WorldWideScience

Sample records for replication linkage study

  1. Evidence for an asthma risk locus on chromosome Xp: a replication linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasch-Andersen, C; Møller, M U; Haagerup, A

    2008-01-01

    replication sample as used in the present study. The aim of the study was to replicate linkage to candidate regions for asthma in an independent Danish sample. METHODS: We performed a replication study investigating linkage to candidate regions for asthma on chromosomes 1p36.31-p36.21, 5q15-q23.2, 6p24.3-p22...... studies have been carried out the results are still conflicting and call for replication experiments. A Danish genome-wide scan has prior reported evidence for candidate regions for asthma susceptibility genes on chromosomes 1p, 5q, 6p, 12q and Xp. Linkage to chromosome 12q was later confirmed in the same.......3, and Xp22.31-p11.4 using additional markers in an independent set of 136 Danish asthmatic sib pair families. RESULTS: Nonparametric multipoint linkage analyses yielded suggestive evidence for linkage to asthma to chromosome Xp21.2 (MLS 2.92) but failed to replicate linkage to chromosomes 1p36.31-p36.21, 5...

  2. Replication of TCF4 through association and linkage studies in late-onset Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ju Li

    Full Text Available Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD is a common, late-onset disorder of the corneal endothelium. Although progress has been made in understanding the genetic basis of FECD by studying large families in which the phenotype is transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion, a recently reported genome-wide association study identified common alleles at a locus on chromosome 18 near TCF4 which confer susceptibility to FECD. Here, we report the findings of our independent validation study for TCF4 using the largest FECD dataset to date (450 FECD cases and 340 normal controls. Logistic regression with sex as a covariate was performed for three genetic models: dominant (DOM, additive (ADD, and recessive (REC. We found significant association with rs613872, the target marker reported by Baratz et al.(2010, for all three genetic models (DOM: P = 9.33×10(-35; ADD: P = 7.48×10(-30; REC: P = 5.27×10(-6. To strengthen the association study, we also conducted a genome-wide linkage scan on 64 multiplex families, composed primarily of affected sibling pairs (ASPs, using both parametric and non-parametric two-point and multipoint analyses. The most significant linkage region localizes to chromosome 18 from 69.94cM to 85.29cM, with a peak multipoint HLOD = 2.5 at rs1145315 (75.58cM under the DOM model, mapping 1.5 Mb proximal to rs613872. In summary, our study presents evidence to support the role of the intronic TCF4 single nucleotide polymorphism rs613872 in late-onset FECD through both association and linkage studies.

  3. Replication of linkage to quantitative trait loci: variation in location and magnitude of the lod score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, W C; Göring, H H; Blangero, J; Mitchell, B D

    2001-01-01

    Replication of linkage signals from independent samples is considered an important step toward verifying the significance of linkage signals in studies of complex traits. The purpose of this empirical investigation was to examine the variability in the precision of localizing a quantitative trait locus (QTL) by analyzing multiple replicates of a simulated data set with the use of variance components-based methods. Specifically, we evaluated across replicates the variation in both the magnitude and the location of the peak lod scores. We analyzed QTLs whose effects accounted for 10-37% of the phenotypic variance in the quantitative traits. Our analyses revealed that the precision of QTL localization was directly related to the magnitude of the QTL effect. For a QTL with effect accounting for > 20% of total phenotypic variation, > 90% of the linkage peaks fall within 10 cM from the true gene location. We found no evidence that, for a given magnitude of the lod score, the presence of interaction influenced the precision of QTL localization.

  4. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  5. When to conduct probabilistic linkage vs. deterministic linkage? A simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Ohashi, Yasuo; Setoguchi, Soko

    2015-08-01

    When unique identifiers are unavailable, successful record linkage depends greatly on data quality and types of variables available. While probabilistic linkage theoretically captures more true matches than deterministic linkage by allowing imperfection in identifiers, studies have shown inconclusive results likely due to variations in data quality, implementation of linkage methodology and validation method. The simulation study aimed to understand data characteristics that affect the performance of probabilistic vs. deterministic linkage. We created ninety-six scenarios that represent real-life situations using non-unique identifiers. We systematically introduced a range of discriminative power, rate of missing and error, and file size to increase linkage patterns and difficulties. We assessed the performance difference of linkage methods using standard validity measures and computation time. Across scenarios, deterministic linkage showed advantage in PPV while probabilistic linkage showed advantage in sensitivity. Probabilistic linkage uniformly outperformed deterministic linkage as the former generated linkages with better trade-off between sensitivity and PPV regardless of data quality. However, with low rate of missing and error in data, deterministic linkage performed not significantly worse. The implementation of deterministic linkage in SAS took less than 1min, and probabilistic linkage took 2min to 2h depending on file size. Our simulation study demonstrated that the intrinsic rate of missing and error of linkage variables was key to choosing between linkage methods. In general, probabilistic linkage was a better choice, but for exceptionally good quality data (<5% error), deterministic linkage was a more resource efficient choice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A comprehensive family-based replication study of schizophrenia genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aberg, Karolina A; Liu, Youfang; Bukszár, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

     768 control subjects from 6 databases and, after quality control 6298 individuals (including 3286 cases) from 1811 nuclear families. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Case-control status for SCZ. RESULTS Replication results showed a highly significant enrichment of SNPs with small P values. Of the SNPs...... in an independent family-based replication study that, after quality control, consisted of 8107 SNPs. SETTING Linkage meta-analysis, brain transcriptome meta-analysis, candidate gene database, OMIM, relevant mouse studies, and expression quantitative trait locus databases. PATIENTS We included 11 185 cases and 10...

  7. Three Conceptual Replication Studies in Group Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhuish, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    Many studies in mathematics education research occur with a nonrepresentative sample and are never replicated. To challenge this paradigm, I designed a large-scale study evaluating student conceptions in group theory that surveyed a national, representative sample of students. By replicating questions previously used to build theory around student…

  8. Irish study of high-density Schizophrenia families: Field methods and power to detect linkage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendler, K.S.; Straub, R.E.; MacLean, C.J. [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-09

    Large samples of multiplex pedigrees will probably be needed to detect susceptibility loci for schizophrenia by linkage analysis. Standardized ascertainment of such pedigrees from culturally and ethnically homogeneous populations may improve the probability of detection and replication of linkage. The Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families (ISHDSF) was formed from standardized ascertainment of multiplex schizophrenia families in 39 psychiatric facilities covering over 90% of the population in Ireland and Northern Ireland. We here describe a phenotypic sample and a subset thereof, the linkage sample. Individuals were included in the phenotypic sample if adequate diagnostic information, based on personal interview and/or hospital record, was available. Only individuals with available DNA were included in the linkage sample. Inclusion of a pedigree into the phenotypic sample required at least two first, second, or third degree relatives with non-affective psychosis (NAP), one of whom had schizophrenia (S) or poor-outcome schizoaffective disorder (PO-SAD). Entry into the linkage sample required DNA samples on at least two individuals with NAP, of whom at least one had S or PO-SAD. Affection was defined by narrow, intermediate, and broad criteria. 75 refs., 6 tabs.

  9. A Replication by Any Other Name: A Systematic Review of Replicative Intervention Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bryan G.; Collins, Lauren W.; Cook, Sara C.; Cook, Lysandra

    2016-01-01

    Replication research is essential to scientific knowledge. Reviews of replication studies often electronically search for "replicat*" as a textword, which does not identify studies that replicate previous research but do not self-identify as such. We examined whether the 83 intervention studies published in six non-categorical research…

  10. What Should Researchers Expect When They Replicate Studies? A Statistical View of Replicability in Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Prasad; Peng, Roger D; Leek, Jeffrey T

    2016-07-01

    A recent study of the replicability of key psychological findings is a major contribution toward understanding the human side of the scientific process. Despite the careful and nuanced analysis reported, the simple narrative disseminated by the mass, social, and scientific media was that in only 36% of the studies were the original results replicated. In the current study, however, we showed that 77% of the replication effect sizes reported were within a 95% prediction interval calculated using the original effect size. Our analysis suggests two critical issues in understanding replication of psychological studies. First, researchers' intuitive expectations for what a replication should show do not always match with statistical estimates of replication. Second, when the results of original studies are very imprecise, they create wide prediction intervals-and a broad range of replication effects that are consistent with the original estimates. This may lead to effects that replicate successfully, in that replication results are consistent with statistical expectations, but do not provide much information about the size (or existence) of the true effect. In this light, the results of the Reproducibility Project: Psychology can be viewed as statistically consistent with what one might expect when performing a large-scale replication experiment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Addressing the "Replication Crisis": Using Original Studies to Design Replication Studies with Appropriate Statistical Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Samantha F; Maxwell, Scott E

    2017-01-01

    Psychology is undergoing a replication crisis. The discussion surrounding this crisis has centered on mistrust of previous findings. Researchers planning replication studies often use the original study sample effect size as the basis for sample size planning. However, this strategy ignores uncertainty and publication bias in estimated effect sizes, resulting in overly optimistic calculations. A psychologist who intends to obtain power of .80 in the replication study, and performs calculations accordingly, may have an actual power lower than .80. We performed simulations to reveal the magnitude of the difference between actual and intended power based on common sample size planning strategies and assessed the performance of methods that aim to correct for effect size uncertainty and/or bias. Our results imply that even if original studies reflect actual phenomena and were conducted in the absence of questionable research practices, popular approaches to designing replication studies may result in a low success rate, especially if the original study is underpowered. Methods correcting for bias and/or uncertainty generally had higher actual power, but were not a panacea for an underpowered original study. Thus, it becomes imperative that 1) original studies are adequately powered and 2) replication studies are designed with methods that are more likely to yield the intended level of power.

  12. Suggestibility and negative priming: two replication studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daniel; Brown, Richard J

    2002-07-01

    Research suggests that inhibiting the effect of irrelevant stimuli on subsequent thought and action (cognitive inhibition) may be an important component of suggestibility. Two small correlation studies were conducted to address the relationship between different aspects of suggestibility and individual differences in cognitive inhibition, operationalized as the degree of negative priming generated by to-be-ignored stimuli in a semantic categorization task. The first study found significant positive correlations between negative priming, hypnotic suggestibility, and creative imagination; a significant negative correlation was obtained between negative priming and interrogative suggestibility, demonstrating the discriminant validity of the study results. The second study replicated the correlation between negative priming and hypnotic suggestibility, using a different suggestibility measurement procedure that assessed subjective experience and hypnotic involuntariness as well as objective responses to suggestions. These studies support the notion that the ability to engage in cognitive inhibition may be an important component of hypnotic responsivity and maybe of other forms of suggestibility.

  13. Statistical correction of the Winner's Curse explains replication variability in quantitative trait genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Palmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified hundreds of SNPs responsible for variation in human quantitative traits. However, genome-wide-significant associations often fail to replicate across independent cohorts, in apparent inconsistency with their apparent strong effects in discovery cohorts. This limited success of replication raises pervasive questions about the utility of the GWAS field. We identify all 332 studies of quantitative traits from the NHGRI-EBI GWAS Database with attempted replication. We find that the majority of studies provide insufficient data to evaluate replication rates. The remaining papers replicate significantly worse than expected (p < 10-14, even when adjusting for regression-to-the-mean of effect size between discovery- and replication-cohorts termed the Winner's Curse (p < 10-16. We show this is due in part to misreporting replication cohort-size as a maximum number, rather than per-locus one. In 39 studies accurately reporting per-locus cohort-size for attempted replication of 707 loci in samples with similar ancestry, replication rate matched expectation (predicted 458, observed 457, p = 0.94. In contrast, ancestry differences between replication and discovery (13 studies, 385 loci cause the most highly-powered decile of loci to replicate worse than expected, due to difference in linkage disequilibrium.

  14. A Combined Linkage and Exome Sequencing Analysis for Electrocardiogram Parameters in the Erasmus Rucphen Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia T; Zorkoltseva, Irina V; Amin, Najaf; Demirkan, Ayşe; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Kors, Jan A; van den Berg, Marten; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Kirichenko, Anatoly V; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Willemsen, Rob; Oostra, Ben A; Axenovich, Tatiana I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Isaacs, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements play a key role in the diagnosis and prediction of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. ECG parameters, such as the PR, QRS, and QT intervals, are known to be heritable and genome-wide association studies of these phenotypes have been successful in identifying common variants; however, a large proportion of the genetic variability of these traits remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to discover loci potentially harboring rare variants utilizing variance component linkage analysis in 1547 individuals from a large family-based study, the Erasmus Rucphen Family Study (ERF). Linked regions were further explored using exome sequencing. Five suggestive linkage peaks were identified: two for QT interval (1q24, LOD = 2.63; 2q34, LOD = 2.05), one for QRS interval (1p35, LOD = 2.52) and two for PR interval (9p22, LOD = 2.20; 14q11, LOD = 2.29). Fine-mapping using exome sequence data identified a C > G missense variant (c.713C > G, p.Ser238Cys) in the FCRL2 gene associated with QT (rs74608430; P = 2.8 × 10 -4 , minor allele frequency = 0.019). Heritability analysis demonstrated that the SNP explained 2.42% of the trait's genetic variability in ERF ( P = 0.02). Pathway analysis suggested that the gene is involved in cytosolic Ca 2+ levels ( P = 3.3 × 10 -3 ) and AMPK stimulated fatty acid oxidation in muscle ( P = 4.1 × 10 -3 ). Look-ups in bioinformatics resources showed that expression of FCRL2 is associated with ARHGAP24 and SETBP1 expression. This finding was not replicated in the Rotterdam study. Combining the bioinformatics information with the association and linkage analyses, FCRL2 emerges as a strong candidate gene for QT interval.

  15. A combined linkage and exome sequencing analysis for electrocardiogram parameters in the Erasmus Rucphen Family study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tamar Silva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiogram (ECG measurements play a key role in the diagnosis and prediction of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. ECG parameters, such as the PR, QRS, and QT intervals, are known to be heritable and genome-wide association studies (GWAS of these phenotypes have been successful in identifying common variants; however, a large proportion of the genetic variability of these traits remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to discover loci potentially harboring rare variants utilizing variance component linkage analysis in 1547 individuals from a large family-based study, the Erasmus Rucphen Family Study (ERF. Linked regions were further explored using exome sequencing. Five suggestive linkage peaks were identified: two for QT interval (1q24, LOD = 2.63; 2q34, LOD = 2.05, one for QRS interval (1p35, LOD = 2.52 and two for PR interval (9p22, LOD = 2.20; 14q11, LOD = 2.29. Fine-mapping using exome sequence data identified a C > G missense variant (c.713C>G, p.Ser238Cys in the FCRL2 gene associated with QT (rs74608430; P = 2.8 ×10-4, minor allele frequency = 0.019. Heritability analysis demonstrated that the SNP explained 2.42% of the trait’s genetic variability in ERF (P = 0.02. Pathway analysis suggested that the gene is involved in cytosolic Ca2+ levels (P = 3.3 × 10-3 and AMPK stimulated fatty acid oxidation in muscle (P = 4.1 ×10-3. Look-ups in bioinformatics resources showed that expression of FCRL2 is associated with ARHGAP24 and SETBP1 expression. This finding was not replicated in the Rotterdam study. Combining the bioinformatics information with the association and linkage analyses, FCRL2 emerges as a strong candidate gene for QT interval.

  16. A genome-wide scan for autoimmune thyroiditis in the Old Order Amish: replication of genetic linkage on chromosome 5q11.2-q14.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Elsie M; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Sabra, Mona M; Pollin, Toni I; Ladenson, Paul W; Silver, Kristi D; Mitchell, Braxton D; Shuldiner, Alan R

    2003-03-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD) is a common disorder characterized by circulating antibodies to epitopes of thyroid tissue and hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis or AITD-hypothyroidism), although many subjects with AITD are euthyroid. Current evidence suggests that AITD is familial and polygenic. We studied AITD in a homogeneous founder Caucasian population, the Old Order Amish of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We found autoimmune thyroiditis, defined by the presence of circulating antimicrosomal antibodies, to be relatively common in the Amish, with a prevalence of 22.7%. The prevalence of AITD-hypothyroidism was 9.2%. We performed a genome-wide linkage analysis with 373 short tandem repeat markers in 445 subjects from 29 families. We observed suggestive evidence of linkage of AITD to a locus on chromosome 5q11.2-q14.3 (LOD, 2.30; P = 0.0006 at 94 cM; closest marker, D5S428), a region that was previously reported to be linked to AITD-hypothyroidism in a Japanese study. AITD-hypothyroidism showed a more modest linkage peak to the same region (LOD, 1.46; P = 0.005). Possible linkage (nominal P Amish.

  17. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity in a genome-wide linkage study of asthma families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuster Antje

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a complex genetic disease with more than 20 genome-wide scans conducted so far. Regions on almost every chromosome have been linked to asthma and several genes have been associated. However, most of these associations are weak and are still awaiting replication. Methods In this study, we conducted a second-stage genome-wide scan with 408 microsatellite markers on 201 asthma-affected sib pair families and defined clinical subgroups to identify phenotype-genotype relations. Results The lowest P value for asthma in the total sample was 0.003 on chromosome 11, while several of the clinical subsets reached lower significance levels than in the overall sample. Suggestive evidence for linkage (p = 0.0007 was found for total IgE on chromosomes 1, 7 and again on chromosome 11, as well as for HDM asthma on chromosome 12. Weaker linkage signals could be found on chromosomes 4 and 5 for early onset and HDM, and, newly described, on chromosome 2 for severe asthma and on chromosome 9 for hay fever. Conclusions This phenotypic dissection underlines the importance of detailed clinical characterisations and the extreme genetic heterogeneity of asthma.

  18. Studies on the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. III. Electron microscopy of replicating DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellens, D.J.; Sussenbach, J.S.; Jansz, H.S.

    1974-01-01

    Replicating Ad5 DNA was isolated from nuclei of infected KB cells and studied by electron microscopy. Branched as well as unbranched linear intermediates were observed containing extended regions of single-stranded DNA. The relationship between the branched and unbranched structures was studied

  19. Epidemiological Studies Persian Gulf War Illnesses Persian Gulf Women's Health Linkage Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klemm, Rebecca

    1997-01-01

    The Persian Gulf Women's Health Linkage Study will provide baseline health and risk factor information to estimate the prevalence of selected health conditions, with an emphasis on reproductive health...

  20. Bayesian evaluation of effect size after replicating an original study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, Robbie C M; Van Assen, Marcel A.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    The vast majority of published results in the literature is statistically significant, which raises concerns about their reliability. The Reproducibility Project Psychology (RPP) and Experimental Economics Replication Project (EE-RP) both replicated a large number of published studies in psychology

  1. Underreporting of maternal mortality in Taiwan: A data linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Pi Wu

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Approximately two-thirds of the maternal deaths in Taiwan were unreported in the officially published mortality data. Hence, routine nationwide data linkage is essential to monitor maternal mortality in Taiwan accurately.

  2. Record linkage for pharmacoepidemiological studies in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P van; Lemmens, Valery E P P; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V van de; Herings, Ron M C; Coebergh, Jan Willem W

    2012-01-01

    An increasing need has developed for the post-approval surveillance of (new) anti-cancer drugs by means of pharmacoepidemiology and outcomes research in the area of oncology. To create an overview that makes researchers aware of the available database linkages in Northern America and Europe which facilitate pharmacoepidemiology and outcomes research in cancer patients. In addition to our own database, i.e. the Eindhoven Cancer Registry (ECR) linked to the PHARMO Record Linkage System, we considered database linkages between a population-based cancer registry and an administrative healthcare database that at least contains information on drug use and offers a longitudinal perspective on healthcare utilization. Eligible database linkages were limited to those that had been used in multiple published articles in English language included in Pubmed. The HMO Cancer Research Network (CRN) in the US was excluded from this review, as an overview of the linked databases participating in the CRN is already provided elsewhere. Researchers who had worked with the data resources included in our review were contacted for additional information and verification of the data presented in the overview. The following database linkages were included: the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results-Medicare; cancer registry data linked to Medicaid; Canadian cancer registries linked to population-based drug databases; the Scottish cancer registry linked to the Tayside drug dispensing data; linked databases in the Nordic Countries of Europe: Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark; and the ECR-PHARMO linkage in the Netherlands. Descriptives of the included database linkages comprise population size, generalizability of the population, year of first data availability, contents of the cancer registry, contents of the administrative healthcare database, the possibility to select a cancer-free control cohort, and linkage to other healthcare databases. The linked databases offer a longitudinal

  3. Health problems in childhood cancer survivors: Linkage studies and guideline development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Font-Gonzalez, A.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis comprises two parts. The first part of this thesis aims to increase the evidence on the burden of disease in childhood cancer survivors and to define high-risk groups of survivors by using medical record linkage studies. A two-step record linkage methodology between Dutch national

  4. A study of inter linkage effects on Candu feeder piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M.; Aggarwal, M.L.; Meysner, A.

    2005-01-01

    A CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactor core consists of a large number of fuel channels where heat is generated. Two feeder pipes are connected to each fuel channel to transport D 2 O coolant into and out of the reactor core. The feeder piping is designed to the requirements of Class 1 piping of Section III NB of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel and CSA Codes. Feeder piping stress analysis is being performed to demonstrate the code compliance check and the fitness for service of feeders. In the past, stress analyses were conducted for each individual feeder without including interaction effects among connected feeders. Interaction effects occur as a result of linkages that exist between feeders to prevent fretting and impacting damage during normal, abnormal and accident conditions. In this paper, a 'combined' approach is adopted to include all feeders connected by inter linkages into one feeder piping model. MSC/NASTRAN finite element software was used in the stress simulation, which contains up to 127 feeder pipes. The ASME Class 1 piping analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of the linkages between feeders. Both seismic time history and broadened response spectra methods were used in the seismic stress calculation. The results show that the effect of linkages is significant in dynamic stresses for all feeder configurations, as well as in static stresses for certain feeder configurations. The single feeder analysis could either underestimate or overestimate feeder stresses depending on the pipe geometry and bend wall thickness. (authors)

  5. Whole genome study of linkage disequilibrium in Sahiwal cattle

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esnart Mukumbo

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... 500,968 SNPs comprising 2518.1 Mb of the genome, were used for the LD estimation. The minior ..... on a high density SNP panel. BMC Genom. ... Linkage disequilibrium and the mapping of complex human traits. Trend.

  6. Quantifying sources of bias in longitudinal data linkage studies of child abuse and neglect: measuring impact of outcome specification, linkage error, and partial cohort follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Jared W; Shanahan, Meghan E; Schnitzer, Patricia G; Lanier, Paul; Daniels, Julie L; Marshall, Stephen W

    2017-12-01

    Health informatics projects combining statewide birth populations with child welfare records have emerged as a valuable approach to conducting longitudinal research of child maltreatment. The potential bias resulting from linkage misspecification, partial cohort follow-up, and outcome misclassification in these studies has been largely unexplored. This study integrated epidemiological survey and novel administrative data sources to establish the Alaska Longitudinal Child Abuse and Neglect Linkage (ALCANLink) project. Using these data we evaluated and quantified the impact of non-linkage misspecification and single source maltreatment ascertainment use on reported maltreatment risk and effect estimates. The ALCANLink project integrates the 2009-2011 Alaska Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) sample with multiple administrative databases through 2014, including one novel administrative source to track out-of-state emigration. For this project we limited our analysis to the 2009 PRAMS sample. We report on the impact of linkage quality, cohort follow-up, and multisource outcome ascertainment on the incidence proportion of reported maltreatment before age 6 and hazard ratios of selected characteristics that are often available in birth cohort linkage studies of maltreatment. Failure to account for out-of-state emigration biased the incidence proportion by 12% (from 28.3% w to 25.2% w ), and the hazard ratio (HR) by as much as 33% for some risk factors. Overly restrictive linkage parameters biased the incidence proportion downwards by 43% and the HR by as much as 27% for some factors. Multi-source linkages, on the other hand, were of little benefit for improving reported maltreatment ascertainment. Using the ALCANLink data which included a novel administrative data source, we were able to observe and quantify bias to both the incidence proportion and HR in a birth cohort linkage study of reported child maltreatment. Failure to account for out

  7. A new method for assessing how sensitivity and specificity of linkage studies affects estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia L Moore

    Full Text Available While the importance of record linkage is widely recognised, few studies have attempted to quantify how linkage errors may have impacted on their own findings and outcomes. Even where authors of linkage studies have attempted to estimate sensitivity and specificity based on subjects with known status, the effects of false negatives and positives on event rates and estimates of effect are not often described.We present quantification of the effect of sensitivity and specificity of the linkage process on event rates and incidence, as well as the resultant effect on relative risks. Formulae to estimate the true number of events and estimated relative risk adjusted for given linkage sensitivity and specificity are then derived and applied to data from a prisoner mortality study. The implications of false positive and false negative matches are also discussed.Comparisons of the effect of sensitivity and specificity on incidence and relative risks indicate that it is more important for linkages to be highly specific than sensitive, particularly if true incidence rates are low. We would recommend that, where possible, some quantitative estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of the linkage process be performed, allowing the effect of these quantities on observed results to be assessed.

  8. Optorsim: A Grid Simulator for Studying Dynamic Data Replication Strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, William H; Millar, A Paul; Capozza, Luigi; Stockinger, Kurt; Zini, Floriano

    2003-01-01

    Computational grids process large, computationally intensive problems on small data sets. In contrast, data grids process large computational problems that in turn require evaluating, mining and producing large amounts of data. Replication, creating geographically disparate identical copies of data, is regarded as one of the major optimization techniques for reducing data access costs. In this paper, several replication algorithms are discussed. These algorithms were studied using the Grid simulator: OptorSim. OptorSim provides a modular framework within which optimization strategies can be studied under different Grid configurations. The goal is to explore the stability and transient behaviour of selected optimization techniques. We detail the design and implementation of OptorSim and analyze various replication algorithms based on different Grid workloads.

  9. Association between cancer and contact allergy: a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engkilde, Kaare; Thyssen, Jacob P; Menné, Torkil

    2011-01-01

    by logistic regression analysis. Results An inverse association between contact allergy and non-melanoma skin- and breast cancer, respectively, was identified in both sexes, and an inverse trend for brain cancer was found in women with contact allergy. Additionally, a positive association between contact...... and cancer, few have looked into the association between cancer and contact allergy, a type IV allergy. By linking two clinical databases, the authors investigate the possible association between contact allergy and cancer. Methods Record linkage of two different registers was performed: (1) a tertiary...

  10. The big five as tendencies in situations : A replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, AAJ

    1996-01-01

    Van Heck, Perugini, Caprara and Froger (1994) report the average generalizability coefficient reflecting the consistent ordering of persons across different situations and different trait markers (items) to be in the order of 0.70. We performed a replication study in which we improved on their

  11. Reproducibility and replicability of rodent phenotyping in preclinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kafkafi, Neri; Agassi, Joseph; Chesler, Elissa J.; Crabbe, John C.; Crusio, Wim E.; Eilam, David; Gerlai, Robert; Golani, Ilan; Gomez-Marin, Alex; Heller, Ruth; Iraqi, Fuad; Jaljuli, Iman; Karp, Natasha A.; Morgan, Hugh; Nicholson, George; Pfaff, Donald W.; Richter, S. Helene; Stark, Philip B.; Stiedl, Oliver; Stodden, Victoria; Tarantino, Lisa M.; Tucci, Valter; Valdar, William; Williams, Robert W.; Würbel, Hanno; Benjamini, Yoav

    The scientific community is increasingly concerned with the proportion of published “discoveries” that are not replicated in subsequent studies. The field of rodent behavioral phenotyping was one of the first to raise this concern, and to relate it to other methodological issues: the complex

  12. Can Coloring Mandalas Reduce Anxiety? A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vennet, Renee; Serice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This experimental study replicated Curry and Kasser's (2005) research that tested whether coloring a mandala would reduce anxiety. After inducing an anxious mood via a writing activity, participants were randomly assigned to three groups that colored either on a mandala design, on a plaid design, or on a blank paper. Anxiety level was measured…

  13. Professional nursing burnout and irrational thinking: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevre, Park S; Cassells, Julie; Buzaianu, Elena

    2012-01-01

    This expanded (n = 648) replication study examines job-related burnout in practicing nurses in relation to five maladaptive thinking patterns at eight northeast Florida hospitals. Data supported the hypothesis that maladaptive thinking patterns may be related to nurses' burnout thoughts and behaviors. The focus of this research spotlights the individual nurse's thoughts, emotions, and actions and suggests that these burnout tendencies can be mitigated if not changed.

  14. Blinded with Science or Informed by Charts? A Replication Study

    OpenAIRE

    Dragicevic , Pierre; Jansen , Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    International audience; We provide a reappraisal of Tal and Wansink's study "Blinded with Science" , where seemingly trivial charts were shown to increase belief in drug efficacy, presumably because charts are associated with science. Through a series of four replications conducted on two crowdsourcing platforms, we investigate an alternative explanation, namely, that the charts allowed participants to better assess the drug's efficacy. Considered together, our experiments suggest that the ch...

  15. Linkage studies on Gilles de la Tourette syndrome: What is the strategy of choice?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heutink, P.; Wetering, J.M. van de; Oostra, B.A. [Erasmus Univ. Rotterdam (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    For a linkage study it is important to ascertain family material that is sufficiently informative. The statistical power of linkage sample can be determined via computer simulation. For complex traits uncertain parameters such as incomplete penetrance, frequency of phenocopies, gene frequency and variable expression have to be taken into account. One can either include only the most severe phenotype in the analysis or apply multiple linkage tests for a gradually broadened disease phenotype. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) is a chronic neurological disorder characterized by multiple, intermittent motor and vocal tics. Segregation analyses suggests that GTS and milder phenotypes are caused by a single dominant gene. We report here the results of an extensive simulation study on a large set of families. We compared the effectiveness of linkage tests with only the GTS phenotype versus multiple tests that included various milder phenotypes and different gene frequencies. The scenario of multiple tests yielded superior power. Our results show that computer simulation can indicate the strategy of choice in linkage studies of multiple, complex phenotypes. 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. The AGIS metric and time of test: A replication study

    OpenAIRE

    Counsell, S; Swift, S; Tucker, A

    2016-01-01

    Visual Field (VF) tests and corresponding data are commonly used in clinical practices to manage glaucoma. The standard metric used to measure glaucoma severity is the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Studies (AGIS) metric. We know that time of day when VF tests are applied can influence a patient’s AGIS metric value; a previous study showed that this was the case for a data set of 160 patients. In this paper, we replicate that study using data from 2468 patients obtained from Moorfields Eye Ho...

  17. Meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide linkage studies of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, MYM; Levinson, DF; Faraone, SV; Suarez, BK; DeLisi, LE; Arinami, T; Riley, B; Paunio, T; Pulver, AE; Irmansyah; Holmans, PA; Escamilla, M; Wildenauer, DB; Williams, NM; Laurent, C; Mowry, BJ; Brzustowicz, LM; Maziade, M; Sklar, P; Garver, DL; Abecasis, GR; Lerer, B; Fallin, MD; Gurling, HMD; Gejman, PV; Lindholm, E; Moises, HW; Byerley, W; Wijsman, EM; Forabosco, P; Tsuang, MT; Hwu, H-G; Okazaki, Y; Kendler, KS; Wormley, B; Fanous, A; Walsh, D; O’Neill, FA; Peltonen, L; Nestadt, G; Lasseter, VK; Liang, KY; Papadimitriou, GM; Dikeos, DG; Schwab, SG; Owen, MJ; O’Donovan, MC; Norton, N; Hare, E; Raventos, H; Nicolini, H; Albus, M; Maier, W; Nimgaonkar, VL; Terenius, L; Mallet, J; Jay, M; Godard, S; Nertney, D; Alexander, M; Crowe, RR; Silverman, JM; Bassett, AS; Roy, M-A; Mérette, C; Pato, CN; Pato, MT; Roos, J Louw; Kohn, Y; Amann-Zalcenstein, D; Kalsi, G; McQuillin, A; Curtis, D; Brynjolfson, J; Sigmundsson, T; Petursson, H; Sanders, AR; Duan, J; Jazin, E; Myles-Worsley, M; Karayiorgou, M; Lewis, CM

    2009-01-01

    A genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) was carried out on 32 independent genome-wide linkage scan analyses that included 3255 pedigrees with 7413 genotyped cases affected with schizophrenia (SCZ) or related disorders. The primary GSMA divided the autosomes into 120 bins, rank-ordered the bins within each study according to the most positive linkage result in each bin, summed these ranks (weighted for study size) for each bin across studies and determined the empirical probability of a given summed rank (PSR) by simulation. Suggestive evidence for linkage was observed in two single bins, on chromosomes 5q (142-168 Mb) and 2q (103-134 Mb). Genome-wide evidence for linkage was detected on chromosome 2q (119-152 Mb) when bin boundaries were shifted to the middle of the previous bins. The primary analysis met empirical criteria for ‘aggregate’ genome-wide significance, indicating that some or all of 10 bins are likely to contain loci linked to SCZ, including regions of chromosomes 1, 2q, 3q, 4q, 5q, 8p and 10q. In a secondary analysis of 22 studies of European-ancestry samples, suggestive evidence for linkage was observed on chromosome 8p (16-33 Mb). Although the newer genome-wide association methodology has greater power to detect weak associations to single common DNA sequence variants, linkage analysis can detect diverse genetic effects that segregate in families, including multiple rare variants within one locus or several weakly associated loci in the same region. Therefore, the regions supported by this meta-analysis deserve close attention in future studies. PMID:19349958

  18. Validation of de-identified record linkage to ascertain hospital admissions in a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    English Dallas R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cohort studies can provide valuable evidence of cause and effect relationships but are subject to loss of participants over time, limiting the validity of findings. Computerised record linkage offers a passive and ongoing method of obtaining health outcomes from existing routinely collected data sources. However, the quality of record linkage is reliant upon the availability and accuracy of common identifying variables. We sought to develop and validate a method for linking a cohort study to a state-wide hospital admissions dataset with limited availability of unique identifying variables. Methods A sample of 2000 participants from a cohort study (n = 41 514 was linked to a state-wide hospitalisations dataset in Victoria, Australia using the national health insurance (Medicare number and demographic data as identifying variables. Availability of the health insurance number was limited in both datasets; therefore linkage was undertaken both with and without use of this number and agreement tested between both algorithms. Sensitivity was calculated for a sub-sample of 101 participants with a hospital admission confirmed by medical record review. Results Of the 2000 study participants, 85% were found to have a record in the hospitalisations dataset when the national health insurance number and sex were used as linkage variables and 92% when demographic details only were used. When agreement between the two methods was tested the disagreement fraction was 9%, mainly due to "false positive" links when demographic details only were used. A final algorithm that used multiple combinations of identifying variables resulted in a match proportion of 87%. Sensitivity of this final linkage was 95%. Conclusions High quality record linkage of cohort data with a hospitalisations dataset that has limited identifiers can be achieved using combinations of a national health insurance number and demographic data as identifying variables.

  19. Trust, trolleys and social dilemmas: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostyn, Dries H; Roets, Arne

    2017-05-01

    The present manuscript addresses how perceived trustworthiness of cooperative partners in a social dilemma context is influenced by the moral judgments those partners make on Trolley-type moral dilemmas; an issue recently investigated by Everett, Pizarro, and Crockett (2016). The present research comprises 2 studies that were conducted independently, simultaneously with, and incognizant of the Everett studies. Whereas the present studies aimed at investigating the same research hypothesis, a different and more elaborate methodology was used, as such providing a conceptual replication opportunity and extension to the Everett et al. Overall, the present studies clearly confirmed the main finding of Everett et al., that deontologists are more trusted than consequentialists in social dilemma games. Study 1 replicates Everett et al.'s effect in the context of trust games. Study 2 generalizes the effect to public goods games, thus demonstrating that it is not specific to the type of social dilemma game used in Everett et al. Finally, both studies build on these results by demonstrating that the increased trust in deontologists may sometimes, but not always, be warranted: deontologists displayed increased cooperation rates but only in the public goods game and not in trust games. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. A large replication study and meta-analysis in European samples provides further support for association of AHI1 markers with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingason, Andrés; Giegling, Ina; Cichon, Sven

    2010-01-01

    The Abelson helper integration site 1 (AHI1) gene locus on chromosome 6q23 is among a group of candidate loci for schizophrenia susceptibility that were initially identified by linkage followed by linkage disequilibrium mapping, and subsequent replication of the association in an independent sample....... Here, we present results of a replication study of AHI1 locus markers, previously implicated in schizophrenia, in a large European sample (in total 3907 affected and 7429 controls). Furthermore, we perform a meta-analysis of the implicated markers in 4496 affected and 18,920 controls. Both...... as the neighbouring phosphodiesterase 7B (PDE7B)-may be considered candidates for involvement in the genetic aetiology of schizophrenia....

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study and Linkage Analysis of the Healthy Aging Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minster, Ryan L; Sanders, Jason L; Singh, Jatinder

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) is a tool for measuring the extent of health and disease across multiple systems. METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study and a genome-wide linkage analysis to map quantitative trait loci associated with the HAI and a modified HAI weighted...

  2. Overview of surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira; Kamada, Kohji; Yamashina, Toshiro.

    1981-02-01

    Overview of surface material developments for fusion devices in university linkage organization has been described. Including subjects are surface properties investigations, surface diagnostics, coating technologies tritium related surface problems and permeation studies. Because surface material investigations are wide spread subjects, necessities of problem definitions from plasma physics side were recognized. (author)

  3. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage studies in BMI and obesity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, Catherine L.; Chiodini, Benedetta D.; Sham, Pak; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Abkevich, Victor; Adeyemo, Adebowale A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Arya, Rector; Berenson, Gerald S.; Blangero, John; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Chagnon, Yvon C.; Chen, Wei; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Deng, Hong-Wen; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Feitosa, Mary F.; Froguel, Philippe; Hanson, Robert L.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huezo-Dias, Patricia; Kissebah, Ahmed H.; Li, Weidong; Luke, Amy; Martin, Lisa J.; Nash, Matthew; Ohman, Muena; Palmer, Lyle J.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Price, R. Arlen; Redline, Susan; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stern, Michael P.; Stone, Steven; Stringham, Heather; Turner, Stephen; Wijmenga, Cisca; Collier, David A.

    Objective: The objective was to provide an overall assessment of genetic linkage data of BMI and BMI-defined obesity using a nonparametric genome scan meta-analysis. Research Methods and Procedures: We identified 37 published studies containing data on over 31,000 individuals from more than >10,000

  4. Linkage studies and mutation analysis of the PDEB gene in 23 families with Leber congenital amaurosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riess, O; Weber, B; Nørremølle, Anne

    1992-01-01

    as to whether mutations in the human PDEB gene might cause LCA. We have previously cloned and characterized the human homologue of the mouse Pdeb gene and have mapped it to chromosome 4p16.3. In this study, a total of 23 LCA families of various ethnic backgrounds have been investigated. Linkage analysis using...

  5. Risk Factors as Major Determinants of Resilience: A Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Yohanan; Kimhi, Shaul; Lahad, Mooli; Leykin, Dmitry; Goroshit, Marina

    2018-03-16

    The present study was conducted in the context of current concerns about replication in psychological research. It claims that risk factors should be regarded as an integral part of the definition of individual resilience, which should be defined in terms of the balance between individual strength or protective factors, and individual vulnerability or risk factors (IND-SVR). Five independent samples, including 3457 Israeli participants, were employed to determine the effects of resilience promoting and resilience suppressing variables on the IND-SVR index of resilience, and on its two components: recovery from adversity, and distress symptoms. Five path analyses were employed for determining the role of distress symptoms as a measure of psychological resilience, as compared to other indices of this resilience. Results indicated the major role of risk factors (distress symptoms) as an integral component of resilience. This role was generally replicated in the five investigated samples. Risk factors are legitimate, valid, and useful parts of the definition of psychological resilience. Resilience research has shifted away from studying individual risk factors to investigating the process through which individuals overcome the hardships they experience. The present data seem to suggest that this shift should be reexamined.

  6. Adaptive scaling of reward in episodic memory: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alice; Ludwig, Casimir; Farrell, Simon

    2017-11-01

    Reward is thought to enhance episodic memory formation via dopaminergic consolidation. Bunzeck, Dayan, Dolan, and Duzel [(2010). A common mechanism for adaptive scaling of reward and novelty. Human Brain Mapping, 31, 1380-1394] provided functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and behavioural evidence that reward and episodic memory systems are sensitive to the contextual value of a reward-whether it is relatively higher or lower-as opposed to absolute value or prediction error. We carried out a direct replication of their behavioural study and did not replicate their finding that memory performance associated with reward follows this pattern of adaptive scaling. An effect of reward outcome was in the opposite direction to that in the original study, with lower reward outcomes leading to better memory than higher outcomes. There was a marginal effect of reward context, suggesting that expected value affected memory performance. We discuss the robustness of the reward memory relationship to variations in reward context, and whether other reward-related factors have a more reliable influence on episodic memory.

  7. Young people’s views about consenting to data linkage: findings from the PEARL qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Audrey

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Electronic administrative data exist in several domains which, if linked, are potentially useful for research. However, benefits from data linkage should be considered alongside risks such as the threat to privacy. Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC is a birth cohort study. The Project to Enhance ALSPAC through Record Linkage (PEARL was established to enrich the ALSPAC resource through linkage between ALSPAC participants and routine sources of health and social data. Qualitative research was incorporated in the PEARL study to examine participants’ views about data linkage and inform approaches to information sharing. This paper focusses on issues of consent. Methods Digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 55 participants aged 17–19 years. Terms and processes relating to consent, anonymization and data linkage were explained to interviewees. Scenarios were used to prompt consideration of linking different sources of data, and whether consent should be requested. Interview recordings were fully transcribed. Thematic analysis was undertaken using the Framework approach. Results Participant views on data linkage appeared to be most influenced by: considerations around the social sensitivity of the research question, and; the possibility of tangible health benefits in the public interest. Some participants appeared unsure about the effectiveness of anonymization, or did not always view effective anonymization as making consent unnecessary. This was related to notions of ownership of personal information and etiquette around asking permission for secondary use. Despite different consent procedures being explained, participants tended to equate consent with ‘opt-in’ consent through which participants are ‘asked’ if their data can be used for a specific study. Participants raising similar concerns came to differing conclusions about whether consent was needed. Views changed when presented

  8. Young people's views about consenting to data linkage: findings from the PEARL qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrey, Suzanne; Brown, Lindsey; Campbell, Rona; Boyd, Andy; Macleod, John

    2016-03-21

    Electronic administrative data exist in several domains which, if linked, are potentially useful for research. However, benefits from data linkage should be considered alongside risks such as the threat to privacy. Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) is a birth cohort study. The Project to Enhance ALSPAC through Record Linkage (PEARL) was established to enrich the ALSPAC resource through linkage between ALSPAC participants and routine sources of health and social data. Qualitative research was incorporated in the PEARL study to examine participants' views about data linkage and inform approaches to information sharing. This paper focusses on issues of consent. Digitally recorded interviews were conducted with 55 participants aged 17-19 years. Terms and processes relating to consent, anonymization and data linkage were explained to interviewees. Scenarios were used to prompt consideration of linking different sources of data, and whether consent should be requested. Interview recordings were fully transcribed. Thematic analysis was undertaken using the Framework approach. Participant views on data linkage appeared to be most influenced by: considerations around the social sensitivity of the research question, and; the possibility of tangible health benefits in the public interest. Some participants appeared unsure about the effectiveness of anonymization, or did not always view effective anonymization as making consent unnecessary. This was related to notions of ownership of personal information and etiquette around asking permission for secondary use. Despite different consent procedures being explained, participants tended to equate consent with 'opt-in' consent through which participants are 'asked' if their data can be used for a specific study. Participants raising similar concerns came to differing conclusions about whether consent was needed. Views changed when presented with different scenarios, and were sometimes inconsistent. Findings

  9. Leather Industry Business Linkages (Case Study in District Magetan)

    OpenAIRE

    Dilahur Dilahur

    2004-01-01

    Leather industry in Magetan covers two forms; they are tanning and leathercraft. During 1960 and 1970, the leather industry decreased in its production, but in 1990 Magetan becomes the center of leather industry. Its development appeals to be studied closely. The goals of this study are to know the relation between tanning and leathercraft, the connection between these industries and other economic ativities, and their connection with production factor. This study uses survey methhod. The res...

  10. Reproducibility and replicability of rodent phenotyping in preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafkafi, Neri; Agassi, Joseph; Chesler, Elissa J; Crabbe, John C; Crusio, Wim E; Eilam, David; Gerlai, Robert; Golani, Ilan; Gomez-Marin, Alex; Heller, Ruth; Iraqi, Fuad; Jaljuli, Iman; Karp, Natasha A; Morgan, Hugh; Nicholson, George; Pfaff, Donald W; Richter, S Helene; Stark, Philip B; Stiedl, Oliver; Stodden, Victoria; Tarantino, Lisa M; Tucci, Valter; Valdar, William; Williams, Robert W; Würbel, Hanno; Benjamini, Yoav

    2018-04-01

    The scientific community is increasingly concerned with the proportion of published "discoveries" that are not replicated in subsequent studies. The field of rodent behavioral phenotyping was one of the first to raise this concern, and to relate it to other methodological issues: the complex interaction between genotype and environment; the definitions of behavioral constructs; and the use of laboratory mice and rats as model species for investigating human health and disease mechanisms. In January 2015, researchers from various disciplines gathered at Tel Aviv University to discuss these issues. The general consensus was that the issue is prevalent and of concern, and should be addressed at the statistical, methodological and policy levels, but is not so severe as to call into question the validity and the usefulness of model organisms as a whole. Well-organized community efforts, coupled with improved data and metadata sharing, have a key role in identifying specific problems and promoting effective solutions. Replicability is closely related to validity, may affect generalizability and translation of findings, and has important ethical implications. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage studies in BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Catherine L; Chiodini, Benedetta D; Sham, Pak; Lewis, Cathryn M; Abkevich, Victor; Adeyemo, Adebowale A; de Andrade, Mariza; Arya, Rector; Berenson, Gerald S; Blangero, John; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Chagnon, Yvon C; Chen, Wei; Comuzzie, Anthony G; Deng, Hong-Wen; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Feitosa, Mary F; Froguel, Philippe; Hanson, Robert L; Hebebrand, Johannes; Huezo-Dias, Patricia; Kissebah, Ahmed H; Li, Weidong; Luke, Amy; Martin, Lisa J; Nash, Matthew; Ohman, Miina; Palmer, Lyle J; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Price, R Arlen; Redline, Susan; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Stern, Michael P; Stone, Steven; Stringham, Heather; Turner, Stephen; Wijmenga, Cisca; Collier, David A

    2007-09-01

    The objective was to provide an overall assessment of genetic linkage data of BMI and BMI-defined obesity using a nonparametric genome scan meta-analysis. We identified 37 published studies containing data on over 31,000 individuals from more than >10,000 families and obtained genome-wide logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores, non-parametric linkage (NPL) scores, or maximum likelihood scores (MLS). BMI was analyzed in a pooled set of all studies, as a subgroup of 10 studies that used BMI-defined obesity, and for subgroups ascertained through type 2 diabetes, hypertension, or subjects of European ancestry. Bins at chromosome 13q13.2- q33.1, 12q23-q24.3 achieved suggestive evidence of linkage to BMI in the pooled analysis and samples ascertained for hypertension. Nominal evidence of linkage to these regions and suggestive evidence for 11q13.3-22.3 were also observed for BMI-defined obesity. The FTO obesity gene locus at 16q12.2 also showed nominal evidence for linkage. However, overall distribution of summed rank p values <0.05 is not different from that expected by chance. The strongest evidence was obtained in the families ascertained for hypertension at 9q31.1-qter and 12p11.21-q23 (p < 0.01). Despite having substantial statistical power, we did not unequivocally implicate specific loci for BMI or obesity. This may be because genes influencing adiposity are of very small effect, with substantial genetic heterogeneity and variable dependence on environmental factors. However, the observation that the FTO gene maps to one of the highest ranking bins for obesity is interesting and, while not a validation of this approach, indicates that other potential loci identified in this study should be investigated further.

  12. Surface study of fusion research in universities linkage organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Akira.

    1980-04-01

    The surface studies for nuclear fusion research consist of the studies on the surface process and the surface damage. The problems with the surface study are different at different research stages. The plasma-wall interaction in the ignition stage is mainly concerned with heating. The impurity control becomes important in the breakeven stage. In the longer burn experiment, the problems of plasma contamination and ash accumulation are serious, and the blistering is also a problem. From the reactor aspect, the reduction of life of wall due to the irradiation of high fluence must be considered. The surface damage due to plasma disruption is a very big problem. The activities concerning the surface studies in university-linked organizations are the surface characterization for fusion reactor materials by low energy ion scattering spectroscopy, the high power ion irradiation test for CTR first wall, data compilation on plasma-wall interaction, the studies of sputtering process and surface coating, and the study on hydrogen isotope permeation through metals for fusion reactors. Other activities such as the sample characterization at many universities using the SUS 304 samples from the same lot, and the collaboration works on JIPP-T-2 plasma wall experiments are introduced. Concerning the surface study, US-Japan or international collaboration are strongly expected. (Kato, T.)

  13. Common variant of ALPK1 is not associated with gout: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshinori; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Shimizu, Seiko; Wakai, Kenji; Suma, Shino; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yutaka; Shimizu, Toru; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Gout is one of the most kinds of common inflammatory arthritis as a consequence of hyperuricemia. Alpha-protein kinase 1 (ALPK1) gene locates in a gout-susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q21-31, and encodes ALPK1 protein which plays a pivotal role in the phosphorylation of myosin 1. In the previous genetic study of Taiwanese populations, 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs11726117, rs231247 and rs231253, in ALPK1 gene were reported to have a significant association with gout. However, no replication study has been performed to confirm this association. Therefore, we first conducted a replication study with clinically defined gout patients in a different population. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analyzes of the 3 SNPs in ALPK1 revealed that these SNPs are in strong LD in a Japanese population. Among the 3 SNPs of ALPK1, rs11726117 (M861T) is the only missense SNP. Therefore, rs11726117 was genotyped in a Japanese population of 903 clinically defined gout cases and 1,302 controls, and was evaluated for a possible association with gout. The minor allele frequencies of rs11726117 were 0.26 and 0.25 in the case and control groups, respectively. The association analysis has not detected a significant association between rs11726117 and gout susceptibility in a Japanese population (p = 0.44). Because ABCG2, a major causative gene for gout, also locates in the gout-susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q, these findings suggest that among genes in a gout-susceptibility locus, not ALPK1 but ABCG2 could be important as a gout-susceptible gene.

  14. Leather Industry Business Linkages (Case Study in District Magetan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilahur Dilahur

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leather industry in Magetan covers two forms; they are tanning and leathercraft. During 1960 and 1970, the leather industry decreased in its production, but in 1990 Magetan becomes the center of leather industry. Its development appeals to be studied closely. The goals of this study are to know the relation between tanning and leathercraft, the connection between these industries and other economic ativities, and their connection with production factor. This study uses survey methhod. The respondents are taken proportionally from both of those leather industries. The data is obtained inetrviewing the respondents with questionnaire that related to the input and out put of the industry. The result of this study shows that there is no relationship between the kind of industries (small and household industry and its capital, especially in its raw material (44,44%. The relationship between tanning and leathercraft is low, because it is only 24,2% input of leathercraft which taken from output of tanning. The region relationship for tanning is larger, because the products that are sold to other regions are 97,22% for tanning and 68,29% for leathercraft. Its relationship to other sectors especially for labour supply is 56,48% from farming and trade sectors in marketing.

  15. An Empirical Study of Logistics Organization, Electronic Linkage, and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Anvari, M., "Electronic Data Interchange and Inventories," International Journal of Production Economics , 26, 1-3 (1992), 135-143. Baker, R. H., EDI: What...Electronic Data Interchange -- A Study of Norwegian Freight Forwarders Using EDI," International Journal of Production Economics , 24 (1991), 91-101. Henry, G

  16. Evidence for bivariate linkage of obesity and HDL-C levels in the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Rector; Lehman, Donna; Hunt, Kelly J; Schneider, Jennifer; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Stern, Michael P; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2003-12-31

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that obesity and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels are strong cardiovascular risk factors, and that these traits are inversely correlated. Despite the belief that these traits are correlated in part due to pleiotropy, knowledge on specific genes commonly affecting obesity and dyslipidemia is very limited. To address this issue, we first conducted univariate multipoint linkage analysis for body mass index (BMI) and HDL-C to identify loci influencing variation in these phenotypes using Framingham Heart Study data relating to 1702 subjects distributed across 330 pedigrees. Subsequently, we performed bivariate multipoint linkage analysis to detect common loci influencing covariation between these two traits. We scanned the genome and identified a major locus near marker D6S1009 influencing variation in BMI (LOD = 3.9) using the program SOLAR. We also identified a major locus for HDL-C near marker D2S1334 on chromosome 2 (LOD = 3.5) and another region near marker D6S1009 on chromosome 6 with suggestive evidence for linkage (LOD = 2.7). Since these two phenotypes have been independently mapped to the same region on chromosome 6q, we used the bivariate multipoint linkage approach using SOLAR. The bivariate linkage analysis of BMI and HDL-C implicated the genetic region near marker D6S1009 as harboring a major gene commonly influencing these phenotypes (bivariate LOD = 6.2; LODeq = 5.5) and appears to improve power to map the correlated traits to a region, precisely. We found substantial evidence for a quantitative trait locus with pleiotropic effects, which appears to influence both BMI and HDL-C phenotypes in the Framingham data.

  17. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  18. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Dumas-Mallet

    Full Text Available To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers.We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk. Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses.Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8% and subsequent (58/600 9.7% lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1% than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%. Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48 than subsequent ones (29/45 and than lifestyle studies (31/63. Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38 than the neurological (26/41 or somatic (40/77 ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim.Journalists preferentially cover initial findings

  19. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  20. A genome-wide linkage study of bipolar disorder and co-morbid migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oedegaard, K. J.; Greenwood, T. A.; Lunde, Asger

    2010-01-01

    Migraine and Bipolar Disorder (BPAD) are clinically heterogeneous disorders of the brain with a significant, but complex, genetic component. Epidemiological and clinical studies have demonstrated a high degree of co-morbidity between migraine and BPAD. Several genomewide linkage studies in BPAD...... that using migraine comorbidity to look at subsets of BPAD families in a genetic linkage analysis would prove useful in identifying genetic susceptibility regions in both of these disorders. We used BPAD with comorbid migraine as an alternative phenotype definition in a re-analysis of the NIMH Bipolar...... osome 4 (not co-segregating with BPAD) in a sample of BPAD families with comorbid migraine, and suggest a susceptibility locus on chromosome 20, harboring a gene for the migraine/BPAD phenotype. Together these data suggest that some genes may predispose to both bipolar disorder and migraine....

  1. Young people’s views about consenting to data linkage: Findings from the PEARL qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Audrey

    2017-04-01

    Findings from this study question the validity of ‘informed consent’ as a cornerstone of good governance, and the extent to which potential research participants understand different types of consent and what they are consenting, or not consenting, to. Pragmatic, imaginative and flexible approaches are needed if research using data linkage is to successfully realise its potential for public good without undermining public trust in the research process.

  2. Historical measures of social context in life course studies: retrospective linkage of addresses to decennial censuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitsel Eric A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is evidence of a contribution of early life socioeconomic exposures to the risk of chronic diseases in adulthood. However, extant studies investigating the impact of the neighborhood social environment on health tend to characterize only the current social environment. This in part may be due to complexities involved in obtaining and geocoding historical addresses. The Life Course Socioeconomic Status, Social Context, and Cardiovascular Disease Study collected information on childhood (1930–1950 and early adulthood (1960–1980 place of residence from 12,681 black and white middle-aged and older men and women from four U.S. communities to link participants with census-based socioeconomic indicators over the life course. Results Most (99% participants were linked to 1930–50 county level socioeconomic census data (the smallest level of aggregation universally available during this time period corresponding to childhood place of residence. Linkage did not vary by race, gender, birth cohort, or level of educational attainment. A commercial geocoding vendor processed participants' self-reported street addresses for ages 30, 40, and 50. For 1970 and 1980 censuses, spatial coordinates were overlaid onto shape files containing census tract boundaries; for 1960 no shape files existed and comparability files were used. Several methods were tested for accuracy and to increase linkage. Successful linkage to historical census tracts varied by census (66% for 1960, 76% for 1970, 85% for 1980. This compares to linkage rates of 94% for current addresses provided by participants over the course of the ARIC examinations. Conclusion There are complexities and limitations in characterizing the past social context. However, our results suggest that it is feasible to characterize the earlier social environment with known levels of measurement error and that such an approach should be considered in future studies.

  3. Clinical and linkage study of a large family with simple ectopia lentis linked to FBN1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, M.J.; Roberts, J.; Partington, M.W. [Newcastle and Northern New South Wales Genetics Service (Australia); Colley, P.W. [John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle (Australia); Hollway, G.E.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C. [Adelaide Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)

    1994-10-15

    Simple ectopia lentis (EL) was studied in a large family, by clinical examination and analysis of linkage to markers in the region of FBN1, the gene for fibrillin which causes Marfan syndrome on chromosome 15. No patient had clinical or echocardiographic evidence of Marfan syndrome, although there was a trend towards relatively longer measurements of height; lower segment; arm span; middle finger, hand, and foot length in the affected members of the family, compared with unaffected sibs of the same sex. Analysis of linkage to intragenic FBN1 markers was inconclusive because they were relatively uninformative. Construction of a multipoint background map from the CEPH reference families identified microsatellite markers linked closely to FBN1 which could demonstrate linkage of EL in this family to the FBN1 region. LINKMAP analysis detected a multipoint lod score of 5.68 at D15S119, a marker approximately 6 cM distal to FBN1, and a multipoint lod score of 5.04 at FBN1. The EL gene in this family is likely to be allelic to Marfan syndrome, and molecular characterization of the FBN1 mutation should now be possible. 25 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Probabilistic record linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Adrian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Blom, Ashley W; Steele, Fiona

    2016-06-01

    Studies involving the use of probabilistic record linkage are becoming increasingly common. However, the methods underpinning probabilistic record linkage are not widely taught or understood, and therefore these studies can appear to be a 'black box' research tool. In this article, we aim to describe the process of probabilistic record linkage through a simple exemplar. We first introduce the concept of deterministic linkage and contrast this with probabilistic linkage. We illustrate each step of the process using a simple exemplar and describe the data structure required to perform a probabilistic linkage. We describe the process of calculating and interpreting matched weights and how to convert matched weights into posterior probabilities of a match using Bayes theorem. We conclude this article with a brief discussion of some of the computational demands of record linkage, how you might assess the quality of your linkage algorithm, and how epidemiologists can maximize the value of their record-linked research using robust record linkage methods. © The Author 2015; Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  5. Examining reproducibility in psychology : A hybrid method for combining a statistically significant original study and a replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Aert, R.C.M.; Van Assen, M.A.L.M.

    2018-01-01

    The unrealistically high rate of positive results within psychology has increased the attention to replication research. However, researchers who conduct a replication and want to statistically combine the results of their replication with a statistically significant original study encounter

  6. Vocal fold immobility and aspiration status: a direct replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Steven B; Suiter, Debra M; Duffey, Dianne; Judson, Benjamin L

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this direct replication study was to confirm the incidence of vocal fold immobility (VFI) and its relationship to pharyngeal dysphagia and aspiration. Using a single-group consecutively referred case series, a total of 2,650 participants underwent fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing between August 2003 and December 2007. Main outcome measures included overall incidence of VFI and aspiration status, with specific emphasis on age, gender, etiology and pharyngeal phase bolus flow characteristics, and side of VFI (right, left, or bilateral). These data were compared to and then combined with the original study (n = 1,452) for a total of 4,102 participants. Results indicated that the incidence of VFI was 4.3% (112/2,650), i.e., 27% (31/112) unilateral right, 58% (65/112) unilateral left, and 14% (16/112) bilateral. Incidence of aspiration was 22% (580/2,650). Of those with VFI, 40% (45/112) aspirated, i.e., 42% (13/31) unilateral right, 37% (24/65) unilateral left, and 50% (8/16) bilateral. An individual with VFI had 2.50 times the odds of aspirating as someone without VFI (95% CI = 1.86-3.37). For liquid aspiration, the odds ratio (OR) = 2.41 (95% CI = 1.77-3.28), and for puree aspiration, OR = 2.08 (95% CI = 1.47-2.93). Left VFI occurred most frequently due to surgical trauma. Liquid was aspirated more often than a puree. Males exhibited VFI more often than females. Side of VFI and age were not factors that increased the incidence of aspiration significantly. It was confirmed that VFI is not an uncommon finding during dysphagia testing and, when present, increased the odds of aspiration compared to a population already being evaluated for dysphagia.

  7. Repeatability study of replicate crash tests: A signal analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppi, Jeremy; Toczyski, Jacek; Crandall, Jeff R; Kerrigan, Jason

    2017-10-03

    To provide an objective basis on which to evaluate the repeatability of vehicle crash test methods, a recently developed signal analysis method was used to evaluate correlation of sensor time history data between replicate vehicle crash tests. The goal of this study was to evaluate the repeatability of rollover crash tests performed with the Dynamic Rollover Test System (DRoTS) relative to other vehicle crash test methods. Test data from DRoTS tests, deceleration rollover sled (DRS) tests, frontal crash tests, frontal offset crash tests, small overlap crash tests, small overlap impact (SOI) crash tests, and oblique crash tests were obtained from the literature and publicly available databases (the NHTSA vehicle database and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety TechData) to examine crash test repeatability. Signal analysis of the DRoTS tests showed that force and deformation time histories had good to excellent repeatability, whereas vehicle kinematics showed only fair repeatability due to the vehicle mounting method for one pair of tests and slightly dissimilar mass properties (2.2%) in a second pair of tests. Relative to the DRS, the DRoTS tests showed very similar or higher levels of repeatability in nearly all vehicle kinematic data signals with the exception of global X' (road direction of travel) velocity and displacement due to the functionality of the DRoTS fixture. Based on the average overall scoring metric of the dominant acceleration, DRoTS was found to be as repeatable as all other crash tests analyzed. Vertical force measures showed good repeatability and were on par with frontal crash barrier forces. Dynamic deformation measures showed good to excellent repeatability as opposed to poor repeatability seen in SOI and oblique deformation measures. Using the signal analysis method as outlined in this article, the DRoTS was shown to have the same or better repeatability of crash test methods used in government regulatory and consumer evaluation test

  8. On Scalability and Replicability of Smart Grid Projects—A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Sigrist

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the scalability and replicability of smart grid projects. Currently, most smart grid projects are still in the R&D or demonstration phases. The full roll-out of the tested solutions requires a suitable degree of scalability and replicability to prevent project demonstrators from remaining local experimental exercises. Scalability and replicability are the preliminary requisites to perform scaling-up and replication successfully; therefore, scalability and replicability allow for or at least reduce barriers for the growth and reuse of the results of project demonstrators. The paper proposes factors that influence and condition a project’s scalability and replicability. These factors involve technical, economic, regulatory and stakeholder acceptance related aspects, and they describe requirements for scalability and replicability. In order to assess and evaluate the identified scalability and replicability factors, data has been collected from European and national smart grid projects by means of a survey, reflecting the projects’ view and results. The evaluation of the factors allows quantifying the status quo of on-going projects with respect to the scalability and replicability, i.e., they provide a feedback on to what extent projects take into account these factors and on whether the projects’ results and solutions are actually scalable and replicable.

  9. Testing association and linkage using affected-sib-parent study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millstein, Joshua; Siegmund, Kimberly D; Conti, David V; Gauderman, W James

    2005-11-01

    We have developed a method for jointly testing linkage and association using data from affected sib pairs and their parents. We specify a conditional logistic regression model with two covariates, one that quantifies association (either direct association or indirect association via linkage disequilibrium), and a second that quantifies linkage. The latter covariate is computed based on expected identity-by-descend (ibd) sharing of marker alleles between siblings. In addition to a joint test of linkage and association, our general framework can be used to obtain a linkage test comparable to the mean test (Blackwelder and Elston [1985] Genet. Epidemiol. 2:85-97), and an association test comparable to the Family-Based Association Test (FBAT; Rabinowitz and Laird [2000] Hum. Hered. 50:211-223). We present simulation results demonstrating that our joint test can be more powerful than some standard tests of linkage or association. For example, with a relative risk of 2.7 per variant allele at a disease locus, the estimated power to detect a nearby marker with a modest level of LD was 58.1% by the mean test (linkage only), 69.8% by FBAT, and 82.5% by our joint test of linkage and association. Our model can also be used to obtain tests of linkage conditional on association and association conditional on linkage, which can be helpful in fine mapping. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Testing the Efficacy of a Tier 2 Mathematics Intervention: A Conceptual Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doabler, Christian T.; Clarke, Ben; Kosty, Derek B.; Kurtz-Nelson, Evangeline; Fien, Hank; Smolkowski, Keith; Baker, Scott K.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this closely aligned conceptual replication study was to investigate the efficacy of a Tier 2 kindergarten mathematics intervention. The replication study differed from the initial randomized controlled trial on three important elements: geographical region, timing of the intervention, and instructional context of the…

  11. Linkage to care among adults being investigated for tuberculosis in South Africa: pilot study of a case manager intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraba, Noriah; Chihota, Violet; McCarthy, Kerrigan; Churchyard, Gavin J; Grant, Alison D

    2018-05-24

    We piloted an intervention to determine if support from a case manager would assist adults being investigated for tuberculosis (TB) to link into TB and HIV care. Pilot interventional cohort study. Patients identified by primary healthcare clinic staff in South Africa as needing TB investigations were enrolled. Participants were supported for 3 months by case managers who facilitated the care pathway by promoting HIV testing, getting laboratory results, calling patients to return for results and facilitating treatment initiation. Linkage to TB care was defined as starting TB treatment within 28 days in those with a positive test result; linkage to HIV care, for HIV-positive people, was defined as having blood taken for CD4 count and, for those eligible, starting antiretroviral therapy within 3 months. Intervention implementation was measured by number of attempts to contact participants. Among 562 participants (307 (54.6%) female, median age: 36 years (IQR 29-44)), most 477 (84.8%) had previously tested for HIV; of these, 328/475 (69.1%) self-reported being HIV-positive. Overall, 189/562 (33.6%) participants needed linkage to care (132 HIV care linkage only; 35 TB treatment linkage only; 22 both). Of 555 attempts to contact these 189 participants, 407 were to facilitate HIV care linkage, 78 for TB treatment linkage and 70 for both. At the end of 3-month follow-up, 40 participants had not linked to care (29 of the 132 (22.0%) participants needing linkage to HIV care only, 4 of the 35 (11.4%) needing to start on TB treatment only and 7 of the 22 (31.8%) needing both). Many people testing for TB need linkage to care. Despite case manager support, non-linkage into HIV care remained higher than desirable, suggesting a need to modify this intervention before implementation. Innovative strategies to enable linkage to care are needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial

  12. Association Between Prepartum Maternal Iron Deficiency and Offspring Risk of Schizophrenia: Population-Based Cohort Study With Linkage of Danish National Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Nielsen, Philip R; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2010-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency may increase the risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in offspring. We initiated this study to determine whether maternal prepartum anemia influences offspring risk of schizophrenia. We conducted a population-based study with individual...... a 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.15) increased risk of schizophrenia. Although the underlying mechanisms are unknown and independent replication is needed, our findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency increases offspring risk of schizophrenia....... record linkage of the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Register. In a cohort of 1 115 752 Danish singleton births from 1978 to 1998, cohort members were considered as having a maternal history of anemia if the mother had received...

  13. Association Between Prepartum Maternal Iron Deficiency and Offspring Risk of Schizophrenia: Population-Based Cohort Study With Linkage of Danish National Registers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Holger J; Nielsen, Philip R; Pedersen, Carsten B

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency may increase the risk of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder in offspring. We initiated this study to determine whether maternal prepartum anemia influences offspring risk of schizophrenia. We conducted a population-based study with individual...... a 1.60-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.16-2.15) increased risk of schizophrenia. Although the underlying mechanisms are unknown and independent replication is needed, our findings suggest that maternal iron deficiency increases offspring risk of schizophrenia....... record linkage of the Danish Civil Registration System, the Danish Psychiatric Central Register, and the Danish National Hospital Register. In a cohort of 1 115 752 Danish singleton births from 1978 to 1998, cohort members were considered as having a maternal history of anemia if the mother had received...

  14. A 4-study replication of the moderating effects of greed on socioeconomic status and unethical behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Anjana; Palma, Paolo A; Patenaude, Joshua; Campbell, Lorne

    2017-01-31

    Four replications of Piff and colleagues' study examined the moderating effects of greed attitudes on the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and unethical behaviour (Study 7). In the original study, the researchers found that both greed and SES predicted increased propensity to engage in unethical behavior. Furthermore, this association was moderated such that the effects of SES on unethical behaviour were no longer present in the greed prime condition versus the neutral condition. In replication 1 of the original study main effects of greed attitudes and SES were found, but no interaction was found. Main effects for greed emerged in replications 3 and 4. However no main effects for SES or interactions emerged for replications 2-4. A meta-analysis was conducted with all replications and the original study, and found no moderating effect of greed on the relationship between SES and unethical behavior.

  15. Data linkage in an established longitudinal cohort: the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain, Jenny A; Nyaradi, Anett; Oddy, Wendy H; Glauert, Rebecca A; de Klerk, Nick H; Straker, Leon M; Stanley, Fiona J

    2016-07-15

    The Western Australian Data Linkage System is one of a few comprehensive, population-based data linkage systems worldwide, creating links between information from different sources relating to the same individual, family, place or event, while maintaining privacy. The Raine Study is an established cohort study with more than 2000 currently active participants. Individual consent was obtained from participants for information in publicly held databases to be linked to their study data. A waiver of consent was granted where it was impracticable to obtain consent. Approvals to link the datasets were obtained from relevant ethics committees and data custodians. The Raine Study dataset was subsequently linked to academic testing data collected by the Western Australian Department of Education. Examination of diet and academic performance showed that children who were predominantly breastfed for at least 6 months scored higher academically at age 10 than children who were breastfed for less than 6 months. A further study found that better diet quality at ages 1, 2 and 3 years was associated with higher academic scores at ages 10 and 12 years. Examination of nutritional intake at 14 years of age found that a better dietary pattern was associated with higher academic performance. The detailed longitudinal data collected in the Raine Study allowed for adjustment for multiple covariates and confounders. Data linkage reduces the burden on cohort participants by providing additional information without the need to contact participants. It can give information on participants who have been lost to follow-up; provide or complement missing data; give the opportunity for validation studies comparing recall of participants with administrative records; increase the population sample of studies by adding control participants from the general population; and allow for the adjustment of multiple covariates and confounders. The Raine Study dataset is extensive and detailed, and can be

  16. Recurrent major depression and right hippocampal volume: A bivariate linkage and association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Samuel R; Knowles, Emma E M; Kent, Jack W; McKay, D Reese; Curran, Joanne E; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Dyer, Thomas D; Göring, Harald H H; Olvera, Rene L; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the hippocampus is smaller in the brains of individuals suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD) than those of healthy controls. Moreover, right hippocampal volume specifically has been found to predict the probability of subsequent depressive episodes. This study explored the utility of right hippocampal volume as an endophenotype of recurrent MDD (rMDD). We observed a significant genetic correlation between the two traits in a large sample of Mexican American individuals from extended pedigrees (ρg = -0.34, p = 0.013). A bivariate linkage scan revealed a significant pleiotropic quantitative trait locus on chromosome 18p11.31-32 (LOD = 3.61). Bivariate association analysis conducted under the linkage peak revealed a variant (rs574972) within an intron of the gene SMCHD1 meeting the corrected significance level (χ(2) = 19.0, p = 7.4 × 10(-5)). Univariate association analyses of each phenotype separately revealed that the same variant was significant for right hippocampal volume alone, and also revealed a suggestively significant variant (rs12455524) within the gene DLGAP1 for rMDD alone. The results implicate right-hemisphere hippocampal volume as a possible endophenotype of rMDD, and in so doing highlight a potential gene of interest for rMDD risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Building Evidence in Early Childhood Special Education: A Systematic Review of Replication Intervention Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rashida; Movahedazarhouligh, Sara; Millen, Kaitlyn; Luckner, John L.

    2018-01-01

    Valid and evidence-informed practices are critical to help young children with disabilities and their families with highly effective interventions and instruction to reach their potentials. Replication research is critical for appraising research and identifying evidence-based practices. The purpose of this study was to replicate the methods used…

  18. Microsatellite markers of water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis - development, characterisation and linkage disequilibrium studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhegi R

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellite markers are highly polymorphic and widely used in genome mapping and population genetic studies in livestock species. River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is an economically important livestock species, though only a limited number of microsatellite markers have been reported thus far in this species. Results In the present study, using two different approaches 571 microsatellite markers have been characterized for water buffalo. Of the 571 microsatellite markers, 498 were polymorphic with average heterozygosity of 0.51 on a panel of 24 unrelated buffalo. Fisher exact test was used to detect LD between the marker pairs. Among the 137550 pairs of marker combination, 14.58% pairs showed significant LD (P Conclusion The high conservation of cattle microsatellite loci in water buffalo promises the usefulness of the cattle microsatellites markers on buffalo. The polymorphic markers characterised in this study will contribute to genetic linkage and radiation hybrid mapping of water buffalo and population genetic studies.

  19. Management Activity Linkages to Innovation Deconstruction: An Exploratory Study of the Furniture Industry in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Pirc Barčić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Corporate leaders often view innovation as a key contributor to superior profits, market sharing, and competitive positioning. However, confusion regarding the definition of innovation, how to create it, and how to implement it remains. In countries that are recent European Union members, little research has been done on innovation and how innovation is related to corporate management activities. In this study, the linkages were examined in the Croatian furniture industry. The first part of the study was to deconstruct innovation into three components: product innovation, production process innovation, and human resource innovation. The second part of the study evaluates the relationships between these innovation components and four company management activities/factors (research and development investments, company flexibility, export activity, and the Internet usage were examined. Scale testing resulted in valid deconstruction measures of innovation. Hypothesized correlations between innovation components and company management factors were supported, although the results were not fully consistent with those of previous studies.

  20. Effectiveness of strategies to increase the validity of findings from association studies: size vs. replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallischnigg Gerd

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The capacity of multiple comparisons to produce false positive findings in genetic association studies is abundantly clear. To address this issue, the concept of false positive report probability (FPRP measures "the probability of no true association between a genetic variant and disease given a statistically significant finding". This concept involves the notion of prior probability of an association between a genetic variant and a disease, making it difficult to achieve acceptable levels for the FPRP when the prior probability is low. Increasing the sample size is of limited efficiency to improve the situation. Methods To further clarify this problem, the concept of true report probability (TRP is introduced by analogy to the positive predictive value (PPV of diagnostic testing. The approach is extended to consider the effects of replication studies. The formula for the TRP after k replication studies is mathematically derived and shown to be only dependent on prior probability, alpha, power, and number of replication studies. Results Case-control association studies are used to illustrate the TRP concept for replication strategies. Based on power considerations, a relationship is derived between TRP after k replication studies and sample size of each individual study. That relationship enables study designers optimization of study plans. Further, it is demonstrated that replication is efficient in increasing the TRP even in the case of low prior probability of an association and without requiring very large sample sizes for each individual study. Conclusions True report probability is a comprehensive and straightforward concept for assessing the validity of positive statistical testing results in association studies. By its extension to replication strategies it can be demonstrated in a transparent manner that replication is highly effective in distinguishing spurious from true associations. Based on the generalized TRP

  1. Epidemiology Data from the Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study (SHELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Fernandez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We linked the 2001 Scottish Census, which contains ethnicity, socio-economic and demographic data to health and death records, creating an anonymised retrospective cohort study of 4.65 million people to assess the association between ethnicity and health outcomes in Scotland. The databases contain data mostly from hospital discharge and mortality records, but also from other registers.  The databases are stored in a safe haven at the National Records of Scotland (NRS. NRS is currently exploring the feasibility of making Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study (SHELS data open access while ensuring that the same level of confidentiality is maintained. If SHELS becomes open access it could be reused, with the appropriate approvals, to assess the influence of other socio-economic or demographic measures on the Scottish population’s health.

  2. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  3. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells.

  4. Probabilistic data linkage: a case study of comparative effectiveness in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this era of comparative effectiveness research, new, advanced techniques are being investigated by the research community to overcome the limitations of existing data sources. We describe the approach of probabilistic data linkage as a means to address this critical issue. Methods: We employed a historical retrospective cohort design. Patients aged 40 and older with a principal or secondary diagnosis of COPD (ICD-9-CM codes 491.xx, 492.xx, and 496 and at least 3 years of continuous enrollment between January 1, 2004 and April 30, 2009 were selected from two US-based commercial administrative claims databases. The index date was designated as the date of the first claim (defined by a 12-month wash-out pre-index period for the study drugs, for illustration purposes referred to as Treatment 1 or Treatment 2. The primary effectiveness measure was risk of any COPD-related exacerbation observed in the 12-month post-index period, with baseline characteristics being identified in the 12-month pre-index period. Results: The percentage of the study sample receiving Treatment 1 at index who had an exacerbation was 39.3% for Database A and 39.7% for Database B; for Treatment 2, the percentages were 46.3% and 47.1%, respectively. The event rate of hospitalizations in each database sample was nearly identical as were the odds ratio and corresponding confidence intervals from the adjusted logistic regression models (OR – Database A: 0.72, Database B: 0.74, Database A with imputed outcomes: 0.72. Conclusions: The probabilistic linkage demonstrated that patients from different databases matched on similar pre-index characteristics may demonstrate similar outcomes in the post-index period.

  5. Replication Studies: Vocabulary Knowledge in Relation to Memory and Analysis--An Approximate Replication of Milton's (2007) Study on Lexical Profiles and Learning Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an approximate replication of Milton's (2007) study on lexical profiles and learning style. Milton investigated the assumption that more frequent words are acquired before less frequent ones. Using a vocabulary recognition test ("X-Lex") to measure vocabulary size, Milton found that L2 English group profiles show…

  6. New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS): an Australian multiagency, multigenerational, longitudinal record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Vaughan J; Harris, Felicity; Raudino, Alessandra; Luo, Luming; Kariuki, Maina; Liu, Enwu; Tzoumakis, Stacy; Smith, Maxwell; Holbrook, Allyson; Bore, Miles; Brinkman, Sally; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Dix, Katherine; Dean, Kimberlie; Laurens, Kristin R; Green, Melissa J

    2016-02-11

    The initial aim of this multiagency, multigenerational record linkage study is to identify childhood profiles of developmental vulnerability and resilience, and to identify the determinants of these profiles. The eventual aim is to identify risk and protective factors for later childhood-onset and adolescent-onset mental health problems, and other adverse social outcomes, using subsequent waves of record linkage. The research will assist in informing the development of public policy and intervention guidelines to help prevent or mitigate adverse long-term health and social outcomes. The study comprises a population cohort of 87,026 children in the Australian State of New South Wales (NSW). The cohort was defined by entry into the first year of full-time schooling in NSW in 2009, at which time class teachers completed the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) on each child (with 99.7% coverage in NSW). The AEDC data have been linked to the children's birth, health, school and child protection records for the period from birth to school entry, and to the health and criminal records of their parents, as well as mortality databases. Descriptive data summarising sex, geographic and socioeconomic distributions, and linkage rates for the various administrative databases are presented. Child data are summarised, and the mental health and criminal records data of the children's parents are provided. In 2015, at age 11 years, a self-report mental health survey was administered to the cohort in collaboration with government, independent and Catholic primary school sectors. A second record linkage, spanning birth to age 11 years, will be undertaken to link this survey data with the aforementioned administrative databases. This will enable a further identification of putative risk and protective factors for adverse mental health and other outcomes in adolescence, which can then be tested in subsequent record linkages. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  7. Fowl plague virus replication in mammalian cell-avian erythrocyte heterokaryons: studies concerning the actinomycin D and ultra-violet lig sensitive phase in influenza virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, D.C.; Dimmock, N.J.

    1974-01-01

    The replication of fowl plague virus in BHK and L cells specifically blocked prior to infection with inhibitors of influenza virus replication (actinomycin D and ultraviolet light irradiation) has been studied by the introduction of a metabolically dormant avian erythrocyte nucleus. This permits the synthesis of just the influenza virus nucleoprotein in actinomycin D (but not ultraviolet light) blocked cells. The NP antigen is first detected in the avian erythrocyte nucleus and subsequently in the heterokaryon cytoplasm

  8. Parenting self-efficacy moderates linkage between partner relationship dissatisfaction and avoidant infant-mother attachment: A Dutch study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casse, J.; Oosterman, M.; Schuengel, C.

    2016-01-01

    The early infant-mother attachment relationship is part of a network of close relationships in which the relationship between parents is especially relevant. Evidence for linkages between maternal satisfaction with the partner relationship and infant-mother attachment is equivocal. The current study

  9. A longitudinal study of childhood social behaviour : Inter-informant agreement, inter-context agreement, and social preference linkages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuppens, Sofie; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick; Michiels, Daisy

    2009-01-01

    This study examined inter-informant agreement, inter-context agreement, and social preference linkages for social behaviour subtypes. On two occasions, data was collected on 600 children (8-10 years old) via mother, father, teacher, and peer reports. Informant reports converged within each context

  10. Autoradiographic studies of chromosome replication during the cell cycle of Streptococcus faecium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, M.L.; Koch, A.L.; Dicker, D.T.; Daneo-Moore, L.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of the distribution of autoradiographic grains around cells of Streptococcus faecium which had been either continuously or pulse-labeled with tritiated thymidine (mass doubling time, 90 min) showed a non-Poisson distribution even when the distribution of cell sizes in the populations studied was taken into account. These non-Poisson distributions of grains were assumed to reflect the discontinuous nature of chromosome replication. To study this discontinuous process further, an equation was fitted to the grain distribution observed for the pulse-labeled cells that assumed that in any population of cells there were subpopulations in which there were zero, one, or two replicating chromosomes. This analysis predicted an average time for chromosome replication and for the period between completion of rounds of chromosome replication and division of 55 and 43 min, respectively, which were in excellent agreement with estimates made by other techniques. The present investigation extended past studies in indicating that the initiation and completion of rounds of chromosome replication are poorly phased with increases in cell volume and that the amount of chromosome replication may be different in different cell halves

  11. Is Implicit Theory of Mind a Real and Robust Phenomenon? Results From a Systematic Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulke, Louisa; von Duhn, Britta; Schneider, Dana; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2018-06-01

    Recently, theory-of-mind research has been revolutionized by findings from novel implicit tasks suggesting that at least some aspects of false-belief reasoning develop earlier in ontogeny than previously assumed and operate automatically throughout adulthood. Although these findings are the empirical basis for far-reaching theories, systematic replications are still missing. This article reports a preregistered large-scale attempt to replicate four influential anticipatory-looking implicit theory-of-mind tasks using original stimuli and procedures. Results showed that only one of the four paradigms was reliably replicated. A second set of studies revealed, further, that this one paradigm was no longer replicated once confounds were removed, which calls its validity into question. There were also no correlations between paradigms, and thus, no evidence for their convergent validity. In conclusion, findings from anticipatory-looking false-belief paradigms seem less reliable and valid than previously assumed, thus limiting the conclusions that can be drawn from them.

  12. Linkage of the Canadian Study of Health and Aging to provincial administrative health care databases in Nova Scotia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, A M; Kephart, G; Rockwood, K

    2001-01-01

    The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) was a cohort study that included 528 Nova Scotian community-dwelling participants. Linkage of CSHA and provincial Medical Services Insurance (MSI) data enabled examination of health care utilization in this subsample. This article discusses methodological and ethical issues of database linkage and explores variation in the use of health services by demographic variables and health status. Utilization over 24 months following baseline was extracted from MSI's physician claims, hospital discharge abstracts, and Pharmacare claims databases. Twenty-nine subjects refused consent for access to their MSI file; health card numbers for three others could not be retrieved. A significant difference in healthcare use by age and self-rated health was revealed. Linkage of population-based data with provincial administrative health care databases has the potential to guide health care planning and resource allocation. This process must include steps to ensure protection of confidentiality. Standard practices for linkage consent and routine follow-up should be adopted. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging (CSHA) began in 1991-92 to explore dementia, frailty, and adverse health outcomes (Canadian Study of Health and Aging Working Group, 1994). The original CSHA proposal included linkage to provincial administrative health care databases by the individual CSHA study centers to enhance information on health care utilization and outcomes of study participants. In Nova Scotia, the Medical Services Insurance (MSI) administration, which drew the sampling frame for the original CSHA, did not retain the list of corresponding health card numbers. Furthermore, consent for this access was not asked of participants at the time of the first interview. The objectives of this study reported here were to examine the feasibility and ethical considerations of linking data from the CSHA to MSI utilization data, and to explore variation in health

  13. Synthesizing Results from Replication Studies Using Robust Variance Estimation: Corrections When the Number of Studies Is Small

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Replication studies allow for making comparisons and generalizations regarding the effectiveness of an intervention across different populations, versions of a treatment, settings and contexts, and outcomes. One method for making these comparisons across many replication studies is through the use of meta-analysis. A recent innovation in…

  14. Genomewide Linkage Scan for Diabetic Renal Failure and Albuminuria: The FIND Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igo, Robert P.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Nicholas, Susanne B.; Goddard, Katrina A.B.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Hanson, Robert L.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Divers, Jasmin; Abboud, Hanna; Adler, Sharon G.; Arar, Nedal H.; Horvath, Amanda; Elston, Robert C.; Bowden, Donald W.; Guo, Xiuqing; Ipp, Eli; Kao, W.H. Linda; Kimmel, Paul L.; Knowler, William C.; Meoni, Lucy A.; Molineros, Julio; Nelson, Robert G.; Pahl, Madeline V.; Parekh, Rulan S.; Rasooly, Rebekah S.; Schelling, Jeffrey R.; Shah, Vallabh O.; Smith, Michael W.; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Zager, Philip G.; Sedor, John R.; Freedman, Barry I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The multicenter FIND consortium aims to identify genes for DN and its associated quantitative traits, e.g. the urine albumin:creatinine ratio (ACR). Herein, the results of whole-genome linkage analysis and a sparse association scan for ACR and a dichotomous DN phenotype are reported in diabetic individuals. Methods A genomewide scan comprising more than 5,500 autosomal single nucleotide polymorphism markers (average spacing of 0.6 cM) was performed on 1,235 nuclear and extended pedigrees (3,972 diabetic participants) ascertained for DN from African-American (AA), American-Indian (AI), European-American (EA) and Mexican-American (MA) populations. Results Strong evidence for linkage to DN was detected on chromosome 6p (p = 8.0 × 10−5, LOD = 3.09) in EA families as well as suggestive evidence for linkage to chromosome 7p in AI families. Regions on chromosomes 3p in AA, 7q in EA, 16q in AA and 22q in MA displayed suggestive evidence of linkage for urine ACR. The linkage peak on chromosome 22q overlaps the MYH9/APOL1 gene region, previously implicated in AA diabetic and nondiabetic nephropathies. Conclusion These results strengthen the evidence for previously identified genomic regions and implicate several novel loci potentially involved in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:21454968

  15. Linkage study of nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate using candidate genes and mapped polymorphic markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, J.D.; Nelson, L.D.; Conner, B.J. [Univ. of Texas, Houston (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL(P)) involves fusion or growth failure of facial primordia during development. Complex segregation analysis of clefting populations suggest that an autosomal dominant gene may play a role in this common craniofacial disorder. We have ascertained 16 multigenerational families with CL(P) and tested linkage to 29 candidate genes and 139 mapped short tandem repeat markers. The candidate genes were selected based on their expression in craniofacial development or were identified through murine models. These include: TGF{alpha}, TGF{beta}1, TGF{beta}2, TGF{beta}3, EGF, EGFR, GRAS, cMyc, FGFR, Jun, JunB, PDFG{alpha}, PDGF{beta}, IGF2R, GCR Hox7, Hox8, Hox2B, twirler, 5 collagen and 3 extracellular matrix genes. Linkage was tested assuming an autosomal dominant model with sex-specific decreased penetrance. Linkage to all of the candidate loci was excluded in 11 families. RARA was tested and was not informative. However, haplotype analysis of markers flanking RARA on 17q allowed exclusion of this candidate locus. We have previously excluded linkage to 61 STR markers in 11 families. Seventy-eight mapped short tandem repeat markers have recently been tested in 16 families and 30 have been excluded. The remaining are being analyzed and an exclusion map is being developed based on the entire study results.

  16. Crime and victimisation in people with intellectual disability: a case linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogden, Billy C; Thomas, Stuart D M; Daffern, Michael; Ogloff, James R P

    2016-05-28

    Studies have suggested that people with intellectual disability are disproportionately involved in crime both as perpetrators and victims. A case linkage design used three Australian contact-level databases, from disability services, public mental health services and police records. Rates of contact, and official records of victimisation and criminal charges were compared to those in a community sample without intellectual disability. Although people with intellectual disability were significantly less likely to have an official record of victimisation and offending overall, their rates of violent and sexual victimisation and offending were significantly higher. The presence of comorbid mental illness considerably increased the likelihood of victimisation and offending; several sex differences were also noted. People with intellectual disability are at increased risk for both violent and sexual victimisation and offending. The presence of comorbid mental illness aggravates the risk of offending and victimisation. Future research should focus on a more nuanced exploration of the risks associated with intellectual disability and specific mental disorders and related indices of complexity.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ENZYME-LINKAGE IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY AGAINST TYPE B OF CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM: A PRELIMINARY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Depamede

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNTs is one of the causes of economic loss in the livestock industry. This economic loss would be as a direct result when animals poisoned by BoNTs or indirectly when the livestock products are contaminated by BoNTs, which end up with the products are banned by authority. Therefore a routine surveillance of BoNTs in the farm and in livestock product processing industry is urgently needed. One of the most relatively quick and accurate methods to perform a routine detection of the presence of BoNTs is enzyme-linkage immunosorbant assay (ELISA. In this article we describe the results of the development of ELISA, using polyclonal antibodies against BoNTs-B produced locally. Antibodies were generated from six Balb/c mice with standard immunological methods. Mice were immunized three times for a period of 8 weeks with a commercial type B Clostridium botulinum toxoid at a dose of 100 ng per mouse per injection. The resulting antibody was purified by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation 50% (w/v technique and a protein A column method. The results of this preliminary study indicated that the developed ELISA method capable of detecting type B Clostridium botulinum toxin up to 1.0 ng/ml.

  18. Gambling, Risk-Taking, and Antisocial Behavior: A Replication Study Supporting the Generality of Deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sandeep; Lalumière, Martin L; Williams, Robert J

    2017-03-01

    Research suggests that high frequency gambling is a component of the "generality of deviance", which describes the observation that various forms of risky and antisocial behavior tend to co-occur among individuals. Furthermore, risky and antisocial behaviors have been associated with such personality traits as low self-control, and impulsivity, and sensation-seeking. We conducted a replication (and extension) of two previous studies examining whether high frequency gambling is part of the generality of deviance using a large and diverse community sample (n = 328). This study was conducted as a response to calls for more replication studies in the behavioral and psychological sciences (recent systematic efforts suggest that a significant proportion of psychology studies do not replicate). The results of the present study largely replicate those previously found, and in many cases, we observed stronger associations among measures of gambling, risk-taking, and antisocial behavior in this diverse sample. Together, this study provides evidence for the generality of deviance inclusive of gambling (and, some evidence for the replicability of research relating to gambling and individual differences).

  19. GWA study data mining and independent replication identify cardiomyopathy-associated 5 (CMYA5) as a risk gene for schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, X

    2011-11-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses using the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) and molecular genetics of schizophrenia genome-wide association study supported by the genetic association information network (MGS-GAIN) schizophrenia data sets and performed bioinformatic prioritization for all the markers with P-values ≤0.05 in both data sets. In this process, we found that in the CMYA5 gene, there were two non-synonymous markers, rs3828611 and rs10043986, showing nominal significance in both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples. In a combined analysis of both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples, rs4704591 was identified as the most significant marker in the gene. Linkage disequilibrium analyses indicated that these markers were in low LD (3 828 611-rs10043986, r(2)=0.008; rs10043986-rs4704591, r(2)=0.204). In addition, CMYA5 was reported to be physically interacting with the DTNBP1 gene, a promising candidate for schizophrenia, suggesting that CMYA5 may be involved in the same biological pathway and process. On the basis of this information, we performed replication studies for these three single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The rs3828611 was found to have conflicting results in our Irish samples and was dropped out without further investigation. The other two markers were verified in 23 other independent data sets. In a meta-analysis of all 23 replication samples (family samples, 912 families with 4160 subjects; case-control samples, 11 380 cases and 15 021 controls), we found that both markers are significantly associated with schizophrenia (rs10043986, odds ratio (OR)=1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.18, P=8.2 × 10(-4) and rs4704591, OR=1.07, 95% CI=1.03-1.11, P=3.0 × 10(-4)). The results were also significant for the 22 Caucasian replication samples (rs10043986, OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.03-1.17, P=0.0026 and rs4704591, OR=1.07, 95% CI=1.02-1.11, P=0.0015). Furthermore, haplotype conditioned analyses indicated that the association

  20. Directional selection in temporally replicated studies is remarkably consistent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Michael B; Hadfield, Jarrod D

    2012-02-01

    Temporal variation in selection is a fundamental determinant of evolutionary outcomes. A recent paper presented a synthetic analysis of temporal variation in selection in natural populations. The authors concluded that there is substantial variation in the strength and direction of selection over time, but acknowledged that sampling error would result in estimates of selection that were more variable than the true values. We reanalyze their dataset using techniques that account for the necessary effect of sampling error to inflate apparent levels of variation and show that directional selection is remarkably constant over time, both in magnitude and direction. Thus we cannot claim that the available data support the existence of substantial temporal heterogeneity in selection. Nonetheless, we conject that temporal variation in selection could be important, but that there are good reasons why it may not appear in the available data. These new analyses highlight the importance of applying techniques that estimate parameters of the distribution of selection, rather than parameters of the distribution of estimated selection (which will reflect both sampling error and "real" variation in selection); indeed, despite availability of methods for the former, focus on the latter has been common in synthetic reviews of the aspects of selection in nature, and can lead to serious misinterpretations. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. The structure of psychopathology in adolescence : Replication of a general psychopathology factor in the TRAILS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laceulle, O.M.; Vollebergh, W.A.M.; Ormel, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to replicate a study by Caspi and colleagues, which proposed that the structure of psychopathology is characterized by a general psychopathology factor, in addition to smaller internalizing and externalizing factors. Our study expanded the approach of the original by using

  2. Sustainability inter-linkages in reporting vindeicated: a study of European companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lozano, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been a rapid growth in company sustainability reporting, as well as an improvement in quality of reports. A number of guidelines have been instrumental in this process; however, they still do not consider the importance of the inter-linkages and synergies among the different

  3. Accuracy of Probabilistic Linkage Using the Enhanced Matching System for Public Health and Epidemiological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert W; Shaji, Kunju; Hayward, Andrew C; Abubakar, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The Enhanced Matching System (EMS) is a probabilistic record linkage program developed by the tuberculosis section at Public Health England to match data for individuals across two datasets. This paper outlines how EMS works and investigates its accuracy for linkage across public health datasets. EMS is a configurable Microsoft SQL Server database program. To examine the accuracy of EMS, two public health databases were matched using National Health Service (NHS) numbers as a gold standard unique identifier. Probabilistic linkage was then performed on the same two datasets without inclusion of NHS number. Sensitivity analyses were carried out to examine the effect of varying matching process parameters. Exact matching using NHS number between two datasets (containing 5931 and 1759 records) identified 1071 matched pairs. EMS probabilistic linkage identified 1068 record pairs. The sensitivity of probabilistic linkage was calculated as 99.5% (95%CI: 98.9, 99.8), specificity 100.0% (95%CI: 99.9, 100.0), positive predictive value 99.8% (95%CI: 99.3, 100.0), and negative predictive value 99.9% (95%CI: 99.8, 100.0). Probabilistic matching was most accurate when including address variables and using the automatically generated threshold for determining links with manual review. With the establishment of national electronic datasets across health and social care, EMS enables previously unanswerable research questions to be tackled with confidence in the accuracy of the linkage process. In scenarios where a small sample is being matched into a very large database (such as national records of hospital attendance) then, compared to results presented in this analysis, the positive predictive value or sensitivity may drop according to the prevalence of matches between databases. Despite this possible limitation, probabilistic linkage has great potential to be used where exact matching using a common identifier is not possible, including in low-income settings, and for vulnerable

  4. Geographic stratification of linkage disequilibrium: a worldwide population study in a region of chromosome 22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Neira Anna

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent studies of haplotype diversity in a number of genomic regions have suggested that long stretches of DNA are preserved in the same chromosome, with little evidence of recombination events. The knowledge of the extent and strength of these haplotypes could become a powerful tool for future genetic analysis of complex traits. Different patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD have been found when comparing individuals of African and European descent, but there is scarce knowledge about the worldwide population stratification. Thus, the study of haplotype composition and the pattern of LD from a global perspective are relevant for elucidating their geographical stratification, as it may have implications in the future analysis of complex traits. We have typed 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a chromosome 22 region--previously described as having high LD levels in European populations -- in 39 different world populations. Haplotype structure has a clear continental structure with marked heterogeneity within some continents (Africa, America. The pattern of LD among neighbouring markers exhibits a strong clustering of all East Asian populations on the one hand and of Western Eurasian populations (including Europe on the other, revealing only two major LD patterns, but with some very specific outliers due to specific demographic histories. Moreover, it should be taken into account that African populations are highly heterogeneous. The present results support the existence of a wide (but not total communality in LD patterns in human populations from different continental regions, despite differences in their demographic histories, as population factors seem to be less relevant compared with genomic forces in shaping the patterns of LD.

  5. Ethnic variations in upper gastrointestinal hospitalizations and deaths: the Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezard, Genevieve I; Bhopal, Raj S; Ward, Hester J T; Bansal, Narinder; Bhala, Neeraj

    2016-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) diseases are common, but there is a paucity of data describing variations by ethnic group and so a lack of understanding of potential health inequalities. We studied the incidence of specific upper GI hospitalization and death by ethnicity in Scotland. Using the Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study, linking NHS hospitalizations and mortality to the Scottish Census 2001, we explored ethnic differences in incidence (2001-10) of oesophagitis, peptic ulcer disease, gallstone disease and pancreatitis. Relative Risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Poisson regression, multiplied by 100, stratified by sex and adjusted for age, country of birth (COB) and socio-economic position. The White Scottish population (100) was the reference population. Ethnic variations varied by outcome and sex, e.g. adjusted RRs (95% confidence intervals) for oesophagitis were comparatively higher in Bangladeshi women (209; 124-352) and lower in Chinese men (65; 51-84) and women (69; 55-88). For peptic ulcer disease, RRs were higher in Chinese men (171; 131-223). Pakistani women had higher RRs for gallstone disease (129; 112-148) and pancreatitis (147; 109-199). The risks of upper GI diseases were lower in Other White British and Other White [e.g. for peptic ulcer disease in men, respectively (74; 64-85) and (81; 69-94)]. Risks of common upper GI diseases were comparatively lower in most White ethnic groups in Scotland. In non-White groups, however, risk varied by disease and ethnic group. These results require consideration in health policy, service planning and future research. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  6. Month of Conception and Learning Disabilities: A Record-Linkage Study of 801,592 Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Daniel F; Smith, Gordon C S; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Wood, Rachael; King, Albert; Clark, David N; Pell, Jill P

    2016-10-01

    Learning disabilities have profound, long-lasting health sequelae. Affected children born over the course of 1 year in the United States of America generated an estimated lifetime cost of $51.2 billion. Results from some studies have suggested that autistic spectrum disorder may vary by season of birth, but there have been few studies in which investigators examined whether this is also true of other causes of learning disabilities. We undertook Scotland-wide record linkage of education (annual pupil census) and maternity (Scottish Morbidity Record 02) databases for 801,592 singleton children attending Scottish schools in 2006-2011. We modeled monthly rates using principal sine and cosine transformations of the month number and demonstrated cyclicity in the percentage of children with special educational needs. Rates were highest among children conceived in the first quarter of the year (January-March) and lowest among those conceived in the third (July-September) (8.9% vs 7.6%; P disabilities, and learning difficulties (e.g., dyslexia) and were absent for sensory or motor/physical impairments and mental, physical, or communication problems. Seasonality accounted for 11.4% (95% confidence interval: 9.0, 13.7) of all cases. Some biologically plausible causes of this variation, such as infection and maternal vitamin D levels, are potentially amendable to intervention. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Do coxibs reduce prescription of gastroprotective agents? Results of a record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violante Andrea

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coxibs are claimed to be cost-effective drugs and reduced prescription of gastroprotective agents is assumed to be one of their major benefits. Real life prescription of these drugs may be substantially different than that considered in pharmacoeconomic analyses or claimed by drug companies, yet. Our objective was to evaluate whether coxibs were associated with reduced prescription of gastro-protective agents (GPAs, specifically proton pump inhibitors, H2 blockers and misoprostol compared to non selective NSAIDs. Methods A record-linkage study was performed using 2001 outpatient prescription data from the province of Modena (about 632,000 inhabitants, in Northern Italy. Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio of GPA prescription for coxib and non-selective NSAID adult users (> 14 years. Three categories of users were further investigated: "acute", "chronic and "incident or new". Main outcome measures were same-day co-prescription and 30 days prescription of GPAs in coxibs and non selective NSAIDs users. To limit selection bias, data were adjusted for age, sex, DDD of coxibs and non selective NSAIDs received during 2001, DDD of GPAs and (for non-incident users DDD of NSAIDs received during the previous 4 years Results Same day co-prescription rates were similar considering the overall population and "acute" users. Chronic coxibs users instead showed higher co-prescription rates than chronic NSAIDs users (OR = 1.2, p Conclusion Assumptions made in pharmacoeconomic analyses on coxibs (lower GPA prescription associated with coxibs use may be overly optimistic. Claims made through cost-effectiveness data should be carefully interpreted, and mechanisms for attributing drug prices revised accordingly.

  8. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  9. A new method of linkage analysis using LOD scores for quantitative traits supports linkage of monoamine oxidase activity to D17S250 in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David; Knight, Jo; Sham, Pak C

    2005-09-01

    Although LOD score methods have been applied to diseases with complex modes of inheritance, linkage analysis of quantitative traits has tended to rely on non-parametric methods based on regression or variance components analysis. Here, we describe a new method for LOD score analysis of quantitative traits which does not require specification of a mode of inheritance. The technique is derived from the MFLINK method for dichotomous traits. A range of plausible transmission models is constructed, constrained to yield the correct population mean and variance for the trait but differing with respect to the contribution to the variance due to the locus under consideration. Maximized LOD scores under homogeneity and admixture are calculated, as is a model-free LOD score which compares the maximized likelihoods under admixture assuming linkage and no linkage. These LOD scores have known asymptotic distributions and hence can be used to provide a statistical test for linkage. The method has been implemented in a program called QMFLINK. It was applied to data sets simulated using a variety of transmission models and to a measure of monoamine oxidase activity in 105 pedigrees from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism. With the simulated data, the results showed that the new method could detect linkage well if the true allele frequency for the trait was close to that specified. However, it performed poorly on models in which the true allele frequency was much rarer. For the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism data set only a modest overlap was observed between the results obtained from the new method and those obtained when the same data were analysed previously using regression and variance components analysis. Of interest is that D17S250 produced a maximized LOD score under homogeneity and admixture of 2.6 but did not indicate linkage using the previous methods. However, this region did produce evidence for linkage in a separate data set

  10. Role of Importance and Distinctiveness of Semantic Features in People with Aphasia: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason-Baughman, Mary Beth; Wallace, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that people with aphasia have incomplete lexical-semantic representations with decreased low-importance distinctive (LID) feature knowledge. In addition, decreased LID feature knowledge correlates with ability to discriminate among semantically related words. The current study seeks to replicate and extend previous…

  11. Susceptibility loci for sporadic brain arteriovenous malformation; a replication study and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, P.H.; Koeleman, B.P.C.; Rinkel, G.J.; Diekstra, F.P.; Berg, L.H. van den; Veldink, J.H.; Klijn, C.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Case-control studies have reported multiple genetic loci to be associated with sporadic brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) but most of these have not been replicated in independent populations. The aim of this study was to find additional evidence for these reported associations

  12. Cross linkage studies with the membranes of the vesicular stomatitis virus using radioactive 4-acido and 5-acido palmitic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verfondern, M.

    1983-01-01

    In the study described here the spatial arrangement of lipids and proteins in the VS virus was investigated on the basis of the covalent cross linkage technique. The formation of such cross linkages is brought about by the action of photosensitive acidosubstituted lipids, which permit acido functions to be introduced into a membrane in a previously defined position. Subsequently, photolysis helps to trigger the generation of radioactive nitrenes that react with the proteins and lipids in their immediate vicinity in a direct and non-selective way. The findings revealed by this study have raised questions as to the possibility of lipid-protein and lipid-lipid interactions, which is also discussed. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Is dopamine D1 receptor availability related to social behavior? A positron emission tomography replication study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pontus Plavén-Sigray

    Full Text Available Associations between dopamine receptor levels and pro- and antisocial behavior have previously been demonstrated in human subjects using positron emission tomography (PET and self-rated measures of personality traits. So far, only one study has focused on the dopamine D1-receptor (D1-R, finding a positive correlation with the trait social desirability, which is characterized by low dominant and high affiliative behavior, while physical aggression showed a negative correlation. The aim of the present study was to replicate these previous findings using a new independent sample of subjects.Twenty-six healthy males were examined with the radioligand [11C]SCH-23390, and completed the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP which includes measures of social desirability and physical trait aggression. The simplified reference tissue model with cerebellum as reference region was used to calculate BPND values in the whole striatum and limbic striatum. The two regions were selected since they showed strong association between D1-R availability and personality scores in the previous study. Pearson's correlation coefficients and replication Bayes factors were then employed to assess the replicability and robustness of previous results.There were no significant correlations (all p values > 0.3 between regional BPND values and personality scale scores. Replication Bayes factors showed strong to moderate evidence in favor no relationship between D1-receptor availability and social desirability (striatum BF01 = 12.4; limbic striatum BF01 = 7.2 or physical aggression scale scores (limbic striatum BF01 = 3.3, compared to the original correlations.We could not replicate the previous findings of associations between D1-R availability and either pro- or antisocial behavior as measured using the SSP. Rather, there was evidence in favor of failed replications of associations between BPND and scale scores. Potential reasons for these results are restrictive

  14. Replication protocol analysis: a method for the study of real-world design thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per; Kovacs, L. B.

    1996-01-01

    ’ is refined into a method called ‘replication protocol analysis’ (RPA), and discussed from a methodological perspective of design research. It is argued that for the study of real-world design thinking this method offers distinct advantages over traditional ‘design protocol analysis’, which seeks to capture......Given the brief of an architectural competition on site planning, and the design awarded the first prize, the first author (trained as an architect but not a participant in the competition) produced a line of reasoning that might have led from brief to design. In the paper, such ‘design replication...... the designer’s authentic line of reasoning. To illustrate how RPA can be used, the site planning case is briefly presented, and part of the replicated line of reasoning analysed. One result of the analysis is a glimpse of a ‘logic of design’; another is an insight which sheds new light on Darke’s classical...

  15. Improving the detection of pathways in genome-wide association studies by combined effects of SNPs from Linkage Disequilibrium blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Huiying; Nyholt, Dale R.; Yang, Yuanhao; Wang, Jihua; Yang, Yuedong

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified single variants associated with diseases. To increase the power of GWAS, gene-based and pathway-based tests are commonly employed to detect more risk factors. However, the gene- and pathway-based association tests may be biased towards genes or pathways containing a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with small P-values caused by high linkage disequilibrium (LD) correlations. To address such bias, numerous...

  16. Replication protocol analysis: a method for the study of real-world design thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galle, Per; Kovacs, L. B.

    1996-01-01

    Given the brief of an architectural competition on site planning, and the design awarded the first prize, the first author (trained as an architect but not a participant in the competition) produced a line of reasoning that might have led from brief to design. In the paper, such ‘design replication......’ is refined into a method called ‘replication protocol analysis’ (RPA), and discussed from a methodological perspective of design research. It is argued that for the study of real-world design thinking this method offers distinct advantages over traditional ‘design protocol analysis’, which seeks to capture...

  17. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-09-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel" addresses this theme by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general-particularly in Dolliver's article-poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study. The replication study is not based on Dolliver's original dataset, but on a second dataset collected applying the same methodology. We have found that the results produced by Dolliver differ greatly from our replicated study. While a margin of error is to be expected, the inconsistencies we found are too great to attribute to anything other than methodological issues. The analysis and conclusions drawn from studies using these methods are promising and insightful. However, based on the replication of Dolliver's study, we suggest that researchers using these methodologies consider and that datasets be made available for other researchers, and that methodology and dataset metrics (e.g. number of downloaded pages, error logs) are described thoroughly in the context of web-o-metrics and web crawling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, I. C.; Wakeford, R.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. DESIGN: Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Phys...

  19. When and Why Replication Studies Should Be Published: Guidelines for Mathematics Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star, Jon R.

    2018-01-01

    The present issue of "JRME" features three articles--Melhuish (2018; see EJ1167195); Jamil, Larsen, and Hamres (2018; see EJ1167178); and Thanheiser (2018; see EJ1167179)--that involve, at least to some degree, replication of prior published studies. In each of these articles, the authors provide a clear rationale for the importance of…

  20. A Replication Study on the Multi-Dimensionality of Online Social Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykota, David B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to conduct an external replication into the multi-dimensionality of social presence as measured by the Computer-Mediated Communication Questionnaire (Tu, 2005). Online social presence is one of the more important constructs for determining the level of interaction and effectiveness of learning in an online…

  1. Human CD46-transgenic mice in studies involving replication-incompetent adenoviral type 35 vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaagh, S.; Jong, E. de; Goudsmit, J.; Lecollinet, S.; Gillissen, G.; Vries, M. de; Leuven, K. van; Que, I.; Ouwehand, K.; Mintardjo, R.; Weverling, G.J.; Radošević, K.; Richardson, J.; Eloit, M.; Lowik, C.; Quax, P.; Havenga, M.

    2006-01-01

    Wild-type strains of mice do not express CD46, a high-affinity receptor for human group B adenoviruses including type 35. Therefore, studies performed to date in mice using replication-incompetent Ad35 (rAd35) vaccine carriers may underestimate potency or result in altered vector distribution. Here,

  2. Predicting the number and sizes of IBD regions among family members and evaluating the family size requirement for linkage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanling; Wang, Zhanyong; Wang, Lusheng; Sham, Pak-Chung; Huang, Peng; Lau, Yu Lung

    2008-12-01

    With genotyping of high-density single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) replacing that of microsatellite markers in linkage studies, it becomes possible to accurately determine the genomic regions shared identity by descent (IBD) by family members. In addition to evaluating the likelihood of linkage for a region with the underlining disease (the LOD score approach), an appropriate question to ask is what would be the expected number and sizes of IBD regions among the affecteds, as there could be more than one region reaching the maximum achievable LOD score for a given family. Here, we introduce a computer program to allow the prediction of the total number of IBD regions among family members and their sizes. Reversely, it can be used to predict the portion of the genome that can be excluded from consideration according to the family size and user-defined inheritance mode and penetrance. Such information has implications on the feasibility of conducting linkage analysis on a given family of certain size and structure or on a few small families when interfamily homogeneity can be assumed. It can also help determine the most relevant members to be genotyped for such a study. Simulation results showed that the IBD regions containing true mutations are usually larger than regions IBD due to random chance. We have made use of this feature in our program to allow evaluation of the identified IBD regions based on Bayesian probability calculation and simulation results.

  3. Survival after a psychoeducational intervention for patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma: a replication study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Ellen H; Boesen, Sidsel H; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2007-01-01

    The results of a randomized, intervention study done in 1993 of psychoeducation for patients with early-stage malignant melanoma showed a beneficial effect on recurrence and survival 6 years after the intervention. In the present study, we replicated the study with 258 Danish patients with malign...... with malignant melanoma. We also compared recurrence and survival among the participants in the randomized study with 137 patients who refused to participate....

  4. Study of Vaccinia and Cowpox viruses' replication in Rac1-N17 dominant-negative cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Carneiro Salgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Interfering with cellular signal transduction pathways is a common strategy used by many viruses to create a propitious intracellular environment for an efficient replication. Our group has been studying cellular signalling pathways activated by the orthopoxviruses Vaccinia (VACV and Cowpox (CPXV and their significance to viral replication. In the present study our aim was to investigate whether the GTPase Rac1 was an upstream signal that led to the activation of MEK/ERK1/2, JNK1/2 or Akt pathways upon VACV or CPXV' infections. Therefore, we generated stable murine fibroblasts exhibiting negative dominance to Rac1-N17 to evaluate viral growth and the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt. Our results demonstrated that VACV replication, but not CPXV, was affected in dominant-negative (DN Rac1-N17 cell lines in which viral yield was reduced in about 10-fold. Viral late gene expression, but not early, was also reduced. Furthermore, our data showed that Akt phosphorylation was diminished upon VACV infection in DN Rac1-N17 cells, suggesting that Rac1 participates in the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway leading to the activation of Akt. In conclusion, our results indicate that while Rac1 indeed plays a role in VACV biology, perhaps another GTPase may be involved in CPXV replication.

  5. Sample preparation composite and replicate strategy case studies for assay of solid oral drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, Beverly; Harrington, Brent; Li, Fasheng; Guo, Michele Xuemei

    2017-11-30

    Drug product assay is one of several tests required for new drug products to ensure the quality of the product at release and throughout the life cycle of the product. Drug product assay testing is typically performed by preparing a composite sample of multiple dosage units to obtain an assay value representative of the batch. In some cases replicate composite samples may be prepared and the reportable assay value is the average value of all the replicates. In previously published work by Harrington et al. (2014) [5], a sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay was developed to provide a systematic approach which accounts for variability due to the analytical method and dosage form with a standard error of the potency assay criteria based on compendia and regulatory requirements. In this work, this sample preparation composite and replicate strategy for assay is applied to several case studies to demonstrate the utility of this approach and its application at various stages of pharmaceutical drug product development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk/protective factors among addicted mothers' offspring: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, M M; McAvay, G; Goldstein, R B; Nunes, E V; Verdeli, H; Wickramaratne, P J

    1999-11-01

    There are few systematic studies of the school-aged offspring of drug-dependent patients, although this information is useful for planning evidence-based prevention programs. We have completed such a study, which we compare to a similar study independently conducted in 1998. In both studies, both the parent and offspring were assessed blindly and independently by direct diagnostic interviews, and parental assessment of offspring was also obtained. The similarity in design and methods between studies provided an opportunity for replication by reanalysis of data. The major findings are a replication in two independently conducted studies of school-aged offspring of opiate- and/or cocaine-addicted mothers of the high rates of any psychiatric disorder (60% in both studies), major depression (20%, 26%), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) (18%, 23%), conduct disorder (17%, 9%), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (13%, 8%), and substance abuse (5%, 10%) among offspring. Both studies also found high rates of comorbid alcohol abuse, depression, and multiple drugs of abuse in the mothers. We conclude that efforts to replicate findings by analyses of independently conducted studies are an inexpensive way to test the sturdiness of findings that can provide the empirical basis for preventive efforts. Clinically, the data in both studies suggest that both drug dependence and associated psychopathology should be assessed and treated in opiate addicts with young offspring, and the offspring should be monitored for the development of conduct and mood disorders and substance use.

  7. Replicating a study of collaborative use of mobile phones for photo sharing in a different cultural context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval, Carolina; Montero, Camila; Jokela, Tero

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we replicate a study of collaborative mobile phone use to share personal photos in groups of collocated people. The replication study was conducted in a different cultural context to check the generalizability of the findings from the original study in terms of the proposed...

  8. Linkage Behavior and Practices of Agencies in the Agricultural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the linkage behaviour and practices of agencies in the ... institutes; while (61.5%,65.5%and 50.0%) indicated that linkages with universities of ... Existing institutional framework for linkages between research and extension ...

  9. Wine glass size and wine sales: a replication study in two bars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechey, Rachel; Couturier, Dominique-Laurent; Hollands, Gareth J; Mantzari, Eleni; Zupan, Zorana; Marteau, Theresa M

    2017-08-01

    Wine glass size may influence perceived volume and subsequently purchasing and consumption. Using a larger glass to serve the same portions of wine was found to increase wine sales by 9.4% (95% CI 1.9, 17.5) in a recent study conducted in one bar. The current study aimed to replicate this previous work in two other bars using a wider range of glass sizes. To match the previous study, a repeated multiple treatment reversal design, during which wine was served in glasses of the same design but different sizes, was used. The study was conducted in two bars in Cambridge, England, using glass sizes of 300, 370, 510 ml (Bar 1) and 300 and 510 ml (Bar 2). Customers purchased their choice of a 750 ml bottle, or standard UK measures of 125, 175 or 250 ml of wine, each of which was served with the same glass. Bar 1 Daily wine volume (ml) purchased was 10.5% (95% CI 1.0, 20.9) higher when sold in 510 ml compared to 370 ml glasses; but sales were not significantly higher with 370 ml versus 300 ml glasses (6.5%, 95% CI -5.2, 19.6). Bar 2 Findings were inconclusive as to whether daily wine purchased differed when using 510 ml versus 300 ml glasses (-1.1%, 95% CI -12.6, 11.9). These results provide a partial replication of previous work showing that introducing larger glasses (without manipulating portion size) increases purchasing. Understanding the mechanisms by which wine glass size influences consumption may elucidate when the effect can be expected and when not. Trial registration This study is a replication study, based on the procedure set out in the trial registration for the study that it attempts to replicate (ISRCTN registry: ISRCTN12018175).

  10. Franchising Public Education: A Study of the Linkage of Charter Schools and Private Education Management Companies in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    School franchising (defined as the replication of a particular product or service across a wide geographic region) marks a radical departure from the traditional view of the community-based neighborhood school. This paper reports on a study of a growing niche of charter school private management contracts in Massachusetts. The focus is on the…

  11. Implementing three evidence-based program models: early lessons from the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Meredith; Layzer, Jean

    2014-03-01

    This article describes some of the early implementation challenges faced by nine grantees participating in the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Replication Study and their response to them. The article draws on information collected as part of a comprehensive implementation study. Sources include site and program documents; program officer reports; notes from site investigation, selection and negotiation; ongoing communications with grantees as part of putting the study into place; and semi-structured interviews with program staff. The issues faced by grantees in implementing evidence-based programs designed to prevent teen pregnancy varied by program model. Grantees implementing a classroom-based curriculum faced challenges in delivering the curriculum within the constraints of school schedules and calendars (program length and size of class). Grantees implementing a culturally tailored curriculum faced a series of challenges, including implementing the intervention as part of the regular school curriculum in schools with diverse populations; low attendance when delivered as an after-school program; and resistance on the part of schools to specific curriculum content. The third set of grantees, implementing a program in clinics, faced challenges in identifying and recruiting young women into the program and in retaining young women once they were in the program. The experiences of these grantees reflect some of the complexities that should be carefully considered when choosing to replicate evidence-based programs. The Teen Pregnancy Prevention replication study will provide important context for assessing the effectiveness of some of the more widely replicated evidence-based programs. Copyright © 2014 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  12. The replication recipe : What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, Ap; Farach, Frank J.; Geller, Jason; Giner-Sorolla, Roger; Grange, James A.; Perugini, Marco; Spies, Jeffrey R.; van 't Veer, Anna

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  13. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  14. Can concurrent memory load reduce distraction? A replication study and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Gómez de Liaño, Beatriz; Stablum, Franca; Umiltà, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The effects of concurrent working memory load in attentional processes have been 1 of the most puzzling issues in cognitive psychology. Studies have shown detrimental effects, no effects, and even beneficial effects of working memory load in different attentional tasks. In the present study we attempted to replicate Kim, Kim, and Chun's (2005, Experiment 3b) findings of beneficial effects of concurrent working memory load in a spatial Stroop-like task. In 3 experiments in which our sample was 3 times larger than that in the original Kim et al. study, we could not replicate their findings. The results are discussed in terms of what may have produced the conflicting results, trying to shed light on how working memory load affects attentional tasks. Also, we emphasize the importance of using adequately large samples in cognitive research. Although we acknowledge the relevance of meta-analyses to analyze conflicting results, in the present article we stress (perhaps more important) the power of an essential trademark in science for research development: replicability. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Is there a 'Scottish effect' for mortality? Prospective observational study of census linkage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popham, Frank; Boyle, Paul J

    2011-09-01

    Scotland's mortality rate is higher than England and Wales' and this difference cannot be explained by differences in area-level socio-economic deprivation. However, studies of this 'Scottish effect' have not adjusted for individual-level measures of socio-economic position nor accounted for country of birth; important as Scottish born living in England and Wales also have high mortality risk. Data sets (1991-2001 and 2001-2007) were obtained from the Scottish Longitudinal Study and the Office for National Statistics England and Wales Longitudinal Study that both link census records to subsequent mortality. Analysis was limited to those aged 35-74 at baseline with people followed to emigration, death or end of follow-up. Those born in Scotland living in either England and Wales or Scotland had a higher mortality rate than the English born living in England and Wales that was not fully attenuated by adjustment for car access and housing tenure. Adjusting for household-level differences in socio-economic deprivation does not fully explain the Scottish excess mortality that is seen for those born in Scotland whether living in England and Wales or Scotland. Taking a life course approach may reveal the cause of the 'Scottish effect'.

  16. Theoretical study of magnetic pattern replication by He+ ion irradiation through stencil masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devolder, T.; Chappert, C.; Bernas, H.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed an irradiation technique that allows us to tune the magnetic properties of Co/Pt multilayers without affecting their roughness. The planarity and the ability to independently control nanostructure size and coercivity make our technique very appealing for magnetic recording. We study the irradiation-induced 1:1 replication of features drilled in a stencil mask. Both the 'gap' G between the magnetic film and the mask, and the aspect ratio (AR) of the mask features are analyzed, in view of the ion straggling in the mask resulting in collateral damages. Optimal gap is such that D<< G<< D/tan(α) (typically 0.1<< G<<25 μm), where the D is the feature size. The replication quality is best for AR≥3. Since the allowed gap interval is wide, we anticipate that mask fast positioning will be possible for the applications to magnetic recording

  17. Turning the Hands of Time Again: A Purely Confirmatory Replication Study and a Bayesian Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric-Jan eWagenmakers

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In a series of four experiments, Topolinski and Sparenberg (2012; TS found support for the conjecture that clockwise movements induce psychological states of temporal progression and an orientation toward the future and novelty. Here we report the results of a preregistered replication attempt of Experiment 2 from TS. Participants turned kitchen rolls either clockwise or counterclockwise while answering items from a questionnaire assessing openness to experience. Data from 102 participants showed that the effect went slightly in the direction opposite to that predicted by TS, and a preregistered Bayes factor hypothesis test revealed that the data were 10.76 times more likely under the null hypothesis than under the alternative hypothesis. Our findings illustrate the theoretical importance and practical advantages of preregistered Bayes factor replication studies, both for psychological science and for empirical work in general.

  18. A Study on Generic Representation of Skeletal Remains Replication of Prehistoric Burial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-W. Shao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Generic representation of skeletal remains from burials consists of three dimensions which include physical anthropologists, replication technicians, and promotional educators. For the reason that archaeological excavation is irreversible and disruptive, detail documentation and replication technologies are surely needed for many purposes. Unearthed bones during the process of 3D digital scanning need to go through reverse procedure, 3D scanning, digital model superimposition, rapid prototyping, mould making, and the integrated errors generated from the presentation of colours and textures are important issues for the presentation of replicate skeleton remains among professional decisions conducted by physical anthropologists, subjective determination of makers, and the expectations of viewers. This study presents several cases and examines current issues on display and replication technologies for human skeletal remains of prehistoric burials. This study documented detail colour changes of human skeleton over time for the reference of reproduction. The tolerance errors of quantification and required technical qualification is acquired according to the precision of 3D scanning, the specification requirement of rapid prototyping machine, and the mould making process should following the professional requirement for physical anthropological study. Additionally, the colorimeter is adopted to record and analyse the “colour change” of the human skeletal remains from wet to dry condition. Then, the “colure change” is used to evaluate the “real” surface texture and colour presentation of human skeletal remains, and to limit the artistic presentation among the human skeletal remains reproduction. The“Lingdao man No.1”, is a well preserved burial of early Neolithic period (8300 B.P. excavated from Liangdao-Daowei site, Matsu, Taiwan , as the replicating object for this study. In this study, we examined the reproduction procedures step by

  19. Recovery from Proactive Semantic Interference and MRI Volume: A Replication and Extension Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, David A; Curiel, Rosie E; DeKosky, Steven; Rosselli, Monica; Bauer, Russell; Grieg-Custo, Maria; Penate, Ailyn; Li, Chunfei; Lizagarra, Gabriel; Golde, Todd; Adjouadi, Malek; Duara, Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    The rise in incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has led to efforts to advance early detection of the disease during its preclinical stages. To achieve this, the field needs to develop more sensitive cognitive tests that relate to biological markers of disease pathology. Failure to recover from proactive interference (frPSI) is one such cognitive marker that is associated with volumetric reductions in the hippocampus, precuneus, and other AD-prone regions, and to amyloid load in the brain. The current study attempted to replicate and extend our previous findings that frPSI is a sensitive marker of early AD, and related to a unique pattern of volumetric loss in AD prone areas. Three different memory measures were examined relative to volumetric loss and cortical thickness among 45 participants with amnestic mild cognitive impairment. frPSI was uniquely associated with reduced volumes in the hippocampus (r = 0.50) precuneus (r = 0.41), and other AD prone regions, replicating previous findings. Strong associations between frPSI and lower entorhinal cortex volumes and cortical thickness (r≥0.60) and precuneus (r = 0.50) were also observed. Unique and strong associations between volumetric reductions and frPSI as observed by Loewenstein and colleagues were replicated. Together with cortical thickness findings, these results indicate that frPSI is worthy of further study as a sensitive and early cognitive marker of AD.

  20. Genomewide linkage scan of resting blood pressure: HERITAGE Family Study. Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Treva; Rankinen, Tuomo; Chagnon, Yvon C; Province, Michael A; Pérusse, Louis; Leon, Arthur S; Skinner, James S; Wilmore, Jack H; Bouchard, Claude; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2002-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to search for genomic regions influencing resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) in sedentary families (baseline), and for resting BP responses (changes) resulting from a 20-week exercise training intervention (post-training-baseline) in the Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics (HERITAGE) Family Study. A genome-wide scan was conducted on 317 black individuals from 114 families and 519 white individuals from 99 families using a multipoint variance-components linkage model and a panel of 509 markers. Promising results were primarily, but not exclusively, found in the black families. Linkage evidence (PHERITAGE data, in conjunction with results from previous genomewide scans, provide a basis for planning future investigations. The major areas warranting further study involve fine mapping to narrow down 3 regions on 2q, 3p, and 12q that may contain "novel" hypertension genes, additional typing of some biological candidate genes to determine whether they are the sources of these and other signals, multilocus investigations to understand how and to what extent some of these candidates may interact, and multivariate studies to characterize any pleiotropy.

  1. Genomics and structure/function studies of Rhabdoviridae proteins involved in replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assenberg, R; Delmas, O; Morin, B; Graham, S C; De Lamballerie, X; Laubert, C; Coutard, B; Grimes, J M; Neyts, J; Owens, R J; Brandt, B W; Gorbalenya, A; Tucker, P; Stuart, D I; Canard, B; Bourhy, H

    2010-08-01

    Some mammalian rhabdoviruses may infect humans, and also infect invertebrates, dogs, and bats, which may act as vectors transmitting viruses among different host species. The VIZIER programme, an EU-funded FP6 program, has characterized viruses that belong to the Vesiculovirus, Ephemerovirus and Lyssavirus genera of the Rhabdoviridae family to perform ground-breaking research on the identification of potential new drug targets against these RNA viruses through comprehensive structural characterization of the replicative machinery. The contribution of VIZIER programme was of several orders. First, it contributed substantially to research aimed at understanding the origin, evolution and diversity of rhabdoviruses. This diversity was then used to obtain further structural information on the proteins involved in replication. Two strategies were used to produce recombinant proteins by expression of both full length or domain constructs in either E. coli or insect cells, using the baculovirus system. In both cases, parallel cloning and expression screening at small-scale of multiple constructs based on different viruses including the addition of fusion tags, was key to the rapid generation of expression data. As a result, some progress has been made in the VIZIER programme towards dissecting the multi-functional L protein into components suitable for structural and functional studies. However, the phosphoprotein polymerase co-factor and the structural matrix protein, which play a number of roles during viral replication and drives viral assembly, have both proved much more amenable to structural biology. Applying the multi-construct/multi-virus approach central to protein production processes in VIZIER has yielded new structural information which may ultimately be exploitable in the derivation of novel ways of intervening in viral replication. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Large-scale replication study reveals a limit on probabilistic prediction in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwland, Mante S; Politzer-Ahles, Stephen; Heyselaar, Evelien; Segaert, Katrien; Darley, Emily; Kazanina, Nina; Von Grebmer Zu Wolfsthurn, Sarah; Bartolozzi, Federica; Kogan, Vita; Ito, Aine; Mézière, Diane; Barr, Dale J; Rousselet, Guillaume A; Ferguson, Heather J; Busch-Moreno, Simon; Fu, Xiao; Tuomainen, Jyrki; Kulakova, Eugenia; Husband, E Matthew; Donaldson, David I; Kohút, Zdenko; Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; Huettig, Falk

    2018-04-03

    Do people routinely pre-activate the meaning and even the phonological form of upcoming words? The most acclaimed evidence for phonological prediction comes from a 2005 Nature Neuroscience publication by DeLong, Urbach and Kutas, who observed a graded modulation of electrical brain potentials (N400) to nouns and preceding articles by the probability that people use a word to continue the sentence fragment ('cloze'). In our direct replication study spanning 9 laboratories ( N =334), pre-registered replication-analyses and exploratory Bayes factor analyses successfully replicated the noun-results but, crucially, not the article-results. Pre-registered single-trial analyses also yielded a statistically significant effect for the nouns but not the articles. Exploratory Bayesian single-trial analyses showed that the article-effect may be non-zero but is likely far smaller than originally reported and too small to observe without very large sample sizes. Our results do not support the view that readers routinely pre-activate the phonological form of predictable words. © 2018, Nieuwland et al.

  3. North-South Business Linkages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull; Kuada, John

    2006-01-01

    Based on empirical studies of linkages between TNCs and local firms in India, Malaysia, Vietnam, Ghana and South Africa, five themes are discussed and related to present theoretical perspectives. The themes are (1) Linakge Governance; (2) Globalisation and the dynamics in developing countries (the...... TNC-driven markets in developing countries); (3) The upgrading impact of FDI; (4) Non-equity linkages as a platform for business development, and (5) The learning perspective on international business linakges. The chapter offers at the end a three-dimanional model for impacts of business linkages....

  4. Antecedents and outcomes of satisfaction in buyer–supplier relationships in South Africa: A replication study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mornay Roberts-Lombard

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a clear difference of opinion amongst researchers on the interrelatedness of the variables trust, commitment, satisfaction, coordination, cooperation and continuity in a business-to-business (B2B environment. The reason is that in previous studies much emphasis has been placed on creating and testing new theories, and not on providing practical generalities. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine how the variable satisfaction is positioned in relation to trust and commitment, and how satisfaction relates to the variables coordination, cooperation and continuity in a South African B2B environment. Setting: This study replicates a similar study conducted in 2013 in a B2B environment in South Africa and hopes to validate the outcome of that study by determining the relationship between the constructs postulated in the current study. The relationships between the different constructs in the proposed model will, therefore, provide a longitudinal perspective which is unique in terms of B2B research in South Africa. Methods: Both the original and replication studies followed a quantitative approach and targeted large companies in South Africa. In the original study, data were collected from 500 large South African companies, while in the replication study data were collected from 250 large companies. Structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data. Results: The findings specifically point to the need for organisations to direct resources towards the establishment of relationships that are founded on trust and commitment. Doing so will help ensure increased satisfaction, which, in turn, will result in greater coordination and cooperation in B2B relationships as well as long-term continuation of the relationship. Conclusion: The foundation for strong B2B relationships is to secure customer satisfaction. Business managers ought to understand that when business customers are dissatisfied, it can result in the

  5. Distributional Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Beare, Brendan K.

    2009-01-01

    Suppose that X and Y are random variables. We define a replicating function to be a function f such that f(X) and Y have the same distribution. In general, the set of replicating functions for a given pair of random variables may be infinite. Suppose we have some objective function, or cost function, defined over the set of replicating functions, and we seek to estimate the replicating function with the lowest cost. We develop an approach to estimating the cheapest replicating function that i...

  6. Genomewide high-density SNP linkage analysis of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families identifies various candidate regions and has greater power than microsatellite studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Neira Anna

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of new high-throughput technologies for SNP genotyping has opened the possibility of taking a genome-wide linkage approach to the search for new candidate genes involved in heredity diseases. The two major breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in 30% of hereditary breast cancer cases, but the discovery of additional breast cancer predisposition genes for the non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families has so far been unsuccessful. Results In order to evaluate the power improvement provided by using SNP markers in a real situation, we have performed a whole genome screen of 19 non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families using 4720 genomewide SNPs with Illumina technology (Illumina's Linkage III Panel, with an average distance of 615 Kb/SNP. We identified six regions on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 7, 11 and 14 as candidates to contain genes involved in breast cancer susceptibility, and additional fine mapping genotyping using microsatellite markers around linkage peaks confirmed five of them, excluding the region on chromosome 3. These results were consistent in analyses that excluded SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium. The results were compared with those obtained previously using a 10 cM microsatellite scan (STR-GWS and we found lower or not significant linkage signals with STR-GWS data compared to SNP data in all cases. Conclusion Our results show the power increase that SNPs can supply in linkage studies.

  7. Exploring evidence-policy linkages in health research plans: A case study from six countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladepo Oladimeji

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The complex evidence-policy interface in low and middle income country settings is receiving increasing attention. Future Health Systems (FHS: Innovations for Equity, is a research consortium conducting health systems explorations in six Asian and African countries: Bangladesh, India, China, Afghanistan, Uganda, and Nigeria. The cross-country research consortium provides a unique opportunity to explore the research-policy interface. Three key activities were undertaken during the initial phase of this five-year project. First, key considerations in strengthening evidence-policy linkages in health system research were developed by FHS researchers through workshops and electronic communications. Four key considerations in strengthening evidence-policy linkages are postulated: development context; research characteristics; decision-making processes; and stakeholder engagement. Second, these four considerations were applied to research proposals in each of the six countries to highlight features in the research plans that potentially strengthen the research-policy interface and opportunities for improvement. Finally, the utility of the approach for setting research priorities in health policy and systems research was reflected upon. These three activities yielded interesting findings. First, developmental consideration with four dimensions – poverty, vulnerabilities, capabilities, and health shocks – provides an entry point in examining research-policy interfaces in the six settings. Second, research plans focused upon on the ground realities in specific countries strengthens the interface. Third, focusing on research prioritized by decision-makers, within a politicized health arena, enhances chances of research influencing action. Lastly, early and continued engagement of multiple stakeholders, from local to national levels, is conducive to enhanced communication at the interface. The approach described has four main utilities: first

  8. T-cell receptor variable genes and genetic susceptibility to celiac disease: an association and linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschmann, E; Wienker, T F; Gerok, W; Volk, B A

    1993-12-01

    Genetic susceptibility of celiac disease is primarily associated with a particular combination of and HLA-DQA1/DQB1 gene; however, this does not fully account for the genetic predisposition. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine whether T-cell receptor (TCR) genes may be susceptibility genes in celiac disease. HLA class II typing was performed by polymerase chain reaction amplification in combination with sequence-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. TCR alpha (TCRA), TCR gamma (TCRG), and TCR beta (TCRB) loci were investigated by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Allelic frequencies of TCRA, TCRG, and TCRB variable genes were compared between patients with celiac disease (n = 53) and control patients (n = 67), and relative risk (RR) estimates were calculated. The RR was 1.67 for allele C1 at TCRA1, 3.35 for allele D2 at TCRA2, 1.66 for allele B2 at TCRG, and 1.35 for allele B at TCRB, showing no significant association. Additionally, linkage analysis was performed in 23 families. The logarithm of odd scores for celiac disease vs. the TCR variable genes at TCRA, TCRG, and TCRB showed no significant linkage. These data suggest that the analyzed TCR variable gene segments V alpha 1.2, V gamma 11, and V beta 8 do not play a major role in susceptibility to celiac disease.

  9. A maize root tip system to study DNA replication programmes in somatic and endocycling nuclei during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Hank W; Wear, Emily E; Lee, Tae-Jin; Hoffman, Gregg G; Gumber, Hardeep K; Allen, George C; Thompson, William F; Hanley-Bowdoin, Linda

    2014-06-01

    The progress of nuclear DNA replication is complex in both time and space, and may reflect several levels of chromatin structure and 3-dimensional organization within the nucleus. To understand the relationship between DNA replication and developmental programmes, it is important to examine replication and nuclear substructure in different developmental contexts including natural cell-cycle progressions in situ. Plant meristems offer an ideal opportunity to analyse such processes in the context of normal growth of an organism. Our current understanding of large-scale chromosomal DNA replication has been limited by the lack of appropriate tools to visualize DNA replication with high resolution at defined points within S phase. In this perspective, we discuss a promising new system that can be used to visualize DNA replication in isolated maize (Zea mays L.) root tip nuclei after in planta pulse labelling with the thymidine analogue, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Mixed populations of EdU-labelled nuclei are then separated by flow cytometry into sequential stages of S phase and examined directly using 3-dimensional deconvolution microscopy to characterize spatial patterns of plant DNA replication. Combining spatiotemporal analyses with studies of replication and epigenetic inheritance at the molecular level enables an integrated experimental approach to problems of mitotic inheritance and cellular differentiation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Yeast as a model host to study replication and recombination of defective interfering RNA of Tomato bushy stunt virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panavas, Tadas; Nagy, Peter D.

    2003-01-01

    Defective interfering (DI) RNA associated with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV), which is a plus-strand RNA virus, requires p33 and p92 proteins of TBSV or the related Cucumber necrosis virus (CNV), for replication in plants. To test if DI RNA can replicate in a model host, we coexpressed TBSV DI RNA and p33/p92 of CNV in yeast. We show evidence for replication of DI RNA in yeast, including (i) dependence on p33 and p92 for DI replication; (ii) presence of active CNV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase in isolated membrane-containing preparations; (iii) increasing amount of DI RNA(+) over time; (iv) accumulation of (-)stranded DI RNA; (v) presence of correct 5' and 3' ends in DI RNA; (vi) inhibition of replication by mutations in the replication enhancer; and (vii) evolution of DI RNA over time, as shown by sequence heterogeneity. We also produced evidence supporting the occurrence of DI RNA recombinants in yeast. In summary, development of yeast as a host for replication of TBSV DI RNA will facilitate studies on the roles of viral and host proteins in replication/recombination

  11. The Reliability and Validity of the Outcome Rating Scale: A Replication Study of a Brief Clinical Measure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bringhurst, David L; Watson, Curtis W; Miller, Scott D; Duncan, Barry L

    2004-01-01

    ... (Miller, Duncan, Brown, Sparks, AND Claud, 2003). This article reports the findings of an independent replication study evaluating the reliability and concurrent validity of the ORS as studied in a non-clinical sample...

  12. Studying Hospitalizations and Mortality in the Netherlands: Feasible and Valid Using Two-Step Medical Record Linkage with Nationwide Registers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elske Sieswerda

    Full Text Available In the Netherlands, the postal code is needed to study hospitalizations of individuals in the nationwide hospitalization register. Studying hospitalizations longitudinally becomes troublesome if individuals change address. We aimed to report on the feasibility and validity of a two-step medical record linkage approach to examine longitudinal trends in hospitalizations and mortality in a study cohort. First, we linked a study cohort of 1564 survivors of childhood cancer with the Municipal Personal Records Database (GBA which has postal code history and mortality data available. Within GBA, we sampled a reference population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year. Second, we extracted hospitalizations from the Hospital Discharge Register (LMR with a date of discharge during unique follow-up (based on date of birth, gender and postal code in GBA. We calculated the agreement of death and being hospitalized in survivors according to the registers and to available cohort data. We retrieved 1477 (94% survivors from GBA. Median percentages of unique/potential follow-up were 87% (survivors and 83% (reference persons. Characteristics of survivors and reference persons contributing to unique follow-up were comparable. Agreement of hospitalization during unique follow-up was 94% and agreement of death was 98%. In absence of unique identifiers in the Dutch hospitalization register, it is feasible and valid to study hospitalizations and mortality of individuals longitudinally using a two-step medical record linkage approach. Cohort studies in the Netherlands have the opportunity to study mortality and hospitalization rates over time. These outcomes provide insight into the burden of clinical events and healthcare use in studies on patients at risk of long-term morbidities.

  13. A record linkage study of outcomes in patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism: the Parathyroid Epidemiology and Audit Research Study (PEARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ning; Donnan, Peter T; Leese, Graham P

    2011-08-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrine disorder, but the majority of cases are perceived to be mild and remain untreated. To determine the risk of mortality and morbidities in patients with mild PHPT. Tayside, Scotland, 1997-2006. A historical, prospective, record-linkage, population-based, matched cohort study. All patients with diagnosed but untreated, mild PHPT. METHOD AND OUTCOME MEASURES: Each patient with PHPT was matched with five population-based comparators, by age, gender and calendar year of PHPT diagnosis, selected from the general population. Primary outcomes were all-cause mortality, fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular disease (CVD). Secondary outcomes were cancer-related deaths and other hospital admitted morbidities, including cerebrovascular disease, fractures, hypertension, psychiatric disease, renal complications, cancer and diabetes. The risk was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model, adjusting for confounding factors of pre-existing co-morbidities, previous prescription of bisphosphonates, socio-economic deprivation score and the probability of having a calcium check. Compared to the matched cohort, the risk of all cause mortality, fatal and nonfatal CVD was increased in patients with asymptomatic PHPT: adjusted hazard ratios (HR) 1·64 (95% CI: 1·43-1·87), 1·64 (95% CI: 1·32-2·04) and 2·48 (95% CI: 2·13-2·89), respectively. The risk was also increased in all secondary outcomes, with the risk of renal failure and renal stones being the highest, adjusted HRs being 13·83 (95% CI: 10·41-18·37) and 5·15 (95% CI: 2·69-9·83), respectively. Patients with mild PHPT had an increased risk of mortality, fatal and nonfatal CVD, and the risk of developing other co-morbidities was also increased. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. A replication and methodological critique of the study "Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munksgaard, Rasmus; Demant, Jakob Johan; Branwen, Gwern

    2016-01-01

    The development of cryptomarkets has gained increasing attention from academics, including growing scientific literature on the distribution of illegal goods using cryptomarkets. Dolliver's 2015 article “Evaluating drug trafficking on the Tor Network: Silk Road 2, the Sequel” addresses this theme...... by evaluating drug trafficking on one of the most well-known cryptomarkets, Silk Road 2.0. The research on cryptomarkets in general—particularly in Dolliver's article—poses a number of new questions for methodologies. This commentary is structured around a replication of Dolliver's original study...

  15. Analysis of 60 reported glioma risk SNPs replicates published GWAS findings but fails to replicate associations from published candidate-gene studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kyle M; Anderson, Erik; Hansen, Helen M; Decker, Paul A; Kosel, Matt L; Kollmeyer, Thomas; Rice, Terri; Zheng, Shichun; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Chang, Jeffrey S; McCoy, Lucie S; Bracci, Paige M; Wiemels, Joe L; Pico, Alexander R; Smirnov, Ivan; Lachance, Daniel H; Sicotte, Hugues; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2013-02-01

    Genomewide association studies (GWAS) and candidate-gene studies have implicated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in at least 45 different genes as putative glioma risk factors. Attempts to validate these associations have yielded variable results and few genetic risk factors have been consistently replicated. We conducted a case-control study of Caucasian glioma cases and controls from the University of California San Francisco (810 cases, 512 controls) and the Mayo Clinic (852 cases, 789 controls) in an attempt to replicate previously reported genetic risk factors for glioma. Sixty SNPs selected from the literature (eight from GWAS and 52 from candidate-gene studies) were successfully genotyped on an Illumina custom genotyping panel. Eight SNPs in/near seven different genes (TERT, EGFR, CCDC26, CDKN2A, PHLDB1, RTEL1, TP53) were significantly associated with glioma risk in the combined dataset (P 0.05). Although several confirmed associations are located near genes long known to be involved in gliomagenesis (e.g., EGFR, CDKN2A, TP53), these associations were first discovered by the GWAS approach and are in noncoding regions. These results highlight that the deficiencies of the candidate-gene approach lay in selecting both appropriate genes and relevant SNPs within these genes. © 2012 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Replication Catastrophe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toledo, Luis; Neelsen, Kai John; Lukas, Jiri

    2017-01-01

    Proliferating cells rely on the so-called DNA replication checkpoint to ensure orderly completion of genome duplication, and its malfunction may lead to catastrophic genome disruption, including unscheduled firing of replication origins, stalling and collapse of replication forks, massive DNA...... breakage, and, ultimately, cell death. Despite many years of intensive research into the molecular underpinnings of the eukaryotic replication checkpoint, the mechanisms underlying the dismal consequences of its failure remain enigmatic. A recent development offers a unifying model in which the replication...... checkpoint guards against global exhaustion of rate-limiting replication regulators. Here we discuss how such a mechanism can prevent catastrophic genome disruption and suggest how to harness this knowledge to advance therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells that inherently proliferate under...

  17. VT Wildlife Linkage Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Wildlife Linkage Habitat Analysis uses landscape scale data to identify or predict the location of potentially significant wildlife linkage...

  18. No Reliable Association between Runs of Homozygosity and Schizophrenia in a Well-Powered Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelland, Douglas W.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Breen, Gerome; Borglum, Anders; Cichon, Sven; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J.; Genovese, Giulio; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hoffman, Per; Maier, Wolfgang; Mattheisen, Manuel; Morris, Derek; Mowry, Bryan; Müller-Mhysok, Betram; Neale, Benjamin; Nenadic, Igor; Nöthen, Markus M.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Rujescu, Dan; Schulze, Thomas G.; Simonson, Matthew A.; Stahl, Eli; Strohmaier, Jana; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Keller, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that inbreeding increases the risk of recessive monogenic diseases, but it is less certain whether it contributes to the etiology of complex diseases such as schizophrenia. One way to estimate the effects of inbreeding is to examine the association between disease diagnosis and genome-wide autozygosity estimated using runs of homozygosity (ROH) in genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Using data for schizophrenia from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n = 21,868), Keller et al. (2012) estimated that the odds of developing schizophrenia increased by approximately 17% for every additional percent of the genome that is autozygous (β = 16.1, CI(β) = [6.93, 25.7], Z = 3.44, p = 0.0006). Here we describe replication results from 22 independent schizophrenia case-control datasets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n = 39,830). Using the same ROH calling thresholds and procedures as Keller et al. (2012), we were unable to replicate the significant association between ROH burden and schizophrenia in the independent PGC phase II data, although the effect was in the predicted direction, and the combined (original + replication) dataset yielded an attenuated but significant relationship between Froh and schizophrenia (β = 4.86,CI(β) = [0.90,8.83],Z = 2.40,p = 0.02). Since Keller et al. (2012), several studies reported inconsistent association of ROH burden with complex traits, particularly in case-control data. These conflicting results might suggest that the effects of autozygosity are confounded by various factors, such as socioeconomic status, education, urbanicity, and religiosity, which may be associated with both real inbreeding and the outcome measures of interest. PMID:27792727

  19. Post-transplant outcomes in pediatric ventricular assist device patients: A PediMACS-Pediatric Heart Transplant Study linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcliffe, David L; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Cantor, Ryan S; Godown, Justin; Lane, John; Turrentine, Mark W; Law, Sabrina P; Lantz, Jodie L; Kirklin, James K; Bernstein, Daniel; Blume, Elizabeth D

    2017-12-13

    Pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) support as bridge to transplant has improved waitlist survival, but the effects of pre-implant status and VAD-related events on post-transplant outcomes have not been assessed. This study is a linkage analysis between the PediMACS and Pediatric Heart Transplant Study databases to determine the effects of VAD course on post-transplant outcomes. Database linkage between October 1, 2012 and December 31, 2015 identified 147 transplanted VAD patients, the primary study group. The comparison cohort was composed of 630 PHTS patients without pre-transplant VAD support. The primary outcome was post-transplant survival, with secondary outcomes of post-transplant length of stay, freedom from infection and freedom from rejection. At implant, the VAD cohort was INTERMACS Profile 1 in 33 (23%), Profile 2 in 89 (63%) and Profile 3 in 14 (10%) patients. The VAD cohort was older, larger, and less likely to have congenital heart disease (p < 0.0001). However, they had greater requirements for inotrope and ventilator support and increased liver and renal dysfunction (p < 0.0001), both of which normalized at transplant after device support. Importantly, there were no differences in 1-year post-transplant survival (96% vs 93%, p = 0.3), freedom from infection (81% vs 79%, p = 0.9) or freedom from rejection (71% vs 74%, p = 0.87) between cohorts. Pediatric VAD patients have post-transplant outcomes equal to that of medically supported patients, despite greater pre-implant illness severity. Post-transplant survival, hospital length of stay, infection and rejection were not affected by patient acuity at VAD implantation or VAD-related complications. Therefore, VAD as bridge to transplant mitigates severity of illness in children. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Linkages between ocean circulation, heat uptake and transient warming: a sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Patrik; Stocker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Transient global warming due to greenhouse gas radiative forcing is substantially reduced by ocean heat uptake (OHU). However, the fraction of equilibrium warming that is realized in transient climate model simulations differs strongly between models (Frölicher and Paynter 2015). It has been shown that this difference is not only related to the magnitude of OHU, but also to the radiative response the OHU causes, measured by the OHU efficacy (Winton et al., 2010). This efficacy is strongly influenced by the spatial pattern of the OHU and its changes (Rose et al. 2014, Winton et al. 2013), predominantly caused by changes in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Even in absence of external greenhouse gas forcing, an AMOC weakening causes a radiative imbalance at the top of the atmosphere (Peltier and Vettoretti, 2014), inducing in a net warming of the Earth System. We investigate linkages between those findings by performing both freshwater and greenhouse gas experiments in an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity. To assess the sensitivity of the results to ocean and atmospheric transport as well as climate sensitivity, we use an ensemble of model versions, systematically varying key parameters. We analyze circulation changes and radiative adjustments in conjunction with traditional warming metrics such as the transient climate response and the equilibrium climate sensitivity. This aims to improve the understanding of the influence of ocean circulation and OHU on transient climate change, and of the relevance of different metrics for describing this influence. References: Frölicher, T. L. and D.J. Paynter (2015), Extending the relationship between global warming and cumulative carbon emissions to multi-millennial timescales, Environ. Res. Lett., 10, 075022 Peltier, W. R., and G. Vettoretti (2014), Dansgaard-Oeschger oscillations predicted in a comprehensive model of glacial climate: A "kicked" salt oscillator in the Atlantic, Geophys. Res

  1. Analytical strategies for discovery and replication of genetic effects in pharmacogenomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohler JR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jared R Kohler, Tobias Guennel, Scott L MarshallBioStat Solutions, Inc., Frederick, MD, USAAbstract: In the past decade, the pharmaceutical industry and biomedical research sector have devoted considerable resources to pharmacogenomics (PGx with the hope that understanding genetic variation in patients would deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. With the advent of new technologies and the improved collection of DNA samples, the roadblock to advancements in PGx discovery is no longer the lack of high-density genetic information captured on patient populations, but rather the development, adaptation, and tailoring of analytical strategies to effectively harness this wealth of information. The current analytical paradigm in PGx considers the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP as the genomic feature of interest and performs single SNP association tests to discover PGx effects – ie, genetic effects impacting drug response. While it can be straightforward to process single SNP results and to consider how this information may be extended for use in downstream patient stratification, the rate of replication for single SNP associations has been low and the desired success of producing clinically and commercially viable biomarkers has not been realized. This may be due to the fact that single SNP association testing is suboptimal given the complexities of PGx discovery in the clinical trial setting, including: 1 relatively small sample sizes; 2 diverse clinical cohorts within and across trials due to genetic ancestry (potentially impacting the ability to replicate findings; and 3 the potential polygenic nature of a drug response. Subsequently, a shift in the current paradigm is proposed: to consider the gene as the genomic feature of interest in PGx discovery. The proof-of-concept study presented in this manuscript demonstrates that genomic region-based association testing has the potential to improve the power of detecting single SNP or

  2. Being a good nurse and doing the right thing: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlett, Shelia; Lovan, Sherry R

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative research study, a replication of a study published in 2002, investigated the qualities of a good nurse and the role ethics plays in decision making. After reviewing the limitations of the published work, the current study implemented modifications related to the research questions, sample selection, data collection, and use of software for data analysis. The original study identified seven categories that related to being a good nurse and doing the right thing. In the present study, the use of relational analysis led to the recognition of four categories: (1) personal traits and attributes; (2) technical skills and management of care; (3) work environment and co-workers; and (4) caring and caring behaviors. To understand what it means to be a good nurse and do the right thing is a complex task; however, this research adds to the small amount of empirical data that exists to describe those characteristics.

  3. Subsidiary Linkage Patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ulf; Perri, Alessandra; Nell, Phillip C.

    2012-01-01

    channels for spillovers to competitors. We find a curvilinear relationship between the extent of competitive pressure and the quality of a subsidiary's set of local linkages. Furthermore, the extent to which a subsidiary possesses capabilities moderates this relationship: Very capable subsidiaries...... in strongly competitive environments tend to shy away from high quality linkages. We discuss our findings in light of the literature on spillovers and inter-organizational linkages.......This paper investigates the pattern of subsidiaries' local vertical linkages under varying levels of competition and subsidiary capabilities. Contrary to most previous literature, we explicitly account for the double role of such linkages as conduits of learning prospects as well as potential...

  4. Owner reports of attention, activity, and impulsivity in dogs: a replication study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosif Ana-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When developing behaviour measurement tools that use third party assessments, such as parent report, it is important to demonstrate reliability of resulting scales through replication using novel cohorts. The domestic dog has been suggested as a model to investigate normal variation in attention, hyperactivity, and impulsive behaviours impaired in Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD. The human ADHD Rating Scale, modified for dogs and using owner-directed surveys, was applied in a European sample. We asked whether findings would be replicated utilizing an Internet survey in a novel sample, where unassisted survey completion, participant attitudes and breeds might affect previous findings. Methods Using a slightly modified version of the prior survey, we collected responses (n = 1030, 118 breeds representing 7 breed groups primarily in the United States and Canada. This study was conducted using an Internet survey mechanism. Results Reliability analyses confirmed two scales previously identified for dogs (inattention [IA], hyperactivity-impulsivity [HA-IM]. Models including age, training status, and breed group accounted for very little variance in subscales, with no effect of gender. Conclusions The factor invariance demonstrated in these findings confirms that owner report, using this modified human questionnaire, provides dog scores according to "inattention" and "hyperactivity-impulsivity" axes. Further characterization of naturally occurring variability of attention, activity, and impulsivity in domestic dogs may provide insight into genetic backgrounds underlying behaviours impaired in attention and associated disorders.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Microarray Data with Replicated Spots: A Case Study with Synechococcus WH8102

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently microarray experiments often involved relatively few arrays with only a single representation of each gene on each array. A complete genome microarray with multiple spots per gene (spread out spatially across the array was developed in order to compare the gene expression of a marine cyanobacterium and a knockout mutant strain in a defined artificial seawater medium. Statistical methods were developed for analysis in the special situation of this case study where there is gene replication within an array and where relatively few arrays are used, which can be the case with current array technology. Due in part to the replication within an array, it was possible to detect very small changes in the levels of expression between the wild type and mutant strains. One interesting biological outcome of this experiment is the indication of the extent to which the phosphorus regulatory system of this cyanobacterium affects the expression of multiple genes beyond those strictly involved in phosphorus acquisition.

  6. Children with life-limiting conditions in paediatric intensive care units: a national cohort, data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lorna K; Parslow, Roger

    2017-07-13

    To determine how many children are admitted to paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with life-limiting conditions (LLCs) and their outcomes. National cohort, data-linkage study. PICUs in England. Children admitted to a UK PICU (1 January 2004 and 31 March 2015) were identified in the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network dataset. Linkage to hospital episodes statistics enabled identification of children with a LLC using an International Classification of Diseases (ICD10) code list. Random-effects logistic regression was undertaken to assess risk of death in PICU. Flexible parametric survival modelling was used to assess survival in the year after discharge. Overall, 57.6% (n=89 127) of PICU admissions and 72.90% (n=4821) of deaths in PICU were for an individual with a LLC.The crude mortality rate in PICU was 5.4% for those with a LLC and 2.7% of those without a LLC. In the fully adjusted model, children with a LLC were 75% more likely than those without a LLC to die in PICU (OR 1.75 (95% CI 1.64 to 1.87)).Although overall survival to 1 year postdischarge was 96%, children with a LLC were 2.5 times more likely to die in that year than children without a LLC (OR 2.59 (95% CI 2.47 to 2.71)). Children with a LLC accounted for a large proportion of the PICU population. There is an opportunity to integrate specialist paediatric palliative care services with paediatric critical care to enable choice around place of care for these children and families. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Studies on the effects of persistent RNA priming on DNA replication and genomic stability

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    [EN]: DNA replication and transcription take place on the same DNA template, and the correct interplay between these processes ensures faithful genome duplication. DNA replication must be highly coordinated with other cell cycle events, such as segregation of fully replicated DNA in order to maintain genomic integrity. Transcription generates RNA:DNA hybrids, transient intermediate structures that are degraded by the ribonuclease H (RNaseH) class of enzymes. RNA:DNA hybrids can form R-loops, ...

  8. Age at onset in Huntington's disease: replication study on the association of HAP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Georgia; Dimovasili, Christina; Koutsis, Georgios; Vassilopoulos, Demetris; Panas, Marios

    2012-11-01

    In recent years two association studies investigating the HAP1 T441M (rs4523977) polymorphism as a potential modifying factor of the age at onset (AAO) of Huntington's disease (HD), have been reported. Initially evidence for association was found between the M441 risk allele and the AAO. Subsequently, a second study, although failing to replicate these findings, found evidence for association between the same risk allele and AAO of motor symptoms (mAAO). In the present study, the role of the HAP1 T441M polymorphism as a modifier of the AAO in HD was investigated in a cohort of 298 Greek HD patients. In this cohort the CAG repeat number accounted for 55% of the variance in AAO. No association was found between the HAP1 T441M polymorphism and the AAO of HD. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PLAB and UK graduates’ performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Design Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Setting Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. Participants 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18 532, 14 094, and 14 376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14 235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Main outcome measures Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. Results PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all PIELTS scores correlated significantly with later performance, multiple regression showing that the effect of PLAB1 (β=0.496) was much stronger than the effect of IELTS (β=0.086). Changes to PLAB pass marks that would result in international medical graduate and UK medical graduate equivalence were assessed in two

  10. PLAB and UK graduates' performance on MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations: data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Wakeford, Richard

    2014-04-17

    To assess whether international medical graduates passing the two examinations set by the Professional and Linguistic Assessments Board (PLAB1 and PLAB2) of the General Medical Council (GMC) are equivalent to UK graduates at the end of the first foundation year of medical training (F1), as the GMC requires, and if not, to assess what changes in the PLAB pass marks might produce equivalence. Data linkage of GMC PLAB performance data with data from the Royal Colleges of Physicians and the Royal College of General Practitioners on performance of PLAB graduates and UK graduates at the MRCP(UK) and MRCGP examinations. Doctors in training for internal medicine or general practice in the United Kingdom. 7829, 5135, and 4387 PLAB graduates on their first attempt at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments from 2001 to 2012 compared with 18,532, 14,094, and 14,376 UK graduates taking the same assessments; 3160 PLAB1 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP AKT during 2007-12 compared with 14,235 UK graduates; and 1411 PLAB2 graduates making their first attempt at the MRCGP CSA during 2010-12 compared with 6935 UK graduates. Performance at MRCP(UK) Part 1, Part 2, and PACES assessments, and MRCGP AKT and CSA assessments in relation to performance on PLAB1 and PLAB2 assessments, as well as to International English Language Testing System (IELTS) scores. MRCP(UK), MRCGP, and PLAB results were analysed as marks relative to the pass mark at the first attempt. PLAB1 marks were a valid predictor of MRCP(UK) Part 1, MRCP(UK) Part 2, and MRCGP AKT (r=0.521, 0.390, and 0.490; all PIELTS scores correlated significantly with later performance, multiple regression showing that the effect of PLAB1 (β=0.496) was much stronger than the effect of IELTS (β=0.086). Changes to PLAB pass marks that would result in international medical graduate and UK medical graduate equivalence were assessed in two ways. Method 1 adjusted PLAB pass marks to equate median performance of PLAB

  11. One-year prospective replication study of an untreated sample of community dysthymia subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, J P; McCune, K J; Kaye, A L; Braith, J A; Friend, R; Roberts, W C; Belyea-Caldwell, S; Norris, S L; Hampton, C

    1994-07-01

    This study replicates an earlier naturalistic-prospective investigation of nontreatment, community DSM-III-R dysthymia subjects. Major goals were to determine spontaneous remission rates and monitor the stability of psychosocial functioning levels over time. Twenty-four dysthymia subjects were followed for 1 year. Three remissions (13%) were diagnosed at the final interview. At a 4-year diagnostic follow-up contact with the remitters only, one remitter had relapsed and two remained in remission. Subjects were monitored for depressive symptom intensity, personality functioning, general medical distress, cognitive functioning, coping stylistics, interpersonal functioning, quality of their social support resources, and general family functioning. Stable levels of psychosocial functioning were maintained across all measures over the 1-year period. Current psychometric findings confirm the conclusions of the earlier nontreatment prospective study that dysthymia is a chronic mood disorder with stable psychosocial features and is unlikely to remit spontaneously over time.

  12. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  13. Short term memory for single surface features and bindings in ageing: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Valeria; Molteni, Federica; Mapelli, Cristina; Ferrarese, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    In the present study we replicated a previous experiment investigating visuo-spatial short term memory binding in young and older healthy individuals, in the attempt to verify the pattern of impairment that can be observed in normal elderly for short term memory for single items vs short term memory for bindings. Assessing a larger sample size (25 young and 25 older subjects), using a more appropriate measure of accuracy for a change detection task (A'), and adding the evaluation of speed of performance, we confirmed that old normals show a decline in short term memory for bindings of shape and colour that is of comparable extent, and not major, to the decline in memory for single shapes and single colours. The absence of a specific deficit of short term memory for conjunctions of surface features seems to distinguish cognitive ageing from Alzheimer's Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Increased level of linkage disequilibrium in rural compared with urban communities: a factor to consider in association-study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitart, Veronique; Carothers, Andrew D; Hayward, Caroline; Teague, Peter; Hastie, Nicholas D; Campbell, Harry; Wright, Alan F

    2005-05-01

    Few studies have investigated genetic differentiation within nonisolate European populations, despite the initiation of large national sample collections such as U.K. Biobank. Here, we used short tandem repeat markers to explore fine-scale genetic structure and to examine the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) within national subpopulations. We studied 955 unrelated individuals of local ancestry from nine Scottish rural regions and the urban center of Edinburgh, as well as 96 unrelated individuals from the general U.K. population. Despite little overall differentiation on the basis of allele frequencies, there were clear differences among subpopulations in the extent of pairwise LD, measured between a subset of X-linked markers, that reflected presumed differences in the depths of the underlying genealogies within these subpopulations. Therefore, there are strategic advantages in studying rural subpopulations, in terms of increased power and reduced cost, that are lost by sampling across regions or within urban populations. Similar rural-urban contrasts are likely to exist in many other populations with stable rural subpopulations, which could influence the design of genetic association studies and national biobank data collections.

  15. Anonymous non-response analysis in the ABCD cohort study enabled by probabilistic record linkage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, M.; van Eijsden, M.; Ravelli, A. C. J.; Bonsel, G. J.

    2009-01-01

    Selective non-response is an important threat to study validity as it can lead to selection bias. The Amsterdam Born Children and their Development study (ABCD-study) is a large cohort study addressing the relationship between life style, psychological conditions, nutrition and sociodemographic

  16. Maternal and perinatal factors associated with hospitalised infectious mononucleosis in children, adolescents and young adults: record linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background There is current interest in the role of perinatal factors in the aetiology of diseases that occur later in life. Infectious mononucleosis (IM) can follow late primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and has been shown to increase the risk of multiple sclerosis and Hodgkin's disease. Little is known about maternal or perinatal factors associated with IM or its sequelae. Methods We investigated perinatal risk factors for hospitalised IM using a prospective record-linkage study in a population in the south of England. The dataset used, the Oxford record linkage study (ORLS), includes abstracts of birth registrations, maternities and in-patient hospital records, including day case care, for all subjects in a defined geographical area. From these sources, we identified cases of hospitalised IM up to the age of 30 years in people for whom the ORLS had a maternity record; and we compared perinatal factors in their pregnancy with those in the pregnancy of children who had no hospital record of IM. Results Our data showed a significant association between hospitalised IM and lower social class (p = 0.02), a higher risk of hospitalised IM in children of married rather than single mothers (p < 0.001), and, of marginal statistical significance, an association with singleton birth (p = 0.06). The ratio of observed to expected cases of hospitalised IM in each season was 0.95 in winter, 1.02 in spring, 1.02 in summer and 1.00 in autumn. The chi-square test for seasonality, with a value of 0.8, was not significant. Other factors studied, including low birth weight, short gestational age, maternal smoking, late age at motherhood, did not increase the risk of subsequent hospitalised IM. Conclusions Because of the increasing tendency of women to postpone childbearing, it is useful to know that older age at motherhood is not associated with an increased risk of hospitalised IM in their children. We have no explanation for the finding that children of married women

  17. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong ePeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs. Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genome. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best characterized. In recent years, advances in DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the number of yeast species involved in ORIs research dramatically. The ORIs in some nonconventional yeast species such as Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris have also been genome-widely identified. Relevant databases of replication origins in yeast were constructed, then the comparative genomic analysis can be carried out. Here, we review several experimental approaches that have been used to map replication origins in yeast and some of the available web resources related to yeast ORIs. We also discuss the sequence characteristics and chromosome structures of ORIs in the four yeast species, which can be utilized to improve the replication origins prediction.

  18. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chong; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Xi; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs). Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genomes. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best characterized. In recent years, advances in DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the number of yeast species involved in ORIs research dramatically. The ORIs in some non-conventional yeast species such as Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris have also been genome-widely identified. Relevant databases of replication origins in yeast were constructed, then the comparative genomic analysis can be carried out. Here, we review several experimental approaches that have been used to map replication origins in yeast and some of the available web resources related to yeast ORIs. We also discuss the sequence characteristics and chromosome structures of ORIs in the four yeast species, which can be utilized to improve yeast replication origins prediction. PMID:25745419

  19. A study of an adaptive replication framework for orchestrated composite web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Marwa F; Elyamany, Hany F; Nassar, Hamed M

    2013-01-01

    Replication is considered one of the most important techniques to improve the Quality of Services (QoS) of published Web Services. It has achieved impressive success in managing resource sharing and usage in order to moderate the energy consumed in IT environments. For a robust and successful replication process, attention should be paid to suitable time as well as the constraints and capabilities in which the process runs. The replication process is time-consuming since outsourcing some new replicas into other hosts is lengthy. Furthermore, nowadays, most of the business processes that might be implemented over the Web are composed of multiple Web services working together in two main styles: Orchestration and Choreography. Accomplishing a replication over such business processes is another challenge due to the complexity and flexibility involved. In this paper, we present an adaptive replication framework for regular and orchestrated composite Web services. The suggested framework includes a number of components for detecting unexpected and unhappy events that might occur when consuming the original published web services including failure or overloading. It also includes a specific replication controller to manage the replication process and select the best host that would encapsulate a new replica. In addition, it includes a component for predicting the incoming load in order to decrease the time needed for outsourcing new replicas, enhancing the performance greatly. A simulation environment has been created to measure the performance of the suggested framework. The results indicate that adaptive replication with prediction scenario is the best option for enhancing the performance of the replication process in an online business environment.

  20. Detecting referral and selection bias by the anonymous linkage of practice, hospital and clinic data using Secure and Private Record Linkage (SAPREL: case study from the evaluation of the Improved Access to Psychological Therapy (IAPT service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Glenys

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evaluation of demonstration sites set up to provide improved access to psychological therapies (IAPT comprised the study of all people identified as having common mental health problems (CMHP, those referred to the IAPT service, and a sample of attenders studied in-depth. Information technology makes it feasible to link practice, hospital and IAPT clinic data to evaluate the representativeness of these samples. However, researchers do not have permission to browse and link these data without the patients' consent. Objective To demonstrate the use of a mixed deterministic-probabilistic method of secure and private record linkage (SAPREL - to describe selection bias in subjects chosen for in-depth evaluation. Method We extracted, pseudonymised and used fuzzy logic to link multiple health records without the researcher knowing the patient's identity. The method can be characterised as a three party protocol mainly using deterministic algorithms with dynamic linking strategies; though incorporating some elements of probabilistic linkage. Within the data providers' safe haven we extracted: Demographic data, hospital utilisation and IAPT clinic data; converted post code to index of multiple deprivation (IMD; and identified people with CMHP. We contrasted the age, gender, ethnicity and IMD for the in-depth evaluation sample with people referred to IAPT, use hospital services, and the population as a whole. Results The in IAPT-in-depth group had a mean age of 43.1 years; CI: 41.0 - 45.2 (n = 166; the IAPT-referred 40.2 years; CI: 39.4 - 40.9 (n = 1118; and those with CMHP 43.6 years SEM 0.15. (n = 12210. Whilst around 67% of those with a CMHP were women, compared to 70% of those referred to IAPT, and 75% of those subject to in-depth evaluation (Chi square p Conclusions The sample studied in-depth were older, more likely female, and less deprived than people with CMHP, and fewer had recorded ethnic minority status. Anonymous

  1. The value of repeating studies and multiple controls: replicated 28-day growth studies of rainbow trout exposed to clofibric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Stewart F; Huggett, Duane B; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Hetheridge, Malcolm J; McCormack, Paul; Kinter, Lewis B; Ericson, Jon F; Constantine, Lisa A; Sumpter, John P

    2010-12-01

    Two studies to examine the effect of waterborne clofibric acid (CA) on growth-rate and condition of rainbow trout were conducted using accepted regulatory tests (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development [OECD] 215). The first study (in 2005) showed significant reductions after 21 d of exposure (21-d growth lowest-observed-effect concentration [LOEC] = 0.1 µg/L, 21-d condition LOEC = 0.1 µg/L) that continued to 28 d. Growth rate was reduced by approximately 50% (from 5.27 to 2.67% per day), while the condition of the fish reduced in a concentration-dependant manner. Additionally, in a concentration-dependent manner, significant changes in relative liver size were observed, such that increasing concentrations of CA resulted in smaller livers after 28-d exposure. A no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) was not achieved in the 2005 study. An expanded second study (in 2006) that included a robust bridge to the 2005 study, with four replicate tanks of eight individual fish per concentration, did not repeat the 2005 findings. In the 2006 study, no significant effect on growth rate, condition, or liver biometry was observed after 21 or 28 d (28-d growth NOEC = 10 µg/L, 28-d condition NOEC = 10 µg/L), contrary to the 2005 findings. We do not dismiss either of these findings and suggest both are relevant and stand for comparison. However, the larger 2006 study carries more statistical power and multiple-tank replication, so probably produced the more robust findings. Despite sufficient statistical power in each study, interpretation of these and similar studies should be conducted with caution, because much significance is placed on the role of limited numbers of individual and tank replicates and the influence of control animals. Copyright © 2010 SETAC.

  2. Who Needs Replication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the editor of a recent Cambridge University Press book on research methods discusses replicating previous key studies to throw more light on their reliability and generalizability. Replication research is presented as an accepted method of validating previous research by providing comparability between the original and replicated…

  3. Decreasing perinatal mortality in the Netherlands, 2000-2006: a record linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Ravelli , Anita C J; Tromp , Miranda; Van Huis , Marian M; Steegers , Eric A P; Tamminga , Pieter; Eskes , Martine; Bonsel , Gouke J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: The European PERISTAT-1 study showed that in 1999 perinatal mortality, especially fetal mortality, was substantially higher in the Netherlands when compared to other European countries. The aim of this study was to analyze the recent trend in Dutch perinatal mortality and the influence of risk factors. Methods: A nationwide retrospective cohort study of 1,246,440 singleton births in 2000-2006 in the Netherlands. The source data were available fro...

  4. Genome-wide linkage scan to identify loci associated with type 2 diabetes and blood lipid phenotypes in the Sikh Diabetes Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharambir K Sanghera

    Full Text Available In this investigation, we have carried out an autosomal genome-wide linkage analysis to map genes associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D and five quantitative traits of blood lipids including total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL cholesterol, and triglycerides in a unique family-based cohort from the Sikh Diabetes Study (SDS. A total of 870 individuals (526 male/344 female from 321 families were successfully genotyped using 398 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 9.26 cM on the autosomes. Results of non-parametric multipoint linkage analysis using S(all statistics (implemented in Merlin did not reveal any chromosomal region to be significantly associated with T2D in this Sikh cohort. However, linkage analysis for lipid traits using QTL-ALL analysis revealed promising linkage signals with p≤0.005 for total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol at chromosomes 5p15, 9q21, 10p11, 10q21, and 22q13. The most significant signal (p = 0.0011 occurred at 10q21.2 for HDL cholesterol. We also observed linkage signals for total cholesterol at 22q13.32 (p = 0.0016 and 5p15.33 (p = 0.0031 and for LDL cholesterol at 10p11.23 (p = 0.0045. Interestingly, some of linkage regions identified in this Sikh population coincide with plausible candidate genes reported in recent genome-wide association and meta-analysis studies for lipid traits. Our study provides the first evidence of linkage for loci associated with quantitative lipid traits at four chromosomal regions in this Asian Indian population from Punjab. More detailed examination of these regions with more informative genotyping, sequencing, and functional studies should lead to rapid detection of novel targets of therapeutic importance.

  5. A genome-wide linkage scan for dietary energy and nutrient intakes: the Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics (HERITAGE) Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collaku, Agron; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rice, Treva; Leon, Arthur S; Rao, D C; Skinner, James S; Wilmore, Jack H; Bouchard, Claude

    2004-05-01

    A poor diet is a risk factor for chronic diseases such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and some cancers. Twin and family studies suggest that genetic factors potentially influence energy and nutrient intakes. We sought to identify genomic regions harboring genes affecting total energy, carbohydrate, protein, and fat intakes. We performed a genomic scan in 347 white sibling pairs and 99 black sibling pairs. Dietary energy and nutrient intakes were assessed by using Willett's food-frequency questionnaire. Single-point and multipoint Haseman-Elston regression techniques were used to test for linkage. These subjects were part of the Health, Risk Factors, Exercise Training, and Genetics (HERITAGE) Family Study, a multicenter project undertaken by 5 laboratories. In the whites, the strongest evidence of linkage appeared for dietary energy and nutrient intakes on chromosomes 1p21.2 (P = 0.0002) and 20q13.13 (P = 0.00007), and that for fat intake appeared on chromosome 12q14.1 (P = 0.0013). The linkage evidence on chromosomes 1 and 20 related to total energy intake rather than to the intake of specific macronutrients. In the blacks, promising linkages for macronutrient intakes occurred on chromosomes 12q23-q24.21, 1q32.1, and 7q11.1. Several potential candidate genes are encoded in and around the linkage regions on chromosomes 1p21.2, 12q14.1, and 20q13.13. These are the first reported human quantitative trait loci for dietary energy and macronutrient intakes. Further study may refine these quantitative trait loci to identify potential candidate genes for energy and specific macronutrient intakes that would be amenable to more detailed molecular studies.

  6. [Transparency and replicability of nursing intervention studies in long-term care: A selective literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gspörer, Irene; Schrems, Berta M

    2018-05-01

    The development and evaluation of interventions in long-term care is time-consuming and expensive due to their complexity. To ensure reproducibility and successful implementation, these interventions must be described and published in a comprehensible and qualitative manner. The aim of this study is to analyze intervention studies from the inpatient long-term care setting with regard to their completeness, reporting quality, transparency and thus reproducibility. The completeness and the reporting quality of the interventions described in the publications were examined in the context of a selective literature review by means of intervention studies from the long-term care setting (n=22). To this end, the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist and the Criteria for Reporting the Development and Evaluation of Complex Interventions in Healthcare 2 (CReDECI2-DE) list were used. Transparency criteria included study registration and access to study protocols. The TIDieR checklist examination revealed that only three studies contained all the information necessary; the CReDECI2 test provided a complete description for only one study. Frequent shortcomings were observed concerning the information on modifications and titrations for the study participants and the location. Protocols were available for eight studies, 14 studies were registered. In terms of science, this means that the reproducibility of scientific findings is limited, which is why they cannot provide secure knowledge. As a result, the practical benefit to be derived from published studies that are accessible to decision-makers is limited as well. As far as publishers are concerned they should pay more attention to the completeness, registration and availability of materials. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  7. New Methods to Address Old Challenges: The Use of Administrative Data for Longitudinal Replication Studies of Child Maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurren, Emily; Stewart, Anna; Dennison, Susan

    2017-09-15

    Administrative data are crucial to the "big data" revolution of social science and have played an important role in the development of child maltreatment research. These data are also of value to administrators, policy makers, and clinicians. The focus of this paper is the use of administrative data to produce and replicate longitudinal studies of child maltreatment. Child protection administrative data have several advantages. They are often population-based, and allow longitudinal examination of child maltreatment and complex multi-level analyses. They also allow comparison across subgroups and minority groups, remove burden from individuals to disclose traumatic experiences, and can be less biased than retrospective recall. Finally, they can be linked to data from other agencies to explore comorbidity and outcomes, and are comparatively cost and time effective. The benefits and challenges associated with the use of administrative data for longitudinal child maltreatment research become magnified when these data are used to produce replications. Techniques to address challenges and support future replication efforts include developing a biographical understanding of the systems from which the data are drawn, using multiple data sources to contextualize the data and research results, recognizing and adopting various approaches to replication, and documenting all data coding and manipulation processes. These techniques are illustrated in this paper via a case study of previous replication work.

  8. Pervasive influence of maternal and paternal criminal offending on early childhood development: a population data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurens, K R; Tzoumakis, S; Kariuki, M; Green, M J; Hamde, M; Harris, F; Carr, V J; Dean, K

    2017-04-01

    Parental criminal offending is an established risk factor for offending among offspring, but little evidence is available indicating the impact of offending on early childhood functioning. We used data from a large Australian population cohort to determine associations between exposure to parental offending and a range of developmental outcomes at age 5 years. Multi-generation data in 66 477 children and their parents from the New South Wales Child Development Study were combined using data linkage. Logistic and multinomial regressions tested associations between any and violent offending histories of parents (fathers, mothers, or both parents) obtained from official records, and multiple measures of early childhood developmental functioning (social, emotional-behavioural, cognitive, communication and physical domains) obtained from the teacher-reported 2009 Australian Early Development Census. Parental offending conferred significantly increased risk of vulnerability on all domains, particularly the cognitive domain. Greater risk magnitudes were observed for offending by both parents and by mothers than by fathers, and for violent than for any offending. For all parental offending exposures, vulnerability on multiple domains (where medium to large effects were observed) was more likely than on a single domain (small to medium effects). Relationships remained significant and of comparable magnitude following adjustment for sociodemographic covariates. The effect of parental offending on early childhood developmental outcomes is pervasive, with the strongest effects on functioning apparent when both parents engage in violent offending. Supporting affected families in early childhood might mitigate both early developmental vulnerability and the propensity for later delinquency among these offspring.

  9. Parenting self-efficacy moderates linkage between partner relationship dissatisfaction and avoidant infant-mother attachment: A Dutch study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassé, Julie F H; Oosterman, Mirjam; Schuengel, Carlo

    2016-12-01

    The early infant-mother attachment relationship is part of a network of close relationships in which the relationship between parents is especially relevant. Evidence for linkages between maternal satisfaction with the partner relationship and infant-mother attachment is equivocal. The current study tested whether associations between partner relationship dissatisfaction and infant-mother attachment quality might be conditional on mothers' parenting self-efficacy. The bivariate effect of partner relationship dissatisfaction on infant-mother attachment as well as moderation of this effect by parenting self-efficacy was tested in a sample of 260 infant-mother dyads 1 year after birth. There was no direct effect of partner dissatisfaction on attachment. Unexpectedly, for high parenting self-efficacy, greater partner dissatisfaction increased the odds of an avoidant infant attachment (compared with a disorganized) whereas, for low parenting self-efficacy, greater partner dissatisfaction decreased the odds of an avoidant infant attachment (compared with secure and disorganized). Findings underline the importance of parenting cognitions for understanding contextual factors of infant-mother attachment quality. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Improving the detection of pathways in genome-wide association studies by combined effects of SNPs from Linkage Disequilibrium blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Nyholt, Dale R; Yang, Yuanhao; Wang, Jihua; Yang, Yuedong

    2017-06-14

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified single variants associated with diseases. To increase the power of GWAS, gene-based and pathway-based tests are commonly employed to detect more risk factors. However, the gene- and pathway-based association tests may be biased towards genes or pathways containing a large number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with small P-values caused by high linkage disequilibrium (LD) correlations. To address such bias, numerous pathway-based methods have been developed. Here we propose a novel method, DGAT-path, to divide all SNPs assigned to genes in each pathway into LD blocks, and to sum the chi-square statistics of LD blocks for assessing the significance of the pathway by permutation tests. The method was proven robust with the type I error rate >1.6 times lower than other methods. Meanwhile, the method displays a higher power and is not biased by the pathway size. The applications to the GWAS summary statistics for schizophrenia and breast cancer indicate that the detected top pathways contain more genes close to associated SNPs than other methods. As a result, the method identified 17 and 12 significant pathways containing 20 and 21 novel associated genes, respectively for two diseases. The method is available online by http://sparks-lab.org/server/DGAT-path .

  11. Challenges in administrative data linkage for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Harron

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Linkage of population-based administrative data is a valuable tool for combining detailed individual-level information from different sources for research. While not a substitute for classical studies based on primary data collection, analyses of linked administrative data can answer questions that require large sample sizes or detailed data on hard-to-reach populations, and generate evidence with a high level of external validity and applicability for policy making. There are unique challenges in the appropriate research use of linked administrative data, for example with respect to bias from linkage errors where records cannot be linked or are linked together incorrectly. For confidentiality and other reasons, the separation of data linkage processes and analysis of linked data is generally regarded as best practice. However, the ‘black box’ of data linkage can make it difficult for researchers to judge the reliability of the resulting linked data for their required purposes. This article aims to provide an overview of challenges in linking administrative data for research. We aim to increase understanding of the implications of (i the data linkage environment and privacy preservation; (ii the linkage process itself (including data preparation, and deterministic and probabilistic linkage methods and (iii linkage quality and potential bias in linked data. We draw on examples from a number of countries to illustrate a range of approaches for data linkage in different contexts.

  12. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers: A summary of the record linkage study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, G.J. [University of Oxford (United Kingdom). Childhood Cancer Research Group; Little, M.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Sorahan, T. [Birmingham University (United Kingdom). Inst. of Occupational Health] [and others

    1997-12-01

    A national study has been conducted to test the Gardner hypothesis`, that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and, more generally, to investigate whether preconception radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. (UK).

  13. Suicide risk in relation to level of urbanicity - a population-based linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The extent to which the high suicide rate in urban areas is influenced by exposures to risk factors for suicide other than urbanicity remains unknown. This population-based study aims to investigate suicide risk in relation to the level of urbanicity in the context of other factors...

  14. Knowledge linkage structures in communication studies using citation analysis among communication journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, H.W.; Leydesdorff, L.

    2009-01-01

    This research analyzes a "who cites whom" matrix in terms of aggregated journal-journal citations to determine the location of communication studies on the academic spectrum. Using the Journal of Communication as the seed journal, the 2006 data in the Journal Citation Reports are used to map

  15. The Utility of EEG in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swatzyna, Ronald J; Tarnow, Jay D; Roark, Alexandra; Mardick, Jacob

    2017-07-01

    The routine use of stimulants in pediatrics has increased dramatically over the past 3 decades and the long-term consequences have yet to be fully studied. Since 1978 there have been 7 articles identifying electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities, particularly epileptiform discharges in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Many have studied the prevalence of these discharges in this population with varying results. An article published in 2011 suggests that EEG technology should be considered prior to prescribing stimulants to children diagnosed with ADHD due to a high prevalence of epileptiform discharges. The 2011 study found a higher prevalence (26%) of epileptiform discharges when using 23-hour and sleep-deprived EEGs in comparison with other methods of activation (hyperventilation or photostimulation) and conventional EEG. We sought to replicate the 2011 results using conventional EEG with the added qEEG technologies of automatic spike detection and low-resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis (LORETA) brain mapping. Our results showed 32% prevalence of epileptiform discharges, which suggests that an EEG should be considered prior to prescribing stimulant medications.

  16. One for all and all for One: Improving replication of genetic studies through network diffusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lancour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Improving accuracy in genetic studies would greatly accelerate understanding the genetic basis of complex diseases. One approach to achieve such an improvement for risk variants identified by the genome wide association study (GWAS approach is to incorporate previously known biology when screening variants across the genome. We developed a simple approach for improving the prioritization of candidate disease genes that incorporates a network diffusion of scores from known disease genes using a protein network and a novel integration with GWAS risk scores, and tested this approach on a large Alzheimer disease (AD GWAS dataset. Using a statistical bootstrap approach, we cross-validated the method and for the first time showed that a network approach improves the expected replication rates in GWAS studies. Several novel AD genes were predicted including CR2, SHARPIN, and PTPN2. Our re-prioritized results are enriched for established known AD-associated biological pathways including inflammation, immune response, and metabolism, whereas standard non-prioritized results were not. Our findings support a strategy of considering network information when investigating genetic risk factors.

  17. Career in mental health still an unlikely career choice for nursing graduates: a replicated longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, John; Browne, Graeme; Graham, Iain

    2013-06-01

    The lack of qualified mental health nurses is at critical level with the problem likely to worsen as the aging mental health nursing workforce retires. This study investigates the career preferences of undergraduate nursing students by comparing preferences at the start, middle, and end of the Bachelor of Nursing program. The comparison of the cohorts gave an indication of the change in preferences over the intervening years. It replicates research completed in 1992, 1997, and 2001, and develops a profile of nursing career preferences and the rationale underpinning those preferences in a cohort of students (n = 150) who began their Bachelor of Nursing studies in 2007 and completed in 2009. The main findings included that, like the previous studies, mental health nursing is one of the least desirable career choices for most nurses at the start of their course and remains so as they approach graduation. The reasons change but the outcome remains the same. The current system of using the Bachelor of Nursing award to produce mental health nurses in Australia does not encourage nurses to consider a career in mental health nursing. Which begs the question: where will mental health nurses in the future come from? © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasan, Senthil K; Rostgaard, Klaus; Ullum, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    ,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors......BACKGROUND: Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined...... the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail. METHODS: We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient...

  19. Suicide risk in relation to level of urbanicity - a population-based linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Ping

    2005-01-01

    from various Danish longitudinal registers. Data were analysed with conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: This study confirms that people living in more urbanized areas are at a higher risk of suicide than their counterparts in less urbanized areas. However, this excess risk is largely eliminated...... when adjusted for personal marital, income, and ethnic differences; it is even reversed when further adjusted for psychiatric status. Moreover, the impact of urbanicity on suicide risk differs significantly by sex and across age. Urban living reduces suicide risk significantly among men, especially......BACKGROUND: The extent to which the high suicide rate in urban areas is influenced by exposures to risk factors for suicide other than urbanicity remains unknown. This population-based study aims to investigate suicide risk in relation to the level of urbanicity in the context of other factors...

  20. End-stage renal disease and survival in people with diabetes: a national database linkage study

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S.; Fletcher, E.H.; Brady, I.; Looker, H.C.; Levin, D.; Joss, N.; Traynor, J.P.; Metcalfe, W.; Conway, B.; Livingstone, S.; Leese, G.; Philip, S.; Wild, S.; Halbesma, N.; Sattar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Increasing prevalence of diabetes worldwide is projected to lead to an increase in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT).Aim: To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of ESRD and requirement for RRT among people with diabetes in a nationwide study and to report associated survival.Methods: Data were extracted and linked from three national databases: Scottish Renal Registry, Scottish Care Initiative-Diabetes Collaboration...

  1. Long working hours and use of psychotropic medicine: a follow-up study with register linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannerz, Harald; Albertsen, Karen

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possibility of a prospective association between long working hours and use of psychotropic medicine. Survey data drawn from random samples of the general working population of Denmark in the time period 1995-2010 were linked to national registers covering all inhabitants. The participants were followed for first occurrence of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine. The primary analysis included 25,959 observations (19,259 persons) and yielded a total of 2914 new cases of psychotropic drug use in 99,018 person-years at risk. Poisson regression was used to model incidence rates of redeemed prescriptions for psychotropic medicine as a function of working hours (32-40, 41-48, >48 hours/week). The analysis was controlled for gender, age, sample, shift work, and socioeconomic status. A likelihood ratio test was used to test the null hypothesis, which stated that the incidence rates were independent of weekly working hours. The likelihood ratio test did not reject the null hypothesis (P=0.085). The rate ratio (RR) was 1.04 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.94-1.15] for the contrast 41-48 versus 32-40 work hours/week and 1.15 (95% CI 1.02-1.30) for >48 versus 32-40 hours/week. None of the rate ratios that were estimated in the present study were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple testing. However, stratified analyses, in which 30 RR were estimated, generated the hypothesis that overtime work (>48 hours/week) might be associated with an increased risk among night or shift workers (RR=1.51, 95% CI 1.15-1.98). The present study did not find a statistically significant association between long working hours and incidence of psychotropic drug usage among Danish employees.

  2. Congenital anomalies in children with cerebral palsy: a population-based record linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rankin, Judith; Cans, Christine; Garne, Ester

    2009-01-01

    Aim Our aim was to determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have a congenital anomaly (CA) in three regions (Isère Region, French Alps; Funen County, Denmark; Northern Region, England) where population-based CP and CA registries exist, and to classify the children according...... to CA subtype. Method Data for children born between 1991 and 1999 were linked using electronic matching of cases. All potential matches were checked manually by each centre and verified as true matches. Results A total of 1104 children with CP were born during the study period (663 males, 441 females...

  3. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers - a record linkage study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draper, G.J. [Childhood Cancer Research Group, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Little, M.P. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Sorahan, T. [Institute of Occupational Health, University of Birmingham (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The objectives of this study were to test the `Gardner hypothesis` that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and more generally, to investigate whether such radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. This was a case-control study, conducted in Great Britain, that involved 35,949 children diagnosed as having cancer, together with matched controls. Examination was made of: parental employment as radiation worker as defined by inclusion in the National Registry for Radiation Workers and being monitored for external radiation before conception of child; cumulative dose of external ionising radiation for various periods of employment before conception; pregnancy dose. It is concluded that the results do not support the hypothesis that paternal preconception irradiation is a cause of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the observed associations may be chance or result from exposure to infective or other agents. If there is any increased risk for the children of fathers who are radiation workers it is small in absolute terms: in Britain the average risk by age 15 years is 6.5 per 10,000; our best estimate, using all available data, is that the increase is 5.4 per 10,000. For mothers, the numbers are too small for reliable estimates of the risk, if any, to be made. (author).

  4. Cancer in the offspring of radiation workers - a record linkage study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, G.J.; Little, M.P.; Sorahan, T.

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to test the 'Gardner hypothesis' that childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma can be caused by paternal exposure to ionising radiation before the conception of the child, and more generally, to investigate whether such radiation exposure of either parent is a cause of childhood cancer. This was a case-control study, conducted in Great Britain, that involved 35,949 children diagnosed as having cancer, together with matched controls. Examination was made of: parental employment as radiation worker as defined by inclusion in the National Registry for Radiation Workers and being monitored for external radiation before conception of child; cumulative dose of external ionising radiation for various periods of employment before conception; pregnancy dose. It is concluded that the results do not support the hypothesis that paternal preconception irradiation is a cause of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; the observed associations may be chance or result from exposure to infective or other agents. If there is any increased risk for the children of fathers who are radiation workers it is small in absolute terms: in Britain the average risk by age 15 years is 6.5 per 10,000; our best estimate, using all available data, is that the increase is 5.4 per 10,000. For mothers, the numbers are too small for reliable estimates of the risk, if any, to be made. (author)

  5. From linkage studies to epigenetics: what we know and what we need to know in the neurobiology of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel eCariaga-Martinez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex psychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of positive, negative and cognitive symptoms that lacks a unifying neuropathology. In the present paper, we will review the current understanding of molecular dysregulation in schizophrenia, including genetic and epigenetic studies. In relation to the latter, basic research suggests that normal cognition is regulated by epigenetic mechanisms and its dysfunction occurs upon epigenetic misregulation, providing new insights into missing heritability of complex psychiatric diseases, referring to the discrepancy between epidemiological heritability and the proportion of phenotypic variation explained by DNA sequence difference. In schizophrenia the absence of consistently replicated genetic effects together with evidence for lasting changes in gene expression after environmental exposures suggest a role of epigenetic mechanisms. In this review we will focus on epigenetic modifications as a key mechanism through which environmental factors interact with individual's genetic constitution to affect risk of psychotic conditions throughout life.

  6. Mortality following Stroke, the Weekend Effect and Related Factors: Record Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Roberts

    Full Text Available Increased mortality following hospitalisation for stroke has been reported from many but not all studies that have investigated a 'weekend effect' for stroke. However, it is not known whether the weekend effect is affected by factors including hospital size, season and patient distance from hospital.To assess changes over time in mortality following hospitalisation for stroke and how any increased mortality for admissions on weekends is related to factors including the size of the hospital, seasonal factors and distance from hospital.A population study using person linked inpatient, mortality and primary care data for stroke from 2004 to 2012. The outcome measures were, firstly, mortality at seven days and secondly, mortality at 30 days and one year.Overall mortality for 37 888 people hospitalised following stroke was 11.6% at seven days, 21.4% at 30 days and 37.7% at one year. Mortality at seven and 30 days fell significantly by 1.7% and 3.1% per annum respectively from 2004 to 2012. When compared with week days, mortality at seven days was increased significantly by 19% for admissions on weekends, although the admission rate was 21% lower on weekends. Although not significant, there were indications of increased mortality at seven days for weekend admissions during winter months (31%, in community (81% rather than large hospitals (8% and for patients resident furthest from hospital (32% for distances of >20 kilometres. The weekend effect was significantly increased (by 39% for strokes of 'unspecified' subtype.Mortality following stroke has fallen over time. Mortality was increased for admissions at weekends, when compared with normal week days, but may be influenced by a higher stroke severity threshold for admission on weekends. Other than for unspecified strokes, we found no significant variation in the weekend effect for hospital size, season and distance from hospital.

  7. ABO Blood Group and Dementia Risk--A Scandinavian Record-Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil K Vasan

    Full Text Available Dementia includes a group of neuro-degenerative disorders characterized by varying degrees of cognitive impairment. Recent data indicates that blood group AB is associated with impaired cognition in elderly patients. To date there are no large-scale studies that have examined the relationship between ABO blood group and dementia-related disorders in detail.We used data from the SCANDAT2 database that contains information on over 1.6 million blood donors from 1968 in Sweden and 1981 from Denmark. The database was linked with health outcomes data from nationwide patient and cause of death registers to investigate the relationship between blood groups and risk of different types of dementia. The incident rate ratios were estimated using log-linear Poisson regression models.Among 1,598,294 donors followed over 24 million person-years of observation we ascertained 3,615 cases of Alzheimer's disease, 1,842 cases of vascular dementia, and 9,091 cases of unspecified dementia. Overall, our study showed no association between ABO blood group and risk of Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia or unspecified dementia. This was also true when analyses were restricted to donors aged 70 years or older except for a slight, but significantly decreased risk of all dementia combined in subjects with blood group A (IRR, 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.88-0.98, compared to those with blood group O.Our results provide no evidence that ABO blood group influences the risk of dementia.

  8. Ethnic variations in five lower gastrointestinal diseases: Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopal, Raj S; Cezard, Genevieve; Bansal, Narinder; Ward, Hester J T; Bhala, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to augment the limited evidence mainly from local, clinical studies of ethnic differences in gastrointestinal disorders. Our question was: are there ethnic variations in hospitalisation/death for lower gastrointestinal disorders in Scotland? Setting Scotland. Population This retrospective-cohort linked 4.65 (of 4.9) million people in the 2001 census of Scotland (providing data on ethnicity, country of birth and indicators of socioeconomic deprivation) to 9 years of National Health Service hospitalisation and death records. Primary and secondary outcome measures and analysis For appendicitis, we studied all ages; for irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease and diverticular disease, we included those ≥20 years. Using Poisson regression (robust variance) we calculated, by ethnic group and sex, first-hospitalisation/death age-adjusted rates per 100 000 person-years, and relative risks (RRs) with 95% CIs multiplied by 100, so the White Scottish reference population had an RR=100. Results There were ethnic variations; for example, for irritable bowel syndrome, RRs (95% CIs) were comparatively high in Other White British women (128.4 (111.0 to 148.6)), and low in Pakistani women (75.1 (60.6 to 93.1)). For appendicitis, RRs were high in men in Other White British (145.2 (127.8 to 164.9)), and low in most non-White groups, for example, Pakistanis (73.8 (56.9 to 95.6)). For ulcerative colitis, RRs were high in Indian (169.8 (109.7 to 262.7)) and Pakistani (160.8 (104.2 to 248.2)) men. For Crohn's disease, the RR was high in Pakistani men (209.2 (149.6 to 292.6)). For diverticular disease, RRs were high in Irish men (176.0 (156.9 to 197.5)), and any Mixed background women (144.6 (107.4 to 194.8)), and low in most non-White groups, for example, Chinese men (47.1 (31.0 to 71.6) and women (46.0 (30.4 to 69.8)). Conclusions Appendicitis and diverticular disease were comparatively low in most non-White groups, while

  9. Cigarette smoking and tooth loss experience among young adults: a national record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Keiko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors affect tooth loss in older age including cigarette smoking; however, evidence regarding the association between smoking and tooth loss during young adulthood is limited. The present study examined the association between cigarette smoking and tooth loss experience among adults aged 20–39 years using linked data from two national databases in Japan. Methods Two databases of the National Nutrition Survey (NNS and the Survey of Dental Diseases (SDD, which were conducted in 1999, were obtained from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare with permission for analytical use. In the NNS, participants received physical examinations and were interviewed regarding dietary intake and health practices including cigarette smoking, whereas in the SDD, participants were asked about their frequency of daily brushing, and received oral examinations by certified dentists. Among 6,805 records electronically linked via household identification code, 1314 records of individuals aged 20 to 39 years were analyzed. The prevalence of 1+ tooth loss was compared among non-, former, and current smokers. Multiple logistic regression models were constructed including confounders: frequency of tooth brushing, body mass index, alcohol consumption, and intake of vitamins C and E. Results Smoking rates differed greatly in men (53.3% and women (15.5%. The overall prevalence of tooth loss was 31.4% (31.8% men and 31.1% women. Tooth loss occurred more frequently among current smokers (40.6% than former (23.1% and non-smokers (27.9%. Current smoking showed a significant association with 1+ tooth loss in men (adjusted OR = 2.21 [1.40–3.50], P = 0.0007 and women (1.70 [1.13–2.55], P = 0.0111. A significant positive exposure-related relationship between cigarette smoking status and tooth loss was observed (P for trend Conclusion An association between cigarette smoking and tooth loss was evident among young adults throughout Japan. Due to

  10. Myocardial infarction incidence and survival by ethnic group: Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narinder; Fischbacher, Colin M; Bhopal, Raj S; Brown, Helen; Steiner, Markus Fc; Capewell, Simon

    2013-09-13

    Inequalities in coronary heart disease mortality by country of birth are large and poorly understood. However, these data misclassify UK-born minority ethnic groups and provide little detail on whether excess risk is due to increased incidence, poorer survival or both. Retrospective cohort study. General resident population of Scotland. All those residing in Scotland during the 2001 Census were eligible for inclusion: 2 972 120 people were included in the analysis. The number still residing in Scotland at the end of the study in 2008 is not known. As specified in the analysis plan, the primary outcome measures were first occurrence of admission or death due to myocardial infarction and time to event. There were no secondary outcome measures. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) incidence risk ratios (95% CIs) relative to white Scottish populations (100) were highest among Pakistani men (164.1 (142.2 to 189.2)) and women (153.7 (120.5, 196.1)) and lowest for men and women of Chinese (39.5 (27.1 to 57.6) and 59.1 (38.6 to 90.7)), other white British (77 (74.2 to 79.8) and 72.2 (69.0 to 75.5)) and other white (83.1 (75.9 to 91.0) and 79.9 (71.5 to 89.3)) ethnic groups. Adjustment for educational qualification did not eliminate these differences. Cardiac intervention uptake was similar across most ethnic groups. Compared to white Scottish, 28-day survival did not differ by ethnicity, except in Pakistanis where it was better, particularly in women (0.44 (0.25 to 0.78)), a difference not removed by adjustment for education, travel time to hospital or cardiac intervention uptake. Pakistanis have the highest incidence of AMI in Scotland, a country renowned for internationally high cardiovascular disease rates. In contrast, survival is similar or better in minority ethnic groups. Clinical care and policy should focus on reducing incidence among Pakistanis through more aggressive prevention.

  11. Use of acute care hospital services by immigrant seniors in Ontario: A linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Edward; Sanmartin, Claudia; Tu, Jack; Manuel, Doug

    2014-10-01

    Seniors constitute the largest group of hospital users. The increasing share of immigrants in Canada's senior population can affect the demand for hospital care. This study used the linked 2006 Census-Hospital Discharge Abstract Database to examine hospitalization during the 2004-to-2006 period, by immigrant status, of Ontario seniors living in the community. Hospitalization was assessed with logistic regressions; cumulative length of stay, with zero-truncated negative binomial regressions. All-cause hospitalization and hospitalizations specific to circulatory and digestive diseases were examined. Immigrant seniors had significantly low age-/sex-adjusted odds of hospitalization, compared with Canadian-born seniors (OR = 0.81). The odds varied from 0.4 among East Asians to 0.89 among Europeans, and rose with length of time since arrival from 0.54 for recent (1994 to 2003) to 0.86 for long-term (before 1984) immigrants. Adjustment for demographic and socio-economic characteristics did not change the overall patterns. Immigrants' cumulated length of hospital stay tended to be shorter than or similar to that of Canadian-born seniors. Immigrant seniors, especially recent arrivals, had lower odds of hospitalization and similar time in hospital, compared with Canadian-born seniors. These patterns likely reflect differences in health status. Variations by world region and disease reflect the diverse health care needs of immigrant seniors.

  12. Clostridium difficile Infections amongst Patients with Haematological Malignancies: A Data Linkage Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda A Selvey

    Full Text Available Identify risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI and assess CDI outcomes among Australian patients with a haematological malignancy.A retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to hospitals in Western Australia with a haematological malignancy from July 2011 to June 2012. Hospital admission data were linked with all hospital investigated CDI case data. Potential risk factors were assessed by logistic regression. The risk of death within 60 and 90 days of CDI was assessed by Cox Proportional Hazards regression.There were 2085 patients of whom 65 had at least one CDI. Twenty percent of CDI cases were either community-acquired, indeterminate source or had only single-day admissions in the 28 days prior to CDI. Using logistic regression, having acute lymphocytic leukaemia, neutropenia and having had bacterial pneumonia or another bacterial infection were associated with CDI. CDI was associated with an increased risk of death within 60 and 90 days post CDI, but only two deaths had CDI recorded as an antecedent factor. Ribotyping information was available for 33 of the 65 CDIs. There were 19 different ribotypes identified.Neutropenia was strongly associated with CDI. While having CDI is a risk factor for death, in many cases it may not be a direct contributor to death but may reflect patients having higher morbidity. A wide variety of C. difficile ribotypes were found and community-acquired infection may be under-estimated in these patients.

  13. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy from a 14-year follow-up study using data linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudie, Jennifer; Mitrou, Francis; Lawrence, David; Stanley, Fiona J; Silburn, Sven R; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2010-02-11

    Many western nations continue to have high rates of teenage pregnancies and births, which can result in adverse outcomes for both mother and child. This study identified possible antecedents of teenage pregnancy using linked data from administrative sources to create a 14-year follow-up from a cross-sectional survey. Data were drawn from two sources - the 1993 Western Australian Child Health Survey (WACHS), a population-based representative sample of 2,736 children aged 4 to 16 years (1,374 girls); and administrative data relating to all their subsequent births and hospital admissions. We used weighted population estimates to examine differences between rates for teenage pregnancy, motherhood and abortion. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model risk for teenage pregnancy. There were 155 girls aged less than 20 years at the time of their first recorded pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy was significantly associated with: family type; highest school year completed by primary carer; combined carer income; whether the primary carer was a smoker; and whether the girl herself displayed aggressive and delinquent behaviours. An age-interaction analysis on the association with aggressive and delinquent behaviours found that while girls with aggressive and delinquent behaviours who were older at the time of the survey were at highest risk of teenage pregnancy, there was elevated risk for future teenage pregnancy across all ages. Our findings suggest that interventions to reduce teenage pregnancy rates could be introduced during primary school years, including those that are focused on the prevention and management of aggressive and delinquent behaviour.

  14. Childhood Health and Educational Outcomes Associated With Maternal Sleep Apnea: A Population Record-Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Yu Sun; Cistulli, Peter A; Roberts, Christine L; Ford, Jane B

    2017-11-01

    Sleep apnea in pregnancy is known to adversely affect birth outcomes. Whether in utero exposure to maternal sleep apnea is associated with long-term childhood consequences is unclear. Population-based longitudinal study of singleton infants born during 2002-2012 was conducted using linked birth, hospital, death, developmental, and educational records from New South Wales, Australia. Maternal sleep apnea during pregnancy was identified from hospital records. Outcomes were mortality and hospitalizations up to age 6, developmental vulnerability in the first year of school (aged 5-6 years), and performance on standardized tests in the third year of school (aged 7-9 years). Cox proportional hazards and modified Poisson regression models were used to calculate hazard and risk ratios for outcomes in children exposed to maternal apnea compared with those not exposed. Two hundred nine of 626188 singleton infants were exposed to maternal sleep apnea. Maternal apnea was not significantly associated with mortality (Fisher's exact p = .48), developmental vulnerability (adjusted RR 1.29; 95% CI 0.75-2.21), special needs status (1.58; 0.61-4.07), or low numeracy test scores (1.03; 0.63-1.67) but was associated with low reading test scores (1.55; 1.08-2.23). Maternal apnea significantly increased hospitalizations in the first year of life (adjusted HR 1.81; 95% CI 1.40-2.34) and between the first and sixth birthdays (1.41; 1.14-1.75). This is partly due to admissions for suspected pediatric sleep apnea. Maternal sleep apnea during pregnancy is associated with poorer childhood health. Its impact on developmental and cognitive outcomes warrants further investigation. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy from a 14-year follow-up study using data linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Fiona J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many western nations continue to have high rates of teenage pregnancies and births, which can result in adverse outcomes for both mother and child. This study identified possible antecedents of teenage pregnancy using linked data from administrative sources to create a 14-year follow-up from a cross-sectional survey. Methods Data were drawn from two sources - the 1993 Western Australian Child Health Survey (WACHS, a population-based representative sample of 2,736 children aged 4 to 16 years (1,374 girls; and administrative data relating to all their subsequent births and hospital admissions. We used weighted population estimates to examine differences between rates for teenage pregnancy, motherhood and abortion. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to model risk for teenage pregnancy. Results There were 155 girls aged less than 20 years at the time of their first recorded pregnancy. Teenage pregnancy was significantly associated with: family type; highest school year completed by primary carer; combined carer income; whether the primary carer was a smoker; and whether the girl herself displayed aggressive and delinquent behaviours. An age-interaction analysis on the association with aggressive and delinquent behaviours found that while girls with aggressive and delinquent behaviours who were older at the time of the survey were at highest risk of teenage pregnancy, there was elevated risk for future teenage pregnancy across all ages. Conclusions Our findings suggest that interventions to reduce teenage pregnancy rates could be introduced during primary school years, including those that are focused on the prevention and management of aggressive and delinquent behaviour.

  16. Workplace bullying and subsequent psychotropic medication: a cohort study with register linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, Tea; Haukka, Jari; Partonen, Timo; Rahkonen, Ossi; Lahelma, Eero

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine longitudinally whether workplace bullying was associated with subsequent psychotropic medication among women and men. Design A cohort study. Setting Helsinki, Finland. Participants Employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland (n=6606, 80% women), 40–60 years at baseline in 2000–2002, and a register-based follow-up on medication. Primary and secondary outcome measures Workplace bullying comprised questions about current and earlier bullying as well as observing bullying. The Finnish Social Insurance Institution's register data on purchases of prescribed reimbursed psychotropic medication were linked with the survey data. All psychotropic medication 3 years prior to and 5 years after the baseline survey was included. Covariates included age, prior psychotropic medication, childhood bullying, occupational class, and body mass index. Cox proportional hazard models (HR, 95% CI) were fitted and days until the first purchase of prescribed psychotropic medication after baseline were used as the time axis. Results Workplace bullying was associated with subsequent psychotropic medication after adjusting for age and prior medication among both women (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.93) and men (HR 2.15, 95% CI 1.36 to 3.41). Also observing bullying was associated with subsequent psychotropic medication among women (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.88) and men (HR 1.92, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.99). The associations only modestly attenuated after full adjustment. Conclusions Our findings highlight the significance of workplace bullying to subsequent psychotropic medication reflecting medically confirmed mental problems. Tackling workplace bullying likely helps prevent mental problems among employees. PMID:23242240

  17. Working conditions as risk factors for disability retirement: a longitudinal register linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Early retirement due to disability is a public health and work environment problem that shortens working careers. Transition to disability retirement is based on ill-health, but working conditions are also of relevance. We examined the contributions of work arrangements, physical working conditions and psychosocial working conditions to subsequent disability retirement. Methods The data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland. Information on working conditions was obtained from the baseline surveys conducted in 2000, 2001 and 2002. These data were linked with register data on disability retirement and their main diagnoses obtained from the Finnish Centre for Pensions. Follow up by the end of 2008 yielded 525 disability retirement events. The analysed data included 6525 participants and 525 disability retirement events. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated from Cox regression analysis. Results Several working conditions showed own associations with disability retirement before adjustment. After adjustment for all working conditions, the primary risk factors for all-cause disability retirement were physical workload among women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.57-2.59) and men (HR 2.00, 95% CI 1.18-3.38), and low job control among women (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.29-1.99). In addition, for disability retirement due to musculoskeletal causes, the risk factors were physical workload and low job control. For disability retirement due to mental causes the risk factors were computer work and low job control. Furthermore, occupational class was a risk factor for disability retirement due to all causes and musculoskeletal diseases. Conclusions Among various working conditions, those that are physically demanding and those that imply low job control are potential risk factors for disability retirement. Improving the physical working environment and enhancing control over one’s job is likely

  18. Cervical and breast cancer screening uptake among women with serious mental illness: a data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Charlotte; Cunningham, Ruth; Ashworth, Mark; Barley, Elizabeth; Stewart, Robert J; Henderson, Max J

    2016-10-21

    Breast and cancer screening uptake has been found to be lower among women with serious mental illness (SMI). This study aims to corroborate these findings in the UK and to identify variation in screening uptake by illness/treatment factors, and primary care consultation frequency. Linked population-based primary and secondary care data from the London borough of Lambeth (UK) were used to compare breast and cervical screening receipt among linked eligible SMI patients (n = 625 and n = 1393), to those without SMI known only to primary care (n = 106,554 and n = 25,385) using logistic regression models adjusted first for socio-demographic factors and second, additionally for primary care consultation frequency. Eligible SMI patients were less likely to have received breast (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.69, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.57 - 0.84, p screening (adjusted OR 0.72, CI: 0.60 - 0.85, p breast (adjusted ORs 0.46 to 0.59, all p screening (adjusted ORs 0.48 - 0.65, all p screening. Women with SMI are less likely to receive breast and cervical cancer screening than comparable women without SMI. Higher primary care consultation rates among SMI patients is likely a mediating factor between SMI status and uptake, particularly for cervical screening - a service organised in primary care. To tackle health disparities linked to SMI, efforts at increasing screening uptake are key and should be targeted at women with other markers of illness severity or risk, beyond SMI status alone.

  19. Design, characterization and use of replicate human upper airways for radon dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, D.L.; Cheng, Y.S.; Su, Y.F.; Yeh, H.C.

    1992-01-01

    The size distribution of inhaled radon progeny aerosols is a significant factor in dosimetry. The role of the airways above the trachea is an important determinant of the respiratory distribution of both attached and unattached progeny aerosols. In order to provide information on the effect of particle size and breathing conditions on the overall and local deposition, we have developed a method to produce a replicate airway model from an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging coronal scan. The model consists of a sandwich of methacrylate elements, each element having the thickness of the scan interval. The transition between successive scan outlines traced on the front and back surfaces of each element is handsculpted in the plastic. The hollow model of the nasal passages thus produced has been characterized both morphologically and fluid-mechanically and has a flow resistance typical of a normal adult. The model has several distinct advantages for studies of radon progeny aerosol deposition. After exposure to a radioaerosol (or to an aerosol of an otherwise measurable substance) the individual elements can be separated to determine local deposition. The dimensions of specific upper-airway regions can be changed by replacing a small number of elements. The model has been incorporated in an exposure system for determining overall nandregional deposition of aerosols whose median diameter is approximately 1.7 nm. Measurements at several flow rates are presented to demonstrate use of the model in radon dosimetry. The model should also be useful for determining the airway deposition of other environmental aerosols

  20. Replicable personality types in childhood and adolescence: A Slovenian cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Zupančič

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored individual constellations of five personality dimensions (personality types and their internal replicability with a sample of 4- to 14-year-olds (N = 1341. Employing an age- and culture-decentered assessment tool the target participants were rated by their mothers and the procedure by Asendorpf et al. (2001 was followed to derive personality types. Several cluster solutions were investigated with the one representing four personality types appearing the most interpretable. The average type included individuals (26% expressing mean levels of conscientiousness, extraversion, openness/intellect, and neuroticism, and a relatively high level of agreeableness. The reserved children/adolescents (35 % scored below-average in openess/intellect, relatively low in conscientiousness and extraversion, and they were rated relatively high for neuroticism. The wilful participants (30 % were high in openness/intelect and within the average range they appeared relatively extraverted and disagreeable. The resilient type turned out to be the least capacious as it captured extremly conscientious, extraverted, open, emotionally stable and relatively high agreeable individuals. More girls than boys were classified as average and the boys were, in comparison to the girls, more often assigned to the wilful and to the reserved personality types. The wilful type was the most common in early childhood, the reserved type memberhip was the most frequent in middle and late childhood, and early adolesscents were the most frequently classified to the average type.

  1. Replicated mesocosm study on the role of natural ultraviolet radiation in high CDOM, shallow lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, A Patricia; Diaz, Mónica M; Ferraro, Marcela A; Cusminsky, Gabriela C; Zagarese, Horacio E

    2003-02-01

    The role of ultraviolet radiation on shallow, high CDOM (colored dissolved organic matter) lakes was investigated during two consecutive summers (1999 and 2000) in replicated mesocosms (rectangular fiberglass tanks). Each tank (volume: 300 L; depth: 40 cm) was covered with a layer (approximately 3 cm) of sediment from lake El Toro (40 degrees 14' S; 70 degrees 22' W) and filled with filtered water. The experimental design consisted of two treatments: full natural radiation (UV-exposed) and natural radiation without ultraviolet radiation (UV-shielded). UV-exposed and UV-shielded treatments differed in most studied variables as revealed by repeated measures ANOVA. UV-exposed tanks displayed lower CDOM levels (dissolved absorbance) of lower average molecular size (absorbance ratio between 250 and 365 nm), higher bacterial biomass, and lower chlorophyll a concentration. The effect on consumers (rotifers and crustaceans) was less noticeable. The results are consistent with UV stimulation of bacteria production mediated by higher rates of CDOM photobleaching, and the photoinhibition of planktonic algae. Thus, a major effect of UVR in shallow, high CDOM ecosystems appears to be the stimulation of heterotrophic pathways and a simultaneous inhibition of photoautotrophs.

  2. The Internal Consistency and Validity of the Vaccination Attitudes Examination Scale: A Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Louise; Smith, Michael; Miller, Christopher B; O'Carroll, Ronan E

    2018-06-19

    Vaccinations are important preventative health behaviors. The recently developed Vaccination Attitudes Examination (VAX) Scale aims to measure the reasons behind refusal/hesitancy regarding vaccinations. The aim of this replication study is to conduct an independent test of the newly developed VAX Scale in the UK. We tested (a) internal consistency (Cronbach's α); (b) convergent validity by assessing its relationships with beliefs about medication, medical mistrust, and perceived sensitivity to medicines; and (c) construct validity by testing how well the VAX Scale discriminated between vaccinators and nonvaccinators. A sample of 243 UK adults completed the VAX Scale, the Beliefs About Medicines Questionnaire, the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines Scale, and the Medical Mistrust Index, in addition to demographics of age, gender, education levels, and social deprivation. Participants were asked (a) whether they received an influenza vaccination in the past year and (b) if they had a young child, whether they had vaccinated the young child against influenza in the past year. The VAX (a) demonstrated high internal consistency (α = .92); (b) was positively correlated with medical mistrust and beliefs about medicines, and less strongly correlated with perceived sensitivity to medicines; and (c) successfully differentiated parental influenza vaccinators from nonvaccinators. The VAX demonstrated good internal consistency, convergent validity, and construct validity in an independent UK sample. It appears to be a useful measure to help us understand the health beliefs that promote or deter vaccination behavior.

  3. Risk of venous thromboembolism in people admitted to hospital with selected immune-mediated diseases: record-linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handel Adam E

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Venous thromboembolism (VTE is a common complication during and after a hospital admission. Although it is mainly considered a complication of surgery, it often occurs in people who have not undergone surgery, with recent evidence suggesting that immune-mediated diseases may play a role in VTE risk. We, therefore, decided to study the risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT and pulmonary embolism (PE in people admitted to hospital with a range of immune-mediated diseases. Methods We analysed databases of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and death certificates for the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS1:1968 to 1998 and ORLS2:1999 to 2008 and the whole of England (1999 to 2008. Rate ratios for VTE were determined, comparing immune-mediated disease cohorts with comparison cohorts. Results Significantly elevated risks of VTE were found, in all three populations studied, in people with a hospital record of admission for autoimmune haemolytic anaemia, chronic active hepatitis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, myxoedema, pemphigus/pemphigoid, polyarteritis nodosa, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Rate ratios were considerably higher for some of these diseases than others: for example, for systemic lupus erythematosus the rate ratios were 3.61 (2.36 to 5.31 in the ORLS1 population, 4.60 (3.19 to 6.43 in ORLS2 and 3.71 (3.43 to 4.02 in the England dataset. Conclusions People admitted to hospital with immune-mediated diseases may be at an increased risk of subsequent VTE. Our findings need independent confirmation or refutation; but, if confirmed, there may be a role for thromboprophylaxis in some patients with these diseases.

  4. Linkage analysis using co-phenotypes in the BRIGHT study reveals novel potential susceptibility loci for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Chris; Xue, Ming-Zhan; Newhouse, Stephen J; Marcano, Ana Carolina B; Onipinla, Abiodun K; Burke, Beverley; Gungadoo, Johannie; Dobson, Richard J; Brown, Morris; Connell, John M; Dominiczak, Anna; Lathrop, G Mark; Webster, John; Farrall, Martin; Mein, Charles; Samani, Nilesh J; Caulfield, Mark J; Clayton, David G; Munroe, Patricia B

    2006-08-01

    Identification of the genetic influences on human essential hypertension and other complex diseases has proved difficult, partly because of genetic heterogeneity. In many complex-trait resources, additional phenotypic data have been collected, allowing comorbid intermediary phenotypes to be used to characterize more genetically homogeneous subsets. The traditional approach to analyzing covariate-defined subsets has typically depended on researchers' previous expectations for definition of a comorbid subset and leads to smaller data sets, with a concomitant attrition in power. An alternative is to test for dependence between genetic sharing and covariates across the entire data set. This approach offers the advantage of exploiting the full data set and could be widely applied to complex-trait genome scans. However, existing maximum-likelihood methods can be prohibitively computationally expensive, especially since permutation is often required to determine significance. We developed a less computationally intensive score test and applied it to biometric and biochemical covariate data, from 2,044 sibling pairs with severe hypertension, collected by the British Genetics of Hypertension (BRIGHT) study. We found genomewide-significant evidence for linkage with hypertension and several related covariates. The strongest signals were with leaner-body-mass measures on chromosome 20q (maximum LOD = 4.24) and with parameters of renal function on chromosome 5p (maximum LOD = 3.71). After correction for the multiple traits and genetic locations studied, our global genomewide P value was .046. This is the first identity-by-descent regression analysis of hypertension to our knowledge, and it demonstrates the value of this approach for the incorporation of additional phenotypic information in genetic studies of complex traits.

  5. Increased planned delivery contributes to declining rates of pregnancy hypertension in Australia: a population-based record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Christine L; Algert, Charles S; Morris, Jonathan M; Ford, Jane B

    2015-10-05

    Since the 1990s, pregnancy hypertension rates have declined in some countries, but not all. Increasing rates of early planned delivery (before the due date) have been hypothesised as the reason for the decline. The aim of this study was to explore whether early planned delivery can partly explain the declining pregnancy hypertension rates in Australia. Population-based record linkage study utilising linked birth and hospital records. A cohort of 1,076,122 deliveries in New South Wales, Australia, 2001-2012. Pregnancy hypertension (including gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia) was the main outcome; pre-eclampsia was a secondary outcome. From 2001 to 2012, pregnancy hypertension rates declined by 22%, from 9.9% to 7.7%, and pre-eclampsia by 27%, from 3.3% to 2.4% (trend prate was predicted to increase to 10.5%. Examination of annual gestational age distributions showed that pregnancy hypertension rates actually declined from 38 weeks gestation and were steepest from 41 weeks; at least 36% of the decrease could be attributed to planned deliveries. The risk factors for pregnancy hypertension were also risk factors for planned delivery. It appears that an unanticipated consequence of increasing early planned deliveries is a decline in the incidence of pregnancy hypertension. Women with risk factors for hypertension were relatively more likely to be selected for early delivery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Replication of genetic associations as pseudoreplication due to shared genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Vanliere, Jenna M

    2009-09-01

    The genotypes of individuals in replicate genetic association studies have some level of correlation due to shared descent in the complete pedigree of all living humans. As a result of this genealogical sharing, replicate studies that search for genotype-phenotype associations using linkage disequilibrium between marker loci and disease-susceptibility loci can be considered as "pseudoreplicates" rather than true replicates. We examine the size of the pseudoreplication effect in association studies simulated from evolutionary models of the history of a population, evaluating the excess probability that both of a pair of studies detect a disease association compared to the probability expected under the assumption that the two studies are independent. Each of nine combinations of a demographic model and a penetrance model leads to a detectable pseudoreplication effect, suggesting that the degree of support that can be attributed to a replicated genetic association result is less than that which can be attributed to a replicated result in a context of true independence.

  7. Registered Replication Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouwmeester, S.; Verkoeijen, P. P.J.L.; Aczel, B.

    2017-01-01

    and colleagues. The results of studies using time pressure have been mixed, with some replication attempts observing similar patterns (e.g., Rand et al., 2014) and others observing null effects (e.g., Tinghög et al., 2013; Verkoeijen & Bouwmeester, 2014). This Registered Replication Report (RRR) assessed...... the size and variability of the effect of time pressure on cooperative decisions by combining 21 separate, preregistered replications of the critical conditions from Study 7 of the original article (Rand et al., 2012). The primary planned analysis used data from all participants who were randomly assigned...

  8. Genetic Moderation of Stability in Attachment Security from Early Childhood to Age 18 Years: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, K. Lee; Roisman, Glenn I.; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question for attachment theory and research is whether genetically based characteristics of the child influence the development of attachment security and its stability over time. This study attempted to replicate and extend recent findings indicating that the developmental stability of attachment security is moderated by oxytocin…

  9. Verbal Self-Guidance as a Treatment Approach for Children with Developmental Coordination Disorder: A Systematic Replication Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Rose; Polatajko, Helene J.

    1998-01-01

    Replicating a 1994 study, four children with developmental coordination disorder (DCD) were taught a verbal self-guidance strategy (Goal, Plan, Do, Check) by an occupational therapist. All four improved performance in attaining their occupational goals, supporting the possible use of a cognitive strategy with children with DCD. (SK)

  10. A pantograph linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, G.V.

    1982-01-01

    A pantograph linkage is actuated by two linear actuators, pivotally connected together at the linkage. The displacement of the actuators is monitored by rectilinear potentiometers to provide feedback signals to a microprocessor which also receives input signals related to a required movement of a slave end of the linkage. In response to these signals, the microprocessor provides signals to control the displacement of the linear actuators to effect the required movement of the slave end. The movement of the slave end might be straightline in a substantially horizontal or vertical direction. (author)

  11. Studies on the mechanism of replication of adenovirus DNA. IV. Discontinuous DNA chain propagation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlak, J.M.; Rozijn, Th.H.; Sussenbach, J.S.

    The replication of adenovirus type 5 DNA occurs by discontinuous chain propagation via short pieces of DNA. These pieces accumulate if the infected cells are treated with hydroxyurea. They have a sedimentation coefficient of 11 S corresponding to a molecular weight of about 700,000, and they contain

  12. Vocabulary Development in European Portuguese: A Replication Study Using the Language Development Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescorla, Leslie; Nyame, Josephine; Dias, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective was to replicate previous cross­linguistic findings by comparing Portuguese and U.S. children with respect to (a) effects of language, gender, and age on vocabulary size; (b) lexical composition; and (c) late talking. Method: We used the Language Development Survey (LDS; Rescorla, 1989) with children (18-35 months) learning…

  13. The dopamine transporter protein gene (SLC6A3): Primary linage mapping and linkage studies in Tourette syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelernter, J.; Kruger, S.D.; Pakstis, A.J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)]|[West Haven Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CT (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The dopamine transporter, the molecule responsible for presynaptic reuptake of dopamine and a major site of action of psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine, is encoded by locus SLC6A3 (alias DAT1). The protein`s actions and DAT`s specific localization to dopaminergic neurons make it a candidate gene for several psychiatric illnesses. SLC6A3 has been mapped to distal chromosome 5p, using physical methods. Genetic linkage methods were used to place SLC6A3 in the genetic linkage map. Four extended pedigrees (one of which overlaps with CEPH) were typed. Linkage with Tourette syndrome (TS) was also examined. SLC6A3 showed close linkage with several markers previously mapped to distal chromosome 5p, including D5S11 (Z{sub max} = 16.0, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0.03, results from four families) and D5S678 (Z{sub max} = 7.84, {theta}{sub M} = {theta}{sub F} = 0, results from two families). Observed crossovers established that SLC6A3 is a distal marker close to D5S10 and D5S678, but these three distal markers could not be ordered. Linkage between TS and SLC6A3 could be excluded independently in two branches of a large kindred segregating TS; the lod score in a third family was also negative, but not significant. Cumulative results show a lod score of -6.2 at {theta} = 0 and of -3.9 at {theta} = 0.05 (dominant model, narrow disease definition). SLC6A3 thus maps to distal chromosome 5p by linkage analysis, in agreement with previous physical mapping data. A mutation at SLC6A3 is not causative for TS in the two large families that generated significant negative lod scores (if the parameters of our analyses were correct) and is unlikely to be causative in the family that generated a negative lod score that did not reach significance. These results do not exclude a role for the dopamine transporter in influencing risk for TS in combination with other loci. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and HIV-related stigma in newly diagnosed pregnant women living with HIV in Kenya: a longitudinal observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Bulent; Stringer, Kristi L; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Weiser, Sheri D; Cohen, Craig R; Turan, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    Background While studies have suggested that depression and HIV-related stigma may impede access to care, a growing body of literature also suggests that access to HIV care itself may help to decrease internalized HIV-related stigma and symptoms of depression in the general population of persons living with HIV. However, this has not been investigated in postpartum women living with HIV. Furthermore, linkage to care itself may have additional impacts on postpartum depression beyond the effect...

  15. Genome-wide scan for serum ghrelin detects linkage on chromosome 1p36 in Hispanic children: results from the Viva La Familia study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, V Saroja; Göring, Harald H H; Diego, Vincent P; Cai, Guowen; Mehta, Nitesh R; Haack, Karin; Cole, Shelley A; Butte, Nancy F; Comuzzie, Anthony G

    2007-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate genetic influence on serum ghrelin and its relationship with adiposity-related phenotypes in Hispanic children (n=1030) from the Viva La Familia study (VFS). Anthropometric measurements and levels of serum ghrelin were estimated and genetic analyses conducted according to standard procedures. Mean age, body mass index (BMI), and serum ghrelin were 11+/-0.13 y, 25+/-0.24 kg/m2 and 38+/-0.5 ng/mL, respectively. Significant heritabilities (p<0.001) were obtained for BMI, weight, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, waist-to-height ratio, and ghrelin. Bivariate analyses of ghrelin with adiposity traits showed significant negative genetic correlations (p<0.0001) with weight, BMI, fat mass, percent fat, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio. A genome-wide scan for ghrelin detected significant linkage on chromosome 1p36.2 between STR markers D1S2697 and D1S199 (LOD=3.2). The same region on chromosome 1 was the site of linkage for insulin (LOD=3.3), insulinlike growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) (LOD=3.4), homeostatic model assessment method (HOMA) (LOD=2.9), and C-peptide (LOD=2.0). Several family-based studies have reported linkages for obesity-related phenotypes in the region of 1p36. These results indicate the importance of this region in relation to adiposity in children from the VFS.

  16. Public responses to the sharing and linkage of health data for research purposes: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Mhairi; de St Jorre, Jenna; Pagliari, Claudia; Jepson, Ruth; Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2016-11-10

    The past 10 years have witnessed a significant growth in sharing of health data for secondary uses. Alongside this there has been growing interest in the public acceptability of data sharing and data linkage practices. Public acceptance is recognised as crucial for ensuring the legitimacy of current practices and systems of governance. Given the growing international interest in this area this systematic review and thematic synthesis represents a timely review of current evidence. It highlights the key factors influencing public responses as well as important areas for further research. This paper reports a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative studies examining public attitudes towards the sharing or linkage of health data for research purposes. Twenty-five studies were included in the review. The included studies were conducted primarily in the UK and North America, with one study set in Japan, another in Sweden and one in multiple countries. The included studies were conducted between 1999 and 2013 (eight studies selected for inclusion did not report data collection dates). The qualitative methods represented in the studies included focus groups, interviews, deliberative events, dialogue workshops and asynchronous online interviews. Key themes identified across the corpus of studies related to the conditions necessary for public support/acceptability, areas of public concern and implications for future research. The results identify a growing body of evidence pointing towards widespread general-though conditional-support for data linkage and data sharing for research purposes. Whilst a variety of concerns were raised (e.g. relating to confidentiality, individuals' control over their data, uses and abuses of data and potential harms arising) in cases where participants perceived there to be actual or potential public benefits from research and had trust in the individuals or organisations conducting and/or overseeing data linkage/sharing, they

  17. Non-replication study of a genome-wide association study for hypertension and blood pressure in African Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidambi Srividya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent genome wide association study in 1017 African Americans identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms that reached genome-wide significance for systolic blood pressure. We attempted to replicate these findings in an independent sample of 2474 unrelated African Americans in the Milwaukee metropolitan area; 53% were women and 47% were hypertensives. Methods We evaluated sixteen top associated SNPs from the above genome wide association study for hypertension as a binary trait or blood pressure as a continuous trait. In addition, we evaluated eight single nucleotide polymorphisms located in two genes (STK-39 and CDH-13 found to be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures by other genome wide association studies in European and Amish populations. TaqMan MGB-based chemistry with fluorescent probes was used for genotyping. We had an adequate sample size (80% power to detect an effect size of 1.2-2.0 for all the single nucleotide polymorphisms for hypertension as a binary trait, and 1% variance in blood pressure as a continuous trait. Quantitative trait analyses were performed both by excluding and also by including subjects on anti-hypertensive therapy (after adjustments were made for anti-hypertensive medications. Results For all 24 SNPs, no statistically significant differences were noted in the minor allele frequencies between cases and controls. One SNP (rs2146204 showed borderline association (p = 0.006 with hypertension status using recessive model and systolic blood pressure (p = 0.02, but was not significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In quantitative trait analyses, among normotensives only, rs12748299 was associated with SBP (p = 0.002. In addition, several nominally significant associations were noted with SBP and DBP among normotensives but none were statistically significant. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of replication to confirm the validity of genome wide

  18. Comorbidities treated in primary care in children with chronic fatigue syndrome / myalgic encephalomyelitis: A nationwide registry linkage study from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Inger J; Tveito, Kari; Aaberg, Kari M; Ghaderi, Sara; Gunnes, Nina; Trogstad, Lill; Magnus, Per; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Håberg, Siri E

    2016-09-02

    Chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is a complex condition. Causal factors are not established, although underlying psychological or immunological susceptibility has been proposed. We studied primary care diagnoses for children with CFS/ME, with children with another hospital diagnosis (type 1 diabetes mellitus [T1DM]) and the general child population as comparison groups. All Norwegian children born 1992-2012 constituted the study sample. Children with CFS/ME (n = 1670) or T1DM (n = 4937) were identified in the Norwegian Patient Register (NPR) (2008-2014). Children without either diagnosis constituted the general child population comparison group (n = 1337508). We obtained information on primary care diagnoses from the Norwegian Directorate of Health. For each primary care diagnosis, the proportion and 99 % confidence interval (CI) within the three groups was calculated, adjusted for sex and age by direct standardization. Children with CFS/ME were more often registered with a primary care diagnosis of weakness/general tiredness (89.9 % [99 % CI 88.0 to 91.8 %]) than children in either comparison group (T1DM: 14.5 % [99 % CI: 13.1 to 16.0 %], general child population: 11.1 % [99 % CI: 11.0 to 11.2 %]). Also, depressive disorder and anxiety disorder were more common in the CFS/ME group, as were migraine, muscle pain, and infections. In the 2 year period prior to the diagnoses, infectious mononucleosis was registered for 11.1 % (99 % CI 9.1 to 13.1 %) of children with CFS/ME and for 0.5 % (99 % CI (0.2 to 0.8 %) of children with T1DM. Of children with CFS/ME, 74.6 % (1292/1670) were registered with a prior primary care diagnosis of weakness / general tiredness. The time span from the first primary care diagnosis of weakness / general tiredness to the specialist health care diagnosis of CFS/ME was 1 year or longer for 47.8 %. This large nationwide registry linkage study confirms that the clinical picture in CFS

  19. Disclosure of adverse events: a data linkage study reporting patient experiences among Australian adults aged ≥ 45 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Merrilyn; Harrison, Reema; Smith-Merry, Jennifer; Kelly, Patrick; Manias, Elizabeth; Jorm, Christine; Iedema, Rick

    2018-04-26

    enhanced by training multidisciplinary teams in the process. What is known about the topic? While open disclosure is required in all cases of serious adverse events, patients' experiences are variable, and lack of, or poor quality disclosures are all too common. What does this paper add? This paper presents experiences reported by patients across New South Wales in a large cross-sectional survey. Unlike previous studies of open disclosure, recently hospitalised patients were identified and invited using data linkage with medical records. Findings suggest that most patients receive informal disclosures rather than a process that aligns with the current policy guidance. What are the implications for practitioners? Experiences of open disclosure may be enhanced by informing patients of their right to full disclosure in advance of or upon admission to hospital, and recognition of and support for informal or bedside disclosure for appropriate types of incidents.

  20. Messaging Circumstances and Economic Pressures as Influences on Linkage to Medical Male Circumcision following Community-Based HIV Testing for Men in Rural Southwest Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah N. Gilbert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary medical male circumcision (MMC reduces risk of HIV infection, but uptake remains suboptimal among certain age groups and locations in sub-Saharan Africa. We analysed qualitative data as part of the Linkages Study, a randomized controlled trial to evaluate community-based HIV testing and follow-up as interventions promoting linkage to HIV treatment and prevention in Uganda and South Africa. Fifty-two HIV-negative uncircumcised men participated in the qualitative study. They participated in semistructured individual interviews exploring (a home HTC experience; (b responses to test results; (c efforts to access circumcision services; (d outcomes of efforts; (e experiences of follow-up support; and (f local HIV education and support. Interviews were audio-recorded, translated, transcribed, and summarized into “linkage summaries.” Summaries were analysed inductively to identify the following three thematic experiences shaping men’s circumcision choices: (1 intense relief upon receipt of an unanticipated seronegative diagnosis, (2 the role of peer support in overcoming fear, and (3 anticipation of missed economic productivity. Increased attention to the timing of demand creation activities, to who delivers information about the HIV prevention benefits of MMC, and to the importance of missed income during recovery as a barrier to uptake promises to strengthen and sharpen future MMC demand creation strategies.

  1. Understanding Conditionals in the East: A Replication Study of Politzer et al. (2010 With Easterners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Nakamura

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The new probabilistic approaches to the natural language conditional imply that there is a parallel relation between indicative conditionals (ICs “if s then b” and conditional bets (CBs “I bet $1 that if s then b” in two aspects. First, the probability of an IC and the probability of winning a CB are both the conditional probability, P(s|b. Second, both an IC and a CB have a third value “void” (neither true nor false, neither wins nor loses when the antecedent is false (¬s. These aspects of the parallel relation have been found in Western participants. In the present study, we investigated whether this parallel is also present in Eastern participants. We replicated the study of Politzer et al. (2010 with Chinese and Japanese participants and made two predictions. First, Eastern participants will tend to engage in more holistic cognition and take all possible cases, including ¬s, into account when they judge the probability of conditional: Easterners may assess the probability of antecedent s out of all possible cases, P(s, and then may focus on consequent b out of s, P(b|s. Consequently, Easterners may judge the probability of the conditional, and of winning the bet, to be P(s ∗ P(b|s = P(s & b, and false/losing the bet as P(s ∗ P(¬b|s = P(s & ¬b. Second, Eastern participants will tend to be strongly affected by context, and they may not show parallel relationships between ICs and CBs. The results indicate no cultural differences in judging the false antecedent cases: Eastern participants judged false antecedent cases as not making the IC true nor false and as not being winning or losing outcomes. However, there were cultural differences when asked about the probability of a conditional. Consistent with our hypothesis, Eastern participants had a greater tendency to take all possible cases into account, especially in CBs. We discuss whether these results can be explained by a hypothesized tendency for Eastern people to think

  2. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duszynski Katherine M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Methods/Design Single-centre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (RCT stratified by firstborn status. Mothers who gave birth at one tertiary South Australian hospital were randomised at six weeks post-partum to receive an opt-in or opt-out reply form, along with information explaining data linkage. The primary outcome at 10 weeks post-partum was parental participation in each arm, as indicated by the respective return or non-return of a reply form (or via telephone or email response. A subsequent telephone interview at 10 weeks post-partum elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of the reply form, and attitudes and knowledge about data linkage, vaccine safety, consent preferences and vaccination practices. Enrolment began in July 2009 and 1,129 households were recruited in a three-month period. Analysis has not yet been undertaken. The participation rate and selection bias for each method of consent will be compared when the data are analysed. Discussion The VALiD RCT represents the first trial of opt-in versus opt-out consent for a data linkage study that assesses consent preferences and intent compared with actual opting in or opting out behaviour, and socioeconomic factors. The limitations to generalisability are discussed. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000332022

  3. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jesia G; Ryan, Philip; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Duszynski, Katherine M; Xafis, Vicki; Gold, Michael S

    2011-01-04

    The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD) trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Single-centre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial (RCT) stratified by firstborn status. Mothers who gave birth at one tertiary South Australian hospital were randomised at six weeks post-partum to receive an opt-in or opt-out reply form, along with information explaining data linkage. The primary outcome at 10 weeks post-partum was parental participation in each arm, as indicated by the respective return or non-return of a reply form (or via telephone or email response). A subsequent telephone interview at 10 weeks post-partum elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of the reply form, and attitudes and knowledge about data linkage, vaccine safety, consent preferences and vaccination practices. Enrolment began in July 2009 and 1,129 households were recruited in a three-month period. Analysis has not yet been undertaken. The participation rate and selection bias for each method of consent will be compared when the data are analysed. The VALiD RCT represents the first trial of opt-in versus opt-out consent for a data linkage study that assesses consent preferences and intent compared with actual opting in or opting out behaviour, and socioeconomic factors. The limitations to generalisability are discussed. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000332022.

  4. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  5. Linkage studies on 13 biochemical loci and 2 coat color loci in a [(BN x TM) x TM] backcross progeny of the rat (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, J; Hamada, S; Bender, K; Adams, M

    1986-10-01

    In a [(BN X TM) X TM] backcross progeny of rats, nine significant linkage associations were found among 105 pairwise combinations of 15 loci. After comparing this with other published data and data of personal communications, we considered that the d gene we tentatively designated may be identical to the gene for pink-eyed dilution (p), and that the associations of Gc-Hbb, RT1-h, and Gc-Fh were due to chance rather than real linkage. The linkages obtained in this study, therefore, were Hbb-p (26.5 +/- 5.5) in LG I, Mup-1-Acon-1 (12.5 +/- 4.1) in LG II, Hao-1-Svp-1 (23.8 +/- 6.6) in LG IV, Es-1-Es-3 (17.2 +/- 4.7) in LG V, h-Gc (10.9 +/- 3.3) in LG VI, and Fh-Pep-3 (32.3 +/- 5.9) in LG X.

  6. Effects of maltreatment and parental schizophrenia spectrum disorders on early childhood social-emotional functioning: a population record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, S L; Kariuki, M; Green, M J; Dean, K; Harris, F; Tzoumakis, S; Tarren-Sweeney, M; Brinkman, S; Chilvers, M; Sprague, T; Carr, V J; Laurens, K R

    2017-12-01

    Childhood maltreatment and a family history of a schizophrenia spectrum disorder (SSD) are each associated with social-emotional dysfunction in childhood. Both are also strong risk factors for adult SSDs, and social-emotional dysfunction in childhood may be an antecedent of these disorders. We used data from a large Australian population cohort to determine the independent and moderating effects of maltreatment and parental SSDs on early childhood social-emotional functioning. The New South Wales Child Development Study combines intergenerational multi-agency data using record linkage methods. Multiple measures of social-emotional functioning (social competency, prosocial/helping behaviour, anxious/fearful behaviour; aggressive behaviour, and hyperactivity/inattention) on 69 116 kindergarten children (age ~5 years) were linked with government records of child maltreatment and parental presentations to health services for SSD. Multivariable analyses investigated the association between maltreatment and social-emotional functioning, adjusting for demographic variables and parental SSD history, in the population sample and in sub-cohorts exposed and not exposed to parental SSD history. We also examined the association of parental SSD history and social-emotional functioning, adjusting for demographic variables and maltreatment. Medium-sized associations were identified between maltreatment and poor social competency, aggressive behaviour and hyperactivity/inattention; small associations were revealed between maltreatment and poor prosocial/helping and anxious/fearful behaviours. These associations did not differ greatly when adjusted for parental SSD, and were greater in magnitude among children with no history of parental SSD. Small associations between parental SSD and poor social-emotional functioning remained after adjusting for demographic variables and maltreatment. Childhood maltreatment and history of parental SSD are associated independently with poor early

  7. Two non-synonymous markers in PTPN21, identified by genome-wide association study data-mining and replication, are associated with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, Jingchun

    2011-09-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses of genome wide association (GWA) studies of the CATIE and MGS-GAIN datasets, and found 13 markers in the two physically linked genes, PTPN21 and EML5, showing nominally significant association with schizophrenia. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated that all 7 markers from PTPN21 shared high LD (r(2)>0.8), including rs2274736 and rs2401751, the two non-synonymous markers with the most significant association signals (rs2401751, P=1.10 × 10(-3) and rs2274736, P=1.21 × 10(-3)). In a meta-analysis of all 13 replication datasets with a total of 13,940 subjects, we found that the two non-synonymous markers are significantly associated with schizophrenia (rs2274736, OR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97, P=5.45 × 10(-3) and rs2401751, OR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97, P=5.29 × 10(-3)). One SNP (rs7147796) in EML5 is also significantly associated with the disease (OR=1.08, 95% CI: 1.02-1.14, P=6.43 × 10(-3)). These 3 markers remain significant after Bonferroni correction. Furthermore, haplotype conditioned analyses indicated that the association signals observed between rs2274736\\/rs2401751 and rs7147796 are statistically independent. Given the results that 2 non-synonymous markers in PTPN21 are associated with schizophrenia, further investigation of this locus is warranted.

  8. Individual and Contextual Factors Influencing Engagement in Learning Activities after Errors at Work: A Replication Study in a German Retail Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leicher, Veronika; Mulder, Regina H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this replication study is to identify relevant individual and contextual factors influencing learning from errors at work and to determine if the predictors for learning activities are the same for the domains of nursing and retail banking. Design/methodology/approach: A cross-sectional replication study was carried out in…

  9. Poverty and local linkages in the tourism value chain: a study of upland economies in China and India

    OpenAIRE

    Dev Nathan; Govind Kelkar; Yang Fuquan; Yu Yin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The paper deals with the role of tourism in reducing poverty in upland economies. Taking cases from China and India, it explores the local segments of the tourism value chain, or the local linkages of tourism. In assessing the impact on poverty it looks at both the local share of tourist expenditure and the size of the tourism sector. Local benefits are looked at from the points of view of both women and men as service providers. The paper brings out the important role of tourism as ...

  10. Adolescent Loneliness and the Interaction between the Serotonin Transporter Gene (5-HTTLPR and Parental Support: A Replication Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette W M Spithoven

    Full Text Available Gene-by-environment interaction (GxEs studies have gained popularity over the last decade, but the robustness of such observed interactions has been questioned. The current study contributes to this debate by replicating the only study on the interaction between the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR and perceived parental support on adolescents' peer-related loneliness. A total of 1,111 adolescents (51% boys with an average age of 13.70 years (SD = 0.93 participated and three annual waves of data were collected. At baseline, adolescent-reported parental support and peer-related loneliness were assessed and genetic information was collected. Assessment of peer-related loneliness was repeated at Waves 2 and 3. Using a cohort-sequential design, a Latent Growth Curve Model was estimated. Overall, a slight increase of loneliness over time was found. However, the development of loneliness over time was found to be different for boys and girls: girls' levels of loneliness increased over time, whereas boys' levels of loneliness decreased. Parental support was inversely related to baseline levels of loneliness, but unrelated to change of loneliness over time. We were unable to replicate the main effect of 5-HTTLPR or the 5-HTTLPR x Support interaction effect. In the Discussion, we examine the implications of our non-replication.

  11. Thermally actuated linkage arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable thermally actuated linkage arrangement includes a first link member having a longitudinal bore therein adapted to receive at least a portion of a second link member therein, the first and second members being sized to effect an interference fit preventing relative movement there-between at a temperature below a predetermined temperature. The link members have different coefficients of thermal expansion so that when the linkage is selectively heated by heating element to a temperature above the predetermined temperature, relative longitudinal and/or rotational movement between the first and second link members is enabled. Two embodiments of a thermally activated linkage are disclosed which find particular application in actuators for a grapple head positioning arm in a nuclear reactor fuel handling mechanism to facilitate back-up safety retraction of the grapple head independently from the primary fuel handling mechanism drive system. (author)

  12. Linkage of a Population-Based Cohort With Primary Data Collection to Medicare Claims: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fenglong; Colantonio, Lisandro D; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Safford, Monika M; Levitan, Emily B; Howard, George; Muntner, Paul

    2016-10-01

    We described the linkage of primary data with administrative claims using the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study and Medicare. REGARDS study data were linked with Medicare claims by use of Social Security numbers. We compared REGARDS participants by Medicare linkage status, having fee-for-service (FFS) coverage or not, and with a 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries who had FFS coverage in 2005, overall, by age (45-64 and ≥65 years), and by race. Among REGARDS participants who were ≥65 years of age, 80% had data linked to Medicare on their study-visit date (64% with FFS coverage). No differences except race and sex were present between REGARDS participants without Medicare linkage and those with data linked to Medicare with and without FFS coverage. After the age-sex-race adjustment, comorbid conditions and health-care utilization were similar for those with FFS coverage in the REGARDS study and the 5% sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Among REGARDS participants aged 45-64 years, 11% had FFS coverage on their study-visit date. In this age group, differences were present between participants with and without FFS coverage and the Medicare 5% sample with FFS coverage. In conclusion, REGARDS participants aged ≥65 years with FFS coverage are representative of the study cohort and the US population aged ≥65 years with FFS coverage. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Genome scan for linkage to asthma using a linkage disequilibrium-lod score test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Slager, S L; Huang, J

    2001-01-01

    We report a genome-wide linkage study of asthma on the German and Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Asthma (CSGA) data. Using a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium test and the nonparametric linkage score, we identified 13 markers from the German data, 1 marker from the African American (CSGA) data, and 7 markers from the Caucasian (CSGA) data in which the p-values ranged between 0.0001 and 0.0100. From our analysis and taking into account previous published linkage studies of asthma, we suggest that three regions in chromosome 5 (around D5S418, D5S644, and D5S422), one region in chromosome 6 (around three neighboring markers D6S1281, D6S291, and D6S1019), one region in chromosome 11 (around D11S2362), and two regions in chromosome 12 (around D12S351 and D12S324) especially merit further investigation.

  14. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis - A replication study in three European populations : a replication study in three European populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, Gisela; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Petersson, Ingemar F.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Martin, Javier

    Objective. This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. Methods.

  15. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  16. Genetic moderation of effects of maternal sensitivity on girl's age of menarche: Replication of the Manuck et al. study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Sarah; Widaman, Keith F; Belsky, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Manuck, Craig, Flory, Halder, and Ferrell (2011) reported that a theoretically anticipated effect of family rearing on girls' menarcheal age was genetically moderated by two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the estrogen receptor-α gene. We sought to replicate and extend these findings, studying 210 White females followed from birth. The replication was general because a different measure of the rearing environment was used in this inquiry (i.e., maternal sensitivity) than in the prior one (i.e., family cohesion). Extensions of the work included prospective rather than retrospective measurements of the rearing environment, reports of first menstruation within a year of its occurrence rather than decades later, accounting for some heritability of menarcheal age by controlling for maternal age of menarche, and using a new model-fitting approach to competitively compare diathesis-stress versus differential-susceptibility models of Gene × Environment interaction. The replication/extension effort proved successful in the case of both estrogen receptor-α SNPs, with the Gene × Environment interactions principally reflecting diathesis-stress: lower levels of maternal sensitivity predicted earlier age of menarche for girls homozygous for the minor alleles of either SNP but not for girls carrying other genotypes. Results are discussed in light of the new analytic methods adopted.

  17. Barriers to HIV testing, linkage to care, and treatment adherence: a cross-sectional study from a large urban center of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCarthy, Sarah; Hoffmann, Michael; Nunn, Amy; Silva, Luís Augusto Vasconcelos da; Dourado, Ines

    2016-12-01

    Early, continued engagement with the HIV treatment continuum can help achieve viral suppression, though few studies have explored how risk factors for delays differ across the continuum. The objective of this study was to identify predictors of delayed diagnosis, delayed linkage to care, and nonadherence to treatment in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Data were collected during 2010 in a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 1 970) of HIV-infected individuals enrolled in care. Multiple logistic regression analyses identified sociodemographic variables, behaviors, and measures of health service quality that were associated with delayed diagnosis, delayed linkage to care, and treatment nonadherence. For delayed diagnosis, male gender (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 3.02; 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.0-4.6); age 45 years and older (AOR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.1-2.5); and provider-initiated testing (AOR, 3.00; 95% CI, 2.1-4.4) increased odds, while drug use (AOR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.2-0.5) and receiving results in a private space (AOR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8) decreased odds. For delayed linkage to care, unemployment (AOR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.07-1.9) and difficulty understanding or speaking with a health care worker (AOR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.2-2.1) increased odds, while posttest counseling (AOR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.3-0.7) decreased odds. For nonadherence, experiencing verbal or physical discrimination related to HIV (AOR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0) and feeling mistreated or not properly attended to at HIV care (AOR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.0-2.5) increased odds, while posttest counseling (AOR, 0.34; 95% CI, 0.2-0.6) decreased odds. More attention is needed on how policies, programs, and research can provide tailored support across the treatment continuum.

  18. Clause linkage in Ket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nefedov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    This work provides a typologically oriented description of clause linkage strategies in Ket, a highly endangered language spoken in Central Siberia. It is now the only surviving member of the Yeniseian language family with the last remaining speakers residing in the north of Russia’s Krasnoyarsk

  19. Genome-wide linkage scan for primary open angle glaucoma: influences of ancestry and age at diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy R Crooks

    Full Text Available Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common form of glaucoma and one of the leading causes of vision loss worldwide. The genetic etiology of POAG is complex and poorly understood. The purpose of this work is to identify genomic regions of interest linked to POAG. This study is the largest genetic linkage study of POAG performed to date: genomic DNA samples from 786 subjects (538 Caucasian ancestry, 248 African ancestry were genotyped using either the Illumina GoldenGate Linkage 4 Panel or the Illumina Infinium Human Linkage-12 Panel. A total of 5233 SNPs was analyzed in 134 multiplex POAG families (89 Caucasian ancestry, 45 African ancestry. Parametric and non-parametric linkage analyses were performed on the overall dataset and within race-specific datasets (Caucasian ancestry and African ancestry. Ordered subset analysis was used to stratify the data on the basis of age of glaucoma diagnosis. Novel linkage regions were identified on chromosomes 1 and 20, and two previously described loci-GLC1D on chromosome 8 and GLC1I on chromosome 15--were replicated. These data will prove valuable in the context of interpreting results from genome-wide association studies for POAG.

  20. Looking Is Not Seeing and Listening Is Not Hearing: A Replication Study With Accelerated BSN Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honan, Linda; Shealy, Sarah; Fennie, Kristopher; Duffy, Thomas C; Friedlaender, Linda; Del Vecchio, Megan

    2016-01-01

    Development of perceptual aptitude is a critical yet complex skill that requires the effective organization and interpretation of data using visual and auditory clinical observation. Educators face challenges in creating pedagogy that consistently demonstrates reliability and validity in fostering clinical skills. We have dependably used the arts as a means to improve students' auditory and visual skills, and this article will describe replication of our work with accelerated nursing students in a bachelor's program in their last semester of nursing school (n=23). Our results reveal that auscultative and observational abilities of soon-to-be registered nurses are in need of improvement. The use of art in a museum improves observational and assessment abilities, and music training increases auscultative interpretive skills significantly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of four families with the Stickler syndrome by linkage studies. Identification of a new premature stop codon in the COL2A1 gene in a family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonaventure, J.; Lasselin, C. [Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Toutain, A. [CHU Bretonneau, Tours (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Stickler syndrome is an arthro-ophthalmopathy which associates progressive myopia with vitreal degeneration and retinal detachment. Cleft palate, cranio-facial abnormalities, deafness and osteoarthritis are often associated symptoms. Genetic heterogeneity of this autosomal dominant disease was consistent with its large clinical variability. Linkage studies have provided evidence for cosegregation of the disease with COL2A1, the gene coding for type II collagen, in about 50% of the families. Four additional families are reported here. Linkage analyses by using a VNTR located in the 3{prime} region of the gene were achieved. In three families, positive lod scores were obtained with a cumulative maximal value of 3.5 at a recombination fraction of 0. In one of these families, single strand conformation analysis of 25 exons disclosed a new mutation in exon 42. Codon for glutamic acid at position a1-803 was converted into a stop codon. The mutation was detected in DNA samples from all the affected members of the family but not in the unaffected. This result confirms that most of the Stickler syndromes linked to COL2A1 are due to premature stop codons. In a second family, an abnormal SSCP pattern of exon 34 was detected in all the affected individuals. The mutation is likely to correspond to a splicing defect in the acceptor site of intron 33. In one family the disease did not segregate with the COL2A1 locus. Further linkage studies with intragenic dimorphic sites in the COL10A1 gene and highly polymorphic markers close to the COL9A1 locus indicated that this disorder did not result from defects in these two genes.

  2. Linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and HIV-related stigma in newly diagnosed pregnant women living with HIV in Kenya: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Stringer, Kristi L; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Weiser, Sheri D; Cohen, Craig R; Turan, Janet M

    2014-12-03

    While studies have suggested that depression and HIV-related stigma may impede access to care, a growing body of literature also suggests that access to HIV care itself may help to decrease internalized HIV-related stigma and symptoms of depression in the general population of persons living with HIV. However, this has not been investigated in postpartum women living with HIV. Furthermore, linkage to care itself may have additional impacts on postpartum depression beyond the effects of antiretroviral therapy. We examined associations between linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and internalized stigma in a population with a high risk of depression: newly diagnosed HIV-positive pregnant women. In this prospective observational study, data were obtained from 135 HIV-positive women from eight antenatal clinics in the rural Nyanza Province of Kenya at their first antenatal visit (prior to testing HIV-positive for the first time) and subsequently at 6 weeks after giving birth. At 6 weeks postpartum, women who had not linked to HIV care after testing positive at their first antenatal visit had higher levels of depression and internalized stigma, compared to women who had linked to care. Internalized stigma mediated the effect of linkage to care on depression. Furthermore, participants who had both linked to HIV care and initiated antiretroviral therapy reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. These results provide further support for current efforts to ensure that women who are newly diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy become linked to HIV care as early as possible, with important benefits for both physical and mental health.

  3. Clinical correlates and genetic linkage of social and communication difficulties in families with obsessive-compulsive disorder: Results from the OCD Collaborative Genetics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jack; Shugart, Yin Yao; Wang, Ying; Grados, Marco A; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Pinto, Anthony; Rauch, Scott L; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Knowles, James A; Fyer, Abby J; Piacentini, John; Pauls, David L; Cullen, Bernadette; Rasmussen, Steven A; Stewart, S Evelyn; Geller, Dan A; Maher, Brion S; Goes, Fernando S; Murphy, Dennis L; McCracken, James T; Riddle, Mark A; Nestadt, Gerald

    2014-06-01

    Some individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have autistic-like traits, including deficits in social and communication behaviors (pragmatics). The objective of this study was to determine if pragmatic impairment aggregates in OCD families and discriminates a clinically and genetically distinct subtype of OCD. We conducted clinical examinations on, and collected DNA samples from, 706 individuals with OCD in 221 multiply affected OCD families. Using the Pragmatic Rating Scale (PRS), we compared the prevalence of pragmatic impairment in OCD-affected relatives of probands with and without pragmatic impairment. We also compared clinical features of OCD-affected individuals in families having at least one, versus no, individual with pragmatic impairment, and assessed for linkage to OCD in the two groups of families. The odds of pragmatic impairment were substantially greater in OCD-affected relatives of probands with pragmatic impairment. Individuals in high-PRS families had greater odds of separation anxiety disorder and social phobia, and a greater number of schizotypal personality traits. In high-PRS families, there was suggestive linkage to OCD on chromosome 12 at marker D12S1064 and on chromosome X at marker DXS7132 whereas, in low-PRS families, there was suggestive linkage to chromosome 3 at marker D3S2398. Pragmatic impairment aggregates in OCD families. Separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, and schizotypal personality traits are part of a clinical spectrum associated with pragmatic impairment in these families. Specific regions of chromosomes 12 and X are linked to OCD in high-PRS families. Thus, pragmatic impairment may distinguish a clinically and genetically homogeneous subtype of OCD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. A combination intervention strategy to improve linkage to and retention in HIV care following diagnosis in Mozambique: A cluster-randomized study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Elul

    2017-11-01

    showed promise for making much needed gains in the HIV care continuum in our study, particularly in the critical first step of timely linkage to care following diagnosis.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01930084.

  5. The Impact of Teacher Study Groups in Vocabulary on Teaching Practice, Teacher Knowledge, and Student Vocabulary Knowledge: A Large-Scale Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthi, Madhavi; Dimino, Joseph; Gersten, Russell; Taylor, Mary Jo; Haymond, Kelly; Smolkowski, Keith; Newman-Gonchar, Rebecca

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this replication study was to examine the impact of the Teacher Study Group (TSG) professional development in vocabulary on first-grade teachers' knowledge of vocabulary instruction and observed teaching practice, and on students' vocabulary knowledge. Sixty-two schools from 16 districts in four states were randomly assigned to…

  6. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna L Mitchell

    Full Text Available Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered.DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18, on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls. The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach.In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7. A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene.This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  7. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison's Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anna L; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S; Cordell, Heather J; Pearce, Simon H S

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis.

  8. Data Linkage from Clinical to Study Databases via an R Data Warehouse User Interface. Experiences from a Large Clinical Follow-up Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, Mathias; Ertl, Maximilian; Fette, Georg; Dietrich, Georg; Toepfer, Martin; Angermann, Christiane; Störk, Stefan; Puppe, Frank

    2016-08-05

    Data that needs to be documented for clinical studies has often been acquired and documented in clinical routine. Usually this data is manually transferred to Case Report Forms (CRF) and/or directly into an electronic data capture (EDC) system. To enhance the documentation process of a large clinical follow-up study targeting patients admitted for acutely decompensated heart failure by accessing the data created during routine and study visits from a hospital information system (HIS) and by transferring it via a data warehouse (DWH) into the study's EDC system. This project is based on the clinical DWH developed at the University of Würzburg. The DWH was extended by several new data domains including data created by the study team itself. An R user interface was developed for the DWH that allows to access its source data in all its detail, to transform data as comprehensively as possible by R into study-specific variables and to support the creation of data and catalog tables. A data flow was established that starts with labeling patients as study patients within the HIS and proceeds with updating the DWH with this label and further data domains at a daily rate. Several study-specific variables were defined using the implemented R user interface of the DWH. This system was then used to export these variables as data tables ready for import into our EDC system. The data tables were then used to initialize the first 296 patients within the EDC system by pseudonym, visit and data values. Afterwards, these records were filled with clinical data on heart failure, vital parameters and time spent on selected wards. This solution focuses on the comprehensive access and transformation of data for a DWH-EDC system linkage. Using this system in a large clinical study has demonstrated the feasibility of this approach for a study with a complex visit schedule.

  9. McCoy cell line as a possible model containing CD4+ receptors for the study of HIV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira Yeda L.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have recently shown the use of recombinant rabies virus as potential vector-viral vaccine for HIV-1. The sequence homology between gp 120 and rabies virus glycoprotein has been reported. The McCoy cell line has therefore been used to show CD4+ or CD4+ like receptors. Samples of HIV-1 were isolated, when plasma of HIV-1 positive patients was inoculated in the McCoy cell line. The virus infection was then studied during successive virus passages. The proteins released in the extra cellular medium were checked for protein activity, by exposure to SDS Electrophoresis and blotting to nitro-cellulose filter, then reacting with sera of HIV positive and negative patients. Successive passages were performed, and showed viral replication, membrane permeabilization, the syncytium formation, and the cellular lysis (cytopathic effect. Flow cytometry analysis shows clear evidence that CD4+ receptors are present in this cell line, which enhances the likelihood of easy isolation and replication of HIV. The results observed allow the use of this cell line as a possible model for isolating HIV, as well as for carrying out studies of the dynamics of viral infection in several situations, including exposure to drugs in pharmacological studies, and possibly studies and analyses of the immune response in vaccine therapies.

  10. An Epidemiologic Study on Ageing and Dysphagia in the Acute Care Geriatric-Hospitalized Population: A Replication and Continuation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Steven B; Suiter, Debra M; Agogo, George O; Cooney, Leo M

    2016-10-01

    United States census data project dramatic increases in the geriatric population ageing demographics by 2060 with concomitant health-care consequences. The purpose of this replication and continuation study was to collect new 2014 demographic data relative to ageing, swallow evaluation referral rates, and oral feeding status in geriatric-hospitalized patients for comparison with published data from 2000 to 2007. This was a planned data acquisition study of consecutive hospitalized patients referred for swallow assessments. Swallow evaluation referral rates for 2014 were described according to inpatient discharges, age range 60-105 years grouped by decade, gender, admitting diagnostic category, results of swallow evaluations, and oral feeding status. Determination of aspiration risk status was made with the Yale Swallow Protocol and diagnosis of dysphagia made with fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES). There were 1348 referrals and 961 patients ≥60 years of age participated. Overall swallow evaluation referral rates increased an average of 63 % between the comparison years 2007 and 2014 with consistent increases corresponding to the decades, i.e., 60-69 (46 %), 70-79 (68 %), 80-89 (53 %), and 90+ (222 %). A total of 75 % of participants resumed oral alimentation and oral medications. Swallow evaluation referral rates increased by 63 % for 60-90+ year-old acute care geriatric-hospitalized participants despite only a 23 % increase in inpatient discharges for the years 2007 versus 2014. This corroborated previously reported increases for individual years from 2000 to 2007. For timely, safe, and successful initiation of oral alimentation, it is important to perform a reliable swallow screen for aspiration risk assessment with the Yale Swallow Protocol and, if failed, instrumental testing with FEES. More dysphagia specialists are needed through 2060 and beyond due to projections of continued population ageing resulting in ever increasing

  11. Replication Improves Sorting-Task Results Analyzed by DISTATIS in a Consumer Study of American Bourbon and Rye Whiskeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahne, Jacob; Collins, Thomas S; Heymann, Hildegarde

    2016-05-01

    In consumer food-sensory studies, sorting and closely related methods (for example, projective mapping) have often been applied to large product sets which are complex and fatiguing for panelists. Analysis of sorting by Multi-Dimensional Scaling (MDS) is common, but this method discards relevant individual decisions; analysis by DISTATIS, which accounts for individual differences, is gaining acceptance. This research posits that replication can improve DISTATIS analysis by stabilizing consumer sensory maps, which are often extremely unstable. As a case study a fatiguing product set was sorted: 10 American whiskeys-5 bourbons and 5 ryes-were sorted into groups by 21 consumers over 2 replications. These products were chosen because American whiskeys are some of the most important distilled beverages in today's market; in particular, "bourbon" (mashbill more than 50% corn) and "rye" (more than 50% rye) whiskeys are important and assumed to be products with distinct sensory attributes. However, there is almost no scientific information about their sensory properties. Data were analyzed using standard and aggregated DISTATIS and MDS. No significant relationship between mashbill and consumer categorization in whiskeys was found; instead, there was evidence of producer and aging effects. aggregated DISTATIS was found to provide more stable results than without replication, and DISTATIS results provided a number of benefits over MDS, including bootstrapped confidence intervals for product separation. In addition, this is the first published evidence that mashbill does not determine sensory properties of American whiskey: bourbons and ryes, while legally distinct, were not separated by consumers. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. Validating self-report of diabetes use by participants in the 45 and up study: a record linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevalence studies usually depend on self-report of disease status in survey data or administrative data collections and may over- or under-estimate disease prevalence. The establishment of a linked data collection provided an opportunity to explore the accuracy and completeness of capture of information about diabetes in survey and administrative data collections. Methods Baseline questionnaire data at recruitment to the 45 and Up Study was obtained for 266,848 adults aged 45 years and over sampled from New South Wales, Australia in 2006–2009, and linked to administrative data about hospitalisation from the Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) for 2000–2009, claims for medical services (MBS) and pharmaceuticals (PBS) from Medicare Australia data for 2004–2009. Diabetes status was determined from response to a question ‘Has a doctor EVER told you that you have diabetes’ (n = 23,981) and augmented by examination of free text fields about diagnosis (n = 119) or use of insulin (n = 58). These data were used to identify the sub-group with type 1 diabetes. We explored the agreement between self-report of diabetes, identification of diabetes diagnostic codes in APDC data, claims for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in MBS data, and claims for dispensed medication (oral hyperglycaemic agents and insulin) in PBS data. Results Most participants with diabetes were identified in APDC data if admitted to hospital (79.3%), in MBS data with at least one claim for HbA1c testing (84.7%; 73.4% if 2 tests claimed) or in PBS data through claim for diabetes medication (71.4%). Using these alternate data collections as an imperfect ‘gold standard’ we calculated sensitivities of 83.7% for APDC, 63.9% (80.5% for two tests) for MBS, and 96.6% for PBS data and specificities of 97.7%, 98.4% and 97.1% respectively. The lower sensitivity for HbA1c may reflect the use of this test to screen for diabetes suggesting that it is less useful in identifying

  13. Grey Matter Abnormalities in Social Anxiety Disorder: Primary, Replication, and Specificity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ardesheer; Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Schneier, Franklin R.; Weissman, Myrna M; Hirsch, Joy

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite increasing evidence that neuroanatomical abnormalities underlie pathological anxiety, social anxiety disorder (SAD), although among the most common of anxiety disorders, has received little attention. Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging, we (1) examined grey matter (GM) differences between generalized SAD and healthy control groups; (2) retested the findings in an independent clinical sample; and (3) tested for specificity by contrasting the SAD group to a separate group of panic disorder (PD) subjects. Methods The primary SAD group (N=16) was required to meet DSM-IV criteria for SAD, with onset by age 30; controls (N=20) had no lifetime history of anxiety. The replication sample included 17 generalized SAD and 17 control subjects. The PD comparison group (N=16) was required to have no lifetime SAD. Images were acquired on a 1.5Tesla GE Signa MRI scanner using a 3D T1-weighted spoiled gradient recalled pulse sequence. Morphological differences were determined using voxel based morphometry, in SPM8. Results After adjusting for age, gender, and total intracranial volume, SAD (as compared to control) subjects had greater GM in the left parahippocampal and middle occipital, and bilateral supramarginal and angular cortices, and left cerebellum; and lower GM in bilateral temporal poles and left lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Cerebellar, parahippocampal, and temporal pole differences were observed in both samples, survived whole brain corrections, and were not observed in the PD group, pointing to relative specificity to SAD. Conclusions These findings parallel the functional literature on SAD, and suggest structural abnormalities underlying the functional disturbances. PMID:22748614

  14. High-cost users of hospital beds in Western Australia: a population-based record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, Janine; Brameld, Kate J; Preen, David B; Alexia, Stoney J; Boldy, Duncan P; McCaul, Kieran A

    2006-04-17

    To describe how high-cost users of inpatient care in Western Australia differ from other users in age, health problems and resource use. Secondary analysis of hospital data and linked mortality data from the WA Data Linkage System for 2002, with cost data from the National Hospital Cost Data Collection (2001-02 financial year). Comparison of high-cost users and other users of inpatient care in terms of age, health profile (major diagnostic category) and resource use (annualised costs, separations and bed days). Older high-cost users (> or = 65 years) were not more expensive to treat than younger high-cost users (at the patient level), but were costlier as a group overall because of their disproportionate representation (n = 8466; 55.9%). Chronic stable and unstable conditions were a key feature of high-cost users, and included end stage renal disease, angina, depression and secondary malignant neoplasms. High-cost users accounted for 38% of both inpatient costs and inpatient days, and 26% of inpatient separations. Ageing of the population is associated with an increase in the proportion of high-cost users of inpatient care. High costs appear to be needs-driven. Constraining high-cost inpatient use requires more focus on preventing the onset and progression of chronic disease, and reducing surgical complications and injuries in vulnerable groups.

  15. Cardiovascular disease treatment among patients with severe mental illness: a data linkage study between primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Charlotte; Ashworth, Mark; Broadbent, Matthew; Callard, Felicity; Hotopf, Matthew; Schofield, Peter; Soncul, Murat; Stewart, Robert J; Henderson, Max J

    2016-06-01

    Suboptimal treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) may contribute to physical health disparities. To identify SMI characteristics associated with meeting CVD treatment and prevention guidelines. Population-based electronic health record database linkage between primary care and the sole provider of secondary mental health care services in south east London, UK. Cardiovascular disease prevalence, risk factor recording, and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) clinical target achievement were compared among 4056 primary care patients with SMI whose records were linked to secondary healthcare records and 270 669 patients without SMI who were not known to secondary care psychiatric services, using multivariate logistic regression modelling. Data available from secondary care records were then used to identify SMI characteristics associated with QOF clinical target achievement. Patients with SMI and with coronary heart disease and heart failure experienced reduced prescribing of beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB). A diagnosis of schizophrenia, being identified with any indicator of risk or illness severity, and being prescribed with depot injectable antipsychotic medication was associated with the lowest likelihood of prescribing. Linking primary and secondary care data allows the identification of patients with SMI most at risk of undertreatment for physical health problems. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  16. Genetic influences on hand osteoarthritis in Finnish women--a replication study of candidate genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satu Hämäläinen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Our aims were to replicate some previously reported associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in five genes (A2BP1, COG5, GDF5, HFE, ESR1 with hand osteoarthritis (OA, and to examine whether genes (BCAP29, DIO2, DUS4L, DVWA, HLA, PTGS2, PARD3B, TGFB1 and TRIB1 associated with OA at other joint sites were associated with hand OA among Finnish women. DESIGN: We examined the bilateral hand radiographs of 542 occupationally active Finnish female dentists and teachers aged 45 to 63 and classified them according to the presence of OA by using reference images. Data regarding finger joint pain and other risk factors were collected using a questionnaire. We defined two hand OA phenotypes: radiographic OA in at least three joints (ROA and symptomatic DIP OA. The genotypes were determined by PCR-based methods. In statistical analysis, we used SNPStats software, the chi-square test and logistic regression. RESULTS: Of the SNPs, rs716508 in A2BP1 was associated with ROA (OR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-0.9 and rs1800470 in TGFB1 with symptomatic DIP OA (1.8, 1.2-2.9. We found an interaction between ESR1 (rs9340799 and occupation: teachers with the minor allele were at an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.8, 1.3-6.5. We saw no association among the dentists. We also found that the carriage of the COG5 rs3757713 C allele increased the risk of ROA only among women with the BCAP29 rs10953541 CC genotype (2.6; 1.1-6.1. There was also a suggestive interaction between the HFE rs179945 and the ESR1 rs9340799, and the carriage of the minor allele of either of these SNPs was associated with an increased risk of symptomatic DIP OA (2.1, 1.3-2.5. CONCLUSIONS: Our results support the earlier findings of A2BP1 and TBGF1 being OA susceptibility genes and provide evidence of a possible gene-gene interaction in the genetic influence on hand OA predisposition.

  17. In vivo study on the replicative model validity of sister chromatid exchanges production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, V.L.

    1996-01-01

    The sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) frequency determination has been used as index of damage to DNA, however the biological meaning of this event is still ignored. Different models in order to explain the mechanism of their formation have been proposed and they could be contained in two categories: a) those that consider that the SCE is produced by means of discreet lesions to the DNA and that they occur in the place of the lesion, and b) those that propose that the SCE is caused by a group of lesions and that therefore the place in which they occur could not be associated with a lesion in particular. The model of Painter (1980) belongs to this last group. It suggests that the region of the DNA where the clusters are united, is the only place in which the exchange of double chain could happen during the synthesis of the DNA and makes the prediction that since the x rays retard the beginning of the duplication, the pretreatment with ionizing radiation would reduce the frequency of SCE induced by agents capable to block the lengthening of the chain of DNA, that are the most efficient SCE inducers. The objective of the present work was to establish the validity of this replicative model for the SCE formation, based in its prediction. The effect of the unilateral preexposition of mouse to gamma radiation was determined on the SCE induction by Mitomycin C (MMC), in cells of the femoral bone marrow In vivo. This strategy allows to determine the effect of the pretreatment in the same organism, minimizing the variability of the response between individuals. There was not a significant variability between the frequencies of SCE, basal and induced by gamma radiation or MMC in the same organism. The animals that received the gamma radiation pretreatment, showed a reduction of approximately the 30 % in the frequency of SCE, assuming an additive effect of the radiation with the MMC. These results coincide with the prediction of the model of Painter, however it is not

  18. Database Replication Prototype

    OpenAIRE

    Vandewall, R.

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the design of a Replication Framework that facilitates the implementation and com-parison of database replication techniques. Furthermore, it discusses the implementation of a Database Replication Prototype and compares the performance measurements of two replication techniques based on the Atomic Broadcast communication primitive: pessimistic active replication and optimistic active replication. The main contributions of this report can be split into four parts....

  19. A replication of the relationship between elderly suicides rates and elderly dependency ratios: a cross-national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit

    2010-01-01

    A positive correlation between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates has been observed using one-year cross-sectional data on elderly suicide rates. A cross-national study designed to replicate this positive correlation between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates was undertaken by: (i) using one-year average of five years data on suicide rates; and (ii) using more recent data on both elderly suicide rates and elderly dependency ratios. Data on elderly suicide rates, and the total number of elderly and young people was ascertained from the World Health Organization website. The main findings were of significant positive correlations between elderly dependency ratios and suicide rates in both sexes in both the elderly age-bands (65-74 years and 75+ years). The replication of the positive correlations between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates by using one-year average of five years data on suicide rates suggests that this relationship is robust and accurate. ‎

  20. A replication of the relationship between elderly suicides rates and elderly dependency ratios: cross-national study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ajit

    2010-01-01

    Abstract: Background: A positive correlation between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates has been observed using one-year cross-sectional data on elderly suicide rates. Methods: A cross-national study designed to replicate this positive correlation between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates was undertaken by: (i) using one-year average of five years data on suicide rates; and (ii) using more recent data on both elderly suicide rates and elderly dependency ratios. Data on elderly suicide rates, and the total number of elderly and young people was ascertained from the World Health Organization website. Results: The main findings were of significant positive correlations between elderly dependency ratios and suicide rates in both sexes in both the elderly age-bands (65-74 years and 75+ years). Conclusions: The replication of the positive correlations between elderly dependency ratios and elderly suicide rates by using one-year average of five years data on suicide rates suggests that this relationship is robust and accurate. PMID:21483194

  1. Effects of Worldwide Population Subdivision on ALDH2 Linkage Disequilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Raymond J.; Goldman, David; Long, Jeffrey C.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of human population subdivision on linkage disequilibrium has previously been studied for unlinked genes. However, no study has focused on closely linked polymorphisms or formally partitioned linkage disequilibrium within and among worldwide populations. With an emphasis on population subdivision, the goal of this paper is to investigate the causes of linkage disequilibrium in ALDH2, the gene that encodes aldehyde dehydrogenase 2. Haplotypes for 756 people from 17 populations acros...

  2. Multivariate analysis of anxiety disorders yields further evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21 and 7p in panic disorder families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, Mark W; Bauver, Sarah R; Knowles, James A; Gameroff, Marc J; Weissman, Myrna M; Crowe, Raymond R; Fyer, Abby J; Hamilton, Steven P

    2012-04-01

    Replication has been difficult to achieve in linkage studies of psychiatric disease. Linkage studies of panic disorder have indicated regions of interest on chromosomes 1q, 2p, 2q, 3, 7, 9, 11, 12q13, 12q23, and 15. Few regions have been implicated in more than one study. We examine two samples, the Iowa (IA) and the Columba panic disorder families. We use the fuzzy-clustering method presented by Kaabi et al. [Kaabi et al. (2006); Am J Hum Genet 78: 543-553] to summarize liability to panic disorder, agoraphobia, simple phobia, and social phobia. Kaabi et al. applied this method to the Yale panic disorder linkage families and found evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21, 4q32, 7p, and 8. When we apply the same method to the IA families, we obtain overlapping evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21 and 7p. Additionally, we find evidence of linkage on chromosomes 1, 5, 6, 16, and 22. The Columbia (CO) data does not indicate linkage to any of the Kaabi et al. peaks, instead implicating chromosomes 2 and 22q11 (2 Mb from COMT). There is some evidence of overlapping linkage between the IA and CO datasets on chromosomes 1 and 14. While use of fuzzy clustering has not produced complete concordance across datasets, it has produced more than previously seen in analyses of panic disorder proper. We conclude that chromosomes 4q21 and 7p should be considered strong candidate regions for panic and fear-associated anxiety disorder loci. More generally, this suggests that analyses including multiple aspects of psychopathology may lead to greater consistency across datasets. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Radiation-induced cross-link DNA damages: synthesis, measurement and insertion into oligonucleotides for replication and enzymatic repair studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellon, Sophie

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the synthesis, measurement and study of the biological impact of radio-induced DNA double damages. In the first part, the author reports the study of the reactivity and fate of the 5-(2'-desoxy-uridilyl)methyl radical which is one of the intermediates formed by oxidizing photo-sensitisation of thymine. The next part reports results of the formation and measurement of double damages of isolated and cellular DNA, notably in the case of γ irradiation. The third part reports the study of in vitro replication of one of the double damages. The behaviour of different polymerases with respect to the damage is reported. Finally, the modified oligonucleotide has been used as a substrate to highlight possible activities of enzymatic repair for this type of cross-link damages by purified proteins or proteins present within cellular extracts [fr

  4. Replication of bacteriophage lambda DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurimoto, T.; Matsubara, K.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper results of studies on the mechanism of bacteriophage lambda replication using molecular biological and biochemical approaches are reported. The purification of the initiator proteins, O and P, and the role of the O and P proteins in the initiation of lambda DNA replication through interactions with specific DNA sequences are described. 47 references, 15 figures

  5. Replication study of STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism and risk of rheumatoid arthritis in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Liu, Ruiping; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Yong; Sun, Rongbin; Tang, Peifu

    2013-09-10

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are common systemic autoimmune diseases with genetic and environmental predisposing factors. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 4 (STAT4) transmits signals induced by interleukin-12, interleukin-23 and interferon-γ, which are key cytokines and play important roles in the development of autoimmune diseases. Previous studies confirmed the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T locus to be associated with RA. Thus we conducted a replication study to investigate STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism and RA/AS susceptibility in a Chinese population. We studied STAT4 rs7574865 G/T gene polymorphism in 520 patients with RA, 100 AS patients and 520 controls in a Chinese population. Genotyping was done using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). When the STAT4 rs7574865 GG homozygote genotype was used as the reference group, the GT or GT/TT genotypes were associated with the risk for RA. After stratification analyses, a significantly increased risk for RA associated with the STAT4 rs7574865 GT genotype was evident among the rheumatoid factor (RF)-positive patients, patients with higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) level and patients with higher RA disease activity score (DAS28) compared with the STAT4 rs7574865 GG genotype. A significantly increased risk for RA associated with the STAT4 rs7574865 TT genotype was evident among older patients and RF-negative patients compared with the STAT4 rs7574865 GG genotype. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T was not associated with susceptibility to AS. This replication study confirmed that STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphism was associated with the risk of RA. STAT4 polymorphisms are associated with rheumatoid arthritis risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multicenter dizygotic twin cohort study confirms two linkage susceptibility loci for body mass index at 3q29 and 7q36 and identifies three further potential novel loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kettunen, J; Perola, M; Martin, N G

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify common loci and potential genetic variants affecting body mass index (BMI, kg m(-2)) in study populations originating from Europe. DESIGN: We combined genome-wide linkage scans of six cohorts from Australia, Denmark, Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and the United Kingdom...... with an approximately 10-cM microsatellite marker map. Variance components linkage analysis was carried out with age, sex and country of origin as covariates. SUBJECTS: The GenomEUtwin consortium consists of twin cohorts from eight countries (Australia, Denmark, the Netherlands, Finland, Italy, Norway, Sweden...... and the United Kingdom) with a total data collection of more than 500,000 monozygotic and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. Variance due to early-life events and the environment is reduced within twin pairs, which makes DZ pairs highly valuable for linkage studies of complex traits. This study totaled 4401 European-originated...

  7. Evidence, from family studies, for linkage disequilibrium between TGFA and a gene for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Hongshu; Lee, A.; Gasser, D.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Sassani, R.; Bartlett, S.P. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buetow, K.H. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hecht, J.T. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States); Malcolm, S.; Winter, R.M.; Vintiner, G.M. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom)

    1994-11-01

    The inheritance of alleles of the transforming growth factor alpha (TGFA) locus has been studied in families affected with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P), by using the transmission/disequilibrium test described by Spielman and colleagues. Only heterozygous parents with an affected child can be included in this test, but within such families a significantly greater frequency of C2 alleles were transmitted to affected children than would be expected by chance. There was no evidence that the total number of C2 alleles transmitted to affected and unaffected children differed significantly from random segregation. These data provide evidence from within families that a gene for susceptibility to CL/P is in significant linkage disequilibrium with the C2 allele of the TGFA locus. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Replication of endometriosis-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms from genome-wide association studies in a Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, J; Xu, H; Vodolazkaia, A; Fassbender, A; Kyama, C; Bokor, A; Gemzell-Danielsson, K; D'Hooghe, T M; Falconer, H

    2013-03-01

    Is it possible to replicate the previously identified genetic association of four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs12700667, rs7798431, rs1250248 and rs7521902, with endometriosis in a Caucasian population? A borderline association was observed for rs1250248 and endometriosis (P = 0.049). However, we could not replicate the other previously identified endometriosis-associated SNPs (rs12700667, rs7798431 and rs7521902) in the same population. Endometriosis is considered a complex disease, influenced by several genetic and environmental factors, as well as interactions between them. Previous studies have found genetic associations with endometriosis for SNPs at the 7p15 and 2q35 loci in a Caucasian population. Allele frequencies of SNPs were investigated in patients with endometriosis and controls. Blood samples and peritoneal biopsies were taken from a Caucasian female population consisting of 1129 patients with endometriosis and 831 controls. DNA was extracted for genotyping. The study was performed at a University hospital and research laboratories. A weak association with endometriosis (all stages) was observed for rs1250248 (P = 0.049). No significant associations were observed for the SNPs rs12700667, rs7798431 and rs7521902. A non-significant trend towards the association of rs1250248 with moderate/severe endometriosis was observed (odds ratio 1.18, 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.44). The inability to confirm all previous findings may result from differences between populations and type II errors. Our result demonstrates the difficulty of identifying common genetic variants in complex diseases. This study was supported by grants from the Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm City County/Karolinska Institutet (ALF), Stockholm, Sweden, Swedish Medical Research Council (K2007-54X-14212-06-3, K2010-54X-14212-09-3), Stockholm, Sweden, Leuven University Research Council (Onderzoeksraad KU Leuven), the Leuven University Hospitals Clinical Research Foundation

  9. Success and failure in replication of genotype-phenotype associations: How does replication help in understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic variation in outbred populations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielzeth, Holger; Rios Villamil, Alejandro; Burri, Reto

    2018-03-25

    Recent developments in sequencing technologies have facilitated genomewide mapping of phenotypic variation in natural populations. Such mapping efforts face a number of challenges potentially leading to low reproducibility. However, reproducible research forms the basis of scientific progress. We here discuss the options for replication and the reasons for potential nonreproducibility. We then review the evidence for reproducible quantitative trait loci (QTL) with a focus on natural animal populations. Existing case studies of replication fall into three categories: (i) traits that have been mapped to major effect loci (including chromosomal inversion and supergenes) by independent research teams; (ii) QTL fine-mapped in discovery populations; and (iii) attempts to replicate QTL across multiple populations. Major effect loci, in particular those associated with inversions, have been successfully replicated in several cases within and across populations. Beyond such major effect variants, replication has been more successful within than across populations, suggesting that QTL discovered in natural populations may often be population-specific. This suggests that biological causes (differences in linkage patterns, allele frequencies or context-dependencies of QTL) contribute to nonreproducibility. Evidence from other fields, notably animal breeding and QTL mapping in humans, suggests that a significant fraction of QTL is indeed reproducible in direction and magnitude at least within populations. However, there is also a large number of QTL that cannot be easily reproduced. We put forward that more studies should explicitly address the causes and context-dependencies of QTL signals, in particular to disentangle linkage differences, allele frequency differences and gene-by-environment interactions as biological causes of nonreproducibility of QTL, especially between populations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. GWA study data mining and independent replication identify cardiomyopathy-associated 5 (CMYA5) as a risk gene for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X; Lee, G; Maher, B S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses using the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) and molecular genetics of schizophrenia genome-wide association study supported by the genetic association information network (MGS-GAIN) schizophrenia data sets and performed...... bioinformatic prioritization for all the markers with P-values ¿0.05 in both data sets. In this process, we found that in the CMYA5 gene, there were two non-synonymous markers, rs3828611 and rs10043986, showing nominal significance in both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples. In a combined analysis of both the CATIE...... in our Irish samples and was dropped out without further investigation. The other two markers were verified in 23 other independent data sets. In a meta-analysis of all 23 replication samples (family samples, 912 families with 4160 subjects; case-control samples, 11¿380 cases and 15¿021 controls), we...

  11. A replicated field intervention study evaluating the impact of a highly adjustable chair and office ergonomics training on visual symptoms☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Cammie Chaumont; Amick, Benjamin C.; Robertson, Michelle; Bazzani, Lianna; DeRango, Kelly; Rooney, Ted; Moore, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Objective Examine the effects of two office ergonomics interventions in reducing visual symptoms at a private sector worksite. Methods A quasi-experimental study design evaluated the effects of a highly adjustable chair with office ergonomics training intervention (CWT group) and the training only (TO group) compared with no intervention (CO group). Data collection occurred 2 and 1 month(s) pre-intervention and 2, 6 and 12 months post-intervention. During each data collection period, a work environment and health questionnaire (covariates) and daily health diary (outcomes) were completed. Multilevel statistical models tested hypotheses. Results Both the training only intervention (p office ergonomics training alone and coupled with a highly adjustable chair reduced visual symptoms. In replicating results from a public sector worksite at a private sector worksite the external validity of the interventions is strengthened, thus broadening its generalizability. PMID:22030069

  12. A replicated field intervention study evaluating the impact of a highly adjustable chair and office ergonomics training on visual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, Cammie Chaumont; Amick, Benjamin C; Robertson, Michelle; Bazzani, Lianna; DeRango, Kelly; Rooney, Ted; Moore, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Examine the effects of two office ergonomics interventions in reducing visual symptoms at a private sector worksite. A quasi-experimental study design evaluated the effects of a highly adjustable chair with office ergonomics training intervention (CWT group) and the training only (TO group) compared with no intervention (CO group). Data collection occurred 2 and 1 month(s) pre-intervention and 2, 6 and 12 months post-intervention. During each data collection period, a work environment and health questionnaire (covariates) and daily health diary (outcomes) were completed. Multilevel statistical models tested hypotheses. Both the training only intervention (poffice ergonomics training alone and coupled with a highly adjustable chair reduced visual symptoms. In replicating results from a public sector worksite at a private sector worksite the external validity of the interventions is strengthened, thus broadening its generalizability. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Students classified as LD who received course substitutions for the college foreign language requirement: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard L; Philips, Lois G; Javorsky, James

    2002-01-01

    This replication study examined whether 158 college students classified as learning disabled (LD) who were granted course substitutions for the foreign language (FL) requirement would display significant cognitive and academic achievement differences when grouped by levels of IQ-achievement and achievement-achievement discrepancy and by level of performance on an FL aptitude test (Modern Language Aptitude Test; MLAT), phonological/orthographic processing measures, and in FL courses. The results showed that there were few differences among groups with differing levels of IQ-achievement or achievement-achievement discrepancy (i.e., 1.50 SD) on MLAT and American College Testing (ACT) scores, graduating grade point average (GPA), or college FL GPA. The results also showed that between groups who scored at or above versus below the 15th percentile (i.e., or = 1.0 SD) for classification as LD. These findings suggest that many traditional assumptions about LD and FL learning are likely to be false.

  14. Bayesian estimates of linkage disequilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abad-Grau María M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maximum likelihood estimator of D' – a standard measure of linkage disequilibrium – is biased toward disequilibrium, and the bias is particularly evident in small samples and rare haplotypes. Results This paper proposes a Bayesian estimation of D' to address this problem. The reduction of the bias is achieved by using a prior distribution on the pair-wise associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that increases the likelihood of equilibrium with increasing physical distances between pairs of SNPs. We show how to compute the Bayesian estimate using a stochastic estimation based on MCMC methods, and also propose a numerical approximation to the Bayesian estimates that can be used to estimate patterns of LD in large datasets of SNPs. Conclusion Our Bayesian estimator of D' corrects the bias toward disequilibrium that affects the maximum likelihood estimator. A consequence of this feature is a more objective view about the extent of linkage disequilibrium in the human genome, and a more realistic number of tagging SNPs to fully exploit the power of genome wide association studies.

  15. Design of special planar linkages

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jing-Shan; Ma, Ning; Chu, Fulei

    2013-01-01

    Planar linkages play a very important role in mechanical engineering. As the simplest closed chain mechanisms, planar four-bar linkages are widely used in mechanical engineering, civil engineering and aerospace engineering.Design of Special Planar Linkages proposes a uniform design theory for planar four-bar linkages. The merit of the method proposed in this book is that it allows engineers to directly obtain accurate results when there are such solutions for the specified n precise positions; otherwise, the best approximate solutions will be found. This book discusses the kinematics and reach

  16. Polymorphisms in RYBP and AOAH genes are associated with chronic rhinosinusitis in a Chinese population: a replication study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of CRS is believed to be the result of combined interactions between the genetic background of the affected subject and environmental factors. OBJECTIVES: To replicate and extend our recent findings from genetic association studies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS performed in a Canadian Caucasian population in a Chinese population. METHODS: In a case-control replication study, DNA samples were obtained from CRS with (n  = 306; CRSwNP and without (n = 332; CRSsNP nasal polyps, and controls (n = 315 in a Chinese population. A total of forty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from previous identified SNPs associated with CRS in Canadian population, and SNPs from the CHB HapMap dataset were individually genotyped. RESULTS: We identified two SNPs respectively in RYBP (rs4532099, p = 2.15E-06, OR = 2.59 and AOAH (rs4504543, p = 0.0001152, OR = 0.58 significantly associated with whole CRS cohort. Subgroup analysis for the presence of nasal polyps (CRSwNP and CRSsNP displayed significant association in CRSwNP cohorts regarding to one SNP in RYBP (P = 3.24(E-006, OR = 2.76. Evidence of association in the CRSsNP groups in terms of 2 SNPs (AOAH_rs4504543 and RYBP_rs4532099 was detected as well. Stratifying analysis by gender demonstrated that none of the selected SNPs were associated with CRSwNP as well as CRSsNP. Meanwhile 3 SNPs (IL1A_rs17561, P = 0.005778; IL1A_rs1800587, P = 0.009561; IRAK4_rs4251513, P = 0.03837 were associated with serum total IgE level. CONCLUSIONS: These genes are biologically plausible, with roles in regulation of transcription (RYBP and inflammatory response (AOAH. The present data suggests the potential common genetic basis in the development of CRS in Chinese and Caucasian population.

  17. A genome-wide association study of bipolar disorder with comorbid eating disorder replicates the SOX2-OT region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohua; Kelsoe, John R; Greenwood, Tiffany A

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a heterogeneous mood disorder associated with several important clinical comorbidities, such as eating disorders. This clinical heterogeneity complicates the identification of genetic variants contributing to bipolar susceptibility. Here we investigate comorbidity of eating disorders as a subphenotype of bipolar disorder to identify genetic variation that is common and unique to both disorders. We performed a genome-wide association analysis contrasting 184 bipolar subjects with eating disorder comorbidity against both 1370 controls and 2006 subjects with bipolar disorder only from the Bipolar Genome Study (BiGS). The most significant genome-wide finding was observed bipolar with comorbid eating disorder vs. controls within SOX2-OT (p=8.9×10(-8) for rs4854912) with a secondary peak in the adjacent FXR1 gene (p=1.2×10(-6) for rs1805576) on chromosome 3q26.33. This region was also the most prominent finding in the case-only analysis (p=3.5×10(-7) and 4.3×10(-6), respectively). Several regions of interest containing genes involved in neurodevelopment and neuroprotection processes were also identified. While our primary finding did not quite reach genome-wide significance, likely due to the relatively limited sample size, these results can be viewed as a replication of a recent study of eating disorders in a large cohort. These findings replicate the prior association of SOX2-OT with eating disorders and broadly support the involvement of neurodevelopmental/neuroprotective mechanisms in the pathophysiology of both disorders. They further suggest that different clinical manifestations of bipolar disorder may reflect differential genetic contributions and argue for the utility of clinical subphenotypes in identifying additional molecular pathways leading to illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A microsatellite linkage map of Drosophila mojavensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schully Sheri

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila mojavensis has been a model system for genetic studies of ecological adaptation and speciation. However, despite its use for over half a century, no linkage map has been produced for this species or its close relatives. Results We have developed and mapped 90 microsatellites in D. mojavensis, and we present a detailed recombinational linkage map of 34 of these microsatellites. A slight excess of repetitive sequence was observed on the X-chromosome relative to the autosomes, and the linkage groups have a greater recombinational length than the homologous D. melanogaster chromosome arms. We also confirmed the conservation of Muller's elements in 23 sequences between D. melanogaster and D. mojavensis. Conclusions The microsatellite primer sequences and localizations are presented here and made available to the public. This map will facilitate future quantitative trait locus mapping studies of phenotypes involved in adaptation or reproductive isolation using this species.

  19. Genome wide linkage disequilibrium in Chinese asparagus bean (Vigna. unguiculata ssp. sesquipedialis) germplasm: implications for domestication history and genome wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, P; Wu, X; Wang, B; Luo, J; Liu, Y; Ehlers, J D; Close, T J; Roberts, P A; Lu, Z; Wang, S; Li, G

    2012-07-01

    Association mapping of important traits of crop plants relies on first understanding the extent and patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the particular germplasm being investigated. We characterize here the genetic diversity, population structure and genome wide LD patterns in a set of asparagus bean (Vigna. unguiculata ssp. sesquipedialis) germplasm from China. A diverse collection of 99 asparagus bean and normal cowpea accessions were genotyped with 1127 expressed sequence tag-derived single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs). The proportion of polymorphic SNPs across the collection was relatively low (39%), with an average number of SNPs per locus of 1.33. Bayesian population structure analysis indicated two subdivisions within the collection sampled that generally represented the 'standard vegetable' type (subgroup SV) and the 'non-standard vegetable' type (subgroup NSV), respectively. Level of LD (r(2)) was higher and extent of LD persisted longer in subgroup SV than in subgroup NSV, whereas LD decayed rapidly (0-2 cM) in both subgroups. LD decay distance varied among chromosomes, with the longest (≈ 5 cM) five times longer than the shortest (≈ 1 cM). Partitioning of LD variance into within- and between-subgroup components coupled with comparative LD decay analysis suggested that linkage group 5, 7 and 10 may have undergone the most intensive epistatic selection toward traits favorable for vegetable use. This work provides a first population genetic insight into domestication history of asparagus bean and demonstrates the feasibility of mapping complex traits by genome wide association study in asparagus bean using a currently available cowpea SNPs marker platform.

  20. Implications of “too good to be true” for replication, theoretical claims, and experimental design: An example using prominent studies of racial bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Francis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In response to concerns about the validity of empirical findings in psychology, some scientists use replication studies as a way to validate good science and to identify poor science. Such efforts are resource intensive and are sometimes controversial (with accusations of researcher incompetence when a replication fails to show a previous result. An alternative approach is to examine the statistical properties of the reported literature to identify some cases of poor science. This review discusses some details of this process for prominent findings about racial bias, where a set of studies seems too good to be true. This kind of analysis is based on the original studies, so it avoids criticism from the original authors about the validity of replication studies. The analysis is also much easier to perform than a new empirical study. A variation of the analysis can also be used to explore whether it makes sense to run a replication study. As demonstrated here, there are situations where the existing data suggest that a direct replication of a set of studies is not worth the effort. Such a conclusion should motivate scientists to generate alternative experimental designs that better test theoretical ideas.

  1. Prelife catalysts and replicators

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    Life is based on replication and evolution. But replication cannot be taken for granted. We must ask what there was prior to replication and evolution. How does evolution begin? We have proposed prelife as a generative system that produces information and diversity in the absence of replication. We model prelife as a binary soup of active monomers that form random polymers. ‘Prevolutionary’ dynamics can have mutation and selection prior to replication. Some sequences might have catalytic acti...

  2. Career Services at Colleges and Universities: A 30-Year Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Bonita M.; Reardon, Robert C.; Bertoch, Sara C.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines career planning programs and career services offices at colleges and universities in the United States as viewed by senior student affairs officers (SSAOs). Findings from a 1979 study of career services offices (CSOs) were compared to the current findings. Additionally, new areas of research were examined in order to provide…

  3. TNFA-863 polymorphism is associated with a reduced risk of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A replication study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina-Coello Chaxiraxi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background TNF-α mediated inflammation is thought to play a key role in the respiratory and systemic features of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease. The aim of the present study was to replicate and extend recent findings in Taiwanese and Caucasian populations of associations between COPD susceptibility and variants of the TNFA gene in a Spanish cohort. Methods The 3 reported SNPs were complemented with nine tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP of the TNFA and LTA genes and genotyped in 724 individuals (202 COPD patients, 90 smokers without COPD and 432 healthy controls. Pulmonary function parameters and serum inflammatory markers were also measured in COPD patients. Results The TNFA rs1800630 (-863C/A SNP was associated with a lower COPD susceptibility (ORadj = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.33-0.77, p = 0.001. The -863A allele was also associated with less severe forms of the disease (GOLD stages I and II (ORadj = 0.303, 95%CI = 0.14-0.65, p = 0.014 and with lower scores of the BODE index (1 percent predicted (p = 0.004 and a lower BODE index (p = 0.003 over a 2 yrs follow-up period. None of the TNFA or LTA gene variants correlated with the serum inflammatory markers in COPD patients (p > 0.05. Conclusions We replicated the previously reported association between the TNFA -863 SNP and COPD. TNFA -863A allele may confer a protective effect to the susceptibility to the disease in the Spanish population.

  4. Negative Emotional Reactions to Challenging Behaviour and Staff Burnout: Two Replication Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, David; Horne, Sharon; Rose, John L.; Hastings, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Hastings, R. P. ["American Journal on Mental Retardation" (2002) Vol. 107, pp. 455-467] hypothesized that staff negative emotional reactions to challenging behaviour might accumulate over time to affect staff well-being. Only one previous study (Mitchell, G.& Hastings, R. P. ["American Journal on Mental…

  5. On the Prevalence of Multiple-Account Cheating in Massive Open Online Learning : A replicant study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bao, Yingying; Chen, G.; Hauff, C.; Hu, X.; Barnes, T.; Hershkovitz, A.; Paquette, L.

    2017-01-01

    Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are a promising form of online education. However, the occurrence of academic dishonesty has been threatening MOOC certificates’ effectiveness as a serious tool for recruiters and employers. Recently, a large-scale study on the log traces from more than one

  6. Validation of reported genetic risk factors for periodontitis in a large-scale replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Bochenek, G.; Manke, T.; Nothnagel, M.; Graetz, C.; Thien, A.; Jockel-Schneider, Y.; Harks, I.; Staufenbiel, I.; Wijmenga, C.; Eberhard, J.; Guzeldemir-Akcakanat, E.; Cine, N.; Folwaczny, M.; Noack, B.; Meyle, J.; Eickholz, P.; Trombelli, L.; Scapoli, C.; Nohutcu, R.; Bruckmann, C.; Doerfer, C.; Jepsen, S.; Loos, B.G.; Schreiber, S.

    2013-01-01

    Aim Many studies investigated the role of genetic variants in periodontitis, but few were established as risk factors. We aimed to validate the associations of recent candidate genes in aggressive periodontitis (AgP). Material and Methods We analysed 23 genes in 600 German AgP patients and 1441

  7. Validation of reported genetic risk factors for periodontitis in a large-scale replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, Arne S.; Bochenek, Gregor; Manke, Thomas; Nothnagel, Michael; Graetz, Christian; Thien, Anneke; Jockel-Schneider, Yvonne; Harks, Inga; Staufenbiel, Ingmar; Wijmenga, Cisca; Eberhard, Joerg; Guzeldemir-Akcakanat, Esra; Cine, Naci; Folwaczny, Mathias; Noack, Barbara; Meyle, Joerg; Eickholz, Peter; Trombelli, Leonardo; Scapoli, Chiara; Nohutcu, Rahime; Bruckmann, Corinna; Doerfer, Christof; Jepsen, Soren; Loos, Bruno G.; Schreiber, Stefan

    Aim Many studies investigated the role of genetic variants in periodontitis, but few were established as risk factors. We aimed to validate the associations of recent candidate genes in aggressive periodontitis (AgP). Material and Methods We analysed 23 genes in 600 German AgP patients and 1441

  8. Teaching of the International Component in the Introductory Marketing Course: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Robert; Koernig, Stephen K.; Greene, Scott

    2004-01-01

    For almost three decades, the AACSB and business leaders have sought increased emphasis on internationalizing students' perspectives. Recent studies demonstrate mixed results in the extent to which business schools have globalized their curricula. With decreasing student interest in the marketing major, Introductory Marketing emerges as a critical…

  9. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study in three European populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, G.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Delgado-Vega, A.M.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Balsa, A.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, B.; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Petersson, I.F.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Barrera, P.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Leeuwen, M.A. van; Wijmenga, C.; Koeleman, B.P.; Alarcon-Riquelme, M.E.; Martin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. METHODS:

  10. Dynamic changes in protein functional linkage networks revealed by integration with gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada R Hegde

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Response of cells to changing environmental conditions is governed by the dynamics of intricate biomolecular interactions. It may be reasonable to assume, proteins being the dominant macromolecules that carry out routine cellular functions, that understanding the dynamics of protein:protein interactions might yield useful insights into the cellular responses. The large-scale protein interaction data sets are, however, unable to capture the changes in the profile of protein:protein interactions. In order to understand how these interactions change dynamically, we have constructed conditional protein linkages for Escherichia coli by integrating functional linkages and gene expression information. As a case study, we have chosen to analyze UV exposure in wild-type and SOS deficient E. coli at 20 minutes post irradiation. The conditional networks exhibit similar topological properties. Although the global topological properties of the networks are similar, many subtle local changes are observed, which are suggestive of the cellular response to the perturbations. Some such changes correspond to differences in the path lengths among the nodes of carbohydrate metabolism correlating with its loss in efficiency in the UV treated cells. Similarly, expression of hubs under unique conditions reflects the importance of these genes. Various centrality measures applied to the networks indicate increased importance for replication, repair, and other stress proteins for the cells under UV treatment, as anticipated. We thus propose a novel approach for studying an organism at the systems level by integrating genome-wide functional linkages and the gene expression data.

  11. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The distances between nine loci on barley chromosome 5 have been studied in five two-point tests, three three-point tests, and one four-point test. Our previous chromosome 5 linkage map, which contained eleven loci mapped from literature data (Jensen and Jørgensen 1975), is extended with four loci......-position is fixed on the map by a locus (necl), which has a good marker gene located centrally in the linkage group. The positions of the other loci are their distances in centimorgans from the 0-position; loci in the direction of the short chromosome arm are assigned positive values and those...

  12. Association of SNCA with Parkinson: replication in the Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Biomarker Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hongliu; Sarokhan, Alison K.; Roderick, Sarah S.; Bakshi, Rachit; Maher, Nancy E.; Ashourian, Paymon; Kan, Caroline G.; Chang, Sunny; Santarlasci, Andrea; Swords, Kyleen E.; Ravina, Bernard M.; Hayes, Michael T.; Sohur, U. Shivraj; Wills, Anne-Marie; Flaherty, Alice W.; Unni, Vivek K.; Hung, Albert Y.; Selkoe, Dennis J.; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Schlossmacher, Michael G.; Sudarsky, Lewis R.; Growdon, John H.; Ivinson, Adrian J.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Scherzer, Clemens R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mutations in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA) cause autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson’s disease, but the substantial risk conferred by this locus to the common sporadic disease has only recently emerged from genome-wide association studies. Methods Here we genotyped a prioritized non-coding variant in SNCA intron-4 in 344 patients with Parkinson’s and 275 controls from the longitudinal Harvard NeuroDiscovery Center Biomarker Study. Results The common minor allele of rs2736990 was associated with elevated disease susceptibility (odds ratio = 1.40, P value = 0.0032). Conclusions This result increases confidence in the notion that in many clinically well-characterized patients genetic variation in SNCA contributes to “sporadic” disease. PMID:21953863

  13. Replication of genome wide association studies on hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility loci in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangmei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified three loci (rs17401966 in KIF1B, rs7574865 in STAT4, rs9275319 in HLA-DQ as being associated with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-related HCC in a Chinese population, two loci (rs2596542 in MICA, rs9275572 located between HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB with hepatitis C virus-related HCC (HCV-related HCC in a Japanese population. In the present study, we sought to determine whether these SNPs are predictive for HBV-related HCC development in other Chinese population as well. METHOD AND FINDINGS: We genotyped 4 SNPs, rs2596542, rs9275572, rs17401966, rs7574865, in 506 HBV-related HCC patients and 772 chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients in Han Chinese by TaqMan methods. Odds ratio(ORand 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated by logistic regression. In our case-control study, significant association between rs9275572 and HCC were observed (P = 0.02, OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.56-0.95. In the further haplotype analysis between rs2596542 at 6p21.33 and rs9275572 at 6p21.3, G-A showed a protective effect on HBV-related HCC occurrence (P<0.001, OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.52-0.84. CONCLUSION: These findings provided convincing evidence that rs9275572 significantly associated with HBV-related HCC.

  14. Replication of genome wide association studies on hepatocellular carcinoma susceptibility loci in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kangmei; Shi, Weimei; Xin, Zhenhui; Wang, Huifen; Zhu, Xilin; Wu, Xiaopan; Li, Zhuo; Li, Hui; Liu, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified three loci (rs17401966 in KIF1B, rs7574865 in STAT4, rs9275319 in HLA-DQ) as being associated with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HBV-related HCC) in a Chinese population, two loci (rs2596542 in MICA, rs9275572 located between HLA-DQA and HLA-DQB) with hepatitis C virus-related HCC (HCV-related HCC) in a Japanese population. In the present study, we sought to determine whether these SNPs are predictive for HBV-related HCC development in other Chinese population as well. We genotyped 4 SNPs, rs2596542, rs9275572, rs17401966, rs7574865, in 506 HBV-related HCC patients and 772 chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in Han Chinese by TaqMan methods. Odds ratio(OR)and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated by logistic regression. In our case-control study, significant association between rs9275572 and HCC were observed (P = 0.02, OR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.56-0.95). In the further haplotype analysis between rs2596542 at 6p21.33 and rs9275572 at 6p21.3, G-A showed a protective effect on HBV-related HCC occurrence (P<0.001, OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.52-0.84). These findings provided convincing evidence that rs9275572 significantly associated with HBV-related HCC.

  15. Common variant of ALPK1 is not associated with gout: a replication study

    OpenAIRE

    Chiba, Toshinori; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Shimizu, Seiko; Wakai, Kenji; Suma, Shino; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yutaka; Shimizu, Toru; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gout is one of the most kinds of common inflammatory arthritis as a consequence of hyperuricemia. Alpha-protein kinase 1 (ALPK1) gene locates in a gout-susceptibility locus on chromosome 4q21?31, and encodes ALPK1 protein which plays a pivotal role in the phosphorylation of myosin 1. In the previous genetic study of Taiwanese populations, 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs11726117, rs231247 and rs231253, in ALPK1 gene were reported to have a significant association with gout. Howeve...

  16. A Formalization of Linkage Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Christensen, A.I.; Hansen, Jens A.

    In this report a formalization of genetic linkage analysis is introduced. Linkage analysis is a computationally hard biomathematical method, which purpose is to locate genes on the human genome. It is rooted in the new area of bioinformatics and no formalization of the method has previously been ...

  17. Replication study confirms link between TSPAN18 mutation and schizophrenia in Han Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Yuan

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia (SCZ is a severe psychiatric disorder associated with many different risk factors, both genetic and environmental. A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS of Han Chinese identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs11038167, rs11038172, and rs835784 in the tetraspanins gene TSPAN18 as possible susceptibility loci for schizophrenia. Hoping to validate these findings, we conducted a case-control study of Han Chinese with 1093 schizophrenia cases and 1022 healthy controls. Using the LDR-PCR method to genotype polymorphisms in TSPAN18, we found no significant differences (P>0.05 between patients and controls in either the allele or genotype frequency of the SNPs rs11038167 and rs11038172. We did find, however, that the frequency of the 'A' allele of SNP rs835784 is significantly higher in patients than in controls. We further observed a significant association (OR= 1.197, 95%CI= 1.047-1.369 between risk for SCZ and this 'A' allele. These results confirm the significant association, in Han Chinese populations, of increased SCZ risk and the variant of the TSPAN18 gene containing the 'A' allele of SNP rs835784.

  18. Psychological essentialism among Korean children and adults: a modified replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Geunyoung

    2013-01-01

    Developmental psychologists have shown interest in the development of psychological essentialism among children; that is, a belief that certain psychological characteristics (such as personality) are relatively stable and unchanging. Although previous studies have shown that children are essentialistic about human traits, and the coherence among various essentialism dimensions increases with age, moderating cultural factors in the development of essentialism, especially among Asian children, have received little attention. Using the methodologies of Gelman, Heyman, and Legare (2007), levels of psychological essentialism among Korean children and adults were measured, and compared with the original US data. Results demonstrated cross-cultural similarity in the development of coherence in essentialistic thought, and difference in the level of essentialism among adult participants. The present findings imply that different cultural values between Asians and Westerners can play a role in the developmental trajectory of psychological essentialism.

  19. PET studies of phonetic processing of speech: review, replication, and reanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zatorre, R J; Meyer, E; Gjedde, A

    1996-01-01

    Positron emission tomography was used to investigate cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes associated with the processing of speech. In a first experiment, normal right-handed volunteers were scanned under two conditions that required phonetic processing (discrimination of final consonants and phoneme...... monitoring), and one baseline condition of passive listening. Analysis was carried out by paired-image subtraction, with MRI overlay for anatomical localization. Comparison of each phonetic condition with the baseline condition revealed increased CBF in the left frontal lobe, close to the border between...... Broca's area and the motor cortex, and in a left parietal region. A second experiment showed that this area was not activated by a semantic judgement task. Reanalysis of data from an earlier study, in which various baseline conditions were used, confirmed that this region of left frontal cortex...

  20. A Critical Review of Theory in Social Work Journals: A Replication Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S. Gentle-Genitty

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is multifold.Key aspects discussed include exploring the extent of theory discussion and progression in social work journals for the year 2004; discussing the necessity of theory in social work research and practice; reviewing previous research literature regarding evaluation of theory discussion and progression; proposing criteria for defining theory in social work journals; and presenting findings from the current study concerning theory discussion and progression in social work journals. Results: Of the 1,168 articles reviewed from 37 journals, 71 (approximately 6% met the criteria for theory development with empirical base. Thus, a minimal number of articles (3 out of 71 or 4.2% evaluated, based on the criteria in the theory quality scale (Table 1, received high quality ratings. Conclusion: Based on the results yielded by the analysis, we assert that social workers need to make a conscious effort to include theory in practice decisions.

  1. On the social nature of global self-esteem: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Yannick; Maiano, Christophe

    2007-10-01

    Few researchers have considered the relationship between global self-esteem and the reflected appraisal of others in one's life, or how reflected appraisals and global self-esteem may change as a result of interpersonal feedback. In this study, the authors collected data from 110 undergraduate students on (a) their global self-esteem and the reflected appraisals of multiple others in their lives and (b) how these dimensions changed in hypothetical interpersonal-feedback situations. Results showed that participants' global self-esteem was related to the reflected appraisals of their fathers, teachers, and friends. The results also indicated that others' reflected appraisals and the individual's global self-esteem fluctuated according to the nature (i.e., positive vs. negative) of the hypothetical interpersonal feedback. Overall, the findings emphasize the social nature and regulation of global self-esteem.

  2. On the Relationship between Brain Laterality and Language Proficiency in L2: A Replication Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Shakouri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper attempted to investigate whether there is any significant relationship between participants' brain laterality and L2 proficiency level. To carry out the experiment, 30 participants administered in the present study. Fifteen of them did not have any English language learning experience and were at the start of language learning, while the rest had attended L2 learning classes for about 2 years in a popular English language center, located in Bandar-e Anzali, Iran. Finally, the researchers concluded that the activity of the right hemisphere went up by the increase in language proficiency among bilinguals. Thereupon, the result of the paper was at variance with Albert and Obler's (1978 early work on hemispheric differentiation, which indicated that bilinguals were less hemispheric dominant than monolinguals.

  3. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study in three European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Gisela; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M; González-Gay, Miguel A; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernández-Gutierrez, Benjamín; González-Escribano, María F; Petersson, Ingemar F; van Riel, Piet L C M; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J H; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Leeuwen, Miek A; Wijmenga, Cisca; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Martín, Javier

    2008-07-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. Three different cohorts were included in the study: 923 RA patients and 1,296 healthy controls from Spain, 273 RA patients and 285 healthy controls from Sweden, and 876 RA patients and 893 healthy controls from The Netherlands. DNA from patients and controls was obtained from peripheral blood. Samples were genotyped for the STAT4 single-nucleotide polymorphism rs7574865 using a TaqMan 5'-allele discrimination assay. The chi-square test was performed to compare allele and genotype distributions. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated. We observed a significantly increased frequency of the minor T allele in RA patients compared with healthy controls in the Spanish population (24.8% versus 20.8%; P = 0.001, OR 1.26 [95% CI 1.09-1.45]). This association was confirmed in both the Swedish population (P = 0.03, OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.03-1.77]) and the Dutch population (P = 0.03, OR 1.45 [95% CI 1.21-1.73]). The overall P value for all 3 populations was 9.79 x 10(-6) (OR 1.25 [95% CI 1.13-1.37]). No association between rs7574865 and the presence of rheumatoid factor or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide autoantibodies was observed. A meta-analysis of all published STAT4 associations revealed an OR of 1.25 (95% CI 1.19-1.33) (P = 1 x 10(-5)). Our findings indicate an association between the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 and RA in 3 different populations, from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, thereby confirming previous data.

  4. Replication Study of Polymorphisms Associated With Brain Arteriovenous Malformation in a Population From South of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franciscatto, André Cerutti; Ludwig, Fernanda S; Matte, Ursula S; Mota, Simone; Stefani, Marco A

    2016-02-24

    The aim of this study was to reproducibly determine if any of the polymorphisms were associated with the susceptibility to brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVM) or the risk of intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) presentation. We recruited 63 BAVM patients and 96 controls. The polymorphisms selected for evaluation were apolipoprotein E (APOE), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF 238G>A - rs361525), interleukin 1 beta (IL1B 511C>T - rs16944 and IL1B -31T>C - rs1143627), activin-like kinase 1 (ACVRL1 IVS3-35A>G - rs2071219), endoglin (ENG 207G>A - rs11545664), and interleukin 6 (IL6 174G>C - rs1800795). In the single analysis, we observed statistically significant differences in the allele distributions for IL1B -31T>C (rs1143627) between the BAVM patients and control subjects (P = 0.02). There was a trend toward significance for the association between the IL1B 511C>T (rs16944) allele and BAVM risk (P = 0.07). In further logistic regression analysis, no polymorphism was significantly associated with the risk of BAVM. No polymorphisms were associated with hemorrhage presentation according to both single and multivariable analyses. In our sample from a south Brazil population, we found no association between the risks of BAVM and ICH presentation with any of the selected polymorphisms.

  5. Some methods for blindfolded record linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christen Peter

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The linkage of records which refer to the same entity in separate data collections is a common requirement in public health and biomedical research. Traditionally, record linkage techniques have required that all the identifying data in which links are sought be revealed to at least one party, often a third party. This necessarily invades personal privacy and requires complete trust in the intentions of that party and their ability to maintain security and confidentiality. Dusserre, Quantin, Bouzelat and colleagues have demonstrated that it is possible to use secure one-way hash transformations to carry out follow-up epidemiological studies without any party having to reveal identifying information about any of the subjects – a technique which we refer to as "blindfolded record linkage". A limitation of their method is that only exact comparisons of values are possible, although phonetic encoding of names and other strings can be used to allow for some types of typographical variation and data errors. Methods A method is described which permits the calculation of a general similarity measure, the n-gram score, without having to reveal the data being compared, albeit at some cost in computation and data communication. This method can be combined with public key cryptography and automatic estimation of linkage model parameters to create an overall system for blindfolded record linkage. Results The system described offers good protection against misdeeds or security failures by any one party, but remains vulnerable to collusion between or simultaneous compromise of two or more parties involved in the linkage operation. In order to reduce the likelihood of this, the use of last-minute allocation of tasks to substitutable servers is proposed. Proof-of-concept computer programmes written in the Python programming language are provided to illustrate the similarity comparison protocol. Conclusion Although the protocols described in

  6. Replication of prostate cancer risk loci in a Japanese case-control association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroki; Penney, Kathryn L; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Katoh, Takahiko; Yamano, Yuko; Yamakado, Minoru; Kimura, Takahiro; Kuruma, Hidetoshi; Kamata, Yuko; Egawa, Shin; Freedman, Matthew L

    2009-10-07

    Two prostate cancer genome-wide scans in populations of European ancestry identified several genetic variants that are strongly associated with prostate cancer risk. The effect of these risk variants and their cumulative effect in other populations are unknown. We evaluated the association of 23 risk single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with prostate cancer risk and clinical covariates (Gleason score, tumor aggressiveness, and age at diagnosis) in men of Japanese ancestry (311 case subjects and 1035 control subjects) using unconditional logistic regression. We also used logistic regression to test the association between increasing numbers of independently associated risk alleles and the risk of prostate cancer, prostate cancer aggressiveness, and age at diagnosis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Seven of the 23 SNPs (five independent loci) were associated with prostate cancer risk (P values ranged from .0084 to 2.3 x 10(-8) and effect sizes [estimated as odds ratios, ORs] ranged from 1.35 to 1.82). None of the seven SNPs was associated with Gleason score or aggressive disease. rs6983561 and rs4430796 were associated with age at diagnosis (Ps = .0188 and .0339, respectively). Men with six or more risk alleles (27% of case patients and 11% of control subjects) had a higher risk of prostate cancer than men with two or fewer risk alleles (7% of case patients and 20% of control subjects) (OR = 6.22, P = 1.5 x 10(-12)). These results highlight the critical importance of considering ancestry in understanding how risk alleles influence disease and suggest that risk estimates and variants differ across populations. It is important to perform studies in multiple ancestral populations so that the composite genetic architecture of prostate cancer can be rigorously addressed.

  7. Structural studies demonstrating a bacteriophage-like replication cycle of the eukaryote-infecting Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Milrot

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental stage in viral infection is the internalization of viral genomes in host cells. Although extensively studied, the mechanisms and factors responsible for the genome internalization process remain poorly understood. Here we report our observations, derived from diverse imaging methods on genome internalization of the large dsDNA Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus-1 (PBCV-1. Our studies reveal that early infection stages of this eukaryotic-infecting virus occurs by a bacteriophage-like pathway, whereby PBCV-1 generates a hole in the host cell wall and ejects its dsDNA genome in a linear, base-pair-by-base-pair process, through a membrane tunnel generated by the fusion of the virus internal membrane with the host membrane. Furthermore, our results imply that PBCV-1 DNA condensation that occurs shortly after infection probably plays a role in genome internalization, as hypothesized for the infection of some bacteriophages. The subsequent perforation of the host photosynthetic membranes presumably enables trafficking of viral genomes towards host nuclei. Previous studies established that at late infection stages PBCV-1 generates cytoplasmic organelles, termed viral factories, where viral assembly takes place, a feature characteristic of many large dsDNA viruses that infect eukaryotic organisms. PBCV-1 thus appears to combine a bacteriophage-like mechanism during early infection stages with a eukaryotic-like infection pathway in its late replication cycle.

  8. Effects of aquaculture researchers' job characteristics on linkage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the effects of researchers' job characteristics on linkage activities in Nigeria due to the fact that many fish farmers have not been properly reached with technologies and the problem of poor fish production has been attributed to the weak linkages existing between research, extension and fish farmers.

  9. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  10. Internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support for pain patients with emotional comorbidity: a replicated single case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilda Wurm

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In pain patients, comorbid emotional problems have been linked to negative outcomes, including suboptimal treatment gains. Developing parsimonious and accessible treatment options is therefore important. The overarching aim of this study was to test an internet delivered therapist guided transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support. An adapted version of the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatments of Emotional Disorders was used as an intervention for pain patients with residual pain problems and comorbid emotional problems after having received a multimodal pain rehabilitation. The study used a replicated AB single case experimental design (N = 5; 3 females. Outcome measures were depressive and general anxiety symptoms, pain intensity, pain coping problems, and diagnostic status. Feasibility measures (completion and compliance and patient satisfaction were also assessed. Scores on Nonoverlap of All Pairs (NAP indicate a decrease of anxiety for three participants and a decrease of depression for four participants. Decreases were small and did not always reach statistical significance. Also, Tau-U scores could only confirm a reliable trend for one participant. Two out of four patients who were diagnosed with psychiatric disorders before treatment did no longer fulfill diagnostic criteria posttreatment. No improvements could be seen on pain problems. The treatment was feasible and patient satisfaction was high. Hence, while an internet delivered transdiagnostic treatment with telephone support may be a feasible and accepted secondary intervention for pain patients with comorbid emotional problems, the effects are unclear. The gap between high patient satisfaction and small changes in symptomatology should be explored further.

  11. A quick behavioral dichotic word test is prognostic for clinical response to cognitive therapy for depression: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Gerard E; Haggerty, Agnes; Siegle, Greg J

    2017-02-01

    There are no commonly used clinical indicators of whether an individual will benefit from cognitive therapy (CT) for depression. A prior study found right ear (left hemisphere) advantage for perceiving dichotic words predicted CT response. This study replicates this finding at a different research center in clinical trials that included clinically representative samples and community therapists. Right-handed individuals with unipolar major depressive disorder who subsequently received 12-14 weeks of CT at the University of Pittsburgh were tested on dichotic fused words and complex tones tests. Responders to CT showed twice the mean right ear advantage in dichotic fused words performance than non-responders. Patients with a right ear advantage greater than the mean for healthy controls had an 81% response rate to CT, whereas those with performance lower than the mean for controls had a 46% response rate. Individuals with a right ear advantage, indicative of strong left hemisphere language dominance, may be better at utilizing cognitive processes and left frontotemporal cortical regions critical for success of CT for depression. Findings at two clinical research centers suggest that verbal dichotic listening may be a clinically disseminative brief, inexpensive and easily automated test prognostic for response to CT across diverse clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Deficit of entropy modulation of the EEG in schizophrenia associated to cognitive performance and symptoms. A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Vicente; Bachiller, Alejandro; Gomez-Pilar, Javier; Lubeiro, Alba; Hornero, Roberto; Cea-Cañas, Benjamín; Valcárcel, César; Haidar, Mahmoun-Karim; Poza, Jesús

    2017-09-05

    Spectral entropy (SE) is a measurement from information theory field that provides an estimation of EEG regularity and may be useful as a summary of its spectral properties. Previous studies using small samples reported a deficit of EEG entropy modulation in schizophrenia during cognitive activity. The present study is aimed at replicating this finding in a larger sample, to explore its cognitive and clinical correlates and to discard antipsychotic treatment as the main source of that deficit. We included 64 schizophrenia patients (21 first episodes, FE) and 65 healthy controls. We computed SE during performance of an odd-ball paradigm, at the windows prior (-300 to 0ms) and following (150 to 450ms) stimulus presentation. Modulation of SE was defined as the difference between post- and pre-stimulus windows. In comparison to controls, patients showed a deficit of SE modulation over frontal and central regions, also shown by FE patients. Baseline SE did not differ between patients and controls. Modulation deficit was directly associated with cognitive deficits and negative symptoms, and inversely with positive symptoms. SE modulation was not related to antipsychotic doses. Patients also showed a smaller change of median frequency (i.e., smaller slowing of oscillatory activity) of the EEG from pre- to post-stimulus windows. These results support that a deficit of fast modulation contributes to cognitive deficits and symptoms in schizophrenia patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Exploring cultural differences in feedback processes and perceived instructiveness during clerkships: replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhoyo, Yoyo; van Hell, Elisabeth A; Prihatiningsih, Titi S; Kuks, Jan B M; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke

    2014-03-01

    Cultural differences between countries may entail differences in feedback processes. By replicating a Dutch study in Indonesia, we analysed whether differences in processes influenced the perceived instructiveness of feedback. Over a two-week period, Indonesian students (n = 215) recorded feedback moments during clerkships, noting who provided the feedback, whether the feedback was based on observations, who initiated the feedback, and its perceived instructiveness. Data were compared with the earlier Dutch study and analysed with χ(2) tests, t-tests and multilevel techniques. Cultural differences were explored using Hofstede's Model, with Indonesia and the Netherlands differing on "power distance" and "individualism." Perceived instructiveness of feedback did not differ significantly between both countries. However, significant differences were found in feedback provider, observation and initiative. Indonesian students perceived feedback as more instructive if provided by specialists and initiated jointly by the supervisor and student (βresidents = -0.201, p culture. Further research is necessary to unravel other possible influences of culture in implementing feedback procedures in different countries.

  14. Diffusion, swelling, cross linkage study and mechanical properties of ZnO doped PVA/NaAlg blend polymer nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruswamy, B.; Ravindrachary, V.; Shruthi, C.; Hegde, Shreedatta; Sagar, Rohan N.

    2018-04-01

    ZnO nano particles were synthesized using a chemical precipitation method. Pure and ZnO nano particle doped PVA-NaAlg blend composite films were prepared using solution casing method. Structural information of these composites was studied using FTIR. Diffusion kinetics of these polymer blend composite were studied using Flory-Huggins theory. Using these diffusion studies, cross-linking density and swelling properties of the films were analyzed. Mechanical properties of these composite are also studied.

  15. An ADAM33 polymorphism associates with progression of preschool wheeze into childhood asthma: a prospective case-control study with replication in a birth cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester M M Klaassen

    Full Text Available The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined.To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma.In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a p<0.10, replication analysis was performed in an independent birth cohort study (KOALA study, n = 248 included for the present analysis.In the ADEM study, the minor alleles of ADAM33 rs511898 and rs528557 and the ORMDL3/GSDMB rs7216389 polymorphisms were negatively associated, whereas the minor alleles of IL4 rs2243250 and rs2070874 polymorphisms were positively associated with childhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97 p = 0.04 and no association with preschool wheeze.Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma.

  16. Testing causal models of job characteristics and employee well-being : a replication study using cross-lagged structural equation modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doest, ter L.; Jonge, de J.

    2006-01-01

    This study re-evaluated causal relationships between job characteristics (demands, autonomy, social support) and employee well-being (job satisfaction, emotional exhaustion) in a methodological replication of De Jonge et al.'s (2001) two-wave panel study. The principal difference was the 2-year time

  17. Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project discovery and replication criteria for cases and controls: Data from a community-based prospective cohort study with autopsy follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Paul K; Foroud, Tatiana; Montine, Thomas J; Larson, Eric B

    2017-12-01

    The Alzheimer's Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP) used different criteria for assigning case and control status from the discovery and replication phases of the project. We considered data from a community-based prospective cohort study with autopsy follow-up where participants could be categorized as case, control, or neither by both definitions and compared the two sets of criteria. We used data from the Adult Changes in Thought (ACT) study including Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-IV criteria for dementia status, McKhann et al. criteria for clinical Alzheimer's disease, and Braak and Consortium to Establish a Registry for AD findings on neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques to categorize the 621 ACT participants of European ancestry who died and came to autopsy. We applied ADSP discovery and replication definitions to identify controls, cases, and people who were neither controls nor cases. There was some agreement between the discovery and replication definitions. Major areas of discrepancy included the finding that only 40% of the discovery sample controls had sufficiently low levels of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques to be considered controls by the replication criteria and the finding that 16% of the replication phase cases were diagnosed with non-AD dementia during life and thus were excluded as cases for the discovery phase. These findings should inform interpretation of genetic association findings from the ADSP. Differences in genetic association findings between the two phases of the study may reflect these different phenotype definitions from the discovery and replication phase of the ADSP. Copyright © 2017 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reporting Errors in Siblings’ Survival Histories and Their Impact on Adult Mortality Estimates: Results From a Record Linkage Study in Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Kanté, Almamy M.; Duthé, Géraldine; Andro, Armelle

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of adult mortality in countries with limited vital registration (e.g., sub-Saharan Africa) are often derived from information about the survival of a respondent’s siblings. We evaluated the completeness and accuracy of such data through a record linkage study conducted in Bandafassi, located in southeastern Senegal. We linked at the individual level retrospective siblings’ survival histories (SSH) reported by female respondents (n = 268) to prospective mortality data and genealogies collected through a health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS). Respondents often reported inaccurate lists of siblings. Additions to these lists were uncommon, but omissions were frequent: respondents omitted 3.8 % of their live sisters, 9.1 % of their deceased sisters, and 16.6 % of their sisters who had migrated out of the DSS area. Respondents underestimated the age at death of the siblings they reported during the interview, particularly among siblings who had died at older ages (≥45 years). Restricting SSH data to person-years and events having occurred during a recent reference period reduced list errors but not age and date errors. Overall, SSH data led to a 20 % underestimate of 45q15 relative to HDSS data. Our study suggests new quality improvement strategies for SSH data and demonstrates the potential use of HDSS data for the validation of “unconventional” demographic techniques. PMID:24493063

  19. Reporting errors in siblings' survival histories and their impact on adult mortality estimates: results from a record linkage study in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Kanté, Almamy M; Duthé, Géraldine; Andro, Armelle

    2014-04-01

    Estimates of adult mortality in countries with limited vital registration (e.g., sub-Saharan Africa) are often derived from information about the survival of a respondent's siblings. We evaluated the completeness and accuracy of such data through a record linkage study conducted in Bandafassi, located in southeastern Senegal. We linked at the individual level retrospective siblings' survival histories (SSH) reported by female respondents (n = 268) to prospective mortality data and genealogies collected through a health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS). Respondents often reported inaccurate lists of siblings. Additions to these lists were uncommon, but omissions were frequent: respondents omitted 3.8 % of their live sisters, 9.1 % of their deceased sisters, and 16.6 % of their sisters who had migrated out of the DSS area. Respondents underestimated the age at death of the siblings they reported during the interview, particularly among siblings who had died at older ages (≥45 years). Restricting SSH data to person-years and events having occurred during a recent reference period reduced list errors but not age and date errors. Overall, SSH data led to a 20 % underestimate of 45 q 15 relative to HDSS data. Our study suggests new quality improvement strategies for SSH data and demonstrates the potential use of HDSS data for the validation of "unconventional" demographic techniques.

  20. Rationales Shaping International Linkages in Higher Education: A Qualitative Case Study of the ASU-ITESM Strategic Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho Lizarraga, Monica Irene

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative case study examines the rationales of the relationship between Arizona State University (ASU)--an American public research university--and Tecnologico de Monterrey (ITESM), a Mexican private not for profit research university. The focus of the study is to document the different meanings participants attached to the rationales of…

  1. Violent offending promotes appetitive aggression rather than posttraumatic stress - a replication study with Burundian ex-combatants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke eKöbach

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Research has identified appetitive aggression, i.e., the perception of committed, violent acts as appealing, exciting and fascinating, as a common phenomenon within populations living in precarious and violent circumstances. Investigating demobilized soldiers in the Democratic Republic of Congo demonstrated that violent offending is associated with appetitive aggression but not necessarily with symptoms of posttraumatic stress. In the present study we sought to replicate these results in an independent and larger sample of demobilized soldiers from Burundi. As with the Congolese ex-combatants, random forest regression revealed that the number of lifetime perpetrated violent acts is the most important predictor of appetitive aggression and the number of lifetime experienced traumatic events is the main predictor for posttraumatic stress. Perpetrated violent acts with salient cues of hunting (pursuing the victim, the sight of blood, etc. were most predictive for perceiving violent cues appealingly after demobilization. Moreover, the association of violent acts and appetitive aggression as well as traumatic events and posttraumatic stress remains strong even years after demobilization. Patterns of traumatic events and perpetrated acts as predictors for posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression seem to be robust among different samples of ex-combatants who fought in civil wars. Psychotherapeutic interventions that address these complementary facets of combat-related disorders -- namely, posttraumatic stress and appetitive aggression -- are indispensable for a successful reintegration of those who fought in armed conflicts and to achieve a successful transition to peace.

  2. Is Comfort Food Really Good for the Soul? A Replication of Troisi and Gabriel’s (2011 Study 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lay See eOng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of three high-powered replications of Troisi and Gabriel’s (2011 idea that writing about comfort food reduces feelings of loneliness amongst securely attached individuals after a belongingness threat. We conducted our studies amongst a large group of participants (Total N = 649 amongst American (MTurk, Dutch (Tilburg University; TiU, and Singaporean (Singapore Management University; SMU samples. Participants first completed an attachment style scale, followed by writing two essays for manipulating a sense of belongingness and salience of comfort food, and then reporting their loneliness levels. We did not confirm the overall effect over all three countries. However, exploratory results provide the preliminary suggestion that 1 the comfort food explanation likely holds amongst the American samples (including Troisi & Gabriel’s, but not amongst the TiU and SMU samples, and potentially that 2 the TiU and SMU participants self-regulate through warmer (vs. colder temperature foods. Both of these should be regarded with great caution as these analyses were exploratory, and because the Ns for the different temperature foods were small. We suspect we have uncovered first cross-cultural differences in self-regulation through food, but further confirmatory work is required to understand the cultural significance of comfort food for self-regulation.

  3. A pilot study on interaction between donkey tetherin and EIAV stains with different virulent and replication characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qiucheng; Ma, Jian; Wang, Xuefeng; Guo, Miaomiao; Li, Yanfei; Wang, Xiaojun

    2017-05-01

    Tetherin (BST-2) is an important host restriction factor that can inhibit the release of a diverse array of enveloped viruses from infected cells. Conversely, to facilitate their release and spread, many viruses have evolved various strategies to overcome the antiviral effect of tetherin in a species-specific manner. During the development of an attenuated equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) vaccine in our laboratory, we found that serial passage of a field-isolated virulent EIAV strains in horse and donkey as well as the cultivated donkey cells, produces several typical EIAV strains, including EIAV DV , EIAV DLV , and EIAV FDDV , which exhibit distinct virulence and replication features in vivo and in vitro. However, the role of host restriction factors in EIAV evolution during the serial passage is not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate whether these newly generated strains adapt differently to donkey tetherin (do-tetherin) based on their virulence. We found that do-tetherin exerts an inhibition on the release of the viral particles produced by all three strains, albeit with varying intensity: EIAV DV   EIAV DLV  > EIAV FDDV . These results indicate that donkey tetherin is involved in shaping of EIAV evolution during serial passage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Productively infected murine Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors define new animal models for studying and targeting KSHV oncogenesis and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany M Ashlock

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells.

  5. Haplotype diversity and linkage disequilibrium at DRD2 locus--a study on four population groups of Andhra Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathy, Kallur Nava; Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Shukla, Deepti; Kaur, Harpreet; Sachdeva, Mohinder Pal; Rao, A P; Saksena, Deepti; Kalla, Aloke Kumar

    2009-02-01

    Dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) is expressed in the central nervous system and has a high affinity for many antipsychotic drugs. Besides several epidemiological investigations on association of DRD2 locus polymorphism(s) with neuropsychiatric problems and addictive behavior, a few polymorphisms in this locus have also been used to understand genomic diversity and population migratory histories globally. The present study attempts to understand the genomic diversity/affinity among four endogamous groups of Andhra Pradesh (India) against the backdrop of diversity studies from other parts of India and the rest of the world, with special reference to DRD2 locus. The four population groups from Adilabad District of Andhra Pradesh, namely, Brahmin (n=50), Nayakpod (n=49), Thoti (n=52), and Kolam (n=53), were included in the study. The DRD2 markers typed for the present study are three biallelic restriction fragments, that is, TaqI A (rs1800497), TaqI B (rs1079597), and TaqI D (rs1800498). Scoring of DRD2 haplotypes with respect to the three TaqI sites shows that five out of eight possible haplotypes are shared by the four populations. Ancestral haplotype B2D2A1 is most frequent among Thotis (0.359). The results of the present study indicate a differential gene flow into South India followed by certain important demographic events resulting in diversified peopling of India.

  6. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Ernst, Anja; Sventoraityte, Jurgita; Kupcinskas, Limas; Jacobsen, Bent A; Krarup, Henrik B; Vogel, Ulla; Jonaitis, Laimas; Denapiene, Goda; Kiudelis, Gediminas; Balschun, Tobias; Franke, Andre

    2011-10-13

    Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome wide association study (GWAS) (Franke et al., 2010), for 1) association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2) for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3) eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance. Eleven SNPs were replicated in a Danish sample consisting of 560 UC patients and 796 controls and nine missing SNPs of the German GWAS study were successfully genotyped in the Baltic sample comprising 441 UC cases and 1156 controls. The independent replication data was then jointly analysed with the original data and systematic comparisons of the findings between ethnicities were made. Pearson's χ2, Breslow-Day (BD) and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH) tests were used for association analyses and heterogeneity testing. The rs5771069 (IL17REL) SNP was not associated with UC in the Danish panel. The rs5771069 (IL17REL) SNP was significantly associated with UC in the combined Baltic, Danish and Norwegian UC study sample driven by the Norwegian panel (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98, P = 0.02). No association was found between rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7) and UC (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.95-1.52, P = 0.10) or between UC and all other remaining SNPs. We had 94% chance of detecting an association for rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7) in the combined replication sample, whereas the power were 55% or lower for the remaining SNPs.Statistically significant PBD was found for OR heterogeneity between the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001), rs12518307 (P = 0.007), and rs2395609 (TCP11) (P = 0.01), respectively).No SNP reached genome

  7. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonaitis Laimas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differences in the genetic architecture of inflammatory bowel disease between different European countries and ethnicities have previously been reported. In the present study, we wanted to assess the role of 11 newly identified UC risk variants, derived from a recent European UC genome wide association study (GWAS (Franke et al., 2010, for 1 association with UC in the Nordic countries, 2 for population heterogeneity between the Nordic countries and the rest of Europe, and, 3 eventually, to drive some of the previous findings towards overall genome-wide significance. Methods Eleven SNPs were replicated in a Danish sample consisting of 560 UC patients and 796 controls and nine missing SNPs of the German GWAS study were successfully genotyped in the Baltic sample comprising 441 UC cases and 1156 controls. The independent replication data was then jointly analysed with the original data and systematic comparisons of the findings between ethnicities were made. Pearson's χ2, Breslow-Day (BD and Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel (CMH tests were used for association analyses and heterogeneity testing. Results The rs5771069 (IL17REL SNP was not associated with UC in the Danish panel. The rs5771069 (IL17REL SNP was significantly associated with UC in the combined Baltic, Danish and Norwegian UC study sample driven by the Norwegian panel (OR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.79-0.98, P = 0.02. No association was found between rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7 and UC (OR = 1.20, 95% CI: 0.95-1.52, P = 0.10 or between UC and all other remaining SNPs. We had 94% chance of detecting an association for rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7 in the combined replication sample, whereas the power were 55% or lower for the remaining SNPs. Statistically significant PBD was found for OR heterogeneity between the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001, rs12518307 (P = 0.007, and rs2395609 (TCP11 (P = 0

  8. Combined approach for finding susceptibility genes in DISH/chondrocalcinosis families: whole-genome-wide linkage and IBS/IBD studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto, Ana Rita; Parreira, Bruna; Thomson, Russell; Soares, Marta; Power, Deborah M; Stankovich, Jim; Armas, Jácome Bruges; Brown, Matthew A

    2017-01-01

    Twelve families with exuberant and early-onset calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate chondrocalcinosis (CC) and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH), hereafter designated DISH/CC, were identified in Terceira Island, the Azores, Portugal. Ninety-two (92) individuals from these families were selected for whole-genome-wide linkage analysis. An identity-by-descent (IBD) analysis was performed in 10 individuals from 5 of the investigated pedigrees. The chromosome area with the maximal logarithm of the odds score (1.32; P =0.007) was not identified using the IBD/identity-by-state (IBS) analysis; therefore, it was not investigated further. From the IBD/IBS analysis, two candidate genes, LEMD3 and RSPO4 , were identified and sequenced. Nine genetic variants were identified in the RSPO4 gene; one regulatory variant (rs146447064) was significantly more frequent in control individuals than in DISH/CC patients ( P =0.03). Four variants were identified in LEMD3 , and the rs201930700 variant was further investigated using segregation analysis. None of the genetic variants in RSPO4 or LEMD3 segregated within the studied families. Therefore, although a major genetic effect was shown to determine DISH/CC occurrence within these families, the specific genetic variants involved were not identified.

  9. Enhancing Public Health HIV Interventions: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis and Systematic Review of Studies to Improve Linkage to Care, Adherence, and Retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph D. Tucker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV services are expanding, few have reached the scale necessary to support universal viral suppression of individuals living with HIV. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the qualitative evidence evaluating public health HIV interventions to enhance linkage to care, antiretroviral drug (ARV adherence, and retention in care. We searched 19 databases without language restrictions. The review collated data from three separate qualitative evidence reviews addressing each of the three outcomes along the care continuum. 21,738 citations were identified and 24 studies were included in the evidence review. Among low and middle-income countries in Africa, men living with HIV had decreased engagement in interventions compared to women and this lack of engagement among men also influenced the willingness of their partners to engage in services. Four structural issues (poverty, unstable housing, food insecurity, lack of transportation mediated the feasibility and acceptability of public health HIV interventions. Individuals living with HIV identified unmet mental health needs that interfered with their ability to access HIV services. Persistent social and cultural factors contribute to disparities in HIV outcomes across the continuum of care, shaping the context of service delivery among important subpopulations.

  10. Examining uncertainties in the linkage between global climate change and potential human health impacts in the western USA -- Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Goldman, M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1994-09-30

    Industrial societies have altered the earth`s environment in ways that could have important, long-term ecological, economic, and health implications. In this paper the authors define, characterize, and evaluate parameter and outcome uncertainties using a model that links global climate change with predictions of chemical exposure and human health risk in the western region of the US. They illustrate the impact of uncertainty about global climate change on such potential secondary outcomes using as a case study the public health consequences related to the behavior environmentally of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), an ubiquitous multimedia pollutant. They begin by constructing a matrix that reveals the linkage between global environmental change and potential regional human-health effects that might be induced directly and/or indirectly by HCB released into the air and water. This matrix is useful for translating critical uncertainties into terms that can be understood and used by policy makers to formulate strategies against potential adverse irreversible health and economic consequences. Specifically, the authors employ a combined uncertainty/sensitivity analysis to investigate how the HCB that has been released is affected by increasing atmospheric temperature and the accompanying climate alterations that are anticipated and how such uncertainty propagates to affect the expected magnitude and calculational precision of estimates of associated potential human exposures and health effects.

  11. No association between metal allergy and cardiac in-stent restenosis in patients with dermatitis-results from a linkage study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Engkilde, Kåre; Menné, Torkil

    2011-01-01

    Background. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with implantation of a metal stent is a common procedure performed in patients with symptomatic ischaemic heart disease. Intracoronary stents typically have a backbone of stainless steel, which contains nickel, chromium, and molybdenum, and it ......Background. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with implantation of a metal stent is a common procedure performed in patients with symptomatic ischaemic heart disease. Intracoronary stents typically have a backbone of stainless steel, which contains nickel, chromium, and molybdenum......, and it remains unclear whether individuals who are allergic to these metals have an increased risk of restenosis after PCI with stent implantation. Objectives. To further evaluate whether dermatitis patients with nickel and/or chromium allergy had an increased risk of developing cardiac in-stent restenosis...... with stainless steel stents. Methods. An individual-level linkage study was performed to identify dermatitis patients who had been patch tested with the European baseline series between 1979 and 2007 at Gentofte University Hospital (N = 18794) and who had also undergone PCI at some point in a Danish hospital...

  12. Enhancing Public Health HIV Interventions: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis and Systematic Review of Studies to Improve Linkage to Care, Adherence, and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joseph D; Tso, Lai Sze; Hall, Brian; Ma, Qingyan; Beanland, Rachel; Best, John; Li, Haochu; Lackey, Mellanye; Marley, Gifty; Rich, Zachary C; Sou, Ka-Lon; Doherty, Meg

    2017-03-01

    Although HIV services are expanding, few have reached the scale necessary to support universal viral suppression of individuals living with HIV. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the qualitative evidence evaluating public health HIV interventions to enhance linkage to care, antiretroviral drug (ARV) adherence, and retention in care. We searched 19 databases without language restrictions. The review collated data from three separate qualitative evidence reviews addressing each of the three outcomes along the care continuum. 21,738 citations were identified and 24 studies were included in the evidence review. Among low and middle-income countries in Africa, men living with HIV had decreased engagement in interventions compared to women and this lack of engagement among men also influenced the willingness of their partners to engage in services. Four structural issues (poverty, unstable housing, food insecurity, lack of transportation) mediated the feasibility and acceptability of public health HIV interventions. Individuals living with HIV identified unmet mental health needs that interfered with their ability to access HIV services. Persistent social and cultural factors contribute to disparities in HIV outcomes across the continuum of care, shaping the context of service delivery among important subpopulations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Three genome-wide association studies and a linkage analysis identify HERC2 as a human iris color gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayser, Manfred; Liu, Fan; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lao, Oscar; van Duijn, Kate; Vermeulen, Mark; Arp, Pascal; Jhamai, Mila M.; van Ijcken, Wilfred F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; Heath, Simon; Zelenika, Diana; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Hofman, Albert; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Oostra, Ben A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2008-01-01

    Human iris color was one of the first traits for which Mendelian segregation was established. To date, the genetics of iris color is still not fully understood and is of interest, particularly in view of forensic applications. In three independent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of a total of

  14. 3D numerical modelling of graben interaction and linkage: a case study of the Canyonlands grabens, Utah

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allken, V.; Huismans, R.S.; Fossen, H.; Thieulot, C.

    2013-01-01

    Graben systems in extensional settings tend to be segmented with evidence of segment interaction. To gain a better understanding of the evolution of structures formed during graben growth and interaction, we here study the Grabens area of Canyonlands National Park, Utah, where a wide range of such

  15. Privacy-preserving record linkage on large real world datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Sean M; Ferrante, Anna M; Boyd, James H; Bauer, Jacqueline K; Semmens, James B

    2014-08-01

    Record linkage typically involves the use of dedicated linkage units who are supplied with personally identifying information to determine individuals from within and across datasets. The personally identifying information supplied to linkage units is separated from clinical information prior to release by data custodians. While this substantially reduces the risk of disclosure of sensitive information, some residual risks still exist and remain a concern for some custodians. In this paper we trial a method of record linkage which reduces privacy risk still further on large real world administrative data. The method uses encrypted personal identifying information (bloom filters) in a probability-based linkage framework. The privacy preserving linkage method was tested on ten years of New South Wales (NSW) and Western Australian (WA) hospital admissions data, comprising in total over 26 million records. No difference in linkage quality was found when the results were compared to traditional probabilistic methods using full unencrypted personal identifiers. This presents as a possible means of reducing privacy risks related to record linkage in population level research studies. It is hoped that through adaptations of this method or similar privacy preserving methods, risks related to information disclosure can be reduced so that the benefits of linked research taking place can be fully realised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A case study of the Secure Anonymous Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway: A privacy-protecting remote access system for health-related research and evaluation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kerina H.; Ford, David V.; Jones, Chris; Dsilva, Rohan; Thompson, Simon; Brooks, Caroline J.; Heaven, Martin L.; Thayer, Daniel S.; McNerney, Cynthia L.; Lyons, Ronan A.

    2014-01-01

    With the current expansion of data linkage research, the challenge is to find the balance between preserving the privacy of person-level data whilst making these data accessible for use to their full potential. We describe a privacy-protecting safe haven and secure remote access system, referred to as the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway. The Gateway provides data users with a familiar Windows interface and their usual toolsets to access approved anonymously-linked datasets for research and evaluation. We outline the principles and operating model of the Gateway, the features provided to users within the secure environment, and how we are approaching the challenges of making data safely accessible to increasing numbers of research users. The Gateway represents a powerful analytical environment and has been designed to be scalable and adaptable to meet the needs of the rapidly growing data linkage community. PMID:24440148

  17. A case study of the Secure Anonymous Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway: a privacy-protecting remote access system for health-related research and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kerina H; Ford, David V; Jones, Chris; Dsilva, Rohan; Thompson, Simon; Brooks, Caroline J; Heaven, Martin L; Thayer, Daniel S; McNerney, Cynthia L; Lyons, Ronan A

    2014-08-01

    With the current expansion of data linkage research, the challenge is to find the balance between preserving the privacy of person-level data whilst making these data accessible for use to their full potential. We describe a privacy-protecting safe haven and secure remote access system, referred to as the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Gateway. The Gateway provides data users with a familiar Windows interface and their usual toolsets to access approved anonymously-linked datasets for research and evaluation. We outline the principles and operating model of the Gateway, the features provided to users within the secure environment, and how we are approaching the challenges of making data safely accessible to increasing numbers of research users. The Gateway represents a powerful analytical environment and has been designed to be scalable and adaptable to meet the needs of the rapidly growing data linkage community. Copyright © 2014 The Aurthors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Ground-penetrating radar study of the Cena Bog, Latvia: linkage of reflections with peat moisture content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karušs, J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Present work illustrates results of the ground-penetrating radar (GPR study of the Cena Bog, Latvia. Six sub-horizontal reflections that most probably correspond to boundaries between sediments with different electromagnetic properties were identified. One of the reflections corresponds to bog peat mineral bottom interface but the rest are linked to boundaries within the peat body. The radar profiles are incorporated with sediment cores and studies of peat moisture and ash content, and degree of decomposition. Most of the electromagnetic wave reflections are related to changes in peat moisture content. The obtained data show that peat moisture content changes of at least 3 % are required to cause GPR signal reflection. However, there exist reflections that do not correlate with peat moisture content. As a result, authors disagree with a dominant opinion that all reflections in bogs are solely due to changes in volumetric peat moisture content.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies single nucleotide polymorphism in DYRK1A associated with replication of HIV-1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan M Bol

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infected macrophages play an important role in rendering resting T cells permissive for infection, in spreading HIV-1 to T cells, and in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia. During highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART, macrophages keep producing virus because tissue penetration of antiretrovirals is suboptimal and the efficacy of some is reduced. Thus, to cure HIV-1 infection with antiretrovirals we will also need to efficiently inhibit viral replication in macrophages. The majority of the current drugs block the action of viral enzymes, whereas there is an abundance of yet unidentified host factors that could be targeted. We here present results from a genome-wide association study identifying novel genetic polymorphisms that affect in vitro HIV-1 replication in macrophages.Monocyte-derived macrophages from 393 blood donors were infected with HIV-1 and viral replication was determined using Gag p24 antigen levels. Genomic DNA from individuals with macrophages that had relatively low (n = 96 or high (n = 96 p24 production was used for SNP genotyping with the Illumina 610 Quad beadchip. A total of 494,656 SNPs that passed quality control were tested for association with HIV-1 replication in macrophages, using linear regression. We found a strong association between in vitro HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages and SNP rs12483205 in DYRK1A (p = 2.16 × 10(-5. While the association was not genome-wide significant (p<1 × 10(-7, we could replicate this association using monocyte-derived macrophages from an independent group of 31 individuals (p = 0.0034. Combined analysis of the initial and replication cohort increased the strength of the association (p = 4.84 × 10(-6. In addition, we found this SNP to be associated with HIV-1 disease progression in vivo in two independent cohort studies (p = 0.035 and p = 0.0048.These findings suggest that the kinase DYRK1A is involved in the replication of HIV-1, in vitro in macrophages

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Single Nucleotide Polymorphism in DYRK1A Associated with Replication of HIV-1 in Monocyte-Derived Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Sebastiaan M.; Moerland, Perry D.; Limou, Sophie; van Remmerden, Yvonne; Coulonges, Cédric; van Manen, Daniëlle; Herbeck, Joshua T.; Fellay, Jacques; Sieberer, Margit; Sietzema, Jantine G.; van 't Slot, Ruben; Martinson, Jeremy; Zagury, Jean-François; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; van 't Wout, Angélique B.

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV-1 infected macrophages play an important role in rendering resting T cells permissive for infection, in spreading HIV-1 to T cells, and in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia. During highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART), macrophages keep producing virus because tissue penetration of antiretrovirals is suboptimal and the efficacy of some is reduced. Thus, to cure HIV-1 infection with antiretrovirals we will also need to efficiently inhibit viral replication in macrophages. The majority of the current drugs block the action of viral enzymes, whereas there is an abundance of yet unidentified host factors that could be targeted. We here present results from a genome-wide association study identifying novel genetic polymorphisms that affect in vitro HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Methodology/Principal Findings Monocyte-derived macrophages from 393 blood donors were infected with HIV-1 and viral replication was determined using Gag p24 antigen levels. Genomic DNA from individuals with macrophages that had relatively low (n = 96) or high (n = 96) p24 production was used for SNP genotyping with the Illumina 610 Quad beadchip. A total of 494,656 SNPs that passed quality control were tested for association with HIV-1 replication in macrophages, using linear regression. We found a strong association between in vitro HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages and SNP rs12483205 in DYRK1A (p = 2.16×10−5). While the association was not genome-wide significant (p<1×10−7), we could replicate this association using monocyte-derived macrophages from an independent group of 31 individuals (p = 0.0034). Combined analysis of the initial and replication cohort increased the strength of the association (p = 4.84×10−6). In addition, we found this SNP to be associated with HIV-1 disease progression in vivo in two independent cohort studies (p = 0.035 and p = 0.0048). Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that

  1. [Individual linkage of primary data with secondary and registry data within large cohort studies - capabilities and procedural proposals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallmann, C; Ahrens, W; Kaaks, R; Pigeot, I; Swart, E; Jacobs, S

    2015-02-01

    Some German cohort studies have already linked secondary and registry data with primary data from interviews and medical examinations. This offers the opportunity to obtain more valid information by taking advantage of the strengths of these data synergistically and overcome their individual weaknesses at the same time. The potential and the requirements for linking secondary and registry data with primary data from cohort studies is described generally and illustrated by the example of the "German National Cohort" (GNC). The transfer and usage of secondary and registry data require that administrative and logistic efforts be made over the whole study period. In addition, rigid data protection regulations for using social data have to be observed. The particular strengths of secondary and registry data, namely their objectivity and independence from recall bias, add to the strengths of newly collected primary data and improve the assessment of morbidity endpoints, exposure history and need of patient care. Moreover, new insights on quality and on the added value of linking different data sources may be obtained. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Uncertain Context Factors in ERP Project Estimation are an Asset: Insights from a Semi-Replication Case Study in a Financial Services Firm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneva, Maia

    This paper reports on the findings of a case study in a company in the financial services sector in which we replicated the use of a previously published approach to systematically balance the contextual uncertainties in the estimation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) projects. The approach is

  3. Effect of Tools for Getting along on Student Risk for Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Upper Elementary Classrooms: A Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Daunic, Ann P.; Aydin, Burak; Van Loan, Christopher L.; Barber, Brian R.; Taylor, Gregory G.

    2016-01-01

    Social-emotional learning curricula to prevent student problematic behaviors should play a prominent role in public school instruction. While social-emotional curricula have been shown to be effective, there are few replication studies that substantiate their capacity to improve outcomes for students who exhibit problem behaviors. Thus, we…

  4. Politics Perceptions as Moderator of the Political Skill-Job Performance Relationship: A Two-Study, Cross-National, Constructive Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoutsis, Ilias; Papalexandris, Alexandros; Nikolopoulos, Andreas; Hochwarter, Wayne A.; Ferris, Gerald R.

    2011-01-01

    We developed a two-study, cross-national, constructive replication to examine the role of organizational politics perceptions as a contextual moderator of the political skill-job performance relationship. Specifically, we hypothesized that high levels of political skill would demonstrate its strongest positive effects on job performance when…

  5. From Enclave to Linkage Economies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael W.

    as the enclave economy par excellence, moving in with fully integrated value chains, extracting resources and exporting them as commodities having virtually no linkages to the local economy. However, new opportunities for promoting linkages are offered by changing business strategies of local African enterprises...... as well as foreign multinational corporations (MNCs). MNCs in extractives are increasingly seeking local linkages as part of their efficiency, risk, and asset-seeking strategies, and linkage programmes are becoming integral elements in many MNCs’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities....... At the same time, local African enterprises are eager to, and increasingly capable of, linking up to the foreign investors in order to expand their activities and acquire technology, skills and market access. The changing strategies of MNCs and the improving capabilities of African enterprises offer new...

  6. Direct power comparisons between simple LOD scores and NPL scores for linkage analysis in complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, P C; Greenberg, D A; Hodge, S E

    1999-09-01

    Several methods have been proposed for linkage analysis of complex traits with unknown mode of inheritance. These methods include the LOD score maximized over disease models (MMLS) and the "nonparametric" linkage (NPL) statistic. In previous work, we evaluated the increase of type I error when maximizing over two or more genetic models, and we compared the power of MMLS to detect linkage, in a number of complex modes of inheritance, with analysis assuming the true model. In the present study, we compare MMLS and NPL directly. We simulated 100 data sets with 20 families each, using 26 generating models: (1) 4 intermediate models (penetrance of heterozygote between that of the two homozygotes); (2) 6 two-locus additive models; and (3) 16 two-locus heterogeneity models (admixture alpha = 1.0,.7,.5, and.3; alpha = 1.0 replicates simple Mendelian models). For LOD scores, we assumed dominant and recessive inheritance with 50% penetrance. We took the higher of the two maximum LOD scores and subtracted 0.3 to correct for multiple tests (MMLS-C). We compared expected maximum LOD scores and power, using MMLS-C and NPL as well as the true model. Since NPL uses only the affected family members, we also performed an affecteds-only analysis using MMLS-C. The MMLS-C was both uniformly more powerful than NPL for most cases we examined, except when linkage information was low, and close to the results for the true model under locus heterogeneity. We still found better power for the MMLS-C compared with NPL in affecteds-only analysis. The results show that use of two simple modes of inheritance at a fixed penetrance can have more power than NPL when the trait mode of inheritance is complex and when there is heterogeneity in the data set.

  7. Thiazides and Osteoporotic Spinal Fractures: A Suspected Linkage Investigated by Means of a Two-Center, Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchis, Renato; Ariano, Carmelina; Di Biase, Giuseppina; Noutsias, Michel

    2017-11-01

    An alleged association of chronic use of thiazide diuretics with an increased risk of bone fragility fractures has been highlighted by a relatively recent prospective cohort study. However, the concept that thiazides exert a beneficial effect on osteoporosis is still a predominant view. This effect would be mediated by the decrease in renal clearance of calcium ions, a pharmacological feature recognized for a long time now to this class of drugs, as opposed to the increase in calcium urinary excretion attributed instead to loop diuretics, i.e. furosemide and similar drugs. The purpose of this retrospective study was to attempt to clarify whether regular use of thiazide diuretics as antihypertensive therapeutics is associated with a significantly increased risk of osteoporotic fractures in female patients aged 65 or over. In this two-center retrospective study, we followed up a cohort of female patients with (n = 80) and without (n = 158) thiazide-induced hyponatremia. A total of 48 osteoporotic fractures were recorded during a median follow-up period of 57.5 months. By means of univariate regression analysis, an association was found between thiazide-induced hyponatremia and increased risk of vertebral fractures (odds ratio (OR): 7.6; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.755 - 15.39; P fractures. No association of a history of thiazide-induced hyponatremia and risk of fracture was noticeable in the final model. Because thiazide-induced hyponatremia was associated with spinal fractures in univariate but not multivariate analysis, a possible explanation is that hyponatremia may be a confounder of the relation between body mass and spinal fractures. Indeed, reduced body mass especially among elderly women with small body build may confer heightened risk of thiazide-induced hyponatremia because of decreased bone sodium available for exchange with the serum sodium. Thus, occurrence of hyponatremia could only serve as an indirect surrogate marker for osteoporosis risk.

  8. Inequalities in pediatric avoidable hospitalizations between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in Australia: a population data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falster, Kathleen; Banks, Emily; Lujic, Sanja; Falster, Michael; Lynch, John; Zwi, Karen; Eades, Sandra; Leyland, Alastair H; Jorm, Louisa

    2016-10-21

    Australian Aboriginal children experience a disproportionate burden of social and health disadvantage. Avoidable hospitalizations present a potentially modifiable health gap that can be targeted and monitored using population data. This study quantifies inequalities in pediatric avoidable hospitalizations between Australian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. This statewide population-based cohort study included 1 121 440 children born in New South Wales, Australia, between 1 July 2000 and 31 December 2012, including 35 609 Aboriginal children. Using linked hospital data from 1 July 2000 to 31 December 2013, we identified pediatric avoidable, ambulatory care sensitive and non-avoidable hospitalization rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children. Absolute and relative inequalities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children were measured as rate differences and rate ratios, respectively. Individual-level covariates included age, sex, low birth weight and/or prematurity, and private health insurance/patient status. Area-level covariates included remoteness of residence and area socioeconomic disadvantage. There were 365 386 potentially avoidable hospitalizations observed over the study period, most commonly for respiratory and infectious conditions; Aboriginal children were admitted more frequently for all conditions. Avoidable hospitalization rates were 90.1/1000 person-years (95 % CI, 88.9-91.4) in Aboriginal children and 44.9/1000 person-years (44.8-45.1) in non-Aboriginal children (age and sex adjusted rate ratio = 1.7 (1.7-1.7)). Rate differences and rate ratios declined with age from 94/1000 person-years and 1.9, respectively, for children aged primary care, have potential to narrow this gap.

  9. Overview of the NKS/RAK-1 project 'Strategies for reactor safety' and linkages to piping reliability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, Kjell

    1997-01-01

    The NKS/RAK-1 project forms part of a four-year research program (1994-97) in the Nordic countries. The general objective of NKS/RAK-1 project is to explore strategies for reactor safety: to investigate and evaluate the safety work, to increase realism and reliability of safety analysis; and to increase the safety of nuclear installations in selected areas. The project has done extensive interview work at utilities and authorities, and analysed a number of case studies. Brief highlights and overviews of the sub-projects are presented in this paper

  10. Identification of myocardial infarction type from electronic hospital data in England and Australia: a comparative data linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedkoff, Lee; Lopez, Derrick; Goldacre, Michael; Hobbs, Michael; Wright, F Lucy

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the utility of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes in investigating trends in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) using person-linked electronic hospitalisation data in England and Western Australia (WA). Methods All hospital admissions with myocardial infarction (MI) as the principal diagnosis were identified from 2000 to 2013 from both jurisdictions. Fourth-digit ICD-10 codes were used to delineate all MI types—STEMI, NSTEMI, unspecified and subsequent MI. The annual frequency of each MI type was calculated as a proportion of all MI admissions. For all MI and each MI type, age-standardised rates were calculated and age-adjusted Poisson regression models used to estimate annual percentage changes in rates. Results In 2000, STEMI accounted for 49% of all MI admissions in England and 59% in WA, decreasing to 35% and 25% respectively by 2013. Less than 10% of admissions were recorded as NSTEMI in England throughout the study period, whereas by 2013, 70% of admissions were NSTEMI in WA. Unspecified MI comprised 60% of all MI admissions in England by 2013, compared with standards in each country. This has important implications for using electronic hospital data for monitoring MI and identifying MI types for outcome studies. PMID:29133337

  11. Comparison of Vital Statistics Definitions of Suicide against a Coroner Reference Standard: A Population-Based Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatov, Evgenia; Kurdyak, Paul; Sinyor, Mark; Holder, Laura; Schaffer, Ayal

    2018-03-01

    We sought to determine the utility of health administrative databases for population-based suicide surveillance, as these data are generally more accessible and more integrated with other data sources compared to coroners' records. In this retrospective validation study, we identified all coroner-confirmed suicides between 2003 and 2012 in Ontario residents aged 21 and over and linked this information to Statistics Canada's vital statistics data set. We examined the overlap between the underlying cause of death field and secondary causes of death using ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes for deliberate self-harm (i.e., suicide) and examined the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of misclassified records. Among 10,153 linked deaths, there was a very high degree of overlap between records coded as deliberate self-harm in the vital statistics data set and coroner-confirmed suicides using both ICD-9 and ICD-10 definitions (96.88% and 96.84% sensitivity, respectively). This alignment steadily increased throughout the study period (from 95.9% to 98.8%). Other vital statistics diagnoses in primary fields included uncategorised signs and symptoms. Vital statistics records that were misclassified did not differ from valid records in terms of sociodemographic characteristics but were more likely to have had an unspecified place of injury on the death certificate ( P statistics and coroner classification of suicide deaths suggests that health administrative data can reliably be used to identify suicide deaths.

  12. An infrared study of the nitro—nitrito linkage isomerization in solid nitro- and nitritopentamminecobalt(III) chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyns, A. M.; de Waal, D.

    1989-01-01

    The photochemical isomerization reaction of [Co(NH 3) 5NO 2]Cl 2 to [Co(NH 3) 5ONO]Cl 2 has been studied in the solid state by means of i.r. spectroscopy. The reaction is first order with k = 2.53±0.05 × 10 -4s -1 and is much faster ( t1/2=49min) than the well-known spontaneous nitrito → nitro isomerization ( t1/2 = 6 days). The i.r. bands of both the NH 3 and ONO - -groups in the range 4000-50 cm -1 indicate minor differences between the structures of freshly and photochemically prepared [Co(NH 3) 5ONO]Cl 2. The far i.r. spectra indicate the disorder existing in the intermediate products during the isomerization processes.

  13. Work-family conflicts and subsequent sleep medication among women and men: a longitudinal registry linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallukka, T; Arber, S; Laaksonen, M; Lahelma, E; Partonen, T; Rahkonen, O

    2013-02-01

    Work and family are two key domains of life among working populations. Conflicts between paid work and family life can be detrimental to sleep and other health-related outcomes. This study examined longitudinally the influence of work-family conflicts on subsequent sleep medication. Questionnaire data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study mail surveys in 2001-2002 (2929 women, 793 men) of employees aged 40-60 years. Data concerning sleep medication were derived from the Finnish Social Insurance Institution's registers covering all prescribed medication from 1995 to 2007. Four items measured whether job responsibilities interfered with family life (work to family conflicts), and four items measured whether family responsibilities interfered with work (family to work conflicts). Cox proportional hazard models were fitted, adjusting for age, sleep medication five years before baseline, as well as various family- and work-related covariates. During a five-year follow-up, 17% of women and 10% of men had at least one purchase of prescribed sleep medication. Among women, family to work conflicts were associated with sleep medication over the following 5 years after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association remained largely unaffected after adjusting for family-related and work-related covariates. Work to family conflicts were also associated with subsequent sleep medication after adjustment for age and prior medication. The association attenuated after adjustment for work-related factors. No associations could be confirmed among men. Thus reasons for men's sleep medication likely emerge outside their work and family lives. Concerning individual items, strain-based ones showed stronger associations with sleep medication than more concrete time-based items. In conclusion, in particular family to work conflicts, but also work to family conflicts, are clear determinants of women's sleep medication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An ADAM33 polymorphism associates with progression of preschool wheeze into childhood asthma: a prospective case-control study with replication in a birth cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Ester M M; Penders, John; Jöbsis, Quirijn; van de Kant, Kim D G; Thijs, Carel; Mommers, Monique; van Schayck, Constant P; van Eys, Guillaume; Koppelman, Gerard H; Dompeling, Edward

    2015-01-01

    The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined. To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma. In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring) study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma) was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a pchildhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97) p = 0.04) and no association with preschool wheeze. Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma.

  15. Docosahexaenoic acid for reading, working memory and behavior in UK children aged 7-9: A randomized controlled trial for replication (the DOLAB II study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Paul; Spreckelsen, Thees F; Burton, Alice; Burton, Jennifer R; Richardson, Alexandra J

    2018-01-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are central to brain-development of children. Evidence from clinical trials and systematic reviews demonstrates the potential of long-chain Omega-3 supplementation for learning and behavior. However, findings are inconclusive and in need of robust replication studies since such work is lacking. Replication of the 2012 DOLAB 1 study findings that a dietary supplementation with the long-chain omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) had beneficial effects on the reading, working memory, and behavior of healthy schoolchildren. Parallel group, fixed-dose, randomized (minimization, 30% random element), double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (RCT). Mainstream primary schools (n = 84) from five counties in the UK in 2012-2015. Healthy children aged 7-9 underperforming in reading (reading, working memory, and behavior, parent-rated and as secondary outcome teacher-rated. 376 children were randomized. Reading, working memory, and behavior change scores showed no consistent differences between intervention and placebo group. Some behavioral subscales showed minor group differences. This RCT did not replicate results of the earlier DOLAB 1 study on the effectiveness of nutritional supplementation with DHA for learning and behavior. Possible reasons are discussed, particularly regarding the replication of complex interventions. www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN48803273) and protocols.io (https://dx.doi.org/10.17504/protocols.io.k8kczuw).

  16. Risk of cardiovascular disease and total mortality in adults with type 1 diabetes: Scottish registry linkage study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona J Livingstone

    Full Text Available Randomized controlled trials have shown the importance of tight glucose control in type 1 diabetes (T1DM, but few recent studies have evaluated the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD and all-cause mortality among adults with T1DM. We evaluated these risks in adults with T1DM compared with the non-diabetic population in a nationwide study from Scotland and examined control of CVD risk factors in those with T1DM.The Scottish Care Information-Diabetes Collaboration database was used to identify all people registered with T1DM and aged ≥20 years in 2005-2007 and to provide risk factor data. Major CVD events and deaths were obtained from the national hospital admissions database and death register. The age-adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR for CVD and mortality in T1DM (n = 21,789 versus the non-diabetic population (3.96 million was estimated using Poisson regression. The age-adjusted IRR for first CVD event associated with T1DM versus the non-diabetic population was higher in women (3.0: 95% CI 2.4-3.8, p<0.001 than men (2.3: 2.0-2.7, p<0.001 while the IRR for all-cause mortality associated with T1DM was comparable at 2.6 (2.2-3.0, p<0.001 in men and 2.7 (2.2-3.4, p<0.001 in women. Between 2005-2007, among individuals with T1DM, 34 of 123 deaths among 10,173 who were <40 years and 37 of 907 deaths among 12,739 who were ≥40 years had an underlying cause of death of coma or diabetic ketoacidosis. Among individuals 60-69 years, approximately three extra deaths per 100 per year occurred among men with T1DM (28.51/1,000 person years at risk, and two per 100 per year for women (17.99/1,000 person years at risk. 28% of those with T1DM were current smokers, 13% achieved target HbA(1c of <7% and 37% had very poor (≥9% glycaemic control. Among those aged ≥40, 37% had blood pressures above even conservative targets (≥140/90 mmHg and 39% of those ≥40 years were not on a statin. Although many of these risk factors were comparable to those

  17. Birth weight and risk of paediatric Hodgkin lymphoma: Findings from a population-based record linkage study in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triebwasser, Corey; Wang, Rong; DeWan, Andrew T; Metayer, Catherine; Morimoto, Libby; Wiemels, Joseph L; Kadan-Lottick, Nina; Ma, Xiaomei

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the relationship between birth weight (along with a variety of pre and perinatal characteristics) and the risk of paediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) diagnosed at age birth records from 1978-2009 and cancer diagnosis data from 1988-2011 to conduct a population-based case-control study with 1216 cases and 4485 controls (matched on birth month and year, sex, and race/ethnicity). Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of paediatric HL overall and by age of diagnosis, controlling for other perinatal factors. Compared to children with a normal birth weight (2500-3999 g), those who had a high birth weight (≥4000 g) had an increased risk of paediatric HL overall (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.02-1.48) after adjusting for birth order, maternal age at the time of delivery, and paternal age at the time of delivery. The magnitude of association appeared larger for subgroups of children whose age of diagnosis was 0-10 years (OR = 1.56, 95% CI: 1.04-2.24) or 15-19 years (OR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.11-1.83), while no association was observed in 11-14 year olds. Compared with firstborn children, those who were third or higher in birth order had a reduced risk of paediatric HL overall (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.95), and this association also varied by age of diagnosis. In this study with the largest number of paediatric HL cases, high birth weight was associated with an increased disease risk for most but not all ages of diagnosis. The different findings by age of diagnosis regarding both birth weight and birth order underscore the importance to stratify paediatric HL by age at diagnosis in future etiological investigations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Healthcare utilization in general practice before and after psychological treatment: a follow-up data linkage study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Smit, Dineke; Verheij, Robert A

    2014-09-01

    Literature suggests that serious mental health problems increase the use of health services and psychological interventions can reduce this effect. This study investigates whether this effect is also found in primary care patients with less serious mental health problems. Routine electronic health records (EHR) from a representative sample of 128 general practices were linked to patient files from 150 primary care psychologists participating in the NIVEL Primary Care Database, using a trusted third party. Data were linked using the date of birth, gender, and postcode. This yielded 503 unique data pairs that were listed in one of the participating GP practices in 2008-2010, for people who had psychological treatment from a psychologist that ended in 2009. The number of contacts, health problems presented, and prescribed medication in general practice were analysed before and after the psychological treatment. Nearly all 503 patients consulted their GP during the six months preceding the psychological treatment (90.9%) and also in the six months after this treatment had ended (83.7%). The frequency of contacts was significantly higher before than after the psychological treatment (6.1 vs. 4.8). Fewer patients contacted their GPs specifically for psychological or social problems (46.3% vs. 38.8%) and fewer patients had anxiolytic drug prescriptions (15.5% vs. 7.6%) after psychological treatment. After psychological treatment, patients contact their GPs less often and present fewer psychological or social problems. Although contact rates seem to decrease, clients of psychologists are still frequent GP attenders.

  19. A genetic study of various enzyme polymorphisms in Pleurodeles waltlii (Urodele Amphibian). II. Peptidases: demonstration of sex linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, V; Gasser, F; Jaylet, A; Cayrol, C

    1983-06-01

    The existence of four peptidases was demonstrated by starch gel electrophoresis in Pleurodeles waltlii: PEP-1, PEP-2, PEP-3, and PEP-4. Peptidases-3 and -4 are monomorphic, and peptidases-1 and -2 are polymorphic. The heredity of the polymorphisms was studied using individuals arising from crosses or of gynogenetic origin. Peptidase-1 is dimeric; its polymorphism depends on a pair of codominant alleles, Pep-1A and Pep-1B, which are situated on the Z and W sex chromosomes, respectively, in close proximity to, or even within, the sex differential segment. As the differential segment is very close to the centromere, the PEP-1 locus therefore also appears to be closely linked to it. Expression of the PEP-1 locus was shown to be independent of the sex hormone environment. This locus is the first case reported in amphibians of an enzyme marker linked to the genetic sex. It allows the sex of PLeurodeles to be determined before they reach sexual maturity. Peptidase-2 is monomeric. Its polymorphism depends on a pair of codominant alleles on an autosomal PEP-2 locus. The high proportion of heterozygous animals in the gynogenetic offspring of females heterozygous for the PEP-2 locus indicates segregation which is independent of the centromere. Analysis of the offspring of doubly heterozygous females (i.e., for two of the loci--LDH-B, G6PDH, PEP-1, and PEP-2) shows that the four loci are independent.

  20. The score statistic of the LD-lod analysis: detecting linkage adaptive to linkage disequilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, J; Jiang, Y

    2001-01-01

    We study the properties of a modified lod score method for testing linkage that incorporates linkage disequilibrium (LD-lod). By examination of its score statistic, we show that the LD-lod score method adaptively combines two sources of information: (a) the IBD sharing score which is informative for linkage regardless of the existence of LD and (b) the contrast between allele-specific IBD sharing scores which is informative for linkage only in the presence of LD. We also consider the connection between the LD-lod score method and the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) for triad data and the mean test for affected sib pair (ASP) data. We show that, for triad data, the recessive LD-lod test is asymptotically equivalent to the TDT; and for ASP data, it is an adaptive combination of the TDT and the ASP mean test. We demonstrate that the LD-lod score method has relatively good statistical efficiency in comparison with the ASP mean test and the TDT for a broad range of LD and the genetic models considered in this report. Therefore, the LD-lod score method is an interesting approach for detecting linkage when the extent of LD is unknown, such as in a genome-wide screen with a dense set of genetic markers. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  1. Exploring the linkage between drought, high temperatures, and hydrologic sensitivities: A case study of the 2012 Great Plains drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, B.; Hoerling, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of drought is associated with agricultural loss, water supply shortfalls, and other economic impacts. Here we explore the physical relationships between precipitation deficits, high temperatures, and hydrologic responses as a pathway to better anticipate drought impacts. Current methodologies to predict hydrologic scarcity include local monitoring of river flows, remote sensing of land-surface wetness, drought indices, expert judgment, climate indices (e.g. SST-relationships) and the application of hydrologic models. At longer lead times, predictions of drought have most frequently been made on the basis of GCM ensembles, with subsequent downscaling of those to scales over which hydrologic predictions can be made. This study focuses on two important aspects of drought. First, we explore the causal hydro-climatic timeline of a drought event, namely (a) the lack of precipitation, which serves to reduce soil moisture and produce (b) a skewed Bowen ratio, i.e. comparatively more sensible heating (warming) with less ET, resulting in (c) anomalously warm conditions. We seek to assess the extent to which the lack of precipitation contributes to warming temperatures, and the further effects of that warming on hydrology and the severity of drought impacts. An ensemble of GCM simulations will be used to explore the evolution of the land surface energy budget during a recent Great Plains drought event, which will subsequently be used to drive a hydrologic model. Second, we examine the impacts of the critical assumptions relating climatic variables with water demand, specifically the relationship between potential evapotranspiration (PET) and temperature. The common oversimplification in relating PET to temperature is explored against a more physically consistent energy balance estimate of PET, using the Penman-Monteith approach and the hydrologic impacts are presented. Results from this work are anticipated to have broad relevance for future water management

  2. Is treatment for alcohol use disorder associated with reductions in criminal offending? A national data linkage cohort study in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Helen; Eastwood, Brian; Gee, Ivan L; Marsden, John

    2016-04-01

    This is the first English national study of change in criminal offending following treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD). All adults treated for AUD by all publicly funded treatment services during April 2008-March 2009 (n=53,017), with data linked to the Police National Computer (April 2006-November 2011). Pre-treatment offender sub-populations were identified by Latent Profile Analysis. The outcome measure was the count of recordable criminal offences during two-year follow-up after admission. A mixed-effects, Poisson regression modelled outcome, adjusting for demographics and clinical information, the latent classes, and treatment exposure covariates. Twenty-two percent of the cohort committed one or more offences in the two years pre-treatment (n=11,742; crude rate, 221.5 offenders per 1000). During follow-up, the number of offenders and offences fell by 23.5% and 24.0%, respectively (crude rate, 69.4 offenders per 1000). During follow-up, a lower number of offences was associated with: completing treatment (adjusted incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.79-0.85); receiving inpatient detoxification (IRR 0.84; CI 0.80-0.89); or community pharmacological therapy (IRR 0.89; CI 0.84-0.96). Reconviction was reduced in the sub-population characterised by driving offences (n=1,140; 11.7%), but was relatively high amongst acquisitive (n=768; 58.3% reconvicted) and violent offending sub-populations (n=602; 77.6% reconvicted). Reduced offending was associated with successful completion of AUD treatment and receiving inpatient and pharmacological therapy, but not enrolment in psychological and residential interventions. Treatment services (particularly those providing psychological therapy and residential care) should be alert to offending, especially violent and acquisitive crime, and enhance crime reduction interventions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ethnicity and first birth: age, smoking, delivery, gestation, weight and feeding: Scottish Health and Ethnicity Linkage Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narinder; Chalmers, James W T; Fischbacher, Colin M; Steiner, Markus F C; Bhopal, Raj S

    2014-12-01

    We linked census and health service data sets to address the shortage of information comparing maternal characteristics and pregnancy outcomes by ethnic group in Scotland. Retrospective cohort study linking the 2001 National Census for Scotland and hospital obstetric data (2001-08), comparing maternal age, smoking status, gestational age, caesarean section rates, birthweight, preterm birth and breastfeeding rates by ethnic group. In all, 144 344 women were identified as having had a first birth between 1 May 2001 and 30 April 2008. White Scottish mothers were younger [mean age 27.3 years; 95% confidence interval (CI): 27.3, 27.4] than other white groups and most non-white groups. They had the highest smoking rates (25.8%; CI: 25.5, 26.0) and the lowest rates of breastfeeding at 6-8 weeks (23.4%; CI: 23.1, 23.6), with most of the other groups being around 40%. Women from non-white minority ethnic groups in Scotland tended to have babies of lower birthweight (e.g. Pakistani mean birthweight-3105 g, white Scottish-3356 g), even after adjustment for gestational age, maternal age, education, smoking and housing tenure. This effect was more noticeable for women born in the UK. White English, Irish and other white babies tended to have higher birthweights. There was little variation between groups in caesarean section rates. Pregnant women from ethnic minority populations in Scotland have more favourable health behaviour than the white Scottish, although the non-white groups tend to have lower birthweight. Further exploration of the reasons for these differences has potential to benefit women from the majority population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychological distress, optimism and general health in breast cancer survivors: a data linkage study using the Scottish Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janni; Atherton, Iain; Kyle, Richard G; Hubbard, Gill; McLaughlin, Deirdre

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the association between optimism and psychological distress in women with breast cancer after taking into account their self-rated general health. Data were aggregated from the Scottish Health Survey (2008 to 2011) to derive a nationally representative sample of 12,255 women (11,960 cancer-free controls, and 295 breast cancer cases identified from linked cancer registry data). The explanatory variables were optimism and general health, and the outcome variable was symptoms of psychological distress. Logistic regression analyses were conducted, with optimism entered in step 1 and general health entered in step 2. In an unadjusted model, higher levels of optimism were associated with lower odds of psychological distress in both the control group (OR = 0. 57, 95 % CI = 0.51-0.60) and breast cancer group (OR = 0. 64, 95 % CI = 0.47-0.88). However, in a model adjusting for general health, optimism was associated with lower odds of psychological distress only in the control group (OR = 0.50, 95 % CI = 0.44-0.57), but not significantly in the breast cancer group (OR = 1.15, 95 % CI = 0.32-4.11). In the breast cancer group, poor general health was a stronger associate of psychological distress (OR = 4. 98, 95 % CI = 1.32-18.75). Results were consistent after adjusting for age, years since breast cancer diagnosis, survey year, socioeconomic status, education, marital status, body mass index, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. This research confirms the value of multicomponent supportive care interventions for women with breast cancer. Specifically, it suggests that following breast cancer diagnosis, health care professionals need to provide advice and signpost to services that assist women to maintain or improve both their psychological and general health.

  5. Comorbidities, treatment patterns and cost-of-illness of acromegaly in Sweden: a register-linkage population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesén, Eva; Granfeldt, Daniel; Houchard, Aude; Dinet, Jérôme; Berthon, Anthony; Olsson, Daniel S; Björholt, Ingela; Johannsson, Gudmundur

    2017-02-01

    Acromegaly is a complex endocrine disease with multiple comorbidities. Treatment to obtain biochemical remission includes surgery, medical therapy and radiation. We aimed to describe comorbidities, treatment patterns and cost-of-illness in patients with acromegaly in Sweden. A nationwide population-based study. Patients with acromegaly were identified and followed in national registers in Sweden. Longitudinal treatment patterns were assessed in patients diagnosed between July 2005 and December 2013. The cost-of-illness during 2013 was estimated from a societal perspective among patients diagnosed between 1987 and 2013. Among 358 patients with acromegaly (48% men, mean age at diagnosis 50.0 (s.d. 15.3) years) at least one comorbidity was reported in 81% (n = 290). The most common comorbidities were hypertension (40%, n = 142), neoplasms outside the pituitary (30%, n = 109), hypopituitarism (22%, n = 80) and diabetes mellitus (17%, n = 61). Acromegaly treatment was initiated on average 3.7 (s.d. 6.9) months after diagnosis. Among the 301 treated patients, the most common first-line treatments were surgery (60%, n = 180), somatostatin analogues (21%, n = 64) and dopamine agonists (14%, n = 41). After primary surgery, 24% (n = 44) received somatostatin analogues. The annual per-patient cost was €12 000; this was €8700 and €16 000 if diagnosed before or after July 2005, respectively. The cost-of-illness for acromegaly and its comorbidities was 77% from direct costs and 23% from production loss. The prevalence of comorbidity is high in patients with acromegaly. The most common first-line treatment in acromegalic patients was surgery followed by somatostatin analogues. The annual per-patient cost of acromegaly and its comorbidities was €12 000. © 2017 European Society of Endocrinology.

  6. The impact of the built environment on health across the life course: design of a cross-sectional data linkage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Karen; Pereira, Gavin; Knuiman, Matthew; Bull, Fiona; Wood, Lisa; Christian, Hayley; Foster, Sarah; Boruff, Bryan J; Beesley, Bridget; Hickey, Sharyn; Joyce, Sarah; Nathan, Andrea; Saarloos, Dick; Giles-Corti, Billie

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The built environment is increasingly recognised as being associated with health outcomes. Relationships between the built environment and health differ among age groups, especially between children and adults, but also between younger, mid-age and older adults. Yet few address differences across life stage groups within a single population study. Moreover, existing research mostly focuses on physical activity behaviours, with few studying objective clinical and mental health outcomes. The Life Course Built Environment and Health (LCBEH) project explores the impact of the built environment on self-reported and objectively measured health outcomes in a random sample of people across the life course. Methods and analysis This cross-sectional data linkage study involves 15 954 children (0–15 years), young adults (16–24 years), adults (25–64 years) and older adults (65+years) from the Perth metropolitan region who completed the Health and Wellbeing Surveillance System survey administered by the Department of Health of Western Australia from 2003 to 2009. Survey data were linked to Western Australia's (WA) Hospital Morbidity Database System (hospital admission) and Mental Health Information System (mental health system outpatient) data. Participants’ residential address was geocoded and features of their ‘neighbourhood’ were measured using Geographic Information Systems software. Associations between the built environment and self-reported and clinical health outcomes will be explored across varying geographic scales and life stages. Ethics and dissemination The University of Western Australia's Human Research Ethics Committee and the Department of Health of Western Australia approved the study protocol (#2010/1). Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at local, national and international conferences, thus contributing to the evidence base informing the design of healthy neighbourhoods for all residents. PMID

  7. Identification of valid reference genes for microRNA expression studies in a hepatitis B virus replicating liver cell line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kari Stougaard; Nielsen, Kirstine Overgaard; Nordmann Winther, Thilde

    2016-01-01

    expressed microRNAs with liver-specific target genes in plasma from children with chronic hepatitis B. To further understand the biological role of these microRNAs in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis B, we have used the human liver cell line HepG2, with and without HBV replication, after transfection...

  8. Identification and replication of loci involved in camptothecin-induced cytotoxicity using CEPH pedigrees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venita Gresham Watson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available To date, the Centre d'Etude Polymorphism Humain (CEPH cell line model has only been used as a pharmacogenomic tool to evaluate which genes are responsible for the disparity in response to a single drug. The purpose of this study was demonstrate the model's ability to establish a specific pattern of quantitative trait loci (QTL related to a shared mechanism for multiple structurally related drugs, the camptothecins, which are Topoisomerase 1 inhibitors. A simultaneous screen of six camptothecin analogues for in vitro sensitivity in the CEPH cell lines resulted in cytotoxicity profiles and orders of potency which were in agreement with the literature. For all camptothecins studied, heritability estimates for cytotoxic response averaged 23.1 ± 2.6%. Nonparametric linkage analysis was used to identify a relationship between genetic markers and response to the camptothecins. Ten QTLs on chromosomes 1, 3, 5, 6, 11, 12, 16 and 20 were identified as shared by all six camptothecin analogues. In a separate validation experiment, nine of the ten QTLs were replicated at the significant and suggestive levels using three additional camptothecin analogues. To further refine this list of QTLs, another validation study was undertaken and seven of the nine QTLs were independently replicated for all nine camptothecin analogues. This is the first study using the CEPH cell lines that demonstrates that a specific pattern of QTLs could be established for a class of drugs which share a mechanism of action. Moreover, it is the first study to report replication of linkage results for drug-induced cytotoxicity using this model. The QTLs, which have been identified as shared by all camptothecins and replicated across multiple datasets, are of considerable interest; they harbor genes related to the shared mechanism of action for the camptothecins, which are responsible for variation in response.

  9. COMT Val158Met genotype is associated with reward learning: A replication study and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Frías, Nadia S.; Pizzagalli, Diego A.; Carré, Justin; Michalski, Lindsay J; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Perlis, Roy H.; Fagerness, Jesen; Lee, Mary R.; Conley, Emily Drabant; Lancaster, Thomas M.; Haddad, Stephen; Wolf, Aaron; Smoller, Jordan W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bogdan, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Identifying mechanisms through which individual differences in reward learning emerge offers an opportunity to understand both a fundamental form of adaptive responding as well as etiological pathways through which aberrant reward learning may contribute to maladaptive behaviors and psychopathology. One candidate mechanism through which individual differences in reward learning may emerge is variability in dopaminergic reinforcement signaling. A common functional polymorphism within the catechol-O-methyl transferase gene (COMT; rs4680, Val158Met) has been linked to reward learning where homozygosity for the Met allele (associated with heightened prefrontal dopamine function and decreased dopamine synthesis in the midbrain) has been associated with relatively increased reward learning. Here, we used a probabilistic reward learning task to asses response bias, a behavioral form of reward learning, across 3 separate samples that were combined for analyses (age: 21.80 ± 3.95; n=392; 268 female; European-American, n=208). We replicate prior reports that COMT rs4680 Met allele homozygosity is associated with increased reward learning in European-American participants (β=0.20, t= 2.75, p< 0.01; ΔR2= 0.04). Moreover, a meta-analysis of 4 studies, including the current one, confirmed the association between COMT rs4680 genotype and reward learning (95% CI −0.11 to −0.03; z=3.2; p<0.01). These results suggest that variability in dopamine signaling associated with COMT rs4680 influences individual differences in reward which may potentially contribute to psychopathology characterized by reward dysfunction. PMID:27138112

  10. New generation pharmacogenomic tools: a SNP linkage disequilibrium Map, validated SNP assay resource, and high-throughput instrumentation system for large-scale genetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Vega, Francisco M; Dailey, David; Ziegle, Janet; Williams, Julie; Madden, Dawn; Gilbert, Dennis A

    2002-06-01

    Since public and private efforts announced the first draft of the human genome last year, researchers have reported great numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We believe that the availability of well-mapped, quality SNP markers constitutes the gateway to a revolution in genetics and personalized medicine that will lead to better diagnosis and treatment of common complex disorders. A new generation of tools and public SNP resources for pharmacogenomic and genetic studies--specifically for candidate-gene, candidate-region, and whole-genome association studies--will form part of the new scientific landscape. This will only be possible through the greater accessibility of SNP resources and superior high-throughput instrumentation-assay systems that enable affordable, highly productive large-scale genetic studies. We are contributing to this effort by developing a high-quality linkage disequilibrium SNP marker map and an accompanying set of ready-to-use, validated SNP assays across every gene in the human genome. This effort incorporates both the public sequence and SNP data sources, and Celera Genomics' human genome assembly and enormous resource ofphysically mapped SNPs (approximately 4,000,000 unique records). This article discusses our approach and methodology for designing the map, choosing quality SNPs, designing and validating these assays, and obtaining population frequency ofthe polymorphisms. We also discuss an advanced, high-performance SNP assay chemisty--a new generation of the TaqMan probe-based, 5' nuclease assay-and high-throughput instrumentation-software system for large-scale genotyping. We provide the new SNP map and validation information, validated SNP assays and reagents, and instrumentation systems as a novel resource for genetic discoveries.

  11. Linkage analysis: Inadequate for detecting susceptibility loci in complex disorders?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, L.L.; Nagatomi, J. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) may provide valuable clues about approaches to detecting susceptibility loci in other oligogenic disorders. Numerous studies have demonstrated significant association between IDDM and a VNTR in the 5{prime} flanking region of the insulin (INS) gene. Paradoxically, all attempts to demonstrate linkage of IDDM to this VNTR have failed. Lack of linkage has been attributed to insufficient marker locus information, genetic heterogeneity, or high frequency of the IDDM-predisposing allele in the general population. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is located 2.7 kb from INS on the 5` side of the VNTR and shows linkage disequilibrium with INS region loci. We typed a highly polymorphic microsatellite within TH in 176 multiplex families, and performed parametric (lod score) linkage analysis using various intermediate reduced penetrance models for IDDM (including rare and common disease allele frequencies), as well as non-parametric (affected sib pair) linkage analysis. The scores significantly reject linkage for recombination values of .05 or less, excluding the entire 19 kb region containing TH, the 5{prime} VNTR, the INS gene, and IGF2 on the 3{prime} side of INS. Non-parametric linkage analysis also provided no significant evidence for linkage (mean TH allele sharing 52.5%, P=.12). These results have important implications for efforts to locate genes predisposing to complex disorders, strongly suggesting that regions which are significantly excluded by linkage methods may nevertheless contain predisposing genes readily detectable by association methods. We advocate that investigators routinely perform association analyses in addition to linkage analyses.

  12. Genomewide high-density SNP linkage analysis of non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families identifies various candidate regions and has greater power than microsatellite studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. González-Neira (Anna); J.M. Rosa-Rosa; A. Osorio (Ana); E. Gonzalez (Emilio); M.C. Southey (Melissa); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); H. Lynch (Henry); R.A. Oldenburg (Rogier); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); G. Pita (Guillermo); P. Devilee (Peter); D. Goldgar (David); J. Benítez (Javier)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The recent development of new high-throughput technologies for SNP genotyping has opened the possibility of taking a genome-wide linkage approach to the search for new candidate genes involved in heredity diseases. The two major breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and

  13. Recommendations for Replication Research in Special Education: A Framework of Systematic, Conceptual Replications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Michael D.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Special education researchers conduct studies that can be considered replications. However, they do not often refer to them as replication studies. The purpose of this article is to consider the potential benefits of conceptualizing special education intervention research within a framework of systematic, conceptual replication. Specifically, we…

  14. Antecedents of hospital admission for deliberate self-harm from a 14-year follow-up study using data-linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrou, Francis; Gaudie, Jennifer; Lawrence, David; Silburn, Sven R; Stanley, Fiona J; Zubrick, Stephen R

    2010-10-18

    A prior episode of deliberate self-harm (DSH) is one of the strongest predictors of future completed suicide. Identifying antecedents of DSH may inform strategies designed to reduce suicide rates. This study aimed to determine whether individual and socio-ecological factors collected in childhood and adolescence were associated with later hospitalisation for DSH. Longitudinal follow-up of a Western Australian population-wide random sample of 2,736 children aged 4-16 years, and their carers, from 1993 until 2007 using administrative record linkage. Children were aged between 18 and 31 years at end of follow-up. Proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between child, parent, family, school and community factors measured in 1993, and subsequent hospitalisation for DSH. There were six factors measured in 1993 that increased a child's risk of future hospitalisation with DSH: female sex; primary carer being a smoker; being in a step/blended family; having more emotional or behavioural problems than other children; living in a family with inconsistent parenting style; and having a teenage mother. Factors found to be not significant included birth weight, combined carer income, carer's lifetime treatment for a mental health problem, and carer education. The persistence of carer smoking as an independent risk factor for later DSH, after adjusting for child, carer, family, school and community level socio-ecological factors, adds to the known risk domains for DSH, and invites further investigation into the underlying mechanisms of this relationship. This study has also confirmed the association of five previously known risk factors for DSH.

  15. Antecedents of hospital admission for deliberate self-harm from a 14-year follow-up study using data-linkage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silburn Sven R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A prior episode of deliberate self-harm (DSH is one of the strongest predictors of future completed suicide. Identifying antecedents of DSH may inform strategies designed to reduce suicide rates. This study aimed to determine whether individual and socio-ecological factors collected in childhood and adolescence were associated with later hospitalisation for DSH. Methods Longitudinal follow-up of a Western Australian population-wide random sample of 2,736 children aged 4-16 years, and their carers, from 1993 until 2007 using administrative record linkage. Children were aged between 18 and 31 years at end of follow-up. Proportional hazards regression was used to examine the relationship between child, parent, family, school and community factors measured in 1993, and subsequent hospitalisation for DSH. Results There were six factors measured in 1993 that increased a child's risk of future hospitalisation with DSH: female sex; primary carer being a smoker; being in a step/blended family; having more emotional or behavioural problems than other children; living in a family with inconsistent parenting style; and having a teenage mother. Factors found to be not significant included birth weight, combined carer income, carer's lifetime treatment for a mental health problem, and carer education. Conclusions The persistence of carer smoking as an independent risk factor for later DSH, after adjusting for child, carer, family, school and community level socio-ecological factors, adds to the known risk domains for DSH, and invites further investigation into the underlying mechanisms of this relationship. This study has also confirmed the association of five previously known risk factors for DSH.

  16. Inequalities in the dental health needs and access to dental services among looked after children in Scotland: a population data linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Alex D; Elliott, Lawrie; Macpherson, Lorna Md; Sharpe, Katharine H; Connelly, Graham; Milligan, Ian; Wilson, Philip; Clark, David; King, Albert; Wood, Rachael; Conway, David I

    2018-01-01

    There is limited evidence on the health needs and service access among children and young people who are looked after by the state. The aim of this study was to compare dental treatment needs and access to dental services (as an exemplar of wider health and well-being concerns) among children and young people who are looked after with the general child population. Population data linkage study utilising national datasets of social work referrals for 'looked after' placements, the Scottish census of children in local authority schools, and national health service's dental health and service datasets. 633 204 children in publicly funded schools in Scotland during the academic year 2011/2012, of whom 10 927 (1.7%) were known to be looked after during that or a previous year (from 2007-2008). The children in the looked after children (LAC) group were more likely to have urgent dental treatment need at 5 years of age: 23%vs10% (n=209/16533), adjusted (for age, sex and area socioeconomic deprivation) OR 2.65 (95% CI 2.30 to 3.05); were less likely to attend a dentist regularly: 51%vs63% (n=5519/388934), 0.55 (0.53 to 0.58) and more likely to have teeth extracted under general anaesthesia: 9%vs5% (n=967/30253), 1.91 (1.78 to 2.04). LAC are more likely to have dental treatment needs and less likely to access dental services even when accounting for sociodemographic factors. Greater efforts are required to integrate child social and healthcare for LAC and to develop preventive care pathways on entering and throughout their time in the care system. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  17. Non-replication of genome-wide based associations between common variants in INSIG2 and PFKP and obesity in studies of 18,014 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Mogensen, Mette S; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2008-01-01

    The INSIG2 rs7566605 and PFKP rs6602024 polymorphisms have been identified as obesity gene variants in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, replication has been contradictory for both variants. The aims of this study were to validate these obesity-associations through case-control stud......The INSIG2 rs7566605 and PFKP rs6602024 polymorphisms have been identified as obesity gene variants in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, replication has been contradictory for both variants. The aims of this study were to validate these obesity-associations through case......-control studies and analyses of obesity-related quantitative traits. Moreover, since environmental and genetic factors may modulate the impact of a genetic variant, we wanted to perform such interaction analyses. We focused on physical activity as an environmental risk factor, and on the GWA identified obesity...

  18. Mothers in methadone treatment and their involvement with the child protection system: a replication and extension study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taplin, Stephanie; Mattick, Richard P

    2013-08-01

    Although a high level of involvement with the child protection system has been identified in families where parental substance use is a feature, not all such parents abuse or neglect their children or have contact with the child protection system. Identifying parents with substance-use histories who are able to care for their children without intervention by the child protection system, and being able to target interventions to the families who need them the most is important. This study interviewed a relatively large sample of mothers about their histories, their children and their involvement with the child protection system. We hypothesized that mothers in opioid pharmacological treatment who are involved with child protection services are different in characteristics to those mothers who are not involved. One hundred and seventy-one women, with at least one child aged under 16 years, were interviewed at nine treatment clinics providing pharmacological treatment for opioid dependence across Sydney, Australia. Just over one-third of the women were involved with child protection services at the time of interview, mostly with children in out-of-home care. Logistic regression analyses revealed that factors which significantly increased the likelihood of the mother being involved with the child protection system were: (1) having a greater number of children, (2) being on psychiatric medication, and (3) having less than daily contact with her own parents. This study replicates and extends the work of Grella, Hser, and Huang (2006) and the limited literature published to date examining the factors which contribute to some substance-using mothers becoming involved with the child protection system while others do not. The finding that mental health problems and parental supports (along with the number of children) were significantly associated with child protection system involvement in this study, indicates a need for improved interventions and the provision of

  19. Computational system to create an entry file for replicating I-125 seeds simulating brachytherapy case studies using the MCNPX code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo da Silva Boia

    2014-03-01

    decline for short distances.------------------------------Cite this article as: Boia LS, Junior J, Menezes AF, Silva AX. Computational system to create an entry file for replicating I-125 seeds simulating brachytherapy case studies using the MCNPX code. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:02023.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.14319/ijcto.0202.3

  20. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  1. Is medical perspective on clinical governance practices associated with clinical units’ performance and mortality? A cross-sectional study through a record-linkage procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Sarchielli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Assessment of the knowledge and application as well as perceived utility by doctors of clinical governance tools in order to explore their impact on clinical units’ performance measured through mortality rates and efficiency indicators. Methods: This research is a cross-sectional study with a deterministic record-linkage procedure. The sample includes n = 1250 doctors (n = 249 chiefs of clinical units; n = 1001 physicians working in six public hospitals located in the Emilia-Romagna Region in Italy. Survey instruments include a checklist and a research-made questionnaire which were used for data collection about doctors’ knowledge and application as well as perceived utility of clinical governance tools. The analysis was based on clinical units’ performance indicators which include patients’ mortality, extra-region active mobility rate, average hospital stay, bed occupancy, rotation and turnover rates, and the comparative performance index as efficiency indicators. Results: The clinical governance tools are known and applied differently in all the considered clinical units. Significant differences emerged between roles and organizational levels at which the medical leadership is carried out. The levels of knowledge and application of clinical governance practices are correlated with the clinical units’ efficiency indicators (bed occupancy rate, bed turnover interval, and extra-region mobility. These multiple linear regression analyses highlighted that the clinical governance knowledge and application is correlated with clinical units’ mortality rates (odds ratio, −8.677; 95% confidence interval, −16.654, −0.700. Conclusion: The knowledge and application, as well as perceived utility by medical professionals of clinical governance tools, are associated with the mortality rates of their units and with some efficiency indicators. However, the medical frontline staff seems to not consider homogeneously useful

  2. Using patients' experiences of adverse events to improve health service delivery and practice: protocol of a data linkage study of Australian adults age 45 and above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Merrilyn; Jorm, Christine; Smith-Merry, Jennifer; Harrison, Reema; Manias, Elizabeth; Iedema, Rick; Kelly, Patrick

    2014-10-13

    Evidence of patients' experiences is fundamental to creating effective health policy and service responses, yet is missing from our knowledge of adverse events. This protocol describes explorative research redressing this significant deficit; investigating the experiences of a large cohort of recently hospitalised patients aged 45 years and above in hospitals in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. The 45 and Up Study is a cohort of 265,000 adults aged 45 years and above in NSW. Patients who were hospitalised between 1 January and 30 June 2014 will be identified from this cohort using data linkage and a random sample of 20,000 invited to participate. A cross-sectional survey (including qualitative and quantitative components) will capture patients' experiences in hospital and specifically of adverse events. Approximately 25% of respondents are likely to report experiencing an adverse event. Quantitative components will capture the nature and type of events as well as common features of patients' experiences. Qualitative data provide contextual knowledge of their condition and care and the impact of the event on individuals. Respondents who do not report an adverse event will report their experience in hospital and be the control group. Statistical and thematic analysis will be used to present a patient perspective of their experiences in hospital; the characteristics of patients experiencing an adverse event; experiences of information sharing after an event (open disclosure) and the other avenues of redress pursued. Interviews with key policymakers and a document analysis will be used to create a map of the current practice. Dissemination via a one-day workshop, peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations will enable effective clinical responses and service provision and policy responses to adverse events to be developed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Conversion from depression to bipolar disorder in a cohort of young people in England, 1999-2011: A national record linkage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony; Wotton, Clare J; Duffy, Anne; Hoang, Uy; Goldacre, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To estimate the conversion rate from unipolar depression (ICD10 codes F32-F33) to bipolar disorder (BP) (ICD10 codes F31) in an English national cohort. It was hypothesised that early-onset BP (age disorder, with a more rapid, and higher rate of conversion from depression to BP. This record linkage study used English national Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) covering all NHS inpatient and day case admissions between 1999 and 2011. The overall rate of conversion from depression to BP for all ages was 5.65% (95% CI: 5.48-5.83) over a minimum 4-year follow-up period. The conversion rate from depression to BP increased in a linear manner with age from 10-14 years - 2.21% (95% C: 1.16-4.22) to 30-34 years - 7.06% (95% CI: 6.44-7.55) (F1,23=77.6, p=0.001, R(2)=0.77). The time to conversion was constant across the age range. The rate of conversion was higher in females (6.77%; 95% CI: 6.53-7.02) compared to males, (4.17%; 95% CI: 3.95-4.40) (χ(2)=194, pconversion rate from depression to bipolar disorder with age, and constant time for conversion across the age range does not support the notion that early-onset BP is a more severe form of the disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Uptake, Accuracy, Safety, and Linkage into Care over Two Years of Promoting Annual Self-Testing for HIV in Blantyre, Malawi: A Community-Based Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustine T Choko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Home-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC achieves high uptake, but is difficult and expensive to implement and sustain. We investigated a novel alternative based on HIV self-testing (HIVST. The aim was to evaluate the uptake of testing, accuracy, linkage into care, and health outcomes when highly convenient and flexible but supported access to HIVST kits was provided to a well-defined and closely monitored population.Following enumeration of 14 neighbourhoods in urban Blantyre, Malawi, trained resident volunteer-counsellors offered oral HIVST kits (OraQuick ADVANCE Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test to adult (≥16 y old residents (n = 16,660 and reported community events, with all deaths investigated by verbal autopsy. Written and demonstrated instructions, pre- and post-test counselling, and facilitated HIV care assessment were provided, with a request to return kits and a self-completed questionnaire. Accuracy, residency, and a study-imposed requirement to limit HIVST to one test per year were monitored by home visits in a systematic quality assurance (QA sample. Overall, 14,004 (crude uptake 83.8%, revised to 76.5% to account for population turnover residents self-tested during months 1-12, with adolescents (16-19 y most likely to test. 10,614/14,004 (75.8% participants shared results with volunteer-counsellors. Of 1,257 (11.8% HIV-positive participants, 26.0% were already on antiretroviral therapy, and 524 (linkage 56.3% newly accessed care with a median CD4 count of 250 cells/μl (interquartile range 159-426. HIVST uptake in months 13-24 was more rapid (70.9% uptake by 6 mo, with fewer (7.3%, 95% CI 6.8%-7.8% positive participants. Being "forced to test", usually by a main partner, was reported by 2.9% (95% CI 2.6%-3.2% of 10,017 questionnaire respondents in months 1-12, but satisfaction with HIVST (94.4% remained high. No HIVST-related partner violence or suicides were reported. HIVST and repeat HTC results agreed in 1

  5. Synthesis of modified oligonucleotides for repair and replication studies of single and double radio-induced DNA lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muller, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several oxidative processes induce the formation of DNA lesions. In order to evaluate the biological and structural significance of such damage, several DNA lesions were inserted into synthetic oligonucleotides at defined sites. The research work aimed at describing the preparation of oligonucleotides t hat contained DNA damage and the evaluation of the biological properties of the lesions. A first part described the incorporation of radiation-induced lesions, namely (5'S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and (5'S,5S,6S)-5',6-cyclo-5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydro-2'-desoxyuridine into oligonucleotides. The modified DNA fragments were characterised by several spectroscopic and biochemical analyses including ESI MS, MALDI-TOF MS, CLHP and enzymatic digestions. During in vitro DNA synthesis by Taq DNA polymerase and Klenow exo fragment, the pyrimidine cyclo-nucleosides were found to block the progression of the enzymes. Then, repair studies by ADN N glycosylases, operating in the base excision repair pathway, have shown that the anhydro-nucleoside lesions were not recognised nor excised by Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, yNtg1 yNtg2 and yOgg1. Interestingly, the Latococcus lactis Fpg protein recognises (formation of a non covalent complex) but do not excise the damage. The incorporation into oligonucleotides of the (5R*) and (5S*) diastereoisomers of 1-[2-deoxy-β-D-erythro-pentofuranosyl]-5-hydroxy-hydantoin, generated by several oxidative processes was then described. In vitro DNA replication assays using modified oligonucleotides matrix showed a lethal potential of the latter base damage. Repair studies by ADN N-glycosylases showed that the damage was substrate for Fpg, endo III, endo VIII, Ntg1, Ntg2 and Fpg-L1. The rates of excision as inferred from the determination of the Michaelis kinetics constants were found to be affected by the presence of the damage. MALDI-TOF MS was used in order to gain insights into mechanistic aspects of oligonucleotides cleavage by the

  6. Genome-wide association and linkage identify modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis at 11p13 and 20q13.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fred A.; Strug, Lisa J.; Doshi, Vishal K.; Commander, Clayton W.; Blackman, Scott M.; Sun, Lei; Berthiaume, Yves; Cutler, David; Cojocaru, Andreea; Collaco, J. Michael; Corey, Mary; Dorfman, Ruslan; Goddard, Katrina; Green, Deanna; Kent, Jack W.; Lange, Ethan M.; Lee, Seunggeun; Li, Weili; Luo, Jingchun; Mayhew, Gregory M.; Naughton, Kathleen M.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Paré, Peter; Rommens, Johanna M.; Sandford, Andrew; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Sun, Wei; Taylor, Chelsea; Vanscoy, Lori L.; Zou, Fei; Blangero, John; Zielenski, Julian; O’Neal, Wanda K.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Durie, Peter R.; Knowles, Michael R.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2012-01-01

    A combined genome-wide association and linkage study was used to identify loci causing variation in CF lung disease severity. A significant association (P=3. 34 × 10-8) near EHF and APIP (chr11p13) was identified in F508del homozygotes (n=1,978). The association replicated in F508del homozygotes (P=0.006) from a separate family-based study (n=557), with P=1.49 × 10-9 for the three-study joint meta-analysis. Linkage analysis of 486 sibling pairs from the family-based study identified a significant QTL on chromosome 20q13.2 (LOD=5.03). Our findings provide insight into the causes of variation in lung disease severity in CF and suggest new therapeutic targets for this life-limiting disorder. PMID:21602797

  7. Linkage mechanisms in the vertebrate skull: Structure and function of three-dimensional, parallel transmission systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Aaron M; Westneat, Mark W

    2016-12-01

    Many musculoskeletal systems, including the skulls of birds, fishes, and some lizards consist of interconnected chains of mobile skeletal elements, analogous to linkage mechanisms used in engineering. Biomechanical studies have applied linkage models to a diversity of musculoskeletal systems, with previous applications primarily focusing on two-dimensional linkage geometries, bilaterally symmetrical pairs of planar linkages, or single four-bar linkages. Here, we present new, three-dimensional (3D), parallel linkage models of the skulls of birds and fishes and use these models (available as free kinematic simulation software), to investigate structure-function relationships in these systems. This new computational framework provides an accessible and integrated workflow for exploring the evolution of structure and function in complex musculoskeletal systems. Linkage simulations show that kinematic transmission, although a suitable functional metric for linkages with single rotating input and output links, can give misleading results when applied to linkages with substantial translational components or multiple output links. To take into account both linear and rotational displacement we define force mechanical advantage for a linkage (analogous to lever mechanical advantage) and apply this metric to measure transmission efficiency in the bird cranial mechanism. For linkages with multiple, expanding output points we propose a new functional metric, expansion advantage, to measure expansion amplification and apply this metric to the buccal expansion mechanism in fishes. Using the bird cranial linkage model, we quantify the inaccuracies that result from simplifying a 3D geometry into two dimensions. We also show that by combining single-chain linkages into parallel linkages, more links can be simulated while decreasing or maintaining the same number of input parameters. This generalized framework for linkage simulation and analysis can accommodate linkages of differing

  8. A coral Sr/Ca calibration and replication study of two massive corals from the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, Kristine L.; Flannery, Jennifer A.; Maupin, Christopher R.; Poore, Richard Z.; Quinn, Terrence M.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the variations in the ratio of strontium-to-calcium (Sr/Ca) for two Atlantic corals (Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea) from the Dry Tortugas National Park (centered on 24.7°N, 82.8°W) in the Gulf of Mexico. Cores from coral colonies in close proximity (10s of meters) and with the same environmental conditions (i.e., depth and water chemistry) were micro-sampled with approximately monthly resolution and the resulting Sr/Ca variations were calibrated with local sea surface temperature (SST) records. Replication tests for coral Sr/Ca variations found high agreement between intra-colony variations and between individual colonies of S. siderea (a single M. faveolata colony was sampled). Regression analysis of monthly variations in coral Sr/Ca and local SST revealed significant correlation on monthly and inter-annual timescales. Verification of the calibration on different timescales found coral Sr/Ca–SST reconstructions in S. siderea were more accurate than those from M. faveolata, especially on inter-annual timescales. Sr/Ca–SST calibration equations for the two species are significantly different (cf., Sr/Ca = -0.042 SST + 10.070, S. siderea; Sr/Ca = -0.027 SST + 9.893, M. faveolata). Mean linear extension for M. faveolata is approximately twice that of S. siderea (4.63, 4.31, and 8.31 mm year−1, A1, F1, and B3, respectively); however, seasonal Sr/Ca variability in M. faveolata is less than S. siderea (0.323, 0.353, and 0.254 mmol mol−1, A1, F1, and B3, respectively). The reduced slope for M. faveolata is attributed to physical sampling issues associated with complex time-skeletal structure of M. faveolata, i.e., a sampling effect, and not a growth effect since the faster growing M. faveolata has the reduced Sr/Ca variability.

  9. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  10. Mapping organizational linkages in the agricultural innovation system of Azerbaijan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Temel, T.

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the evolving context and organisational linkages in the agricultural innovation system of Azerbaijan and suggests ways to promote effective organisational ties for the development, distribution and use of new or improved information and knowledge related to agriculture.

  11. Data Linkage: A powerful research tool with potential problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Ian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, clinicians and researchers are demonstrating increasing interest in using data linked from multiple sources to support measurement of clinical performance and patient health outcomes. However, the utility of data linkage may be compromised by sub-optimal or incomplete linkage, leading to systematic bias. In this study, we synthesize the evidence identifying participant or population characteristics that can influence the validity and completeness of data linkage and may be associated with systematic bias in reported outcomes. Methods A narrative review, using structured search methods was undertaken. Key words "data linkage" and Mesh term "medical record linkage" were applied to Medline, EMBASE and CINAHL databases between 1991 and 2007. Abstract inclusion criteria were; the article attempted an empirical evaluation of methodological issues relating to data linkage and reported on patient characteristics, the study design included analysis of matched versus unmatched records, and the report was in English. Included articles were grouped thematically according to patient characteristics that were compared between matched and unmatched records. Results The search identified 1810 articles of which 33 (1.8% met inclusion criteria. There was marked heterogeneity in study methods and factors investigated. Characteristics that were unevenly distributed among matched and unmatched records were; age (72% of studies, sex (50% of studies, race (64% of studies, geographical/hospital site (93% of studies, socio-economic status (82% of studies and health status (72% of studies. Conclusion A number of relevant patient or population factors may be associated with incomplete data linkage resulting in systematic bias in reported clinical outcomes. Readers should consider these factors in interpreting the reported results of data linkage studies.

  12. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  13. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis: effect of bin width on the probability of linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slager, S L; Juo, S H; Durner, M; Hodge, S E

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed part of the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data using Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods that are implemented in the computer program Loki. The MCMC method reports the "probability of linkage" (PL) across the chromosomal regions of interest. The point of maximum PL can then be taken as a "location estimate" for the location of the quantitative trait locus (QTL). However, Loki does not provide a formal statistical test of linkage. In this paper, we explore how the bin width used in the calculations affects the max PL and the location estimate. We analyzed age at onset (AO) and quantitative trait number 5, Q5, from 26 replicates of the general simulated data in one region where we knew a major gene, MG5, is located. For each trait, we found the max PL and the corresponding location estimate, using four different bin widths. We found that bin width, as expected, does affect the max PL and the location estimate, and we recommend that users of Loki explore how their results vary with different bin widths.

  14. Docosahexaenoic acid for reading, working memory and behavior in UK children aged 7-9: A randomized controlled trial for replication (the DOLAB II study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Montgomery

    Full Text Available Omega-3 fatty acids are central to brain-development of children. Evidence from clinical trials and systematic reviews demonstrates the potential of long-chain Omega-3 supplementation for learning and behavior. However, findings are inconclusive and in need of robust replication studies since such work is lacking.Replication of the 2012 DOLAB 1 study findings that a dietary supplementation with the long-chain omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid (DHA had beneficial effects on the reading, working memory, and behavior of healthy schoolchildren.Parallel group, fixed-dose, randomized (minimization, 30% random element, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (RCT.Mainstream primary schools (n = 84 from five counties in the UK in 2012-2015.Healthy children aged 7-9 underperforming in reading (<20th centile. 1230 invited, 376 met study criteria.600 mg/day DHA (from algal oil, placebo: taste/color matched corn/soybean oil; for 16 weeks.Age-standardized measures of reading, working memory, and behavior, parent-rated and as secondary outcome teacher-rated.376 children were randomized. Reading, working memory, and behavior change scores showed no consistent differences between intervention and placebo group. Some behavioral subscales showed minor group differences.This RCT did not replicate results of the earlier DOLAB 1 study on the effectiveness of nutritional supplementation with DHA for learning and behavior. Possible reasons are discussed, particularly regarding the replication of complex interventions.www.controlled-trials.com (ISRCTN48803273 and protocols.io (https://dx.doi.org/10.17504/protocols.io.k8kczuw.

  15. Linkage disequilibrium in wild mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Laurie

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Crosses between laboratory strains of mice provide a powerful way of detecting quantitative trait loci for complex traits related to human disease. Hundreds of these loci have been detected, but only a small number of the underlying causative genes have been identified. The main difficulty is the extensive linkage disequilibrium (LD in intercross progeny and the slow process of fine-scale mapping by traditional methods. Recently, new approaches have been introduced, such as association studies with inbred lines and multigenerational crosses. These approaches are very useful for interval reduction, but generally do not provide single-gene resolution because of strong LD extending over one to several megabases. Here, we investigate the genetic structure of a natural population of mice in Arizona to determine its suitability for fine-scale LD mapping and association studies. There are three main findings: (1 Arizona mice have a high level of genetic variation, which includes a large fraction of the sequence variation present in classical strains of laboratory mice; (2 they show clear evidence of local inbreeding but appear to lack stable population structure across the study area; and (3 LD decays with distance at a rate similar to human populations, which is considerably more rapid than in laboratory populations of mice. Strong associations in Arizona mice are limited primarily to markers less than 100 kb apart, which provides the possibility of fine-scale association mapping at the level of one or a few genes. Although other considerations, such as sample size requirements and marker discovery, are serious issues in the implementation of association studies, the genetic variation and LD results indicate that wild mice could provide a useful tool for identifying genes that cause variation in complex traits.

  16. Use of two-part regression calibration model to correct for measurement error in episodically consumed foods in a single-replicate study design: EPIC case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogo, George O; van der Voet, Hilko; van't Veer, Pieter; Ferrari, Pietro; Leenders, Max; Muller, David C; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Bamia, Christina; Braaten, Tonje; Knüppel, Sven; Johansson, Ingegerd; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference measurements are required. Short-term reference measurements for foods that are not consumed daily contain excess zeroes that pose challenges in the calibration model. We adapted two-part regression calibration model, initially developed for multiple replicates of reference measurements per individual to a single-replicate setting. We showed how to handle excess zero reference measurements by two-step modeling approach, how to explore heteroscedasticity in the consumed amount with variance-mean graph, how to explore nonlinearity with the generalized additive modeling (GAM) and the empirical logit approaches, and how to select covariates in the calibration model. The performance of two-part calibration model was compared with the one-part counterpart. We used vegetable intake and mortality data from European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. In the EPIC, reference measurements were taken with 24-hour recalls. For each of the three vegetable subgroups assessed separately, correcting for error with an appropriately specified two-part calibration model resulted in about three fold increase in the strength of association with all-cause mortality, as measured by the log hazard ratio. Further found is that the standard way of including covariates in the calibration model can lead to over fitting the two-part calibration model. Moreover, the extent of adjusting for error is influenced by the number and forms of covariates in the calibration model. For episodically consumed foods, we advise researchers to pay special attention to response distribution, nonlinearity, and covariate inclusion in specifying the calibration model.

  17. Linkage and related analyses of Barrett's esophagus and its associated adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangqing; Elston, Robert; Falk, Gary W; Grady, William M; Faulx, Ashley; Mittal, Sumeet K; Canto, Marcia I; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Wang, Jean S; Iyer, Prasad G; Abrams, Julian A; Willis, Joseph E; Guda, Kishore; Markowitz, Sanford; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Chandar, Apoorva; Brock, Wendy; Chak, Amitabh

    2016-07-01

    Familial aggregation and segregation analysis studies have provided evidence of a genetic basis for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and its premalignant precursor, Barrett's esophagus (BE). We aim to demonstrate the utility of linkage analysis to identify the genomic regions that might contain the genetic variants that predispose individuals to this complex trait (BE and EAC). We genotyped 144 individuals in 42 multiplex pedigrees chosen from 1000 singly ascertained BE/EAC pedigrees, and performed both model-based and model-free linkage analyses, using S.A.G.E. and other software. Segregation models were fitted, from the data on both the 42 pedigrees and the 1000 pedigrees, to determine parameters for performing model-based linkage analysis. Model-based and model-free linkage analyses were conducted in two sets of pedigrees: the 42 pedigrees and a subset of 18 pedigrees with female affected members that are expected to be more genetically homogeneous. Genome-wide associations were also tested in these families. Linkage analyses on the 42 pedigrees identified several regions consistently suggestive of linkage by different linkage analysis methods on chromosomes 2q31, 12q23, and 4p14. A linkage on 15q26 is the only consistent linkage region identified in the 18 female-affected pedigrees, in which the linkage signal is higher than in the 42 pedigrees. Other tentative linkage signals are also reported. Our linkage study of BE/EAC pedigrees identified linkage regions on chromosomes 2, 4, 12, and 15, with some reported associations located within our linkage peaks. Our linkage results can help prioritize association tests to delineate the genetic determinants underlying susceptibility to BE and EAC.

  18. High-Yield HIV Testing, Facilitated Linkage to Care, and Prevention for Female Youth in Kenya (GIRLS Study): Implementation Science Protocol for a Priority Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inwani, Irene; Chhun, Nok; Agot, Kawango; Cleland, Charles M; Buttolph, Jasmine; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Kurth, Ann E

    2017-12-13

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the region with the highest HIV burden. Adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) in the age range of 15 to 24 years are twice as likely as their male peers to be infected, making females in sub-Saharan Africa the most at-risk group for HIV infection. It is therefore critical to prioritize access to HIV testing, prevention, and treatment for this vulnerable population. Using an implementation science framework, the purpose of this research protocol was to describe the approaches we propose to optimize engagement of AGYW in both the HIV prevention and care continuum and to determine the recruitment and testing strategies that identify the highest proportion of previously undiagnosed HIV infections. We will compare two seek recruitment strategies, three test strategies, and pilot adaptive linkage to care interventions (sequential multiple assignment randomized trial [SMART] design) among AGYW in the age range of 15 to 24 years in Homa Bay County, western Kenya. AGYW will be recruited in the home or community-based setting and offered three testing options: oral fluid HIV self-testing, staff-aided rapid HIV testing, or referral to a health care facility for standard HIV testing services. Newly diagnosed AGYW with HIV will be enrolled in the SMART trial pilot to determine the most effective way to support initial linkage to care after a positive diagnosis. They will be randomized to standard referral (counseling and a referral note) or standard referral plus SMS text message (short message service, SMS); those not linked to care within 2 weeks will be rerandomized to receive an additional SMS text message or a one-time financial incentive (approximately US $4). We will also evaluate a primary prevention messaging intervention to support identified high-risk HIV-negative AGYW to reduce their HIV risk and adhere to HIV retesting recommendations. We will also conduct analyses to determine the incremental cost-effectiveness of the seek, testing and

  19. STAKEHOLDER LINKAGES FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    Key words: Stakeholders; farmer-expert linkages; resource management; Ethiopia. Introduction ... decentralized democratic decision making processes and thus ..... district offices within the given time limits. They were often .... -less willing and less ready to hearing weaker performance reports (expect more success with ...

  20. An exploratory study to examine intentions to adopt an evidence-based HIV linkage-to-care intervention among state health department AIDS directors in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norton Wynne E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread dissemination and implementation of evidence-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV linkage-to-care (LTC interventions is essential for improving HIV-positive patients' health outcomes and reducing transmission to uninfected others. To date, however, little work has focused on identifying factors associated with intentions to adopt LTC interventions among policy makers, including city, state, and territory health department AIDS directors who play a critical role in deciding whether an intervention is endorsed, distributed, and/or funded throughout their region. Methods Between December 2010 and February 2011, we administered an online questionnaire with state, territory, and city health department AIDS directors throughout the United States to identify factors associated with intentions to adopt an LTC intervention. Guided by pertinent theoretical frameworks, including the Diffusion of Innovations and the "push-pull" capacity model, we assessed participants' attitudes towards the intervention, perceived organizational and contextual demand and support for the intervention, likelihood of adoption given endorsement from stakeholder groups (e.g., academic researchers, federal agencies, activist organizations, and likelihood of enabling future dissemination efforts by recommending the intervention to other health departments and community-based organizations. Results Forty-four participants (67% of the eligible sample completed the online questionnaire. Approximately one-third (34.9% reported that they intended to adopt the LTC intervention for use in their city, state, or territory in the future. Consistent with prior, related work, these participants were classified as LTC intervention "adopters" and were compared to "nonadopters" for data analysis. Overall, adopters reported more positive attitudes and greater perceived demand and support for the intervention than did nonadopters. Further, participants varied with

  1. An exploratory study to examine intentions to adopt an evidence-based HIV linkage-to-care intervention among state health department AIDS directors in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Wynne E

    2012-04-02

    Widespread dissemination and implementation of evidence-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) linkage-to-care (LTC) interventions is essential for improving HIV-positive patients' health outcomes and reducing transmission to uninfected others. To date, however, little work has focused on identifying factors associated with intentions to adopt LTC interventions among policy makers, including city, state, and territory health department AIDS directors who play a critical role in deciding whether an intervention is endorsed, distributed, and/or funded throughout their region. Between December 2010 and February 2011, we administered an online questionnaire with state, territory, and city health department AIDS directors throughout the United States to identify factors associated with intentions to adopt an LTC intervention. Guided by pertinent theoretical frameworks, including the Diffusion of Innovations and the "push-pull" capacity model, we assessed participants' attitudes towards the intervention, perceived organizational and contextual demand and support for the intervention, likelihood of adoption given endorsement from stakeholder groups (e.g., academic researchers, federal agencies, activist organizations), and likelihood of enabling future dissemination efforts by recommending the intervention to other health departments and community-based organizations. Forty-four participants (67% of the eligible sample) completed the online questionnaire. Approximately one-third (34.9%) reported that they intended to adopt the LTC intervention for use in their city, state, or territory in the future. Consistent with prior, related work, these participants were classified as LTC intervention "adopters" and were compared to "nonadopters" for data analysis. Overall, adopters reported more positive attitudes and greater perceived demand and support for the intervention than did nonadopters. Further, participants varied with their intention to adopt the LTC intervention in

  2. Data from Investigating Variation in Replicability: A “Many Labs” Replication Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Klein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This dataset is from the Many Labs Replication Project in which 13 effects were replicated across 36 samples and over 6,000 participants. Data from the replications are included, along with demographic variables about the participants and contextual information about the environment in which the replication was conducted. Data were collected in-lab and online through a standardized procedure administered via an online link. The dataset is stored on the Open Science Framework website. These data could be used to further investigate the results of the included 13 effects or to study replication and generalizability more broadly.

  3. Construction and Cloning of Reporter-Tagged Replicon cDNA for an In Vitro Replication Study of Murine Norovirus-1 (MNV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muhammad Khairi; Tabana, Yasser M; Ahmed, Mowaffaq Adam; Sandai, Doblin Anak; Mohamed, Rafeezul; Ismail, Ida Shazrina; Zulkiflie, Nurulisa; Yunus, Muhammad Amir

    2017-12-01

    A norovirus maintains its viability, infectivity and virulence by its ability to replicate. However, the biological mechanisms of the process remain to be explored. In this work, the NanoLuc™ Luciferase gene was used to develop a reporter-tagged replicon system to study norovirus replication. The NanoLuc™ Luciferase reporter protein was engineered to be expressed as a fusion protein for MNV-1 minor capsid protein, VP2. The foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (FMDV2A) sequence was inserted between the 3'end of the reporter gene and the VP2 start sequence to allow co-translational 'cleavage' of fusion proteins during intracellular transcript expression. Amplification of the fusion gene was performed using a series of standard and overlapping polymerase chain reactions. The resulting amplicon was then cloned into three readily available backbones of MNV-1 cDNA clones. Restriction enzyme analysis indicated that the NanoLucTM Luciferase gene was successfully inserted into the parental MNV-1 cDNA clone. The insertion was further confirmed by using DNA sequencing. NanoLuc™ Luciferase-tagged MNV-1 cDNA clones were successfully engineered. Such clones can be exploited to develop robust experimental assays for in vitro assessments of viral RNA replication.

  4. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  5. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation of Replication Factors Moving with the Replication Fork

    OpenAIRE

    Rapp, Jordan B.; Ansbach, Alison B.; Noguchi, Chiaki; Noguchi, Eishi

    2009-01-01

    Replication of chromosomes involves a variety of replication proteins including DNA polymerases, DNA helicases, and other accessory factors. Many of these proteins are known to localize at replication forks and travel with them as components of the replisome complex. Other proteins do not move with replication forks but still play an essential role in DNA replication. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms of DNA replication and its controls, it is important to examine localization ...

  6. Exploitation of linkage learning in evolutionary algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ying-ping

    2010-01-01

    The exploitation of linkage learning is enhancing the performance of evolutionary algorithms. This monograph examines recent progress in linkage learning, with a series of focused technical chapters that cover developments and trends in the field.

  7. A randomised controlled trial to compare opt-in and opt-out parental consent for childhood vaccine safety surveillance using data linkage: study protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Berry, Jesia G; Ryan, Philip; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Duszynski, Katherine M; Xafis, Vicki; Gold, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The Vaccine Assessment using Linked Data (VALiD) trial compared opt-in and opt-out parental consent for a population-based childhood vaccine safety surveillance program using data linkage. A subsequent telephone interview of all households enrolled in the trial elicited parental intent regarding the return or non-return of reply forms for opt-in and opt-out consent. This paper describes the rationale for the trial and provides an overview of the design and methods. Methods...

  8. Efficient Record Linkage Algorithms Using Complete Linkage Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2016-01-01

    Data from different agencies share data of the same individuals. Linking these datasets to identify all the records belonging to the same individuals is a crucial and challenging problem, especially given the large volumes of data. A large number of available algorithms for record linkage are prone to either time inefficiency or low-accuracy in finding matches and non-matches among the records. In this paper we propose efficient as well as reliable sequential and parallel algorithms for the record linkage problem employing hierarchical clustering methods. We employ complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms to address this problem. In addition to hierarchical clustering, we also use two other techniques: elimination of duplicate records and blocking. Our algorithms use sorting as a sub-routine to identify identical copies of records. We have tested our algorithms on datasets with millions of synthetic records. Experimental results show that our algorithms achieve nearly 100% accuracy. Parallel implementations achieve almost linear speedups. Time complexities of these algorithms do not exceed those of previous best-known algorithms. Our proposed algorithms outperform previous best-known algorithms in terms of accuracy consuming reasonable run times.

  9. A guide to evaluating linkage quality for the analysis of linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harron, Katie L; Doidge, James C; Knight, Hannah E; Gilbert, Ruth E; Goldstein, Harvey; Cromwell, David A; van der Meulen, Jan H

    2017-10-01

    Linked datasets are an important resource for epidemiological and clinical studies, but linkage error can lead to biased results. For data security reasons, linkage of personal identifiers is often performed by a third party, making it difficult for researchers to assess the quality of the linked dataset in the context of specific research questions. This is compounded by a lack of guidance on how to determine the potential impact of linkage error. We describe how linkage quality can be evaluated and provide widely applicable guidance for both data providers and researchers. Using an illustrative example of a linked dataset of maternal and baby hospital records, we demonstrate three approaches for evaluating linkage quality: applying the linkage algorithm to a subset of gold standard data to quantify linkage error; comparing characteristics of linked and unlinked data to identify potential sources of bias; and evaluating the sensitivity of results to changes in the linkage procedure. These approaches can inform our understanding of the potential impact of linkage error and provide an opportunity to select the most appropriate linkage procedure for a specific analysis. Evaluating linkage quality in this way will improve the quality and transparency of epidemiological and clinical research using linked data. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  10. Estimating parameters for probabilistic linkage of privacy-preserved datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Adrian P; Randall, Sean M; Ferrante, Anna M; Semmens, James B; Boyd, James H

    2017-07-10

    Probabilistic record linkage is a process used to bring together person-based records from within the same dataset (de-duplication) or from disparate datasets using pairwise comparisons and matching probabilities. The linkage strategy and associated match probabilities are often estimated through investigations into data quality and manual inspection. However, as privacy-preserved datasets comprise encrypted data, such methods are not possible. In this paper, we present a method for estimating the probabilities and threshold values for probabilistic privacy-preserved record linkage using Bloom filters. Our method was tested through a simulation study using synthetic data, followed by an application using real-world administrative data. Synthetic datasets were generated with error rates from zero to 20% error. Our method was used to estimate parameters (probabilities and thresholds) for de-duplication linkages. Linkage quality was determined by F-measure. Each dataset was privacy-preserved using separate Bloom filters for each field. Match probabilities were estimated using the expectation-maximisation (EM) algorithm on the privacy-preserved data. Threshold cut-off values were determined by an extension to the EM algorithm allowing linkage quality to be estimated for each possible threshold. De-duplication linkages of each privacy-preserved dataset were performed using both estimated and calculated probabilities. Linkage quality using the F-measure at the estimated threshold values was also compared to the highest F-measure. Three large administrative datasets were used to demonstrate the applicability of the probability and threshold estimation technique on real-world data. Linkage of the synthetic datasets using the estimated probabilities produced an F-measure that was comparable to the F-measure using calculated probabilities, even with up to 20% error. Linkage of the administrative datasets using estimated probabilities produced an F-measure that was higher

  11. Effects of cooking on the cell walls (dietary fiber) of 'Scarlet Warren' winter squash ( Cucurbita maxima ) studied by polysaccharide linkage analysis and solid-state (13)C NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayake, R M Sunil; Sims, Ian M; Newman, Roger H; Melton, Laurence D

    2011-07-13

    Cell wall polysaccharides of 'Scarlet Warren' winter squash ( Cucurbita maxima ) were investigated before and after thermal processing. Linkage analysis of polysaccharides was done by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The linkage analysis showed the cell wall polysaccharide compositions of raw and cooked squash were similar. The total pectic polysaccharides (galacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan, arabinan, and arabinogalactan) contents of the cell walls of both raw and cooked squash were 39 mol %. The amounts of pectic polysaccharides and xyloglucan in the cell walls of squash showed little alteration on heating. The cellulose content of the raw and cooked cell walls was relatively high at 47 mol %, whereas the xyloglucan content was low at 4 mol %. Solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy techniques were used to examine the molecular motion of the polysaccharides in the cell walls. The mobility of highly flexible galactan depends on the water content of the sample, but no difference was seen between raw and cooked samples. Likewise, the mobility of semimobile pectic polysaccharides was apparently unaltered by cooking. No change was detected in the rigid cellulose microfibrils on cooking.

  12. Replication of kinetoplast minicircle DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, C.T.

    1989-01-01

    These studies describe the isolation and characterization of early minicircle replication intermediates from Crithidia fasciculata, and Leishmania tarentolae, the mitochondrial localization of a type II topoisomerase (TIImt) in C. fasciculata, and the implication of the aforementioned TIImt in minicircle replication in L. tarentolae. Early minicircle replication intermediates from C. fasciculata were identified and characterized using isolated kinetoplasts to incorporate radiolabeled nucleotides into its DNA. The pulse-label in an apparent theta-type intermediate chase into two daughter molecules. A uniquely gapped, ribonucleotide primed, knotted molecule represents the leading strand in the model proposed, and a highly gapped molecule represents the lagging strand. This theta intermediate is repaired in vitro to a doubly nicked catenated dimer which was shown to result from the replication of a single parental molecule. Very similar intermediates were found in the heterogeneous population of minicircles of L. tarentolae. The sites of the Leishmania specific discontinuities were mapped and shown to lie within the universally conserved sequence blocks in identical positions as compared to C. fasciculata and Trypanosoma equiperdum

  13. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsofia A Kiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  14. Using Replication Projects in Teaching Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, Lionel G.; Grenier, Manuel; Lane, Erica A.; Roberts, Meigan S.; Sykes, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    It is suggested that replication projects may be valuable in teaching research methods, and also address the current need in psychology for more independent verification of published studies. Their use in an undergraduate methods course is described, involving student teams who performed direct replications of four well-known experiments, yielding…

  15. Activation of human herpesvirus replication by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Alka; Remick, Jill; Zeichner, Steven L

    2013-10-01

    A central feature of herpesvirus biology is the ability of herpesviruses to remain latent within host cells. Classically, exposure to inducing agents, like activating cytokines or phorbol esters that stimulate host cell signal transduction events, and epigenetic agents (e.g., butyrate) was thought to end latency. We recently showed that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, or human herpesvirus-8 [HHV-8]) has another, alternative emergency escape replication pathway that is triggered when KSHV's host cell undergoes apoptosis, characterized by the lack of a requirement for the replication and transcription activator (RTA) protein, accelerated late gene kinetics, and production of virus with decreased infectivity. Caspase-3 is necessary and sufficient to initiate the alternative replication program. HSV-1 was also recently shown to initiate replication in response to host cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that an alternative apoptosis-triggered replication program might be a general feature of herpesvirus biology and that apoptosis-initiated herpesvirus replication may have clinical implications, particularly for herpesviruses that almost universally infect humans. To explore whether an alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program is a common feature of herpesvirus biology, we studied cell lines latently infected with Epstein-Barr virus/HHV-4, HHV-6A, HHV-6B, HHV-7, and KSHV. We found that apoptosis triggers replication for each HHV studied, with caspase-3 being necessary and sufficient for HHV replication. An alternative apoptosis-initiated replication program appears to be a common feature of HHV biology. We also found that commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents activate HHV replication, which suggests that treatments that promote apoptosis may lead to activation of latent herpesviruses, with potential clinical significance.

  16. Inspirations on Virus Replication and Cell-to-Cell Movement from Studies Examining the Cytopathology Induced by Lettuce infectious yellows virus in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Qiao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type member of the genus Crinivirus in the family Closteroviridae. Like many other positive-strand RNA viruses, LIYV infections induce a number of cytopathic changes in plant cells, of which the two most characteristic are: Beet yellows virus-type inclusion bodies composed of vesicles derived from cytoplasmic membranes; and conical plasmalemma deposits (PLDs located at the plasmalemma over plasmodesmata pit fields. The former are not only found in various closterovirus infections, but similar structures are known as ‘viral factories’ or viroplasms in cells infected with diverse types of animal and plant viruses. These are generally sites of virus replication, virion assembly and in some cases are involved in cell-to-cell transport. By contrast, PLDs induced by the LIYV-encoded P26 non-virion protein are not involved in replication but are speculated to have roles in virus intercellular movement. These deposits often harbor LIYV virions arranged to be perpendicular to the plasma membrane over plasmodesmata, and our recent studies show that P26 is required for LIYV systemic plant infection. The functional mechanism of how LIYV P26 facilitates intercellular movement remains unclear, however, research on other plant viruses provides some insights on the possible ways of viral intercellular movement through targeting and modifying plasmodesmata via interactions between plant cellular components and viral-encoded factors. In summary, beginning with LIYV, we review the studies that have uncovered the biological determinants giving rise to these cytopathological effects and their importance in viral replication, virion assembly and intercellular movement during the plant infection by closteroviruses, and compare these findings with those for other positive-strand RNA viruses.

  17. Privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kum, Hye-Chung; Krishnamurthy, Ashok; Machanavajjhala, Ashwin; Reiter, Michael K; Ahalt, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Record linkage to integrate uncoordinated databases is critical in biomedical research using Big Data. Balancing privacy protection against the need for high quality record linkage requires a human-machine hybrid system to safely manage uncertainty in the ever changing streams of chaotic Big Data. In the computer science literature, private record linkage is the most published area. It investigates how to apply a known linkage function safely when linking two tables. However, in practice, the linkage function is rarely known. Thus, there are many data linkage centers whose main role is to be the trusted third party to determine the linkage function manually and link data for research via a master population list for a designated region. Recently, a more flexible computerized third-party linkage platform, Secure Decoupled Linkage (SDLink), has been proposed based on: (1) decoupling data via encryption, (2) obfuscation via chaffing (adding fake data) and universe manipulation; and (3) minimum information disclosure via recoding. We synthesize this literature to formalize a new framework for privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL) with tractable privacy and utility properties and then analyze the literature using this framework. Human-based third-party linkage centers for privacy preserving record linkage are the accepted norm internationally. We find that a computer-based third-party platform that can precisely control the information disclosed at the micro level and allow frequent human interaction during the linkage process, is an effective human-machine hybrid system that significantly improves on the linkage center model both in terms of privacy and utility.

  18. Rheumatic Heart Disease-Attributable Mortality at Ages 5-69 Years in Fiji: A Five-Year, National, Population-Based Record-Linkage Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Tom; Kado, Joseph; Miller, Anne E; Ward, Brenton; Heenan, Rachel; Colquhoun, Samantha M; Bärnighausen, Till W; Mirabel, Mariana; Bloom, David E; Bailey, Robin L; Tukana, Isimeli N; Steer, Andrew C

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is considered a major public health problem in developing countries, although scarce data are available to substantiate this. Here we quantify mortality from RHD in Fiji during 2008-2012 in people aged 5-69 years. Using 1,773,999 records derived from multiple sources of routine clinical and administrative data, we used probabilistic record-linkage to define a cohort of 2,619 persons diagnosed with RHD, observed for all-cause mortality over 11,538 person-years. Using relative survival methods, we estimated there were 378 RHD-attributable deaths, almost half of which occurred before age 40 years. Using census data as the denominator, we calculated there were 9.9 deaths (95% CI 9.8-10.0) and 331 years of life-lost (YLL, 95% CI 330.4-331.5) due to RHD per 100,000 person-years, standardised to the portion of the WHO World Standard Population aged 0-69 years. Valuing life using Fiji's per-capita gross domestic product, we estimated these deaths cost United States Dollar $6,077,431 annually. Compared to vital registration data for 2011-2012, we calculated there were 1.6-times more RHD-attributable deaths than the number reported, and found our estimate of RHD mortality exceeded all but the five leading reported causes of premature death, based on collapsed underlying cause-of-death diagnoses. Rheumatic heart disease is a leading cause of premature death as well as an important economic burden in this setting. Age-standardised death rates are more than twice those reported in current global estimates. Linkage of routine data provides an efficient tool to better define the epidemiology of neglected diseases.

  19. Rheumatic Heart Disease-Attributable Mortality at Ages 5–69 Years in Fiji: A Five-Year, National, Population-Based Record-Linkage Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Tom; Kado, Joseph; Miller, Anne E.; Ward, Brenton; Heenan, Rachel; Colquhoun, Samantha M.; Bärnighausen, Till W.; Mirabel, Mariana; Bloom, David E.; Bailey, Robin L.; Tukana, Isimeli N.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is considered a major public health problem in developing countries, although scarce data are available to substantiate this. Here we quantify mortality from RHD in Fiji during 2008–2012 in people aged 5–69 years. Methods and Findings Using 1,773,999 records derived from multiple sources of routine clinical and administrative data, we used probabilistic record-linkage to define a cohort of 2,619 persons diagnosed with RHD, observed for all-cause mortality over 11,538 person-years. Using relative survival methods, we estimated there were 378 RHD-attributable deaths, almost half of which occurred before age 40 years. Using census data as the denominator, we calculated there were 9.9 deaths (95% CI 9.8–10.0) and 331 years of life-lost (YLL, 95% CI 330.4–331.5) due to RHD per 100,000 person-years, standardised to the portion of the WHO World Standard Population aged 0–69 years. Valuing life using Fiji’s per-capita gross domestic product, we estimated these deaths cost United States Dollar $6,077,431 annually. Compared to vital registration data for 2011–2012, we calculated there were 1.6-times more RHD-attributable deaths than the number reported, and found our estimate of RHD mortality exceeded all but the five leading reported causes of premature death, based on collapsed underlying cause-of-death diagnoses. Conclusions Rheumatic heart disease is a leading cause of premature death as well as an important economic burden in this setting. Age-standardised death rates are more than twice those reported in current global estimates. Linkage of routine data provides an efficient tool to better define the epidemiology of neglected diseases. PMID:26371755

  20. Rheumatic Heart Disease-Attributable Mortality at Ages 5-69 Years in Fiji: A Five-Year, National, Population-Based Record-Linkage Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Parks

    Full Text Available Rheumatic heart disease (RHD is considered a major public health problem in developing countries, although scarce data are available to substantiate this. Here we quantify mortality from RHD in Fiji during 2008-2012 in people aged 5-69 years.Using 1,773,999 records derived from multiple sources of routine clinical and administrative data, we used probabilistic record-linkage to define a cohort of 2,619 persons diagnosed with RHD, observed for all-cause mortality over 11,538 person-years. Using relative survival methods, we estimated there were 378 RHD-attributable deaths, almost half of which occurred before age 40 years. Using census data as the denominator, we calculated there were 9.9 deaths (95% CI 9.8-10.0 and 331 years of life-lost (YLL, 95% CI 330.4-331.5 due to RHD per 100,000 person-years, standardised to the portion of the WHO World Standard Population aged 0-69 years. Valuing life using Fiji's per-capita gross domestic product, we estimated these deaths cost United States Dollar $6,077,431 annually. Compared to vital registration data for 2011-2012, we calculated there were 1.6-times more RHD-attributable deaths than the number reported, and found our estimate of RHD mortality exceeded all but the five leading reported causes of premature death, based on collapsed underlying cause-of-death diagnoses.Rheumatic heart disease is a leading cause of premature death as well as an important economic burden in this setting. Age-standardised death rates are more than twice those reported in current global estimates. Linkage of routine data provides an efficient tool to better define the epidemiology of neglected diseases.

  1. Epigenetic Studies Point to DNA Replication/Repair Genes as a Basis for the Heritable Nature of Long Term Complications in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey A. Leontovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic memory (MM is defined as the persistence of diabetic (DM complications even after glycemic control is pharmacologically achieved. Using a zebrafish diabetic model that induces a MM state, we previously reported that, in this model, tissue dysfunction was of a heritable nature based on cell proliferation studies in limb tissue and this correlated with epigenetic DNA methylation changes that paralleled alterations in gene expression. In the current study, control, DM, and MM excised fin tissues were further analyzed by MeDIP sequencing and microarray techniques. Bioinformatics analysis of the data found that genes of the DNA replication/DNA metabolism process group (with upregulation of the apex1, mcm2, mcm4, orc3, lig1, and dnmt1 genes were altered in the DM state and these molecular changes continued into MM. Interestingly, DNA methylation changes could be found as far as 6–13 kb upstream of the transcription start site for these genes suggesting potential higher levels of epigenetic control. In conclusion, DNA methylation changes in members of the DNA replication/repair process group best explain the heritable nature of cell proliferation impairment found in the zebrafish DM/MM model. These results are consistent with human diabetic epigenetic studies and provide one explanation for the persistence of long term tissue complications as seen in diabetes.

  2. Surface microstructure replication in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, Uffe Arlø; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2006-01-01

    topography is transcribed onto the plastic part through complex mechanisms. This replication, however, is not perfect, and the replication quality depends on the plastic material properties, the topography itself, and the process conditions. This paper describes and discusses an investigation of injection...... molding of surface microstructures. The fundamental problem of surface microstructure replication has been studied. The research is based on specific microstructures as found in lab-on-a-chip products and on rough surfaces generated from EDM (electro discharge machining) mold cavities. Emphasis is put...... on the ability to replicate surface microstructures under normal injection-molding conditions, i.e., with commodity materials within typical process windows. It was found that within typical process windows the replication quality depends significantly on several process parameters, and especially the mold...

  3. Suppression of Poxvirus Replication by Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuai; Realegeno, Susan; Pant, Anil; Satheshkumar, Panayampalli S; Yang, Zhilong

    2017-01-01

    Poxviruses continue to cause serious diseases even after eradication of the historically deadly infectious human disease, smallpox. Poxviruses are currently being developed as vaccine vectors and cancer therapeutic agents. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol stilbenoid found in plants that has been shown to inhibit or enhance replication of a number of viruses, but the effect of resveratrol on poxvirus replication is unknown. In the present study, we found that resveratrol dramatically suppressed the replication of vaccinia virus (VACV), the prototypic member of poxviruses, in various cell types. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the replication of monkeypox virus, a zoonotic virus that is endemic in Western and Central Africa and causes human mortality. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on poxviruses is independent of VACV N1 protein, a potential resveratrol binding target. Further experiments demonstrated that resveratrol had little effect on VACV early gene expression, while it suppressed VACV DNA synthesis, and subsequently post-replicative gene expression.

  4. Suppression of Poxvirus Replication by Resveratrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Cao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses continue to cause serious diseases even after eradication of the historically deadly infectious human disease, smallpox. Poxviruses are currently being developed as vaccine vectors and cancer therapeutic agents. Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol stilbenoid found in plants that has been shown to inhibit or enhance replication of a number of viruses, but the effect of resveratrol on poxvirus replication is unknown. In the present study, we found that resveratrol dramatically suppressed the replication of vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototypic member of poxviruses, in various cell types. Resveratrol also significantly reduced the replication of monkeypox virus, a zoonotic virus that is endemic in Western and Central Africa and causes human mortality. The inhibitory effect of resveratrol on poxviruses is independent of VACV N1 protein, a potential resveratrol binding target. Further experiments demonstrated that resveratrol had little effect on VACV early gene expression, while it suppressed VACV DNA synthesis, and subsequently post-replicative gene expression.

  5. The yeast replicative aging model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chong; Zhou, Chuankai; Kennedy, Brian K

    2018-03-08

    It has been nearly three decades since the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae became a significant model organism for aging research and it has emerged as both simple and powerful. The replicative aging assay, which interrogates the number of times a "mother" cell can divide and produce "daughters", has been a stalwart in these studies, and genetic approaches have led to the identification of hundreds of genes impacting lifespan. More recently, cell biological and biochemical approaches have been developed to determine how cellular processes become altered with age. Together, the tools are in place to develop a holistic view of aging in this single-celled organism. Here, we summarize the current state of understanding of yeast replicative aging with a focus on the recent studies that shed new light on how aging pathways interact to modulate lifespan in yeast. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. A literature review of record linkage procedures focusing on infant health outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Jorge Machado

    Full Text Available Record linkage is a powerful tool in assembling information from different data sources and has been used by a number of public health researchers. In this review, we provide an overview of the record linkage methodologies, focusing particularly on probabilistic record linkage. We then stress the purposes and research applications of linking records by focusing on studies of infant health outcomes based on large data sets, and provide a critical review of the studies in Brazil.

  7. Dimensional Anxiety Mediates Linkage of GABRA2 Haplotypes With Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoch, Mary-Anne; Schwartz, Lori; Albaugh, Bernard; Virkkunen, Matti; Goldman, David

    2015-01-01

    The GABAAα2 receptor gene (GABRA2) modulates anxiety and stress response. Three recent association studies implicate GABRA2 in alcoholism, however in these papers both common, opposite-configuration haplotypes in the region distal to intron3 predict risk. We have now replicated the GABRA2 association with alcoholism in 331 Plains Indian men and women and 461 Finnish Caucasian men. Using a dimensional measure of anxiety, harm avoidance (HA), we also found that the association with alcoholism is mediated, or moderated, by anxiety. Nine SNPs were genotyped revealing two haplotype blocks. Within the previously implicated block 2 region, we identified the two common, opposite-configuration risk haplotypes, A and B. Their frequencies differed markedly in Finns and Plains Indians. In both populations, most block 2 SNPs were significantly associated with alcoholism. The associations were due to increased frequencies of both homozygotes in alcoholics, indicating the possibility of alcoholic subtypes with opposite genotypes. Congruently, there was no significant haplotype association. Using HA as an indicator variable for anxiety, we found haplotype linkage to alcoholism with high and low dimensional anxiety, and to HA itself, in both populations. High HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the more abundant haplotype (A in Finns, B in Plains Indians); low HA alcoholics had the highest frequency of the less abundant haplotype (B in Finns, A in Plains Indians) (Finns: P α0.007, OR α2.1, Plains Indians: P α0.040, OR α1.9). Non-alcoholics had intermediate frequencies. Our results suggest that within the distal GABRA2 region is a functional locus or loci that may differ between populations but that alters risk for alcoholism via the mediating action of anxiety. PMID:16874763

  8. Evolution of Replication Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Nina Y.; O'Donnell, Mike E.

    2016-01-01

    The machines that decode and regulate genetic information require the translation, transcription and replication pathways essential to all living cells. Thus, it might be expected that all cells share the same basic machinery for these pathways that were inherited from the primordial ancestor cell from which they evolved. A clear example of this is found in the translation machinery that converts RNA sequence to protein. The translation process requires numerous structural and catalytic RNAs and proteins, the central factors of which are homologous in all three domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukarya. Likewise, the central actor in transcription, RNA polymerase, shows homology among the catalytic subunits in bacteria, archaea and eukarya. In contrast, while some “gears” of the genome replication machinery are homologous in all domains of life, most components of the replication machine appear to be unrelated between bacteria and those of archaea and eukarya. This review will compare and contrast the central proteins of the “replisome” machines that duplicate DNA in bacteria, archaea and eukarya, with an eye to understanding the issues surrounding the evolution of the DNA replication apparatus. PMID:27160337

  9. The functional subdivision of the visual brain: Is there a real illusion effect on action? A multi-lab replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopiske, Karl K; Bruno, Nicola; Hesse, Constanze; Schenk, Thomas; Franz, Volker H

    2016-06-01

    It has often been suggested that visual illusions affect perception but not actions such as grasping, as predicted by the "two-visual-systems" hypothesis of Milner and Goodale (1995, The Visual Brain in Action, Oxford University press). However, at least for the Ebbinghaus illusion, relevant studies seem to reveal a consistent illusion effect on grasping (Franz & Gegenfurtner, 2008. Grasping visual illusions: consistent data and no dissociation. Cognitive Neuropsychology). Two interpretations are possible: either grasping is not immune to illusions (arguing against dissociable processing mechanisms for vision-for-perception and vision-for-action), or some other factors modulate grasping in ways that mimic a vision-for perception effect in actions. It has been suggested that one such factor may be obstacle avoidance (Haffenden Schiff & Goodale, 2001. The dissociation between perception and action in the Ebbinghaus illusion: nonillusory effects of pictorial cues on grasp. Current Biology, 11, 177-181). In four different labs (total N = 144), we conducted an exact replication of previous studies suggesting obstacle avoidance mechanisms, implementing conditions that tested grasping as well as multiple perceptual tasks. This replication was supplemented by additional conditions to obtain more conclusive results. Our results confirm that grasping is affected by the Ebbinghaus illusion and demonstrate that this effect cannot be explained by obstacle avoidance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A New Replication Norm for Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne P LeBel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a growing concern regarding the replicability of findings in psychology, including a mounting number of prominent findings that have failed to replicate via high-powered independent replication attempts. In the face of this replicability “crisis of confidence”, several initiatives have been implemented to increase the reliability of empirical findings. In the current article, I propose a new replication norm that aims to further boost the dependability of findings in psychology. Paralleling the extant social norm that researchers should peer review about three times as many articles that they themselves publish per year, the new replication norm states that researchers should aim to independently replicate important findings in their own research areas in proportion to the number of original studies they themselves publish per year (e.g., a 4:1 original-to-replication studies ratio. I argue this simple approach could significantly advance our science by increasing the reliability and cumulative nature of our empirical knowledge base, accelerating our theoretical understanding of psychological phenomena, instilling a focus on quality rather than quantity, and by facilitating our transformation toward a research culture where executing and reporting independent direct replications is viewed as an ordinary part of the research process. To help promote the new norm, I delineate (1 how each of the major constituencies of the research process (i.e., funders, journals, professional societies, departments, and individual researchers can incentivize replications and promote the new norm and (2 any obstacles each constituency faces in supporting the new norm.

  11. DNA Replication Control During Drosophila Development: Insights into the Onset of S Phase, Replication Initiation, and Fork Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Brian L.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2017-01-01

    Proper control of DNA replication is critical to ensure genomic integrity during cell proliferation. In addition, differential regulation of the DNA replication program during development can change gene copy number to influence cell size and gene expression. Drosophila melanogaster serves as a powerful organism to study the developmental control of DNA replication in various cell cycle contexts in a variety of differentiated cell and tissue types. Additionally, Drosophila has provided several developmentally regulated replication models to dissect the molecular mechanisms that underlie replication-based copy number changes in the genome, which include differential underreplication and gene amplification. Here, we review key findings and our current understanding of the developmental control of DNA replication in the contexts of the archetypal replication program as well as of underreplication and differential gene amplification. We focus on the use of these latter two replication systems to delineate many of the molecular mechanisms that underlie the developmental control of replication initiation and fork elongation. PMID:28874453

  12. Chromosome biology: conflict management for replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2013-03-04

    A recent study has uncovered a new mechanism that attenuates DNA replication during periods of heightened gene expression to avoid collisions between replication and transcription. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Topology of a Membrane Associated Regulator of Prokaryotic DNA Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Firshein, William

    1998-01-01

    This proposal has focused on a broad host range plasmid, RK2, as a model system to study how a pair of initiation proteins encoded by the plasmid for DNA replication function when replication occurs...

  14. Lack of replication of thirteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms implicated in Parkinson’s disease: a large-scale international study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Alexis; Nelson, Lorene M; Payami, Haydeh; Ioannidis, John P A; Fiske, Brian K; Annesi, Grazia; Belin, Andrea Carmine; Factor, Stewart A; Ferrarese, Carlo; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Higgins, Donald S; Kawakami, Hideshi; Krüger, Rejko; Marder, Karen S; Mayeux, Richard P; Mellick, George D; Nutt, John G; Ritz, Beate; Samii, Ali; Tanner, Caroline M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Wirdefeldt, Karin; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Dehem, Marie; Montimurro, Jennifer S; Southwick, Audrey; Myers, Richard M; Trikalinos, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background A genome-wide association study identified 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with Parkinson’s disease. Small-scale replication studies were largely non-confirmatory, but a meta-analysis that included data from the original study could not exclude all SNP associations, leaving relevance of several markers uncertain. Methods Investigators from three Michael J Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research-funded genetics consortia—comprising 14 teams—contributed DNA samples from 5526 patients with Parkinson’s disease and 6682 controls, which were genotyped for the 13 SNPs. Most (88%) participants were of white, non-Hispanic descent. We assessed log-additive genetic effects using fixed and random effects models stratified by team and ethnic origin, and tested for heterogeneity across strata. A meta-analysis was undertaken that incorporated data from the original genome-wide study as well as subsequent replication studies. Findings In fixed and random-effects models no associations with any of the 13 SNPs were identified (odds ratios 0·89 to 1·09). Heterogeneity between studies and between ethnic groups was low for all SNPs. Subgroup analyses by age at study entry, ethnic origin, sex, and family history did not show any consistent associations. In our meta-analysis, no SNP showed significant association (summary odds ratios 0·95 to 1.08); there was little heterogeneity except for SNP rs7520966. Interpretation Our results do not lend support to the finding that the 13 SNPs reported in the original genome-wide association study are genetic susceptibility factors for Parkinson’s disease. PMID:17052658

  15. Tomato bushy stunt virus and DI RNAs as a model for studying mechanisms of RNA virus replication, pathogenicity and recombination. Final technical report for 1994--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). School of Biological Sciences; Jackson, A.O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1997-12-31

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) is a small icosahedral virus with a very broad host-range. The symptoms of systemic infection range from mild mosaic to severe necrosis that often results in death. The genome of TBSV is composed of a single plus stranded RNA molecule with five genes. Two 5 inch genes are translated from the viral RNA, and the remaining three are translated from two subgenomic RNAs. Prior to the DOE supported studies, TBSV gene function had been assigned solely on the basis of sequence similarity with other virus genes of known function. The two 5 inch proximal genes (p33 and p92) were thought to be involved in viral replication, the middle gene encoded the capsid protein (p41), but no clear function was assigned to two nested 3 inch genes (p19 and p22), although it was suggested that at least one could be involved in movement. This research has determined the roles of each of the viral genes in the infection process, and the authors have obtained considerable genetic information pertinent to the contributions of the coat protein and the nested genes to the disease phenotypes observed in several host plants. They have also identified another genetic element with a short open reading frame in the 3 inch-noncoding region of the genome that provides a host-dependent replication function.

  16. Replication-Competent Influenza A and B Viruses Expressing a Fluorescent Dynamic Timer Protein for In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Breen

    Full Text Available Influenza A and B viruses (IAV and IBV, respectively cause annual seasonal human respiratory disease epidemics. In addition, IAVs have been implicated in occasional pandemics with inordinate health and economic consequences. Studying influenza viruses in vitro or in vivo requires the use of laborious secondary methodologies to identify infected cells. To circumvent this requirement, replication-competent infectious influenza viruses expressing an easily traceable fluorescent reporter protein can be used. Timer is a fluorescent protein that undergoes a time-dependent color emission conversion from green to red. The rate of spectral change is independent of Timer protein concentration and can be used to chronologically measure the duration of its expression. Here, we describe the generation of replication-competent IAV and IBV where the viral non-structural protein 1 (NS1 was fused to the fluorescent dynamic Timer protein. Timer-expressing IAV and IBV displayed similar plaque phenotypes and growth kinetics to wild-type viruses in tissue culture. Within infected cells, Timer's spectral shift can be used to measure the rate and cell-to-cell spread of infection using fluorescent microscopy, plate readers, or flow cytometry. The progression of Timer-expressing IAV infection was also evaluated in a mouse model, demonstrating the feasibility to characterize IAV cell-to-cell infections in vivo. By providing the ability to chronologically track viral spread, Timer-expressing influenza viruses are an excellent option to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo dynamics of viral infection.

  17. Replication of an Experimental Study Investigating the Efficacy of a Multisyllabic Word Reading Intervention With and Without Motivational Beliefs Training for Struggling Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Jessica R; Capin, Philip; Williams, Kelly J; Cho, Eunsoo; Vaughn, Sharon

    2018-05-01

    This randomized control trial examined the efficacy of an intervention aimed at improving multisyllabic word reading (MWR) skills among fourth- and fifth-grade struggling readers ( n = 109, 48.6% male), as well as the relative effects of an embedded motivational beliefs training component. This study was a closely aligned replication of our earlier work. The intervention was replicated with a three-condition design: MWR only, MWR with a motivational beliefs component, and business-as-usual control. Students were tutored in small groups for 40 lessons (four 40-min lessons each week). When we combined performance of students in both MWR conditions, intervention students significantly outperformed controls on proximal measures of affix reading and MWR, as well as standardized measures of decoding, spelling, and text comprehension. Furthermore, there was a noted interaction between English learner status and treatment on spelling performance. There were no statistically significant main effects between the MWR groups on proximal or standardized measures of interest. Findings are discussed in terms of their relevance to MWR instruction for students with persistent reading difficulties and considerations for future research related to the malleability of motivation.

  18. Autosomal dominant distal myopathy: Linkage to chromosome 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laing, N.G.; Laing, B.A.; Wilton, S.D.; Dorosz, S.; Mastaglia, F.L.; Kakulas, B.A. [Australian Neuromuscular Research Institute, Perth (Australia); Robbins, P.; Meredith, C.; Honeyman, K.; Kozman, H.

    1995-02-01

    We have studied a family segregating a form of autosomal dominant distal myopathy (MIM 160500) and containing nine living affected individuals. The myopathy in this family is closest in clinical phenotype to that first described by Gowers in 1902. A search for linkage was conducted using microsatellite, VNTR, and RFLP markers. In total, 92 markers on all 22 autosomes were run. Positive linkage was obtained with 14 of 15 markers tested on chromosome 14, with little indication of linkage elsewhere in the genome. Maximum two-point LOD scores of 2.60 at recombination fraction .00 were obtained for the markers MYH7 and D14S64 - the family structure precludes a two-point LOD score {ge} 3. Recombinations with D14S72 and D14S49 indicate that this distal myopathy locus, MPD1, should lie between these markers. A multipoint analysis assuming 100% penetrance and using the markers D14S72, D14S50, MYH7, D14S64, D14S54, and D14S49 gave a LOD score of exactly 3 at MYH7. Analysis at a penetrance of 80% gave a LOD score of 2.8 at this marker. This probable localization of a gene for distal myopathy, MPD1, on chromosome 14 should allow other investigators studying distal myopathy families to test this region for linkage in other types of the disease, to confirm linkage or to demonstrate the likely genetic heterogeneity. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Factors influencing microinjection molding replication quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Julie; Brulez, Anne-Catherine; Contraires, Elise; Larochette, Mathieu; Trannoy-Orban, Nathalie; Pignon, Maxime; Mauclair, Cyril; Valette, Stéphane; Benayoun, Stéphane

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in producing and providing high-precision plastic parts that can be manufactured by microinjection molding: gears, pumps, optical grating elements, and so on. For all of these applications, the replication quality is essential. This study has two goals: (1) fabrication of high-precision parts using the conventional injection molding machine; (2) identification of robust parameters that ensure production quality. Thus, different technological solutions have been used: cavity vacuuming and the use of a mold coated with DLC or CrN deposits. AFM and SEM analyses were carried out to characterize the replication profile. The replication quality was studied in terms of the process parameters, coated and uncoated molds and crystallinity of the polymer. Specific studies were processed to quantify the replicability of injection molded parts (ABS, PC and PP). Analysis of the Taguchi experimental designs permits prioritization of the impact of each parameter on the replication quality. A discussion taking into account these new parameters and the thermal and spreading properties on the coatings is proposed. It appeared that, in general, increasing the mold temperature improves the molten polymer fill in submicron features except for the steel insert (for which the presence of a vacuum is the most important factor). Moreover, the DLC coating was the best coating to increase the quality of the replication. This result could be explained by the lower thermal diffusivity of this coating. We noted that the viscosity of the polymers is not a primordial factor of the replication quality.

  20. IL23R in the Swedish, Finnish, Hungarian and Italian populations: association with IBD and psoriasis, and linkage to celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vatta Serena

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association of the interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD has been confirmed in several populations. IL23R also associates with psoriasis, suggesting that the gene may be an important candidate for many chronic inflammatory diseases. Methods We studied association of single-nucleotide variants in IL23R with IBD in Swedish patients, in both Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC subsets. The same genetic variants were also studied in Finnish patients with psoriasis or celiac disease, and in Hungarian and Italian patients with celiac disease. Results Association of IL23R with IBD was replicated in our Swedish patients, and linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis was found in the Finnish population. The IL23R region was also linked to celiac disease in Finnish families, but no association of IL23R variants with celiac disease was found in the Finnish, Hungarian or Italian samples. Conclusion Our study is the first to demonstrate association of IL23R with CD and UC in Swedish patients with IBD. It is also the first study to report linkage and association of the IL23R region with psoriasis in the Finnish population. Importantly, this is the first report of linkage of the IL23R region to celiac disease, a chronic inflammatory condition in which IL23R has not been previously implicated.

  1. Improving dementia diagnosis and management in primary care: a cohort study of the impact of a training and support program on physician competency, practice patterns, and community linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathren, Christine R; Sloane, Philip D; Hoyle, Joseph D; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Kaufer, Daniel I

    2013-12-10

    Primary care physicians routinely provide dementia care, but may lack the clinical skills and awareness of available resources to provide optimal care. We conducted a community-based pilot dementia training intervention designed to both improve clinical competency and increase utilization of local dementia care services. Physicians (N = 29) and affiliated staff (N = 24) participated in a one-day training program on dementia screening, diagnosis and management that included direct engagement with local support service providers. Questionnaires about their dementia care competency and referral patterns were completed before and 6 months after the training intervention. Physicians reported significantly higher overall confidence in their dementia care competency 6 months post-training compared to pre-training. The largest reported improvements were in their ability to educate patients and caregivers about dementia and making appropriate referrals to community care services. Participants also reported markedly increased use of cognitive screening tools in providing care. Community service providers recorded approximately 160 physician-initiated referrals over a 2 year-period post-training, compared to few beforehand. Combining a targeted physician practice-based educational intervention with community service engagement improves dementia care competency in clinicians and promotes linkages between clinical and community dementia care providers.

  2. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tienari, P.J. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland) Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States)); Palo, J. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland))

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Robust LOD scores for variance component-based linkage analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blangero, J; Williams, J T; Almasy, L

    2000-01-01

    The variance component method is now widely used for linkage analysis of quantitative traits. Although this approach offers many advantages, the importance of the underlying assumption of multivariate normality of the trait distribution within pedigrees has not been studied extensively. Simulation studies have shown that traits with leptokurtic distributions yield linkage test statistics that exhibit excessive Type I error when analyzed naively. We derive analytical formulae relating the deviation from the expected asymptotic distribution of the lod score to the kurtosis and total heritability of the quantitative trait. A simple correction constant yields a robust lod score for any deviation from normality and for any pedigree structure, and effectively eliminates the problem of inflated Type I error due to misspecification of the underlying probability model in variance component-based linkage analysis.

  4. A general model for likelihood computations of genetic marker data accounting for linkage, linkage disequilibrium, and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Egeland, Thore; Mostad, Petter

    2015-09-01

    Several applications necessitate an unbiased determination of relatedness, be it in linkage or association studies or in a forensic setting. An appropriate model to compute the joint probability of some genetic data for a set of persons given some hypothesis about the pedigree structure is then required. The increasing number of markers available through high-density SNP microarray typing and NGS technologies intensifies the demand, where using a large number of markers may lead to biased results due to strong dependencies between closely located loci, both within pedigrees (linkage) and in the population (allelic association or linkage disequilibrium (LD)). We present a new general model, based on a Markov chain for inheritance patterns and another Markov chain for founder allele patterns, the latter allowing us to account for LD. We also demonstrate a specific implementation for X chromosomal markers that allows for computation of likelihoods based on hypotheses of alleged relationships and genetic marker data. The algorithm can simultaneously account for linkage, LD, and mutations. We demonstrate its feasibility using simulated examples. The algorithm is implemented in the software FamLinkX, providing a user-friendly GUI for Windows systems (FamLinkX, as well as further usage instructions, is freely available at www.famlink.se ). Our software provides the necessary means to solve cases where no previous implementation exists. In addition, the software has the possibility to perform simulations in order to further study the impact of linkage and LD on computed likelihoods for an arbitrary set of markers.

  5. Comparative study of linkage between environmental policy instruments and technological innovation: Case study on end-of-life vehicles technologies in Japan and EU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Yabar, Helmut; Nozaki, Noriko; Niraula, Baburam; Mizunoya, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    A growing population and urbanization is a challenge for finite natural resources. Without strict regulation to recycle, recover and reuse resources, waste is discarded with no value. Every year throughout the world, more than twenty-five million vehicles turn into end-of-life vehicles (ELV) and most of their valuable resources end up in landfill sites. This research analyses the effect of regulation on ELV innovation for additional recovery of resources in Japan and EU nations using patent data as a proxy. The analysis determines the statistical difference in patent activity before and after regulations were enacted in the case studies. The relevant data on ELV technologies was gathered for the period 1985-2013. The study suggests that in general environmental regulation in Japan drove innovation and reveals that environmental policy in Japan was more effective in enabling innovation compared to EU nations. Specifically, the results from these developed countries can be used by the rapidly growing developing countries in automobile manufacturing like China for amendment of their ELV regulation accordingly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative study between Federer and Gomez method for number of replication in complete randomized design using simulation: study of Areca Palm (Areca catechu) as organic waste for producing handicraft paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihwah, A.; Deoranto, P.; Wijana, S.; Dewi, I. A.

    2018-03-01

    The part of Areca Palm (Areca catechu) that economical is the seed. It is commercially available in dried, cured and fresh forms, while the fibre is usually thrown away. Cellulose fibers from agricultural waste can be utilized as raw material for handicraft paper. Laboratory research showed that Areca palm fibre contained 70.2% of cellulose, 10.92% of water, and 6.02% of ash. This indicated that Areca palm fibre is very potential to be processed as handicraft paper. Handicraft paper is made of wastepaper or plants which cointain celluloce to produce rough-textured paper. In order to obtain preferred sensory quality of handicraft paper such as color, fiber appearance and texture as well as good physical quantity such as tensile strength, tear resistance and grammage, the addition of wastepaper to provide secondary fibre and sometimes adhesive are needed in making handicraft paper. Handicraft paper making was one alternative to treat the solid waste and to reduce the use of wood fiber as paper raw material. The aim of this study is to compare the two most famous method, i.e. Federer and Gomez Method, for calculate the number of replications. This study is preliminary research before do the research in order to get the best treatment to produce handicraft paper. The Gomez method calculates fewer replications than the Federer method. Based on data simulation the error generated using 3 replicates of 0.0876 while using 2 replicates of 0.1032.

  7. Targeting DNA Replication Stress for Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The human cellular genome is under constant stress from extrinsic and intrinsic factors, which can lead to DNA damage and defective replication. In normal cells, DNA damage response (DDR mediated by various checkpoints will either activate the DNA repair system or induce cellular apoptosis/senescence, therefore maintaining overall genomic integrity. Cancer cells, however, due to constitutive growth signaling and defective DDR, may exhibit “replication stress” —a phenomenon unique to cancer cells that is described as the perturbation of error-free DNA replication and slow-down of DNA synthesis. Although replication stress has been proven to induce genomic instability and tumorigenesis, recent studies have counterintuitively shown that enhancing replicative stress through further loosening of the remaining checkpoints in cancer cells to induce their catastrophic failure of proliferation may provide an alternative therapeutic approach. In this review, we discuss the rationale to enhance replicative stress in cancer cells, past approaches using traditional radiation and chemotherapy, and emerging approaches targeting the signaling cascades induced by DNA damage. We also summarize current clinical trials exploring these strategies and propose future research directions including the use of combination therapies, and the identification of potential new targets and biomarkers to track and predict treatment responses to targeting DNA replication stress.

  8. Sterol Binding by the Tombusviral Replication Proteins Is Essential for Replication in Yeast and Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Nagy, Peter D

    2017-04-01

    Membranous structures derived from various organelles are important for replication of plus-stranded RNA viruses. Although the important roles of co-opted host proteins in RNA virus replication have been appreciated for a decade, the equally important functions of cellular lipids in virus replication have been gaining full attention only recently. Previous work with Tomato bushy stunt tombusvirus (TBSV) in model host yeast has revealed essential roles for phosphatidylethanolamine and sterols in viral replication. To further our understanding of the role of sterols in tombusvirus replication, in this work we showed that the TBSV p33 and p92 replication proteins could bind to sterols in vitro The sterol binding by p33 is supported by cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) and CARC-like sequences within the two transmembrane domains of p33. Mutagenesis of the critical Y amino acids within the CRAC and CARC sequences blocked TBSV replication in yeast and plant cells. We also showed the enrichment of sterols in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fractions obtained from yeast and plant cells replicating TBSV. The DRMs could support viral RNA synthesis on both the endogenous and exogenous templates. A lipidomic approach showed the lack of enhancement of sterol levels in yeast and plant cells replicating TBSV. The data support the notion that the TBSV replication proteins are associated with sterol-rich detergent-resistant membranes in yeast and plant cells. Together, the results obtained in this study and the previously published results support the local enrichment of sterols around the viral replication proteins that is critical for TBSV replication. IMPORTANCE One intriguing aspect of viral infections is their dependence on efficient subcellular assembly platforms serving replication, virion assembly, or virus egress via budding out of infected cells. These assembly platforms might involve sterol-rich membrane microdomains, which are

  9. The TGFB1 gene is associated with curve severity but not with the development of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a replication study in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Leilei; Sun, Weixiang; Qin, Xiaodong; Qiu, Yong; Zhu, Zezhang

    2016-01-13

    The transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFB1) gene was recently reported to be a new susceptible gene of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) in Russian population. This study aimed to replicate the relationship between the TGFB1 gene and the susceptibility of AIS in a Chinese population, and to further describe its association with the curve severity. A total of 1251 female AIS patients and 994 age-matched healthy controls were included in this study. The rs1800469 of TGFB1 gene was genotyped for all participants using the PCR-based Invader assay. The differences of genotype and allele distributions between AIS patients and healthy controls were assessed using the Chi-square test. One-way ANOVA test was used to compare the mean Cobb angles among patients with different genotypes. There was no significant difference in terms of the genotype and the allele frequency between the patients and the controls. The mean Cobb angle was 34.7 ± 11.9° (range 25-61°). Case-only analysis showed that rs1800469 was significantly associated with the curve severity. Patients with genotype TT had remarkably higher curve magnitude (39.1 ± 12.8°) than those with genotype CT (34.8 ± 11.1°) or CC (32.1 ± 10.6°). The TGFB1 gene may not be a predisposition gene of AIS in the Chinese population. However, it can play a role in the curve progression of AIS. Replication studies in other ethnic groups are warranted to understand the implication of TGFB1 gene in AIS.

  10. Comprehensive multi-stage linkage analyses identify a locus for adult height on chromosome 3p in a healthy Caucasian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Duncan, Anna E; Lamantia, Angela; Byrnes, Graham B; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-04-01

    There have been a number of genome-wide linkage studies for adult height in recent years. These studies have yielded few well-replicated loci, and none have been further confirmed by the identification of associated gene variants. The inconsistent results may be attributable to the fact that few studies have combined accurate phenotype measures with informative statistical modelling in healthy populations. We have performed a multi-stage genome-wide linkage analysis for height in 275 adult sibling pairs drawn randomly from the Victorian Family Heart Study (VFHS), a healthy population-based Caucasian cohort. Height was carefully measured in a standardised fashion on regularly calibrated equipment. Following genome-wide identification of a peak Z-score of 3.14 on chromosome 3 at 69 cM, we performed a fine-mapping analysis of this region in an extended sample of 392 two-generation families. We used a number of variance components models that incorporated assortative mating and shared environment effects, and we observed a peak LOD score of approximately 3.5 at 78 cM in four of the five models tested. We also demonstrated that the most prevalent model in the literature gave the worst fit, and the lowest LOD score (2.9) demonstrating the importance of appropriate modelling. The region identified in this study replicates the results of other genome-wide scans of height and bone-related phenotypes, strongly suggesting the presence of a gene important in bone growth on chromosome 3p. Association analyses of relevant candidate genes should identify the genetic variants responsible for the chromosome 3p linkage signal in our population.

  11. Linkage disequilibrium and association mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, B S

    2008-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium refers to the association between alleles at different loci. The standard definition applies to two alleles in the same gamete, and it can be regarded as the covariance of indicator variables for the states of those two alleles. The corresponding correlation coefficient rho is the parameter that arises naturally in discussions of tests of association between markers and genetic diseases. A general treatment of association tests makes use of the additive and nonadditive components of variance for the disease gene. In almost all expressions that describe the behavior of association tests, additive variance components are modified by the squared correlation coefficient rho2 and the nonadditive variance components by rho4, suggesting that nonadditive components have less influence than additive components on association tests.

  12. The role of avoidant and obsessive-compulsive personality disorder traits in matching patients with major depression to cognitive behavioral and psychodynamic therapy: A replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkert, Martijn J; Driessen, Ellen; Peen, Jaap; Barber, Jacques P; Bockting, Claudi; Schalkwijk, Frans; Dekker, Jeff; Dekker, Jack J M

    2016-11-15

    Barber and Muenz (1996) reported that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) was more effective than interpersonal therapy (IPT) for depressed patients with elevated levels of avoidant personality disorder, while IPT was more effective than CBT in patients with elevated levels of obsessive-compulsive personality disorder. These findings may have important clinical implications, but have not yet been replicated. We conducted a study using data from a randomized clinical trial comparing the efficacy of CBT and short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy in the outpatient treatment of depression. We found no evidence indicating that avoidant patients may benefit more from CBT compared to short-term psychodynamic supportive therapy (SPSP). Our results indicate that treatment effect does not depend on the level of avoidance, or obsessive-compulsiveness personality disorders further examine the influence of personality disorders on the effectiveness of CBT or psychodynamic therapy in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Under-ascertainment of Aboriginality in records of cardiovascular disease in hospital morbidity and mortality data in Western Australia: a record linkage study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katzenellenbogen Judy M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring the real burden of cardiovascular disease in Australian Aboriginals is complicated by under-identification of Aboriginality in administrative health data collections. Accurate data is essential to measure Australia's progress in its efforts to intervene to improve health outcomes of Australian Aboriginals. We estimated the under-ascertainment of Aboriginal status in linked morbidity and mortality databases in patients hospitalised with cardiovascular disease. Methods Persons with public hospital admissions for cardiovascular disease in Western Australia during 2000-2005 (and their 20-year admission history or who subsequently died were identified from linkage data. The Aboriginal status flag in all records for a given individual was variously used to determine their ethnicity (index positive, and in all records both majority positive or ever positive and stratified by region, age and gender. The index admission was the baseline comparator. Results Index cases comprised 62,692 individuals who shared a total of 778,714 hospital admissions over 20 years, of which 19,809 subsequently died. There were 3,060 (4.9% persons identified as Aboriginal on index admission. An additional 83 (2.7% Aboriginal cases were identified through death records, increasing to 3.7% when cases with a positive Aboriginal identifier in the majority (≥50% of previous hospital admissions over twenty years were added and by 20.8% when those with a positive flag in any record over 20 years were incorporated. These results equated to underestimating Aboriginal status in unlinked index admission by 2.6%, 3.5% and 17.2%, respectively. Deaths classified as Aboriginal in official records would underestimate total Aboriginal deaths by 26.8% (95% Confidence Interval 24.1 to 29.6%. Conclusions Combining Aboriginal determinations in morbidity and official death records increases ascertainment of unlinked cardiovascular morbidity in Western Australian

  14. Wait times to rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases: a data linkage study of primary care electronic medical records and administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdifield, Jessica; Bernatsky, Sasha; Thorne, J Carter; Bombardier, Claire; Jaakkimainen, R Liisa; Wing, Laura; Paterson, J Michael; Ivers, Noah; Butt, Debra; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Catherine; Ahluwalia, Vandana; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    The Wait Time Alliance recently established wait time benchmarks for rheumatology consultations in Canada. Our aim was to quantify wait times to primary and rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases. We identified patients from primary care practices in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database who had referrals to Ontario rheumatologists over the period 2000-2013. To assess the full care pathway, we identified dates of symptom onset, presentation in primary care and referral from electronic medical records. Dates of rheumatologist consultations were obtained by linking with physician service claims. We determined the duration of each phase of the care pathway (symptom onset to primary care encounter, primary care encounter to referral, and referral to rheumatologist consultation) and compared them with established benchmarks. Among 2430 referrals from 168 family physicians, 2015 patients (82.9%) were seen by 146 rheumatologists within 1 year of referral. Of the 2430 referrals, 2417 (99.5%) occurred between 2005 and 2013. The main reasons for referral were osteoarthritis (32.4%) and systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (30.6%). Wait times varied by diagnosis and geographic region. Overall, the median wait time from referral to rheumatologist consultation was 74 (interquartile range 27-101) days; it was 66 (interquartile range 18-84) days for systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Wait time benchmarks were not achieved, even for the most urgent types of referral. For systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, most of the delays occurred before referral. Rheumatology wait times exceeded established benchmarks. Targeted efforts are needed to promote more timely access to both primary and rheumatology care. Routine linkage of electronic medical records with administrative data may help fill important gaps in knowledge about waits to primary and specialty care.

  15. Underuse of Radiation Therapy After Breast Conservation Surgery in Puerto Rico: A Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry–Health Insurance Linkage Database Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William W. Chance

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To identify rates of postoperative radiation therapy (RT after breast conservation surgery (BCS in women with stage I or II invasive breast cancer treated in Puerto Rico and to examine the sociodemographic and health services characteristics associated with variations in receipt of RT. Methods: The Puerto Rico Central Cancer Registry–Health Insurance Linkage Database was used to identify patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 2008 and 2012 in Puerto Rico. Claims codes identified the type of surgery and the use of RT. Logistic regression models were used to examine the independent association between sociodemographic and clinical covariates. Results: Among women who received BCS as their primary definitive treatment, 64% received adjuvant RT. Significant predictors of RT after BCS included enrollment in Medicare (odds ratio [OR], 2.14; 95% CI, 1.46 to 3.13; P ≤ .01 and dual eligibility for Medicare and Medicaid (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.27; P 2.0 cm and ≤ 5.0 cm (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40 to 0.93; P = .02 and those with tumor size > 5.0 cm (OR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15 to 0.92; P = .03 were found to be significantly less likely to receive RT. Conclusion: Underuse of RT after BCS was identified in Puerto Rico. Patients enrolled in Medicare and those who were dually eligible for Medicaid and Medicare were more likely to receive RT after BCS compared with patients with Medicaid alone. There were geographic variations in the receipt of RT on the island.

  16. Mechanisms of DNA replication termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, James M; Walter, Johannes C

    2017-08-01

    Genome duplication is carried out by pairs of replication forks that assemble at origins of replication and then move in opposite directions. DNA replication ends when converging replication forks meet. During this process, which is known as replication termination, DNA synthesis is completed, the replication machinery is disassembled and daughter molecules are resolved. In this Review, we outline the steps that are likely to be common to replication termination in most organisms, namely, fork convergence, synthesis completion, replisome disassembly and decatenation. We briefly review the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli and in simian virus 40 (SV40) and also focus on recent advances in eukaryotic replication termination. In particular, we discuss the recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases that control replisome disassembly in yeast and higher eukaryotes, and how their activity is regulated to avoid genome instability.

  17. A Simple Sampling Method for Estimating the Accuracy of Large Scale Record Linkage Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, James H; Guiver, Tenniel; Randall, Sean M; Ferrante, Anna M; Semmens, James B; Anderson, Phil; Dickinson, Teresa

    2016-05-17

    Record linkage techniques allow different data collections to be brought together to provide a wider picture of the health status of individuals. Ensuring high linkage quality is important to guarantee the quality and integrity of research. Current methods for measuring linkage quality typically focus on precision (the proportion of incorrect links), given the difficulty of measuring the proportion of false negatives. The aim of this work is to introduce and evaluate a sampling based method to estimate both precision and recall following record linkage. In the sampling based method, record-pairs from each threshold (including those below the identified cut-off for acceptance) are sampled and clerically reviewed. These results are then applied to the entire set of record-pairs, providing estimates of false positives and false negatives. This method was evaluated on a synthetically generated dataset, where the true match status (which records belonged to the same person) was known. The sampled estimates of linkage quality were relatively close to actual linkage quality metrics calculated for the whole synthetic dataset. The precision and recall measures for seven reviewers were very consistent with little variation in the clerical assessment results (overall agreement using the Fleiss Kappa statistics was 0.601). This method presents as a possible means of accurately estimating matching quality and refining linkages in population level linkage studies. The sampling approach is especially important for large project linkages where the number of record pairs produced may be very large often running into millions.

  18. The Dynamics of Linkages and Innovativeness in Publicly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined how linkages among actors in the cocoa and pineapple value chains relate to the innovativeness of actors in the chains. The study showed that a policy environment that promoted public sector leadership in value chain functions and service provision, tended to offer less incentives for smallholder ...

  19. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena;