by UVL. The patch size increased during lymphocyte stimulation until one day prior to the peak of DNA replication when patch sizes of 45 and 35 nucleotides were produced in response to UVL- and DMS-induced damage, respectively. At the peak of DNA replication, the patch sizes were equal for both damaging agents at 34 nucleotides. In the second study, a small amount of repair replication was observed in undamaged quiescent and concanavalin A-stimulated bovine lymphocytes as well as in human T98G glioblastoma cells. Repair incorporation doubled in the presence of hydroxyurea. Thirdly, the enhanced repair replication induced by the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, 3-aminobenzamide, (3-AB), could not be correlated either with an increased rate of repair in the presence of 3-AB or with the use of hydroxyurea in the repair protocol. Finally, treatment of unstimulated lymphocytes with hyperthermia was accompanied by decreased repair replication while the repair patches remained constant at 20 nucleotides.

  18. Evolution of Replication Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  19. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  20. MSH6- or PMS2-deficiency causes re-replication in DT40 B cells, but it has little effect on immunoglobulin gene conversion or on repair of AID-generated uracils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Vanina A.; Patenaude, Anne-Marie; Kaden, Svenja; Horb, Lori; Firka, Daniel; Jiricny, Josef; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian antibody repertoire is shaped by somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) loci of B lymphocytes. SHM and CSR are triggered by non-canonical, error-prone processing of G/U mismatches generated by activation-induced deaminase (AID). In birds, AID does not trigger SHM, but it triggers Ig gene conversion (GC), a ‘homeologous’ recombination process involving the Ig variable region and proximal pseudogenes. Because recombination fidelity is controlled by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, we investigated whether MMR affects GC in the chicken B cell line DT40. We show here that Msh6−/− and Pms2−/− DT40 cells display cell cycle defects, including genomic re-replication. However, although IgVλ GC tracts in MMR-deficient cells were slightly longer than in normal cells, Ig GC frequency, donor choice or the number of mutations per sequence remained unaltered. The finding that the avian MMR system, unlike that of mammals, does not seem to contribute towards the processing of G/U mismatches in vitro could explain why MMR is unable to initiate Ig GC in this species, despite initiating SHM and CSR in mammalian cells. Moreover, as MMR does not counteract or govern Ig GC, we report a rare example of ‘homeologous’ recombination insensitive to MMR. PMID:23314153

  1. The DNA Replication Checkpoint Directly Regulates MBF-Dependent G1/S Transcription▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K.; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G1/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G1/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G1/S transcriptional program du...

  2. Identifying Functional Neighborhoods within the Cell Nucleus: Proximity Analysis of Early S-Phase Replicating Chromatin Domains to Sites of Transcription, RNA Polymerase II, HP1γ, Matrin 3 and SAF-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyavantham, Kishore S; Bhattacharya, Sambit; Barbeitos, Marcos; Mukherjee, Lopamudra; Xu, Jinhui; Fackelmayer, Frank O; Berezney, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Higher order chromatin organization in concert with epigenetic regulation is a key process that determines gene expression at the global level. The organization of dynamic chromatin domains and their associated protein factors is intertwined with nuclear function to create higher levels of functional zones within the cell nucleus. As a step towards elucidating the organization and dynamics of these functional zones, we have investigated the spatial proximities among a constellation of functionally related sites that are found within euchromatic regions of the cell nucleus including: HP1γ, nascent transcript sites (TS), active DNA replicating sites in early S phase (PCNA) and RNA polymerase II sites. We report close associations among these different sites with proximity values specific for each combination. Analysis of matrin 3 and SAF-A sites demonstrates that these nuclear matrix proteins are highly proximal with the functionally related sites as well as to each other and display closely aligned and overlapping regions following application of the minimal spanning tree (MST) algorithm to visualize higher order network-like patterns. Our findings suggest that multiple factors within the nuclear microenvironment collectively form higher order combinatorial arrays of function. We propose a model for the organization of these functional neighborhoods which takes into account the proximity values of the individual sites and their spatial organization within the nuclear architecture. PMID:18618731

  3. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  4. Cytology of DNA Replication Reveals Dynamic Plasticity of Large-Scale Chromatin Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiang; Zhironkina, Oxana A; Cherepanynets, Varvara D; Strelkova, Olga S; Kireev, Igor I; Belmont, Andrew S

    2016-09-26

    In higher eukaryotic interphase nuclei, the 100- to >1,000-fold linear compaction of chromatin is difficult to reconcile with its function as a template for transcription, replication, and repair. It is challenging to imagine how DNA and RNA polymerases with their associated molecular machinery would move along the DNA template without transient decondensation of observed large-scale chromatin "chromonema" fibers [1]. Transcription or "replication factory" models [2], in which polymerases remain fixed while DNA is reeled through, are similarly difficult to conceptualize without transient decondensation of these chromonema fibers. Here, we show how a dynamic plasticity of chromatin folding within large-scale chromatin fibers allows DNA replication to take place without significant changes in the global large-scale chromatin compaction or shape of these large-scale chromatin fibers. Time-lapse imaging of lac-operator-tagged chromosome regions shows no major change in the overall compaction of these chromosome regions during their DNA replication. Improved pulse-chase labeling of endogenous interphase chromosomes yields a model in which the global compaction and shape of large-Mbp chromatin domains remains largely invariant during DNA replication, with DNA within these domains undergoing significant movements and redistribution as they move into and then out of adjacent replication foci. In contrast to hierarchical folding models, this dynamic plasticity of large-scale chromatin organization explains how localized changes in DNA topology allow DNA replication to take place without an accompanying global unfolding of large-scale chromatin fibers while suggesting a possible mechanism for maintaining epigenetic programming of large-scale chromatin domains throughout DNA replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Recombinant methods for screening human DNA excision repair proficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Athas, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    A method for measuring DNA excision repair in response to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage has been developed, validated, and field-tested in cultured human lymphocytes. The methodology is amenable to population-based screening and should facilitate future epidemiologic studies seeking to investigate associations between excision repair proficiency and cancer susceptibility. The impetus for such endeavors derives from the belief that the high incidence of skin cancer in the genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) primarily is a result of the reduced capacity of patients cells to repair UV-induced DNA damage. For assay, UV-irradiated non-replicating recombinant plasmid DNA harboring a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) indicator gene is introduced into lymphocytes using DEAE-dextran short-term transfection conditions. Exposure to UV induces transcriptionally-inactivating DNA photoproducts in the plasmid DNA which inactivate CAT gene expression. Excision repair of the damaged CAT gene is monitored indirectly as a function of reactivated CAT enzyme activity following a 40 hour repair/expression incubation period

  6. DNA repair deficiency in neurodegeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Bohr, Vilhelm A; Stevnsner, Tinna V.

    2011-01-01

    Deficiency in repair of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage has been linked to several neurodegenerative disorders. Many recent experimental results indicate that the post-mitotic neurons are particularly prone to accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions potentially leading to progressive...... neurodegeneration. Nucleotide excision repair is the cellular pathway responsible for removing helix-distorting DNA damage and deficiency in such repair is found in a number of diseases with neurodegenerative phenotypes, including Xeroderma Pigmentosum and Cockayne syndrome. The main pathway for repairing oxidative...... base lesions is base excision repair, and such repair is crucial for neurons given their high rates of oxygen metabolism. Mismatch repair corrects base mispairs generated during replication and evidence indicates that oxidative DNA damage can cause this pathway to expand trinucleotide repeats, thereby...

  7. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Katherine; Tellier, Michael; Murphy, Shona

    2018-02-27

    The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79). H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL)-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  8. DOT1L and H3K79 Methylation in Transcription and Genomic Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wood

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The organization of eukaryotic genomes into chromatin provides challenges for the cell to accomplish basic cellular functions, such as transcription, DNA replication and repair of DNA damage. Accordingly, a range of proteins modify and/or read chromatin states to regulate access to chromosomal DNA. Yeast Dot1 and the mammalian homologue DOT1L are methyltransferases that can add up to three methyl groups to histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79. H3K79 methylation is implicated in several processes, including transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II, the DNA damage response and cell cycle checkpoint activation. DOT1L is also an important drug target for treatment of mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-rearranged leukemia where aberrant transcriptional activation is promoted by DOT1L mislocalisation. This review summarizes what is currently known about the role of Dot1/DOT1L and H3K79 methylation in transcription and genomic stability.

  9. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivites of virus functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglin, R P; Gugerli, P; Wildy, P

    1980-07-01

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription;unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II).

  10. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivities of virus functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglin, R.P.; Gugerli, P.; Wildy, P.

    1980-01-01

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription; unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II). (U.K.)

  11. Modulation of mutagenesis in eukaryotes by DNA replication fork dynamics and quality of nucleotide pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisertreiger, Irina S.-R.; Liston, Victoria G.; Menezes, Miriam R.; Kim, Hyun-Min; Lobachev, Kirill S.; Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tahirov, Tahir H.; Rogozin, Igor B.; Pavlov, Youri. I.

    2014-01-01

    The rate of mutations in eukaryotes depends on a plethora of factors and is not immediately derived from the fidelity of DNA polymerases (Pols). Replication of chromosomes containing the anti-parallel strands of duplex DNA occurs through the copying of leading and lagging strand templates by a trio of Pols α, δ and ε, with the assistance of Pol ζ and Y-family Pols at difficult DNA template structures or sites of DNA damage. The parameters of the synthesis at a given location are dictated by the quality and quantity of nucleotides in the pools, replication fork architecture, transcription status, regulation of Pol switches, and structure of chromatin. The result of these transactions is a subject of survey and editing by DNA repair. PMID:23055184

  12. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals

  13. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  14. Function of BRCA1 at a DNA Replication Origin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieberman, Paul

    2004-01-01

    ... and allow efficient repair of damaged DNA. In this proposal, we present preliminary data that BRCA1 functions in a DNA checkpoint response for the origin of Epstein-Barr Virus DNA replication (Ori P...

  15. Laboratory of Mutagenesis and DNA Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Two main lines of research were continued: the first one concerned the mechanisms controlling the fidelity of DNA replication in Escherichia coli; the second concerned cellular responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damaging agents. We have been investigating the question whether during chromosomal DNA replication in Escherichia coli the two DNA strands may be replicated with differential accuracy. To address this question we set up a new system that allows the examination of mutagenesis either of the leading strand or the lagging strand. Our results suggest that the lagging strand replication of the E. coli chromosome may be more accurate than leading strand replication. More recently, we studied mutagenesis of the two strands in recA730 strains which exhibit constitutive expression of the SOS system. Our results clearly indicate that in recA730 strains there is a significant difference in the fidelity of replication between the two replicating strands. Based on our data we propose a model describing a possible mechanism of SOS mutagenesis. To get more insight into cellular responses to DNA damage we have isolated several novel genes of S. cerevisiae, the transcription of which is induced by DNA lesions. Main effort was concentrated on the characterization of the DIN7 gene. We found that Din7p specifically affects the metabolism of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The elevated level of Din7p results in an increased frequency of mitochondrial petite mutants, as well as in a higher frequency of mitochondrial point mutations. Din7p affects also the stability of microsatellite sequences present in the mitochondrial genome. As expected, Din7p was found to be located in mitochondria. In another project, we found that the DIN8 gene isolated in our laboratory is identical with the UMP1 gene encoding a chaperone-like protein involved in 20S proteasome maturation. Interestingly, induction of UMP1 expression in response to DNA damage is subject to regulation

  16. Database Replication Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Vandewall, R.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Replication Framework that facilitates the implementation and com-parison of database replication techniques. Furthermore, it discusses the implementation of a Database Replication Prototype and compares the performance measurements of two replication techniques based on the Atomic Broadcast communication primitive: pessimistic active replication and optimistic active replication. The main contributions of this report can be split into four parts....

  17. Stalled repair of lesions when present within a clustered DNA damage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomax, M.E.; Cunniffe, S.; O'Neill, P.

    2003-01-01

    Ionising radiation produces clustered DNA damages (two or more lesions within one or two helical turns of the DNA) which could challenge the repair mechanism(s) of the cell. Using purified base excision repair (BER) enzymes and synthetic oligonucleotides a number of recent studies have established the excision of a lesion within clustered damage sites is compromised. Evidence will be presented that the efficiency of repair of lesions within a clustered DNA damage site is reduced, relative to that of the isolated lesions, since the lifetime of both lesions is extended by up to four fold. Simple clustered damage sites, comprised of single-strand breaks, abasic sites and base damages, one or five bases 3' or 5' to each other, were synthesised in oligonucleotides and repair carried out in mammalian cell nuclear extracts. The rate of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site within these clustered damage sites is reduced, mainly due to inhibition of the DNA ligase. The mechanism of repair of the single-strand break/abasic site shows some asymmetry. Repair appears to be by the short-patch BER pathway when the lesions are 5' to each other. In contrast, when the lesions are 3' to each other repair appears to proceed along the long-patch BER pathway. The lesions within the cluster are processed sequentially, the single-strand break/abasic site being repaired before excision of 8-oxoG, limiting the formation of double-strand breaks to <2%. Stalled processing of clustered DNA damage extends the lifetime of the lesions to an extent that could have biological consequences, e.g. if the lesions are still present during transcription and/or at replication mutations could arise

  18. Replication of kinetoplast minicircle DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    These studies describe the isolation and characterization of early minicircle replication intermediates from Crithidia fasciculata, and Leishmania tarentolae, the mitochondrial localization of a type II topoisomerase (TIImt) in C. fasciculata, and the implication of the aforementioned TIImt in minicircle replication in L. tarentolae. Early minicircle replication intermediates from C. fasciculata were identified and characterized using isolated kinetoplasts to incorporate radiolabeled nucleotides into its DNA. The pulse-label in an apparent theta-type intermediate chase into two daughter molecules. A uniquely gapped, ribonucleotide primed, knotted molecule represents the leading strand in the model proposed, and a highly gapped molecule represents the lagging strand. This theta intermediate is repaired in vitro to a doubly nicked catenated dimer which was shown to result from the replication of a single parental molecule. Very similar intermediates were found in the heterogeneous population of minicircles of L. tarentolae. The sites of the Leishmania specific discontinuities were mapped and shown to lie within the universally conserved sequence blocks in identical positions as compared to C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma equiperdum

  19. A loss of function analysis of host factors influencing Vaccinia virus replication by RNA interference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa M Beard

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV is a large, cytoplasmic, double-stranded DNA virus that requires complex interactions with host proteins in order to replicate. To explore these interactions a functional high throughput small interfering RNA (siRNA screen targeting 6719 druggable cellular genes was undertaken to identify host factors (HF influencing the replication and spread of an eGFP-tagged VACV. The experimental design incorporated a low multiplicity of infection, thereby enhancing detection of cellular proteins involved in cell-to-cell spread of VACV. The screen revealed 153 pro- and 149 anti-viral HFs that strongly influenced VACV replication. These HFs were investigated further by comparisons with transcriptional profiling data sets and HFs identified in RNAi screens of other viruses. In addition, functional and pathway analysis of the entire screen was carried out to highlight cellular mechanisms involved in VACV replication. This revealed, as anticipated, that many pro-viral HFs are involved in translation of mRNA and, unexpectedly, suggested that a range of proteins involved in cellular transcriptional processes and several DNA repair pathways possess anti-viral activity. Multiple components of the AMPK complex were found to act as pro-viral HFs, while several septins, a group of highly conserved GTP binding proteins with a role in sequestering intracellular bacteria, were identified as strong anti-viral VACV HFs. This screen has identified novel and previously unexplored roles for cellular factors in poxvirus replication. This advancement in our understanding of the VACV life cycle provides a reliable knowledge base for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine vectors and development of anti-viral theraputics.

  20. Exposure to 4100K fluorescent light elicits sex specific transcriptional responses in Xiphophorus maculatus skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, William T; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J; Navarro, Kaela L; Chang, Jordan; Lu, Yuan; Savage, Markita G; Shen, Jianjun; Walter, Ronald B

    2018-06-01

    It has been reported that exposure to artificial light may affect oxygen intake, heart rate, absorption of vitamins and minerals, and behavioral responses in humans. We have reported specific gene expression responses in the skin of Xiphophorus fish after exposure to ultraviolet light (UV), as well as, both broad spectrum and narrow waveband visible light. In regard to fluorescent light (FL), we have shown that male X. maculatus exposed to 4100K FL (i.e. "cool white") rapidly suppress transcription of many genes involved with DNA replication and repair, chromosomal segregation, and cell cycle progression in skin. We have also detailed sex specific transcriptional responses of Xiphophorus skin after exposure to UVB. However, investigation of gender differences in global gene expression response after exposure to 4100K FL has not been reported, despite common use of this FL source for residential, commercial, and animal facility illumination. Here, we compare RNA-Seq results analyzed to assess changes in the global transcription profiles of female and male X. maculatus skin in response to 4100K FL exposure. Our results suggest 4100K FL exposure incites a sex-biased genetic response including up-modulation of inflammation in females and down modulation of DNA repair/replication in males. In addition, we identify clusters of genes that become oppositely modulated in males and females after FL exposure that are principally involved in cell death and cell proliferation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutagenesis and repair of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janion, C.; Grzesiuk, E.; Fabisiewicz, A.; Tudek, B.; Ciesla, J.; Graziewicz, M.; Wojcik, A.; Speina, E.

    1998-01-01

    Full text. The discovery that the mfd gene codes for a transcription-coupling repair factor (TRCF) prompted us to re-investigate the MFD (mutation frequency decline) phenomenon in E.coli K-12 strain when mutations were induced by ultraviolet light, halogen light or MMS-treatment. These studies revealed that: (i) the process of MFD involves the proofreading activity of DNA pol III and the mismatch repair system, as well as, TRCF and the UvrABC-excinuclease (ii) a semi-rich plate test may be replaced by a rich liquid medium, (iii) the T-T pyrimidine dimers are the lesions excised with the highest activity, and (iv) overproduction of UmuD(D'C) proteins leads to a great increase in mutant frequency in irradiated and MMS-treated cells. The role of mismatch repair (MR) in MMS-induced mutagenesis is obscured by the fact that the spectra of mutational specificity are different in bacteria proficient and deficient in MR. It has been found that transposons Tn10 (and Tn5) when inserted into chromosomal DNA of E. coli influence the phenotype lowering the survival and frequency of mutations induced by UV or halogen light irradiation. This is connected with a deficiency of UmuD(D') and UmuC proteins. Transformation of bacteria with plasmids bearing the umuD(D')C genes, suppresses the effects of the transposon insertion, a phenomenon which has not been described before. Single-stranded DNA of M13mp18 phage was oxidized in vitro by a hydroxyl radical generating system including hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase/Fe3+/EDTA, and it was found that Fapy-Ade, Fapy-Gua, 8-oxyAde and thymine glycol were the main products formed. Replication of the oxidized template by T7 phage DNA polymerase, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, or polymerase beta from bovine thymus has revealed that oxidized pyrimidines are stronger blockers than oxidized purines for T7 phage and Klenow fragment polymerases and the blocking potency depends on the neighboring bases and on the type of polymerase. Studies of

  2. Human Parvovirus B19 Utilizes Cellular DNA Replication Machinery for Viral DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Wang, Zekun; Xiong, Min; Chen, Aaron Yun; Xu, Peng; Ganaie, Safder S; Badawi, Yomna; Kleiboeker, Steve; Nishimune, Hiroshi; Ye, Shui Qing; Qiu, Jianming

    2018-03-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection of human erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) induces a DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest at late S phase, which facilitates viral DNA replication. However, it is not clear exactly which cellular factors are employed by this single-stranded DNA virus. Here, we used microarrays to systematically analyze the dynamic transcriptome of EPCs infected with B19V. We found that DNA metabolism, DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and cell cycle arrest pathways were significantly regulated after B19V infection. Confocal microscopy analyses revealed that most cellular DNA replication proteins were recruited to the centers of viral DNA replication, but not the DNA repair DNA polymerases. Our results suggest that DNA replication polymerase δ and polymerase α are responsible for B19V DNA replication by knocking down its expression in EPCs. We further showed that although RPA32 is essential for B19V DNA replication and the phosphorylated forms of RPA32 colocalized with the replicating viral genomes, RPA32 phosphorylation was not necessary for B19V DNA replication. Thus, this report provides evidence that B19V uses the cellular DNA replication machinery for viral DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection can cause transient aplastic crisis, persistent viremia, and pure red cell aplasia. In fetuses, B19V infection can result in nonimmune hydrops fetalis and fetal death. These clinical manifestations of B19V infection are a direct outcome of the death of human erythroid progenitors that host B19V replication. B19V infection induces a DNA damage response that is important for cell cycle arrest at late S phase. Here, we analyzed dynamic changes in cellular gene expression and found that DNA metabolic processes are tightly regulated during B19V infection. Although genes involved in cellular DNA replication were downregulated overall, the cellular DNA replication machinery was tightly

  3. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic acti...

  4. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-11-30

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities.

  5. Recombinational DNA repair and human disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2002-01-01

    We review the genes and proteins related to the homologous recombinational repair (HRR) pathway that are implicated in cancer through either genetic disorders that predispose to cancer through chromosome instability or the occurrence of somatic mutations that contribute to carcinogenesis. Ataxia telangiectasia (AT), Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS), and an ataxia-like disorder (ATLD), are chromosome instability disorders that are defective in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), NBS, and Mre11 genes, respectively. These genes are critical in maintaining cellular resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), which kills largely by the production of double-strand breaks (DSBs). Bloom syndrome involves a defect in the BLM helicase, which seems to play a role in restarting DNA replication forks that are blocked at lesions, thereby promoting chromosome stability. The Werner syndrome gene (WRN) helicase, another member of the RecQ family like BLM, has very recently been found to help mediate homologous recombination. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically complex chromosomal instability disorder involving seven or more genes, one of which is BRCA2. FA may be at least partially caused by the aberrant production of reactive oxidative species. The breast cancer-associated BRCA1 and BRCA2 proteins are strongly implicated in HRR; BRCA2 associates with Rad51 and appears to regulate its activity. We discuss in detail the phenotypes of the various mutant cell lines and the signaling pathways mediated by the ATM kinase. ATM's phosphorylation targets can be grouped into oxidative stress-mediated transcriptional changes, cell cycle checkpoints, and recombinational repair. We present the DNA damage response pathways by using the DSB as the prototype lesion, whose incorrect repair can initiate and augment karyotypic abnormalities

  6. Radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moseley, B.E.B.

    1984-01-01

    A review is given of radiation damage and its repair in non-sporulating bacteria. The identification and measurement of radiation damage in the DNA of the bacteria after exposure to ultraviolet radiation and ionizing radiation is described. Measuring the extent of DNA repair and ways of isolating repair mutants are also described. The DNA repair mechanisms for UV-induced damage are discussed including photoreactivation repair, excision repair, post-replication recombination repair and induced error-prone repair. The DNA repair mechanisms for ionizing radiation damage are also discussed including the repair of both single and double-strand breaks. Other aspects discussed include the effects of growth, irradiation medium and recovery medium on survival, DNA repair in humans, the commercial use of UV and ionizing radiations and the future of ionizing irradiation as a food treatment process. (U.K.)

  7. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination

  8. A novel method for monitoring functional lesion-specific recruitment of repair proteins in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodrick, Jordan; Gupta, Suhani; Khatkar, Pooja; Dave, Kalpana; Levashova, Darya; Choudhury, Sujata; Elias, Hadi; Saha, Tapas; Mueller, Susette; Roy, Rabindra, E-mail: rr228@georgetown.edu

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • A method of monitoring lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo is described. • Recruitment of repair enzymes to abasic sites is monitored by co-localization. • Repair protein recruitment is consistent with known protein–protein relationships. • Cells demonstrated complete repair of abasic sites by 90 min. - Abstract: DNA–protein relationships have been studied by numerous methods, but a particular gap in methodology lies in the study of DNA adduct-specific interactions with proteins in vivo, which particularly affects the field of DNA repair. Using the repair of a well-characterized and ubiquitous adduct, the abasic (AP) site, as a model, we have developed a comprehensive method of monitoring DNA lesion-specific recruitment of proteins in vivo over time. We utilized a surrogate system in which a Cy3-labeled plasmid containing a single AP-site was transfected into cells, and the interaction of the labeled DNA with BER enzymes, including APE1, Polβ, LIG1, and FEN1, was monitored by immunofluorescent staining of the enzymes by Alexafluor-488-conjugated secondary antibody. The recruitment of enzymes was characterized by quantification of Cy3-Alexafluor-488 co-localization. To validate the microscopy-based method, repair of the transfected AP-site DNA was also quantified at various time points post-transfection using a real time PCR-based method. Notably, the recruitment time kinetics for each enzyme were consistent with AP-site repair time kinetics. This microscopy-based methodology is reliable in detecting the recruitment of proteins to specific DNA substrates and can be extended to study other in vivo DNA–protein relationships in any DNA sequence and in the context of any DNA structure in transfectable proliferating or quiescent cells. The method may be applied to a variety of disciplines of nucleic acid transaction pathways, including repair, replication, transcription, and recombination.

  9. Implication of Posttranslational Histone Modifications in Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shisheng Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Histones are highly alkaline proteins that package and order the DNA into chromatin in eukaryotic cells. Nucleotide excision repair (NER is a conserved multistep reaction that removes a wide range of generally bulky and/or helix-distorting DNA lesions. Although the core biochemical mechanism of NER is relatively well known, how cells detect and repair lesions in diverse chromatin environments is still under intensive research. As with all DNA-related processes, the NER machinery must deal with the presence of organized chromatin and the physical obstacles it presents. A huge catalogue of posttranslational histone modifications has been documented. Although a comprehensive understanding of most of these modifications is still lacking, they are believed to be important regulatory elements for many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and cell cycle control. Some of these modifications, including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 or the histone H2A variant H2AX, have been found to be implicated in different stages of the NER process. This review will summarize our recent understanding in this area.

  10. Chromatin Structure and Replication Origins: Determinants Of Chromosome Replication And Nuclear Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Owen K.; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA replication program is, in part, determined by the epigenetic landscape that governs local chromosome architecture and directs chromosome duplication. Replication must coordinate with other biochemical processes occurring concomitantly on chromatin, such as transcription and remodeling, to insure accurate duplication of both genetic and epigenetic features and to preserve genomic stability. The importance of genome architecture and chromatin looping in coordinating cellular processes on chromatin is illustrated by two recent sets of discoveries. First, chromatin-associated proteins that are not part of the core replication machinery were shown to affect the timing of DNA replication. These chromatin-associated proteins could be working in concert, or perhaps in competition, with the transcriptional machinery and with chromatin modifiers to determine the spatial and temporal organization of replication initiation events. Second, epigenetic interactions are mediated by DNA sequences that determine chromosomal replication. In this review we summarize recent findings and current models linking spatial and temporal regulation of the replication program with epigenetic signaling. We discuss these issues in the context of the genome’s three-dimensional structure with an emphasis on events occurring during the initiation of DNA replication. PMID:24905010

  11. Initiation of DNA replication requires actin dynamics and formin activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisis, Nikolaos; Krasinska, Liliana; Harker, Bethany; Urbach, Serge; Rossignol, Michel; Camasses, Alain; Dewar, James; Morin, Nathalie; Fisher, Daniel

    2017-11-02

    Nuclear actin regulates transcriptional programmes in a manner dependent on its levels and polymerisation state. This dynamics is determined by the balance of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, formin- and redox-dependent filament polymerisation. Here, using Xenopus egg extracts and human somatic cells, we show that actin dynamics and formins are essential for DNA replication. In proliferating cells, formin inhibition abolishes nuclear transport and initiation of DNA replication, as well as general transcription. In replicating nuclei from transcriptionally silent Xenopus egg extracts, we identified numerous actin regulators, and disruption of actin dynamics abrogates nuclear transport, preventing NLS (nuclear localisation signal)-cargo release from RanGTP-importin complexes. Nuclear formin activity is further required to promote loading of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) onto chromatin, as well as initiation and elongation of DNA replication. Therefore, actin dynamics and formins control DNA replication by multiple direct and indirect mechanisms. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Systems-wide RNAi analysis of CASP8AP2/FLASH shows transcriptional deregulation of the replication-dependent histone genes and extensive effects on the transcriptome of colorectal cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hummon Amanda B; Pitt Jason J; Camps Jordi; Emons Georg; Skube Susan B; Huppi Konrad; Jones Tamara L; Beissbarth Tim; Kramer Frank; Grade Marian; Difilippantonio Michael J; Ried Thomas; Caplen Natasha J

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Colorectal carcinomas (CRC) carry massive genetic and transcriptional alterations that influence multiple cellular pathways. The study of proteins whose loss-of-function (LOF) alters the growth of CRC cells can be used to further understand the cellular processes cancer cells depend upon for survival. Results A small-scale RNAi screen of ~400 genes conducted in SW480 CRC cells identified several candidate genes as required for the viability of CRC cells, most prominently C...

  13. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  14. Deficiency of the Arabidopsis helicase RTEL1 triggers a SOG1-dependent replication checkpoint in response to DNA cross-links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhubing; Cools, Toon; Kalhorzadeh, Pooneh; Heyman, Jefri; De Veylder, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    To maintain genome integrity, DNA replication is executed and regulated by a complex molecular network of numerous proteins, including helicases and cell cycle checkpoint regulators. Through a systematic screening for putative replication mutants, we identified an Arabidopsis thaliana homolog of human Regulator of Telomere Length 1 (RTEL1), which functions in DNA replication, DNA repair, and recombination. RTEL1 deficiency retards plant growth, a phenotype including a prolonged S-phase duration and decreased cell proliferation. Genetic analysis revealed that rtel1 mutant plants show activated cell cycle checkpoints, specific sensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents, and increased homologous recombination, but a lack of progressive shortening of telomeres, indicating that RTEL1 functions have only been partially conserved between mammals and plants. Surprisingly, RTEL1 deficiency induces tolerance to the deoxynucleotide-depleting drug hydroxyurea, which could be mimicked by DNA cross-linking agents. This resistance does not rely on the essential replication checkpoint regulator WEE1 but could be blocked by a mutation in the SOG1 transcription factor. Taken together, our data indicate that RTEL1 is required for DNA replication and that its deficiency activates a SOG1-dependent replication checkpoint. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. Activation of human herpesvirus replication by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Alka; Remick, Jill; Zeichner, Steven L

    2013-10-01

    A central feature of herpesvirus biology is the ability of herpesviruses to remain latent within host cells. Classically, exposure to inducing agents, like activating cytokines or phorbol esters that stimulate host cell signal transduction events, and epigenetic agents (e.g., butyrate) was thought to end latency. We recently showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, or human herpesvirus-8 [HHV-8]) has another, alternative emergency escape replication pathway that is triggered when KSHV's host cell undergoes apoptosis, characterized by the lack of a requirement for the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein, accelerated late gene kinetics, and production of virus with decreased infectivity. Caspase-3 is necessary and sufficient to initiate the alternative replication program. HSV-1 was also recently shown to initiate replication in response to host cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that an alternative apoptosis-triggered replication program might be a general feature of herpesvirus biology and that apoptosis-initiated herpesvirus replication may have clinical implications, particularly for herpesviruses that almost universally infect humans. To explore whether an alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program is a common feature of herpesvirus biology, we studied cell lines latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus/HHV-4, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, HHV-7, and KSHV. We found that apoptosis triggers replication for each HHV studied, with caspase-3 being necessary and sufficient for HHV replication. An alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program appears to be a common feature of HHV biology. We also found that commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents activate HHV replication, which suggests that treatments that promote apoptosis may lead to activation of latent herpesviruses, with potential clinical significance.

  16. RAD52 Facilitates Mitotic DNA Synthesis Following Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary to counteract DNA replication stress. Common fragile site (CFS) loci are particularly sensitive to replication stress and undergo pathological rearrangements in tumors. At these loci, replication stress frequently activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis...... replication stress at CFS loci during S-phase. In contrast, MiDAS is RAD52 dependent, and RAD52 is required for the timely recruitment of MUS81 and POLD3 to CFSs in early mitosis. Our results provide further mechanistic insight into MiDAS and define a specific function for human RAD52. Furthermore, selective...

  17. Repair of damaged DNA in vivo: Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawalt, P.C.

    1987-09-01

    This contract was initiated in 1962 with the US Atomic Energy Commission to carry out basic research on the effects of radiation on the process of DNA replication in bacteria. Within the first contract year we discovered repair replication at the same time that Setlow and Carrier discovered pyrimidine dimer excision. These discoveries led to the elucidation of the process of excision-repair, one of the most important mechanisms by which living systems, including humans, respond to structural damage in their genetic material. We improved methodology for distinguishing repair replication from semiconservative replication and instructed others in these techniques. Painter then was the first to demonstrate repair replication in ultraviolet irradiated human cells. He, in turn, instructed James Cleaver who discovered that skin fibroblasts from patients with xeroderma pigmentosum were defective in excision-repair. People with this genetic defect are extremely sensitive to sunlight and they develop carcinomas and melanomas of the skin with high frequency. The existence of this hereditary disease attests to the importance of DNA repair in man. We certainly could not survive in the normal ultraviolet flux from the sun if our DNA were not continuously monitored for damage and repaired. Other hereditary diseases such as ataxia telangiectasia, Cockayne's syndrome, Blooms syndrome and Fanconi's anemia also involve deficiencies in DNA damage processing. The field of DNA repair has developed rapidly as we have learned that most environmental chemical carcinogens as well as radiation produce repairable damage in DNA. 251 refs

  18. Rickettsia conorii transcriptional response within inoculation eschar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Renesto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rickettsia conorii, the causative agent of the Mediterranean spotted fever, is transmitted to humans by the bite of infected ticks Rhipicephalus sanguineus. The skin thus constitutes an important barrier for the entry and propagation of R. conorii. Given this, analysis of the survival strategies used by the bacterium within infected skin is critical for our understanding of rickettsiosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report the first genome-wide analysis of R. conorii gene expression from infected human skin biopsies. Our data showed that R. conorii exhibited a striking transcript signature that is remarkably conserved across patients, regardless of genotype. The expression profiles obtained using custom Agilent microarrays were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. Within eschars, the amount of detected R. conorii transcripts was of 55%, this value being of 74% for bacteria grown in Vero cells. In such infected host tissues, approximately 15% (n = 211 of the total predicted R. conorii ORFs appeared differentially expressed compared to bacteria grown in standard laboratory conditions. These genes are mostly down-regulated and encode proteins essential for bacterial replication. Some of the strategies displayed by rickettsiae to overcome the host defense barriers, thus avoiding killing, were also pointed out. The observed up-regulation of rickettsial genes associated with DNA repair is likely to correspond to a DNA-damaging agent enriched environment generated by the host cells to eradicate the pathogens. Survival of R. conorii within eschars also involves adaptation to osmotic stress, changes in cell surface proteins and up-regulation of some virulence factors. Interestingly, in contrast to down-regulated transcripts, we noticed that up-regulated ones rather exhibit a small nucleotide size, most of them being exclusive for the spotted fever group rickettsiae. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Because eschar is a site for rickettsial

  19. PA from an H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus activates viral transcription and replication and induces apoptosis and interferon expression at an early stage of infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although gene exchange is not likely to occur freely, reassortment between the H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV and currently circulating human viruses is a serious concern. The PA polymerase subunit of H5N1 HPAIV was recently reported to activate the influenza replicon activity. Methods The replicon activities of PR8 and WSN strains (H1N1 of influenza containing PA from HPAIV A/Cambodia/P0322095/2005 (H5N1 and the activity of the chimeric RNA polymerase were analyzed. A reassortant WSN virus containing the H5N1 Cambodia PA (C-PA was then reconstituted and its growth in cells and pathogenicity in mice examined. The interferon promoter, TUNEL, and caspase 3, 8, and 9 activities of C-PA-infected cells were compared with those of WSN-infected cells. Results The activity of the chimeric RNA polymerase was slightly higher than that of WSN, and C-PA replicated better than WSN in cells. However, the multi-step growth of C-PA and its pathogenicity in mice were lower than those of WSN. The interferon promoter, TUNEL, and caspase 3, 8, and 9 activities were strongly induced in early infection in C-PA-infected cells but not in WSN-infected cells. Conclusions Apoptosis and interferon were strongly induced early in C-PA infection, which protected the uninfected cells from expansion of viral infection. In this case, these classical host-virus interactions contributed to the attenuation of this strongly replicating virus.

  20. The DNA Replication Checkpoint Directly Regulates MBF-Dependent G1/S Transcription▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Chaitali; Patel, Prasanta K.; Rosebrock, Adam; Oliva, Anna; Leatherwood, Janet; Rhind, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint transcriptionally upregulates genes that allow cells to adapt to and survive replication stress. Our results show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the replication checkpoint regulates the entire G1/S transcriptional program by directly regulating MBF, the G1/S transcription factor. Instead of initiating a checkpoint-specific transcriptional program, the replication checkpoint targets MBF to maintain the normal G1/S transcriptional program during replication stress. We propose a mechanism for this regulation, based on in vitro phosphorylation of the Cdc10 subunit of MBF by the Cds1 replication-checkpoint kinase. Replacement of two potential phosphorylation sites with phosphomimetic amino acids suffices to promote the checkpoint transcriptional program, suggesting that Cds1 phosphorylation directly regulates MBF-dependent transcription. The conservation of MBF between fission and budding yeast, and recent results implicating MBF as a target of the budding yeast replication checkpoint, suggests that checkpoint regulation of the MBF transcription factor is a conserved strategy for coping with replication stress. Furthermore, the structural and regulatory similarity between MBF and E2F, the metazoan G1/S transcription factor, suggests that this checkpoint mechanism may be broadly conserved among eukaryotes. PMID:18662996

  1. Meningocele repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is surgery to repair birth defects of the spine and spinal membranes. Meningocele and myelomeningocele ... is covered by a sterile dressing. Your child may then be transferred to a neonatal intensive ...

  2. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  3. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F.

    2003-01-01

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Polκ). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development

  4. Functions of Ubiquitin and SUMO in DNA Replication and Replication Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Néstor; Wong, Ronald P.; Ulrich, Helle D.

    2016-01-01

    Complete and faithful duplication of its entire genetic material is one of the essential prerequisites for a proliferating cell to maintain genome stability. Yet, during replication DNA is particularly vulnerable to insults. On the one hand, lesions in replicating DNA frequently cause a stalling of the replication machinery, as most DNA polymerases cannot cope with defective templates. This situation is aggravated by the fact that strand separation in preparation for DNA synthesis prevents common repair mechanisms relying on strand complementarity, such as base and nucleotide excision repair, from working properly. On the other hand, the replication process itself subjects the DNA to a series of hazardous transformations, ranging from the exposure of single-stranded DNA to topological contortions and the generation of nicks and fragments, which all bear the risk of inducing genomic instability. Dealing with these problems requires rapid and flexible responses, for which posttranslational protein modifications that act independently of protein synthesis are particularly well suited. Hence, it is not surprising that members of the ubiquitin family, particularly ubiquitin itself and SUMO, feature prominently in controlling many of the defensive and restorative measures involved in the protection of DNA during replication. In this review we will discuss the contributions of ubiquitin and SUMO to genome maintenance specifically as they relate to DNA replication. We will consider cases where the modifiers act during regular, i.e., unperturbed stages of replication, such as initiation, fork progression, and termination, but also give an account of their functions in dealing with lesions, replication stalling and fork collapse. PMID:27242895

  5. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  6. Gene organization inside replication domains in mammalian genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the large-scale organization of human genes with respect to "master" replication origins that were previously identified as bordering nucleotide compositional skew domains. We separate genes in two categories depending on their CpG enrichment at the promoter which can be considered as a marker of germline DNA methylation. Using expression data in mouse, we confirm that CpG-rich genes are highly expressed in germline whereas CpG-poor genes are in a silent state. We further show that, whether tissue-specific or broadly expressed (housekeeping genes), the CpG-rich genes are over-represented close to the replication skew domain borders suggesting some coordination of replication and transcription. We also reveal that the transcription of the longest CpG-rich genes is co-oriented with replication fork progression so that the promoter of these transcriptionally active genes be located into the accessible open chromatin environment surrounding the master replication origins that border the replication skew domains. The observation of a similar gene organization in the mouse genome confirms the interplay of replication, transcription and chromatin structure as the cornerstone of mammalian genome architecture.

  7. DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Zeeland, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    In this chapter a series of DNA repair pathways are discussed which are available to the cell to cope with the problem of DNA damaged by chemical or physical agents. In the case of microorganisms our knowledge about the precise mechanism of each DNA repair pathway and the regulation of it has been improved considerably when mutants deficient in these repair mechanisms became available. In the case of mammalian cells in culture, until recently there were very little repair deficient mutants available, because in almost all mammalian cells in culture at least the diploid number of chromosomes is present. Therefore the frequency of repair deficient mutants in such populations is very low. Nevertheless because replica plating techniques are improving some mutants from Chinese hamsters ovary cells and L5178Y mouse lymphoma cells are now available. In the case of human cells, cultures obtained from patients with certain genetic diseases are available. A number of cells appear to be sensitive to some chemical or physical mutagens. These include cells from patients suffering from xeroderma pigmentosum, Ataxia telangiectasia, Fanconi's anemia, Cockayne's syndrome. However, only in the case of xeroderma pigmentosum cells, has the sensitivity to ultraviolet light been clearly correlated with a deficiency in excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. Furthermore the work with strains obtained from biopsies from man is difficult because these cells generally have low cloning efficiencies and also have a limited lifespan in vitro. It is therefore very important that more repair deficient mutants will become available from established cell lines from human or animal origin

  8. Rhodium metalloinsertor binding generates a lesion with selective cytotoxicity for mismatch repair-deficient cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailis, Julie M; Weidmann, Alyson G; Mariano, Natalie F; Barton, Jacqueline K

    2017-07-03

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway recognizes and repairs errors in base pairing and acts to maintain genome stability. Cancers that have lost MMR function are common and comprise an important clinical subtype that is resistant to many standard of care chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin. We have identified a family of rhodium metalloinsertors that bind DNA mismatches with high specificity and are preferentially cytotoxic to MMR-deficient cells. Here, we characterize the cellular mechanism of action of the most potent and selective complex in this family, [Rh(chrysi)(phen)(PPO)] 2+ (Rh-PPO). We find that Rh-PPO binding induces a lesion that triggers the DNA damage response (DDR). DDR activation results in cell-cycle blockade and inhibition of DNA replication and transcription. Significantly, the lesion induced by Rh-PPO is not repaired in MMR-deficient cells, resulting in selective cytotoxicity. The Rh-PPO mechanism is reminiscent of DNA repair enzymes that displace mismatched bases, and is differentiated from other DNA-targeted chemotherapeutics such as cisplatin by its potency, cellular mechanism, and selectivity for MMR-deficient cells.

  9. Chemotherapy induces alternative transcription and splicing: Facts and hopes for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Charles A; Garbacki, Nancy; Colige, Alain C

    2017-10-01

    Alternative promoter usage, alternative splicing and alternative cleavage/polyadenylation (referred here as to alternative transcription and splicing) are main instruments to diversify the transcriptome from a limited set of genes. There is a good deal of evidence that chemotherapeutic drugs affect these processes, but the therapeutic incidence of these effects is poorly documented. The scope of this study is to review the impact of chemotherapy on alternative transcription and splicing and to discuss potential implications in cancer therapy. A literature survey identified >2200 events induced by chemotherapeutic drugs. The molecular pathways involved in these regulations are briefly discussed. The GO terms associated with the alternative transcripts are mainly related to cell cycle/division, mRNA processing, DNA repair, macromolecules catabolism and chromatin. A large fraction (43%) of transcripts are also related to the new hallmarks of cancer, mostly genetic instability and replicative immortality. Finally, we ask the question of the impact of alternative transcription and splicing on drug efficacy and of the possible curative benefit of combining chemotherapy and pharmaceutical regulation of this process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  11. Who Needs Replication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  12. Flock House virus subgenomic RNA3 is replicated and its replication correlates with transactivation of RNA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Ball, L. Andrew.

    2003-01-01

    The nodavirus Flock House virus has a bipartite genome composed of RNAs 1 and 2, which encode the catalytic component of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein precursor, respectively. In addition to catalyzing replication of the viral genome, the RdRp also transcribes from RNA1 a subgenomic RNA3, which is both required for and suppressed by RNA2 replication. Here, we show that in the absence of RNA1 replication, FHV RdRp replicated positive-sense RNA3 transcripts fully and copied negative-sense RNA3 transcripts into positive strands. The two nonstructural proteins encoded by RNA3 were dispensable for replication, but sequences in the 3'-terminal 58 nucleotides were required. RNA3 variants that failed to replicate also failed to transactivate RNA2. These results imply that RNA3 is naturally produced both by transcription from RNA1 and by subsequent RNA1-independent replication and that RNA3 replication may be necessary for transactivation of RNA2

  13. KIN17, XPC, DNA-PKCS and XRCC4 proteins in the cellular response to DNA damages. Relations between nucleotide excision repair and non-homologous end joining in a human syn-genic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despras, Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    The response to genotoxic stress involves many cellular factors in a complex network of mechanisms that aim to preserve the genetic integrity of the organism. These mechanisms enclose the detection and repair of DNA lesions, the regulation of transcription and replication and, eventually, the setting of cell death. Among the nuclear proteins involved in this response, kin17 proteins are zinc-finger proteins conserved through evolution and activated by ultraviolet (UV) or ionizing radiations (IR). We showed that human kin17 protein (HSAkin17) is found in the cell under a soluble form and a form tightly anchored to nuclear structures. A fraction of HSAkin17 protein is directly associated with chromatin. HSAkin17 protein is recruited to nuclear structures 24 hours after treatment with various agents inducing DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and/or replication forks blockage. Moreover, the reduction of total HSAkin17 protein level sensitizes RKO cells to IR. We also present evidence for the involvement of HSAkin17 protein in DNA replication. This hypothesis was further confirmed by the biochemical demonstration of its belonging to the replication complex. HSAkin17 protein could link DNA replication and DNA repair, a defect in the HSAkin17 pathway leading to an increased radiosensitivity. In a second part, we studied the interactions between two DNA repair mechanisms: nucleotide excision repair (NER) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). NER repairs a wide variety of lesions inducing a distortion of the DNA double helix including UV-induced pyrimidine dimers. NHEJ allows the repair of DSB by direct joining of DNA ends. We used a syn-genic model for DNA repair defects based on RNA interference developed in the laboratory. Epstein-Barr virus-derived vectors (pEBV) allow long-term expression of siRNA and specific extinction of the targeted gene. The reduction of the expression of genes involved in NER (XPA and XPC) or NHEJ (DNA-PKcs and XRCC4) leads to the expected

  14. Repair process and a repaired component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, III, Herbert Chidsey; Simpson, Stanley F.

    2018-02-20

    Matrix composite component repair processes are disclosed. The matrix composite repair process includes applying a repair material to a matrix composite component, securing the repair material to the matrix composite component with an external securing mechanism and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component during the securing by the external securing mechanism. The matrix composite component is selected from the group consisting of a ceramic matrix composite, a polymer matrix composite, and a metal matrix composite. In another embodiment, the repair process includes applying a partially-cured repair material to a matrix composite component, and curing the repair material to bond the repair material to the matrix composite component, an external securing mechanism securing the repair material throughout a curing period, In another embodiment, the external securing mechanism is consumed or decomposed during the repair process.

  15. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  16. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  17. Motorcycle Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Jim; Bundy, Mike

    This motorcycle repair curriculum guide contains the following ten areas of study: brake systems, clutches, constant mesh transmissions, final drives, suspension, mechanical starting mechanisms, electrical systems, fuel systems, lubrication systems, and overhead camshafts. Each area consists of one or more units of instruction. Each instructional…

  18. Registered Replication Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwmeester, S.; Verkoeijen, P. P.J.L.; Aczel, B.

    2017-01-01

    and colleagues. The results of studies using time pressure have been mixed, with some replication attempts observing similar patterns (e.g., Rand et al., 2014) and others observing null effects (e.g., Tinghög et al., 2013; Verkoeijen & Bouwmeester, 2014). This Registered Replication Report (RRR) assessed...... the size and variability of the effect of time pressure on cooperative decisions by combining 21 separate, preregistered replications of the critical conditions from Study 7 of the original article (Rand et al., 2012). The primary planned analysis used data from all participants who were randomly assigned...

  19. Induction of UV-resistant DNA replication in Escherichia coli: Induced stable DNA replication as an SOS function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogoma, T.; Torrey, T.A.; Connaughton, M.J.

    1979-01-01

    The striking similarity between the treatments that induce SOS functions and those that result in stable DNA replication (continuous DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis) prompted us to examine the possibility of stable DNA replication being a recA + lexA + -dependent SOS function. In addition to the treatments previously reported, ultraviolet (UV) irradiation or treatment with mitomycin C was also found to induce stable DNA replication. The thermal treatment of tif-1 strains did not result in detectable levels of stable DNA replication, but nalidixic acid readily induced the activity in these strains. The induction of stable DNA replication with nalidixic acid was severely suppressed in tif-1 lex A mutant strains. The inhibitory activity of lexA3 was negated by the presence of the spr-5l mutation, an intragenic suppressor of lexA3. Induced stable DNA replication was found to be considerably more resistant to UV irradiation than normal replication both in a uvr A6 strain and a uvr + strain. The UV-resistant replication occurred mostly in the semiconservative manner. The possible roles of stable DNA replication in repair of damaged DNA are discussed. (orig.)

  20. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  1. The replication recipe : What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, Ap; Farach, Frank J.; Geller, Jason; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Grange, James A.; Perugini, Marco; Spies, Jeffrey R.; van 't Veer, Anna

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  2. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  3. Repetitious nature of repaired DNA in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The report consists of three appendices, as follows: summary of preliminary studies of the comparative DNA repair in normal lymphoblastoid and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines; nonuniform reassociation of human lymphoblastoid cell DNA repair replicated following methyl methane sulfonate treatment; and preliminary DNA single-strand breakage studies in the L5178Y cell line

  4. Situation-dependent repair of DNA damage in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Borstel, R.C.; Hastings, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    The concept of channelling of lesions in DNA into defined repair systems has been used to explain many aspects of induced and spontaneous mutation. The channelling hypothesis states that lesions excluded from one repair process will be taken up by another repair process. This is a simplification. The three known modes of repair of damage induced by radiation are not equivalent modes of repair; they are, instead, different solutions to the problem of replacement of damaged molecules with new molecules which have the same informational content as those that were damaged. The mode of repair that is used is the result of the response to the situation in which the damage takes place. Thus, when the most likely mode of repair does not take place, then the situation changes with respect to the repair of the lesion; the lesion may enter the replication fork and be reparable by another route

  5. Chromatin Controls DNA Replication Origin Selection, Lagging-Strand Synthesis, and Replication Fork Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurat, Christoph F; Yeeles, Joseph T P; Patel, Harshil; Early, Anne; Diffley, John F X

    2017-01-05

    The integrity of eukaryotic genomes requires rapid and regulated chromatin replication. How this is accomplished is still poorly understood. Using purified yeast replication proteins and fully chromatinized templates, we have reconstituted this process in vitro. We show that chromatin enforces DNA replication origin specificity by preventing non-specific MCM helicase loading. Helicase activation occurs efficiently in the context of chromatin, but subsequent replisome progression requires the histone chaperone FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription). The FACT-associated Nhp6 protein, the nucleosome remodelers INO80 or ISW1A, and the lysine acetyltransferases Gcn5 and Esa1 each contribute separately to maximum DNA synthesis rates. Chromatin promotes the regular priming of lagging-strand DNA synthesis by facilitating DNA polymerase α function at replication forks. Finally, nucleosomes disrupted during replication are efficiently re-assembled into regular arrays on nascent DNA. Our work defines the minimum requirements for chromatin replication in vitro and shows how multiple chromatin factors might modulate replication fork rates in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation of Replication Factors Moving with the Replication Fork

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, Jordan B.; Ansbach, Alison B.; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2009-01-01

    Replication of chromosomes involves a variety of replication proteins including DNA polymerases, DNA helicases, and other accessory factors. Many of these proteins are known to localize at replication forks and travel with them as components of the replisome complex. Other proteins do not move with replication forks but still play an essential role in DNA replication. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms of DNA replication and its controls, it is important to examine localization ...

  8. Cytoplasmic ATR Activation Promotes Vaccinia Virus Genome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Postigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate their genomes in the cytoplasm without host involvement. We find that vaccinia virus induces cytoplasmic activation of ATR early during infection, before genome uncoating, which is unexpected because ATR plays a fundamental nuclear role in maintaining host genome integrity. ATR, RPA, INTS7, and Chk1 are recruited to cytoplasmic DNA viral factories, suggesting canonical ATR pathway activation. Consistent with this, pharmacological and RNAi-mediated inhibition of canonical ATR signaling suppresses genome replication. RPA and the sliding clamp PCNA interact with the viral polymerase E9 and are required for DNA replication. Moreover, the ATR activator TOPBP1 promotes genome replication and associates with the viral replisome component H5. Our study suggests that, in contrast to long-held beliefs, vaccinia recruits conserved components of the eukaryote DNA replication and repair machinery to amplify its genome in the host cytoplasm.

  9. Use of hydroxyurea in the measurement of DNA repair by the BND cellulose method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.; Strauss, B.

    1980-01-01

    Hydroxyurea inhibition is a convenient method of suppressing replicative DNA synthesis for DNA excision-repair measurement by the BND cellulose technique. Nonetheless, hydroxyurea can introduce artefacts by direct reaction with repair-inducing compounds and by long-term inhibition of the overall repair process. A simple technique of overcoming these problems is described. Cells are reacted with repair-inducing compounds in the absence of hydroxyurea, the cells are washed free of inducer, hydroxyurea is added to 2 mM, and after a short period to establish replication inhibition, 3 H dThd is added and repair measured over a one-hour incubation period

  10. Stalled replication forks generate a distinct mutational signature in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B.; Liberti, Sascha E.; Vogel, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells acquire genome alterations during the act of DNA replication. This leads to mutation accumulation and somatic cell mosaicism in multicellular organisms, and is also implicated as an underlying cause of aging and tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms of DNA replication...... Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex) engineered into the yeast genome. We demonstrate that transient stalling at this barrier induces a distinct pattern of genome rearrangements in the newly replicated region behind the stalled fork, which primarily consist of localized losses and duplications of DNA sequences....... These genetic alterations arise through the aberrant repair of a single-stranded DNA gap, in a process that is dependent on Exo1- and Shu1-dependent homologous recombination repair (HRR). Furthermore, aberrant processing of HRR intermediates, and elevated HRR-associated mutagenesis, is detectable in a yeast...

  11. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  12. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemontt, J F

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

  13. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  14. Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemontt, J.F.

    1979-01-01

    Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

  15. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  16. Inhibition of DNA replication by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edenberg, H.J.

    1976-01-01

    DNA replication in ultraviolet-irradiated HeLa cells was studied by two different techniques: measurements of the kinetics of semiconservative DNA synthesis, and DNA fiber autoradiography. In examining the kinetics of semiconservative DNA synthesis, density label was used to avoid measuring the incorporation due to repair replication. The extent of inhibition varied with time. After doses of less than 10 J/m 2 the rate was initially depressed but later showed some recovery. After higher doses, a constant, low rate of synthesis was seen for at least the initial 6 h. An analysis of these data indicated that the inhibition of DNA synthesis could be explained by replication forks halting at pyrimidine dimers. DNA fiber autoradiography was used to further characterize replication after ultraviolet irradiation. The average length of labeled segments in irradiated cells increased in the time immediately after irradiation, and then leveled off. This is the predicted pattern if DNA synthesis in each replicon continued at its previous rate until a lesion is reached, and then halted. The frequency of lesions that block synthesis is approximately the same as the frequency of pyrimidine dimers

  17. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Sowd

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  18. SV40 Utilizes ATM Kinase Activity to Prevent Non-homologous End Joining of Broken Viral DNA Replication Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A.; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L.; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PKcs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PKcs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5′ to 3′ end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication. PMID:25474690

  19. DNA Damage, Repair, and Cancer Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Marc-Olivier; Perry, Nicholas J. S.; Poulogiannis, George

    2018-01-01

    Although there has been a renewed interest in the field of cancer metabolism in the last decade, the link between metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair in cancer has yet to be appreciably explored. In this review, we examine the evidence connecting DNA damage and repair mechanisms with cell metabolism through three principal links. (1) Regulation of methyl- and acetyl-group donors through different metabolic pathways can impact DNA folding and remodeling, an essential part of accurate double strand break repair. (2) Glutamine, aspartate, and other nutrients are essential for de novo nucleotide synthesis, which dictates the availability of the nucleotide pool, and thereby influences DNA repair and replication. (3) Reactive oxygen species, which can increase oxidative DNA damage and hence the load of the DNA-repair machinery, are regulated through different metabolic pathways. Interestingly, while metabolism affects DNA repair, DNA damage can also induce metabolic rewiring. Activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers an increase in nucleotide synthesis and anabolic glucose metabolism, while also reducing glutamine anaplerosis. Furthermore, mutations in genes involved in the DDR and DNA repair also lead to metabolic rewiring. Links between cancer metabolism and DNA damage/DNA repair are increasingly apparent, yielding opportunities to investigate the mechanistic basis behind potential metabolic vulnerabilities of a substantial fraction of tumors. PMID:29459886

  20. Faulty DNA-polymerase δ/ε-mediated excision-repair in response to gamma-radiation or ultraviolet-light in P53-deficient fibroblast strains from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzayans, R.; Enns, L.; Dietrich, K.; Barley, R.D.C.; Paterson, M.C.; Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB; Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB

    1996-01-01

    Dermal fibroblast strains cultured from affected members of a cancer-prone family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) harbor a point mutation in one allele of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, resulting in loss of normal p53-deficient strains to carry out the long-patch mode of excision repair, mediated by DNA polymerases delta and epsilon, after exposure to Co-60 gamma radiation or far ultraviolet (UV) (chiefly 254 mm) light. Repair was monitored by incubation of the irradiated cultures in the presence of aphidicolin (ape) or 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (araC), each a specific inhibitor of long-patch repair, followed by measurement of drug-induced DNA strand breaks (reflecting non-ligated strand incision events) by alkaline surcrose velocity sedimentation. The LFS strains displayed deficient repair capacity in response to both gamma rays and UV light. The repair anomaly in UV-irradiated LFS cultures was manifested not only in the overall genome, but also in the transcriptionally active, preferentially repaired c-myc gene. Using autoradiography we also assessed unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) after UV irradiation and found this conventional measure of repair replication to be deficient in LFS strains. Moreover, both ape and araC decreased the level of UV-induced UDS by similar to 75% in normal cells, but each had only a marginal effect on LFS cells. We further demonstrated that the LFS strains are impaired in the recovery of both RNA and replicative DNA syntheses after UV treatment, two molecular anomalies of the DNA repair deficiency disorders xeroderma pigmentosum and Cockayne's syndrome. Together these results imply a critical role for wild-type p53 protein in DNA polymerase delta/epsilon-mediated excision repair, both the mechanism operating on the entire genome and that acting on expressed genes. (Author)

  1. DNA Replication and Transcription: An Innovative Teaching Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossey, Annabel; Hancock, Carolyn

    2005-01-01

    First-year students in genetics at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, attend two general biology modules, one in each semester. Teaching involves four formal lectures per week of 45 min each, one 3-h practical, and one lecture period tutorial. These students, graduating from secondary education, are well schooled in rote learning but…

  2. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) by Methyl CpG Binding Protein 2 (MeCP2): a Novel Mechanism for Re-Myelination and/or Myelin Repair Involved in the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    KhorshidAhmad, Tina; Acosta, Crystal; Cortes, Claudia; Lakowski, Ted M; Gangadaran, Surendiran; Namaka, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive, neurological disease characterized by the targeted immune system-mediated destruction of central nervous system (CNS) myelin. Autoreactive CD4+ T helper cells have a key role in orchestrating MS-induced myelin damage. Once activated, circulating Th1-cells secrete a variety of inflammatory cytokines that foster the breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) eventually infiltrating into the CNS. Inside the CNS, they become reactivated upon exposure to the myelin structural proteins and continue to produce inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) that leads to direct activation of antibodies and macrophages that are involved in the phagocytosis of myelin. Proliferating oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) migrating to the lesion sites are capable of acute remyelination but unable to completely repair or restore the immune system-mediated myelin damage. This results in various permanent clinical neurological disabilities such as cognitive dysfunction, fatigue, bowel/bladder abnormalities, and neuropathic pain. At present, there is no cure for MS. Recent remyelination and/or myelin repair strategies have focused on the role of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its upstream transcriptional repressor methyl CpG binding protein (MeCP2). Research in the field of epigenetic therapeutics involving histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and lysine acetyl transferase (KAT) inhibitors is being explored to repress the detrimental effects of MeCP2. This review will address the role of MeCP2 and BDNF in remyelination and/or myelin repair and the potential of HDAC and KAT inhibitors as novel therapeutic interventions for MS.

  4. Brain aneurysm repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... aneurysm repair; Dissecting aneurysm repair; Endovascular aneurysm repair - brain; Subarachnoid hemorrhage - aneurysm ... Your scalp, skull, and the coverings of the brain are opened. A metal clip is placed at ...

  5. Repair of DNA damage in light sensitive human skin diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horkay, I.; Varga, L.; Tam' asi P., Gundy, S.

    1978-12-01

    Repair of uv-light induced DNA damage and changes in the semiconservative DNA synthesis were studied by in vitro autoradiography in the skin of patients with lightdermatoses (polymorphous light eruption, porphyria cutanea tarda, erythropoietic protoporphyria) and xeroderma pigmentosum as well as in that of healthy controls. In polymorphous light eruption the semiconservative DNA replication rate was more intensive in the area of the skin lesions and in the repeated phototest site, the excision repair synthesis appeared to be unaltered. In cutaneous prophyrias a decreased rate of the repair incorporation could be detected. Xeroderma pigmentosum was characterized by a strongly reduced repair synthesis.

  6. Suppression of Coronavirus Replication by Cyclophilin Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Coronaviruses infect a variety of mammalian and avian species and cause serious diseases in humans, cats, mice, and birds in the form of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS, feline infectious peritonitis (FIP, mouse hepatitis, and avian infectious bronchitis, respectively. No effective vaccine or treatment has been developed for SARS-coronavirus or FIP virus, both of which cause lethal diseases. It has been reported that a cyclophilin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, could inhibit the replication of coronaviruses. CsA is a well-known immunosuppressive drug that binds to cellular cyclophilins to inhibit calcineurin, a calcium-calmodulin-activated serine/threonine-specific phosphatase. The inhibition of calcineurin blocks the translocation of nuclear factor of activated T cells from the cytosol into the nucleus, thus preventing the transcription of genes encoding cytokines such as interleukin-2. Cyclophilins are peptidyl-prolyl isomerases with physiological functions that have been described for many years to include chaperone and foldase activities. Also, many viruses require cyclophilins for replication; these include human immunodeficiency virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, and hepatitis C virus. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the suppression of viral replication differ for different viruses. This review describes the suppressive effects of CsA on coronavirus replication.

  7. Dynamic interaction of TTDA with TFIIH is stabilized by nucleotide excision repair in living cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Giglia-Mari (Giuseppina); C. Miquel (Catherine); A.F. Theil (Arjan); P.O. Mari (Pierre-Olivier); D. Hoogstraten (Deborah); J.M.Y. Ng (Jessica); C. Dinant (Christoffel); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractTranscription/repair factor IIH (TFIIH) is essential for RNA polymerase II transcription and nucleotide excision repair (NER). This multi-subunit complex consists of ten polypeptides, including the recently identified small 8-kDa trichothiodystrophy group A (TTDA)/ hTFB5 protein.

  8. DNA repair , cell repair and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhestyanikov, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    Data obtained in laboratory of radiation cytology and literature data testifying to a considerable role of DNA repair in cell sensitivity to radiation and chemical DNA-tropic agents have been considered. Data pointing to the probability of contribution of inducible repair of DNA into plant cells sensitivity to X-rays are obtained. Certain violations of DNA repair do not result in the increase of radiosensitivity. It is assumed that in the cases unknown mechanisms of DNA repair operate

  9. Mutagenic repair of double-stranded DNA breaks in vaccinia virus genomes requires cellular DNA ligase IV activity in the cytosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luteijn, Rutger David; Drexler, Ingo; Smith, Geoffrey L; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2018-04-20

    Poxviruses comprise a group of large dsDNA viruses that include members relevant to human and animal health, such as variola virus, monkeypox virus, cowpox virus and vaccinia virus (VACV). Poxviruses are remarkable for their unique replication cycle, which is restricted to the cytoplasm of infected cells. The independence from the host nucleus requires poxviruses to encode most of the enzymes involved in DNA replication, transcription and processing. Here, we use the CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering system to induce DNA damage to VACV (strain Western Reserve) genomes. We show that targeting CRISPR/Cas9 to essential viral genes limits virus replication efficiently. Although VACV is a strictly cytoplasmic pathogen, we observed extensive viral genome editing at the target site; this is reminiscent of a non-homologous end-joining DNA repair mechanism. This pathway was not dependent on the viral DNA ligase, but critically involved the cellular DNA ligase IV. Our data show that DNA ligase IV can act outside of the nucleus to allow repair of dsDNA breaks in poxvirus genomes. This pathway might contribute to the introduction of mutations within the genome of poxviruses and may thereby promote the evolution of these viruses.

  10. FANCJ couples replication past natural fork barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Rebekka A; Nieminuszczy, Jadwiga; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Niedzwiedz, Wojciech

    2013-04-01

    Defective DNA repair causes Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare childhood cancer-predisposing syndrome. At least 15 genes are known to be mutated in FA; however, their role in DNA repair remains unclear. Here, we show that the FANCJ helicase promotes DNA replication in trans by counteracting fork stalling on replication barriers, such as G4 quadruplex structures. Accordingly, stabilization of G4 quadruplexes in ΔFANCJ cells restricts fork movements, uncouples leading- and lagging-strand synthesis and generates small single-stranded DNA gaps behind the fork. Unexpectedly, we also discovered that FANCJ suppresses heterochromatin spreading by coupling fork movement through replication barriers with maintenance of chromatin structure. We propose that FANCJ plays an essential role in counteracting chromatin compaction associated with unscheduled replication fork stalling and restart, and suppresses tumorigenesis, at least partially, in this replication-specific manner.

  11. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  12. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  13. The roles of different repair mechanisms in the ultraviolet resistance of Micrococcus luteus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zherebtsov, S.V.; Tomilin, N.V.

    1982-01-01

    In ultraviolet-irradiated Micrococcus luteus wild type the replication of DNA was not interrupted at every pyrimidine dimer, in contrast to that in ultraviolet-sensitive G7 and some other mutants. The contribution of uninterrupted replication to the ultraviolet resistance of M. luteus proved to be equal to the contributions of excision repair and inducible postreplication repair. It was found that some postreplication gaps could be filled by constitutive pathways of postreplication repair when inducible pathways were suppressed by chloramphenicol. Prolonged treatment with chloramphenicol was shown to block not only inducible repair but also other processes essential for ultraviolet irradiation survival. (Auth.)

  14. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  15. Characterization of a mutant rat kangaroo cell line with alterations in the cell cycle and DNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaji, E.N.; Johnson, R.T.; Downes, C.S.; Eveno, E.; Mezzina, M.; Sarasin, A.; Menck, C.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Using a positive selection system for isolating DNA replication and repair related mutants, we isolated a clone from a rat kangaroo cell line (PtK2) that has increased sensitivity to UV light. Characterization of this clone indicated normal post-replication repair after UV irradiation, and normal removal rates of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproducts by excision repair. However, this cell line has decreased ability to make early incisions on damaged DNA, po...

  16. Nucleotide excision repair in differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wees, Caroline van der [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Jansen, Jacob [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Vrieling, Harry [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Laarse, Arnoud van der [Department of Cardiology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Zeeland, Albert van [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)]. E-mail: l.mullenders@lumc.nl

    2007-01-03

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the principal pathway for the removal of a wide range of DNA helix-distorting lesions and operates via two NER subpathways, i.e. global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Although detailed information is available on expression and efficiency of NER in established mammalian cell lines, little is known about the expression of NER pathways in (terminally) differentiated cells. The majority of studies in differentiated cells have focused on repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and 6-4-photoproducts (6-4PP) because of the high frequency of photolesions at low level of toxicity and availability of sensitive technologies to determine photolesions in defined regions of the genome. The picture that emerges from these studies is blurred and rather complex. Fibroblasts and terminally differentiated myocytes of the rat heart display equally efficient GGR of 6-4PP but poor repair of CPD due to the absence of p48 expression. This repair phenotype is clearly different from human terminal differentiated neurons. Furthermore, both cell types were found to carry out TCR of CPD, thus mimicking the repair phenotype of established rodent cell lines. In contrast, in intact rat spermatogenic cells repair was very inefficient at the genome overall level and in transcriptionally active genes indicating that GGR and TCR are non-functional. Also, non-differentiated mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exhibit low levels of NER after UV irradiation. However, the mechanisms that lead to low NER activity are clearly different: in differentiated spermatogenic cells differences in chromatin compaction and sequestering of NER proteins may underlie the lack of NER activity in pre-meiotic cells, whereas in non-differentiated ES cells NER is impaired by a strong apoptotic response.

  17. Analysis of DNA replication associated chromatin decondensation: in vivo assay for understanding chromatin remodeling mechanisms of selected proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysov, Sergiy; Bryant, Victoria L; Alexandrow, Mark G

    2015-01-01

    Of critical importance to many of the events underlying transcriptional control of gene expression are modifications to core and linker histones that regulate the accessibility of trans-acting factors to the DNA substrate within the context of chromatin. Likewise, control over the initiation of DNA replication, as well as the ability of the replication machinery to proceed during elongation through the multiple levels of chromatin condensation that are likely to be encountered, is known to involve the creation of chromatin accessibility. In the latter case, chromatin access will likely need to be a transient event so as to prevent total genomic unraveling of the chromatin that would be deleterious to cells. While there are many molecular and biochemical approaches in use to study histone changes and their relationship to transcription and chromatin accessibility, few techniques exist that allow a molecular dissection of the events underlying DNA replication control as it pertains to chromatin changes and accessibility. Here, we outline a novel experimental strategy for addressing the ability of specific proteins to induce large-scale chromatin unfolding (decondensation) in vivo upon site-specific targeting to an engineered locus. Our laboratory has used this powerful system in novel ways to directly address the ability of DNA replication proteins to create chromatin accessibility, and have incorporated modifications to the basic approach that allow for a molecular genetic analysis of the mechanisms and associated factors involved in causing chromatin decondensation by a protein of interest. Alternative approaches involving co-expression of other proteins (competitors or stimulators), concurrent drug treatments, and analysis of co-localizing histone modifications are also addressed, all of which are illustrative of the utility of this experimental system for extending basic findings to physiologically relevant mechanisms. Although used by our group to analyze

  18. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate [MMS], methyl methanethiosulfonate [MMTS], ultraviolet light [UV], or gamma radiation [GR]) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes

  19. The G-quadruplex DNA stabilizing drug pyridostatin promotes DNA damage and downregulates transcription of Brca1 in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moruno-Manchon, Jose F; Koellhoffer, Edward C; Gopakumar, Jayakrishnan; Hambarde, Shashank; Kim, Nayun; McCullough, Louise D; Tsvetkov, Andrey S

    2017-09-12

    The G-quadruplex is a non-canonical DNA secondary structure formed by four DNA strands containing multiple runs of guanines. G-quadruplexes play important roles in DNA recombination, replication, telomere maintenance, and regulation of transcription. Small molecules that stabilize the G-quadruplexes alter gene expression in cancer cells. Here, we hypothesized that the G-quadruplexes regulate transcription in neurons. We discovered that pyridostatin, a small molecule that specifically stabilizes G-quadruplex DNA complexes, induced neurotoxicity and promoted the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in cultured neurons. We also found that pyridostatin downregulated transcription of the Brca1 gene, a gene that is critical for DSB repair. Importantly, in an in vitro gel shift assay, we discovered that an antibody specific to the G-quadruplex structure binds to a synthetic oligonucleotide, which corresponds to the first putative G-quadruplex in the Brca1 gene promoter. Our results suggest that the G-quadruplex complexes regulate transcription in neurons. Studying the G-quadruplexes could represent a new avenue for neurodegeneration and brain aging research.

  20. In Vivo Regulation of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Peroxisome Proliferators†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Luca G.; Eggers, Carrie M.; Raney, Anneke K.; Chi, Susan Y.; Peters, Jeffrey M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; McLachlan, Alan

    1999-01-01

    The role of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) in regulating hepatitis B virus (HBV) transcription and replication in vivo was investigated in an HBV transgenic mouse model. Treatment of HBV transgenic mice with the peroxisome proliferators Wy-14,643 and clofibric acid resulted in a less than twofold increase in HBV transcription rates and steady-state levels of HBV RNAs in the livers of these mice. In male mice, this increase in transcription was associated with a 2- to 3-fold increase in replication intermediates, whereas in female mice it was associated with a 7- to 14-fold increase in replication intermediates. The observed increases in transcription and replication were dependent on PPARα. HBV transgenic mice lacking this nuclear hormone receptor showed similar levels of HBV transcripts and replication intermediates as untreated HBV transgenic mice expressing PPARα but failed to demonstrate alterations in either RNA or DNA synthesis in response to peroxisome proliferators. Therefore, it appears that very modest alterations in transcription can, under certain circumstances, result in relatively large increases in HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. PMID:10559356

  1. Inhibition of histone deacetylases stimulates HBV replication independent of protein X

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Klundert, Maarten A. A.; Swart, Marjolein; Zaaijer, Hans L.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: HBV expresses an accessory protein called X (HBx), which supports HBV replication by increasing transcription from episomal templates. Here, we investigate whether HBx augments HBV replication by interfering with the deacetylation of HBV DNA associated histones by histone deacetylases (HDACs).

  2. Transcriptional profiling of putative human epithelial stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koçer Salih S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human interfollicular epidermis is sustained by the proliferation of stem cells and their progeny, transient amplifying cells. Molecular characterization of these two cell populations is essential for better understanding of self renewal, differentiation and mechanisms of skin pathogenesis. The purpose of this study was to obtain gene expression profiles of alpha 6+/MHCI+, transient amplifying cells and alpha 6+/MHCI-, putative stem cells, and to compare them with existing data bases of gene expression profiles of hair follicle stem cells. The expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I, previously shown to be absent in stem cells in several tissues, and alpha 6 integrin were used to isolate MHCI positive basal cells, and MHCI low/negative basal cells. Results Transcriptional profiles of the two cell populations were determined and comparisons made with published data for hair follicle stem cell gene expression profiles. We demonstrate that presumptive interfollicular stem cells, alpha 6+/MHCI- cells, are enriched in messenger RNAs encoding surface receptors, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix proteins, transcripts encoding members of IFN-alpha family proteins and components of IFN signaling, but contain lower levels of transcripts encoding proteins which take part in energy metabolism, cell cycle, ribosome biosynthesis, splicing, protein translation, degradation, DNA replication, repair, and chromosome remodeling. Furthermore, our data indicate that the cell signaling pathways Notch1 and NF-κB are downregulated/inhibited in MHC negative basal cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells have additional characteristics attributed to stem cells. Moreover, the transcription profile of alpha 6+/MHCI- cells shows similarities to transcription profiles of mouse hair follicle bulge cells known to be enriched for stem cells. Collectively, our data suggests that alpha 6+/MHCI- cells

  3. International Expansion through Flexible Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    Business organizations may expand internationally by replicating a part of their value chain, such as a sales and marketing format, in other countries. However, little is known regarding how such “international replicators” build a format for replication, or how they can adjust it in order to ada......, etc.) are replicated in a uniform manner across stores, and change only very slowly (if at all) in response to learning (“flexible replication”). We conclude by discussing the factors that influence the approach to replication adopted by an international replicator.......Business organizations may expand internationally by replicating a part of their value chain, such as a sales and marketing format, in other countries. However, little is known regarding how such “international replicators” build a format for replication, or how they can adjust it in order to adapt...

  4. DNA Repair and Genome Maintenance in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Justin S.; Schroeder, Jeremy W.; Walsh, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: From microbes to multicellular eukaryotic organisms, all cells contain pathways responsible for genome maintenance. DNA replication allows for the faithful duplication of the genome, whereas DNA repair pathways preserve DNA integrity in response to damage originating from endogenous and exogenous sources. The basic pathways important for DNA replication and repair are often conserved throughout biology. In bacteria, high-fidelity repair is balanced with low-fidelity repair and mutagenesis. Such a balance is important for maintaining viability while providing an opportunity for the advantageous selection of mutations when faced with a changing environment. Over the last decade, studies of DNA repair pathways in bacteria have demonstrated considerable differences between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. Here we review and discuss the DNA repair, genome maintenance, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We present their molecular mechanisms and compare the functions and regulation of several pathways with known information on other organisms. We also discuss DNA repair during different growth phases and the developmental program of sporulation. In summary, we present a review of the function, regulation, and molecular mechanisms of DNA repair and mutagenesis in Gram-positive bacteria, with a strong emphasis on B. subtilis. PMID:22933559

  5. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  6. The forked flap repair for hypospadias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Chadha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite the abundance of techniques for the repair of Hypospadias, its problems still persist and a satisfactory design to correct the penile curvature with the formation of neourethra from the native urethral tissue or genital or extragenital tissues, with minimal postoperative complications has yet to evolve. Aim: Persisting with such an endeavor, a new technique for the repair of distal and midpenile hypospadias is described. Materials and Methods: The study has been done in 70 cases over the past 11 years. The "Forked-Flap" repair is a single stage method for the repair of such Hypospadias with chordee. It takes advantage of the rich vascular communication at the corona and capitalizes on the established reliability of the meatal based flip-flap. The repair achieves straightening of the curvature of the penis by complete excision of chordee tissue from the ventral surface of the penis beneath the urethral plate. The urethra is reconstructed using the native plate with forked flap extensions and genital tissue relying on the concept of meatal based flaps. Water proofing by dartos tissue and reinforcement by Nesbit′s prepucial tissue transfer completes the one stage procedure. Statistical Analysis: An analysis of 70 cases of this single stage technique of repair of penile hypospadias with chordee, operated at 3 to 5 years of age over the past 11 years is presented. Results and Conclusion: The Forked Flap gives comparable and replicable results; except for a urethrocutaneous fistula rate of 4% no other complications were observed.

  7. BARE retrotransposons are translated and replicated via distinct RNA pools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chang

    Full Text Available The replication of Long Terminal Repeat (LTR retrotransposons, which can constitute over 80% of higher plant genomes, resembles that of retroviruses. A major question for retrotransposons and retroviruses is how the two conflicting roles of their transcripts, in translation and reverse transcription, are balanced. Here, we show that the BARE retrotransposon, despite its organization into just one open reading frame, produces three distinct classes of transcripts. One is capped, polyadenylated, and translated, but cannot be copied into cDNA. The second is not capped or polyadenylated, but is destined for packaging and ultimate reverse transcription. The third class is capped, polyadenylated, and spliced to favor production of a subgenomic RNA encoding only Gag, the protein forming virus-like particles. Moreover, the BARE2 subfamily, which cannot synthesize Gag and is parasitic on BARE1, does not produce the spliced sub-genomic RNA for translation but does make the replication competent transcripts, which are packaged into BARE1 particles. To our knowledge, this is first demonstration of distinct RNA pools for translation and transcription for any retrotransposon.

  8. Chromosomal Replication Complexity: A Novel DNA Metrics and Genome Instability Factor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Kuzminov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As the ratio of the copy number of the most replicated to the unreplicated regions in the same chromosome, the definition of chromosomal replication complexity (CRC appears to leave little room for variation, being either two during S-phase or one otherwise. However, bacteria dividing faster than they replicate their chromosome spike CRC to four and even eight. A recent experimental inquiry about the limits of CRC in Escherichia coli revealed two major reasons to avoid elevating it further: (i increased chromosomal fragmentation and (ii complications with subsequent double-strand break repair. Remarkably, examples of stable elevated CRC in eukaryotic chromosomes are well known under various terms like "differential replication," "underreplication," "DNA puffs," "onion-skin replication," or "re-replication" and highlight the phenomenon of static replication fork (sRF. To accurately describe the resulting "amplification by overinitiation," I propose a new term: "replification" (subchromosomal overreplication. In both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, replification, via sRF processing, causes double-strand DNA breaks and, with their repair elevating chromosomal rearrangements, represents a novel genome instability factor. I suggest how static replication bubbles could be stabilized and speculate that some tandem duplications represent such persistent static bubbles. Moreover, I propose how static replication bubbles could be transformed into tandem duplications, double minutes, or inverted triplications. Possible experimental tests of these models are discussed.

  9. Rapid road repair vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Leo M.

    1998-01-01

    Disclosed is a rapid road repair vehicle capable of moving over a surface to be repaired at near normal posted traffic speeds to scan for and find an the high rate of speed, imperfections in the pavement surface, prepare the surface imperfection for repair by air pressure and vacuum cleaning, applying a correct amount of the correct patching material to effect the repair, smooth the resulting repaired surface, and catalog the location and quality of the repairs for maintenance records of the road surface. The rapid road repair vehicle can repair surface imperfections at lower cost, improved quality, at a higher rate of speed than was was heretofor possible, with significantly reduced exposure to safety and health hazards associated with this kind of road repair activities in the past.

  10. Replication-mediated disassociation of replication protein A-XPA complex upon DNA damage: implications for RPA handing off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gaofeng; Zou, Yue; Wu, Xiaoming

    2012-08-01

    RPA (replication protein A), the eukaryotic ssDNA (single-stranded DNA)-binding protein, participates in most cellular processes in response to genotoxic insults, such as NER (nucleotide excision repair), DNA, DSB (double-strand break) repair and activation of cell cycle checkpoint signalling. RPA interacts with XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum A) and functions in early stage of NER. We have shown that in cells the RPA-XPA complex disassociated upon exposure of cells to high dose of UV irradiation. The dissociation required replication stress and was partially attributed to tRPA hyperphosphorylation. Treatment of cells with CPT (camptothecin) and HU (hydroxyurea), which cause DSB DNA damage and replication fork collapse respectively and also leads to the disruption of RPA-XPA complex. Purified RPA and XPA were unable to form complex in vitro in the presence of ssDNA. We propose that the competition-based RPA switch among different DNA metabolic pathways regulates the dissociation of RPA with XPA in cells after DNA damage. The biological significances of RPA-XPA complex disruption in relation with checkpoint activation, DSB repair and RPA hyperphosphorylation are discussed.

  11. Replication-mediated disassociation of replication protein A–XPA complex upon DNA damage: implications for RPA handing off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gaofeng; Zou, Yue; Wu, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    RPA (replication protein A), the eukaryotic ssDNA (single-stranded DNA)-binding protein, participates in most cellular processes in response to genotoxic insults, such as NER (nucleotide excision repair), DNA, DSB (double-strand break) repair and activation of cell cycle checkpoint signalling. RPA interacts with XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum A) and functions in early stage of NER. We have shown that in cells the RPA–XPA complex disassociated upon exposure of cells to high dose of UV irradiation. The dissociation required replication stress and was partially attributed to tRPA hyperphosphorylation. Treatment of cells with CPT (camptothecin) and HU (hydroxyurea), which cause DSB DNA damage and replication fork collapse respectively and also leads to the disruption of RPA–XPA complex. Purified RPA and XPA were unable to form complex in vitro in the presence of ssDNA. We propose that the competition-based RPA switch among different DNA metabolic pathways regulates the dissociation of RPA with XPA in cells after DNA damage. The biological significances of RPA–XPA complex disruption in relation with checkpoint activation, DSB repair and RPA hyperphosphorylation are discussed. PMID:22578086

  12. Double-Strand DNA Break Repair in Mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Discontinuity of both strands of the chromosome is a lethal event in all living organisms because it compromises chromosome replication. As such, a diversity of DNA repair systems has evolved to repair double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In part, this diversity of DSB repair systems has evolved to repair breaks that arise in diverse physiologic circumstances or sequence contexts, including cellular states of nonreplication or breaks that arise between repeats. Mycobacteria elaborate a set of three genetically distinct DNA repair pathways: homologous recombination, nonhomologous end joining, and single-strand annealing. As such, mycobacterial DSB repair diverges substantially from the standard model of prokaryotic DSB repair and represents an attractive new model system. In addition, the presence in mycobacteria of a DSB repair system that can repair DSBs in nonreplicating cells (nonhomologous end joining) or when DSBs arise between repeats (single-strand annealing) has clear potential relevance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis pathogenesis, although the exact role of these systems in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis is still being elucidated. In this article we will review the genetics of mycobacterial DSB repair systems, focusing on recent insights.

  13. A CI-Independent Form of Replicative Inhibition: Turn Off of Early Replication of Bacteriophage Lambda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Sidney; Horbay, Monique A.; Hayes, Connie

    2012-01-01

    Several earlier studies have described an unusual exclusion phenotype exhibited by cells with plasmids carrying a portion of the replication region of phage lambda. Cells exhibiting this inhibition phenotype (IP) prevent the plating of homo-immune and hybrid hetero-immune lambdoid phages. We have attempted to define aspects of IP, and show that it is directed to repλ phages. IP was observed in cells with plasmids containing a λ DNA fragment including oop, encoding a short OOP micro RNA, and part of the lambda origin of replication, oriλ, defined by iteron sequences ITN1-4 and an adjacent high AT-rich sequence. Transcription of the intact oop sequence from its promoter, pO is required for IP, as are iterons ITN3–4, but not the high AT-rich portion of oriλ. The results suggest that IP silencing is directed to theta mode replication initiation from an infecting repλ genome, or an induced repλ prophage. Phage mutations suppressing IP, i.e., Sip, map within, or adjacent to cro or in O, or both. Our results for plasmid based IP suggest the hypothesis that there is a natural mechanism for silencing early theta-mode replication initiation, i.e. the buildup of λ genomes with oop + oriλ+ sequence. PMID:22590552

  14. Mutagenic DNA repair in Escherichia coli. VII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridges, B.A.; Mottershead, R.P.

    1978-01-01

    Incubation of E. coli WP2 in the presence of chloramphenicol (CAP) for 90 min before and 60 min after γ-irradiation had no effect on the induction of Trp + mutations. Bacteria that had been treated with CAP for 90 min prior to UV irradiation showed normal or near normal yields of induced mutations to streptomycin or colicin E2 resistance. Most of these mutations lost their photoreversibility (indicating 'fixation') during continued incubation with CAP for a further 60 min after irradiation, during which time neither protein nor DNA synthesis was detectable. It is suggested that CAP-sensitive protein synthesis is not required for mutagenic (error-prone) repair of lesions in pre-existing DNA, arguing against an inducible component in this repair. In contrast the frequency of UV-induced mutations to Trp + (largely at suppressor loci) was drastically reduced by CAP pretreatment, confirming the need for an active replication fork for UV-mutagenesis at these loci. It is known from the work of others that CAP given after UV abolishes mutagenesis at these loci. It is concluded that CAP-sensitive protein synthesis (consistent with a requirement for an inducible function) is necessary for mutagenic repair only in newly-replicated DNA (presumably at daughter strand gaps) and not in pre-existing DNA. The data are consistent with but do not prove the hypothesis that CAP-sensitive and insensitive modes of mutagenesis reflect minor differences in the operation of a single basic mutagenic repair system. (Auth.)

  15. DNA repair in human bronchial epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Lechner, J.F.; Grafstrom, R.C.; Harris, C.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the response of human cell types (bronchial epithelial cells and fibroblasts and skin fibroblasts) to various DNA damaging agents. Repair of DNA single strand breaks (SSB) induced by 5 krads of X-ray was similar for all cell types; approximately 90% of the DNA SSB were rejoined within one hour. During excision repair of DNA damage from u.v.-radiation, the frequencies of DNA SSB as estimated by the alkaline elution technique, were similar in all cell types. Repair replication as measured by BND cellulose chromatography was also similar in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after u.v.-irradiation. Similar levels of SSB were also observed in epithelial and fibroblastic cells after exposure to chemical carcinogens: 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene; benzo[a]pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE); or N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Significant repair replication of BPDE-induced DNA damage was detected in both bronchial epithelial and fibroblastic cells, although the level in fibroblasts was approximately 40% of that in epithelial cells. The pulmonary carcinogen asbestos did not damage DNA. DNA-protein crosslinks induced by formaldehyde were rapidly removed in bronchial cells. Further, epithelial and fibroblastic cells, which were incubated with formaldehyde and the polymerase inhibitor combination of cytosine arabinoside and hydroxyurea, accumulated DNA SSB at approximately equal frequencies. These results should provide a useful background for further investigations of the response of human bronchial cells to various DNA damaging agents

  16. Human ribonuclease H1 resolves R-loops and thereby enables progression of the DNA replication fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parajuli, Shankar; Teasley, Daniel C; Murali, Bhavna; Jackson, Jessica; Vindigni, Alessandro; Stewart, Sheila A

    2017-09-15

    Faithful DNA replication is essential for genome stability. To ensure accurate replication, numerous complex and redundant replication and repair mechanisms function in tandem with the core replication proteins to ensure DNA replication continues even when replication challenges are present that could impede progression of the replication fork. A unique topological challenge to the replication machinery is posed by RNA-DNA hybrids, commonly referred to as R-loops. Although R-loops play important roles in gene expression and recombination at immunoglobulin sites, their persistence is thought to interfere with DNA replication by slowing or impeding replication fork progression. Therefore, it is of interest to identify DNA-associated enzymes that help resolve replication-impeding R-loops. Here, using DNA fiber analysis, we demonstrate that human ribonuclease H1 (RNH1) plays an important role in replication fork movement in the mammalian nucleus by resolving R-loops. We found that RNH1 depletion results in accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids, slowing of replication forks, and increased DNA damage. Our data uncovered a role for RNH1 in global DNA replication in the mammalian nucleus. Because accumulation of RNA-DNA hybrids is linked to various human cancers and neurodegenerative disorders, our study raises the possibility that replication fork progression might be impeded, adding to increased genomic instability and contributing to disease. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Traveling Rocky Roads: The Consequences of Transcription-Blocking DNA Lesions on RNA Polymerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurer, Barbara; Marteijn, Jurgen A

    2017-10-27

    The faithful transcription of eukaryotic genes by RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) is crucial for proper cell function and tissue homeostasis. However, transcription-blocking DNA lesions of both endogenous and environmental origin continuously challenge the progression of elongating RNAP2. The stalling of RNAP2 on a transcription-blocking lesion triggers a series of highly regulated events, including RNAP2 processing to make the lesion accessible for DNA repair, R-loop-mediated DNA damage signaling, and the initiation of transcription-coupled DNA repair. The correct execution and coordination of these processes is vital for resuming transcription following the successful repair of transcription-blocking lesions. Here, we outline recent insights into the molecular consequences of RNAP2 stalling on transcription-blocking DNA lesions and how these lesions are resolved to restore mRNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA Replication Profiling Using Deep Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saayman, Xanita; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Brown, Grant W

    2018-01-01

    Profiling of DNA replication during progression through S phase allows a quantitative snap-shot of replication origin usage and DNA replication fork progression. We present a method for using deep sequencing data to profile DNA replication in S. cerevisiae.

  19. ATM-mediated transcriptional and developmental responses to gamma-rays in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Ricaud

    Full Text Available ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated is an essential checkpoint kinase that signals DNA double-strand breaks in eukaryotes. Its depletion causes meiotic and somatic defects in Arabidopsis and progressive motor impairment accompanied by several cell deficiencies in patients with ataxia telangiectasia (AT. To obtain a comprehensive view of the ATM pathway in plants, we performed a time-course analysis of seedling responses by combining confocal laser scanning microscopy studies of root development and genome-wide expression profiling of wild-type (WT and homozygous ATM-deficient mutants challenged with a dose of gamma-rays (IR that is sublethal for WT plants. Early morphologic defects in meristematic stem cells indicated that AtATM, an Arabidopsis homolog of the human ATM gene, is essential for maintaining the quiescent center and controlling the differentiation of initial cells after exposure to IR. Results of several microarray experiments performed with whole seedlings and roots up to 5 h post-IR were compiled in a single table, which was used to import gene information and extract gene sets. Sequence and function homology searches; import of spatio-temporal, cell cycling, and mutant-constitutive expression characteristics; and a simplified functional classification system were used to identify novel genes in all functional classes. The hundreds of radiomodulated genes identified were not a random collection, but belonged to functional pathways such as those of the cell cycle; cell death and repair; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; and transcription; translation; and signaling, indicating the strong cell reprogramming and double-strand break abrogation functions of ATM checkpoints. Accordingly, genes in all functional classes were either down or up-regulated concomitantly with downregulation of chromatin deacetylases or upregulation of acetylases and methylases, respectively. Determining the early transcriptional indicators of

  20. Hydroxyurea-Induced Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenza Lahkim Bennani-Belhaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloom's syndrome (BS displays one of the strongest known correlations between chromosomal instability and a high risk of cancer at an early age. BS cells combine a reduced average fork velocity with constitutive endogenous replication stress. However, the response of BS cells to replication stress induced by hydroxyurea (HU, which strongly slows the progression of replication forks, remains unclear due to publication of conflicting results. Using two different cellular models of BS, we showed that BLM deficiency is not associated with sensitivity to HU, in terms of clonogenic survival, DSB generation, and SCE induction. We suggest that surviving BLM-deficient cells are selected on the basis of their ability to deal with an endogenous replication stress induced by replication fork slowing, resulting in insensitivity to HU-induced replication stress.

  1. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    OpenAIRE

    Hendro Nindito; Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja; Albert Verasius Dian Sano

    2014-01-01

    The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MyS...

  2. Collision Repair Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Collision Repair Campaign targets meaningful risk reduction in the Collision Repair source category to reduce air toxic emissions in their communities. The Campaign also helps shops to work towards early compliance with the Auto Body Rule.

  3. Retinal detachment repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicines Problems breathing You may not recover full vision. ... detachments can be repaired. Failure to repair the retina always results in loss of vision to some degree. After surgery, the quality of ...

  4. Chloroethylating nitrosoureas in cancer therapy: DNA damage, repair and cell death signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Teodora; Roos, Wynand P; Krämer, Oliver H; Strik, Herwig M; Kaina, Bernd

    2017-08-01

    Chloroethylating nitrosoureas (CNU), such as lomustine, nimustine, semustine, carmustine and fotemustine are used for the treatment of malignant gliomas, brain metastases of different origin, melanomas and Hodgkin disease. They alkylate the DNA bases and give rise to the formation of monoadducts and subsequently interstrand crosslinks (ICL). ICL are critical cytotoxic DNA lesions that link the DNA strands covalently and block DNA replication and transcription. As a result, S phase progression is inhibited and cells are triggered to undergo apoptosis and necrosis, which both contribute to the effectiveness of CNU-based cancer therapy. However, tumor cells resist chemotherapy through the repair of CNU-induced DNA damage. The suicide enzyme O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) removes the precursor DNA lesion O 6 -chloroethylguanine prior to its conversion into ICL. In cells lacking MGMT, the formed ICL evoke complex enzymatic networks to accomplish their removal. Here we discuss the mechanism of ICL repair as a survival strategy of healthy and cancer cells and DNA damage signaling as a mechanism contributing to CNU-induced cell death. We also discuss therapeutic implications and strategies based on sequential and simultaneous treatment with CNU and the methylating drug temozolomide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Stop Stalling: Mus81 Required for Efficient Replication | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DNA replication is precisely controlled to ensure that daughter cells receive intact, accurate genetic information. Each segment of DNA must be copied only once, and the rate of replication coordinated genome-wide. Mild replication stress slows DNA synthesis and activates a pathway involving the Mus81 endonuclease, which generates a series of DNA breaks that are rapidly repaired, allowing the cell to avoid activating the S-phase checkpoint and its potentially damaging outcomes of apoptosis or error-prone repair. Mirit Aladjem, Ph.D., of CCR’s Developmental Therapeutics Branch, and her colleagues wondered whether Mus81 also plays a role in regulating the replication rate during growth in the absence of stress.

  6. GC-rich DNA elements enable replication origin activity in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liachko, Ivan; Youngblood, Rachel A; Tsui, Kyle; Bubb, Kerry L; Queitsch, Christine; Raghuraman, M K; Nislow, Corey; Brewer, Bonita J; Dunham, Maitreya J

    2014-03-01

    The well-studied DNA replication origins of the model budding and fission yeasts are A/T-rich elements. However, unlike their yeast counterparts, both plant and metazoan origins are G/C-rich and are associated with transcription start sites. Here we show that an industrially important methylotrophic budding yeast, Pichia pastoris, simultaneously employs at least two types of replication origins--a G/C-rich type associated with transcription start sites and an A/T-rich type more reminiscent of typical budding and fission yeast origins. We used a suite of massively parallel sequencing tools to map and dissect P. pastoris origins comprehensively, to measure their replication dynamics, and to assay the global positioning of nucleosomes across the genome. Our results suggest that some functional overlap exists between promoter sequences and G/C-rich replication origins in P. pastoris and imply an evolutionary bifurcation of the modes of replication initiation.

  7. GC-rich DNA elements enable replication origin activity in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Liachko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The well-studied DNA replication origins of the model budding and fission yeasts are A/T-rich elements. However, unlike their yeast counterparts, both plant and metazoan origins are G/C-rich and are associated with transcription start sites. Here we show that an industrially important methylotrophic budding yeast, Pichia pastoris, simultaneously employs at least two types of replication origins--a G/C-rich type associated with transcription start sites and an A/T-rich type more reminiscent of typical budding and fission yeast origins. We used a suite of massively parallel sequencing tools to map and dissect P. pastoris origins comprehensively, to measure their replication dynamics, and to assay the global positioning of nucleosomes across the genome. Our results suggest that some functional overlap exists between promoter sequences and G/C-rich replication origins in P. pastoris and imply an evolutionary bifurcation of the modes of replication initiation.

  8. Impaired replication stress response in cells from immunodeficiency patients carrying Cernunnos/XLF mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Schwartz

    Full Text Available Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ is one of the two major pathways of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs repair. Mutations in human NHEJ genes can lead to immunodeficiency due to its role in V(DJ recombination in the immune system. In addition, most patients carrying mutations in NHEJ genes display developmental anomalies which are likely the result of a general defect in repair of endogenously induced DSBs such as those arising during normal DNA replication. Cernunnos/XLF is a recently identified NHEJ gene which is mutated in immunodeficiency with microcephaly patients. Here we aimed to investigate whether Cernunnos/XLF mutations disrupt the ability of patient cells to respond to replication stress conditions. Our results demonstrate that Cernunnos/XLF mutated cells and cells downregulated for Cernunnos/XLF have increased sensitivity to conditions which perturb DNA replication. In addition, under replication stress, these cells exhibit impaired DSB repair and increased accumulation of cells in G2/M. Moreover Cernunnos/XLF mutated and down regulated cells display greater chromosomal instability, particularly at fragile sites, under replication stress conditions. These results provide evidence for the role of Cernunnos/XLF in repair of DSBs and maintenance of genomic stability under replication stress conditions. This is the first study of a NHEJ syndrome showing association with impaired cellular response to replication stress conditions. These findings may be related to the clinical features in these patients which are not due to the V(DJ recombination defect. Additionally, in light of the emerging important role of replication stress in the early stages of cancer development, our findings may provide a mechanism for the role of NHEJ in preventing tumorigenesis.

  9. Visualization of DNA double-strand break repair: From molecules to cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Stap, Jan; Aten, Jacob A.

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) signaling and repair processes are positioned at the crossroad of nuclear pathways that regulate DNA replication, cell division, senescence and apoptosis. Importantly, errors in DSB repair may lead to lethal or potentially tumorigenic chromosome rearrangements.

  10. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  11. Repetitious nature of repaired DNA in mammalian cells. Progress report, June 1, 1976--February 28, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meltz, M.L.

    1977-02-01

    Progress is reported on studies of DNA repair in cultured mouse L fibroblasts, human diploid fibroblasts, and cultured human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Data are included on the effects of methyl methanesulfonate treatment, uv light, and age of cell donors on repair replication of DNA

  12. Inhibition of DNA2 nuclease as a therapeutic strategy targeting replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S; Peng, X; Daley, J; Yang, L; Shen, J; Nguyen, N; Bae, G; Niu, H; Peng, Y; Hsieh, H-J; Wang, L; Rao, C; Stephan, C C; Sung, P; Ira, G; Peng, G

    2017-04-17

    Replication stress is a characteristic feature of cancer cells, which is resulted from sustained proliferative signaling induced by activation of oncogenes or loss of tumor suppressors. In cancer cells, oncogene-induced replication stress manifests as replication-associated lesions, predominantly double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs). An essential mechanism utilized by cells to repair replication-associated DSBs is homologous recombination (HR). In order to overcome replication stress and survive, cancer cells often require enhanced HR repair capacity. Therefore, the key link between HR repair and cellular tolerance to replication-associated DSBs provides us with a mechanistic rationale for exploiting synthetic lethality between HR repair inhibition and replication stress. DNA2 nuclease is an evolutionarily conserved essential enzyme in replication and HR repair. Here we demonstrate that DNA2 is overexpressed in pancreatic cancers, one of the deadliest and more aggressive forms of human cancers, where mutations in the KRAS are present in 90-95% of cases. In addition, depletion of DNA2 significantly reduces pancreatic cancer cell survival and xenograft tumor growth, suggesting the therapeutic potential of DNA2 inhibition. Finally, we develop a robust high-throughput biochemistry assay to screen for inhibitors of the DNA2 nuclease activity. The top inhibitors were shown to be efficacious against both yeast Dna2 and human DNA2. Treatment of cancer cells with DNA2 inhibitors recapitulates phenotypes observed upon DNA2 depletion, including decreased DNA double strand break end resection and attenuation of HR repair. Similar to genetic ablation of DNA2, chemical inhibition of DNA2 selectively attenuates the growth of various cancer cells with oncogene-induced replication stress. Taken together, our findings open a new avenue to develop a new class of anticancer drugs by targeting druggable nuclease DNA2. We propose DNA2 inhibition as new strategy in cancer therapy by targeting

  13. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Matsubara, K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  14. Pattern replication by confined dewetting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harkema, S.; Schäffer, E.; Morariu, M.D.; Steiner, U

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of a polymer film in a confined geometry was employed in a pattern-replication process. The instability of dewetting films is pinned by a structured confining surface, thereby replicating its topographic pattern. Depending on the surface energy of the confining surface, two different

  15. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  16. Effects of low dose radiation on repair processes in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Altmann, H.; Kovac, R.; Topaloglou, A.; Egg, D.; Guenther, R.

    1978-10-01

    DNA excision repair was investigated in lymphocytes of persons occupationally exposed to low dose radiation of 222 Rn. Autoradiographic studies of unscheduled DNA synthesis and measurement of 3 H-thymidine incorporation by repair replication into double stranded and single-strand containing DNA fractions obtained by BND cellulose chromatography seem to indicate a stimulatory effect of repeated low dose radiation on repair enzymes. (author)

  17. Tombusviruses upregulate phospholipid biosynthesis via interaction between p33 replication protein and yeast lipid sensor proteins during virus replication in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; Sharma, Monika; Wu, Cheng-Yu; Nagy, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Positive-stranded RNA viruses induce new membranous structures and promote membrane proliferation in infected cells to facilitate viral replication. In this paper, the authors show that a plant-infecting tombusvirus upregulates transcription of phospholipid biosynthesis genes, such as INO1, OPI3 and CHO1, and increases phospholipid levels in yeast model host. This is accomplished by the viral p33 replication protein, which interacts with Opi1p FFAT domain protein and Scs2p VAP protein. Opi1p and Scs2p are phospholipid sensor proteins and they repress the expression of phospholipid genes. Accordingly, deletion of OPI1 transcription repressor in yeast has a stimulatory effect on TBSV RNA accumulation and enhanced tombusvirus replicase activity in an in vitro assay. Altogether, the presented data convincingly demonstrate that de novo lipid biosynthesis is required for optimal TBSV replication. Overall, this work reveals that a (+)RNA virus reprograms the phospholipid biosynthesis pathway in a unique way to facilitate its replication in yeast cells. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with FFAT-domain host protein. • Tombusvirus replication leads to upregulation of phospholipids. • Tombusvirus replication depends on de novo lipid synthesis. • Deletion of FFAT-domain host protein enhances TBSV replication. • TBSV rewires host phospholipid synthesis

  18. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonifazi, F; Carbone, A; D'Apice, A; Dell'Agnello, L; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vitlacil, D; Perez, E D; Duellmann, D; Girone, M; Peco, G; Vagnoni, V

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements

  19. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  20. The cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 suppresses Ebola virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Batorski, Lindsay; Halfmann, Peter; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2013-12-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with reported case fatality rates as high as 90%. There are currently no licensed vaccines or antiviral therapeutics to combat EBOV infections. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in heme degradation, has antioxidative properties and protects cells from various stresses. Activated HO-1 was recently shown to have antiviral activity, potently inhibiting the replication of viruses such as hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus. However, the effect of HO-1 activation on EBOV replication remains unknown. To determine whether the upregulation of HO-1 attenuates EBOV replication, we treated cells with cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP), a selective HO-1 inducer, and assessed its effects on EBOV replication. We found that CoPP treatment, pre- and postinfection, significantly suppressed EBOV replication in a manner dependent upon HO-1 upregulation and activity. In addition, stable overexpression of HO-1 significantly attenuated EBOV growth. Although the exact mechanism behind the antiviral properties of HO-1 remains to be elucidated, our data show that HO-1 upregulation does not attenuate EBOV entry or budding but specifically targets EBOV transcription/replication. Therefore, modulation of the cellular enzyme HO-1 may represent a novel therapeutic strategy against EBOV infection.

  1. Mismatch repair deficiency does not enhance ENU mutagenesis in the zebrafish germ line.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feitsma, H.; de Bruijn, E.; van de Belt, J.; Nijman, I.J.; Cuppen, E.

    2008-01-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents such as N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) are very potent mutagens. They act by transferring their alkyl group to DNA bases, which, upon mispairing during replication, can cause single base pair mutations in the next replication cycle. As DNA mismatch repair (MMR) proteins are

  2. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways by murine polyomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, Katie; Nicholas, Catherine; Garcea, Robert L., E-mail: Robert.Garcea@Colorado.edu

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear replication of DNA viruses activates DNA damage repair (DDR) pathways, which are thought to detect and inhibit viral replication. However, many DNA viruses also depend on these pathways in order to optimally replicate their genomes. We investigated the relationship between murine polyomavirus (MuPyV) and components of DDR signaling pathways including CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, ATR, and DNAPK. We found that recruitment and retention of DDR proteins at viral replication centers was independent of H2AX, as well as the viral small and middle T-antigens. Additionally, infectious virus production required ATR kinase activity, but was independent of CHK1, CHK2, or DNAPK signaling. ATR inhibition did not reduce the total amount of viral DNA accumulated, but affected the amount of virus produced, indicating a defect in virus assembly. These results suggest that MuPyV may utilize a subset of DDR proteins or non-canonical DDR signaling pathways in order to efficiently replicate and assemble. -- Highlights: •Murine polyomavirus activates and recruits DNA damage repair (DDR) proteins to replication centers. •Large T-antigen mediates recruitment of DDR proteins to viral replication centers. •Inhibition or knockout of CHK1, CHK2, DNA-PK or H2AX do not affect viral titers. •Inhibition of ATR activity reduces viral titers, but not viral DNA accumulation.

  3. Structural disorder in proteins of the rhabdoviridae replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyrat, Cédric; Gérard, Francine C A; de Almeida Ribeiro, Euripedes; Ivanov, Ivan; Ruigrok, Rob W H; Jamin, Marc

    2010-08-01

    Rhabdoviridae are single stranded negative sense RNA viruses. The viral RNA condensed by the nucleoprotein (N), the phosphoprotein (P) and the large subunit (L) of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase are the viral components of the transcription/replication machineries. Both P and N contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) that play different roles in the virus life cycle. Here, we describe the modular organization of P based on recent structural, biophysical and bioinformatics data. We show how flexible loops in N participate in the attachment of P to the N-RNA template by an induced-fit mechanism. Finally, we discuss the roles of IDRs in the mechanism of replication/transcription, and propose a new model for the interaction of the L subunit with its N-RNA template.

  4. Transfer of Chinese hamster DNA repair gene(s) into repair-deficient human cells (Xeroderma pigmentosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karentz, D.; Cleaver, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Transfer of repair genes by DNA transfection into repair-deficient Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells has thus far been unsuccessful, presenting an obstacle to cloning XP genes. The authors chose an indirect route to transfer repair genes in chromosome fragments. DNA repair-competent (UV resistant) hybrid cell lines were established by PEG-mediated fusions of DNA repair-deficient (UV sensitive) human fibroblasts (XP12RO) with wild type Chinese hamster (CHO) cells (AA8). CHO cells were exposed to 5 Krad X-rays prior to fusions, predisposing hybrid cells to lose CHO chromosome fragments preferentially. Repair-competent hybrids were selected by periodic exposures to UV light. Secondary and tertiary hybrid cell lines were developed by fusion of X-irradiated hybrids to XP12RO. The hybrid cell lines exhibit resistance to UV that is comparable to that of CHO cells and they are proficient at repair replication after UV exposure. Whole cell DNA-DNA hybridizations indicate that the hybrids have greater homology to CHO DNA than is evident between XP12RO and CHO. These observations indicate that CHO DNA sequences which can function in repair of UV-damaged DNA in human cells have been transferred into the genome of the repair-deficient XP12RO cells

  5. Rad52 SUMOylation affects the efficiency of the DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmannova, Veronika; Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Arneric, Milica

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) plays a vital role in DNA metabolic processes including meiosis, DNA repair, DNA replication and rDNA homeostasis. HR defects can lead to pathological outcomes, including genetic diseases and cancer. Recent studies suggest that the post-translational modification by ...

  6. Specificity and completeness of inhibition of DNA repair by novobiocin and aphidicolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleaver, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    Novobiocin and aphidicolin were both potent inhibitors of excision repair of u.v.-induced damage to DNA in human embryonic fibroblasts, and both also inhibited semiconservative DNA replication even more strongly. The mechanism of action of these two drugs is, however, different. Novobiocin inhibited repair replication without accumulating single-strand breaks, but aphidicolin inhibited repair replication with the accumulation of numerous single-strand breaks. Novobiocin appears to inhibit repair at an earlier stage than aphidicolin, which may indicate that DNA topoisomerases play a role in eukaryotic DNA repair. Digestion of DNA by exonuclease III indicated that repair patches in novobiocin-treated cells contained no excess 3'OH termini, whereas up to 40% of the repaired DNA in aphidicolin-treated cells had free 3'OH termini. Therefore, although aphidicolin resulted in the accumulation of single-strand breaks, many of the repair events escaped inhibition and the number of breaks is an underestimate of the true number of repair events

  7. Monitoring of the spatial and temporal dynamics of BER/SSBR pathway proteins, including MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1 and NEIL1-3, during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bj Rås, Karine Ø; Sousa, Mirta M L; Sharma, Animesh; Fonseca, Davi M; S Gaard, Caroline K; Bj Rås, Magnar; Otterlei, Marit

    2017-08-21

    Base lesions in DNA can stall the replication machinery or induce mutations if bypassed. Consequently, lesions must be repaired before replication or in a post-replicative process to maintain genomic stability. Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for repair of base lesions and is known to be associated with DNA replication, but how BER is organized during replication is unclear. Here we coupled the iPOND (isolation of proteins on nascent DNA) technique with targeted mass-spectrometry analysis, which enabled us to detect all proteins required for BER on nascent DNA and to monitor their spatiotemporal orchestration at replication forks. We demonstrate that XRCC1 and other BER/single-strand break repair (SSBR) proteins are enriched in replisomes in unstressed cells, supporting a cellular capacity of post-replicative BER/SSBR. Importantly, we identify for the first time the DNA glycosylases MYH, UNG2, MPG, NTH1, NEIL1, 2 and 3 on nascent DNA. Our findings suggest that a broad spectrum of DNA base lesions are recognized and repaired by BER in a post-replicative process. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. NACSA Charter School Replication Guide: The Spectrum of Replication Options. Authorizing Matters. Replication Brief 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and high-profile issues in public education reform today is the replication of successful public charter school programs. With more than 5,000 failing public schools in the United States, there is a tremendous need for strong alternatives for parents and students. Replicating successful charter school models is an…

  9. pUL34 binding near the human cytomegalovirus origin of lytic replication enhances DNA replication and viral growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slayton, Mark; Hossain, Tanvir; Biegalke, Bonita J

    2018-05-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL34 gene encodes sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins (pUL34) which are required for viral replication. Interactions of pUL34 with DNA binding sites represses transcription of two viral immune evasion genes, US3 and US9. 12 additional predicted pUL34-binding sites are present in the HCMV genome (strain AD169) with three binding sites concentrated near the HCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt). We used ChIP-seq analysis of pUL34-DNA interactions to confirm that pUL34 binds to the oriLyt region during infection. Mutagenesis of the UL34-binding sites in an oriLyt-containing plasmid significantly reduced viral-mediated oriLyt-dependent DNA replication. Mutagenesis of these sites in the HCMV genome reduced the replication efficiencies of the resulting viruses. Protein-protein interaction analyses demonstrated that pUL34 interacts with the viral proteins IE2, UL44, and UL84, that are essential for viral DNA replication, suggesting that pUL34-DNA interactions in the oriLyt region are involved in the DNA replication cascade. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Megabase replication domains along the human genome: relation to chromatin structure and genome organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audit, Benjamin; Zaghloul, Lamia; Baker, Antoine; Arneodo, Alain; Chen, Chun-Long; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude

    2013-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the absence of specific sequence motifs, marking the origins of replication has been a serious hindrance to the understanding of (i) the mechanisms that regulate the spatio-temporal replication program, and (ii) the links between origins activation, chromatin structure and transcription. In this chapter, we review the partitioning of the human genome into megabased-size replication domains delineated as N-shaped motifs in the strand compositional asymmetry profiles. They collectively span 28.3% of the genome and are bordered by more than 1,000 putative replication origins. We recapitulate the comparison of this partition of the human genome with high-resolution experimental data that confirms that replication domain borders are likely to be preferential replication initiation zones in the germline. In addition, we highlight the specific distribution of experimental and numerical chromatin marks along replication domains. Domain borders correspond to particular open chromatin regions, possibly encoded in the DNA sequence, and around which replication and transcription are highly coordinated. These regions also present a high evolutionary breakpoint density, suggesting that susceptibility to breakage might be linked to local open chromatin fiber state. Altogether, this chapter presents a compartmentalization of the human genome into replication domains that are landmarks of the human genome organization and are likely to play a key role in genome dynamics during evolution and in pathological situations.

  11. DNA methylation in human fibroblasts following DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastan, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Methylation of deoxycytidine (dCyd) incorporated by DNA excision repair synthesis in human diploid fibroblasts following damage with ultraviolet radiation (UV), N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene was studied utilizing [6- 3 H]dCyd to label repaired DNA specifically and high performance liquid chromatographic analysis to quantify the percentage of deoxycytidine converted to 5-methyldeoxycytidine (m 5 dCyd). In confluent, nondividing cells, methylation in repair patches induced by all three agents is slow and incomplete. Whereas after DNA replication a level of 3.4% m 5 dCyd is reached in less than 2 hours, following UV-stimulated repair synthesis in confluent cells it takes about 3 days to reach a level of approx.2.0% m 5 dCyd in the repair patch. This undermethylation of repair patches occurs throughout the genome. In cells from cultures in logarithmic-phase growth, m 5 dCyd formation in UV-induced repair patches occurs faster and to a greater extent, reaching a level of approx.2.7% in 10-20 hours. Pre-existing hypomethylated repair patches in confluent cells are methylated further when the cells are stimulated to divide; however, the repair patch may still not be fully methylated before cell division occurs. Thus DNA damage and repair may lead to heritable loss of methylation at some sites. The distribution within chromatin of m 5 dCyd in repair patches was also investigated. Over a wide range of extents of digestion by staphylococcal nuclease or deoxyribonuclease I, the level of hypomethylation in repaired DNA in nuclease sensitive and resistant regions of chromatin was constant relative to the genomic level of methylation in these regions. Similar conclusions were reached in experiments with isolated mononucleosomes

  12. Effect of DNA repair on the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of uv irradiation and of chemical carcinogens in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cytotoxic and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and of aromatic amides or polycyclic hydrocarbons was quantitatively compared in normally repairing strains of human cells and in several excision-repair deficient or post-replication repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) strains

  13. Structural Basis of Mitochondrial Transcription Initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, Hauke S; Morozov, Yaroslav I; Sarfallah, Azadeh; Temiakov, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick

    2017-11-16

    Transcription in human mitochondria is driven by a single-subunit, factor-dependent RNA polymerase (mtRNAP). Despite its critical role in both expression and replication of the mitochondrial genome, transcription initiation by mtRNAP remains poorly understood. Here, we report crystal structures of human mitochondrial transcription initiation complexes assembled on both light and heavy strand promoters. The structures reveal how transcription factors TFAM and TFB2M assist mtRNAP to achieve promoter-dependent initiation. TFAM tethers the N-terminal region of mtRNAP to recruit the polymerase to the promoter whereas TFB2M induces structural changes in mtRNAP to enable promoter opening and trapping of the DNA non-template strand. Structural comparisons demonstrate that the initiation mechanism in mitochondria is distinct from that in the well-studied nuclear, bacterial, or bacteriophage transcription systems but that similarities are found on the topological and conceptual level. These results provide a framework for studying the regulation of gene expression and DNA replication in mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cyclophilin B facilitates the replication of Orf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kui; Li, Jida; He, Wenqi; Song, Deguang; Zhang, Ximu; Zhang, Di; Zhou, Yanlong; Gao, Feng

    2017-06-15

    Viruses interact with host cellular factors to construct a more favourable environment for their efficient replication. Expression of cyclophilin B (CypB), a cellular peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), was found to be significantly up-regulated. Recently, a number of studies have shown that CypB is important in the replication of several viruses, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16). However, the function of cellular CypB in ORFV replication has not yet been explored. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) technique was applied to identify genes differentially expressed in the ORFV-infected MDBK cells at an early phase of infection. Cellular CypB was confirmed to be significantly up-regulated by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis and Western blotting. The role of CypB in ORFV infection was further determined using Cyclosporin A (CsA) and RNA interference (RNAi). Effect of CypB gene silencing on ORFV replication by 50% tissue culture infectious dose (TCID 50 ) assay and qRT-PCR detection. In the present study, CypB was found to be significantly up-regulated in the ORFV-infected MDBK cells at an early phase of infection. Cyclosporin A (CsA) exhibited suppressive effects on ORFV replication through the inhibition of CypB. Silencing of CypB gene inhibited the replication of ORFV in MDBK cells. In conclusion, these data suggest that CypB is critical for the efficient replication of the ORFV genome. Cellular CypB was confirmed to be significantly up-regulated in the ORFV-infected MDBK cells at an early phase of infection, which could effectively facilitate the replication of ORFV.

  15. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  16. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Hanna; Kwon, Chang Seob; Choi, Yoonjung; Lee, Daeyoup

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  17. Both H4K20 mono-methylation and H3K56 acetylation mark transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hanna [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Chang Seob [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Korea Science Academy of KAIST, Busan, 614-822 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yoonjung, E-mail: jjungii@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Daeyoup, E-mail: daeyoup@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-05

    Nucleosome dynamics facilitated by histone turnover is required for transcription as well as DNA replication and repair. Histone turnover is often associated with various histone modifications such as H3K56 acetylation (H3K56Ac), H3K36 methylation (H3K36me), and H4K20 methylation (H4K20me). In order to correlate histone modifications and transcription-dependent histone turnover, we performed genome wide analyses for euchromatic regions in G2/M-arrested fission yeast. The results show that transcription-dependent histone turnover at 5′ promoter and 3′ termination regions is directly correlated with the occurrence of H3K56Ac and H4K20 mono-methylation (H4K20me1) in actively transcribed genes. Furthermore, the increase of H3K56Ac and H4K20me1 and antisense RNA production was observed in the absence of the histone H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 and histone deacetylase complex (HDAC) that are involved in the suppression of histone turnover within the coding regions. These results together indicate that H4K20me1 as well as H3K56Ac are bona fide marks for transcription-dependent histone turnover in fission yeast.

  18. HSV-1 Remodels Host Telomeres to Facilitate Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Deng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres protect the ends of cellular chromosomes. We show here that infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 results in chromosomal structural aberrations at telomeres and the accumulation of telomere dysfunction-induced DNA damage foci (TIFs. At the molecular level, HSV-1 induces transcription of telomere repeat-containing RNA (TERRA, followed by the proteolytic degradation of the telomere protein TPP1 and loss of the telomere repeat DNA signal. The HSV-1-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0 is required for TERRA transcription and facilitates TPP1 degradation. Small hairpin RNA (shRNA depletion of TPP1 increases viral replication, indicating that TPP1 inhibits viral replication. Viral replication protein ICP8 forms foci that coincide with telomeric proteins, and ICP8-null virus failed to degrade telomere DNA signal. These findings suggest that HSV-1 reorganizes telomeres to form ICP8-associated prereplication foci and to promote viral genomic replication.

  19. Functions of alternative Replication Protein A (aRPA) in initiation and elongation

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Aaron C.; Roy, Rupa; Simmons, Daniel T.; Wold, Marc S.

    2010-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding complex that is essential for DNA replication, repair and recombination in eukaryotic cells. In addition to this canonical complex, we have recently characterized an alternative Replication Protein A complex (aRPA) that is unique to primates. aRPA is composed of three subunits: RPA1 and RPA3, also present in canonical RPA, and a primate-specific subunit RPA4, homologous to canonical RPA2. aRPA has biochemical properties similar to t...

  20. Inferring transcriptional compensation interactions in yeast via stepwise structure equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Woei-Fuh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the abundant information produced by microarray technology, various approaches have been proposed to infer transcriptional regulatory networks. However, few approaches have studied subtle and indirect interaction such as genetic compensation, the existence of which is widely recognized although its mechanism has yet to be clarified. Furthermore, when inferring gene networks most models include only observed variables whereas latent factors, such as proteins and mRNA degradation that are not measured by microarrays, do participate in networks in reality. Results Motivated by inferring transcriptional compensation (TC interactions in yeast, a stepwise structural equation modeling algorithm (SSEM is developed. In addition to observed variables, SSEM also incorporates hidden variables to capture interactions (or regulations from latent factors. Simulated gene networks are used to determine with which of six possible model selection criteria (MSC SSEM works best. SSEM with Bayesian information criterion (BIC results in the highest true positive rates, the largest percentage of correctly predicted interactions from all existing interactions, and the highest true negative (non-existing interactions rates. Next, we apply SSEM using real microarray data to infer TC interactions among (1 small groups of genes that are synthetic sick or lethal (SSL to SGS1, and (2 a group of SSL pairs of 51 yeast genes involved in DNA synthesis and repair that are of interest. For (1, SSEM with BIC is shown to outperform three Bayesian network algorithms and a multivariate autoregressive model, checked against the results of qRT-PCR experiments. The predictions for (2 are shown to coincide with several known pathways of Sgs1 and its partners that are involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair. In addition, experimentally testable interactions of Rad27 are predicted. Conclusion SSEM is a useful tool for inferring genetic networks, and the

  1. Cellular Repair of DNA–DNA Cross-Links Induced by 1,2,3,4-Diepoxybutane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa N. Chesner

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xenobiotic-induced interstrand DNA–DNA cross-links (ICL interfere with transcription and replication and can be converted to toxic DNA double strand breaks. In this work, we investigated cellular responses to 1,4-bis-(guan-7-yl-2,3-butanediol (bis-N7G-BD cross-links induced by 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (DEB. High pressure liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI+-MS/MS assays were used to quantify the formation and repair of bis-N7G-BD cross-links in wild-type Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts (V79 and the corresponding isogenic clones V-H1 and V-H4, deficient in the XPD and FANCA genes, respectively. Both V-H1 and V-H4 cells exhibited enhanced sensitivity to DEB-induced cell death and elevated bis-N7G-BD cross-links. However, relatively modest increases of bis-N7G-BD adduct levels in V-H4 clones did not correlate with their hypersensitivity to DEB. Further, bis-N7G-BD levels were not elevated in DEB-treated human clones with defects in the XPA or FANCD2 genes. Comet assays and γ-H2AX focus analyses conducted with hamster cells revealed that ICL removal was associated with chromosomal double strand break formation, and that these breaks persisted in V-H4 cells as compared to control cells. Our findings suggest that ICL repair in cells with defects in the Fanconi anemia repair pathway is associated with aberrant re-joining of repair-induced double strand breaks, potentially resulting in lethal chromosome rearrangements.

  2. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... regions, the map of transcripts is very complex due to small transcripts from the flanking ends of the transcription unit, the use of multiple start and stop sites for the main transcript, production of multiple functional RNA molecules from the same primary transcript, and RNA molecules made...... by independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  3. Beyond DNA repair: DNA-PK function in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Jonathan F.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a pivotal component of the DNA repair machinery that governs the response to DNA damage, serving to maintain genome integrity. However, the DNA-PK kinase component was initially isolated with transcriptional complexes, and recent findings have illuminated the impact of DNA-PK-mediated transcriptional regulation on tumor progression and therapeutic response. DNA-PK expression has also been correlated with poor outcome in selected tumor types, furthe...

  4. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjoismaki, J.L.; Goffart, S.; Spelbrink, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively

  5. 'Regular' and 'emergency' repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luchnik, N.V.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments on the combined action of radiation and a DNA inhibitor using Crepis roots and on split-dose irradiation of human lymphocytes lead to the conclusion that there are two types of repair. The 'regular' repair takes place twice in each mitotic cycle and ensures the maintenance of genetic stability. The 'emergency' repair is induced at all stages of the mitotic cycle by high levels of injury. (author)

  6. Repair kinetics in tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thames, H.D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoexponential repair kinetics is based on the assumption of a single, dose-independent rate of repair of sublethal injury in the target cells for tissue injury after exposure to ionizing radiation. Descriptions of the available data based on this assumption have proved fairly successful for both acutely responding (skin, lip mucosa, gut) and late-responding (lung, spinal cord) normal tissues. There are indications of biphasic exponential repair in both categories, however. Unfortunately, the data usually lack sufficient resolution to permit unambiguous determination of the repair rates. There are also indications that repair kinetics may depend on the size of the dose. The data are conflicting on this account, however, with suggestions of both faster and slower repair after larger doses. Indeed, experiments that have been explicitly designed to test this hypothesis show either no effect (gut, spinal cord), faster repair after higher doses (lung, kidney), or slower repair after higher doses (skin). Monoexponential repair appears to be a fairly accurate description that provides an approximation to a more complicated picture, the elucidation of whose details will, however, require very careful and extensive experimental study. (author). 30 refs.; 1 fig

  7. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  8. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F.; McDonald, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy

  9. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  10. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...... acetyltransferases is of key interest because of its potential importance in aging, DNA repair and transcription....

  11. The cellular Mre11 protein interferes with adenovirus E4 mutant DNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathew, Shomita S.; Bridge, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) relocalizes and degrades the host DNA repair protein Mre11, and efficiently initiates viral DNA replication. Mre11 associates with Ad E4 mutant DNA replication centers and is important for concatenating viral genomes. We have investigated the role of Mre11 in the E4 mutant DNA replication defect. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Mre11 dramatically rescues E4 mutant DNA replication in cells that do or do not concatenate viral genomes, suggesting that Mre11 inhibits DNA replication independent of genome concatenation. The mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) protein is involved in recruiting and sustaining Mre11 at sites of DNA damage following ionizing radiation. We observe foci formation by Mdc1 in response to viral infection, indicating that this damage response protein is activated. However, knockdown of Mdc1 does not prevent Mre11 from localizing at viral DNA replication foci or rescue E4 mutant DNA replication. Our results are consistent with a model in which Mre11 interferes with DNA replication when it is localized at viral DNA replication foci

  12. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia

    2016-01-01

    /4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11......Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  13. Stochastic Petri net analysis of a replicated file system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechta Dugan, Joanne; Ciardo, Gianfranco

    1989-01-01

    A stochastic Petri-net model of a replicated file system is presented for a distributed environment where replicated files reside on different hosts and a voting algorithm is used to maintain consistency. Witnesses, which simply record the status of the file but contain no data, can be used in addition to or in place of files to reduce overhead. A model sufficiently detailed to include file status (current or out-of-date), as well as failure and repair of hosts where copies or witnesses reside, is presented. The number of copies and witnesses is a parameter of the model. Two different majority protocols are examined, one where a majority of all copies and witnesses is necessary to form a quorum, and the other where only a majority of the copies and witnesses on operational hosts is needed. The latter, known as adaptive voting, is shown to increase file availability in most cases.

  14. REPLICATION TOOL AND METHOD OF PROVIDING A REPLICATION TOOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) for producing a part (4) with a microscale textured replica surface (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d). The replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) comprises a tool surface (2a, 2b) defining a general shape of the item. The tool surface (2a, 2b) comprises a microscale...... energy directors on flange portions thereof uses the replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) to form an item (4) with a general shape as defined by the tool surface (2a, 2b). The formed item (4) comprises a microscale textured replica surface (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d) with a lateral arrangement of polydisperse microscale...

  15. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert; Gagnon, David; Gjoerup, Ole; Archambault, Jacques; Bullock, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication

  16. Analysis of JC virus DNA replication using a quantitative and high-throughput assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong; Phelan, Paul J.; Chhum, Panharith; Bashkenova, Nazym; Yim, Sung; Parker, Robert [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gagnon, David [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Gjoerup, Ole [Molecular Oncology Research Institute, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Archambault, Jacques [Institut de Recherches Cliniques de Montreal (IRCM), 110 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2W 1R7 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec (Canada); Bullock, Peter A., E-mail: Peter.Bullock@tufts.edu [Department of Developmental, Molecular and Chemical Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML) is caused by lytic replication of JC virus (JCV) in specific cells of the central nervous system. Like other polyomaviruses, JCV encodes a large T-antigen helicase needed for replication of the viral DNA. Here, we report the development of a luciferase-based, quantitative and high-throughput assay of JCV DNA replication in C33A cells, which, unlike the glial cell lines Hs 683 and U87, accumulate high levels of nuclear T-ag needed for robust replication. Using this assay, we investigated the requirement for different domains of T-ag, and for specific sequences within and flanking the viral origin, in JCV DNA replication. Beyond providing validation of the assay, these studies revealed an important stimulatory role of the transcription factor NF1 in JCV DNA replication. Finally, we show that the assay can be used for inhibitor testing, highlighting its value for the identification of antiviral drugs targeting JCV DNA replication. - Highlights: • Development of a high-throughput screening assay for JCV DNA replication using C33A cells. • Evidence that T-ag fails to accumulate in the nuclei of established glioma cell lines. • Evidence that NF-1 directly promotes JCV DNA replication in C33A cells. • Proof-of-concept that the HTS assay can be used to identify pharmacological inhibitor of JCV DNA replication.

  17. DNA damage mediated transcription arrest: Step back to go forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenders, Leon

    2015-12-01

    The disturbance of DNA helix conformation by bulky DNA damage poses hindrance to transcription elongating due to stalling of RNA polymerase at transcription blocking lesions. Stalling of RNA polymerase provokes the formation of R-loops, i.e. the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid and a displaced single stranded DNA strand as well as displacement of spliceosomes. R-loops are processed into DNA single and double strand breaks by NER factors depending on TC-NER factors leading to genome instability. Moreover, stalling of RNA polymerase induces a strong signal for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These toxic and mutagenic effects are counteracted by a rapid recruitment of DNA repair proteins to perform transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to remove the blocking DNA lesions and to restore transcription. Recent studies have highlighted the role of backtracking of RNA polymerase to facilitate TC-NER and identified novel factors that play key roles in TC-NER and in restoration of transcription. On the molecular level these factors facilitate stability of the repair complex by promotion and regulation of various post-translational modifications of NER factors and chromatin substrate. In addition, the continuous flow of new factors that emerge from screening assays hints to several regulatory levels to safeguard the integrity of transcription elongation after disturbance by DNA damage that have yet to be explored. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Snowmobile Repair. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Stephen S.; Conrad, Rex

    This teacher's guide contains 14 units on snowmobile repair: (1) introduction to snowmobile repair; (2) skis, front suspension, and steering; (3) drive clutch; (4) drive belts; (5) driven clutch; (6) chain drives; (7) jackshafts and axles; (8) rear suspension; (9) tracks; (10) shock absorbers; (11) brakes; (12) engines; (13) ignition and…

  19. DNA repair genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimyo, Mitsuoki

    1995-01-01

    Fission yeast S. pombe is assumed to be a good model for cloning of human DNA repair genes, because human gene is normally expressed in S. pombe and has a very similar protein sequence to yeast protein. We have tried to elucidate the DNA repair mechanisms of S. pombe as a model system for those of mammals. (J.P.N.)

  20. Insulated hsp70B' promoter: stringent heat-inducible activity in replication-deficient, but not replication-competent adenoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Stanimira; Mainka, Astrid; Knippertz, Ilka; Hesse, Andrea; Nettelbeck, Dirk M

    2008-04-01

    Key to the realization of gene therapy is the development of efficient and targeted gene transfer vectors. Therapeutic gene transfer by replication-deficient or more recently by conditionally replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses has shown much promise. For specific applications, however, it will be advantageous to provide vectors that allow for external control of gene expression. The efficient cellular heat shock system in combination with available technology for focused and controlled hyperthermia suggests heat-regulated transcription control as a promising tool for this purpose. We investigated the feasibility of a short fragment of the human hsp70B' promoter, with and without upstream insulator elements, for the regulation of transgene expression by replication-deficient or oncolytic adenoviruses. Two novel adenoviral vectors with an insulated hsp70B' promoter were developed and showed stringent heat-inducible gene expression with induction ratios up to 8000-fold. In contrast, regulation of gene expression from the hsp70B' promoter without insulation was suboptimal. In replication-competent/oncolytic adenoviruses regulation of the hsp70B' promoter was lost specifically during late replication in permissive cells and could not be restored by the insulators. We developed novel adenovirus gene transfer vectors that feature improved and stringent regulation of transgene expression from the hsp70B' promoter using promoter insulation. These vectors have potential for gene therapy applications that benefit from external modulation of therapeutic gene expression or for combination therapy with hyperthermia. Furthermore, our study reveals that vector replication can deregulate inserted cellular promoters, an observation which is of relevance for the development of replication-competent/oncolytic gene transfer vectors. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Transcription as a Threat to Genome Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Hélène; Aguilera, Andrés

    2016-06-02

    Genomes undergo different types of sporadic alterations, including DNA damage, point mutations, and genome rearrangements, that constitute the basis for evolution. However, these changes may occur at high levels as a result of cell pathology and trigger genome instability, a hallmark of cancer and a number of genetic diseases. In the last two decades, evidence has accumulated that transcription constitutes an important natural source of DNA metabolic errors that can compromise the integrity of the genome. Transcription can create the conditions for high levels of mutations and recombination by its ability to open the DNA structure and remodel chromatin, making it more accessible to DNA insulting agents, and by its ability to become a barrier to DNA replication. Here we review the molecular basis of such events from a mechanistic perspective with particular emphasis on the role of transcription as a genome instability determinant.

  2. DNA replication is an integral part of the mouse oocyte's reprogramming machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyuan Wang

    Full Text Available Many of the structural and mechanistic requirements of oocyte-mediated nuclear reprogramming remain elusive. Previous accounts that transcriptional reprogramming of somatic nuclei in mouse zygotes may be complete in 24-36 hours, far more rapidly than in other reprogramming systems, raise the question of whether the mere exposure to the activated mouse ooplasm is sufficient to enact reprogramming in a nucleus. We therefore prevented DNA replication and cytokinesis, which ensue after nuclear transfer, in order to assess their requirement for transcriptional reprogramming of the key pluripotency genes Oct4 (Pou5f1 and Nanog in cloned mouse embryos. Using transcriptome and allele-specific analysis, we observed that hundreds of mRNAs, but not Oct4 and Nanog, became elevated in nucleus-transplanted oocytes without DNA replication. Progression through the first round of DNA replication was essential but not sufficient for transcriptional reprogramming of Oct4 and Nanog, whereas cytokinesis and thereby cell-cell interactions were dispensable for transcriptional reprogramming. Responses similar to clones also were observed in embryos produced by fertilization in vitro. Our results link the occurrence of reprogramming to a previously unappreciated requirement of oocyte-mediated nuclear reprogramming, namely DNA replication. Nuclear transfer alone affords no immediate transition from a somatic to a pluripotent gene expression pattern unless DNA replication is also in place. This study is therefore a resource to appreciate that the quest for always faster reprogramming methods may collide with a limit that is dictated by the cell cycle.

  3. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... arrest. The biomarkers that characterize the path to an irreversible state of cell cycle arrest due to proliferative exhaustion may also be shared by other forms of senescence-inducing mechanisms. Validation of senescence markers is crucial in circumstances where quiescence or temporary growth arrest may...... be triggered or is thought to be induced. Pre-senescence biomarkers are also important to consider as their presence indicate that induction of aging processes is taking place. The bona fide pathway leading to replicative senescence that has been extensively characterized is a consequence of gradual reduction...

  4. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  5. Post-transcription cleavage generates the 3' end of F17R transcripts in vaccinia virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Costa, Susan M.; Antczak, James B.; Pickup, David J.; Condit, Richard C.

    2004-01-01

    Most vaccinia virus intermediate and late mRNAs possess 3' ends that are extremely heterogeneous in sequence. However, late mRNAs encoding the cowpox A-type inclusion protein (ATI), the second largest subunit of the RNA polymerase, and the late telomeric transcripts possess homogeneous 3' ends. In the case of the ATI mRNA, it has been shown that the homogeneous 3' end is generated by a post-transcriptional endoribonucleolytic cleavage event. We have determined that the F17R gene also produces homogeneous transcripts generated by a post-transcriptional cleavage event. Mapping of in vivo mRNA shows that the major 3' end of the F17R transcript maps 1262 nt downstream of the F17R translational start site. In vitro transcripts spanning the in vivo 3' end are cleaved in an in vitro reaction using extracts from virus infected cells, and the site of cleavage is the same both in vivo and in vitro. Cleavage is not observed using extract from cells infected in the presence of hydroxyurea; therefore, the cleavage factor is either virus-coded or virus-induced during the post-replicative phase of virus replication. The cis-acting sequence responsible for cleavage is orientation specific and the factor responsible for cleavage activity has biochemical properties similar to the factor required for cleavage of ATI transcripts. Partially purified cleavage factor generates cleavage products of expected size when either the ATI or F17R substrates are used in vitro, strongly suggesting that cleavage of both transcripts is mediated by the same factor

  6. The BAH domain of ORC1 links H4K20me2 to DNA replication licensing and Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alex J; Song, Jikui; Cheung, Peggie; Ishibe-Murakami, Satoko; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K; Patel, Dinshaw J; Gozani, Or [Stanford; (MSKCC); (Stanford-MED)

    2012-07-11

    The recognition of distinctly modified histones by specialized 'effector' proteins constitutes a key mechanism for transducing molecular events at chromatin to biological outcomes. Effector proteins influence DNA-templated processes, including transcription, DNA recombination and DNA repair; however, no effector functions have yet been identified within the mammalian machinery that regulate DNA replication. Here we show that ORC1 - a component of ORC (origin of replication complex), which mediates pre-DNA replication licensing - contains a bromo adjacent homology (BAH) domain that specifically recognizes histone H4 dimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20me2). Recognition of H4K20me2 is a property common to BAH domains present within diverse metazoan ORC1 proteins. Structural studies reveal that the specificity of the BAH domain for H4K20me2 is mediated by a dynamic aromatic dimethyl-lysine-binding cage and multiple intermolecular contacts involving the bound peptide. H4K20me2 is enriched at replication origins, and abrogating ORC1 recognition of H4K20me2 in cells impairs ORC1 occupancy at replication origins, ORC chromatin loading and cell-cycle progression. Mutation of the ORC1 BAH domain has been implicated in the aetiology of Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS), a form of primordial dwarfism, and ORC1 depletion in zebrafish results in an MGS-like phenotype. We find that wild-type human ORC1, but not ORC1-H4K20me2-binding mutants, rescues the growth retardation of orc1 morphants. Moreover, zebrafish depleted of H4K20me2 have diminished body size, mirroring the phenotype of orc1 morphants. Together, our results identify the BAH domain as a novel methyl-lysine-binding module, thereby establishing the first direct link between histone methylation and the metazoan DNA replication machinery, and defining a pivotal aetiological role for the canonical H4K20me2 mark, via ORC1, in primordial dwarfism.

  7. Personality and Academic Motivation: Replication, Extension, and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin H.; McMichael, Stephanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work examines the relationships between personality traits and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation. We replicate and extend previous work to examine how personality may relate to achievement goals, efficacious beliefs, and mindset about intelligence. Approximately 200 undergraduates responded to the survey with a 150 participants replicating…

  8. Identification of DNA repair genes in the human genome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; van Duin, M.; Westerveld, A.; Yasui, A.; Bootsma, D.

    1986-01-01

    To identify human DNA repair genes we have transfected human genomic DNA ligated to a dominant marker to excision repair deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and CHO cells. This resulted in the cloning of a human gene, ERCC-1, that complements the defect of a UV- and mitomycin-C sensitive CHO mutant 43-3B. The ERCC-1 gene has a size of 15 kb, consists of 10 exons and is located in the region 19q13.2-q13.3. Its primary transcript is processed into two mRNAs by alternative splicing of an internal coding exon. One of these transcripts encodes a polypeptide of 297 aminoacids. A putative DNA binding protein domain and nuclear location signal could be identified. Significant AA-homology is found between ERCC-1 and the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. 58 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. Effects of Interferon-α/β on HBV Replication Determined by Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Chen, Wen-ling; Ou, Jing-hsiung James

    2011-01-01

    Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β) are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low. PMID:21829354

  10. Sp100 colocalizes with HPV replication foci and restricts the productive stage of the infectious cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley H Stepp

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We have shown previously that Sp100 (a component of the ND10 nuclear body represses transcription, replication and establishment of incoming human papillomavirus (HPV DNA in the early stages of infection. In this follow up study, we show that Sp100 does not substantially regulate viral infection in the maintenance phase, however at late stages of infection Sp100 interacts with amplifying viral genomes to repress viral processes. We find that Sp100 localizes to HPV16 replication foci generated in primary keratinocytes, to HPV31 replication foci that form in differentiated cells, and to HPV16 replication foci in CIN 1 cervical biopsies. To analyze this further, Sp100 was down regulated by siRNA treatment of differentiating HPV31 containing cells and levels of viral transcription and replication were assessed. This revealed that Sp100 represses viral transcription and replication in differentiated cells. Analysis of Sp100 binding to viral chromatin showed that Sp100 bound across the viral genome, and that binding increased at late stages of infection. Therefore, Sp100 represses the HPV life cycle at both early and late stages of infection.

  11. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  12. Iron chelators ICL670 and 311 inhibit HIV-1 transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Jerebtsova, Marina; Kurantsin-Mills, Joseph; Niu, Xiaomei; Charles, Sharroya; Richardson, Des R.; Ray, Patricio E.; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Nekhai, Sergei

    2007-01-01

    HIV-1 replication is induced by an excess of iron and iron chelation by desferrioxamine (DFO) inhibits viral replication by reducing proliferation of infected cells. Treatment of cells with DFO and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311) inhibit expression of proteins that regulate cell-cycle progression, including cycle-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Our recent studies showed that CDK2 participates in HIV-1 transcription and viral replication suggesting that inhibition of CDK2 by iron chelators might also affect HIV-1 transcription. Here we evaluated the effect of a clinically approved orally effective iron chelator, 4-[3,5-bis-(hydroxyphenyl)-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl]-benzoic acid (ICL670) and 311 on HIV-1 transcription. Both ICL670 and 311 inhibited Tat-induced HIV-1 transcription in CEM-T cells, 293T and HeLa cells. Neither ICL670 nor 311 induced cytotoxicity at concentrations that inhibited HIV-1 transcription. The chelators decreased cellular activity of CDK2 and reduced HIV-1 Tat phosphorylation by CDK2. Neither ICL670A or 311 decreased CDK9 protein level but significantly reduced association of CDK9 with cyclin T1 and reduced phosphorylation of Ser-2 residues of RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain. In conclusion, our findings add to the evidence that iron chelators can inhibit HIV-1 transcription by deregulating CDK2 and CDK9. Further consideration should be given to the development of iron chelators for future anti-retroviral therapeutics

  13. On the mutagenicity of homologous recombination and double-strand break repair in bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Victor P; Plugina, Lidiya; Shcherbakova, Tamara; Sizova, Svetlana; Kudryashova, Elena

    2011-01-02

    The double-strand break (DSB) repair via homologous recombination is generally construed as a high-fidelity process. However, some molecular genetic observations show that the recombination and the recombinational DSB repair may be mutagenic and even highly mutagenic. Here we developed an effective and precise method for studying the fidelity of DSB repair in vivo by combining DSBs produced site-specifically by the SegC endonuclease with the famous advantages of the recombination analysis of bacteriophage T4 rII mutants. The method is based on the comparison of the rate of reversion of rII mutation in the presence and in the absence of a DSB repair event initiated in the proximity of the mutation. We observed that DSB repair may moderately (up to 6-fold) increase the apparent reversion frequency, the effect of being dependent on the mutation structure. We also studied the effect of the T4 recombinase deficiency (amber mutation in the uvsX gene) on the fidelity of DSB repair. We observed that DSBs are still repaired via homologous recombination in the uvsX mutants, and the apparent fidelity of this repair is higher than that seen in the wild-type background. The mutator effect of the DSB repair may look unexpected given that most of the normal DNA synthesis in bacteriophage T4 is performed via a recombination-dependent replication (RDR) pathway, which is thought to be indistinguishable from DSB repair. There are three possible explanations for the observed mutagenicity of DSB repair: (1) the origin-dependent (early) DNA replication may be more accurate than the RDR; (2) the step of replication initiation may be more mutagenic than the process of elongation; and (3) the apparent mutagenicity may just reflect some non-randomness in the pool of replicating DNA, i.e., preferential replication of the sequences already involved in replication. We discuss the DSB repair pathway in the absence of UvsX recombinase. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Posttranslational modifications of Forkhead box O transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, Aart Arno van der

    2006-01-01

    FOXO transcription factors play an important role in essential biological processes such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair, metabolism and stress resistance. Phosphorylation is the modification that was first found on FOXOs and much of the subsequent studies focused on this

  15. Ssb1 and Ssb2 cooperate to regulate mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells by resolving replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Vu, Therese; Boucher, Didier; Biernacka, Anna; Nde, Jules; Pandita, Raj K; Straube, Jasmin; Boyle, Glen M; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Nag, Purba; Jeffery, Jessie; Harris, Janelle L; Bain, Amanda L; Grzelak, Marta; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Mitra, Abhishek; Dojer, Norbert; Crosetto, Nicola; Cloonan, Nicole; Becherel, Olivier J; Finnie, John; Skaar, Jeffrey R; Walkley, Carl R; Pandita, Tej K; Rowicka, Maga; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Lane, Steven W; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2017-05-04

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are vulnerable to endogenous damage and defects in DNA repair can limit their function. The 2 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding proteins SSB1 and SSB2 are crucial regulators of the DNA damage response; however, their overlapping roles during normal physiology are incompletely understood. We generated mice in which both Ssb1 and Ssb2 were constitutively or conditionally deleted. Constitutive Ssb1/Ssb2 double knockout (DKO) caused early embryonic lethality, whereas conditional Ssb1/Ssb2 double knockout (cDKO) in adult mice resulted in acute lethality due to bone marrow failure and intestinal atrophy featuring stem and progenitor cell depletion, a phenotype unexpected from the previously reported single knockout models of Ssb1 or Ssb2 Mechanistically, cDKO HSPCs showed altered replication fork dynamics, massive accumulation of DNA damage, genome-wide double-strand breaks enriched at Ssb-binding regions and CpG islands, together with the accumulation of R -loops and cytosolic ssDNA. Transcriptional profiling of cDKO HSPCs revealed the activation of p53 and interferon (IFN) pathways, which enforced cell cycling in quiescent HSPCs, resulting in their apoptotic death. The rapid cell death phenotype was reproducible in in vitro cultured cDKO-hematopoietic stem cells, which were significantly rescued by nucleotide supplementation or after depletion of p53. Collectively, Ssb1 and Ssb2 control crucial aspects of HSPC function, including proliferation and survival in vivo by resolving replicative stress to maintain genomic stability. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Transcription profiling suggests that mitochondrial topoisomerase IB acts as a topological barrier and regulator of mitochondrial DNA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Zhang, Hongliang; Khiati, Salim; Wu, Xiaolin; Pommier, Yves

    2017-12-08

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cell viability because it encodes subunits of the respiratory chain complexes. Mitochondrial topoisomerase IB (TOP1MT) facilitates mtDNA replication by removing DNA topological tensions produced during mtDNA transcription, but it appears to be dispensable. To test whether cells lacking TOP1MT have aberrant mtDNA transcription, we performed mitochondrial transcriptome profiling. To that end, we designed and implemented a customized tiling array, which enabled genome-wide, strand-specific, and simultaneous detection of all mitochondrial transcripts. Our technique revealed that Top1mt KO mouse cells process the mitochondrial transcripts normally but that protein-coding mitochondrial transcripts are elevated. Moreover, we found discrete long noncoding RNAs produced by H-strand transcription and encompassing the noncoding regulatory region of mtDNA in human and murine cells and tissues. Of note, these noncoding RNAs were strongly up-regulated in the absence of TOP1MT. In contrast, 7S DNA, produced by mtDNA replication, was reduced in the Top1mt KO cells. We propose that the long noncoding RNA species in the D-loop region are generated by the extension of H-strand transcripts beyond their canonical stop site and that TOP1MT acts as a topological barrier and regulator for mtDNA transcription and D-loop formation.

  17. Chameleon Chasing II: A Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, Doug A.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Replicates a 1972 survey of students, educators, and Public Relations Society of America members regarding who the public relations counselor really serves. Finds that, in 1992, most respondents thought primary responsibility was to the client, then to the client's relevant publics, then to self, then to society, and finally to media. Compares…

  18. Adressing Replication and Model Uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebersberger, Bernd; Galia, Fabrice; Laursen, Keld

    innovation survey data for France, Germany and the UK, we conduct a ‘large-scale’ replication using the Bayesian averaging approach of classical estimators. Our method tests a wide range of determinants of innovation suggested in the prior literature, and establishes a robust set of findings on the variables...

  19. Manual of Cupule Replication Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giriraj Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the world, iconic rock art is preceded by non-iconic rock art. Cupules (manmade, roughly semi-hemispherical depressions on rocks form the major bulk of the early non-iconic rock art globally. The antiquity of cupules extends back to the Lower Paleolithic in Asia and Africa, hundreds of thousand years ago. When one observes these cupules, the inquisitive mind poses so many questions with regard to understanding their technology, reasons for selecting the site, which rocks were used to make the hammer stones used, the skill and cognitive abilities employed to create the different types of cupules, the objective of their creation, their age, and so on. Replication of the cupules can provide satisfactory answers to some of these questions. Comparison of the hammer stones and cupules produced by the replication process with those obtained from excavation can provide support to observations. This paper presents a manual of cupule replication technology based on our experience of cupule replication on hard quartzite rock near Daraki-Chattan in the Chambal Basin, India.

  20. Mutations in DONSON disrupt replication fork stability and cause microcephalic dwarfism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, John J; Bicknell, Louise S; Carroll, Paula; Higgs, Martin R; Shaheen, Ranad; Murray, Jennie E; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios K; Leitch, Andrea; Murina, Olga; Tarnauskaitė, Žygimantė; Wessel, Sarah R; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Vernet, Audrey; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mottram, Rachel M A; Logan, Clare V; Bye, Hannah; Li, Yun; Brean, Alexander; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Challis, Rachel C; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Almoisheer, Agaadir; Alsaif, Hessa S; Amar, Ariella; Prescott, Natalie J; Bober, Michael B; Duker, Angela; Faqeih, Eissa; Seidahmed, Mohammed Zain; Al Tala, Saeed; Alswaid, Abdulrahman; Ahmed, Saleem; Al-Aama, Jumana Yousuf; Altmüller, Janine; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Brady, Angela F; Chessa, Luciana; Cox, Helen; Fischetto, Rita; Heller, Raoul; Henderson, Bertram D; Hobson, Emma; Nürnberg, Peter; Percin, E Ferda; Peron, Angela; Spaccini, Luigina; Quigley, Alan J; Thakur, Seema; Wise, Carol A; Yoon, Grace; Alnemer, Maha; Tomancak, Pavel; Yigit, Gökhan; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Reijns, Martin A M; Simpson, Michael A; Cortez, David; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Mathew, Christopher G; Jackson, Andrew P; Stewart, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    To ensure efficient genome duplication, cells have evolved numerous factors that promote unperturbed DNA replication and protect, repair and restart damaged forks. Here we identify downstream neighbor of SON (DONSON) as a novel fork protection factor and report biallelic DONSON mutations in 29 individuals with microcephalic dwarfism. We demonstrate that DONSON is a replisome component that stabilizes forks during genome replication. Loss of DONSON leads to severe replication-associated DNA damage arising from nucleolytic cleavage of stalled replication forks. Furthermore, ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR)-dependent signaling in response to replication stress is impaired in DONSON-deficient cells, resulting in decreased checkpoint activity and the potentiation of chromosomal instability. Hypomorphic mutations in DONSON substantially reduce DONSON protein levels and impair fork stability in cells from patients, consistent with defective DNA replication underlying the disease phenotype. In summary, we have identified mutations in DONSON as a common cause of microcephalic dwarfism and established DONSON as a critical replication fork protein required for mammalian DNA replication and genome stability.

  1. DNA replication restart and cellular dynamics of Hef helicase/nuclease protein in Haloferax volcanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestini, Roxane; Delpech, Floriane; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how frequently spontaneous replication arrests occur and how archaea deal with these arrests are very interesting and challenging research topics. Here we will described how genetic and imaging studies have revealed the central role of the archaeal helicase/nuclease Hef belonging to the XPF/MUS81/FANCM family of endonucleases in repair of arrested replication forks. Special focus will be on description of a recently developed combination of genetic and imaging tools to study the dynamic localization of a functional Hef::GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) fusion protein in the living cells of halophilic archaea Haloferax volcanii. As Archaea provide an excellent and unique model for understanding how DNA replication is regulated to allow replication of a circular DNA molecule either from single or multiple replication origins, we will also summarize recent studies that have revealed peculiar features regarding DNA replication, particularly in halophilic archaea. We strongly believe that fundamental knowledge of our on-going studies will shed light on the evolutionary history of the DNA replication machinery and will help to establish general rules concerning replication restart and the key role of recombination proteins not only in bacteria, yeast and higher eukaryotes but also in archaea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  2. Repairing fuel for reinsertion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krukshenk, A.

    1986-01-01

    Eqiupment for nuclear reactor fuel assembly repairing produced by Westinghouse and Brawn Bovery companies is described. Repair of failed fuel assemblies replacement of defect fuel elements gives a noticeable economical effect. Thus if the cost of a new fuel assembly is 450-500 thousand dollars, the replacement of one fuel element in it costs approximately 40-60 thousand dollars. In simple cases repairing includes either removal of failed fuel elements from a fuel assembly and its reinsertion with the rest of fuel elements into the reactor core (reactor refueling), or replacement of unfailed fuel elements from one fuel assembly to a new one (fuel assembly overhaul and reconditioning)

  3. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsofia A Kiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  4. Effect of deoxyribonucleic acid replication inhibitors on bacterial recombination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canosi, U.; Siccardi, A.G.; Falaschi, A.; Mazza, G.

    1976-01-01

    Two inhibitors of replicative deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis, nalidixic acid (NAL) and 6-(p-hydroxyphenylazo)-uracil (HPUra), showed different effects on genetic recombination and DNA repair in Bacillus subtilis. Previous work (Pedrini et al., 1972) showed that NAL does not interfere with the transformation process of B. subtilis. The results reported in this work demonstrated that the drug was also without effect on the transfection SPP1 or SPO-1 phage DNA (a process that requires a recombination event). The drug was also ineffective on the host cell reactivation of ultraviolet-irradiated SPP1 phage, as well as on transfection with ultraviolet-irradiated DNA of the same phage. HPUra instead markedly reduced the transformation process, as well as transfection, by SPO-1 DNA, but it did not affect the host cell reactivation of SPO-1 phage. In conclusion, whereas the NAL target seems to be specific for replicative DNA synthesis, the HPUra target (i.e., the DNA polymerase III of B. subtilis) seems to be involved also in recombination, but not in the excision repair process. The mutations conferring NAL and HPUra resistance used in this work were mapped by PBS-1 transduction

  5. Intragenic origins due to short G1 phases underlie oncogene-induced DNA replication stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheret, Morgane; Halazonetis, Thanos D

    2018-03-01

    Oncogene-induced DNA replication stress contributes critically to the genomic instability that is present in cancer. However, elucidating how oncogenes deregulate DNA replication has been impeded by difficulty in mapping replication initiation sites on the human genome. Here, using a sensitive assay to monitor nascent DNA synthesis in early S phase, we identified thousands of replication initiation sites in cells before and after induction of the oncogenes CCNE1 and MYC. Remarkably, both oncogenes induced firing of a novel set of DNA replication origins that mapped within highly transcribed genes. These ectopic origins were normally suppressed by transcription during G1, but precocious entry into S phase, before all genic regions had been transcribed, allowed firing of origins within genes in cells with activated oncogenes. Forks from oncogene-induced origins were prone to collapse, as a result of conflicts between replication and transcription, and were associated with DNA double-stranded break formation and chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints both in our experimental system and in a large cohort of human cancers. Thus, firing of intragenic origins caused by premature S phase entry represents a mechanism of oncogene-induced DNA replication stress that is relevant for genomic instability in human cancer.

  6. Opposite replication polarities of transcribed and nontranscribed histone H5 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trempe, J.P.; Lindstrom, Y.I.; Leffak, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors used an in vitro nuclear runoff replication assay to analyze the direction of replication of the active and inactive histone H5 genes in avian cells. In embryonic erythrocytes the transcribed histone H5 gene displayed sensitivity to endogenous nuclease cleavage. In contrast, this gene was insensitive to endogenous nuclease digestion under the same conditions in nuclei of the lymphoblastoid cell line MSB-1, and histone H5 gene transcripts were not detectable by dot-blot analysis of MSB-1 cell RNA. When nuclei were isolated from embryonic erythrocyctes and incubated with bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate, runoff replication from endogenous nuclease cleavage sites led to a relative enrichment for fragments near the 3' end of the histone H5 gene in the density-labeled DNA. In nuclei of MSB-1 cells or chicken embryo fibroblasts, however, runoff replication from restriction enzyme-cut sites (or induced endogenous nuclease-cut sites in MSB-1 nuclei) led to a relative enrichment for fragments near the 5' end of the H5 gene in dense DNA. Based on the enhanced incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into origin-distal regions of DNA during the in vitro runoff replication assay, the authors conclude that the active histone H5 gene in embryonic erythrocytes is preferentially replicated in the transcriptional direction from an origin in the 5'-flanking DNA, whereas its inactive counterparts in MSB-1 cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts are preferentially replicated in the opposite direction

  7. Exonuclease 1 and its versatile roles in DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keijzers, Guido; Liu, Dekang; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2016-01-01

    Exonuclease 1 (EXO1) is a multifunctional 5' → 3' exonuclease and a DNA structure-specific DNA endonuclease. EXO1 plays roles in DNA replication, DNA mismatch repair (MMR) and DNA double-stranded break repair (DSBR) in lower and higher eukaryotes and contributes to meiosis, immunoglobulin...... maturation, and micro-mediated end-joining in higher eukaryotes. In human cells, EXO1 is also thought to play a role in telomere maintenance. Mutations in the human EXO1 gene correlate with increased susceptibility to some cancers. This review summarizes recent studies on the enzymatic functions...

  8. Functional link between DNA damage responses and transcriptional regulation by ATM in response to a histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Soo

    2007-09-01

    Mutations in the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) gene, which encodes a 370 kd protein with a kinase catalytic domain, predisposes people to cancers, and these mutations are also linked to ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). The histone acetylaion/deacetylation- dependent chromatin remodeling can activate the ATM kinase-mediated DNA damage signal pathway (in an accompanying work, Lee, 2007). This has led us to study whether this modification can impinge on the ATM-mediated DNA damage response via transcriptional modulation in order to understand the function of ATM in the regulation of gene transcription. To identify the genes whose expression is regulated by ATM in response to histone deaceylase (HDAC) inhibition, we performed an analysis of oligonucleotide microarrays with using the appropriate cell lines, isogenic A-T (ATM(-)) and control (ATM(+)) cells, following treatment with a HDAC inhibitor TSA. Treatment with TSA reprograms the differential gene expression profile in response to HDAC inhibition in ATM(-) cells and ATM(+) cells. We analyzed the genes that are regulated by TSA in the ATM-dependent manner, and we classified these genes into different functional categories, including those involved in cell cycle/DNA replication, DNA repair, apoptosis, growth/differentiation, cell- cell adhesion, signal transduction, metabolism and transcription. We found that while some genes are regulated by TSA without regard to ATM, the patterns of gene regulation are differentially regulated in an ATM-dependent manner. Taken together, these finding indicate that ATM can regulate the transcription of genes that play critical roles in the molecular response to DNA damage, and this response is modulated through an altered HDAC inhibition-mediated gene expression.

  9. Balancing Pathways in DNA Double Strand Break Repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Brandsma (Inger)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractAll information a cell needs to live and survive is stored in the genomic DNA. Maintenance of an intact and uncompromised genome is of vital importance for cell survival. Damaged DNA can block transcription and replication, processes essential for cell viability. Persistent DNA

  10. Repair of DNA damage in the human metallothionein gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leadon, S.A.; Snowden, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    In order to distinguish enhanced repair of a sequence due to its transcriptional activity from enhanced repair due to chromatin alterations brought about by integration of a sequence into the genome, we have investigated the repair of damage both in endogenous genes and in cell lines that contain an integrated gene with an inducible promoter. The endogenous genes we are studying are the metallothioneins (MTs), a multigene family in man consisting of about 10-12 members. Cultured cells were exposed to 10-J/m 2 uv light and allowed to repair in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine. The DNA was then isolated, digested with Eco RI, and fully hybrid density DNA made by semiconservative synthesis was separated from unreplicated DNA by centrifugation in CsCl density gradients. Unreplicated, parental-density DNA was then reacted with a monoclonal antibody against bromouracil. 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Cisplatin- and UV-damaged DNA lure the basal transcription factor TFIID/TBP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Vichi; F. Coin (Frédéric); J-P. Renaud (Jean-Paul); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Moras; J-M. Egly (Jean-Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA connection between transcription and DNA repair was demonstrated previously through the characterization of TFIIH. Using filter binding as well as in vitro transcription challenge competition assays, we now show that the promoter recognition factor TATA box-binding protein (TBP)/TFIID

  12. Phosphorylated STAT5 directly facilitates parvovirus B19 DNA replication in human erythroid progenitors through interaction with the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganaie, Safder S; Zou, Wei; Xu, Peng; Deng, Xuefeng; Kleiboeker, Steve; Qiu, Jianming

    2017-05-01

    Productive infection of human parvovirus B19 (B19V) exhibits high tropism for burst forming unit erythroid (BFU-E) and colony forming unit erythroid (CFU-E) progenitor cells in human bone marrow and fetal liver. This exclusive restriction of the virus replication to human erythroid progenitor cells is partly due to the intracellular factors that are essential for viral DNA replication, including erythropoietin signaling. Efficient B19V replication also requires hypoxic conditions, which upregulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) pathway, and phosphorylated STAT5 is essential for virus replication. In this study, our results revealed direct involvement of STAT5 in B19V DNA replication. Consensus STAT5-binding elements were identified adjacent to the NS1-binding element within the minimal origins of viral DNA replication in the B19V genome. Phosphorylated STAT5 specifically interacted with viral DNA replication origins both in vivo and in vitro, and was actively recruited within the viral DNA replication centers. Notably, STAT5 interacted with minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex, suggesting that STAT5 directly facilitates viral DNA replication by recruiting the helicase complex of the cellular DNA replication machinery to viral DNA replication centers. The FDA-approved drug pimozide dephosphorylates STAT5, and it inhibited B19V replication in ex vivo expanded human erythroid progenitors. Our results demonstrated that pimozide could be a promising antiviral drug for treatment of B19V-related diseases.

  13. Repair of U/G and U/A in DNA by UNG2-associated repair complexes takes place predominantly by short-patch repair both in proliferating and growth-arrested cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Otterlei, Marit; Pena Diaz, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 has an established role in repair of U/A pairs resulting from misincorporation of dUMP during replication. In antigen-stimulated B-lymphocytes UNG2 removes uracil from U/G mispairs as part of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination processes. Using......, PCNA and DNA ligase, the latter detected as activity. Short-patch repair was the predominant mechanism both in extracts and UNG2-ARC from proliferating and less BER-proficient growth-arrested cells. Repair of U/G mispairs and U/A pairs was completely inhibited by neutralizing UNG...

  14. Block to influenza virus replication in cells preirradiated with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahy, B.W.J.; Carroll, A.R.; Brownson, J.M.T.; McGeoch, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet (uv) irradiation of CEF cells immediately before infection with influenza A (fowl plague) virus inhibited virus growth; no inhibition of the growth of a parainfluenza virus (Newcastle disease virus) could be detected in irradiated cells. The kinetics of inhibition after various doses of uv irradiation were multihit, with an extrapolation number of two. When irradiated cells were allowed to photoreactivate by exposure to visible light for 16 hr their capacity to support influenza virus replication was largely restored; this process was sensitive to caffeine, suggesting that it required DNA repair. In CEF cells exposed to 360 ergs/mm 2 of uv radiation the rate of synthesis of host cellular RNA was reduced by more than 90%, and that of host cellular protein by 40 to 50%, as judged by incorporation of precursor molecules into an acid-insoluble form. When such irradiated cells were infected with influenza virus all the genome RNA segments were transcribed, but the overall concentration of virus-specific poly(A)-containing cRNA was reduced about 50-fold. Within this population of cRNA molecules, the RNAs coding for late proteins (HA, NA, and M) were reduced in amount relative to the other segments. The rates of synthesis of the M and HA proteins were specifically reduced in uv-irradiated cells, but the rates of synthesis of the P, NP, and NS proteins were only slightly reduced compared to normal cells. Immunofluorescent studies showed that, in uv-irradiated cells, NP migrated into the nucleus early after infection and later migrated out into the cytoplasm, as in normal cells. In contrast to normal cells, no specific immunofluorescence associated with M protein could be observed in uv-irradiated cells. It is concluded that uv-induced damage to host cellular DNA alters the pattern of RNA transcription in CEF cells infected with influenza virus, and that this results in a block to late protein synthesis which stops virus production

  15. DNA Repair Systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DNA molecule which makes it ideal for storage and propagation of genetic information. ... of these errors are broadly referred to as DNA repair. DNA can ... changes occur in the human genome per day. ..... nails, frequent physical and mental.

  16. Brain aneurysm repair - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000123.htm Brain aneurysm repair - discharge To use the sharing features ... this page, please enable JavaScript. You had a brain aneurysm . An aneurysm is a weak area in ...

  17. Ventral hernia repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... incarcerated) in the hernia and become impossible to push back in. This is usually painful. The blood supply ... you are lying down or that you cannot push back in. Risks The risks of ventral hernia repair ...

  18. Omphalocele repair - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100033.htm Omphalocele repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... Go to slide 4 out of 4 Overview Omphalocele is an abdominal wall defect at the base ...

  19. DBR1 siRNA inhibition of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naidu Yathi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 and all retroviruses are related to retroelements of simpler organisms such as the yeast Ty elements. Recent work has suggested that the yeast retroelement Ty1 replicates via an unexpected RNA lariat intermediate in cDNA synthesis. The putative genomic RNA lariat intermediate is formed by a 2'-5' phosphodiester bond, like that found in pre-mRNA intron lariats and it facilitates the minus-strand template switch during cDNA synthesis. We hypothesized that HIV-1 might also form a genomic RNA lariat and therefore that siRNA-mediated inhibition of expression of the human RNA lariat de-branching enzyme (DBR1 expression would specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Results We designed three short interfering RNA (siRNA molecules targeting DBR1, which were capable of reducing DBR1 mRNA expression by 80% and did not significantly affect cell viability. We assessed HIV-1 replication in the presence of DBR1 siRNA and found that DBR1 knockdown led to decreases in viral cDNA and protein production. These effects could be reversed by cotransfection of a DBR1 cDNA indicating that the inhibition of HIV-1 replication was a specific effect of DBR1 underexpression. Conclusion These data suggest that DBR1 function may be needed to debranch a putative HIV-1 genomic RNA lariat prior to completion of reverse transcription.

  20. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  1. The Fanconi anaemia components UBE2T and FANCM are functionally linked to nucleotide excision repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Kelsall

    Full Text Available The many proteins that function in the Fanconi anaemia (FA monoubiquitylation pathway initiate replicative DNA crosslink repair. However, it is not clear whether individual FA genes participate in DNA repair pathways other than homologous recombination and translesion bypass. Here we show that avian DT40 cell knockouts of two integral FA genes--UBE2T and FANCM are unexpectedly sensitive to UV-induced DNA damage. Comprehensive genetic dissection experiments indicate that both of these FA genes collaborate to promote nucleotide excision repair rather than translesion bypass to protect cells form UV genotoxicity. Furthermore, UBE2T deficiency impacts on the efficient removal of the UV-induced photolesion cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer. Therefore, this work reveals that the FA pathway shares two components with nucleotide excision repair, intimating not only crosstalk between the two major repair pathways, but also potentially identifying a UBE2T-mediated ubiquitin-signalling response pathway that contributes to nucleotide excision repair.

  2. Celebrating DNA's Repair Crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Thomas A

    2015-12-03

    This year, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar, and Paul Modrich for their seminal studies of the mechanisms by which cells from bacteria to man repair DNA damage that is generated by normal cellular metabolism and stress from the environment. These studies beautifully illustrate the remarkable power of DNA repair to influence life from evolution through disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hepatitis A Virus Genome Organization and Replication Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Kevin L; Lemon, Stanley M

    2018-04-02

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is a positive-strand RNA virus classified in the genus Hepatovirus of the family Picornaviridae It is an ancient virus with a long evolutionary history and multiple features of its capsid structure, genome organization, and replication cycle that distinguish it from other mammalian picornaviruses. HAV proteins are produced by cap-independent translation of a single, long open reading frame under direction of an inefficient, upstream internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Genome replication occurs slowly and is noncytopathic, with transcription likely primed by a uridylated protein primer as in other picornaviruses. Newly produced quasi-enveloped virions (eHAV) are released from cells in a nonlytic fashion in a unique process mediated by interactions of capsid proteins with components of the host cell endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) system. Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms of bacterial DNA replication restart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windgassen, Tricia A; Wessel, Sarah R; Bhattacharyya, Basudeb

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Multi-protein DNA replication complexes called replisomes perform the essential process of copying cellular genetic information prior to cell division. Under ideal conditions, replisomes dissociate only after the entire genome has been duplicated. However, DNA replication rarely occurs without interruptions that can dislodge replisomes from DNA. Such events produce incompletely replicated chromosomes that, if left unrepaired, prevent the segregation of full genomes to daughter cells. To mitigate this threat, cells have evolved ‘DNA replication restart’ pathways that have been best defined in bacteria. Replication restart requires recognition and remodeling of abandoned replication forks by DNA replication restart proteins followed by reloading of the replicative DNA helicase, which subsequently directs assembly of the remaining replisome subunits. This review summarizes our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying replication restart and the proteins that drive the process in Escherichia coli (PriA, PriB, PriC and DnaT). PMID:29202195

  5. NF-κB regulates DNA double-strand break repair in conjunction with BRCA1-CtIP complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcic, Meta; Karl, Sabine; Baumann, Bernd; Salles, Daniela; Daniel, Peter; Fulda, Simone; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    NF-κB is involved in immune responses, inflammation, oncogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Even though NF-κB can be activated by DNA damage via Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) signalling, little was known about an involvement in DNA repair. In this work, we dissected distinct DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms revealing a stimulatory role of NF-κB in homologous recombination (HR). This effect was independent of chromatin context, cell cycle distribution or cross-talk with p53. It was not mediated by the transcriptional NF-κB targets Bcl2, BAX or Ku70, known for their dual roles in apoptosis and DSB repair. A contribution by Bcl-xL was abrogated when caspases were inhibited. Notably, HR induction by NF-κB required the targets ATM and BRCA2. Additionally, we provide evidence that NF-κB interacts with CtIP-BRCA1 complexes and promotes BRCA1 stabilization, and thereby contributes to HR induction. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed accelerated formation of replication protein A (RPA) and Rad51 foci upon NF-κB activation indicating HR stimulation through DSB resection by the interacting CtIP-BRCA1 complex and Rad51 filament formation. Taken together, these results define multiple NF-κB-dependent mechanisms regulating HR induction, and thereby providing a novel intriguing explanation for both NF-κB-mediated resistance to chemo- and radiotherapies as well as for the sensitization by pharmaceutical intervention of NF-κB activation.

  6. Recovery of arrested replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Iraqui

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows repair of DNA and provides support for DNA replication. Homologous recombination is therefore a major pathway that suppresses non-homology-mediated genome instability. Here, we report that recovery of impeded replication forks by homologous recombination is error-prone. Using a fork-arrest-based assay in fission yeast, we demonstrate that a single collapsed fork can cause mutations and large-scale genomic changes, including deletions and translocations. Fork-arrest-induced gross chromosomal rearrangements are mediated by inappropriate ectopic recombination events at the site of collapsed forks. Inverted repeats near the site of fork collapse stimulate large-scale genomic changes up to 1,500 times over spontaneous events. We also show that the high accuracy of DNA replication during S-phase is impaired by impediments to fork progression, since fork-arrest-induced mutation is due to erroneous DNA synthesis during recovery of replication forks. The mutations caused are small insertions/duplications between short tandem repeats (micro-homology indicative of replication slippage. Our data establish that collapsed forks, but not stalled forks, recovered by homologous recombination are prone to replication slippage. The inaccuracy of DNA synthesis does not rely on PCNA ubiquitination or trans-lesion-synthesis DNA polymerases, and it is not counteracted by mismatch repair. We propose that deletions/insertions, mediated by micro-homology, leading to copy number variations during replication stress may arise by progression of error-prone replication forks restarted by homologous recombination.

  7. DNA damage by X-rays and their impact on replication processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parplys, Ann Christin; Petermann, Eva; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Borgmann, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Replication-dependent radiosensitization of tumors ranks among the most promising tools for future improvements in tumor therapy. However, cell cycle checkpoint signaling during S phase is a key for maintaining genomic stability after ionizing irradiation allowing DNA damage repair by stabilizing replication forks, inhibiting new origin firing and recruiting DNA repair proteins. As the impact of the different types of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation on replication fork functionality has not been investigated, this study was performed in tumor cells treated with various agents that induce specific DNA lesions. Methods: U2OS cells were exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) to induce base damage, low or high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for the induction of SSBs, Topotecan to induce DSBs at replication, Mitomycin C (MMC) to induce interstrand cross-links or ionizing irradiation to analyze all damages. Chk1 phosphorylation, origin firing and replication fork progression, and cell cycle distribution were analyzed. Results: In our system, the extent of Chk1 phosphorylation was dependent on the type of damage induced and prolonged Chk1 phosphorylation correlated with the inhibition of replication initiation. Ionizing radiation, high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, and Topotecan affected replication elongation much more strongly that the other agents. Almost all agents induced a slight increase in the S phase population but subsequent G2 arrest was only observed in response to those agents that strongly inhibited replication elongation and caused prolonged Chk1 phosphorylation. Conclusions: Our data suggest that to improve radiotherapy, radiosensitivity in S phase could be increased by combining irradiation with agents that induce secondary DSB or inhibit checkpoint signaling, such as inhibitors of PARP or Chk1.

  8. Ubiquitin ligase activity of TFIIH and the transcriptional response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yuichiro; Masuda, Claudio A; Chang, Wei-Hau; Komori, Hirofumi; Wang, Dong; Hunter, Tony; Joazeiro, Claudio A P; Kornberg, Roger D

    2005-04-15

    Core transcription factor (TF) IIH purified from yeast possesses an E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase activity, which resides, at least in part, in a RING finger (RNF) domain of the Ssl1 subunit. Yeast strains mutated in the Ssl1 RNF domain are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). This increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents does not reflect a deficiency in nucleotide excision repair. Rather, it correlates with reduced transcriptional induction of genes involved in DNA repair, suggesting that the E3 Ub ligase activity of TFIIH mediates the transcriptional response to DNA damage.

  9. A critical role for topoisomerase IIb and DNA double strand breaks in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderwood, Stuart K

    2016-05-26

    Recent studies have indicated a novel role for topoisomerase IIb in transcription. Transcription of heat shock genes, serum-induced immediate early genes and nuclear receptor-activated genes, each required DNA double strands generated by topoisomerase IIb. Such strand breaks seemed both necessary and sufficient for transcriptional activation. In addition, such transcription was associated with initiation of the DNA damage response pathways, including the activation of the enzymes: ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase 1. DNA damage response signaling was involved both in transcription and in repair of DNA breaks generated by topoisomerase IIb.

  10. Transcription and Regulation of the Bidirectional Hydrogenase in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöholm, Johannes; Oliveira, Paulo; Lindblad, Peter

    2007-01-01

    F. This indicates that, in addition to the bidirectional hydrogenase gene, a number of other genes, including open reading frames connected to DNA replication, recombination, and repair, may be part of the LexA regulatory network in Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120. PMID:17630298

  11. The yeast replicative aging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chong; Zhou, Chuankai; Kennedy, Brian K

    2018-03-08

    It has been nearly three decades since the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae became a significant model organism for aging research and it has emerged as both simple and powerful. The replicative aging assay, which interrogates the number of times a "mother" cell can divide and produce "daughters", has been a stalwart in these studies, and genetic approaches have led to the identification of hundreds of genes impacting lifespan. More recently, cell biological and biochemical approaches have been developed to determine how cellular processes become altered with age. Together, the tools are in place to develop a holistic view of aging in this single-celled organism. Here, we summarize the current state of understanding of yeast replicative aging with a focus on the recent studies that shed new light on how aging pathways interact to modulate lifespan in yeast. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Replicator dynamics in value chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Savin, Ivan; Vannuccini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The pure model of replicator dynamics though providing important insights in the evolution of markets has not found much of empirical support. This paper extends the model to the case of firms vertically integrated in value chains. We show that i) by taking value chains into account, the replicator...... dynamics may revert its effect. In these regressive developments of market selection, firms with low fitness expand because of being integrated with highly fit partners, and the other way around; ii) allowing partner's switching within a value chain illustrates that periods of instability in the early...... stage of industry life-cycle may be the result of an 'optimization' of partners within a value chain providing a novel and simple explanation to the evidence discussed by Mazzucato (1998); iii) there are distinct differences in the contribution to market selection between the layers of a value chain...

  13. Replication confers β cell immaturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Sapna; Roy, Nilotpal; Russ, Holger A; Leonhardt, Laura; French, Esra K; Roy, Ritu; Bengtsson, Henrik; Scott, Donald K; Stewart, Andrew F; Hebrok, Matthias

    2018-02-02

    Pancreatic β cells are highly specialized to regulate systemic glucose levels by secreting insulin. In adults, increase in β-cell mass is limited due to brakes on cell replication. In contrast, proliferation is robust in neonatal β cells that are functionally immature as defined by a lower set point for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Here we show that β-cell proliferation and immaturity are linked by tuning expression of physiologically relevant, non-oncogenic levels of c-Myc. Adult β cells induced to replicate adopt gene expression and metabolic profiles resembling those of immature neonatal β that proliferate readily. We directly demonstrate that priming insulin-producing cells to enter the cell cycle promotes a functionally immature phenotype. We suggest that there exists a balance between mature functionality and the ability to expand, as the phenotypic state of the β cell reverts to a less functional one in response to proliferative cues.

  14. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Inheritance of the DNA sequence and its proper organization into chromatin is fundamental for genome stability and function. Therefore, how specific chromatin structures are restored on newly synthesized DNA and transmitted through cell division remains a central question to understand cell fate...... choices and self-renewal. Propagation of genetic information and chromatin-based information in cycling cells entails genome-wide disruption and restoration of chromatin, coupled with faithful replication of DNA. In this chapter, we describe how cells duplicate the genome while maintaining its proper...... organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  15. Live Replication of Paravirtual Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Stodden, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Virtual machines offer a fair degree of system state encapsulation, which promotes practical advances in fault tolerance, system debugging, profiling and security applications. This work investigates deterministic replay and semi-active replication for system paravirtualization, a software discipline trading guest kernel binar compatibility for reduced dependency on costly trap-and-emulate techniques. A primary contribution is evidence that trace capturing under a piecewise deterministic exec...

  16. Transcriptional regulation by competing transcription factor modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger Hermsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input-output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits.

  17. In vitro replication of poliovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubinski, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Poliovirus is a member of the Picornaviridae whose genome is a single stranded RNA molecule of positive polarity surrounded by a proteinaceous capsid. Replication of poliovirus occurs via negative strand intermediates in infected cells using a virally encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and host cell proteins. The authors have exploited the fact that complete cDNA copies of the viral genome when transfected onto susceptible cells generate virus. Utilizing the bacteriophage SP6 DNA dependent RNA polymerase system to synthesize negative strands in vitro and using these in an in vitro reaction the authors have generated full length infectious plus strands. Mutagenesis of the 5' and 3' ends of the negative and positive strands demonstrated that replication could occur either de novo or be extensions of the templates from their 3' ends or from nicks occurring during replication. The appearance of dimeric RNA molecules generated in these reactions was not dependent upon the same protein required for de novo initiation. Full length dimeric RNA molecules using a 5' 32 P end-labelled oligo uridylic acid primer and positive strand template were demonstrated in vitro containing only the 35,000 Mr host protein and the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. A model for generating positive strands without protein priming by cleavage of dimeric RNA molecules was proposed

  18. A UV-sensitive human clonal cell line, RSa, which has low repair activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, N.; Fuse, A.

    1981-01-01

    The repair activity of a human transformed cell line, RSa, which was found to be highly sensitive to the lethal effects of 254 mm far-ultraviolet radiation, was compared with that of HeLa cells by evaluating the range of UV-induced incorporation of [methyl- 3 H]thymidine ([ 3 H]dThd) or 5-[6- 3 H]bromodeoxyuridine ([ 3 H]BrdUrd) into deoxyribonucleic acid. Direct scintillation counting was used for measuring the extent of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in UV-irradiated cells, which were trea